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Sample records for inhibitor protein capmei1

  1. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  2. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors and progeria.

    PubMed

    Meta, Margarita; Yang, Shao H; Bergo, Martin O; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G

    2006-10-01

    Genetic mutations that lead to an accumulation of farnesyl-prelamin A cause progeroid syndromes, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. It seemed possible that the farnesylated form of prelamin A might be toxic to mammalian cells, accounting for all the disease phenotypes that are characteristic of progeria. This concept led to the hypothesis that protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) might ameliorate the disease phenotypes of progeria in mouse models. Thus far, two different mouse models of progeria have been examined. In both models, FTIs improved progeria-like disease phenotypes. Here, prelamin A post-translational processing is discussed and several mutations underlying human progeroid syndromes are described. In addition, recent data showing that FTIs ameliorate disease phenotypes in a pair of mouse models of progeria are discussed.

  3. Diphenylpyrazoles as Replication Protein A inhibitors

    DOE PAGES

    Waterson, Alex G.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Patrone, James D.; ...

    2014-11-11

    Replication Protein A is the primary eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein that has a central role in initiating the cellular response to DNA damage. RPA recruits multiple proteins to sites of DNA damage via the N-terminal domain of the 70 kDa subunit (RPA70N). Here we describe the optimization of a diphenylpyrazole carboxylic acid series of inhibitors of these RPA–protein interactions. Lastly, we evaluated substituents on the aromatic rings as well as the type and geometry of the linkers used to combine fragments, ultimately leading to submicromolar inhibitors of RPA70N protein–protein interactions.

  4. Diphenylpyrazoles as Replication Protein A inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Waterson, Alex G.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Patrone, James D.; Pelz, Nicholas F.; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Frank, Andreas O.; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M.; Rossanese, Olivia W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2014-11-11

    Replication Protein A is the primary eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein that has a central role in initiating the cellular response to DNA damage. RPA recruits multiple proteins to sites of DNA damage via the N-terminal domain of the 70 kDa subunit (RPA70N). Here we describe the optimization of a diphenylpyrazole carboxylic acid series of inhibitors of these RPA–protein interactions. Lastly, we evaluated substituents on the aromatic rings as well as the type and geometry of the linkers used to combine fragments, ultimately leading to submicromolar inhibitors of RPA70N protein–protein interactions.

  5. Protein-Inhibitor Interaction Studies Using NMR

    PubMed Central

    Ishima, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Solution-state NMR has been widely applied to determine the three-dimensional structure, dynamics, and molecular interactions of proteins. The designs of experiments used in protein NMR differ from those used for small-molecule NMR, primarily because the information available prior to an experiment, such as molecular mass and knowledge of the primary structure, is unique for proteins compared to small molecules. In this review article, protein NMR for structural biology is introduced with comparisons to small-molecule NMR, such as descriptions of labeling strategies and the effects of molecular dynamics on relaxation. Next, applications for protein NMR are reviewed, especially practical aspects for protein-observed ligand-protein interaction studies. Overall, the following topics are described: (1) characteristics of protein NMR, (2) methods to detect protein-ligand interactions by NMR, and (3) practical aspects of carrying out protein-observed inhibitor-protein interaction studies. PMID:26361636

  6. Small-molecule inhibitors of myosin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Tumbarello, David A; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2014-01-01

    Advances in screening and computational methods have enhanced recent efforts to discover/design small-molecule protein inhibitors. One attractive target for inhibition is the myosin family of motor proteins. Myosins function in a wide variety of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility, and are implicated in several human diseases (e.g., cancer, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness and many neurological disorders). Potent and selective myosin inhibitors are, therefore, not only a tool for understanding myosin function, but are also a resource for developing treatments for diseases involving myosin dysfunction or overactivity. This review will provide a brief overview of the characteristics and scientific/therapeutic applications of the presently identified small-molecule myosin inhibitors before discussing the future of myosin inhibitor and activator design. PMID:23256812

  7. Subtilisin protein inhibitor from potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Revina, T A; Speranskaya, A S; Kladnitskaya, G V; Shevelev, A B; Valueva, T A

    2004-10-01

    A protein with molecular weight of 21 kD denoted as PKSI has been isolated from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Istrinskii). The isolation procedure includes precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion-exchange chromatography on CM-Sepharose CL-6B. The protein effectively inhibits the activity of subtilisin Carlsberg (Ki = 1.67 +/- 0.2 nM) by stoichiometric complexing with the enzyme at the molar ratio of 1 : 1. The inhibitor has no effect on trypsin, chymotrypsin, and the cysteine proteinase papain. The N-terminal sequence of the protein consists of 19 amino acid residues and is highly homologous to sequences of the known inhibitors from group C of the subfamily of potato Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors (PKPIs-C). By cloning PCR products from the genomic DNA of potato, a gene denoted as PKPI-C2 was isolated and sequenced. The N-terminal sequence (residues from 15 to 33) of the protein encoded by the PKPI-C2 gene is identical to the N-terminal sequence (residues from 1 to 19) of the isolated protein PKSI. Thus, the inhibitor PKSI is very likely encoded by this gene.

  8. Protein synthesis inhibitor from potato tuber

    SciTech Connect

    Romaen, R. )

    1989-04-01

    A protein fraction capable of inhibit in vitro protein synthesis was found in potato tubers in fresh and wounded tissue. Inhibitor activity from fresh tissue decays with wounding. Inhibition activity was detected absorbed to ribsomal fraction and cytosol of potato tuber tissue by a partially reconstituted in vitro system from potato tuber and wheat germ. Adsorbed ribosomal fraction was more suitable of purification. This fraction was washed from ribosomes with 0.3M KCl, concentrated with ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified through sephadex G100 and sephadex G-75 columns chromatography. After 61 fold purification adsorbed protein fraction can inhibit germination of maize, wheat and sesame seeds, as well as {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into protein by imbibed maize embryos. Inhibition activity was lost by temperature, alkali and protease-K hydrolysis. Preliminar analysis could not show presence of reductor sugars. Physiological role of this inhibitor in relation to rest and active tissue remains to be studied.

  9. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Qian, Kun; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zheng, Y. George

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Arginine methylation is an abundant posttranslational modification occurring in mammalian cells and catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). Misregulation and aberrant expression of PRMTs are associated with various disease states, notably cancer. PRMTs are prominent therapeutic targets in drug discovery. Areas covered The authors provide an updated review of the research on the development of chemical modulators for PRMTs. Great efforts are seen in screening and designing potent and selective PRMT inhibitors, and a number of micromolar and submicromolar inhibitors have been obtained for key PRMT enzymes such as PRMT1, CARM1, and PRMT5. The authors provide a focus on their chemical structures, mechanism of action, and pharmacological activities. Pros and cons of each type of inhibitors are also discussed. Expert opinion Several key challenging issues exist in PRMT inhibitor discovery. Structural mechanisms of many PRMT inhibitors remain unclear. There lacks consistency in potency data due to divergence of assay methods and conditions. Physiologically relevant cellular assays are warranted. Substantial engagements are needed to investigate pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the new PRMT inhibitors in pertinent disease models. Discovery and evaluation of potent, isoform-selective, cell-permeable and in vivo-active PRMT modulators will continue to be an active arena of research in years ahead. PMID:26789238

  10. Tau protein and tau aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bulic, Bruno; Pickhardt, Marcus; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by pathological aggregation of two proteins, tau and Abeta-amyloid, both of which are considered to be toxic to neurons. In this review we summarize recent advances on small molecule inhibitors of protein aggregation with emphasis on tau, with activities mediated by the direct interference of self-assembly. The inhibitors can be clustered in several compound classes according to their chemical structure, with subsequent description of the structure-activity relationships, showing that hydrophobic interactions are prevailing. The description is extended to the pharmacological profile of the compounds in order to evaluate their drug-likeness, with special attention to toxicity and bioavailability. The collected data indicate that following the improvements of the in vitro inhibitory potencies, the consideration of the in vivo pharmacokinetics is an absolute prerequisite for the development of compounds suitable for a transfer from bench to bedside.

  11. Small Molecule Inhibitors to Disrupt Protein-protein Interactions of Heat Shock Protein 90 Chaperone Machinery.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Ho

    2015-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is an adenosine triphosphate dependent molecular chaperone in eukaryotic cells that regulates the activation and maintenance of numerous regulatory and signaling proteins including epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor, cyclin-dependent kinase-4, protein kinase B, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Since many of Hsp90 clients are oncogenic proteins, Hsp90 has become an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of cancer. To discover small molecule inhibitors targeting Hsp90 chaperone machinery, several strategies have been employed, which results in three classes of inhibitors such as N-terminal inhibitors, C-terminal inhibitors, and inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 chaperone machinery. Developing small molecule inhibitors that modulate protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 is a challenging task, although it offers many alternative opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The lack of well-defined binding pocket and starting points for drug design challenges medicinal chemists to discover small molecule inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90. The present review will focus on the current studies on small molecule inhibitors disrupting protein-protein interactions of Hsp90 chaperone machinery, provide biological background on the structure, function and mechanism of Hsp90's protein-protein interactions, and discuss the challenges and promise of its small molecule modulations.

  12. Specificity of a protein phosphatase inhibitor from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P; Nimmo, G A; Antoniw, J F

    1977-01-01

    A hear-stable protein, which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-III, was purified 700-fold from skeletal muscle by a procedure that involved heat-treatment at 95 degrees C, chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The final step completely resolved the protein phosphatase inhibitor from the protein inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylase phosphatase, beta-phosphorylase kinase phosphatase, glycogen synthase phosphatase-1 and glycogen synthase phosphatase-2 activities of protein phosphatase-III [Antoniw, J. F., Nimmo, H. G., Yeaman, S. J. & Cohen, P.(1977) Biochem.J. 162, 423-433] were inhibited in a very similar manner by the protein phosphatase inhibitor and at least 95% inhibition was observed at high concentrations of inhibitor. The two forms of protein phosphatase-III, termed IIIA and IIIB, were equally susceptible to the protein phosphatase inhibitor. The protein phosphatase inhibitor was at least 200 times less effective in inhibiting the activity of protein phosphatase-I and protein phosphatase-II. The high degree of specificity of the inhibitor for protein phosphatase-III was used to show that 90% of the phosphorylase phosphatase and glycogen synthase phosphatase activities measured in muscle extracts are catalysed by protein phosphatase-III. Protein phosphatase-III was tightly associated with the protein-glycogen complex that can be isolated from skeletal muscle, whereas the protein phosphatase inhibitor and protein phosphatase-II were not. The results provide further evidence that the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the alpha-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-II) and the enzyme that catalyses the dephosphorylation of the beta-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (protein phosphatase-III) are distinct. The results suggest that the protein phosphatase inhibitor may be a useful probe for differentiating different classes of protein phosphatases in mammalian

  13. The INHIBITOR OF MERISTEM ACTIVITY (IMA) protein

    PubMed Central

    Sicard, Adrien; Hernould, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The INHIBITOR OF MERISTEM ACTIVITY (IMA) gene from tomato regulates the processes of flower and ovule development. 1 IMA encodes a Mini Zinc Finger (MIF) protein that is characterized by a very short sequence containing an unusual zinc-finger domain. IMA acts as a repressor of WUSCHEL expression which controls the meristem organizing centre and the determinacy of the nucellus during ovule development. IMA inhibits cell proliferation during floral termination, controls the number of carpels during floral development and participates in the initiation of ovule primordia by activating D-type gene expression. In addition IMA is involved in a multiple hormonal signalling pathway like its Arabidopsis homolog MIF1.2 We thus propose that IMA, as a representative of this new family of zinc finger proteins, is an important effector in the regulatory pathway controlling meristem activity linking cell division, differentiation and hormonal control of development. PMID:19704478

  14. Protein C and its inhibitor in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koji; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2007-10-01

    Activated protein C (APC) and protein C inhibitor (PCI) are the major components of the anticoagulant protein C pathway. Recently, APC and PCI have been demonstrated to play many roles not only in the regulation of hemostasis but also in cell inflammation, proliferation, apoptosis, tumor cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Here we summarize the role of APC and PCI in malignancy. APC increases migration of ovarian cancer cells and choriocarcinoma cells in a Transwell invasion assay in the presence of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1; this finding suggests that APC stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) by forming a complex with PAI-1 leading to activation of extracellular matrix proteases and increased invasion. It was recently reported that APC, independent of PAI-1, may increase invasion and chemotaxis of breast cancer cells by activating specific signaling pathways through endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1. APC also increased proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and angiogenesis by EPCR-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathways. On the other hand, we have previously reported that both uPA and PCI are synthesized in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTECs) and that PCI expression in RPTEC-derived tumor cells is significantly decreased compared with normal RPTECs. The RPTEC-derived renal carcinoma cell line Caki-1 also showed decreased expression of PCI. PCI inhibited in vitro invasive activity of Caki-1 and breast cancer cells by its protease inhibitory activity. However, PCI was found to inhibit the growth and metastatic potential of breast cancer cells independent of its protease inhibitory activity in severe combined immunodeficient mice. PCI can also inhibit angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro assays independent of its protease inhibitory activity. Overall, these

  15. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barak, D; Shibata, M; Rein, R

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  16. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  17. Novel protein kinase C inhibitors: alpha-terthiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, D S; Ashendel, C L; Zhou, Q; Chang, C T; Lee, E S; Chang, C J

    1998-10-06

    A series of alpha-terthiophene derivatives were prepared and their protein kinase C inhibitory activity were evaluated. The aldehyde derivatives were most potent inhibitors (IC50 < 1 microM). alpha-Terthiophene monoaldehyde was inactive in the inhibitions of protein kinase A, mitogen activated protein kinase and protein tyrosine kinase.

  18. Regulation of the activity of protein kinases by endogenous heat stable protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Szmigielski, A

    1985-01-01

    Protein kinase activities are regulated by endogenous thermostable protein inhibitors. Type I inhibitor is a protein of MW 22,000-24,000 which inhibits specifically cyclic AMP-(cAMP) dependent protein kinase (APK) as a competitive inhibitor of catalytic subunits of the enzyme. Type I inhibitor activity changes inversely according to the activation of adenylate cyclase and the changes in cAMP content in tissues. It seems that type I inhibitor serves as a factor preventing spontaneous cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in unstimulated cell. The other thermostable protein which inhibits APK activity has been found in Sertoli cell-enriched testis (testis inhibitor). Physiological role of the testis inhibitor is unknown. Type II inhibitor is a protein of MW 15,000 which blocks phosphorylation mediated by cAMP and cyclic GMP (cGMP) dependent (APK and GPK) and cyclic nucleotide independent protein kinases as a competitive inhibitor of substrate proteins. Activity of this inhibitor specifically changes in reciprocal manner to the changes in cGMP content. It seems that type II inhibitor serves as a factor preventing the phosphorylation catalyzed by GPK when cGMP content is low. Stimulation of guanylate cyclase and activation of GPK is followed by a decrease of type II inhibitor activity. This change in relationship between activities of GPK and type II inhibitor allows for effective phosphorylation catalyzed by this enzyme when cGMP content is increased.

  19. Interfacial inhibitors of protein-nucleic acid interactions.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2005-07-01

    This essay develops the paradigm of "Interfacial Inhibitors" (Pommier and Cherfils, TiPS, 2005, 28: 136) for inhibitory drugs beside orthosteric (competitive or non-competitive) and allosteric inhibitors. Interfacial inhibitors bind with high selectivity to a binding site involving two or more macromolecules within macromolecular complexes undergoing conformational changes. Interfacial binding traps (generally reversibly) a transition state of the complex, resulting in kinetic inactivation. The exemplary case of interfacial inhibitor of protein-DNA interface is camptothecin and its clinical derivatives. We will also provide examples generalizing the interfacial inhibitor concept to inhibitors of topoisomerase II (anthracyclines, ellipticines, epipodophyllotoxins), gyrase (quinolones, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin), RNA polymerases (alpha-amanitin and actinomycin D), and ribosomes (antibiotics such as streptomycin, hygromycin B, tetracycline, kirromycin, fusidic acid, thiostrepton, and possibly cycloheximide). We discuss the implications of the interfacial inhibitor concept for drug discovery.

  20. Stimulation of cleavage of membrane proteins by calmodulin inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rodríguez, E; Esparís-Ogando, A; Montero, J C; Yuste, L; Pandiella, A

    2000-01-01

    The ectodomain of several membrane-bound proteins can be shed by proteolytic cleavage. The activity of the proteases involved in shedding is highly regulated by several intracellular second messenger pathways, such as protein kinase C (PKC) and intracellular Ca(2+). Recently, the shedding of the adhesion molecule L-selectin has been shown to be regulated by the interaction of calmodulin (CaM) with the cytosolic tail of L-selectin. Prevention of CaM-L-selectin interaction by CaM inhibitors or mutation of a CaM binding site in L-selectin induced L-selectin ectodomain shedding. Whether this action of CaM inhibitors also affects other membrane-bound proteins is not known. In the present paper we show that CaM inhibitors also stimulate the cleavage of several other transmembrane proteins, such as the membrane-bound growth factor precursors pro-transforming growth factor-alpha and pro-neuregulin-alpha2c, the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, and the beta-amyloid precursor protein. Cleavage induced by CaM inhibitors was a rapid event, and resulted from the activation of a mechanism that was independent of PKC or intracellular Ca(2+) increases, but was highly sensitive to hydroxamic acid-based metalloprotease inhibitors. Mutational analysis of the intracellular domain of the TrkA receptor indicated that CaM inhibitors may stimulate membrane-protein ectodomain cleavage by mechanisms independent of CaM-substrate interaction. PMID:10677354

  1. Towards a Green Hydrate Inhibitor: Imaging Antifreeze Proteins on Clathrates

    PubMed Central

    Gordienko, Raimond; Ohno, Hiroshi; Singh, Vinay K.; Jia, Zongchao; Ripmeester, John A.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possess the ability to modify structure II (sII) tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors. PMID:20161789

  2. Towards a green hydrate inhibitor: imaging antifreeze proteins on clathrates.

    PubMed

    Gordienko, Raimond; Ohno, Hiroshi; Singh, Vinay K; Jia, Zongchao; Ripmeester, John A; Walker, Virginia K

    2010-02-11

    The formation of hydrate plugs in oil and gas pipelines is a serious industrial problem and recently there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative hydrate inhibitors as substitutes for thermodynamic inhibitors like methanol. We show here that antifreeze proteins (AFPs) possess the ability to modify structure II (sII) tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate crystal morphologies by adhering to the hydrate surface and inhibiting growth in a similar fashion to the kinetic inhibitor poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The effects of AFPs on the formation and growth rate of high-pressure sII gas mix hydrate demonstrated that AFPs are superior hydrate inhibitors compared to PVP. These results indicate that AFPs may be suitable for the study of new inhibitor systems and represent an important step towards the development of biologically-based hydrate inhibitors.

  3. Developing irreversible inhibitors of the protein kinase cysteinome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Sabnis, Yogesh; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Tinghu; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Jones, Lyn H.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of approximately 530 highly conserved enzymes that transfer a γ-phosphate group from ATP to a variety of amino acid residues such as tyrosine, serine and threonine which serves as a ubiquitous mechanism for cellular signal transduction. The clinical success of a number of kinase-directed drugs and the frequent observation of disease causing mutations in protein kinases suggest that a large number of kinases may represent therapeutically relevant targets. To-date the majority of clinical and preclinical kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive, non-covalent inhibitors that achieve selectivity through recognition of unique features of particular protein kinases. Recently there has been renewed interest in the development of irreversible inhibitors that form covalent bonds with cysteine or other nucleophilic residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Irreversible kinase inhibitors have a number of potential advantages including prolonged pharmacodynamics, suitability for rational design, high potency and ability to validate pharmacological specificity through mutation of the reactive cysteine residue. Here we review recent efforts to develop cysteine-targeted irreversible protein kinase inhibitors and discuss their modes of recognizing the ATP-binding pocket and their biological activity profiles. In addition, we provided an informatics assessment of the potential ‘kinase-cysteinome’ and discuss strategies for the efficient development of new covalent inhibitors. PMID:23438744

  4. Overcoming Resistance to Inhibitors of the Akt Protein Kinase by Modulation of the Pim Kinase Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    kinase . This grant proposal will explore the resistance to small molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors mediated by the... molecule AKT protein kinase inhibitors is potentially mediated by the Pim-1 protein kinase , and that unique Pim protein kinase inhibitors that can in...application is essential for the development of this combined chemotherapeutic strategy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small Molecule AKT Inhibitors ,

  5. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin) into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:21569443

  6. Detailed Structural Characterization of Unbound Protein Phosphatase 1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dancheck, Barbara; Nairn, Angus C.; Peti, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is an essential and ubiquitous serine/threonine protein phosphatase that is regulated by more than 100 known inhibitor and targeting proteins. It is currently unclear how protein inhibitors distinctly and specifically regulate PP1 to enable rapid responses to cellular alterations. We demonstrate that two PP1 inhibitors, I-2 and DARPP-32, belong to the class of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs). We show that both inhibitors have distinct preferences for transient local and long range structure. These preferences are likely their structural signature for their interaction with PP1. Furthermore, we show that upon phosphorylation of Thr34 in DARPP-32, which turns DARPP-32 into a potent inhibitor of PP1, neither local nor long range structure of DARPP-32 is altered. Therefore, our data suggests a role for these transient 3-dimensional topologies in binding mechanisms that enable extensive contacts with PP1's invariant surfaces. Together, these interactions enable potent and selective inhibition of PP1. PMID:18954090

  7. Comparing protein VEGF inhibitors: In vitro biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Lanlan; Liang, Xiao Huan; Ferrara, Napoleone

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} VEGF is a mediator of angiogenesis. {yields} VEGF inhibitors have clinical applications in cancer and eye disorders. {yields} Five protein VEGF inhibitors were compared for their ability to inhibit. {yields} VEGF-induced activities in cultured endothelial cells. -- Abstract: VEGF inhibitors are widely used as a therapy for tumors and intravascular neovascular disorders, but limited and conflicting data regarding their relative biological potencies are available. The purpose of the study is to compare different protein VEGF inhibitors for their ability to inhibit VEGF-stimulated activities. We tested ranibizumab, the full-length variant of ranibizumab (Mab Y0317), bevacizumab, the VEGF-TrapR1R2 and Flt(1-3)-IgG in bioassays measuring VEGF-stimulated proliferation of bovine retinal microvascular endothelial cells or chemotaxis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The inhibitors were also compared for their ability to inhibit MAP kinase activation in HUVECs following VEGF addition. Ranibizumab, VEGF-TrapR1R2 and Flt(1-3)-IgG had very similar potencies in the bioassays tested. Bevacizumab was over 10-fold less potent than these molecules. Mab Y0317 was over 30-fold more potent than bevacizumab. The findings reported in this manuscript describe important intrinsic characteristics of several VEGF inhibitors that may be useful to design and interpret preclinical or clinical studies.

  8. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  9. Visible-Light-Triggered Activation of a Protein Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Danielle; Li, Jason W; Branda, Neil R

    2017-02-20

    A photoresponsive small molecule undergoes a ring-opening reaction when exposed to visible light and becomes an active inhibitor of the enzyme protein kinase C. This "turning on" of enzyme inhibition with light puts control into the hands of the user, creating the opportunity to regulate when and where enzyme catalysis takes place.

  10. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  11. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  12. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  13. Heat shock protein 90 inhibitors repurposed against Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Shahinas, Dea; Debnath, Anjan; Benedict, Christan; McKerrow, James H.; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2015-01-01

    Hsp90 is an essential chaperone responsible for trafficking a vast array of client proteins, which are substrates that Hsp90 regulates in eukaryotic cells under stress conditions. The ATP-binding N-terminal domain of Hsp90 (also known as a GHKL type ATPase domain) can serve as a specific drug target, because sufficient structural diversity in the ATP-binding pocket of Hsp90 allows for ortholog selectivity of Hsp90 inhibitors. The primary objective of this study is to identify inhibitors specific for the ATP-binding domain of Entamoeba histolytica Hsp90 (EhHsp90). An additional aim, using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and a protein in vitro assay, is to show that the antiparasitic activity of Hsp90 inhibitors is dependent on specific residues within the ATP-binding domain. Here, we tested the activity of 43 inhibitors of Hsp90 that we previously identified using a high-throughput screen. Of the 43 compounds tested, 19 competed for binding of the EhHsp90 ATP-binding domain. Five out of the 19 EhHsp90 protein hits demonstrated activity against E. histolytica in vitro culture: rifabutin, rutilantin, cetylpyridinium chloride, pararosaniline pamoate and gentian violet. These five top E. histolytica Hsp90 inhibitors showed 30–100% inhibition of E. histolytica in culture in the micromolar range. These data suggest that E. histolytica-specific Hsp90 inhibitors are possible to identify and provide important lead compounds for the development of novel antiamebic drugs. PMID:26029171

  14. A Novel Inhibitor of the Obesity-Related Protein FTO.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Meizi; Liu, Weijia; Han, Zhifu; Song, Chuanjun; Yu, Wenquan; Yang, Qinghua; Wang, Ruiyong; Wang, Shaomin; Shi, Shuai; Zhao, Renbin; Chai, Jijie; Chang, Junbiao

    2016-03-15

    Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate-dependent fat mass and obesity associated protein (FTO)-dependent demethylation of m⁶A is important for regulation of mRNA splicing and adipogenesis. Developing FTO-specific inhibitors can help probe the biology of FTO and unravel novel therapeutic targets for treatment of obesity or obesity-associated diseases. In the present paper, we have identified that 4-chloro-6-(6'-chloro-7'-hydroxy-2',4',4'-trimethyl-chroman-2'-yl)benzene-1,3-diol (CHTB) is an inhibitor of FTO. The crystal structure of CHTB complexed with human FTO reveals that the novel small molecule binds to FTO in a specific manner. The identification of the novel small molecule offers opportunities for further development of more selective and potent FTO inhibitors.

  15. Plant protein inhibitors of cell wall degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Juge, Nathalie

    2006-07-01

    Plant cell walls, which consist mainly of polysaccharides (i.e. cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins), play an important role in defending plants against pathogens. Most phytopathogenic microorganisms secrete an array of cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) capable of depolymerizing the polysaccharides in the plant host wall. In response, plants have evolved a diverse battery of defence responses including protein inhibitors of these enzymes. These include inhibitors of pectin degrading enzymes such as polygalacturonases, pectinmethyl esterases and pectin lyases, and hemicellulose degrading enzymes such as endoxylanases and xyloglucan endoglucanases. The discovery of these plant inhibitors and the recent resolution of their three-dimensional structures, free or in complex with their target enzymes, provide new lines of evidence regarding their function and evolution in plant-pathogen interactions.

  16. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  17. Small molecule inhibitors targeting activator protein 1 (AP-1).

    PubMed

    Ye, Na; Ding, Ye; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-08-28

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases.

  18. Protein-Protein Interaction for the De Novo Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Peptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arumugasamy, Karthiga; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The homology of the inhibitor binding site regions on the surface of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) makes actual CDK inhibitors unable to bind specifically to their molecular targets. Most of them are ATP competitive inhibitors with low specificity that also affect the phosphorylation mechanisms of other nontarget kinases giving rise to harmful side effects. So, the search of specific and potent inhibitors able to bind to the desired CDK target is still a pending issue. Structure based drug design minimized the erroneous binding and increased the affinity of the inhibitor interaction. In the case of CDKs their activation and regulation mechanisms mainly depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The design of drugs targeting these PPIs makes feasible and promising towards the discovery of new and specific CDK inhibitors. Development of peptide inhibitors for a target protein is an emerging approach in computer aided drug designing. This chapter describes in detail methodology for use of the VitAL-Viterbi algorithm for de novo peptide design of CDK2 inhibitors.

  19. Hypervalent Organochalcogenanes as Inhibitors of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Piovan, Leandro; Wu, Li; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Andrade, Leandro H.

    2011-01-01

    A series of organochalcogenanes was synthesized and evaluated as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) inhibitors. The results indicate that organochalcogenanes inactivate the PTPs in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, most likely through covalent modification of the active site sulfur-moiety by the chalcogen atom. Consequently, organochalcogenanes represent a new class of mechanism-based probes to modulate the PTP-mediated cellular processes. PMID:21240419

  20. Delaying aging in Caenorhabditis elegans with protein aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cuanalo-Contreras, Karina; Park, Kyung-Won; Mukherjee, Abhisek; Millán-Pérez Peña, Lourdes; Soto, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that during aging there is widespread accumulation of aggregated insoluble proteins, even in the absence of pathological conditions. Pharmacological manipulation of protein aggregation might be helpful to unveil the involvement of protein aggregates during aging, as well as to develop novel strategies to delay aging. Here we investigated the effect of known protein aggregation inhibitors on the lifespan and health-span of Caenorhabditis elegans. For this purpose, we selected various structurally diverse anti-aggregation compounds and screened them in liquid and solid medium for their ability to alter the rate of aging in vivo. Our results show that treatment of C. elegans with diverse aggregation inhibitors significantly increases the animal lifespan and health-span. These findings indicate that protein misfolding and aggregation may play an important role in cellular dysfunction during aging, opening a novel approach to increase longevity and enhance the quality of life during aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E.; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-β type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  2. Interaction of Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT (PIAS) Proteins with the TATA-binding Protein, TBP*

    PubMed Central

    Prigge, Justin R.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Transcription activators often recruit promoter-targeted assembly of a pre-initiation complex; many repressors antagonize recruitment. These activities can involve direct interactions with proteins in the pre-initiation complex. We used an optimized yeast two-hybrid system to screen mouse pregnancy-associated libraries for proteins that interact with TATA-binding protein (TBP). Screens revealed an interaction between TBP and a single member of the zinc finger family of transcription factors, ZFP523. Two members of the protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) family, PIAS1 and PIAS3, also interacted with TBP in screens. Endogenous PIAS1 and TBP co-immunoprecipitated from nuclear extracts, suggesting the interaction occurred in vivo. In vitro-translated PIAS1 and TBP coimmunopreciptated, which indicated that other nuclear proteins were not required for the interaction. Deletion analysis mapped the PIAS-interacting domain of TBP to the conserved TBPCORE and the TBP-interacting domain on PIAS1 to a 39-amino acid C-terminal region. Mammals issue seven known PIAS proteins from four pias genes, pias1, pias3, piasx, and piasy, each with different cell type-specific expression patterns; the TBP-interacting domain reported here is the only part of the PIAS C-terminal region shared by all seven PIAS proteins. Direct analyses indicated that PIASx and PIASy also interacted with TBP. Our results suggest that all PIAS proteins might mediate situation-specific regulatory signaling at the TBP interface and that previously unknown levels of complexity could exist in the gene regulatory interplay between TBP, PIAS proteins, ZFP523, and other transcription factors. PMID:16522640

  3. Potent triazolothione inhibitor of heat-shock protein-90.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Richard I; Mintzer, Bob; Zhu, Daguang; Wu, James M; Biroc, Sandra L; Yuan, Shendong; Emayan, Kumar; Chang, Zheng; Chen, Deborah; Arnaiz, Damian O; Bryant, Judi; Ge, Xue Snow; Whitlow, Marc; Adler, Marc; Polokoff, Mark A; Li, Wei-Wei; Ferrer, Mike; Sato, Takashi; Gu, Jian-Ming; Shen, Jun; Tseng, Jih-Lie; Dinter, Harald; Buckman, Brad

    2009-07-01

    Heat-shock protein-90 is an attractive target for anticancer drugs, as heat-shock protein-90 blockers such as the ansamycin 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin greatly reduce the expression of many signaling molecules that are disregulated in cancer cells and are key drivers of tumor growth and metastasis. While 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin has shown promise in clinical trials, this compound class has significant template-related drawbacks. In this paper, we describe a new, potent non-ansamycin small-molecule inhibitor of heat-shock protein-90, BX-2819, containing resorcinol and triazolothione rings. Structural studies demonstrate binding of BX-2819 to the ADP/ATP-binding pocket of heat-shock protein-90. The compound blocked expression of heat-shock protein-90 client proteins in cancer cell lines and inhibited cell growth with a potency similar to 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. In a panel of four cancer cell lines, BX-2819 blocked growth with an average IC(50) value of 32 nM (range of 7-72 nM). Efficacy studies demonstrated that treatment with BX-2819 significantly inhibited the growth of NCI-N87 and HT-29 tumors in nude mice, consistent with pharmacodynamic studies showing inhibition of heat-shock protein-90 client protein expression in tumors for greater than 16 h after dosing. These data support further studies to assess the potential of BX-2819 and related analogs for the treatment of cancer.

  4. Prediction of HIV-1 protease inhibitor resistance using a protein-inhibitor flexible docking approach.

    PubMed

    Jenwitheesuk, Ekachai; Samudrala, Ram

    2005-01-01

    Emergence of drug resistance remains one of the most challenging issues in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Here we focus on resistance to HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) at a molecular level, which can be analysed genotypically or phenotypically. Genotypic assays are based on the analysis of mutations associated with reduced drug susceptibility, but are problematic because of the numerous mutations and mutational patterns that confer drug resistance. Phenotypic resistance or susceptibility can be experimentally evaluated by measuring the amount of free drug bound to HIV-1 protease molecules, but this procedure is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome these problems, we have developed a docking protocol that takes protein-inhibitor flexibility into account to predict phenotypic drug resistance. For six FDA-approved Pls and a total of 1792 HIV-1 protease sequence mutants, we used a combination of inhibitor flexible docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to calculate protein-inhibitor binding energies. Prediction results were expressed as fold changes of the calculated inhibitory constant (Ki), and the samples predicted to have fold-increase in calculated Ki above the fixed cut-off were defined as drug resistant. Our combined docking and MD protocol achieved accuracies ranging from 72-83% in predicting resistance/susceptibility for five of the six drugs evaluated. Evaluating the method only on samples where our predictions concurred with established knowledge-based methods resulted in increased accuracies of 83-94% for the six drugs. The results suggest that a physics-based approach, which is readily applicable to any novel PI and/or mutant, can be used judiciously with knowledge-based approaches that require experimental training data to devise accurate models of HIV-1 Pl resistance prediction.

  5. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  6. Hot spot-based design of small-molecule inhibitors for protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenxing; Wisniewski, John A; Ji, Haitao

    2014-06-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are important targets for the development of chemical probes and therapeutic agents. From the initial discovery of the existence of hot spots at PPI interfaces, it has been proposed that hot spots might provide the key for developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors. However, there has been no review on the ways in which the knowledge of hot spots can be used to achieve inhibitor design, nor critical examination of successful examples. This Digest discusses the characteristics of hot spots and the identification of druggable hot spot pockets. An analysis of four examples of hot spot-based design reveals the importance of this strategy in discovering potent and selective PPI inhibitors. A general procedure for hot spot-based design of PPI inhibitors is outlined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors of BRCA1 Discovered Using Small Molecule Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Na, Zhenkun; Pan, Sijun; Uttamchandani, Mahesh; Yao, Shao Q

    2017-01-01

    Microarray screening technology has transformed the life sciences arena over the last decade. The platform is widely used in the area of mapping interaction networks, to molecular fingerprinting and small molecular inhibitor discovery. The technique has significantly impacted both basic and applied research. The microarray platform can likewise enable high-throughput screening and discovery of protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitors. Herein we demonstrate the application of microarray-guided PPI inhibitor discovery, using human BRCA1 as an example. Mutations in BRCA1 have been implicated in ~50 % of hereditary breast cancers. By targeting the (BRCT)2 domain, we showed compound 15a and its prodrug 15b inhibited BRCA1 activities in tumor cells. Unlike previously reported peptide-based PPI inhibitors of BRCA1, the compounds identified could be directly administered to tumor cells, thus making them useful in targeting BRCA1/PARP-related pathways involved in DNA damage and repair response, for cancer therapy.

  8. Peptidyl aldehydes as reversible covalent inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua; Park, Junguk; Pei, Dehua

    2002-08-27

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are a large family of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic removal of the phosphoryl group from phosphotyrosyl (pY) proteins. PTP inhibitors provide potential treatment of human diseases/conditions such as diabetes and obesity as well as useful tools for studying the function of PTPs in signaling pathways. In this work, we have shown that certain aryl-substituted aldehydes act as reversible, slow-binding inhibitors of modest potency against PTP1B, SHP-1, and a dual-specificity phosphatase, VHR. Attachment of the tripeptide Gly-Glu-Glu to the para position of cinnamaldehyde resulted in an inhibitor (Cinn-GEE) of substantially increased potency against all three enzymes (e.g., K(I) = 5.4 microM against PTP1B). The mechanism of inhibition was investigated using Cinn-GEE specifically labeled with (13)C at the aldehyde carbon and (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear single-quantum coherence spectroscopy. While Cinn-GEE alone showed a single cross-peak at delta 9.64 ((1)H) and delta 201 ((13)C), the PTP1B/Cinn-GEE complex showed three distinct cross-peaks at delta 7.6-7.8 ((1)H) and 130-137 ((13)C). Mutation of the catalytic cysteine (Cys-215 in PTP1B) into alanine had no effect on the cross-peaks, whereas mutation of a conserved active-site arginine (Arg-221 in PTP1B) to alanine abolished all three cross-peaks. Similar experiments with Cinn-GEE that had been labeled with (13)C at the benzylic position revealed a change in the hybridization state (from sp(2) to sp(3)) for the benzylic carbon as a result of binding to PTP1B. These results rule out the possibility of a free aldehyde, aldehyde hydrate, or hemithioacetal as the enzyme-bound inhibitor form. Instead, the data are consistent with the formation of an enamine between the aldehyde group of the inhibitor and the guanidine group of Arg-221 in the PTP1B active site. These aldehydes may provide a general core structure that can be further developed into highly potent and specific PTP

  9. Effects of a new microbial α-amylase inhibitor protein on Helicoverpa armigera larvae.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanrong; Wang, Xiaojing; Cui, Jinjie; Ma, Yan; Li, Qiannan

    2013-03-06

    A new microbial α-amylase inhibitor gene was cloned and characterized. The encoded, recombinant, α-amylase inhibitor protein was induced and expressed by isopropyl β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) in Escherichia coli M15 cells. The effects of the α-amylase inhibitor protein on Helicoverpa armigera larvae were studied. Compared to the control, the weight of H. armigera larvae fed the diet with recombinant α-amylase inhibitor protein added at a concentration of 20 μg/g was reduced by 49.8%. The total soluble protein of H. armigera larvae fed the diet with the α-amylase inhibitor protein added was also reduced by 36.8% compared to the control. The recombinant α-amylase inhibitor protein showed inhibition activity against α-amylase of H. armigera. These results suggested that this α-amylase inhibitor protein may be a promising bioinsecticide candidate for controlling H. armigera.

  10. Optimization of rhodanine scaffold for the development of protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Stefania; De Luca, Laura; Agharbaoui, Fatima Ezzahra; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Gitto, Rosaria

    2015-07-01

    Searching for novel protein-protein interactions inhibitors (PPIs) herein we describe the identification of a new series of rhodanine derivatives. The selection was performed by means virtual-screening, docking studies, Molecular Dynamic (MD) simulations and synthetic approaches. All the new obtained compounds were tested in order to evaluate their ability to inhibit the interaction between the HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme and the nuclear protein lens epithelium growth factor LEDGF/p75.

  11. Protease-inhibitor interaction predictions: Lessons on the complexity of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Butler, Georgina S; Overall, Christopher Mark; Pavlidis, Paul

    2017-04-06

    Protein interactions shape proteome function and thus biology. Identification of protein interactions is a major goal in molecular biology, but biochemical methods, although improving, remain limited in coverage and accuracy. Whereas computational predictions can guide biochemical experiments, low validation rates of predictions remain a major limitation. Here, we investigated computational methods in the prediction of a specific type of interaction, the inhibitory interactions between proteases and their inhibitors. Proteases generate thousands of proteoforms that dynamically shape the functional state of proteomes. Despite the important regulatory role of proteases, knowledge of their inhibitors remains largely incomplete with the vast majority of proteases lacking an annotated inhibitor. To link inhibitors to their target proteases on a large scale, we applied computational methods to predict inhibitory interactions between proteases and their inhibitors based on complementary data including coexpression, phylogenetic similarity, structural information, co-annotation, and colocalization, and also surveyed general protein interaction networks for potential inhibitory interactions. In testing nine predicted interactions biochemically, we validated the inhibition of kallikrein 5 by serpin B12. Despite the use of a wide array of complementary data, we found a high false positive rate of computational predictions in biochemical follow-up. Based on a protease-specific definition of true negatives derived from the biochemical classification of proteases and inhibitors, we analyzed prediction accuracy of individual features. Thereby we identified feature-specific limitations, which also affected general protein interaction prediction methods. Interestingly, proteases were often not coexpressed with most of their functional inhibitors, contrary to what is commonly assumed and extrapolated predominantly from cell culture experiments. Predictions of inhibitory interactions

  12. An in vivo platform for identifying inhibitors of protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mahood, Rachel A.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Revill, Charlotte H.; Foster, Richard J.; Smith, D. Alastair; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Brockwell, David J.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an array of human diseases, yet only one small molecule therapeutic has been successfully developed to date. Here, we introduce an in vivo system, based on a β-lactamase tripartite fusion construct, capable of identifying aggregation-prone sequences in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and inhibitors that prevent their aberrant self-assembly. We demonstrate the power of the system using a range of proteins, from small unstructured peptides (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid β) to larger, folded immunoglobulin domains. Configured in a 48-well format, the split β-lactamase sensor readily differentiates between aggregation-prone and soluble sequences. Performing the assay in the presence of 109 compounds enabled a rank ordering of inhibition and revealed a new inhibitor of IAPP aggregation. This platform can be applied to both amyloidogenic and other aggregation-prone systems, independent of sequence or size, and can identify small molecules or other factors able to ameliorate or inhibit protein aggregation. PMID:26656088

  13. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins as intracellular signaling intermediates.

    PubMed

    Kocab, Andrew J; Duckett, Colin S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have often been considered inhibitors of cell death due to early reports that described their ability to directly bind and inhibit caspases, the primary factors that implement apoptosis. However, a greater understanding is evolving regarding the vital roles played by IAPs as transduction intermediates in a diverse set of signaling cascades associated with functions ranging from the innate immune response to cell migration to cell-cycle regulation. In this review, we discuss the functions of IAPs in signaling, focusing primarily on the cellular IAP (c-IAP) proteins. The c-IAPs are important components in tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily signaling cascades, which include activation of the NF-κB transcription factor family. As these receptors modulate cell proliferation and cell death, the involvement of the c-IAPs in these pathways provides an additional means of controlling cellular fate beyond simply inhibiting caspase activity. Additionally, IAP-binding proteins, such as Smac and caspases, which have been described as having cell death-independent roles, may affect c-IAP activity in intracellular signaling. Collectively, the multi-faceted functions and complex regulation of the c-IAPs illustrate their importance as intracellular signaling intermediates.

  14. INHIBITOR OF APOPTOSIS PROTEINS AS INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING INTERMEDIATES

    PubMed Central

    Kocab, Andrew J.; Duckett, Colin S.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins have often been considered inhibitors of cell death due to early studies describing their ability to directly bind and inhibit caspases, the primary factors that implement apoptosis. However, a greater understanding is evolving for the vital roles played by the IAPs as transduction intermediates in a diverse set of signaling cascades that have been associated with functions ranging from the innate immune response to cell migration to cell cycle regulation. In this review, we discuss the functions of the IAPs in signaling, focusing primarily on the cellular IAP (c-IAP) proteins. The c-IAPs are important components in the TNF receptor superfamily signaling cascades, which include the activation of the NF-κB transcription factor family. Since these receptors can modulate cell proliferation and cell death, the roles of the c-IAPs in these pathways provide additional means of controlling cellular fate beyond simply inhibiting caspase activity. Additionally, IAP binding proteins, such as Smac and caspases, which have been described as having cell death-independent roles, may impact c-IAP activity in intracellular signaling. Collectively, the multifaceted functions and complex regulation of the c-IAPs illustrate the importance of the c-IAPs as intracellular signaling intermediates. PMID:26462035

  15. Classification of Breast Cancer Resistant Protein (BCRP) Inhibitors and Non-Inhibitors Using Machine Learning Approaches.

    PubMed

    Belekar, Vilas; Lingineni, Karthik; Garg, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    The breast cancer resistant protein (BCRP) is an important transporter and its inhibitors play an important role in cancer treatment by improving the oral bioavailability as well as blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability of anticancer drugs. In this work, a computational model was developed to predict the compounds as BCRP inhibitors or non-inhibitors. Various machine learning approaches like, support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) and artificial neural network (ANN) were used to develop the models. The Matthews correlation coefficients (MCC) of developed models using ANN, k-NN and SVM are 0.67, 0.71 and 0.77, and prediction accuracies are 85.2%, 88.3% and 90.8% respectively. The developed models were tested with a test set of 99 compounds and further validated with external set of 98 compounds. Distribution plot analysis and various machine learning models were also developed based on druglikeness descriptors. Applicability domain is used to check the prediction reliability of the new molecules.

  16. Peptidomimetics as protein arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Trabocchi, Andrea; Pala, Nicolino; Krimmelbein, Ilga; Menchi, Gloria; Guarna, Antonio; Sechi, Mario; Dreker, Tobias; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carta, Fabrizio

    2015-06-01

    The protein arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is a calcium-dependent enzyme, which catalyses the irreversible conversion of peptidyl-arginines into peptidyl-citrullines and plays an important role in several diseases such as in the rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jacob's disease and cancer. In this study, we report the inhibition profiles and computational docking toward the PAD4 enzyme of a series of 1,2,3-triazole peptidomimetic-based derivatives incorporating the β-phenylalanine and guanidine scaffolds. Several effective, low micromolar PAD4 inhibitors are reported in this study.

  17. Evans Blue and other dyes as protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Suja; Shim, Yi Sup; Kim, Ki Chul; Lee, Keun-Hyeung; Cho, Hyeongjin

    2004-04-19

    Commonly used dyes including Evans Blue and Trypan Blue were examined for their inhibitory activities against protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), all of them showed inhibition of PTPases with different potencies. Of the 13 dyes tested, four exhibited IC(50) value of less than 10 microM, Evans Blue lowest IC(50) of 1.3 microM against PTP1B. Care must be taken in the use of dyes for clinical or biochemical experiments to avoid unwanted side effects. Some of the low molecular weight dyes might be useful as lead compounds for the development of potent and selective PTPase inhibitors.

  18. Protein flexibility oriented virtual screening strategy for JAK2 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiao; Yuan, Haoliang; Zhang, Yanmin; Xu, Jinxing; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Li, Hongmei; Jiang, Yulei; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-10-01

    JAK2 has been considered as an important target for the development of anti-cancer agents. In this study, considering the flexibility of its binding site, an integrated strategy combining Bayesian categorization modeling and ensemble docking was established. Four representative crystal structures were selected for ensemble docking by the hierarchical clustering of 34 crystal structures according to the volume overlaps of each structure. A retrospective virtual screening was performed to validate this integrated strategy. As the preliminary filtration, the Bayesian model enhanced the ratio of actives by reducing the large amount of decoys. After docking the remaining compounds, the comparison between the ensemble and individual results showed that the enrichment of ensemble docking improved significantly. The results of analysis on conformational changes of two top ranked active inhibitors when docking into different proteins indicated that compounds with flexible conformations well fitted the different binding site shapes were more likely to be potential JAK2 inhibitors. This high efficient strategy will facilitate virtual screening for novel JAK2 inhibitors and could be even applied in drug discovery against other targets.

  19. The specificities of protein kinase inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Jenny; McLauchlan, Hilary; Elliott, Matthew; Cohen, Philip

    2003-01-01

    We have previously examined the specificities of 28 commercially available compounds, reported to be relatively selective inhibitors of particular serine/threonine-specific protein kinases [Davies, Reddy, Caivano and Cohen (2000) Biochem. J. 351, 95-105]. In the present study, we have extended this analysis to a further 14 compounds. Of these, indirubin-3'-monoxime, SP 600125, KT 5823 and ML-9 were found to inhibit a number of protein kinases and conclusions drawn from their use in cell-based assays are likely to be erroneous. Kenpaullone, Alsterpaullone, Purvalanol, Roscovitine, pyrazolopyrimidine 1 (PP1), PP2 and ML-7 were more specific, but still inhibited two or more protein kinases with similar potency. Our results suggest that the combined use of Roscovitine and Kenpaullone may be useful for identifying substrates and physiological roles of cyclin-dependent protein kinases, whereas the combined use of Kenpaullone and LiCl may be useful for identifying substrates and physiological roles of glycogen synthase kinase 3. The combined use of SU 6656 and either PP1 or PP2 may be useful for identifying substrates of Src family members. Epigallocatechin 3-gallate, one of the main polyphenolic constituents of tea, inhibited two of the 28 protein kinases in the panel, dual-specificity, tyrosine-phosphorylated and regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A; IC(50)=0.33 microM) and p38-regulated/activated kinase (PRAK; IC(50)=1.0 microM). PMID:12534346

  20. Plant Protein Inhibitors of Enzymes: Their Role in Animal Nutrition and Plant Defence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Current information and research related to plant protein inhibitors of enzymes are reviewed, including potential uses of the inhibitors for medical treatment and for breeding plant varieties with greater resistance to insects. (DC)

  1. Plant Protein Inhibitors of Enzymes: Their Role in Animal Nutrition and Plant Defence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Current information and research related to plant protein inhibitors of enzymes are reviewed, including potential uses of the inhibitors for medical treatment and for breeding plant varieties with greater resistance to insects. (DC)

  2. Carcinogenic Aspects of Protein Phosphatase 1 and 2A Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, Hirota; Suganuma, Masami

    Okadaic acid is functionally a potent tumor promoter working through inhibition of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A (PP1 and PP2A), resulting in sustained phosphorylation of proteins in cells. The mechanism of tumor promotion with oka-daic acid is thus completely different from that of the classic tumor promoter phorbol ester. Other potent inhibitors of PP1 and PP2A - such as dinophysistoxin-1, calyculins A-H, microcystin-LR and its derivatives, and nodularin - were isolated from marine organisms, and their structural features including the crystal structure of the PP1-inhibitor complex, tumor promoting activities, and biochemical and biological effects, are here reviewed. The compounds induced tumor promoting activity in three different organs, including mouse skin, rat glandular stomach and rat liver, initiated with three different carcinogens. The results indicate that inhibition of PP1 and PP2A is a general mechanism of tumor promotion applicable to various organs. This study supports the concept of endogenous tumor promoters in human cancer development.

  3. Overcoming Chemical, Biological, and Computational Challenges in the Development of Inhibitors Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Luca; McKenzie, Grahame; Spring, David R.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Huggins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie the majority of biological processes, signaling, and disease. Approaches to modulate PPIs with small molecules have therefore attracted increasing interest over the past decade. However, there are a number of challenges inherent in developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors that have prevented these approaches from reaching their full potential. From target validation to small-molecule screening and lead optimization, identifying therapeutically relevant PPIs that can be successfully modulated by small molecules is not a simple task. Following the recent review by Arkin et al., which summarized the lessons learnt from prior successes, we focus in this article on the specific challenges of developing PPI inhibitors and detail the recent advances in chemistry, biology, and computation that facilitate overcoming them. We conclude by providing a perspective on the field and outlining four innovations that we see as key enabling steps for successful development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting PPIs. PMID:26091166

  4. Overcoming Chemical, Biological, and Computational Challenges in the Development of Inhibitors Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Laraia, Luca; McKenzie, Grahame; Spring, David R; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Huggins, David J

    2015-06-18

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie the majority of biological processes, signaling, and disease. Approaches to modulate PPIs with small molecules have therefore attracted increasing interest over the past decade. However, there are a number of challenges inherent in developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors that have prevented these approaches from reaching their full potential. From target validation to small-molecule screening and lead optimization, identifying therapeutically relevant PPIs that can be successfully modulated by small molecules is not a simple task. Following the recent review by Arkin et al., which summarized the lessons learnt from prior successes, we focus in this article on the specific challenges of developing PPI inhibitors and detail the recent advances in chemistry, biology, and computation that facilitate overcoming them. We conclude by providing a perspective on the field and outlining four innovations that we see as key enabling steps for successful development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting PPIs.

  5. Reviewing the current classification of inhibitor of growth family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Unoki, Motoko; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Harris, Curtis C.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth (ING) family proteins have been defined as candidate tumor suppressors for more than a decade. Recent emerging results using siRNA and knockout mice are expanding the previous understanding of this protein family. The results of ING1 knockout mouse experiments revealed that ING1 has a protective effect on apoptosis. Our recent results showed that ING2 is overexpressed in colorectal cancer, and induces colon cancer cell invasion through an MMP13-dependent pathway. Knockdown of ING2 by siRNA induces premature senescence in normal human fibroblast cells, and apoptosis or cell cycle arrest in various adherent cancer cells. Taken together, these results suggest that ING2 may also have roles in cancer progression and/or malignant transformation under some conditions. Additionally, knockdown of ING4 and ING5 by siRNA shows an inhibitory effect on the transition from G2/M to G1 phase and DNA replication, respectively, suggesting that these proteins may play roles during cell proliferation in some context. ING family proteins may play dual roles, similar to transforming growth factor-β, which has tumor suppressor-like functions in normal epithelium and also oncogenic functions in invasive metastatic cancers. In the present article, we briefly review ING history and propose a possible interpretation of discrepancies between past and recent data. PMID:19432890

  6. Development of a Capillary Electrophoresis Platform for Identifying Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Jennifer N.; Nie, Jing; Buchholz, Tonia J.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Kennedy, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Methods for identifying chemical inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are often prone to discovery of false positives, particularly those caused by molecules that induce protein aggregation. Thus, there is interest in developing new platforms that might allow earlier identification of these problematic compounds. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been evaluated as a method to screen for PPI inhibitors using the challenging system of Hsp70 interacting with its co-chaperone Bag3. In the method, Hsp70 is labeled with a fluorophore, mixed with Bag3, and the resulting bound and free Hsp70 separated and detected by CE with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The method used a chemically modified CE capillary to prevent protein adsorption. Inhibitors of the Hsp70-Bag3 interaction were detected by observing a reduction in the bound to free ratio. The method was used to screen a library of 3,443 compounds and results compared to those from a flow cytometry protein interaction assay. CE was found to produce a lower hit rate with more compounds that reconfirmed in subsequent testing suggesting greater specificity. This finding was attributed to use of electropherograms to detect artifacts such as aggregators and to differences in protein modifications required to perform the different assays. Increases in throughput are required to make the CE method suitable for primary screens but at the current stage of development it is attractive as a secondary screen to test hits found by higher throughput methods. PMID:24060167

  7. Development of a capillary electrophoresis platform for identifying inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Jennifer N; Nie, Jing; Buchholz, Tonia J; Gestwicki, Jason E; Kennedy, Robert T

    2013-10-15

    Methods for identifying chemical inhibitors of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are often prone to discovery of false positives, particularly those caused by molecules that induce protein aggregation. Thus, there is interest in developing new platforms that might allow earlier identification of these problematic compounds. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been evaluated as a method to screen for PPI inhibitors using the challenging system of Hsp70 interacting with its co-chaperone Bag3. In the method, Hsp70 is labeled with a fluorophore, mixed with Bag3, and the resulting bound and free Hsp70 are separated and detected by CE with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The method used a chemically modified CE capillary to prevent protein adsorption. Inhibitors of the Hsp70-Bag3 interaction were detected by observing a reduction in the bound-to-free ratio. The method was used to screen a library of 3443 compounds, and the results were compared to those from a flow cytometry protein interaction assay. CE was found to produce a lower hit rate with more compounds that were reconfirmed in subsequent testing, suggesting greater specificity. This finding was attributed to the use of electropherograms to detect artifacts such as aggregators and to differences in protein modifications required to perform the different assays. Increases in throughput are required to make the CE method suitable for primary screens, but at the current stage of development it is attractive as a secondary screen to test hits found by higher-throughput methods.

  8. Interaction of ABC multidrug transporters with anticancer protein kinase inhibitors: substrates and/or inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Csilla; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Szakács, Gergely; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2009-05-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors (PKI) are becoming key agents in modern cancer chemotherapy, and combination of PKIs with classical chemotherapeutic drugs may help to overcome currently untreatable metastatic cancers. Since chemotherapy resistance is a recurrent problem, mechanisms of resistance should be clarified in order to help further drug development. Here we suggest that in addition to PKI resistance based on altered target structures, the active removal of these therapeutic agents by the MDR-ABC transporters should also be considered as a major cause of clinical resistance. We discuss the occurring systemic and cellular mechanisms, which may hamper PKI efficiency, and document the role of selected MDR-ABC transporters in these phenomena through their interactions with these anticancer agents. Moreover, we suggest that PKI interactions with ABC transporters may modulate overall drug metabolism, including the fate of diverse, chemically or target-wise unrelated drugs. These effects are based on multiple forms of MDR-ABC transporter interaction with PKIs, as these compounds may be both substrates and/or inhibitors of an ABC transporter. We propose that these interactions should be carefully considered in clinical application, and a combined MDR-ABC transporter and PKI effect may bring a major advantage in future drug development.

  9. Development of a selective inhibitor of Protein Arginine Deiminase 2.

    PubMed

    Muth, Aaron; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Beaumont, Edward; Nagar, Mitesh; Kerry, Philip; McEwan, Paul; Srinath, Hema; Clancy, Kathleen Wanda; Parelkar, Sangram S; Thompson, Paul R

    2017-03-22

    Protein arginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) plays a key role in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and breast cancer. To date, no PAD2-selective inhibitor has been developed. Such a compound will be critical for elucidating the biological roles of this isozyme and may ultimately be useful for treating specific diseases in which PAD2 activity is dysregulated. To achieve this goal, we synthesized a series of benzimidazole-based derivatives of Cl-amidine, hypothesizing that this scaffold would allow access to a series of PAD2-selective inhibitors with enhanced cellular efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that substitutions at both the N-terminus and C-terminus of Cl-amidine result in >100-fold increases in PAD2 potency and selectivity (30a, 41a, and 49a) as well as cellular efficacy 30a. Notably, these compounds use the far less reactive fluoroacetamidine warhead. In total, we predict that 30a will be a critical tool for understanding cellular PAD2 function and sets the stage for treating diseases in which PAD2 activity is dysregulated.

  10. Interaction of Bothrops jararaca venom metalloproteinases with protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Asega, Amanda F; Oliveira, Ana K; Menezes, Milene C; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C; Serrano, Solange M T

    2014-03-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) play important roles in the local and systemic hemorrhage observed upon envenomation. In a previous study on the structural elements important for the activities of HF3 (highly hemorrhagic, P-III-SVMP), bothropasin (hemorrhagic, P-III-SVMP) and BJ-PI (non-hemorrhagic, P-I-SVMP), from Bothrops jararaca, it was demonstrated that they differ in their proteolysis profile of plasma and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study, we evaluated the ability of proteins DM43 and α2-macroglobulin to interfere with the proteolytic activity of these SVMPs on fibrinogen and collagen VI and with their ability to induce hemorrhage. DM43 inhibited the proteolytic activity of bothropasin and BJ-PI but not that of HF3, and was not cleaved the three proteinases. On the other hand, α2-macroglobulin did not inhibit any of the proteinases and was rather cleaved by them. In agreement with these findings, binding analysis showed interaction of bothropasin and BJ-PI but not HF3 to DM43 while none of the proteinases bound to α2-macroglobulin. Moreover, DM43 promoted partial inhibition of the hemorrhagic activity of bothropasin but not that of HF3. Our results demonstrate that metalloproteinases of B. jararaca venom showing different domain composition, glycosylation level and hemorrhagic potency show variable susceptibilities to protein inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Okadaic acid: the archetypal serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dounay, A B; Forsyth, C J

    2002-11-01

    As the first recognized member of the "okadaic acid class" of phosphatase inhibitors, the marine natural product okadaic acid is perhaps the most well-known member of a diverse array of secondary metabolites that have emerged as valuable probes for studying the roles of various cellular protein serine/threonine phosphatases. This review provides a historical perspective on the role that okadaic acid has played in stimulating a broad spectrum of modern scientific research as a result of the natural product's ability to bind to and inhibit important classes of protein serine / threonine phosphatases. The relationships between the structure and biological activities of okadaic acid are briefly reviewed, as well as the structural information regarding the particular cellular receptors protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A. Laboratory syntheses of okadaic acid and its analogs are thoroughly reviewed. Finally, an interpretation of the critical contacts observed between okadaic acid and PP1 by X-ray crystallography is provided, and specific molecular recognition hypotheses that are testable via the synthesis and assay of non-natural analogs of okadaic acid are suggested.

  12. Cell death in leukemia: passenger protein regulation by topoisomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Ulrike; Higginbottom, Karen; Newland, Adrian C; Cotter, Finbarr E; Allen, Paul D

    2007-10-05

    Etoposide is a potent inducer of mitotic catastrophe; a type of cell death resulting from aberrant mitosis. It is important in p53 negative cells where p53 dependent apoptosis and events at the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints are compromised. Passenger proteins regulate many aspects of mitosis and siRNA interference or direct inhibition of Aurora B kinase results in mitotic catastrophe. However, there is little available data of clinical relevance in leukaemia models. Here, in p53 negative K562 myeloid leukemia cells, etoposide-induced mitotic catastrophe is shown to be time and/or concentration dependent. Survivin and Aurora remained bound to chromosomes. Survivin and Aurora were also associated with Cdk1 and were shown to form complexes, which in pull down experiments, included INCENP. There was no evidence of Aurora B kinase suppression. These data suggests etoposide will complement Aurora B kinase inhibitors currently in clinical trials for cancer.

  13. Diarylthiophenes as inhibitors of the pore-forming protein perforin

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christian K.; Huttunen, Kristiina M.; Denny, William A.; Jaiswal, Jagdish K.; Ciccone, Annette; Browne, Kylie A.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Spicer, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution from a furan-containing high-throughput screen (HTS) hit (1) resulted in isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one (2) as a potent inhibitor of the function of both isolated perforin protein and perforin delivered in situ by intact KHYG-1 NK cells. In the current study, structure–activity relationship (SAR) development towards a novel series of diarylthiophene analogues has continued through the use of substituted-benzene and -pyridyl moieties as bioisosteres for 2-thioxoimidazolidin-4-one (A) on a thiophene (B) -isobenzofuranone (C) scaffold. The resulting compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit perforin lytic activity in vitro. Carboxamide (23) shows a 4-fold increase over (2) in lytic activity against isolated perforin and provides good rationale for continued development within this class. PMID:26711151

  14. Atomic Analysis of Protein-Protein Interfaces with Known Inhibitors: The 2P2I Database

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeas, Raphaël; Basse, Marie-Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last decade, the inhibition of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has emerged from both academic and private research as a new way to modulate the activity of proteins. Inhibitors of these original interactions are certainly the next generation of highly innovative drugs that will reach the market in the next decade. However, in silico design of such compounds still remains challenging. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe this particular PPI chemical space through the presentation of 2P2IDB, a hand-curated database dedicated to the structure of PPIs with known inhibitors. We have analyzed protein/protein and protein/inhibitor interfaces in terms of geometrical parameters, atom and residue properties, buried accessible surface area and other biophysical parameters. The interfaces found in 2P2IDB were then compared to those of representative datasets of heterodimeric complexes. We propose a new classification of PPIs with known inhibitors into two classes depending on the number of segments present at the interface and corresponding to either a single secondary structure element or to a more globular interacting domain. 2P2IDB complexes share global shape properties with standard transient heterodimer complexes, but their accessible surface areas are significantly smaller. No major conformational changes are seen between the different states of the proteins. The interfaces are more hydrophobic than general PPI's interfaces, with less charged residues and more non-polar atoms. Finally, fifty percent of the complexes in the 2P2IDB dataset possess more hydrogen bonds than typical protein-protein complexes. Potential areas of study for the future are proposed, which include a new classification system consisting of specific families and the identification of PPI targets with high druggability potential based on key descriptors of the interaction. Conclusions 2P2I database stores structural information about PPIs with known inhibitors and

  15. Protein-Directed Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: A Guide to Protein Ligand and Inhibitor Discovery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renjie; Leung, Ivanhoe K H

    2016-07-16

    Protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry is an emerging technique for efficient discovery of novel chemical structures for binding to a target protein. Typically, this method relies on a library of small molecules that react reversibly with each other to generate a combinatorial library. The components in the combinatorial library are at equilibrium with each other under thermodynamic control. When a protein is added to the equilibrium mixture, and if the protein interacts with any components of the combinatorial library, the position of the equilibrium will shift and those components that interact with the protein will be amplified, which can then be identified by a suitable biophysical technique. Such information is useful as a starting point to guide further organic synthesis of novel protein ligands and enzyme inhibitors. This review uses literature examples to discuss the practicalities of applying this method to inhibitor discovery, in particular, the set-up of the combinatorial library, the reversible reactions that may be employed, and the choice of detection methods to screen protein ligands from a mixture of reversibly forming molecules.

  16. Designing Focused Chemical Libraries Enriched in Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors using Machine-Learning Methods

    PubMed Central

    Reynès, Christelle; Host, Hélène; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Laconde, Guillaume; Leroux, Florence; Mazars, Anne; Deprez, Benoit; Fahraeus, Robin; Villoutreix, Bruno O.; Sperandio, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) may represent one of the next major classes of therapeutic targets. So far, only a minute fraction of the estimated 650,000 PPIs that comprise the human interactome are known with a tiny number of complexes being drugged. Such intricate biological systems cannot be cost-efficiently tackled using conventional high-throughput screening methods. Rather, time has come for designing new strategies that will maximize the chance for hit identification through a rationalization of the PPI inhibitor chemical space and the design of PPI-focused compound libraries (global or target-specific). Here, we train machine-learning-based models, mainly decision trees, using a dataset of known PPI inhibitors and of regular drugs in order to determine a global physico-chemical profile for putative PPI inhibitors. This statistical analysis unravels two important molecular descriptors for PPI inhibitors characterizing specific molecular shapes and the presence of a privileged number of aromatic bonds. The best model has been transposed into a computer program, PPI-HitProfiler, that can output from any drug-like compound collection a focused chemical library enriched in putative PPI inhibitors. Our PPI inhibitor profiler is challenged on the experimental screening results of 11 different PPIs among which the p53/MDM2 interaction screened within our own CDithem platform, that in addition to the validation of our concept led to the identification of 4 novel p53/MDM2 inhibitors. Collectively, our tool shows a robust behavior on the 11 experimental datasets by correctly profiling 70% of the experimentally identified hits while removing 52% of the inactive compounds from the initial compound collections. We strongly believe that this new tool can be used as a global PPI inhibitor profiler prior to screening assays to reduce the size of the compound collections to be experimentally screened while keeping most of the true PPI inhibitors. PPI-HitProfiler is

  17. Computationally designed high specificity inhibitors delineate the roles of BCL2 family proteins in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Stephanie; Procko, Erik; Margineantu, Daciana; Lee, Erinna F; Shen, Betty W; Zelter, Alex; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Chawla, Kusum; Herold, Marco J; Garnier, Jean-Marc; Johnson, Richard; MacCoss, Michael J; Lessene, Guillaume; Davis, Trisha N; Stayton, Patrick S; Stoddard, Barry L; Fairlie, W Douglas; Hockenbery, David M; Baker, David

    2016-01-01

    Many cancers overexpress one or more of the six human pro-survival BCL2 family proteins to evade apoptosis. To determine which BCL2 protein or proteins block apoptosis in different cancers, we computationally designed three-helix bundle protein inhibitors specific for each BCL2 pro-survival protein. Following in vitro optimization, each inhibitor binds its target with high picomolar to low nanomolar affinity and at least 300-fold specificity. Expression of the designed inhibitors in human cancer cell lines revealed unique dependencies on BCL2 proteins for survival which could not be inferred from other BCL2 profiling methods. Our results show that designed inhibitors can be generated for each member of a closely-knit protein family to probe the importance of specific protein-protein interactions in complex biological processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20352.001 PMID:27805565

  18. Computationally designed high specificity inhibitors delineate the roles of BCL2 family proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Berger, Stephanie; Procko, Erik; Margineantu, Daciana; Lee, Erinna F; Shen, Betty W; Zelter, Alex; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Chawla, Kusum; Herold, Marco J; Garnier, Jean-Marc; Johnson, Richard; MacCoss, Michael J; Lessene, Guillaume; Davis, Trisha N; Stayton, Patrick S; Stoddard, Barry L; Fairlie, W Douglas; Hockenbery, David M; Baker, David

    2016-11-02

    Many cancers overexpress one or more of the six human pro-survival BCL2 family proteins to evade apoptosis. To determine which BCL2 protein or proteins block apoptosis in different cancers, we computationally designed three-helix bundle protein inhibitors specific for each BCL2 pro-survival protein. Following in vitro optimization, each inhibitor binds its target with high picomolar to low nanomolar affinity and at least 300-fold specificity. Expression of the designed inhibitors in human cancer cell lines revealed unique dependencies on BCL2 proteins for survival which could not be inferred from other BCL2 profiling methods. Our results show that designed inhibitors can be generated for each member of a closely-knit protein family to probe the importance of specific protein-protein interactions in complex biological processes.

  19. Hydroxyindole Carboxylic Acid-Based Inhibitors for Receptor-Type Protein Tyrosine Protein Phosphatase Beta

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li-Fan; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Bai, Yunpeng; Wu, Li; Gunawan, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) play an important role in regulating a wide range of cellular processes. Understanding the role of PTPs within these processes has been hampered by a lack of potent and selective PTP inhibitors. Generating potent and selective probes for PTPs remains a significant challenge because of the highly conserved and positively charged PTP active site that also harbors a redox-sensitive Cys residue. Results: We describe a facile method that uses an appropriate hydroxyindole carboxylic acid to anchor the inhibitor to the PTP active site and relies on the secondary binding elements introduced through an amide-focused library to enhance binding affinity for the target PTP and to impart selectivity against off-target phosphatases. Here, we disclose a novel series of hydroxyindole carboxylic acid-based inhibitors for receptor-type tyrosine protein phosphatase beta (RPTPβ), a potential target that is implicated in blood vessel development. The representative RPTPβ inhibitor 8b-1 (L87B44) has an IC50 of 0.38 μM and at least 14-fold selectivity for RPTPβ over a large panel of PTPs. Moreover, 8b-1 also exhibits excellent cellular activity and augments growth factor signaling in HEK293, MDA-MB-468, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Innovation: The bicyclic salicylic acid pharmacophore-based focused library approach may provide a potential solution to overcome the bioavailability issue that has plagued the PTP drug discovery field for many years. Conclusion: A novel method is described for the development of bioavailable PTP inhibitors that utilizes bicyclic salicylic acid to anchor the inhibitors to the active site and peripheral site interactions to enhance binding affinity and selectivity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2130–2140. PMID:24180557

  20. Features of Protein-Protein Interactions that Translate into Potent Inhibitors: Topology, Surface Area and Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew C.; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) control the assembly of multi-protein complexes and, thus, these contacts have enormous potential as drug targets. However, the field has produced a mix of both exciting success stories and frustrating challenges. Here, we review known examples and explore how the physical features of a PPI, such as its affinity, hotspots, off-rates, buried surface area and topology, may influence the chances of success in finding inhibitors. This analysis suggests that concise, tight binding PPIs are most amenable to inhibition. However, it is also clear that emerging technical methods are expanding the repertoire of “druggable” protein contacts and increasing the odds against difficult targets. In particular, natural product-like compound libraries, high throughput screens specifically designed for PPIs and approaches that favor discovery of allosteric inhibitors appear to be attractive routes. The first group of PPI inhibitors has entered clinical trials, further motivating the need to understand the challenges and opportunities in pursuing these types of targets. PMID:22831787

  1. Involvement of histone phosphorylation in thymocyte apoptosis by protein phosphatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, E; Nakatsuma, A; Hiraoka, R; Ishikawa, E; Enomoto, R; Yamauchi, A

    1999-07-01

    Incubation of rat thymocytes with the inhibitors of protein phosphatase such as calyculin A and okadaic acid resulted in an increase in DNA fragmentation. These effects were dependent on the concentration of the inhibitors and the incubation time. Analyses of the fragmented DNA revealed the production of approximately 50 kbp of DNA and a 180 bp DNA ladder. In addition, a laser scanning-microscopic analysis showed that these compounds caused nuclear condensation. Thus, these results demonstrated that protein phosphatase inhibitors induced thymocyte apoptosis. The inhibitors of protein phosphatase increased the phosphorylation of proteins of approximately 15 kDa. The phosphorylation of proteins preceded the DNA fragmentation induced by these inhibitors. Judging from acetic acid-urea-Triton X-100 gel electrophoresis, the phosphorylated proteins were histone H1 and H2A/H3. Therefore, these results suggest that phosphorylation of histones triggers the DNA fragmentation of thymocytes undergoing apoptosis.

  2. Brainstorming: weighted voting prediction of inhibitors for protein targets.

    PubMed

    Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    The "Brainstorming" approach presented in this paper is a weighted voting method that can improve the quality of predictions generated by several machine learning (ML) methods. First, an ensemble of heterogeneous ML algorithms is trained on available experimental data, then all solutions are gathered and a consensus is built between them. The final prediction is performed using a voting procedure, whereby the vote of each method is weighted according to a quality coefficient calculated using multivariable linear regression (MLR). The MLR optimization procedure is very fast, therefore no additional computational cost is introduced by using this jury approach. Here, brainstorming is applied to selecting actives from large collections of compounds relating to five diverse biological targets of medicinal interest, namely HIV-reverse transcriptase, cyclooxygenase-2, dihydrofolate reductase, estrogen receptor, and thrombin. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) database was used for selecting known inhibitors for these protein targets, and experimental data was then used to train a set of machine learning methods. The benchmark dataset (available at http://bio.icm.edu.pl/∼darman/chemoinfo/benchmark.tar.gz ) can be used for further testing of various clustering and machine learning methods when predicting the biological activity of compounds. Depending on the protein target, the overall recall value is raised by at least 20% in comparison to any single machine learning method (including ensemble methods like random forest) and unweighted simple majority voting procedures.

  3. Fluorescent biosensors for high throughput screening of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Van, Thi Nhu Ngoc; Morris, May C

    2014-02-01

    High throughput screening assays aim to identify small molecules that interfere with protein function, activity, or conformation, which can serve as effective tools for chemical biology studies of targets involved in physiological processes or pathways of interest or disease models, as well as templates for development of therapeutics in medicinal chemistry. Fluorescent biosensors constitute attractive and powerful tools for drug discovery programs, from high throughput screening assays, to postscreen characterization of hits, optimization of lead compounds, and preclinical evaluation of candidate drugs. They provide a means of screening for inhibitors that selectively target enzymatic activity, conformation, and/or function in vitro. Moreover, fluorescent biosensors constitute useful tools for cell- and image-based, multiplex and multiparametric, high-content screening. Application of fluorescence-based sensors to screen large and complex libraries of compounds in vitro, in cell-based formats or whole organisms requires several levels of optimization to establish robust and reproducible assays. In this review, we describe the different fluorescent biosensor technologies which have been applied to high throughput screens, and discuss the prerequisite criteria underlying their successful application. Special emphasis is placed on protein kinase biosensors, since these enzymes constitute one of the most important classes of therapeutic targets in drug discovery.

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Protein Kinase Inhibitor Pyrrol Derivate

    PubMed Central

    Yena, Maryna S.; Kotlyar, Iryna P.; Ogloblya, Olexandr V.; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr K.

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies we showed antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities of protein kinases inhibitor pyrrol derivate 1-(4-Cl-benzyl)-3-Cl-4-(CF3-fenylamino)-1H-pyrrol-2,5-dione (MI-1) on rat colon cancer model. Therefore anti-inflammatory effect of MI-1 on rat acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis (UC) model was aimed to be discovered. The anti-inflammatory effects of MI-1 (2.7 mg/kg daily) compared to reference drug Prednisolone (0.7 mg/kg daily) after 14-day usage were evaluated on macro- and light microscopy levels and expressed in 21-grade scale. Redox status of bowel mucosa was also estimated. It was shown that in UC group the grade of total injury (GTI) was equal to 9.6 (GTIcontrol = 0). Increase of malonic dialdehyde (MDA) by 89% and protein carbonyl groups (PCG) by 60% and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 40% were also observed. Prednisolone decreased GTI to 3 and leveled SOD activity, but MDA and PCG remained higher than control ones by 52% and 42%, respectively. MI-1 restored colon mucosa integrity and decreased mucosa inflammation down to GTI = 0.5 and leveled PCG and SOD. Thus, MI-1 possessed anti-inflammatory properties, which were more expressed that Prednisolone ones, as well as normalized mucosa redox balance, and so has a prospect for correction of inflammatory processes. PMID:28101521

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Protein Kinase Inhibitor Pyrrol Derivate.

    PubMed

    Kuznietsova, Halyna M; Yena, Maryna S; Kotlyar, Iryna P; Ogloblya, Olexandr V; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr K

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies we showed antitumor and anti-inflammatory activities of protein kinases inhibitor pyrrol derivate 1-(4-Cl-benzyl)-3-Cl-4-(CF3-fenylamino)-1H-pyrrol-2,5-dione (MI-1) on rat colon cancer model. Therefore anti-inflammatory effect of MI-1 on rat acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis (UC) model was aimed to be discovered. The anti-inflammatory effects of MI-1 (2.7 mg/kg daily) compared to reference drug Prednisolone (0.7 mg/kg daily) after 14-day usage were evaluated on macro- and light microscopy levels and expressed in 21-grade scale. Redox status of bowel mucosa was also estimated. It was shown that in UC group the grade of total injury (GTI) was equal to 9.6 (GTIcontrol = 0). Increase of malonic dialdehyde (MDA) by 89% and protein carbonyl groups (PCG) by 60% and decrease of superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 40% were also observed. Prednisolone decreased GTI to 3 and leveled SOD activity, but MDA and PCG remained higher than control ones by 52% and 42%, respectively. MI-1 restored colon mucosa integrity and decreased mucosa inflammation down to GTI = 0.5 and leveled PCG and SOD. Thus, MI-1 possessed anti-inflammatory properties, which were more expressed that Prednisolone ones, as well as normalized mucosa redox balance, and so has a prospect for correction of inflammatory processes.

  6. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  7. Development of Heat Shock Protein (Hsp90) Inhibitors To Combat Resistance to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors through Hsp90-Kinase Interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meining; Shen, Aijun; Zhang, Chi; Song, Zilan; Ai, Jing; Liu, Hongchun; Sun, Liping; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu; Zhang, Ao

    2016-06-23

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a ubiquitous chaperone of all of the oncogenic tyrosine kinases. Many Hsp90 inhibitors, alone or in combination, have shown significant antitumor efficacy against the kinase-positive naïve and mutant models. However, clinical trials of these inhibitors are unsuccessful due to insufficient clinical benefits and nonoptimal safety profiles. Recently, much progress has been reported on the Hsp90-cochaperone-client complex, which will undoubtedly assist in the understanding of the interactions between Hsp90 and its clients. Meanwhile, Hsp90 inhibitors have shown promise against patients' resistance caused by early generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), and at least 13 Hsp90 inhibitors are being reevaluated in the clinic. In this regard, the objectives of the current perspective are to summarize the structure and function of the Hsp90-cochaperone-client complex, to analyze the structural and functional insights into the Hsp90-client interactions to address several existing unresolved problems with Hsp90 inhibitors, and to highlight the preclinical and clinical studies of Hsp90 inhibitors as an effective treatment against resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  8. A novel protein C inhibitor gene mutation in pediatric stroke patients after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Torun, Didem; Deda, Gülhis; Ertem, Mehmet; Uysal, Zümrüt; Yılmaz, Erkan; Akar, Nejat

    2013-09-01

    Protein C inhibitor is a heparin dependent serine protease inhibitor found in human plasma, urine and other body fluids. It was originally identified as an inhibitor of activated protein C. Stroke is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric age group. In this study we analyzed the protein C inhibitor gene mutations in Turkish pediatric stroke patients. We found a missense mutation of G to A at nucleotide 6760 in exon 2, resulting in a transition serine to asparagine (p.Ser188Asp) and in a child and his father and also we found same alteration in exon 2 in an another pediatric stroke case following bone marrow transplantation.

  9. The myeloid leukemia-associated protein SET is a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Makkinje, A; Damuni, Z

    1996-05-10

    Two potent heat-stable protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor proteins designated I1PP2A and I2PP2A have been purified to apparent homogeneity from extracts of bovine kidney (Li, M., Guo, H., and Damuni, Z. (1995) Biochemistry 34, 1988-1996). N-terminal and internal amino acid sequencing indicated that I2PP2A was a truncated form of SET, a largely nuclear protein that is fused to nucleoporin Nup214 in acute non-lymphocytic myeloid leukemia. Experiments using purified preparations of recombinant human SET confirmed that this protein inhibited PP2A. Half-maximal inhibition of the phosphatase occurred at about 2 nM SET. By contrast, SET (up to 20 nM) did not affect the activities of purified preparations of protein phosphatases 1, 2B, and 2C. The results indicate that SET is a potent and specific inhibitor of PP2A and suggest that impaired regulation of PP2A may contribute to acute myeloid leukemogenesis.

  10. Discovery of Protein–Protein Interaction Inhibitors of Replication Protein A

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ssDNA binding protein that is essential for DNA replication and repair. The initiation of the DNA damage response by RPA is mediated by protein–protein interactions involving the N-terminal domain of the 70 kDa subunit with partner proteins. Inhibition of these interactions increases sensitivity toward DNA damage and replication stress and may therefore be a potential strategy for cancer drug discovery. Toward this end, we have discovered two lead series of compounds, derived from hits obtained from a fragment-based screen, that bind to RPA70N with low micromolar affinity and inhibit the binding of an ATRIP-derived peptide to RPA. These compounds may offer a promising starting point for the discovery of clinically useful RPA inhibitors. PMID:23914285

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors isolated from Artemisia roxburghiana.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Raza; Ishtiaq; Hizbullah, Syed Muhammad; Habtemariam, Solomon; Zarrelli, Armando; Muhammad, Akhtar; Collina, Simona; Khan, Inamulllah

    2016-08-01

    Artemisia roxburghiana is used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases including diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of active constituents by using protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a validated target for management of diabetes. Various compounds were isolated as active principles from the crude methanolic extract of aerial parts of A. roxburghiana. All compounds were screened for PTP1B inhibitory activity. Molecular docking simulations were performed to investigate the mechanism behind PTP1B inhibition of the isolated compound and positive control, ursolic acid. Betulinic acid, betulin and taraxeryl acetate were the active PTP1B principles with IC50 values 3.49 ± 0.02, 4.17 ± 0.03 and 87.52 ± 0.03 µM, respectively. Molecular docking studies showed significant molecular interactions of the triterpene inhibitors with Gly220, Cys215, Gly218 and Asp48 inside the active site of PTP1B. The antidiabetic activity of A. roxburghiana could be attributed due to PTP1B inhibition by its triterpene constituents, betulin, betulinic acid and taraxeryl acetate. Computational insights of this study revealed that the C-3 and C-17 positions of the compounds needs extensive optimization for the development of new lead compounds.

  12. The EED protein-protein interaction inhibitor A-395 inactivates the PRC2 complex.

    PubMed

    He, Yupeng; Selvaraju, Sujatha; Curtin, Michael L; Jakob, Clarissa G; Zhu, Haizhong; Comess, Kenneth M; Shaw, Bailin; The, Juliana; Lima-Fernandes, Evelyne; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Cheng, Dong; Klinge, Kelly L; Li, Huan-Qiu; Pliushchev, Marina; Algire, Mikkel A; Maag, David; Guo, Jun; Dietrich, Justin; Panchal, Sanjay C; Petros, Andrew M; Sweis, Ramzi F; Torrent, Maricel; Bigelow, Lance J; Senisterra, Guillermo; Li, Fengling; Kennedy, Steven; Wu, Qin; Osterling, Donald J; Lindley, David J; Gao, Wenqing; Galasinski, Scott; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Vedadi, Masoud; Buchanan, Fritz G; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Chiang, Gary G; Sun, Chaohong; Pappano, William N

    2017-04-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is a regulator of epigenetic states required for development and homeostasis. PRC2 trimethylates histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), which leads to gene silencing, and is dysregulated in many cancers. The embryonic ectoderm development (EED) protein is an essential subunit of PRC2 that has both a scaffolding function and an H3K27me3-binding function. Here we report the identification of A-395, a potent antagonist of the H3K27me3 binding functions of EED. Structural studies demonstrate that A-395 binds to EED in the H3K27me3-binding pocket, thereby preventing allosteric activation of the catalytic activity of PRC2. Phenotypic effects observed in vitro and in vivo are similar to those of known PRC2 enzymatic inhibitors; however, A-395 retains potent activity against cell lines resistant to the catalytic inhibitors. A-395 represents a first-in-class antagonist of PRC2 protein-protein interactions (PPI) for use as a chemical probe to investigate the roles of EED-containing protein complexes.

  13. ATP competitive protein kinase C inhibitors demonstrate distinct state-dependent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Hoshi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that some ATP competitive protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors are either competitive or uncompetitive inhibitors with respect to substrate peptides. In this report, we demonstrate how the interactions between PKC and inhibitors change PKC activation kinetics. A substrate competitive inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, targets activated PKC and stabilizes PKC in the activated conformation. This leads to transient activation and prolonged deactivation of PKC in the presence of bisindolylmaleimide I. In contrast, an uncompetitive substrate inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide IV, targets quiescent PKC and stabilizes PKC in the quiescent conformation, which generates slower activation and suppressed translocation upon activation of PKC.

  14. Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate and its triterpenoid analogs

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Brooks, Wesley H.; Guida, Wayne C.; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphate (PTP) is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery. We identified estramustine phosphate as a Shp2 PTP inhibitor from the National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drug set. A focused structure-activity relationship study indicated that the 17- phosphate group is required for the Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate. A search for estramustine phosphate analogs led to identification of two triperpenoids, enoxolone and celastrol, having Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity. With the previously reported PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine, our study reveals steroids and triterpenoids with negatively charged phosphate, carboxylate, or sulfonate groups as novel pharmacophores of selective PTP inhibitors. PMID:21193311

  15. Small molecule inhibitors of PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions as novel analgesics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wan-Hung; Xu, Zhili; Ashpole, Nicole M.; Hudmon, Andy; Kulkarni, Pushkar M.; Thakur, Ganesh A.; Lai, Yvonne Y.; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant increases in NMDA receptor (NMDAR) signaling contributes to central nervous system sensitization and chronic pain by activating neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and generating nitric oxide (NO). Because the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95kDA (PSD95) tethers nNOS to NMDARs, the PSD95-nNOS complex represents a therapeutic target. Small molecule inhibitors IC87201 (EC5O: 23.94 µM) and ZL006 (EC50: 12.88 µM) directly inhibited binding of purified PSD95 and nNOS proteins in AlphaScreen without altering binding of PSD95 to ErbB4. Both PSD95-nNOS inhibitors suppressed glutamate-induced cell death with efficacy comparable to MK-801. IC87201 and ZL006 preferentially suppressed phase 2A pain behavior in the formalin test and suppressed allodynia induced by intraplantar complete Freund’s adjuvant administration. IC87201 and ZL006 suppressed mechanical and cold allodynia induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (ED50s: 2.47 and 0.93 mg/kg i.p. for IC87201 and ZL006, respectively). Efficacy of PSD95-nNOS disruptors was similar to MK-801. Motor ataxic effects were induced by MK-801 but not by ZL006 or IC87201. Finally, MK-801 produced hyperalgesia in the tail-flick test whereas IC87201 and ZL006 did not alter basal nociceptive thresholds. Our studies establish the utility of using AlphaScreen and purified protein pairs to establish and quantify disruption of protein-protein interactions. Our results demonstrate previously unrecognized antinociceptive efficacy of ZL006 and establish, using two small molecules, a broad application for PSD95-nNOS inhibitors in treating neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Collectively, our results demonstrate that disrupting PSD95-nNOS protein-protein interactions is effective in attenuating pathological pain without producing unwanted side effects (i.e. motor ataxia) associated with NMDAR antagonists. PMID:26071110

  16. Constrained Cyclic Peptides as Immunomodulatory Inhibitors of the CD2:CD58 Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sable, Rushikesh; Durek, Thomas; Taneja, Veena; Craik, David J; Pallerla, Sandeep; Gauthier, Ted; Jois, Seetharama

    2016-08-19

    The interaction between the cell-cell adhesion proteins CD2 and CD58 plays a crucial role in lymphocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites, and inhibitors of this interaction have potential as immunomodulatory drugs in autoimmune diseases. Peptides from the CD2 adhesion domain were designed to inhibit CD2:CD58 interactions. To improve the stability of the peptides, β-sheet epitopes from the CD2 region implicated in CD58 recognition were grafted into the cyclic peptide frameworks of sunflower trypsin inhibitor and rhesus theta defensin. The designed multicyclic peptides were evaluated for their ability to modulate cell-cell interactions in three different cell adhesion assays, with one candidate, SFTI-a, showing potent activity in the nanomolar range (IC50: 51 nM). This peptide also suppresses the immune responses in T cells obtained from mice that exhibit the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis. SFTI-a was resistant to thermal denaturation, as judged by circular dichroism spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and had a half-life of ∼24 h in human serum. Binding of this peptide to CD58 was predicted by molecular docking studies and experimentally confirmed by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Our results suggest that cyclic peptides from natural sources are promising scaffolds for modulating protein-protein interactions that are typically difficult to target with small-molecule compounds.

  17. Phosphonate derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles as new inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Oleksandr L; Shevchuk, Michael V; Lyashenko, Alesya N; Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Romanenko, Vadim D; Kobelev, Sergei M; Averin, Alexei D; Beletskaya, Irina P; Vovk, Andriy I; Kukhar, Valery P

    2015-07-21

    α,α-Difluoro-β-ketophosphonated derivatives of tetraazamacrocycles were synthesized and found to be potential inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases. N-Substituted conjugates of cyclam and cyclen with bioisosteric phosphonate groups displayed good activities toward T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase with IC50 values in the micromolar to nanomolar range and showed selectivity over PTP1B, CD45, SHP2, and PTPβ. Kinetic studies indicated that the inhibitors can occupy the region of the active site of TC-PTP. This study demonstrates a new approach which employs tetraazamacrocycles as a molecular platform for designing inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatases.

  18. Structure-based design of isoquinoline-5-sulfonamide inhibitors of protein kinase B.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ian; Caldwell, John; Fonseca, Tatiana; Donald, Alastair; Bavetsias, Vassilios; Hunter, Lisa-Jane K; Garrett, Michelle D; Rowlands, Martin G; Aherne, G Wynne; Davies, Thomas G; Berdini, Valerio; Woodhead, Steven J; Davis, Deborah; Seavers, Lisa C A; Wyatt, Paul G; Workman, Paul; McDonald, Edward

    2006-02-15

    Structure-based drug design of novel isoquinoline-5-sulfonamide inhibitors of PKB as potential antitumour agents was investigated. Constrained pyrrolidine analogues that mimicked the bound conformation of linear prototypes were identified and investigated by co-crystal structure determinations with the related protein PKA. Detailed variation in the binding modes between inhibitors with similar overall conformations was observed. Potent PKB inhibitors from this series inhibited GSK3beta phosphorylation in cellular assays, consistent with inhibition of PKB kinase activity in cells.

  19. Surfing the Protein-Protein Interaction Surface Using Docking Methods: Application to the Design of PPI Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sable, Rushikesh; Jois, Seetharama

    2015-06-23

    Blocking protein-protein interactions (PPI) using small molecules or peptides modulates biochemical pathways and has therapeutic significance. PPI inhibition for designing drug-like molecules is a new area that has been explored extensively during the last decade. Considering the number of available PPI inhibitor databases and the limited number of 3D structures available for proteins, docking and scoring methods play a major role in designing PPI inhibitors as well as stabilizers. Docking methods are used in the design of PPI inhibitors at several stages of finding a lead compound, including modeling the protein complex, screening for hot spots on the protein-protein interaction interface and screening small molecules or peptides that bind to the PPI interface. There are three major challenges to the use of docking on the relatively flat surfaces of PPI. In this review we will provide some examples of the use of docking in PPI inhibitor design as well as its limitations. The combination of experimental and docking methods with improved scoring function has thus far resulted in few success stories of PPI inhibitors for therapeutic purposes. Docking algorithms used for PPI are in the early stages, however, and as more data are available docking will become a highly promising area in the design of PPI inhibitors or stabilizers.

  20. Resistance of human glioblastoma multiforme cells to growth factor inhibitors is overcome by blockade of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, David S.; Wright, Renee D.; Kesari, Santosh; Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Tran, Mary A.; Jain, Monish; Zawel, Leigh; Kung, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), including PDGFR, have been validated as therapeutic targets in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), yet inhibitors of RTKs have had limited clinical success. As various antiapoptotic mechanisms render GBM cells resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, we hypothesized that these antiapoptotic mechanisms also confer resistance to RTK inhibition. We found that in vitro inhibition of PDGFR in human GBM cells initiated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, as evidenced by mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, but downstream caspase activation was blocked by inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). Consistent with this, inhibition of PDGFR combined with small molecule inactivation of IAPs induced apoptosis in human GBM cells in vitro and had synergistic antitumor effects in orthotopic mouse models of GBM and in primary human GBM neurospheres. These results demonstrate that concomitant inhibition of IAPs can overcome resistance to RTK inhibitors in human malignant GBM cells, and suggest that blockade of IAPs has the potential to improve treatment outcomes in patients with GBM. PMID:18677408

  1. Small-molecule inhibitors of AF6 PDZ-mediated protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Carolyn; Radziwill, Gerald; Krause, Gerd; Diehl, Anne; Keller, Sandro; Kamdem, Nestor; Czekelius, Constantin; Kreuchwig, Annika; Schmieder, Peter; Doyle, Declan; Moelling, Karin; Hagen, Volker; Schade, Markus; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2014-07-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, Dlg, ZO-1) domains are ubiquitous interaction modules that are involved in many cellular signal transduction pathways. Interference with PDZ-mediated protein-protein interactions has important implications in disease-related signaling processes. For this reason, PDZ domains have gained attention as potential targets for inhibitor design and, in the long run, drug development. Herein we report the development of small molecules to probe the function of the PDZ domain from human AF6 (ALL1-fused gene from chromosome 6), which is an essential component of cell-cell junctions. These compounds bind to AF6 PDZ with substantially higher affinity than the peptide (Ile-Gln-Ser-Val-Glu-Val) derived from its natural ligand, EphB2. In intact cells, the compounds inhibit the AF6-Bcr interaction and interfere with epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent signaling. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The food colorant erythrosine is a promiscuous protein-protein interaction inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Lakshmi; Margolles-Clark, Emilio; Song, Yun; Buchwald, Peter

    2011-03-15

    Following our observation that erythrosine B (FD&C Red No. 3) is a relatively potent inhibitor of the TNF-R-TNFα and CD40-CD154 protein-protein interactions, we investigated whether this inhibitory activity extends to any other protein-protein interactions (PPI) as well as whether any other approved food colors possess such inhibitory activity. We found erythrosine, a poly-iodinated xanthene dye, to be a non-specific promiscuous inhibitor of a number of PPIs within the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNF-R-TNFα, CD40-CD154, BAFF-R-BAFF, RANK-RANKL, OX40-OX40L, 4-1BB-4-1BBL) as well as outside of it (EGF-R-EGF) with a remarkably consistent median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) in the 2-20 μM (approximately 2-20mg/L) range. In agreement with this, erythrosine also showed cellular effects including clear cytotoxic effects around this concentration range (IC₅₀≈50 μM). Among the seven FDA-approved food colorants, only erythrosine showed consistent PPI inhibitory activity in the sub-100 μM range, which might also explain (at least partially) why it also has the lowest approved acceptable daily intake (ADI) (0.1 mg/kg body weight/day). Among a number of xanthene structural analogs of erythrosine tested for activity, rose Bengal, a food colorant approved in Japan, showed similar, maybe even more pronounced, promiscuous inhibitory activity, whereas fluorescein was inactive and gallein, phloxine, and eosin were somewhat active in some of the assays.

  3. Anticancer osmium complex inhibitors of the HIF-1α and p300 protein-protein interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Wanhe; Li, Guo-Dong; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Dong, Zhen-Zhen; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Kwong, Daniel W. J.; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2017-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathway has been considered to be an attractive anti-cancer target. One strategy to inhibit HIF activity is through the disruption of the HIF-1α–p300 protein-protein interaction. We report herein the identification of an osmium(II) complex as the first metal-based inhibitor of the HIF-1α–p300 interaction. We evaluated the effect of complex 1 on HIF-1α signaling pathway in vitro and in cellulo by using the dual luciferase reporter assay, co-immunoprecipitation assay, and immunoblot assay. Complex 1 exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of HRE-driven luciferase activity, with an IC50 value of 1.22 μM. Complex 1 interfered with the HIF-1α–p300 interaction as revealed by a dose-dependent reduction of p300 co-precipitated with HIF-1α as the concentration of complex 1 was increased. Complex 1 repressed the phosphorylation of SRC, AKT and STAT3, and had no discernible effect on the activity of NF-κB. We anticipate that complex 1 could be utilized as a promising scaffold for the further development of more potent HIF-1α inhibitors for anti-cancer treatment. PMID:28225008

  4. A Cell-Permeable Inhibitor to Trap Gαq Proteins in the Empty Pocket Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Anna-Lena; Schrage, Ramona; Gaffal, Evelyn; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Wiest, Johannes; Hiltensperger, Georg; Morschel, Julia; Hennen, Stephanie; Häußler, Daniela; Horn, Velten; Wenzel, Daniela; Grundmann, Manuel; Büllesbach, Katrin M.; Schröder, Ralf; Brewitz, H. Henning; Schmidt, Johannes; Gomeza, Jesús; Galés, Céline; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Tüting, Thomas; Imhof, Diana; Tietze, Daniel; Gütschow, Michael; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Sondek, John; Harden, T. Kendall; Mohr, Klaus; Kostenis, Evi

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In spite of the crucial role of heterotrimeric G proteins as molecular switches transmitting signals from G protein-coupled receptors, their selective manipulation with small molecule, cell-permeable inhibitors still remains an unmet challenge. Here, we report that the small molecule BIM-46187, previously classified as pan-G protein inhibitor, preferentially silences Gαq signaling in a cellular context-dependent manner. Investigations into its mode of action reveal that BIM traps Gαq in the empty pocket conformation by permitting GDP exit but interdicting GTP entry, a molecular mechanism not yet assigned to any other small molecule Gα inhibitor to date. Our data show that Gα proteins may be “frozen” pharmacologically in an intermediate conformation along their activation pathway and propose a pharmacological strategy to specifically silence Gα subclasses with cell-permeable inhibitors. PMID:25036778

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of potential inhibitors of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent substrate specificity studies, a series of ribonucleotide based esters and carbamates were synthesized and screened as inhibitors of the phosphoramidases and acyl-AMP hydrolases, Escherichia coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein (ecHinT) and human Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (hHint1). Using our established phosphoramidase assay, K(i) values were determined. All compounds exhibited non-competitive inhibition profiles. The carbamate based inhibitors were shown to successfully suppress the Hint1-associated phenotype in E. coli, suggesting that they are permeable intracellular inhibitors of ecHinT.

  6. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  7. Novel Pyridazinone Inhibitors for Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 (VAP-1): Old target – New Inhibition Mode

    PubMed Central

    Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Szatmári, István; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Smith, David J.; Lázár, László; Fülöp, Ferenc; Salminen, Tiina A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a primary amine oxidase and a drug target for inflammatory and vascular diseases. Despite extensive attempts to develop potent, specific and reversible inhibitors of its enzyme activity, the task has proven challenging. Here we report the synthesis, inhibitory activity and molecular binding mode of novel pyridazinone inhibitors, which show specificity for VAP-1 over monoamine and diamine oxidases. The crystal structures of three inhibitor-VAP-1 complexes show that these compounds bind reversibly into a unique binding site in the active site channel. Though they are good inhibitors of human VAP-1, they do not inhibit rodent VAP-1 well. To investigate this further, we used homology modeling and structural comparison to identify amino acid differences, which explain the species-specific binding properties. Our results prove the potency and specificity of these new inhibitors and the detailed characterization of their binding mode is of importance for further development of VAP-1 inhibitors. PMID:24304424

  8. [Characterization and postnatal evolution of an endogenous protein inhibitor of intestinal fucosyltransferase activities].

    PubMed

    Ruggiero-Lopez, D; Martin, A; Louisot, P

    1991-01-01

    An endogenous protein inhibitor was shown to act in vitro on small intestinal fucosyl-transferase activities. In order to support the hypothesis of a physiological role in vivo for this inhibitor in the regulation of the fucosylation process, we characterized this inhibitor and studied its postnatal development. This inhibitor acts differently upon the enzymes of intestinal fucosylation processes. Among the different organs analyzed, the inhibitor was found only in the intestine and the pancreas. Intestinal inhibitory activity decreased 10 fold between the 7th and the 24th day of rat postnatal development; this decrease was inversely correlated with intestinal fucosyl-transferase activities. Two mechanisms of action by which the inhibitor could exert a physiological regulatory role are discussed.

  9. Purification and partial characterization of a protein proteinanse inhibitor isolated from eggplant exocarp.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, M; Ibuki, F; Tashiro, M; Yamada, M; Miyoshi, M

    1976-08-09

    A protein proteinase inhibitor was isolated and purified from eggplant exocarp by heat treatment, ammomium sulfate fractionation, column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, and gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 and G-50. The final purified preparation of the inhibitor was found homogeneous by electrophoretic analysis. The inhibitor showed strong and stoichiometric inhibition on trypsin whereas it showed weak inhibition on alpha-chymotrypsin. It displayed no inhibiting characteristics on pepsin. The molecular weight of the inhibitor was estimated to be approximately 6000. This finding, with the trypsin inhibition data, suggested that the inhibitor combined trypsin in the molar ratio of 1:1. The amino acid analysis indicated that the inhibitor is rich in half-cystine, glycine and aspartic acid, and contains no tryptophan, histidine, methionine or valine.

  10. Novel pyridazinone inhibitors for vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1): old target-new inhibition mode.

    PubMed

    Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Szatmári, István; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Smith, David J; Lázár, László; Fülöp, Ferenc; Salminen, Tiina A

    2013-12-27

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a primary amine oxidase and a drug target for inflammatory and vascular diseases. Despite extensive attempts to develop potent, specific, and reversible inhibitors of its enzyme activity, the task has proven challenging. Here we report the synthesis, inhibitory activity, and molecular binding mode of novel pyridazinone inhibitors, which show specificity for VAP-1 over monoamine and diamine oxidases. The crystal structures of three inhibitor-VAP-1 complexes show that these compounds bind reversibly into a unique binding site in the active site channel. Although they are good inhibitors of human VAP-1, they do not inhibit rodent VAP-1 well. To investigate this further, we used homology modeling and structural comparison to identify amino acid differences, which explain the species-specific binding properties. Our results prove the potency and specificity of these new inhibitors, and the detailed characterization of their binding mode is of importance for further development of VAP-1 inhibitors.

  11. Bisubstrate fluorescent probes and biosensors in binding assays for HTS of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Uri, Asko; Lust, Marje; Vaasa, Angela; Lavogina, Darja; Viht, Kaido; Enkvist, Erki

    2010-03-01

    Conjugates of adenosine mimics and d-arginine-rich peptides (ARCs) are potent inhibitors of protein kinases (PKs) from the AGC group. Labeling ARCs with fluorescent dyes or immobilizing on chip surfaces gives fluorescent probes (ARC-Photo) and biosensors that can be used for high-throughput screening (HTS) of inhibitors of protein kinases. The bisubstrate character (simultaneous association with both binding sites of the kinase) and high affinity of ARCs allow ARC-based probes and sensors to be used for characterization of inhibitors targeted to either binding site of the kinase with affinities in whole nanomolar to micromolar range. The ability to penetrate cell plasma membrane and bind to the target kinase fused with a fluorescent protein leads to the possibility to use ARC-Photo probes for high content screening (HCS) of inhibitors in cellular milieu with detection of intensity of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two fluorophores.

  12. Structural basis for the inhibition of mammalian and insect alpha-amylases by plant protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Payan, Françoise

    2004-02-12

    Alpha-amylases are ubiquitous proteins which play an important role in the carbohydrate metabolism of microorganisms, animals and plants. Living organisms use protein inhibitors as a major tool to regulate the glycolytic activity of alpha-amylases. Most of the inhibitors for which three-dimensional (3-D) structures are available are directed against mammalian and insect alpha-amylases, interacting with the active sites in a substrate-like manner. In this review, we discuss the detailed inhibitory mechanism of these enzymes in light of the recent determination of the 3-D structures of pig pancreatic, human pancreatic, and yellow mealworm alpha-amylases in complex with plant protein inhibitors. In most cases, the mechanism of inhibition occurs through the direct blockage of the active center at several subsites of the enzyme. Inhibitors exhibiting "dual" activity against mammalian and insect alpha-amylases establish contacts of the same type in alternative ways.

  13. Virtual screening and experimental validation reveal novel small-molecule inhibitors of 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Philipp; Röglin, Lars; Meissner, Nicole; Hennig, Sven; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Ottmann, Christian

    2013-10-04

    We report first non-covalent and exclusively extracellular inhibitors of 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions identified by virtual screening. Optimization by crystal structure analysis and in vitro binding assays yielded compounds capable of disrupting the interaction of 14-3-3σ with aminopeptidase N in a cellular assay.

  14. Active site inhibitors protect protein kinase C from dephosphorylation and stabilize its mature form.

    PubMed

    Gould, Christine M; Antal, Corina E; Reyes, Gloria; Kunkel, Maya T; Adams, Ryan A; Ziyar, Ahdad; Riveros, Tania; Newton, Alexandra C

    2011-08-19

    Conformational changes acutely control protein kinase C (PKC). We have previously shown that the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate must be removed from the active site in order for 1) PKC to be phosphorylated by its upstream kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1), 2) the mature enzyme to bind and phosphorylate substrates, and 3) the mature enzyme to be dephosphorylated by phosphatases. Here we show an additional level of conformational control; binding of active site inhibitors locks PKC in a conformation in which the priming phosphorylation sites are resistant to dephosphorylation. Using homogeneously pure PKC, we show that the active site inhibitor Gö 6983 prevents the dephosphorylation by pure protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) or the hydrophobic motif phosphatase, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP). Consistent with results using pure proteins, treatment of cells with the competitive inhibitors Gö 6983 or bisindolylmaleimide I, but not the uncompetitive inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide IV, prevents the dephosphorylation and down-regulation of PKC induced by phorbol esters. Pulse-chase analyses reveal that active site inhibitors do not affect the net rate of priming phosphorylations of PKC; rather, they inhibit the dephosphorylation triggered by phorbol esters. These data provide a molecular explanation for the recent studies showing that active site inhibitors stabilize the phosphorylation state of protein kinases B/Akt and C.

  15. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A determines bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Yu; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Chen, Ming-Huang; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The multiple cellular targets affected by proteasome inhibition implicate a potential role for bortezomib, a first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, in enhancing antitumor activities in hematologic malignancies. Here, we examined the antitumor activity and drug targets of bortezomib in leukemia cells. Human leukemia cell lines were used for in vitro studies. Drug efficacy was evaluated by apoptosis assays and associated molecular events assessed by Western Blot. Gene silencing was performed by small interference RNA. Drug was tested in vivo in xenograft models of human leukemia cell lines and in primary leukemia cells. Clinical samples were assessed by immunohistochemical staining. Bortezomib differentially induced apoptosis in leukemia cells that was independent of its proteasome inhibition. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, a cellular inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A, mediated the apoptotic effect of bortezomib. Bortezomib increased protein phosphatase 2A activity in sensitive leukemia cells (HL-60 and KG-1), but not in resistant cells (MOLT-3 and K562). Bortezomib’s downregulation of cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A and phospho-Akt correlated with its drug sensitivity. Furthermore, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A negatively regulated protein phosphatase 2A activity. Ectopic expression of CIP2A up-regulated phospho-Akt and protected HL-60 cells from bortezomib-induced apoptosis, whereas silencing CIP2A overcame the resistance to bortezomib-induced apoptosis in MOLT3 and K562 cells. Importantly, bortezomib exerted in vivo antitumor activity in HL-60 xenografted tumors and induced cell death in some primary leukemic cells. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A was expressed in leukemic blasts from bone marrow samples. Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A plays a major role in mediating bortezomib-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. PMID:22983581

  16. Peptide inhibitors of the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Rowena; Bertrand, Hélène C; Tsujita, Tadayuki; Naz, Shama; El-Bakry, Ayman; Laoruchupong, Jitnueng; Hayes, John D; Wells, Geoff

    2012-01-15

    Disruption of the interaction between the ubiquitination facilitator protein Keap1 and the cap'n'collar basic-region leucine-zipper transcription factor Nrf2 is a potential strategy to enhance expression of antioxidant and free radical detoxification gene products regulated by Nrf2. Agents that disrupt this protein-protein interaction may be useful pharmacological probes and future cancer-chemopreventive agents. We describe the structure-activity relationships for a series of peptides based upon regions of the Nrf2 Neh2 domain, of varying length and sequence, that interact with the Keap1 Kelch domain and disrupt the interaction with Nrf2. We have also investigated sequestosome-1 (p62) and prothymosin-α sequences that have been reported to interact with Keap1. To achieve this we have developed a high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP) assay to screen inhibitors. In addition to screening synthetic peptides, we have used a phage display library approach to identify putative peptide ligands with non-native sequence motifs. Candidate peptides from the phage display library screening protocol were evaluated in the FP assay to quantify their binding activity. Hybrid peptides based upon the Nrf2 "ETGE" motif and the sequestosome-1 "Keap1-interaction region" have superior binding activity compared to either native peptide alone.

  17. Discovery of 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitors that sensitize multidrug-resistant cancer cells to doxorubicin and the Akt inhibitor GSK690693.

    PubMed

    Mori, Mattia; Vignaroli, Giulia; Cau, Ylenia; Dinić, Jelena; Hill, Richard; Rossi, Matteo; Colecchia, David; Pešić, Milica; Link, Wolfgang; Chiariello, Mario; Ottmann, Christian; Botta, Maurizio

    2014-05-01

    14-3-3 is a family of highly conserved adapter proteins that is attracting much interest among medicinal chemists. Small-molecule inhibitors of 14-3-3 protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are in high demand, both as tools to increase our understanding of 14-3-3 actions in human diseases and as leads to develop innovative therapeutic agents. Herein we present the discovery of novel 14-3-3 PPI inhibitors through a multidisciplinary strategy combining molecular modeling, organic synthesis, image-based high-content analysis of reporter cells, and in vitro assays using cancer cells. Notably, the two most active compounds promoted the translocation of c-Abl and FOXO pro-apoptotic factors into the nucleus and sensitized multidrug-resistant cancer cells to apoptotic inducers such as doxorubicin and the pan-Akt inhibitor GSK690693, thus becoming valuable lead candidates for further optimization. Our results emphasize the possible role of 14-3-3 PPI inhibitors in anticancer combination therapies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Prokaryote-derived protein inhibitors of peptidases: a sketchy occurrence and mostly unknown function

    PubMed Central

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Rawlings, Neil D.; Potempa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In metazoan organisms protein inhibitors of peptidases are important factors essential for regulation of proteolytic activity. In vertebrates genes encoding peptidase inhibitors constitute up to 1% of genes reflecting a need for tight and specific control of proteolysis especially in extracellular body fluids. In stark contrast unicellular organisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic consistently contain only few, if any, genes coding for putative peptidase inhibitors. This may seem perplexing in the light of the fact that these organisms produce large numbers of proteases of different catalytic classes with the genes constituting up to 6% of the total gene count with the average being about 3%. Apparently, however, a unicellular life-style is fully compatible with other mechanisms of regulation of proteolysis and does not require protein inhibitors to control their intracellular and extracellular proteolytic activity. So in prokaryotes occurrence of genes encoding different types of peptidase inhibitors is infrequent and often scattered among phylogenetically distinct orders or even phyla of microbiota. Genes encoding proteins homologous to alpha-2-macroglobulin (family I39), serine carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor (family I51), alpha-1-peptidase inhibitor (family I4) and ecotin (family I11) are the most frequently represented in Bacteria. Although several of these gene products were shown to possess inhibitory activity, with an exception of ecotin and staphostatins, the biological function of microbial inhibitors is unclear. In this review we present distribution of protein inhibitors from different families among prokaryotes, describe their mode of action and hypothesize on their role in microbial physiology and interactions with hosts and environment. PMID:20558234

  19. HIV proteinase inhibitors target the Ddi1-like protein of Leishmania parasites

    PubMed Central

    White, Rhian E.; Powell, David J.; Berry, Colin

    2011-01-01

    HIV proteinase inhibitors reduce the levels of Leishmania parasites in vivo and in vitro, but their biochemical target is unknown. We have identified an ortholog of the yeast Ddi1 protein as the only member of the aspartic proteinase family in Leishmania parasites, and in this study we investigate this protein as a potential target for the drugs. To date, no enzyme assay has been developed for the Ddi1 proteins, but Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the DDI1 gene secrete high levels of protein into the medium. We developed an assay in which these knockout yeast were functionally complemented to low secretion by introduction of genes encoding Ddi1 orthologs from Leishmania major or humans. Plasmid alone controls gave no complementation. Treatment of the Ddi1 transformants with HIV proteinase inhibitors showed differential effects dependent on the origin of the Ddi1. Dose responses allowed calculation of IC50 values; e.g., for nelfinavir, of 3.4 μM (human Ddi1) and 0.44 μM (Leishmania Ddi1). IC50 values with Leishmania constructs mirror the potency of inhibitors against parasites. Our results show that Ddi1 proteins are targets of HIV proteinase inhibitors and indicates the Leishmania Ddi1 as the likely target for these drugs and a potential target for antiparasitic therapy.—White, R. E., Powell, D. J., Berry, C. HIV proteinase inhibitors target the Ddi1-Like protein of Leishmania parasites. PMID:21266539

  20. Exploiting Protein Conformational Change to Optimize Adenosine-Derived Inhibitors of HSP70

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    HSP70 is a molecular chaperone and a key component of the heat-shock response. Because of its proposed importance in oncology, this protein has become a popular target for drug discovery, efforts which have as yet brought little success. This study demonstrates that adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors potentially bind to the protein with a novel mechanism of action, the stabilization by desolvation of an intramolecular salt-bridge which induces a conformational change in the protein, leading to high affinity ligands. We also demonstrate that through the application of this mechanism, adenosine-derived HSP70 inhibitors can be optimized in a rational manner. PMID:27119979

  1. Computational design of a protein-based enzyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Procko, Erik; Hedman, Rickard; Hamilton, Keith; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Fleishman, Sarel J; Su, Min; Aramini, James; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T; Baker, David

    2013-09-23

    While there has been considerable progress in designing protein-protein interactions, the design of proteins that bind polar surfaces is an unmet challenge. We describe the computational design of a protein that binds the acidic active site of hen egg lysozyme and inhibits the enzyme. The design process starts with two polar amino acids that fit deep into the enzyme active site, identifies a protein scaffold that supports these residues and is complementary in shape to the lysozyme active-site region, and finally optimizes the surrounding contact surface for high-affinity binding. Following affinity maturation, a protein designed using this method bound lysozyme with low nanomolar affinity, and a combination of NMR studies, crystallography, and knockout mutagenesis confirmed the designed binding surface and orientation. Saturation mutagenesis with selection and deep sequencing demonstrated that specific designed interactions extending well beyond the centrally grafted polar residues are critical for high-affinity binding.

  2. Computational design of a protein-based enzyme inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Procko, Erik; Hedman, Rickard; Hamilton, Keith; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Fleishman, Sarel J.; Su, Min; Aramini, James; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F.; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    While there has been considerable progress in designing protein-protein interactions, the design of proteins that bind polar surfaces is an unmet challenge. We describe the computational design of a protein that binds the acidic active site of hen egg lysozyme and inhibits the enzyme. The design process starts with two polar amino acids that fit deep into the enzyme active site, identifies a protein scaffold that supports these residues and is complementary in shape to the lysozyme active site region, and finally optimizes the surrounding contact surface for high affinity binding. Following affinity maturation, a protein designed using this method bound lysozyme with low nanomolar affinity, and a combination of NMR studies, crystallography and knockout mutagenesis confirmed the designed binding surface and orientation. Saturation mutagenesis with selection and deep sequencing demonstrated that specific designed interactions extending well beyond the centrally grafted polar residues are critical for high affinity binding. PMID:23827138

  3. [Properties of a nitrite reductase inhibitor protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Karapetian, A V; Nalbandian, R M

    1993-08-01

    The amino acid composition and major physico-chemical properties of the "nonblue" copper protein isolated earlier from Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been determined. It has been found that the azurin oxidase, cytochrome c551 oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities of the enzyme are inhibited by this protein. The inhibition seems to be due to the protein interaction with the electron-accepting center of nitrite reductase.

  4. Discovery of a Potent Inhibitor of Replication Protein A Protein-Protein Interactions Using a Fragment-Linking Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Andreas O.; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Waterson, Alex G.; Pelz, Nicholas F.; Patrone, James D.; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Camper, DeMarco V.; Rossanese, Olivia W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2013-10-22

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, is involved in nearly all cellular DNA transactions. The RPA N-terminal domain (RPA70N) is a recruitment site for proteins involved in DNA-damage response and repair. Selective inhibition of these protein–protein interactions has the potential to inhibit the DNA-damage response and to sensitize cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents without affecting other functions of RPA. To discover a potent, selective inhibitor of the RPA70N protein–protein interactions to test this hypothesis, we used NMR spectroscopy to identify fragment hits that bind to two adjacent sites in the basic cleft of RPA70N. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures of RPA70N–ligand complexes revealed how these fragments bind to RPA and guided the design of linked compounds that simultaneously occupy both sites. We have synthesized linked molecules that bind to RPA70N with submicromolar affinity and minimal disruption of RPA’s interaction with ssDNA.

  5. Inhibition of the 20S proteosome by a protein proteinase inhibitor: evidence that a natural serine proteinase inhibitor can inhibit a threonine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Kimihiko; Koide, Takehiko

    2009-02-01

    The 20S proteasome (20S) is an intracellular threonine proteinase (Mr 750,000) that plays important roles in many cellular regulations. Several synthetic peptide inhibitors and bacteria-derived inhibitors such as lactacystin and epoxomicin have been identified as potent proteasome inhibitors. However, essentially no protein proteinase inhibitor has been characterized. By examining several small size protein proteinase inhibitors, we found that a well-known serine proteinase inhibitor from bovine pancreas, basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), inhibits the 20S in vitro and ex vivo. Inhibition of the 20S by BPTI was time- and concentration-dependent, and stoichiometric. To inhibit the 20S activity, BPTI needs to enter into the interior of the 20S molecule. The molar ratio of BPTI to the 20S in the complex was estimated as approximately six BPTI to one 20S, thereby two sets of three peptidase activities (trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like) of the 20S were all inhibited. These results indicate that an entrance hole to the 20S formed by seven alpha-subunits is sufficiently large for BPTI to enter. This report is essentially the initial description of the inhibition of a threonine proteinase by a protein serine proteinase inhibitor, suggesting a common mechanism of inhibition between serine and threonine proteinases by a natural protein proteinase inhibitor.

  6. [Influence of electromagnetic radiation on raf kinase inhibitor protein and its related proteins of hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hong-yan; Wang, De-wen; Peng, Rui-yun; Wang, Shui-ming; Gao, Ya-bing; Xu, Xin-ping; Ma, Jun-jie

    2008-09-01

    To study the development of changes for Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) and its mRNA in rats hippocampus after electromagnetic radiation. Rats were exposed to X-band high power microwave (X-HPM), S-band high power microwave (S-HPM) and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) radiation source respectively. The animal model of electromagnetic radiation was established. Western blot was used to detect the expression of RKIP, and RT-PCR was applied to detect the expression of RKIP mRNA. The interaction of RKIP and Raf-1 was measured with co-immunoprecipitation method, and the expression of cerebral choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) was measured by immunohistochemistry. The expression of RKIP significantly down-regulated at 6 h after radiation, and recovered at 1 d in group EMP, but the down-regulation continued during 1 approximately 7 d after radiation in the two microwave groups. The expression of RKIP mRNA changed wavily during 6 h approximately 7 d after radiation, which showed down-regulation at 6 h, and up-regulation at 3 d. The interaction of RKIP and Raf-1 decreased during 6 h approximately 7 d after radiation, most significantly at 7 d, and the two microwave groups were more significant. The expression of CHAT decreased continuously during 6 h approximately 7 d after radiation, and generally recovered on 14 d. The down-regulation of RKIP and its related proteins of hippocampus is induced by electromagnetic radiation.

  7. Imbalance in chemical space: How to facilitate the identification of protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuenemann, Mélaine A.; Labbé, Céline M.; Cerdan, Adrien H.; Sperandio, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play vital roles in life and provide new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. In this large data analysis, 3,300 inhibitors of PPIs (iPPIs) were compared to 17 reference datasets of collectively ~566,000 compounds (including natural compounds, existing drugs, active compounds on conventional targets, etc.) using a chemoinformatics approach. Using this procedure, we showed that comparable classes of PPI targets can be formed using either the similarity of their ligands or the shared properties of their binding cavities, constituting a proof-of-concept that not only can binding pockets be used to group PPI targets, but that these pockets certainly condition the properties of their corresponding ligands. These results demonstrate that matching regions in both chemical space and target space can be found. Such identified classes of targets could lead to the design of PPI-class-specific chemical libraries and therefore facilitate the development of iPPIs to the stage of drug candidates.

  8. Gardenia jasminoides Encodes an Inhibitor-2 Protein for Protein Phosphatase Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lan; Li, Hao-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) regulates diverse, essential cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, muscle contraction, carbohydrate metabolism, transcription and neuronal signaling. Inhibitor-2 (I-2) can inhibit the activity of PP1 and has been found in diverse organisms. In this work, a Gardenia jasminoides fruit cDNA library was constructed, and the GjI-2 cDNA was isolated from the cDNA library by sequencing method. The GjI-2 cDNA contains a predicted 543 bp open reading frame that encodes 180 amino acids. The bioinformatics analysis suggested that the GjI-2 has conserved PP1c binding motif, and contains a conserved phosphorylation site, which is important in regulation of its activity. The three-dimensional model structure of GjI-2 was buite, its similar with the structure of I-2 from mouse. The results suggest that GjI-2 has relatively conserved RVxF, FxxR/KxR/K and HYNE motif, and these motifs are involved in interaction with PP1.

  9. Inhibitors of the Yersinia protein tyrosine phosphatase through high throughput and virtual screening approaches.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Vujanac, Milos; Southall, Noel; Stebbins, C Erec

    2013-02-15

    The bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH is an essential virulence determinant in Yersinia pestis and a potential antibacterial drug target. Here we report our studies of screening for small molecule inhibitors of YopH using both high throughput and in silico approaches. The identified inhibitors represent a diversity of chemotypes and novel pTyr mimetics, providing a starting point for further development and fragment-based design of multi-site binding inhibitors. We demonstrate that the applications of high throughput and virtual screening, when guided by structural binding mode analysis, is an effective approach for identifying potent and selective inhibitors of YopH and other protein phosphatases for rational drug design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibitors of the Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Through High Throughput and Virtual Screening Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Vujanac, Milos; Southall, Noel; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH is an essential virulence determinant in Yersinia pestis and a potential antibacterial drug target. Here we report our studies of screening for small molecule inhibitors of YopH using both high throughput and in silico approaches. The identified inhibitors represent a diversity of chemotypes and novel pTyr mimetics, providing a starting point for further development and fragment-based design of multi-site binding inhibitors. We demonstrate that the applications of high throughput and virtual screening, when guided by structural binding mode analysis, is an effective approach for identifying potent and selective inhibitors of YopH and other protein phosphatases for rational drug design. PMID:23294700

  11. Adipocyte fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) inhibitors. A comprehensive systematic review.

    PubMed

    Floresta, Giuseppe; Pistarà, Venerando; Amata, Emanuele; Dichiara, Maria; Marrazzo, Agostino; Prezzavento, Orazio; Rescifina, Antonio

    2017-09-29

    Small molecule inhibitors of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) have attracted interest following the recent publications of beneficial pharmacological effects of these compounds. FABP4 is predominantly expressed in macrophages and adipose tissue where it regulates fatty acids (FAs) storage and lipolysis and is an important mediator of inflammation. In the past years, hundreds FABP4 inhibitors have been synthesized for effective atherosclerosis and diabetes treatments, including derivatives of niacin, quinoxaline, aryl-quinoline, bicyclic pyridine, urea, aromatic compounds and other novel heterocyclic compounds. This review provides an overview of the synthesized and discovered molecules as adipocyte fatty acid binding protein 4 inhibitors (FABP4is) since the synthesis of the putative FABP4i, BMS309403, highlighting the interactions of the different classes of inhibitors with the targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural Basis for Binding and Selectivity of Antimalarial and Anticancer Ethylenediamine Inhibitors to Protein Farnesyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Fletcher, Steven; Cummings, Christopher G.; Pusateri, Erin E.; Blaskovich, Michelle A.; Rivas, Kasey; Gelb, Michael H.; Voorhis, Wesley C.Van; Sebti, Said M.; Hamilton, Andrew D.; Beese, Lorena S. ); ); ); )

    2009-03-20

    Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes an essential posttranslational lipid modification of more than 60 proteins involved in intracellular signal transduction networks. FTase inhibitors have emerged as a significant target for development of anticancer therapeutics and, more recently, for the treatment of parasitic diseases caused by protozoan pathogens, including malaria (Plasmodium falciparum). We present the X-ray crystallographic structures of complexes of mammalian FTase with five inhibitors based on an ethylenediamine scaffold, two of which exhibit over 1000-fold selective inhibition of P. falciparum FTase. These structures reveal the dominant determinants in both the inhibitor and enzyme that control binding and selectivity. Comparison to a homology model constructed for the P. falciparum FTase suggests opportunities for further improving selectivity of a new generation of antimalarial inhibitors.

  13. Crosstalks between Raf-kinase inhibitor protein and cancer stem cell transcription factors (Oct4, KLF4, Sox2, Nanog).

    PubMed

    Lee, SoHyun; Wottrich, Stephanie; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Raf-kinase inhibitor protein has been reported to inhibit both the Raf/mitogen extracellular signal-regulated kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain of activated B cells pathways. It has also been reported in cancers that Raf-kinase inhibitor protein behaves as a metastatic suppressor as well as a chemo-immunosensitizing factor to drug/immune-mediated apoptosis. The majority of cancers exhibit low or no levels of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein. Hence, the activities of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein contrast, in part, to those mediated by several cancer stem cell transcription factors for their roles in resistance and metastasis. In this review, the existence of crosstalks in the signaling pathways between Raf-kinase inhibitor protein and several cancer stem cell transcription factors (Oct4, KLF4, Sox2 and Nanog) was assembled. Oct4 is induced by Lin28, and Raf-kinase inhibitor protein inhibits the microRNA binding protein Lin28. The expression of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein inversely correlates with the expression of Oct4. KLF4 does not interact directly with Raf-kinase inhibitor protein, but rather interacts indirectly via Raf-kinase inhibitor protein's regulation of the Oct4/Sox2/KLF4 complex through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. The mechanism by which Raf-kinase inhibitor protein inhibits Sox2 is via the inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway by Raf-kinase inhibitor protein. Thus, Raf-kinase inhibitor protein's relationship with Sox2 is via its regulation of Oct4. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by Raf-kinase inhibitor protein results in the upregulation of Nanog. The inhibition of Oct4 by Raf-kinase inhibitor protein results in the failure of the heterodimer formation of Oct4 and Sox2 that is necessary to bind to the Nanog promoter for the transcription of Nanog. The findings revealed that there exists a direct correlation between the expression of Raf

  14. Senescence in isolated carnation petals : effects of indoleacetic Acid and inhibitors of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wulster, G; Sacalis, J; Janes, H W

    1982-10-01

    Indoleacetic acid induces senescence in isolated carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus, cv. White Sim) petals, increasing the duration and amount of ethylene production. This effect is inhibited by Actinomycin D, an inhibitor of RNA synthesis, and cycloheximide, a translational inhibitor of protein synthesis. The ability of petals to respond to indoleacetic acid appears to be a function of physiological age. Indoleacetic acid is capable of enhancing ethylene evolution and senescence only in specific portions of the petal.

  15. Role of inter-alpha-inhibitor and its related proteins in urolithiasis. Purification of an inter-alpha-inhibitor related protein from the bovine kidney.

    PubMed

    Atmani, F; Khan, S R

    1999-01-01

    Urine contains several macromolecules that inhibit calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallization. Among them is bikunin, the light chain of most of the inter-alpha-inhibitor (IalphaI) family of glycoproteins. This study aimed to verify whether bikunin and other members of the IalphaI family are synthesized in the kidneys or derived exclusively from the plasma. Proteins extracted from homogenized bovine kidney were applied successively to three chromatographic steps on DEAE-Sephacel, Sephacryl S-300, and Mono Q column. The inhibitory activity was assayed using a CaOx crystallization system. The presence of IalphaI-related proteins was determined by electrophoresis and Western blotting. The results showed that kidney extract contained a 125-kDa protein that cross-reacted with anti-IalphaI antibodies. This protein inhibited CaOx crystallization efficiently. According to its molecular weight and immunoreaction with anti-IalphaI antibody, the 125-kDa protein could be pre-alpha-inhibitor. The latter is known to encompass a heavy chain and bikunin, which may explain its inhibitory activity against CaOx crystallization. Consequently, we hypothesize that kidneys may produce some IalphaI-related proteins that are involved in the inhibition of stone formation.

  16. Effects of selected sulfhydryl inhibitors on nonhistone chromosomal proteins of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Knock, F E; Stein, G S; Davis, J; Galt, R M; Oester, Y T; Sylvester, R

    1975-01-01

    Effects of the SH inhibitor sodium iodoacetate, alone and with adjuncts menadiol diphosphate, sodium malonate, sodium fluoride and heparin, on incorporation of tryptophane-3 H into nonhistone chromosomal proteins of HeLa cells were examined. The drugs block incorporation of tryptophane-3 H into nonhistone chromosomal proteins far more than incorporation of leucine-3 H into total cellular proteins. Drug effects on thymidine phosphorylation and DNA synthesis in HeLa cells exceed corresponding effects on fibroblasts from normal healing wounds.

  17. Targeting inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) for new breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaomeng; Bai, Longchuan; Lu, Jianfeng; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Sun, Haiying

    2012-12-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of human cancer. Research in the last two decades has identified key regulators of apoptosis, including inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). These critical apoptosis regulators have been targeted for the development of new cancer therapeutics. In this article, we will discuss three members of IAP proteins, namely XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, as cancer therapeutic targets and the progress made in developing new cancer therapeutic agents to target these IAP proteins.

  18. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Volta, Viviana; Cho, Chi Hin; Wu, Ya Chun; Li, Hai Tao; Yu, Le; Li, Zhi Jie; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2009-09-04

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  19. Eliminating anti-nutritional plant food proteins: the case of seed protease inhibitors in pea.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria C; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Chinoy, Catherine; Olias, Raquel; Rayner, Tracey; Isaac, Peter G; Lawson, David M; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Domoney, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING) resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea) and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk) class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K) resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius) as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for either halving

  20. Eliminating Anti-Nutritional Plant Food Proteins: The Case of Seed Protease Inhibitors in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Alfonso; Arques, Maria C.; Dalmais, Marion; Le Signor, Christine; Chinoy, Catherine; Olias, Raquel; Rayner, Tracey; Isaac, Peter G.; Lawson, David M.; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Domoney, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Several classes of seed proteins limit the utilisation of plant proteins in human and farm animal diets, while plant foods have much to offer to the sustainable intensification of food/feed production and to human health. Reduction or removal of these proteins could greatly enhance seed protein quality and various strategies have been used to try to achieve this with limited success. We investigated whether seed protease inhibitor mutations could be exploited to enhance seed quality, availing of induced mutant and natural Pisum germplasm collections to identify mutants, whilst acquiring an understanding of the impact of mutations on activity. A mutant (TILLING) resource developed in Pisum sativum L. (pea) and a large germplasm collection representing Pisum diversity were investigated as sources of mutations that reduce or abolish the activity of the major protease inhibitor (Bowman-Birk) class of seed protein. Of three missense mutations, predicted to affect activity of the mature trypsin / chymotrypsin inhibitor TI1 protein, a C77Y substitution in the mature mutant inhibitor abolished inhibitor activity, consistent with an absolute requirement for the disulphide bond C77-C92 for function in the native inhibitor. Two further classes of mutation (S85F, E109K) resulted in less dramatic changes to isoform or overall inhibitory activity. The alternative strategy to reduce anti-nutrients, by targeted screening of Pisum germplasm, successfully identified a single accession (Pisum elatius) as a double null mutant for the two closely linked genes encoding the TI1 and TI2 seed protease inhibitors. The P. elatius mutant has extremely low seed protease inhibitory activity and introgression of the mutation into cultivated germplasm has been achieved. The study provides new insights into structure-function relationships for protease inhibitors which impact on pea seed quality. The induced and natural germplasm variants identified provide immediate potential for either halving

  1. Omacetaxine: a protein translation inhibitor for treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Varsha; Plunkett, William; Cortes, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is driven by the Bcr-Abl fusion protein which is a result of a (9;22) chromosomal translocation. Imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitors, TKIs) have revolutionized how CML is treated. While the majority of patients respond to these kinase inhibitors, a subset become resistant to these therapeutics. Synribo (omacetaxine mepesuccinate) was recently FDA approved for Philadelphia-positive CML either in chronic or accelerated phase whose disease failed two prior TKIs. With omacetaxine 1.25 mg/m2 twice daily for 14 days during induction and for 7 days during maintenance, a major cytogenetic response occurred in 20% of patients in chronic phase and major hematologic response in 27% of patients in accelerated phase. Laboratory investigations unraveled the mechanism of action and effectiveness of this agent. Bcr-Abl protein is intrinsically programmed to turn over with a short half-life which makes it susceptible to protein translation inhibitors. Omacetaxine (homoharringtonine) inhibits total protein biosynthesis by binding to A-site cleft of ribosomes. As a corollary to this action, there is a diminution of short-lived proteins such as Bcr-Abl followed by cell death. Approval of this first-in-class protein translation inhibitor opens up new avenues for its use in other diseases as well as mechanism-based combinations. PMID:24501394

  2. Hemin as a generic and potent protein misfolding inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanqin; Carver, John A.; Ho, Lam H.; Elias, Abigail K.; Musgrave, Ian F.; Pukala, Tara L.

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • Hemin prevents Aβ42, α-synuclein and RCM-κ-casein forming amyloid fibrils. • Hemin inhibits the β-sheet structure formation of Aβ42. • Hemin reduces the cell toxicity caused by fibrillar Aβ42. • Hemin dissociates partially formed Aβ42 fibrils. • Hemin prevents amorphous aggregation by ADH, catalase and γs-crystallin. - Abstract: Protein misfolding causes serious biological malfunction, resulting in diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and cataract. Molecules which inhibit protein misfolding are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In the present study, thioflavin T fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrated that hemin prevents amyloid fibril formation of kappa-casein, amyloid beta peptide and α-synuclein by blocking β-sheet structure assembly which is essential in fibril aggregation. Further, inhibition of fibril formation by hemin significantly reduces the cytotoxicity caused by fibrillar amyloid beta peptide in vitro. Interestingly, hemin degrades partially formed amyloid fibrils and prevents further aggregation to mature fibrils. Light scattering assay results revealed that hemin also prevents protein amorphous aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase, catalase and γs-crystallin. In summary, hemin is a potent agent which generically stabilises proteins against aggregation, and has potential as a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases.

  3. Angiogenic inhibitor protein fractions derived from shark cartilage.

    PubMed

    Bargahi, Afshar; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra

    2008-02-01

    Development of therapies based on the growth inhibition of new blood vessels is among the most intensively studied approaches to the treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-related diseases. Shark cartilage has been proven to have inhibitory effects on the endothelial cell angiogenesis, metastasis, cell adhesion and MMP (matrix metalloprotease) activity. In the present study, we have used a chromatography-based procedure for the isolation and partial purification of a shark cartilage protein fraction containing anti-angiogenesis activity. Proteins were extracted in 4 M guanidinium chloride, followed by sequential anion- and cation-exchange column chromatography. Angiogenesis assays were performed using the rat aortic ring and chick CAM (chorioallantoic membrane) assay models. The results show that the final fraction contains two proteins with molecular masses of 14.7 and 16 kDa. The protein fraction is able to block microvessel sprouting in the collagen-embedded rat aortic ring assay in vitro and inhibition of capillary sprouting in the CAM assay in vivo. It is suggested that these are partially purified anti-angiogenesis proteins, which have further biotechnological or biomedical applications.

  4. Hemin as a generic and potent protein misfolding inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanqin; Carver, John A; Ho, Lam H; Elias, Abigail K; Musgrave, Ian F; Pukala, Tara L

    2014-11-14

    Protein misfolding causes serious biological malfunction, resulting in diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cataract. Molecules which inhibit protein misfolding are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In the present study, thioflavin T fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrated that hemin prevents amyloid fibril formation of kappa-casein, amyloid beta peptide and α-synuclein by blocking β-sheet structure assembly which is essential in fibril aggregation. Further, inhibition of fibril formation by hemin significantly reduces the cytotoxicity caused by fibrillar amyloid beta peptide in vitro. Interestingly, hemin degrades partially formed amyloid fibrils and prevents further aggregation to mature fibrils. Light scattering assay results revealed that hemin also prevents protein amorphous aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase, catalase and γs-crystallin. In summary, hemin is a potent agent which generically stabilises proteins against aggregation, and has potential as a key molecule for the development of therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of a novel prokaryotic GDP dissociation inhibitor domain from the G protein coupled membrane protein FeoB.

    PubMed

    Eng, Edward T; Jalilian, Amir R; Spasov, Krasimir A; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2008-01-25

    The FeoB family of membrane embedded G proteins are involved with high affinity Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report that FeoB harbors a novel GDP dissociation inhibitor-like domain that specifically stabilizes GDP-binding through an interaction with the switch I region of the G protein. We show that the stabilization of GDP binding is conserved between species despite a high degree of sequence variability in their guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI)-like domains, and demonstrate that the presence of the membrane embedded domain increases GDP-binding affinity roughly 150-fold over the level accomplished by action of the GDI-like domain alone. To our knowledge, this is the first example for a prokaryotic GDI, targeting a bacterial G protein-coupled membrane process. Our findings suggest that Fe(II) uptake in bacteria involves a G protein regulatory pathway reminiscent of signaling mechanisms found in higher-order organisms.

  6. Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep K.; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Christen, Philipp

    2008-07-25

    Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

  7. Natural phospholipase A(2) myotoxin inhibitor proteins from snakes, mammals and plants.

    PubMed

    Lizano, Sergio; Domont, Gilberto; Perales, Jonas

    2003-12-15

    A renewed interest in the phenomenon of inter- and intra-species resistance towards the toxicity of snake venoms, coupled with the search for new strategies for treatment of snake envenomations, has prompted the discovery of proteins which neutralize the major toxic components of these venoms. Among these emerging groups of proteins are inhibitors of toxic phospholipases A2 (PLA2s), many of which exhibit a wide range of toxic effects including muscle-tissue damage, neurotoxicity, and inflammation. These proteins have been isolated from both venomous and non-venomous snakes, mammals, and most recently from medicinal plant extracts. The snake blood-derived inhibitors have been grouped into three major classes, alpha, beta, and gamma, based on common structural motifs found in other proteins with diverse physiological properties. In mammals, DM64, an anti-myotoxic protein isolated from opossum serum, belongs to the immunoglobulin super gene family and is homologous to human alpha1B-glycoprotein and DM43, a metalloproteinase inhibitor from the same organism. In plants, a short note is made of WSG, a newly described anti-toxic-PLA2 glycoprotein isolated from Withania somnifera (Ashwaganda), a medicinal plant whose aqueous extracts neutralize the PLA2 activity of the Naja naja venom. The implications of these new groups of PLA2 toxin inhibitors in the context of our current understanding of snake biology as well as in the development of novel therapeutic reagents in the treatment of snake envenomations worldwide are discussed.

  8. Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis increase hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ness, G C; Zhao, Z; Lopez, D

    1996-01-15

    Inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis are believed to lower serum cholesterol levels by enhancing the removal of serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL) by increasing hepatic LDL receptor function. Thus, the effects of several different inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis were examined for their effects on the expression of the hepatic LDL receptor in rats. We found that administration of inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase such as lovastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, and rivastatin resulted in increased hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Surprisingly, these agents failed to increase levels of immunoreactive LDL receptor protein in rat liver even when the dose and length of treatment were increased. Treatment of rats with zaragozic acid A, an inhibitor of squalene synthase, caused even greater increases in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels, but did not increase levels of immunoreactive protein. Further investigation revealed that the rate of degradation of the hepatic LDL receptor was increased in rats given inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. The greatest increase in the rate of degradation was seen in animals treated with zaragozic acid A which caused the largest increase in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. In contrast, hepatic LDL receptor protein was stabilized in cholesterol-fed rats. It appears that increased potential for LDL receptor protein synthesis, reflected in increased mRNA levels, is offset by a corresponding increase in the rate of receptor protein degradation resulting in constant steady-state levels of hepatic LDL receptor protein. These findings are suggestive of increased cycling of the hepatic LDL receptor. This postulated mechanism can provide for enhanced hepatic uptake of lipoproteins without increasing steady-state levels of LDL receptor protein.

  9. Identification and characterization of alpha-I-proteinase inhibitor from common carp sarcoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Siriangkanakun, Siriphon; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Yongsawadigul, Jirawat

    2016-02-01

    Purification of proteinase inhibitor from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sarcoplasmic proteins resulted in 2.8% yield with purification fold of 111. Two inhibitors, namely inhibitor I and II, exhibited molecular mass of 47 and 52 kDa, respectively, based on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both inhibitors I and II were identified to be alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) based on LC-MS/MS. They were glycoproteins and molecular mass after peptide-N-glycosidase F treatment was 38 and 45 kDa, respectively. The N-glycosylation sites of both inhibitors were determined to be at N214 and N226. The inhibitors specifically inhibited trypsin. The common carp α1-PI showed high thermal stability with denaturation temperatures of 65.43 and 73.31 °C, which were slightly less than those of ovomucoid. High stability toward NaCl was also evident up to 3M. The common carp α1-PI effectively reduced autolytic degradation of bigeye snapper surimi at the concentration as low as 0.025%.

  10. Structure-Based Design of Inhibitors of Protein–Protein Interactions: Mimicking Peptide Binding Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Pelay-Gimeno, Marta; Glas, Adrian; Koch, Oliver; Grossmann, Tom N

    2015-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions (PPIs) are involved at all levels of cellular organization, thus making the development of PPI inhibitors extremely valuable. The identification of selective inhibitors is challenging because of the shallow and extended nature of PPI interfaces. Inhibitors can be obtained by mimicking peptide binding epitopes in their bioactive conformation. For this purpose, several strategies have been evolved to enable a projection of side chain functionalities in analogy to peptide secondary structures, thereby yielding molecules that are generally referred to as peptidomimetics. Herein, we introduce a new classification of peptidomimetics (classes A–D) that enables a clear assignment of available approaches. Based on this classification, the Review summarizes strategies that have been applied for the structure-based design of PPI inhibitors through stabilizing or mimicking turns, β-sheets, and helices. PMID:26119925

  11. Molecular dynamics of protein kinase-inhibitor complexes: a valid structural information.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Julio; Alzate-Morales, Jans H

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases (PKs) are key components of protein phosphorylation based signaling networks in eukaryotic cells. They have been identified as being implicated in many diseases. High-resolution X-ray crystallographic data exist for many PKs and, in many cases, these structures are co-complexed with inhibitors. Although this valuable information confirms the precise structure of PKs and their complexes, it ignores the dynamic movements of the structures which are relevant to explain the affinities and selectivity of the ligands, to characterize the thermodynamics of the solvated complexes, and to derive predictive models. Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations present a convenient way to study PK-inhibitor complexes and have been increasingly used in recent years in structure-based drug design. MD is a very useful computational method and a great counterpart for experimentalists, which helps them to derive important additional molecular information. That enables them to follow and understand structure and dynamics of protein-ligand systems with extreme molecular detail on scales where motion of individual atoms can be tracked. MD can be used to sample dynamic molecular processes, and can be complemented with more advanced computational methods (e.g., free energy calculations, structure-activity relationship analysis). This review focuses on the most commonly applications to study PK-inhibitor complexes using MD simulations. Our aim is that researchers working in the design of PK inhibitors be aware of the benefits of this powerful tool in the design of potent and selective PK inhibitors.

  12. Synthetic silvestrol analogues as potent and selective protein synthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Nair, Somarajan J; Lescarbeau, André; Belani, Jitendra; Peluso, Stéphane; Conley, James; Tillotson, Bonnie; O'Hearn, Patrick; Smith, Sherri; Slocum, Kelly; West, Kip; Helble, Joseph; Douglas, Mark; Bahadoor, Adilah; Ali, Janid; McGovern, Karen; Fritz, Christian; Palombella, Vito J; Wylie, Andrew; Castro, Alfredo C; Tremblay, Martin R

    2012-10-25

    Misregulation of protein translation plays a critical role in human cancer pathogenesis at many levels. Silvestrol, a cyclopenta[b]benzofuran natural product, blocks translation at the initiation step by interfering with assembly of the eIF4F translation complex. Silvestrol has a complex chemical structure whose functional group requirements have not been systematically investigated. Moreover, silvestrol has limited development potential due to poor druglike properties. Herein, we sought to develop a practical synthesis of key intermediates of silvestrol and explore structure-activity relationships around the C6 position. The ability of silvestrol and analogues to selectively inhibit the translation of proteins with high requirement on the translation-initiation machinery (i.e., complex 5'-untranslated region UTR) relative to simple 5'UTR was determined by a cellular reporter assay. Simplified analogues of silvestrol such as compounds 74 and 76 were shown to have similar cytotoxic potency and better ADME characteristics relative to those of silvestrol.

  13. Structural dynamics and inhibitor searching for Wnt-4 protein using comparative computational studies

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Mirza A; Azam, Syed Sikander

    2015-01-01

    Wnt-4 (wingless mouse mammary tumor virus integration site-4) protein is involved in many crucial embryonic pathways regulating essential processes. Aberrant Wnt-4 activity causes various anomalies leading to gastric, colon, or breast cancer. Wnt-4 is a conserved protein in structure and sequence. All Wnt proteins contain an unusual fold comprising of a thumb (or N-terminal domain) and index finger (or C-terminal domain) bifurcated by a palm domain. The aim of this study was to identify the best inhibitors of Wnt-4 that not only interact with Wnt-4 protein but also with the covalently bound acyl group to inhibit aberrant Wnt-4 activity. A systematic computational approach was used to analyze inhibition of Wnt-4. Palmitoleic acid was docked into Wnt-4 protein, followed by ligand-based virtual screening of nearly 209,847 compounds; conformer generation of 271 compounds resulted from extensive virtual screening and comparative docking of 10,531 conformers of 271 unique compounds through GOLD (Genetic Optimization for Ligand Docking), AutoDock-Vina, and FRED (Fast Rigid Exhaustive Docking) was subsequently performed. Linux scripts was used to handle the libraries of compounds. The best compounds were selected on the basis of having maximum interactions to protein with bound palmitoleic acid. These represented lead inhibitors in further experiments. Palmitoleic acid is important for efficient Wnt activity, but aberrant Wnt-4 expression can be inhibited by designing inhibitors interacting with both protein and palmitoleic acid. PMID:25995617

  14. Effects of chymostatin and other proteinase inhibitors on protein breakdown and proteolytic activities in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    1980-01-01

    To learn more about the enzymes involved in protein catabolism in skeletal and cardiac muscle and to identify selective inhibitors of this process, we studied the effects of proteinase inhibitors on protein turnover in isolated muscles and on proteolytic activities in muscle homogenates. Chymostatin (20μm) decreased protein breakdown by 20–40% in leg muscles from normal rodents and also in denervated and dystrophic muscles. These results are similar to our previous findings with leupeptin. The related inhibitors pepstatin, bestatin, and elastatinal did not decrease protein breakdown; antipain slowed this process in rat hind-limb muscles but not in diaphragm. Chymostatin did not decrease protein synthesis and thus probably retards proteolysis by a specific effect on cell proteinase(s). In homogenates of rat muscle, chymostatin, in common with leupeptin and antipain, inhibits the lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B, and the soluble Ca2+-activated proteinase. In addition, chymostatin, but not leupeptin, inhibits the chymotrypsin-like proteinase apparent in muscle homogenates. In muscles depleted of most of this activity by treatment with the mast-cell-degranulating agent 48/80, chymostatin still decreased protein breakdown. Therefore inhibition of this alkaline activity probably does not account for the decrease in protein breakdown. These results are consistent with a lysosomal site of action for chymostatin. Because of its lack of toxicity, chymostatin may be useful in maintaining tissues in vitro and perhaps in decreasing muscle atrophy in vivo. PMID:7406880

  15. Reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors cause changes in neuronal amyloid precursor protein processing and protein kinase C level in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pakaski, M; Rakonczay, Z; Kasa, P

    2001-03-01

    The alternative routes of cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) result in the generation and secretion of both soluble APP and beta-amyloid, the latter being the main component of the amyloid deposits in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study examined the question of whether acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors can alter the processing of APP and the level of protein kinase C (PKC) in primary rat basal forebrain cultures. Western blotting was used to test two AChE inhibitors (reversible and irreversible) for their ability to enhance the release of APP and PKC content. These inhibitors were ambenonium (AMB) and metrifonate (MTF), at different concentrations. A significant increase was found in the cell-associated APP level in a basal forebrain neuronal culture, and there was an elevation of the APP release into the medium. Increases were similarly observed in the PKC levels after AMB or MTF treatment. The results suggest that these AChE inhibitors promote the non-amyloidogenic route of APP processing, which may be due to their stimulatory effects on PKC. The PKC activation may enhance the alpha-secretase activity and consequently the production of the N-terminal APP. Since both a decreased level of APP secretion and a low activity and level of PKC may be involved in the pathogenesis of AD, it is concluded that the administration of AChE inhibitors to AD patients may facilitate the memory processes and exert a neuroprotective effect.

  16. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  17. Fragment-based discovery of potent inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic MCL-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Petros, Andrew M; Swann, Steven L; Song, Danying; Swinger, Kerren; Park, Chang; Zhang, Haichao; Wendt, Michael D; Kunzer, Aaron R; Souers, Andrew J; Sun, Chaohong

    2014-03-15

    Apoptosis is regulated by the BCL-2 family of proteins, which is comprised of both pro-death and pro-survival members. Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant cells. One way in which cancer cells achieve this evasion is thru overexpression of the pro-survival members of the BCL-2 family. Overexpression of MCL-1, a pro-survival protein, has been shown to be a resistance factor for Navitoclax, a potent inhibitor of BCL-2 and BCL-XL. Here we describe the use of fragment screening methods and structural biology to drive the discovery of novel MCL-1 inhibitors from two distinct structural classes. Specifically, cores derived from a biphenyl sulfonamide and salicylic acid were uncovered in an NMR-based fragment screen and elaborated using high throughput analog synthesis. This culminated in the discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of MCL-1 that may serve as promising leads for medicinal chemistry optimization efforts.

  18. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) might contaminate murine monoclonal antibodies after purification on protein G.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Jörg A; Fettke, Joerg; Lenz, Christine; Albers, Katharina; Mallwitz, Frank; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Kusch, Emely; Sellrie, Frank

    2012-03-31

    The large scale production of a monoclonal anti-progesterone antibody in serum free medium followed by affinity chromatography on protein G lead to a contamination of the antibody sample with a protein of about 14 kDa. This protein was identified by mass spectrometry as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). This SLPI contamination lead to a failure of the fiber-optic based competitive fluorescence assay to detect progesterone in milk. Purification of the monoclonal antibody using protein A columns circumvented this problem.

  19. Neurite outgrowth of NG108-15 cells induced by heat shock protein 90 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Erika; Sano, Mamoru

    2008-12-01

    We previously reported that radicicol (Rad) and geldanamycin (Geld), heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, potentiate neurite growth of cultured sensory neurons from chick embryo. We now show that the antibiotics induce neurite growth in NG108-15 cells. Treatment of the cells with these drugs caused transient decrease in protein levels of Raf1, ERK1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, Akt1, and CDK4. The neurite growth of NG108-15 induced by the inhibitors was blocked by actynomycin D, but the neurite growth stimulated by dbcAMP in the cells was not affected. The neurite growth could be due to a change in the synthesis of some specific protein(s) and is speculated to be due to the transient downregulation of particular-signaling molecules stabilized by Hsp90.

  20. A continuous protein methyltransferase (G9a) assay for enzyme activity measurement and inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Dhayalan, Arunkumar; Dimitrova, Emilia; Rathert, Philipp; Jeltsch, Albert

    2009-10-01

    The authors describe a continuous protein methylation assay using the G9a protein lysine methyltransferase and its substrate protein WIZ (widely interspaced zinc finger motifs). The assay is based on the coupling of the biotinylated substrate protein to streptavidin-coated FlashPlates and the transfer of radioactive methyl groups from the S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the substrate. The reaction progress is monitored continuously by proximity scintillation counting. The assay is very accurate, convenient, well suited for automation, and highly reproducible with standard errors in the range of 5%. Because of few pipetting steps and continuous data readout, it is ideal for high-throughput applications such as screening of inhibitors, testing many enzyme variants, or analyzing differences in methylation rates of different substrates under various conditions. By using this new assay, the IC(50) of AdoHcy and the G9a inhibitor BIX-01294 were determined for methylation of the G9a nonhistone substrate WIZ.

  1. Crystal Structures of Two Aminoglycoside Kinases Bound with a Eukaryotic Protein Kinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jiyoung; Berghuis, Albert M.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is recognized as a growing healthcare problem. To address this issue, one strategy is to thwart the causal mechanism using an adjuvant in partner with the antibiotic. Aminoglycosides are a class of clinically important antibiotics used for the treatment of serious infections. Their usefulness has been compromised predominantly due to drug inactivation by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, such as aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases. These kinases are structurally homologous to eukaryotic Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinases and it has been shown that some can be inhibited by select protein kinase inhibitors. The aminoglycoside kinase, APH(3′)-IIIa, can be inhibited by CKI-7, an ATP-competitive inhibitor for the casein kinase 1. We have determined that CKI-7 is also a moderate inhibitor for the atypical APH(9)-Ia. Here we present the crystal structures of CKI-7-bound APH(3′)-IIIa and APH(9)-Ia, the first structures of a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor in complex with bacterial kinases. CKI-7 binds to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the enzymes and its binding alters the conformation of the nucleotide-binding loop, the segment homologous to the glycine-rich loop in eurkaryotic protein kinases. Comparison of these structures with the CKI-7-bound casein kinase 1 reveals features in the binding pockets that are distinct in the bacterial kinases and could be exploited for the design of a bacterial kinase specific inhibitor. Our results provide evidence that an inhibitor for a subset of APHs can be developed in order to curtail resistance to aminoglycosides. PMID:21573013

  2. Protein synthesis inhibitors prevent both spontaneous and hormone-dependent maturation of isolated mouse oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, S.M. )

    1990-11-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the role of protein synthesis in mouse oocyte maturation in vitro. In the first part of this study, the effects of cycloheximide (CX) were tested on spontaneous meiotic maturation when oocytes were cultured in inhibitor-free medium. CX reversibly suppressed maturation of oocytes as long as maturation was either initially prevented by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX), or delayed by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). In the second part of this study, the actions of protein synthesis inhibitors were tested on hormone-induced maturation. CEO were maintained in meiotic arrest for 21-22 h with hypoxanthine, and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB) was induced with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Three different protein synthesis inhibitors (CX, emetine (EM), and puromycin (PUR)) each prevented the stimulatory action of FSH on GVB in a dose-dependent fashion. This was accompanied by a dose-dependent suppression of 3H-leucine incorporation by oocyte-cumulus cell complexes. The action of these inhibitors on FSH- and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced GVB was next compared. All three drugs lowered the frequency of GVB in the FSH-treated groups, below even that of the controls (drug + hypoxanthine); the drugs maintained meiotic arrest at the control frequencies in the EGF-treated groups. Puromycin aminonucleoside, an analog of PUR with no inhibitory action on protein synthesis, had no effect. The three inhibitors also suppressed the stimulatory action of FSH on oocyte maturation when meiotic arrest was maintained with the cAMP analog, dbcAMP.

  3. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Nancy K.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance. PMID:27620953

  4. AutoGrow: A Novel Algorithm for Protein Inhibitor Design

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Jacob; Amaro, Rommie E.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Due in part to the increasing availability of crystallographic protein structures as well as rapid improvements in computing power, the past few decades have seen an explosion in the field of computer-based rational drug design. Several algorithms have been developed to identify or generate potential ligands in silico by optimizing the ligand-receptor hydrogen bond, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions. We here present AutoGrow, a novel computer-aided drug design algorithm that combines the strengths of both fragment-based growing and docking algorithms. To validate AutoGrow, we recreate three crystallographically resolved ligands from their constituent fragments. PMID:19207419

  5. Discovery of Benzisoxazoles as Potent Inhibitors of Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Shi, Mengxiao; Golas, Jennifer; Vogan, Erik; Jacob, Jaison; Johnson, Mark; Lee, Frederick; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Petersen, Roseann; Svenson, Kristin; Chopra, Rajiv; Tam, May S.; Wen, Yingxia; Ellingboe, John; Arndt, Kim; Boschelli, Frank

    2008-08-11

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is responsible for activating many signaling proteins and is a promising target in tumor biology. We have identified small-molecule benzisoxazole derivatives as Hsp90 inhibitors. Crystallographic studies show that these compounds bind in the ATP binding pocket interacting with the Asp93. Structure based optimization led to the identification of potent analogues, such as 13, with good biochemical profiles.

  6. Inactivation of ribosomes by an inhibitor of protein synthesis from Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Brigotti, M; Nanetti, A; Montanaro, L; Sperti, S

    1993-01-01

    Sonic extracts of Salmonella enteritidis contain a factor which inhibits protein synthesis in cell-free systems by irreversibly inactivating ribosomes. The extent of the inactivation of ribosomes depends on the system used to assay protein synthesis, natural mRNA translation being more strongly inhibited than poly(U) translation. The inhibitory power of the Salmonella factor is destroyed by trypsin and by 5% mercaptoethanol. Placental RNase inhibitor is unable to protect ribosomes from inactivation.

  7. COMPARATIVE PATHOGENESIS OF HALOACETIC ACID AND PROTEIN KINASE INHIBITOR EMBRYOTOXICITY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative pathogenesis of haloacetic acid and protein kinase inhibitor embryotoxicity in mouse whole embryo culture.

    Ward KW, Rogers EH, Hunter ES 3rd.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599-7270, USA.

    Haloacetic acids ...

  8. The Antibiotic Micrococcin Is a Potent Inhibitor of Growth and Protein Synthesis in the Malaria Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, M. John; Cundliffe, Eric; McCutchan, Thomas F.

    1998-01-01

    The antibiotic micrococcin is a potent growth inhibitor of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 35 nM. This is comparable to or less than the corresponding levels of commonly used antimalarial drugs. Micrococcin, like thiostrepton, putatively targets protein synthesis in the plastid-like organelle of the parasite. PMID:9517961

  9. COMPARATIVE PATHOGENESIS OF HALOACETIC ACID AND PROTEIN KINASE INHIBITOR EMBRYOTOXICITY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative pathogenesis of haloacetic acid and protein kinase inhibitor embryotoxicity in mouse whole embryo culture.

    Ward KW, Rogers EH, Hunter ES 3rd.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 27599-7270, USA.

    Haloacetic acids ...

  10. Novel protein kinase C inhibitors: synthesis and PKC inhibition of beta-substituted polythiophene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Xu, W C; Zhou, Q; Ashendel, C L; Chang, C T; Chang, C J

    1999-08-02

    A series of beta-substituted polythiophene derivatives was synthesized through palladium-catalyzed coupling reaction. Their structure-protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitory activity relationship was studied. The carboxaldehyde and hydroxymethyl derivatives of alpha-terthiophene were potent PKC inhibitors (IC50 = 10(-7) M).

  11. The antibiotic micrococcin is a potent inhibitor of growth and protein synthesis in the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M J; Cundliffe, E; McCutchan, T F

    1998-03-01

    The antibiotic micrococcin is a potent growth inhibitor of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 35 nM. This is comparable to or less than the corresponding levels of commonly used antimalarial drugs. Micrococcin, like thiostrepton, putatively targets protein synthesis in the plastid-like organelle of the parasite.

  12. Dual roles of F123 in protein homodimerization and inhibitor binding to biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Yap, Min Y; Perugini, Matthew A; Wallace, John C; Abell, Andrew D; Wilce, Matthew C J; Polyak, Steven W; Booker, Grant W

    2014-01-01

    Protein biotinylation is catalysed by biotin protein ligase (BPL). The most characterized BPL is from Escherichia coli where it functions as both a biotin ligase and a homodimeric transcriptional repressor. Here we investigated another bifunctional BPL from the clinically important Staphylococcus aureus (SaBPL). Unliganded SaBPL (apo) exists in a dimer-monomer equilibrium at low micromolar concentrations - a stark contrast to E. coli BPL (EcBPL) that is monomeric under the same conditions. EMSA and SAXS analysis demonstrated that dimeric apo SaBPL adopted a conformation that was competent to bind DNA and necessary for it to function as a transcription factor. The SaBPL dimer-monomer dissociation constant was 5.8-fold tighter when binding the inhibitor biotin acetylene, but unchanged with biotin. F123, located in the dimer interface, was critical for homodimerization. Inhibition studies together with surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed a strong correlation between inhibitor potency and slow dissociation kinetics. A 24-fold difference in Ki values for these two enzymes was explained by differences in enzyme:inhibitor dissociation rates. Substitution of F123 in SaBPL and its equivalent in EcBPL altered both inhibitor potency and dissociation. Hence, F123 in SaBPL has novel roles in both protein dimerization and ligand-binding that have not been reported in EcBPL.

  13. Marine natural products as breast cancer resistance protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cherigo, Lilia; Lopez, Dioxelis; Martinez-Luis, Sergio

    2015-04-03

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its multi-drug resistance properties in cancer. BCRP can be associated with clinical cancer drug resistance, in particular acute myelogenous or acute lymphocytic leukemias. The overexpression of BCRP contributes to the resistance of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as topotecan, methotrexate, mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and daunorubicin. The Food and Drugs Administration has already recognized that BCRP is clinically one of the most important drug transporters, mainly because it leads to a reduction of clinical efficacy of various anticancer drugs through its ATP-dependent drug efflux pump function as well as its apparent participation in drug resistance. This review article aims to summarize the different research findings on marine natural products with BCRP inhibiting activity. In this sense, the potential modulation of physiological targets of BCRP by natural or synthetic compounds offers a great possibility for the discovery of new drugs and valuable research tools to recognize the function of the complex ABC-transporters.

  14. Marine Natural Products as Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cherigo, Lilia; Lopez, Dioxelis; Martinez-Luis, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its multi-drug resistance properties in cancer. BCRP can be associated with clinical cancer drug resistance, in particular acute myelogenous or acute lymphocytic leukemias. The overexpression of BCRP contributes to the resistance of several chemotherapeutic drugs, such as topotecan, methotrexate, mitoxantrone, doxorubicin and daunorubicin. The Food and Drugs Administration has already recognized that BCRP is clinically one of the most important drug transporters, mainly because it leads to a reduction of clinical efficacy of various anticancer drugs through its ATP-dependent drug efflux pump function as well as its apparent participation in drug resistance. This review article aims to summarize the different research findings on marine natural products with BCRP inhibiting activity. In this sense, the potential modulation of physiological targets of BCRP by natural or synthetic compounds offers a great possibility for the discovery of new drugs and valuable research tools to recognize the function of the complex ABC-transporters. PMID:25854646

  15. Peptiderive server: derive peptide inhibitors from protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sedan, Yuval; Marcu, Orly; Lyskov, Sergey; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2016-01-01

    The Rosetta Peptiderive protocol identifies, in a given structure of a protein–protein interaction, the linear polypeptide segment suggested to contribute most to binding energy. Interactions that feature a ‘hot segment’, a linear peptide with significant binding energy compared to that of the complex, may be amenable for inhibition and the peptide sequence and structure derived from the interaction provide a starting point for rational drug design. Here we present a web server for Peptiderive, which is incorporated within the ROSIE web interface for Rosetta protocols. A new feature of the protocol also evaluates whether derived peptides are good candidates for cyclization. Fast computation times and clear visualization allow users to quickly assess the interaction of interest. The Peptiderive server is available for free use at http://rosie.rosettacommons.org/peptiderive. PMID:27141963

  16. A class of selective antibacterials derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J. Richard; Dunham, Steve; Mochalkin, Igor; Banotai, Craig; Bowman, Matthew; Buist, Susan; Dunkle, Bill; Hanna, Debra; Harwood, H. James; Huband, Michael D.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kuhn, Michael; Limberakis, Chris; Liu, Jia Y.; Mehrens, Shawn; Mueller, W. Thomas; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Ogden, Adam; Ohren, Jeff; Prasad, J. V. N. Vara; Shelly, John A.; Skerlos, Laura; Sulavik, Mark; Thomas, V. Hayden; VanderRoest, Steve; Wang, LiAnn; Wang, Zhigang; Whitton, Amy; Zhu, Tong; Stover, C. Kendall

    2009-01-01

    As the need for novel antibiotic classes to combat bacterial drug resistance increases, the paucity of leads resulting from target-based antibacterial screening of pharmaceutical compound libraries is of major concern. One explanation for this lack of success is that antibacterial screening efforts have not leveraged the eukaryotic bias resulting from more extensive chemistry efforts targeting eukaryotic gene families such as G protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases. Consistent with a focus on antibacterial target space resembling these eukaryotic targets, we used whole-cell screening to identify a series of antibacterial pyridopyrimidines derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore. In bacteria, the pyridopyrimidines target the ATP-binding site of biotin carboxylase (BC), which catalyzes the first enzymatic step of fatty acid biosynthesis. These inhibitors are effective in vitro and in vivo against fastidious Gram-negative pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae. Although the BC active site has architectural similarity to those of eukaryotic protein kinases, inhibitor binding to the BC ATP-binding site is distinct from the protein kinase-binding mode, such that the inhibitors are selective for bacterial BC. In summary, we have discovered a promising class of potent antibacterials with a previously undescribed mechanism of action. In consideration of the eukaryotic bias of pharmaceutical libraries, our findings also suggest that pursuit of a novel inhibitor leads for antibacterial targets with active-site structural similarity to known human targets will likely be more fruitful than the traditional focus on unique bacterial target space, particularly when structure-based and computational methodologies are applied to ensure bacterial selectivity. PMID:19164768

  17. A class of selective antibacterials derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Miller, J Richard; Dunham, Steve; Mochalkin, Igor; Banotai, Craig; Bowman, Matthew; Buist, Susan; Dunkle, Bill; Hanna, Debra; Harwood, H James; Huband, Michael D; Karnovsky, Alla; Kuhn, Michael; Limberakis, Chris; Liu, Jia Y; Mehrens, Shawn; Mueller, W Thomas; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Ogden, Adam; Ohren, Jeff; Prasad, J V N Vara; Shelly, John A; Skerlos, Laura; Sulavik, Mark; Thomas, V Hayden; VanderRoest, Steve; Wang, LiAnn; Wang, Zhigang; Whitton, Amy; Zhu, Tong; Stover, C Kendall

    2009-02-10

    As the need for novel antibiotic classes to combat bacterial drug resistance increases, the paucity of leads resulting from target-based antibacterial screening of pharmaceutical compound libraries is of major concern. One explanation for this lack of success is that antibacterial screening efforts have not leveraged the eukaryotic bias resulting from more extensive chemistry efforts targeting eukaryotic gene families such as G protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases. Consistent with a focus on antibacterial target space resembling these eukaryotic targets, we used whole-cell screening to identify a series of antibacterial pyridopyrimidines derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore. In bacteria, the pyridopyrimidines target the ATP-binding site of biotin carboxylase (BC), which catalyzes the first enzymatic step of fatty acid biosynthesis. These inhibitors are effective in vitro and in vivo against fastidious gram-negative pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae. Although the BC active site has architectural similarity to those of eukaryotic protein kinases, inhibitor binding to the BC ATP-binding site is distinct from the protein kinase-binding mode, such that the inhibitors are selective for bacterial BC. In summary, we have discovered a promising class of potent antibacterials with a previously undescribed mechanism of action. In consideration of the eukaryotic bias of pharmaceutical libraries, our findings also suggest that pursuit of a novel inhibitor leads for antibacterial targets with active-site structural similarity to known human targets will likely be more fruitful than the traditional focus on unique bacterial target space, particularly when structure-based and computational methodologies are applied to ensure bacterial selectivity.

  18. A class of selective antibacterials derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. Richard; Dunham, Steve; Mochalkin, Igor; Banotai, Craig; Bowman, Matthew; Buist, Susan; Dunkle, Bill; Hanna, Debra; Harwood, H. James; Huband, Michael D.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kuhn, Michael; Limberakis, Chris; Liu, Jia Y.; Mehrens, Shawn; Mueller, W. Thomas; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Ogden, Adam; Ohren, Jeff; Prasad, J.V.N. Vara; Shelly, John A.; Skerlos, Laura; Sulavik, Mark; Thomas, V. Hayden; VanderRoest, Steve; Wang, LiAnn; Wang, Zhigang; Whitton, Amy; Zhu, Tong; Stover, C. Kendall

    2009-06-25

    As the need for novel antibiotic classes to combat bacterial drug resistance increases, the paucity of leads resulting from target-based antibacterial screening of pharmaceutical compound libraries is of major concern. One explanation for this lack of success is that antibacterial screening efforts have not leveraged the eukaryotic bias resulting from more extensive chemistry efforts targeting eukaryotic gene families such as G protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases. Consistent with a focus on antibacterial target space resembling these eukaryotic targets, we used whole-cell screening to identify a series of antibacterial pyridopyrimidines derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore. In bacteria, the pyridopyrimidines target the ATP-binding site of biotin carboxylase (BC), which catalyzes the first enzymatic step of fatty acid biosynthesis. These inhibitors are effective in vitro and in vivo against fastidious Gram-negative pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae. Although the BC active site has architectural similarity to those of eukaryotic protein kinases, inhibitor binding to the BC ATP-binding site is distinct from the protein kinase-binding mode, such that the inhibitors are selective for bacterial BC. In summary, we have discovered a promising class of potent antibacterials with a previously undescribed mechanism of action. In consideration of the eukaryotic bias of pharmaceutical libraries, our findings also suggest that pursuit of a novel inhibitor leads for antibacterial targets with active-site structural similarity to known human targets will likely be more fruitful than the traditional focus on unique bacterial target space, particularly when structure-based and computational methodologies are applied to ensure bacterial selectivity.

  19. Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Protects against Hyperglycemic Stress by Activating Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Kirtikar; Pal, Pabitra Bikash; Sonowal, Himangshu; Srivastava, Satish K.

    2017-01-01

    We have shown earlier that pretreatment of cultured cells with aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors prevents hyperglycemia-induced mitogenic and proinflammatory responses. However, the effects of AR inhibitors on Nrf2-mediated anti-inflammatory responses have not been elucidated yet. We have investigated how AR inhibitor fidarestat protects high glucose- (HG-) induced cell viability changes by increasing the expression of Nrf2 and its dependent phase II antioxidant enzymes. Fidarestat pretreatment prevents HG (25 mM)-induced Thp1 monocyte viability. Further, treatment of Thp1 monocytes with fidarestat caused a time-dependent increase in the expression as well as the DNA-binding activity of Nrf2. In addition, fidarestat augmented the HG-induced Nrf2 expression and activity and also upregulated the expression of Nrf2-dependent proteins such as hemeoxygenase-1 (HO1) and NQO1 in Thp1 cells. Similarly, treatment with AR inhibitor also induced the expression of Nrf2 and HO1 in STZ-induced diabetic mice heart and kidney tissues. Further, AR inhibition increased the HG-induced expression of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD and catalase and activation of AMPK-α1 in Thp1 cells. Our results thus suggest that pretreatment with AR inhibitor prepares the monocytes against hyperglycemic stress by overexpressing the Nrf2-dependent antioxidative proteins. PMID:28740855

  20. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  1. Investigational BET bromodomain protein inhibitors in early stage clinical trials for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Braun, Thorsten; Gardin, Claude

    2017-07-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies driven by genetic mutations and deregulated epigenetic control. Relapse/refractory disease remains frequent in younger patients and even more so in older patients, including treatment with epigenetic drugs in this age group, mainly with hypomethylating agents. New treatment strategies are urgently needed. The recent discovery that epigenetic readers of the bromodomain (BRD) and extraterminal (BET) protein family, are crucial for AML maintenance by transcription of oncogenic c-MYC lead to rapid development of BET inhibitors entering clinical trials. Areas covered: We provide a critical overview using main sources for the use of BET inhibitors in AML treatment. Limits of this treatment approach including resistance mechanisms and future directions including development of new generation BET inhibitors and combination strategies with other drugs are detailed. Expert opinion: BET inhibitors were expected to overcome limits of conventional treatment in patients as impressive in vitro data emerged recently in well-characterized AML subsets, including those associated with poor risk characteristics in the clinic. Nevertheless single activity of BET inhibitors appears to be modest and resistance mechanisms were already identified. BET inhibitors with alternative mechanisms of action and/or combination strategies with epigenetic drugs should be tested.

  2. Advances in the clinical development of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Komal; Taldone, Tony; Modi, Shanu; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Hsp90 is an ATP dependent molecular chaperone protein which integrates multiple oncogenic pathways. As such, Hsp90 inhibition is a promising anti-cancer strategy. Several inhibitors that act on Hsp90 by binding to its N-terminal ATP pocket have entered clinical evaluation. Robust pre-clinical data suggested anti-tumor activity in multiple cancer types. Clinically, encouraging results have been demonstrated in melanoma, acute myeloid leukemia, castrate refractory prostate cancer, non-small cell lung carcinoma and multiple myeloma. In breast cancer, proof-of-concept was demonstrated by first generation Hsp90 inhibitors in combination with trastuzumab mainly in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) + metastatic breast cancer. There are a multitude of second generation Hsp90 inhibitors currently under investigation. To date, however, there is no FDA approved Hsp90 inhibitor nor standardized assay to ascertain Hsp90 inhibition. This review summarizes the current status of both first and second generation Hsp90 inhibitors based on their chemical classification and stage of clinical development. It also discusses the pharmacodynamic assays currently implemented in clinic as well as other novel strategies aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of Hsp90 inhibitors. Ultimately, these efforts will aid in maximizing the full potential of this class of agents. PMID:22062686

  3. The phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 inhibitor, UCN-01, induces fragmentation: possible role of metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-10-05

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) is a key enzyme, master regulator of cellular proliferation and metabolism; it is considered a key target for pharmacological intervention. Using membranes obtained from DDT1 MF-2 cells, phospho-PDK1 was identified by Western blotting, as two major protein bands of Mr 58-68 kDa. Cell incubation with the PDK1 inhibitor, UCN-01, induced a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in the amount of phospho-PDK1 with a concomitant appearance of a ≈42 kDa phosphorylated fragment. Knocking down PDK1 diminished the amount of phospho-PDK1 detected in membranes, accompanied by similarly decreased fragment generation. UCN-01-induced fragment generation was also observed in membranes from cells stably expressing a myc-tagged PDK1 construct. Other PDK1 inhibitors were also tested: OSU-03012 induced a clear decrease in phospho-PDK1 and increased the presence of the phosphorylated fragment in membrane preparations; in contrast, GSK2334470 and staurosporine induced only marginal increases in the amount of PDK1 fragment. Galardin and batimastat, two metalloproteinase inhibitors, markedly attenuated inhibitor-induced PDK1 fragment generation. Metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 9 co-immunoprecipitated with myc-PDK1 under baseline conditions and this interaction was stimulated by UCN-01; batimastat also markedly diminished this effect of the PDK1 inhibitor. Our results indicate that a series of protein kinase inhibitors, namely UCN-01 and OSU-03012 and to a lesser extent GSK2334470 and staurosporine induce PDK1 fragmentation and suggest that metalloproteinases could participate in this effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bromodomain and Extra-terminal (BET) Protein Inhibitors Suppress Chondrocyte Differentiation and Restrain Bone Growth.

    PubMed

    Niu, Ningning; Shao, Rui; Yan, Guang; Zou, Weiguo

    2016-12-23

    Small molecule inhibitors for bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins have recently emerged as potential therapeutic agents in clinical trials for various cancers. However, to date, it is unknown whether these inhibitors have side effects on bone structures. Here, we report that inhibition of BET bromodomain proteins may suppress chondrocyte differentiation and restrain bone growth. We generated a luciferase reporter system using the chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 in which the luciferase gene was driven by the promoter of Col2a1, an elementary collagen of the chondrocyte. The Col2a1-luciferase ATDC5 system was used for rapidly screening both activators and repressors of human collagen Col2a1 gene expression, and we found that BET bromodomain inhibitors reduce the Col2a1-luciferase. Consistent with the luciferase assay, BET inhibitors decrease the expression of Col2a1 Furthermore, we constructed a zebrafish line in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression was driven by col2a1 promoter. The transgenic (col2a1-EGFP) zebrafish line demonstrated that BET inhibitors I-BET151 and (+)-JQ1 may affect EGFP expression in zebrafish. Furthermore, we found that I-BET151 and (+)-JQ1 may affect chondrocyte differentiation in vitro and inhibit zebrafish growth in vivo Mechanistic analysis revealed that BET inhibitors influenced the depletion of RNA polymerase II from the Col2a1 promoter. Collectively, these results suggest that BET bromodomain inhibition may have side effects on skeletal bone structures. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. An otoprotective role for the apoptosis inhibitor protein survivin

    PubMed Central

    Knauer, S K; Heinrich, U-R; Bier, C; Habtemichael, N; Docter, D; Helling, K; Mann, W J; Stauber, R H

    2010-01-01

    Hearing impairment caused by ototoxic insults, such as noise or gentamicin is a worldwide health problem. As the molecular circuitries involved are not yet resolved, current otoprotective therapies are rather empirical than rational. Here, immunohistochemistry and western blotting showed that the cytoprotective protein survivin is expressed in the human and guinea pig cochlea. In the guinea pig model, moderate noise exposure causing only a temporary hearing impairment transiently evoked survivin expression in the spiral ligament, nerve fibers and the organ of Corti. Mechanistically, survivin upregulation may involve nitric oxide (NO)-induced Akt signaling, as enhanced expression of the endothelial NO synthase and phosphorylated Akt were detectable in some surviving-positive cell types. In contrast, intratympanic gentamicin injection inducing cell damage and permanent hearing loss correlated with attenuated survivin levels in the cochlea. Subsequently, the protective activity of the human and the guinea pig survivin orthologs against the ototoxin gentamicin was demonstrated by ectopic overexpression and RNAi-mediated depletion studies in auditory cells in vitro. These data suggest that survivin represents an innate cytoprotective resistor against stress conditions in the auditory system. The pharmacogenetic modulation of survivin may thus provide the conceptual basis for the rational design of novel therapeutic otoprotective strategies. PMID:21364656

  6. Rational tailoring of substrate and inhibitor affinity via ATRP polymer-based protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Murata, Hironobu; Cummings, Chad S; Koepsel, Richard R; Russell, Alan J

    2014-07-14

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP)-based protein engineering of chymotrypsin with a cationic polymer was used to tune the substrate specificity and inhibitor binding. Poly(quaternary ammonium) was grown from the surface of the enzyme using ATRP after covalent attachment of a protein reactive, water-soluble ATRP-initiator. This "grafting from" conjugation approach generated a high density of cationic ammonium ions around the biocatalytic core. Modification increased the surface area of the protein over 40-fold, and the density of modification on the protein surface was approximately one chain per 4 nm(2). After modification, bioactivity was increased at low pH relative to the activity of the native enzyme. In addition, the affinity of the enzyme for a peptide substrate was increased over a wide pH range. The massively cationic chymotrypsin, which included up to 2000 additional positive charges per molecule of enzyme, was also more stable at extremes of temperature and pH. Most interestingly, we were able to rationally control the binding of two oppositely charged polypeptide protease inhibitors, aprotinin and the Bowman-Birk trypsin-chymotrypsin inhibitor from Glycine max, to the cationic derivative of chymotrypsin. This study expands upon our efforts to use polymer-based protein engineering to predictably engineer enzyme properties without the need for molecular biology.

  7. Distinct folding pathways of two homologous disulfide proteins: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2011-01-01

    The folding pathways of disulfide proteins vary substantially (Arolas et al., Trends Biochem Sci 31: 292-301, 2006). The diversity is mainly manifested by (a) the extent of heterogeneity of folding intermediates, (b) the extent of presence of native-like intermediates, and (c) the variation of folding kinetics. Even among structurally similar proteins, the difference can be enormous. This is demonstrated in this concise review with two structurally homologous kunitz-type protease inhibitors, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide, as well as a group of cystine knot proteins. The diversity of their folding mechanisms is illustrated with two different folding techniques: (a) the conventional method of disulfide oxidation (oxidative folding), and (b) the novel method of disulfide scrambling (Chang, J Biol Chem 277: 120-126, 2002). This review also highlights the convergence of folding models concluded form the conventional conformational folding and those obtained by oxidative folding.

  8. Structure guided design of biotin protein ligase inhibitors for antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Paparella, Ashleigh S; Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Yap, Min Y; Tieu, William; Wilce, Matthew C J; Booker, Grant W; Abell, Andrew D; Polyak, Steven W

    2014-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) represents a promising target for the discovery of new antibacterial chemotherapeutics. Here we review the central role of BPL for the survival and virulence of clinically important Staphylococcus aureus in support of this claim. X-ray crystallography structures of BPLs in complex with ligands and small molecule inhibitors provide new insights into the mechanism of protein biotinylation, and a template for structure guided approaches to the design of inhibitors for antibacterial discovery. Most BPLs employ an ordered ligand binding mechanism for the synthesis of the reaction intermediate biotinyl-5´-AMP from substrates biotin and ATP. Recent studies reporting chemical analogs of biotin and biotinyl-5´-AMP as BPL inhibitors that represent new classes of anti-S. aureus agents are reviewed. We highlight strategies to selectively inhibit bacterial BPL over the mammalian equivalent using a 1,2,3-triazole isostere to replace the labile phosphoanhydride naturally present in biotinyl-5´-AMP. A novel in situ approach to improve the detection of triazole-based inhibitors is also presented that could potentially be widely applied to other protein targets.

  9. Binding of natural and synthetic inhibitors to human heat shock protein 90 and their clinical application.

    PubMed

    Petrikaitė, Vilma; Matulis, Daumantas

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the recent progress in the field of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor design. Hsp90 is a heat shock protein with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. Hsp90 is considered a good anticancer target because its inhibition leads to inactivation of its numerous client proteins participating in various signaling and other processes involved in cancer progression. Numerous Hsp90 inhibitors-leads currently tested in clinical trials are presented in this review. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the application of biophysical binding assays in the development of Hsp90 inhibitors. The binding of designed lead compounds to various Hsp90 constructs is measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and thermal shift assay. These assays provide a detailed energetic insight of the binding reaction, including the enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and the Gibbs free energy. A detailed description of the binding energetics helps to extend our knowledge of structure-activity relationships in the design of more potent inhibitors. The most active compounds are then tested for their absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, toxicity, and activity against cancer cell lines.

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of analogues of AKT (protein kinase B) inhibitor-IV.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Wu, Runzhi; Cai, Sutang; Lin, Yuan; Sellers, Llewlyn; Sakamoto, Kaori; He, Biao; Peterson, Blake R

    2011-03-10

    Inhibitors of the PI3-kinase/AKT (protein kinase B) pathway are under investigation as anticancer and antiviral agents. The benzimidazole derivative AKT inhibitor-IV (ChemBridge 5233705) affects this pathway and exhibits potent anticancer and antiviral activity. To probe its biological activity, we synthesized AKT inhibitor-IV and 21 analogues using a novel six-step route based on ZrCl(4)-catalyzed cyclization of 1,2-arylenediamines with α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. We examined effects on viability of HeLa carcinoma cells, viability of normal human cells (NHBE), replication of recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) in HeLa cells, and replication of the intracellular bacterium Mycobacterium fortuitum in HeLa cells. Replacement of the benzimidazole N-ethyl substitutent of AKT inhibitor-IV with N-hexyl and N-dodecyl groups enhanced antiviral activity and cytotoxicity against the cancer cell line, but these compounds showed substantially lower toxicity (from 6-fold to >20-fold) against NHBE cells and no effect on M. fortuitum, suggesting inhibition of one or more host protein(s) required for proliferation of cancer cells and PIV5. The key structural elements identified here may facilitate identification of targets of this highly biologically active scaffold.

  11. Cellular Activity of New Small Molecule Protein Arginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Haya; Khan, Hasan A; Tjin, Caroline C; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-09-08

    The protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational deimination of arginine side chains. Multiple PAD isozymes have been characterized, and abnormal PAD activity has been associated with several human disease states. PAD3 has been characterized as a modulator of cell growth via apoptosis inducing factor and has been implicated in the neurodegenerative response to spinal cord injury. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally constrained versions of the potent and selective PAD3 inhibitor 2. The cell activity of representative inhibitors in this series was also demonstrated for the first time by rescue of thapsigargin-induced cell death in PAD3-expressing HEK293T cells.

  12. Heterocyclic acyl-phosphate bioisostere-based inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus biotin protein ligase.

    PubMed

    Tieu, William; Jarrad, Angie M; Paparella, Ashleigh S; Keeling, Kelly A; Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Wallace, John C; Booker, Grant W; Polyak, Steven W; Abell, Andrew D

    2014-10-01

    Inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus biotin protein ligase (SaBPL) are generated by replacing the acyl phosphate group of biotinyl-5'-AMP with either a 1,2,3-triazole (see 5/10a/10b) or a 1,2,4-oxadiazole (see 7) bioisostere. Importantly, the inhibitors are inactive against the human BPL. The nature of the 5-substituent in the component benzoxazolone of the optimum 1,2,3-triazole series is critical to activity, where this group binds in the ATP binding pocket of the enzyme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Key Structures and Interactions for Binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase B Inhibitors from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Punkvang, Auradee; Kamsri, Pharit; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Hannongbua, Supa; Wolschann, Peter; Irle, Stephan; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2015-07-01

    Substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors have recently been introduced as antituberculosis agents. These inhibitors show impressive activity against protein kinase B, a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is essential for cell growth of M. tuberculosis. However, up to now, X-ray structures of the protein kinase B enzyme complexes with the substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors are currently unavailable. Consequently, structural details of their binding modes are questionable, prohibiting the structural-based design of more potent protein kinase B inhibitors in the future. Here, molecular dynamics simulations, in conjunction with molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area binding free-energy analysis, were employed to gain insight into the complex structures of the protein kinase B inhibitors and their binding energetics. The complex structures obtained by the molecular dynamics simulations show binding free energies in good agreement with experiment. The detailed analysis of molecular dynamics results shows that Glu93, Val95, and Leu17 are key residues responsible to the binding of the protein kinase B inhibitors. The aminopyrazole group and the pyrimidine core are the crucial moieties of substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors for interaction with the key residues. Our results provide a structural concept that can be used as a guide for the future design of protein kinase B inhibitors with highly increased antagonistic activity.

  14. Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor-Trypsin Complex as a Detection System for Recombinant Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borjigin, Jimo; Nathans, Jeremy

    1993-01-01

    Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) binds to trypsin and anhydrotrypsin (an enzymatically inactive derivative of trypsin) with affinities of 6 x 10-14 and 1.1 x 10-13 M, respectively. We have taken advantage of the high affinity and specificity of this binding reaction to develop a protein tagging system in which biotinylated trypsin or biotinylated anhydrotrypsin is used as the reagent to detect recombinant fusion proteins into which BPTI has been inserted. Two proteins, opsin and growth hormone, were used as targets for insertional mutagenesis with BPTI. In each case, both domains of the fusion protein appear to be correctly folded. The fusion proteins can be specifically and efficiently detected by biotinylated trypsin or biotinylated anhydrotrypsin, as demonstrated by staining of transfected cells, protein blotting, affinity purification, and a mobility shift assay in SDS/polyacrylamide gels.

  15. Amyloid precursor protein selective gamma-secretase inhibitors for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Inhibition of gamma-secretase presents a direct target for lowering Aβ production in the brain as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, gamma-secretase is known to process multiple substrates in addition to amyloid precursor protein (APP), most notably Notch, which has limited clinical development of inhibitors targeting this enzyme. It has been postulated that APP substrate selective inhibitors of gamma-secretase would be preferable to non-selective inhibitors from a safety perspective for AD therapy. Methods In vitro assays monitoring inhibitor potencies at APP γ-site cleavage (equivalent to Aβ40), and Notch ε-site cleavage, in conjunction with a single cell assay to simultaneously monitor selectivity for inhibition of Aβ production vs. Notch signaling were developed to discover APP selective gamma-secretase inhibitors. In vivo efficacy for acute reduction of brain Aβ was determined in the PDAPP transgene model of AD, as well as in wild-type FVB strain mice. In vivo selectivity was determined following seven days x twice per day (b.i.d.) treatment with 15 mg/kg/dose to 1,000 mg/kg/dose ELN475516, and monitoring brain Aβ reduction vs. Notch signaling endpoints in periphery. Results The APP selective gamma-secretase inhibitors ELN318463 and ELN475516 reported here behave as classic gamma-secretase inhibitors, demonstrate 75- to 120-fold selectivity for inhibiting Aβ production compared with Notch signaling in cells, and displace an active site directed inhibitor at very high concentrations only in the presence of substrate. ELN318463 demonstrated discordant efficacy for reduction of brain Aβ in the PDAPP compared with wild-type FVB, not observed with ELN475516. Improved in vivo safety of ELN475516 was demonstrated in the 7d repeat dose study in wild-type mice, where a 33% reduction of brain Aβ was observed in mice terminated three hours post last dose at the lowest dose of inhibitor tested. No overt in-life or post

  16. Amyloid precursor protein selective gamma-secretase inhibitors for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Basi, Guriqbal S; Hemphill, Susanna; Brigham, Elizabeth F; Liao, Anna; Aubele, Danielle L; Baker, Jeanne; Barbour, Robin; Bova, Michael; Chen, Xiao-Hua; Dappen, Michael S; Eichenbaum, Tovah; Goldbach, Erich; Hawkinson, Jon; Lawler-Herbold, Rose; Hu, Kang; Hui, Terence; Jagodzinski, Jacek J; Keim, Pamela S; Kholodenko, Dora; Latimer, Lee H; Lee, Mike; Marugg, Jennifer; Mattson, Matthew N; McCauley, Scott; Miller, James L; Motter, Ruth; Mutter, Linda; Neitzel, Martin L; Ni, Huifang; Nguyen, Lan; Quinn, Kevin; Ruslim, Lany; Semko, Christopher M; Shapiro, Paul; Smith, Jenifer; Soriano, Ferdie; Szoke, Balazs; Tanaka, Kevin; Tang, Pearl; Tucker, John A; Ye, Xiacong Michael; Yu, Mei; Wu, Jing; Xu, Ying-Zi; Garofalo, Albert W; Sauer, John Michael; Konradi, Andrei W; Ness, Daniel; Shopp, George; Pleiss, Michael A; Freedman, Stephen B; Schenk, Dale

    2010-12-29

    Inhibition of gamma-secretase presents a direct target for lowering Aβ production in the brain as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, gamma-secretase is known to process multiple substrates in addition to amyloid precursor protein (APP), most notably Notch, which has limited clinical development of inhibitors targeting this enzyme. It has been postulated that APP substrate selective inhibitors of gamma-secretase would be preferable to non-selective inhibitors from a safety perspective for AD therapy. In vitro assays monitoring inhibitor potencies at APP γ-site cleavage (equivalent to Aβ40), and Notch ε-site cleavage, in conjunction with a single cell assay to simultaneously monitor selectivity for inhibition of Aβ production vs. Notch signaling were developed to discover APP selective gamma-secretase inhibitors. In vivo efficacy for acute reduction of brain Aβ was determined in the PDAPP transgene model of AD, as well as in wild-type FVB strain mice. In vivo selectivity was determined following seven days x twice per day (b.i.d.) treatment with 15 mg/kg/dose to 1,000 mg/kg/dose ELN475516, and monitoring brain Aβ reduction vs. Notch signaling endpoints in periphery. The APP selective gamma-secretase inhibitors ELN318463 and ELN475516 reported here behave as classic gamma-secretase inhibitors, demonstrate 75- to 120-fold selectivity for inhibiting Aβ production compared with Notch signaling in cells, and displace an active site directed inhibitor at very high concentrations only in the presence of substrate. ELN318463 demonstrated discordant efficacy for reduction of brain Aβ in the PDAPP compared with wild-type FVB, not observed with ELN475516. Improved in vivo safety of ELN475516 was demonstrated in the 7d repeat dose study in wild-type mice, where a 33% reduction of brain Aβ was observed in mice terminated three hours post last dose at the lowest dose of inhibitor tested. No overt in-life or post-mortem indications of systemic toxicity, nor

  17. Effect of a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor on postexercise muscle protein synthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Nicholas A.; Dickinson, Jared M.; LeMoine, Jennifer K.; Carroll, Chad C.; Sullivan, Bridget E.; Haus, Jacob M.; Jemiolo, Bozena; Trappe, Scott W.; Hughes, Gordon M.; Sanders, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Nonselective blockade of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes in skeletal muscle eliminates the normal increase in muscle protein synthesis following resistance exercise. The current study tested the hypothesis that this COX-mediated increase in postexercise muscle protein synthesis is regulated specifically by the COX-2 isoform. Sixteen males (23 ± 1 yr) were randomly assigned to one of two groups that received three doses of either a selective COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib; 200 mg/dose, 600 mg total) or a placebo in double-blind fashion during the 24 h following a single bout of knee extensor resistance exercise. At rest and 24 h postexercise, skeletal muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) was measured using a primed constant infusion of [2H5]phenylalanine coupled with muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis, and measurements were made of mRNA and protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2. Mixed muscle protein FSR in response to exercise (P < 0.05) was not suppressed by the COX-2 inhibitor (0.056 ± 0.004 to 0.108 ± 0.014%/h) compared with placebo (0.074 ± 0.004 to 0.091 ± 0.005%/h), nor was there any difference (P > 0.05) between the placebo and COX-2 inhibitor postexercise when controlling for resting FSR. The COX-2 inhibitor did not influence COX-1 mRNA, COX-1 protein, or COX-2 protein levels, whereas it did increase (P < 0.05) COX-2 mRNA (3.0 ± 0.9-fold) compared with placebo (1.3 ± 0.3-fold). It appears that the elimination of the postexercise muscle protein synthesis response by nonselective COX inhibitors is not solely due to COX-2 isoform blockade. Furthermore, the current data suggest that the COX-1 enzyme is likely the main isoform responsible for the COX-mediated increase in muscle protein synthesis following resistance exercise in humans. PMID:19934404

  18. An Aminopyridazine Inhibitor of Death Associated Protein Kinase Attenuates Hypoxia-Ischemia Induced Brain Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Velentza, A.V.; Wainwright, M.S.; Zasadzki, M.; Mirzoeva, S.; Haiech, J.; Focia, P.J.; Egli, M.; Watterson, D.M.

    2010-03-08

    Death associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a calcium and calmodulin regulated enzyme that functions early in eukaryotic programmed cell death, or apoptosis. To validate DAPK as a potential drug discovery target for acute brain injury, the first small molecule DAPK inhibitor was synthesized and tested in vivo. A single injection of the aminopyridazine-based inhibitor administered 6 h after injury attenuated brain tissue or neuronal biomarker loss measured, respectively, 1 week and 3 days later. Because aminopyridazine is a privileged structure in neuropharmacology, we determined the high-resolution crystal structure of a binary complex between the kinase domain and a molecular fragment of the DAPK inhibitor. The co-crystal structure describes a structural basis for interaction and provides a firm foundation for structure-assisted design of lead compounds with appropriate molecular properties for future drug development.

  19. Studies on pyrrolopyrimidines as selective inhibitors of multidrug-resistance-associated protein in multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouming; Folkes, Adrian; Chuckowree, Irina; Cockcroft, Xiaoling; Sohal, Sukhjit; Miller, Warren; Milton, John; Wren, Stephen P; Vicker, Nigel; Depledge, Paul; Scott, John; Smith, Lyndsay; Jones, Hazel; Mistry, Prakash; Faint, Richard; Thompson, Deanne; Cocks, Simon

    2004-03-11

    Multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) remains a major obstacle for successful treatment of cancer. Inhibition of Pgp and MRP transport is important for high efficacy of anticancer drugs. While several Pgp inhibitors have entered clinical trials, the development of specific MRP1 inhibitors is still in its infancy. In our screening program, we have identified a pyrrolopyrimidine (4) as a novel and selective MRP1 inhibitor. Subsequent SAR work on the 4-position of the template revealed the phenethylpiperazine side chain as a potent replacement of the benzylthio group of the lead molecule. Introduction of groups at the 2-position seems to have no detrimental effect on activity. Modifications to the nitrile group at the 7-position resulted in the identification of analogues with groups, such as amides, with superior pharmacokinetic profiles. In vivo efficacy has been demonstrated by xenograft studies on selected compounds.

  20. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is a target for selective kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Kayode K; Larson, Eric T; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Castaneda, Lisa J; DeRocher, Amy E; Inampudi, Krishna K; Kim, Jessica E; Arakaki, Tracy L; Murphy, Ryan C; Zhang, Li; Napuli, Alberto J; Maly, Dustin J; Verlinde, Christophe LMJ; Buckner, Frederick S; Parsons, Marilyn; Hol, Wim GJ; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2010-01-01

    New drugs are needed to treat toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinases (TgCDPKs) are attractive targets because they are absent in mammals. We show that TgCDPK1 is inhibited by low nanomolar levels of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs), compounds designed to be inactive against mammalian kinases. Cocrystal structures of TgCDPK1 with BKIs confirm that the structural basis for selectivity is due to the unique glycine gatekeeper residue in the ATP-binding site at residue 128. We show that BKIs interfere with an early step in T. gondii infection of human cells in culture. Furthermore, we show that TgCDPK1 is the in vivo target of BKIs because T. gondii cells expressing a glycine to methionine gatekeeper mutant enzyme show significantly decreased sensitivity to this class of selective kinase inhibitors. Thus, design of selective TgCDPK1 inhibitors with low host toxicity may be achievable. PMID:20436472

  1. A novel transmembrane Ser/Thr kinase complexes with protein phosphatase-1 and inhibitor-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Brautigan, David L

    2002-12-20

    Protein kinases and protein phosphatases exert coordinated control over many essential cellular processes. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of a novel human transmembrane protein KPI-2 (Kinase/Phosphatase/Inhibitor-2) that was identified by yeast two-hybrid using protein phosphatase inhibitor-2 (Inh2) as bait. KPI-2 mRNA was predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle. KPI-2 is a 1503-residue protein with two predicted transmembrane helices at the N terminus, a kinase domain, followed by a C-terminal domain. The transmembrane helices were sufficient for targeting proteins to the membrane. KPI-2 kinase domain has about 60% identity with its closest relative, a tyrosine kinase. However, it only exhibited serine/threonine kinase activity in autophosphorylation reactions or with added substrates. KPI-2 kinase domain phosphorylated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1C) at Thr(320), which attenuated PP1C activity. KPI-2 C-terminal domain directly associated with PP1C, and this required a VTF motif. Inh2 associated with KPI-2 C-terminal domain with and without PP1C. Thus, KPI-2 is a kinase with sites to associate with PP1C and Inh2 to form a regulatory complex that is localized to membranes.

  2. Retaspimycin hydrochloride (IPI-504): a novel heat shock protein inhibitor as an anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Britt Erika; Vesole, David H

    2009-09-01

    Heat shock proteins are vital to cell survival under conditions of stress. They bind client proteins to assist in protein stabilization, translocation of polypeptides across cell membranes and recovery of proteins from aggregates. Heat shock protein inhibitors are a diverse group of novel agents that have been demonstrated to have pro-apoptotic effects on malignant cells through inhibition of ATP binding on the ATP/ADP-binding pocket of the heat shock protein. Initial development of heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, geldanamycin and 17-AAG, were limited by hepatotoxicity and the need for solvent carrying agents. In contrast, retaspimycin, or IPI-504, a derivative of geldanamycin and 17-AAG, is highly soluble in water and generally well tolerated. In Phase I/II trials, retaspimycin has shown activity in NSCLC and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The most promising activity was observed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Phase I/II trials are currently underway to evaluate the dosing schedules and activity of IPI-504 in breast cancer. Given the in vitro activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, melanoma, leukemia and pancreatic cancer, current and future trials are of clinical interest. This article reviews IPI-504 and its utility in a wide variety of cancer phenotypes.

  3. Transcriptional upregulation of the human MRP2 gene expression by serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pułaski, L; Szemraj, J; Uchiumi, T; Kuwano, M; Bartosz, G

    2005-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation by cellular signalling pathways of multidrug resistance proteins that pump anticancer drugs out of cells is one of key issues in the development of the multidrug resistance phenotype. In our study, we have used the reporter gene approach as well as determination of mRNA levels in two cancer cell lines of human origin, MCF-7 and A549, to study the regulation of multidrug resistance proteins 2 and 3 (MRP2 AND MRP3) by serine/threonine protein kinases. Since a prototypic PKC inducer, PMA, caused a marked upregulation of transcription from both human MRP2 and MRP3 promoters, a role for PKC isoforms in positive control of expression of these proteins could be postulated. Interestingly, broad-spectrum serine-threonine protein kinase inhibitors which also inhibit PKC, staurosporine and H-7, stimulated expression from the MRP2 promoter instead of inhibiting it. This effect was not seen for MRP3. MRP2 induction by staurosporine and H-7 was shown to have phenotypic consequences in whole cells, rendering them more resistant to etoposide and increasing their ability to export calcein through the plasma membrane. These results point to the involvement of serine/threonine protein kinases in negative regulation of the human MRP2 gene and to the necessity of testing novel anti-cancer drugs acting as protein kinase inhibitors with regard to their potential ability to induce multidrug resistance.

  4. Influence of oxidative browning inhibitors and isolation techniques on sweet potato protein recovery and composition.

    PubMed

    Arogundade, Lawrence A; Mu, Tai-Hua

    2012-10-01

    Effects of oxidative browning inhibitors on sweet potato protein (SPP) recovery and quality were studied. Oxidative browning inhibitors successfully decreased sweet potato oxidative browning, but reduced both SPP extractability and recovery. Ultrafiltration/diafiltration processed sweet potato (UDSP) protein (at pH 4, 6 and 7) showed significantly (p<0.05) higher yield, purity, solubility, thermal stability and amino acid constituents than that of isoelectrically precipitated sweet potato (IPSP) protein (at pH 4). The yield of UDSP proteins was more than twice that of IPSP protein. Denaturation temperature (Td), enthalpy change (ΔH) and solubility (at pH 3 and 8) of UDSP proteins were in the ranges 82.89-90.29 °C, 6.34-11.35 (J/g) and 71.4-94.2%, respectively, while that of IPSP protein were 85.27 °C, 2.35 (J/g) 31.2% and 55.5%, respectively. Ratio of SPP essential amino acid to the total amino acid ratio ranged from 0.49 to 0.51. SPP in vitro digestibility and digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) ranged 70-80.7% and 44.79-51.08%, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anticancer activity of BIM-46174, a new inhibitor of the heterotrimeric Galpha/Gbetagamma protein complex.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Grégoire P; Lonchampt, Marie O; Holbeck, Susan; Attoub, Samir; Zaharevitz, Daniel; Alley, Mike; Wright, John; Brezak, Marie C; Coulomb, Hélène; Savola, Ann; Huchet, Marion; Chaumeron, Sophie; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Forgez, Patricia; Bruyneel, Erik; Bracke, Mark; Ferrandis, Eric; Roubert, Pierre; Demarquay, Danièle; Gespach, Christian; Kasprzyk, Philip G

    2006-09-15

    A large number of hormones and local agonists activating guanine-binding protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) play a major role in cancer progression. Here, we characterize the new imidazo-pyrazine derivative BIM-46174, which acts as a selective inhibitor of heterotrimeric G-protein complex. BIM-46174 prevents the heterotrimeric G-protein signaling linked to several GPCRs mediating (a) cyclic AMP generation (Galphas), (b) calcium release (Galphaq), and (c) cancer cell invasion by Wnt-2 frizzled receptors and high-affinity neurotensin receptors (Galphao/i and Galphaq). BIM-46174 inhibits the growth of a large panel of human cancer cell lines, including anticancer drug-resistant cells. Exposure of cancer cells to BIM-46174 leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. National Cancer Institute COMPARE analysis for BIM-46174 supports its novel pharmacologic profile compared with 12,000 anticancer agents. The growth rate of human tumor xenografts in athymic mice is significantly reduced after administration of BIM-46174 combined with either cisplatin, farnesyltransferase inhibitor, or topoisomerase inhibitors. Our data validate the feasibility of targeting heterotrimeric G-protein functions downstream the GPCRs to improve anticancer chemotherapy.

  6. Allergenicity, trypsin inhibitor activity and nutritive quality of enzymatically modified soy proteins.

    PubMed

    De La Barca, Ana María Calderón; Wall, Abraham; López-Díaz, José Alberto

    2005-05-01

    Two ultrafiltered soy flour protein fractions were evaluated; the first was obtained by hydrolysis (0.5-3 kDa, F(0.5-3)), and the second was an enzymatically methionine-enriched fraction (1-10 kDa, F(1-10)E). Amino acid profiles, protein quality, allergenicity (against soy-sensitive infant sera) and trypsin inhibitor activity were determined. Fraction F(1-10)E fulfilled amino acid requirements for infants, whereas the F(0.5-3) fraction was methionine deficient. Both fractions were similar in net protein utilization, and F(1-10)E digestibility was comparable with casein and higher (P?inhibitor activity with respect to soy flour was 8.1%, 3.3% and 1% for hydrolysate, F(1-10)E and F(0.5-3), respectively. Both fractions presented high nutritive quality and reduced or null allergenicity. The trypsin inhibitor activity decreased along processing and could be a useful indicator for production of hypoallergenic proteins.

  7. Characterization of a Serine Hydrolase Targeted by Acyl-protein Thioesterase Inhibitors in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Louise E.; Rusch, Marion; Adibekian, Alexander; Bullen, Hayley E.; Graindorge, Arnault; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Braun-Breton, Catherine; Baumeister, Stefan; Porfetye, Arthur T.; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Hedberg, Christian; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, cysteine palmitoylation is an important reversible modification that impacts protein targeting, folding, stability, and interactions with partners. Evidence suggests that protein palmitoylation contributes to key biological processes in Apicomplexa with the recent palmitome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum reporting over 400 substrates that are modified with palmitate by a broad range of protein S-acyl transferases. Dynamic palmitoylation cycles require the action of an acyl-protein thioesterase (APT) that cleaves palmitate from substrates and conveys reversibility to this posttranslational modification. In this work, we identified candidates for APT activity in Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of parasites with low micromolar concentrations of β-lactone- or triazole urea-based inhibitors that target human APT1 showed varied detrimental effects at multiple steps of the parasite lytic cycle. The use of an activity-based probe in combination with these inhibitors revealed the existence of several serine hydrolases that are targeted by APT1 inhibitors. The active serine hydrolase, TgASH1, identified as the homologue closest to human APT1 and APT2, was characterized further. Biochemical analysis of TgASH1 indicated that this enzyme cleaves substrates with a specificity similar to APTs, and homology modeling points toward an APT-like enzyme. TgASH1 is dispensable for parasite survival, which indicates that the severe effects observed with the β-lactone inhibitors are caused by the inhibition of non-TgASH1 targets. Other ASH candidates for APT activity were functionally characterized, and one of them was found to be resistant to gene disruption due to the potential essential nature of the protein. PMID:23913689

  8. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  9. Molecular Mechanism of Selectivity among G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thal, David M.; Yeow, Raymond Y.; Schoenau, Christian; Huber, Jochen; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-07-11

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of cell physiology and control processes ranging from glucose homeostasis to contractility of the heart. A major mechanism for the desensitization of activated GPCRs is their phosphorylation by GPCR kinases (GRKs). Overexpression of GRK2 is strongly linked to heart failure, and GRK2 has long been considered a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Several lead compounds developed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals show high selectivity for GRK2 and therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure. To understand how these drugs achieve their selectivity, we determined crystal structures of the bovine GRK2-G{beta}{gamma} complex in the presence of two of these inhibitors. Comparison with the apoGRK2-G{beta}{gamma} structure demonstrates that the compounds bind in the kinase active site in a manner similar to that of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. Both balanol and the Takeda compounds induce a slight closure of the kinase domain, the degree of which correlates with the potencies of the inhibitors. Based on our crystal structures and homology modeling, we identified five amino acids surrounding the inhibitor binding site that we hypothesized could contribute to inhibitor selectivity. However, our results indicate that these residues are not major determinants of selectivity among GRK subfamilies. Rather, selectivity is achieved by the stabilization of a unique inactive conformation of the GRK2 kinase domain.

  10. Discovery of protein phosphatase inhibitor classes by biology-oriented synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nören-Müller, Andrea; Reis-Corrêa, Ivan; Prinz, Heino; Rosenbaum, Claudia; Saxena, Krishna; Schwalbe, Harald J.; Vestweber, Dietmar; Cagna, Guiseppe; Schunk, Stefan; Schwarz, Oliver; Schiewe, Hajo; Waldmann, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Protein phosphatases have very recently emerged as important targets for chemical biology and medicinal chemistry research, and new phosphatase inhibitor classes are in high demand. The underlying frameworks of natural products represent the evolutionarily selected fractions of chemical space explored by nature so far and meet the criteria of relevance to nature and biological prevalidation most crucial to inhibitor development. We refer to synthesis efforts and compound collection development based on these criteria as biology-oriented synthesis. For the discovery of phosphatase inhibitor classes by means of this approach, four natural product-derived or -inspired medium-sized compound collections were synthesized and investigated for inhibition of the tyrosine phosphatases VE-PTP, Shp-2, PTP1B, MptpA, and MptpB and the dual-specificity phosphatases Cdc25A and VHR. The screen yielded four unprecedented and selective phosphatase inhibitor classes for four phosphatases with high hit rates. For VE-PTP and MptpB the first inhibitors were discovered. These results demonstrate that biology-oriented synthesis is an efficient approach to the discovery of new compound classes for medicinal chemistry and chemical biology research that opens up new opportunities for the study of phosphatases, which may lead to the development of new drug candidates. PMID:16809424

  11. Chemoproteomics-Enabled Discovery of a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of the DNA Repair Protein MGMT.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Abegg, Daniel; Hoch, Dominic G; Adibekian, Alexander

    2016-02-18

    We present a novel chemical scaffold for cysteine-reactive covalent inhibitors. Chloromethyl triazoles (CMTs) are readily accessed in only two chemical steps, thus enabling the rapid optimization of the pharmacological properties of these inhibitors. We demonstrate the tunability of the CMTs towards a specific biological target by synthesizing AA-CW236 as the first potent non-pseudosubstrate inhibitor of the O(6) -alkylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a protein of major clinical significance for the treatment of several severe cancer forms. Using quantitative proteomics profiling techniques, we show that AA-CW236 exhibits a high degree of selectivity towards MGMT. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of our MGMT inhibitor in combination with the DNA alkylating drug temozolomide in breast and colon cancer cells by fluorescence imaging and a cell-viability assay. Our results may open a new avenue towards the development of a clinically approved MGMT inhibitor. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  13. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans protein farnesyltransferase reveal strategies for developing inhibitors that target fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hast, Michael A; Nichols, Connie B; Armstrong, Stephanie M; Kelly, Shannon M; Hellinga, Homme W; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Beese, Lorena S

    2011-10-07

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  14. Biochemical Mechanisms of Resistance to Small-Molecule Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurty, Ratika; Maly, Dustin J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases have emerged as one of the most frequently targeted families of proteins in drug discovery. While the development of small-molecule inhibitors that have the potency and selectivity necessary to be effective cancer drugs is still a formidable challenge, there have been several notable successes in this area over the last decade. However, in the course of the clinical use of these inhibitors, it has become apparent that drug resistance is a recurring problem. Because kinase inhibitors act by targeting a specific kinase or set of kinases, there is a strong selective pressure for the development of mutations that hinder drug binding but preserve the catalytic activity of these enzymes. To date, resistance mutations to clinically-approved kinase inhibitors have been identified in a number of kinases. This review will highlight recent work that has been performed to understand how mutations in the kinase catalytic domain confer drug resistance. In addition, recent experimental efforts to predict potential sites of clinical drug resistance will be discussed. PMID:20044834

  15. The phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil stimulates angiogenesis through a protein kinase G/MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Pyriochou, Anastasia; Zhou, Zongmin; Koika, Vasiliki; Petrou, Christos; Cordopatis, Paul; Sessa, William C; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2007-04-01

    cGMP-degrading pathways have received little attention in the context of angiogenesis. In the present study we set out to determine whether cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibition affects new blood vessel growth. Incubation of chicken chorioallantoic membranes (CAMs) in vivo with sildenafil increased vascular length in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, incubation of cultured endothelial cells (ECs) with the PDE5 inhibitor promoted proliferation, migration, and organization into tube-like structures. The effects of sildenafil on the angiogenesis-related properties of EC could be blocked by pre-treatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ or the protein kinase G (PKG) I inhibitor DT-3. In addition, over-expression of sGC in EC led to an enhanced growth and migratory response to sildenafil. To study the signaling pathways implicated in the sildenafil-stimulated angiogenic responses we determined the phosphorylation status of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) members. Incubation of cells with sildenafil increased both extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. Inhibition of MEK by PD98059 and p38 with SB203580 blocked sildenafil-induced proliferation and migration, respectively, suggesting that these MAPK members are downstream of PDE5 and mediate the angiogenic effects of sildenafil. PDE5 inhibitors could, thus, be used in disease states where neo-vessel growth is desired. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowers gastric adenocarcinoma TMK1 cell proliferation via bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu; Yu Le; Cho, C.H.

    2008-06-27

    Proteasome inhibitor is a novel class of cancer therapeutics, of which the mechanism of action is not fully understood. It is reported that proteasome inhibitor enhances bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in osteoblasts to stimulate bone formation. BMP signaling is also an important tumor-suppressing pathway in gastric carcinogenesis. We therefore sought to determine the anti-mitogenic effect of proteasome inhibition in relation to BMP signaling in gastric cancer cells. Results showed that proteasome inhibitor MG-132 significantly suppressed the proliferation and the colony-forming ability of gastric cancer TMK1 cells. In this connection, MG-132 activated BMP signaling, manifested as an increase in Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and up-regulation of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} mRNA and protein expression. Knockdown of BMP receptor II by RNA interference abolished Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction, and the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by MG-132. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 up-regulated the expression of BMP1 and BMP4 and suppressed the expression of Smad6. Knockdown of Smad6 also mimicked the effect of MG-132 on BMP signaling. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of proteasome suppresses gastric cancer cell proliferation via activation of BMP signaling. This discovery may open up a novel therapeutic avenue to proteasome inhibitors for the management of gastric cancer.

  17. On-Chip Peptide Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Protein Kinase Inhibitor Screening.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Lai; Kim, Young-Pil; Son, Jin Gyeong; Son, Miyoung; Lee, Tae Geol

    2017-01-03

    Protein kinases are enzymes that are important targets for drug discovery because of their involvement in regulating the essential cellular processes. For this reason, the changes in protein kinase activity induced by each drug candidate (the inhibitor in this case) need to be accurately determined. Here, an on-chip secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging technique of the peptides was developed for determining protein kinase activity and inhibitor screening without a matrix. In our method, cysteine-tethered peptides adsorbed onto a gold surface produced changes in the relative peak intensities of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated substrate peptides, which were quantitatively dependent on protein kinase activity. Using mass spectrometry imaging of multiple compartments on the gold surface in the presence of a peptide substrate, we screened 13,727 inhibitors, of which seven were initially found to have inhibitor efficiencies that surpassed 50%. Of these, we were able to identify a new breakpoint cluster region-abelson (BCR-ABL)(T315I) kinase inhibitor, henceforth referred to as KR135861. KR135861 showed no cytotoxicity and was subsequently confirmed to be superior to imatinib, a commercial drug marketed as Gleevec. Moreover, KR135861 exhibited a greater inhibitory effect on the BCR-ABL(T315I) tyrosine kinase, with an IC50 value as low as 1.3 μM. In in vitro experiments, KR135861 reduced the viability of both Ba/F3 cells expressing wild-type BCR-ABL and BCR-ABL(T315I), in contrast to imatinib's inhibitory effects only on Ba/F3 cells expressing wild-type BCR-ABL. Due to the surface sensitivity and selectivity of SIMS imaging, it is anticipated that our approach will make it easier to validate the small modifications of a substrate in relation to enzyme activity as well as for drug discovery. This mass spectrometry imaging analysis enables efficient screening for protein kinase inhibitors, thus permitting high-throughput drug screening with high accuracy

  18. Characterization of a novel prokaryotic GDP dissociation inhibitor domain from the G protein coupled membrane protein FeoB

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Edward T.; Jalilian, Amir R.; Spasov, Krasimir A.; Unger, Vinzenz M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The FeoB family of membrane embedded G proteins are involved with high affinity Fe(II) uptake in prokaryotes. Here, we report that FeoB harbors a novel GDP dissociation inhibitor like domain that specifically stabilizes GDP-binding through an interaction with the switch I region of the G protein. We show that the stabilization of GDP-binding is conserved between species despite a high degree of sequence variability in their GDI-like domains, and demonstrate that the presence of the membrane embedded domain increases GDP-binding affinity roughly 150-fold over the level accomplished by action of the GDI-like domain alone. To our knowledge, this is the first example for a prokaryotic GDI, targeting a bacterial G protein-coupled membrane process. Our findings suggest that Fe(II) uptake in bacteria involves a G protein regulatory pathway reminiscent of signaling mechanisms found in higher order organisms. PMID:18068722

  19. Inhibition of formation of filopodia after axotomy by inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D J; Wu, D Y

    1995-08-01

    The activity of motile protrusions of the growth cone--filopodia, veils, and lamellipodia--is essential for directed growth of a neuronal process. The regulation of the formation of these protrusions is not well understood. Numerous filopodia and veils or lamellipodia form within minutes of transection of an Aplysia axon in culture, as the initial components of growth cones of regenerating neurites. Axotomy, therefore, provides a robust and reliable protocol for analyzing the formation of these protrusions. We evaluated the involvement of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of protrusive activity. Of the inhibitors of protein kinases assayed, only the inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases--genistein, lavendustin A, herbimycin A, and erbstatin analogue--suppressed the formation of protrusions, as assessed by high magnification video microscopy. These drugs did not work by preventing resealing of the axon, as evident from visual inspection and by the unimpaired effectiveness of genistein or lavendustin in preventing formation of filopodia when applied after resealing. Inhibition of protein tyrosine kinases not only prevented the formation of actin-based protrusions, but also caused deterioration of the actin network underlying the protrusive area of preexisting growth cones. Consistent with an involvement of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the generation of protrusive structures, immunocytochemistry revealed that aggregates of phosphotyrosine appeared at the margins of the axon, from which protrusions emerge shortly after axotomy. These results suggest a role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the formation and maintenance of actin-based protrusive structures.

  20. Benzodiazepines and benzotriazepines as protein interaction inhibitors targeting bromodomains of the BET family

    PubMed Central

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Picaud, Sarah; Fedorov, Oleg; Keller, Marco; Wrobel, Matthias; Morgenstern, Olaf; Bracher, Franz; Knapp, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are psychoactive drugs with anxiolytic, sedative, skeletal muscle relaxant and amnestic properties. Recently triazolo-benzodiazepines have been also described as potent and highly selective protein interaction inhibitors of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins, a family of transcriptional co-regulators that play a key role in cancer cell survival and proliferation, but the requirements for high affinity interaction of this compound class with bromodomains has not been described. Here we provide insight into the structure–activity relationship (SAR) and selectivity of this versatile scaffold. In addition, using high resolution crystal structures we compared the binding mode of a series of benzodiazepine (BzD) and related triazolo-benzotriazepines (BzT) derivatives including clinically approved drugs such as alprazolam and midazolam. Our analysis revealed the importance of the 1-methyl triazolo ring system for BET binding and suggests modifications for the development of further high affinity bromodomain inhibitors. PMID:22137933

  1. Synthesis and Evaluation of Quinazolines as Inhibitors of the Bacterial Cell Division Protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Nepomuceno, Gabriella M; Chan, Katie M; Huynh, Valerie; Martin, Kevin S; Moore, Jared T; O'Brien, Terrence E; Pollo, Luiz A E; Sarabia, Francisco J; Tadeus, Clarissa; Yao, Zi; Anderson, David E; Ames, James B; Shaw, Jared T

    2015-03-12

    The bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is one of many potential targets for the development of novel antibiotics. Recently, zantrin Z3 was shown to be a cross-species inhibitor of FtsZ; however, its specific interactions with the protein are still unknown. Herein we report the synthesis of analogues that contain a more tractable core structure and an analogue with single-digit micromolar inhibition of FtsZ's GTPase activity, which represents the most potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli FtsZ reported to date. In addition, the zantrin Z3 core has been converted to two potential photo-cross-linking reagents for proteomic studies that could shed light on the molecular interactions between FtsZ and molecules related to zantrin Z3.

  2. Synthesis and Evaluation of Quinazolines as Inhibitors of the Bacterial Cell Division Protein FtsZ

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial cell division protein FtsZ is one of many potential targets for the development of novel antibiotics. Recently, zantrin Z3 was shown to be a cross-species inhibitor of FtsZ; however, its specific interactions with the protein are still unknown. Herein we report the synthesis of analogues that contain a more tractable core structure and an analogue with single-digit micromolar inhibition of FtsZ’s GTPase activity, which represents the most potent inhibitor of Escherichia coli FtsZ reported to date. In addition, the zantrin Z3 core has been converted to two potential photo-cross-linking reagents for proteomic studies that could shed light on the molecular interactions between FtsZ and molecules related to zantrin Z3. PMID:25815151

  3. [ENHANCEMENT OF AGROBACTERIAL TRANSFORMATION OF PLANTS USING PROTEIN KINASE INHIBITORS TRIFLUOPERAZINE AND GENISTEIN].

    PubMed

    Yemets, A I; Fedorchuk, V V; Blume, Ya B

    2016-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein and serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor, trifluoperazine, on the frequency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of leaf explants of N. tabacum was investigated. The influence of different concentrations of trifluoperazine in the range from 10 to 300 μM was investigated. It was found that 10 μM trifluoperazine provoked the increase of the frequency of agrobacterial transformation of tobacco leaf disks on 25%. In parallel, the influence of different concentrations of genistein in the range from 10 to 100 μM was investigated. It was found 100 μM genistein provoked the increase of the frequency of agrobacterial transformation of tobacco leaf disks on 12%.

  4. Heat Shock Protein-70 Inducers and iNOS Inhibitors as Therapeutics to Ameliorate Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    RTO-MP-HFM-109 P28 - 1 Heat Shock Protein-70 Inducers and iNOS Inhibitors as Therapeutics to Ameliorate Hemorrhagic Shock Juliann G. Kiang...mechanisms are still not fully understood, it has been shown that nitric oxide (NO) overproduction and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS...tissues and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) generation increases. In a hemorrhage/resuscitation- induced injury model, iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2, and CD14 are all

  5. Small-Molecule Inhibitor Leads of Ribosome-Inactivating Proteins Developed Using the Doorstop Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yuan-Ping; Park, Jewn Giew; Wang, Shaohua; Vummenthala, Anuradha; Mishra, Rajesh K.; McLaughlin, John E.; Di, Rong; Kahn, Jennifer Nielsen; Tumer, Nilgun E.; Janosi, Laszlo; Davis, Jon; Millard, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are toxic because they bind to 28S rRNA and depurinate a specific adenine residue from the α-sarcin/ricin loop (SRL), thereby inhibiting protein synthesis. Shiga-like toxins (Stx1 and Stx2), produced by Escherichia coli, are RIPs that cause outbreaks of foodborne diseases with significant morbidity and mortality. Ricin, produced by the castor bean plant, is another RIP lethal to mammals. Currently, no US Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines nor therapeutics exist to protect against ricin, Shiga-like toxins, or other RIPs. Development of effective small-molecule RIP inhibitors as therapeutics is challenging because strong electrostatic interactions at the RIP•SRL interface make drug-like molecules ineffective in competing with the rRNA for binding to RIPs. Herein, we report small molecules that show up to 20% cell protection against ricin or Stx2 at a drug concentration of 300 nM. These molecules were discovered using the doorstop approach, a new approach to protein•polynucleotide inhibitors that identifies small molecules as doorstops to prevent an active-site residue of an RIP (e.g., Tyr80 of ricin or Tyr77 of Stx2) from adopting an active conformation thereby blocking the function of the protein rather than contenders in the competition for binding to the RIP. This work offers promising leads for developing RIP therapeutics. The results suggest that the doorstop approach might also be applicable in the development of other protein•polynucleotide inhibitors as antiviral agents such as inhibitors of the Z-DNA binding proteins in poxviruses. This work also calls for careful chemical and biological characterization of drug leads obtained from chemical screens to avoid the identification of irrelevant chemical structures and to avoid the interference caused by direct interactions between the chemicals being screened and the luciferase reporter used in screening assays. PMID:21455295

  6. A Comparison of Protein Kinases Inhibitor Screening Methods Using Both Enzymatic Activity and Binding Affinity Determination

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Amalie Frederikke; Skovgaard, Tine; Knapp, Stefan; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Berthelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Binding assays are increasingly used as a screening method for protein kinase inhibitors; however, as yet only a weak correlation with enzymatic activity-based assays has been demonstrated. We show that the correlation between the two types of assays can be improved using more precise screening conditions. Furthermore a marked improvement in the correlation was found by using kinase constructs containing the catalytic domain in presence of additional domains or subunits. PMID:24915177

  7. Molecular modeling of G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2: docking and biochemical evaluation of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kassack, M U; Högger, P; Gschwend, D A; Kameyama, K; Haga, T; Graul, R C; Sadée, W

    2000-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) regulates the activity of many receptors. Because potent inhibitors of GRK2 are thus far limited to polyanionic compounds like heparin, we searched for new inhibitors with the aid of a molecular model of GRK2. We used the available crystal structure of cAMP dependent protein kinase (cAPK) as a template to construct a 3D homology model of GRK2. Known cAPK and GRK2 inhibitors were docked into the active sites of GRK2 and cAPK using DOCK v3.5. H8 docked into the hydrophobic pocket of the adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) binding site of cAPK, consistent with its known competitive cAPK inhibition relative to ATP. Similarly, 3 of 4 known GRK2 inhibitors docked into the ATP binding pocket of GRK2 with good scores. Screening the Fine Chemicals Directory (FCD, containing the 3D structures of 13,000 compounds) for docking into the active sites of GRK2 identified H8 and the known GRK2 inhibitor trifluoperazine as candidates. Whereas H8 indeed inhibited light-dependent phosphorylation of rhodopsin by GRK2, but with low potency, 3 additional FCD compounds with promising GRK2 scores failed to inhibit GRK2. This result demonstrates limitations of the GRK2 model in predicting activity among diverse chemical structures. Docking suramin, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (not present in FCD) yielded a good fit into the ATP binding site of GRK2 over cAPK. Suramin did inhibit GRK2 with IC50 32 microM (pA26.39 for competitive inhibition of ATP). Suramin congeners with fewer sulfonic acid residues (NF062, NF503 [IC50 14 microM]) or representing half of the suramin molecule (NF520) also inhibited GRK2 as predicted by docking. In conclusion, suramin and analogues are lead compounds in the development of more potent and selective inhibitors of GRK2.

  8. Applying 89Zr-Transferrin To Study the Pharmacology of Inhibitors to BET Bromodomain Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin modifying proteins are attractive drug targets in oncology, given the fundamental reliance of cancer on altered transcriptional activity. Multiple transcription factors can be impacted downstream of primary target inhibition, thus making it challenging to understand the driving mechanism of action of pharmacologic inhibition of chromatin modifying proteins. This in turn makes it difficult to identify biomarkers predictive of response and pharmacodynamic tools to optimize drug dosing. In this report, we show that 89Zr-transferrin, an imaging tool we developed to measure MYC activity in cancer, can be used to identify cancer models that respond to broad spectrum inhibitors of transcription primarily due to MYC inhibition. As a proof of concept, we studied inhibitors of BET bromodomain containing proteins, as they can impart antitumor effects in a MYC dependent or independent fashion. In vitro, we show that transferrin receptor biology is inhibited in multiple MYC positive models of prostate cancer and double hit lymphoma when MYC biology is impacted. Moreover, we show that bromodomain inhibition in one lymphoma model results in transferrin receptor expression changes large enough to be quantified with 89Zr-transferrin and positron emission tomography (PET) in vivo. Collectively, these data further underscore the diagnostic utility of the relationship between MYC and transferrin in oncology, and provide the rationale to incorporate transferrin-based PET into early clinical trials with bromodomain inhibitors for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:26725682

  9. Identification of natural allosteric inhibitor for Akt1 protein through computational approaches and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pragna Lakshmi, T; Kumar, Amit; Vijaykumar, Veena; Natarajan, Sakthivel; Krishna, Ramadas

    2017-03-01

    Akt, a serine/threonine protein kinase, is often hyper activated in breast and prostate cancers, but with poor prognosis. Allosteric inhibitors regulate aberrant kinase activity by stabilizing the protein in inactive conformation. Several natural compounds have been reported as inhibitors for kinases. In this study, to identify potential natural allosteric inhibitor for Akt1, we generated a seven-point pharmacophore model and screened it through natural compound library. Quercetin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside or Q7G was found to be the best among selected molecules based on its hydrogen bond occupancy with key allosteric residues, persistent polar contacts and salt bridges that stabilize Akt1 in inactive conformation and minimum binding free energy during molecular dynamics simulation. Q7G induced dose-dependent inhibition of breast cancer cells (MDA MB-231) and arrested them in G1 and sub-G phase. This was associated with down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. Expression of p-Akt (Ser473) was also down-regulated which might be due to Akt1 inhibition in inactive conformation. We further confirmed the Akt1 and Q7G interaction which was observed to have a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.246μM. With these computational, biological and thermodynamic studies, we suggest Q7G as a lead molecule and propose for its further optimization.

  10. Novel, potent and selective inhibitors of protein kinase C show oral anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Nixon, J S; Bishop, J; Bradshaw, D; Davis, P D; Hill, C H; Elliott, L H; Kumar, H; Lawton, G; Lewis, E J; Mulqueen, M

    1991-01-01

    Clarification of the precise role of protein kinase C (PKC) in cellular functional responses has been hampered by a lack of potent, selective inhibitors. The structural lead provided by staurosporine, a potent but non-selective protein kinase (PK) inhibitor, was used to derive a series of bis(indolyl)maleimides of which the most potent, Ro 31-8425 (I50: PKC = 8 nM) showed 350-fold selectivity for PKC over cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Ro 31-8425 antagonised cellular processes triggered by phorbol esters (potent, specific PKC activators) and inhibited the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction, suggesting a role for PKC in T-cell activation. Methylation of the primary amine in Ro 31-8425 produced an analogue. Ro 31-8830 which, when administered orally, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of a phorbol ester-induced paw oedema in mice (minimum effective dose = 15 mg/kg). Ro 31-8830 also selectively inhibited the secondary inflammation in a developing adjuvant arthritis model in the rat. The results presented here suggest that these selective inhibitors of PKC may have therapeutic value in the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  11. Suppression of cytochrome P450 3A protein levels by proteasome inhibitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C. ); Kocarek, Thomas A.; Shen, Shang; Bollinger, Nikki ); Dahn, Michael S.; Lee, Donna W.

    2003-06-01

    We have previously reported that CYP3A cross-links with polyubiquitinated proteins in microsomes from nicardipine-treated rats in a process that is distinct from classical polyubiquitination. To further examine the role of the proteasome in CYP3A degradation, we investigated the effects of proteasome inhibitors lactacystin, MG132, proteasome inhibitor 1, and hemin in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes. With the exception of hemin, these agents increased the total pool of ubiquitinated proteins in microsomes isolated from rat hepatocytes, indicating that lactacystin, MG132, and proteasome inhibitor 1 effectively inhibited the proteasome in these cells. All four agents caused a reduction in the amount of the major approximately 55-kDa CYP3A band, opposite to what would be expected if the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway degraded CYP3A. Only hemin treatment caused an increase in high molecular mass (HMM) CYP3A bands. Because hemin treatment did not alter levels of ubiquitin in CYP3 A immunoprecipitates, the HMM CYP3A bands formed in response to hemin treatment clearly were not due to proteasome inhibition. Rather, because hemin treatment also caused an increase in HMM CYP3A in the detergent-insoluble fraction of the 10,000g pellet, the HMM CYP3A seems to represent a large protein complex that is unlikely to primarily represent ubiquitination.

  12. Dimeric Macrocyclic Antagonists of Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of dimeric macrocyclic compounds were prepared and evaluated as antagonists for inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. The most potent analogue 11, which binds to XIAP and c-IAP proteins with high affinity and induces caspase-3 activation and ultimately cell apoptosis, inhibits growth of human melanoma and colorectal cell lines at low nanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, compound 11 demonstrated significant antitumor activity in the A875 human melanoma xenograft model at doses as low as 2 mg/kg on a q3d schedule. PMID:26191364

  13. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  14. Discovery and characterization of non-ATP site inhibitors of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases.

    PubMed

    Comess, Kenneth M; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R; Gum, Rebecca J; Borhani, David W; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E; Haasch, Deanna L; Smith, Harriet T; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L; Cloutier, Timothy E; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J; Calderwood, David J; Hajduk, Philip J

    2011-03-18

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38α (involved in the formation of TNFα and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38α both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in similar fashion to Jnk-1 si

  15. Multiple Mechanisms of Action for Inhibitors of Histidine Protein Kinases from Bacterial Two-Component Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Jamese J.; Goldschmidt, Raul M.; Licata, Lisa; Baum, Ellen Z.; Bush, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria utilize two-component systems consisting of a histidine protein kinase (HPK) and a response regulator (RR) for signal transduction. During the search for novel inhibitors, several chemical series, including benzoxazines, benzimidazoles, bis-phenols, cyclohexenes, trityls, and salicylanilides, were identified that inhibited the purified HPK-RR pairs KinA-Spo0F and NRII-NRI, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 1.9 to >500 μM and MICs ranging from 0.5 to >16 μg/ml for gram-positive bacteria. However, additional observations suggested that mechanisms other than HPK inhibition might contribute to antibacterial activity. In the present work, representative compounds from the six different series of inhibitors were analyzed for their effects on membrane integrity and macromolecular synthesis. At 4× MIC, 17 of 24 compounds compromised the integrity of the bacterial cell membrane within 10 min, as measured by uptake of propidium iodide. In this set, compounds with lower IC50s tended to cause greater membrane disruption. Eleven of 12 compounds inhibited cellular incorporation of radiolabeled thymidine and uridine >97% in 5 min and amino acids >80% in 15 min. The HPK inhibitor that allowed >25% precursor incorporation had no measurable MIC (>16 μg/ml). Fifteen of 24 compounds also caused hemolysis of equine erythrocytes. Thus, the antibacterial HPK inhibitors caused a rapid decrease in cellular incorporation of RNA, DNA, and protein precursors, possibly as a result of the concomitant disruption of the cytoplasmic membrane. Bacterial killing by these HPK inhibitors may therefore be due to multiple mechanisms, independent of HPK inhibition. PMID:10390224

  16. Structure-based lead discovery for protein kinase C zeta inhibitor design by exploiting kinase-inhibitor complex crystal structure data and potential therapeutics for preterm labour.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing-Chun; Zhang, Cui-Juan; Li, Jie

    2014-10-14

    The protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases with a broad range of cellular targets. Members of the PKC family participate at the diverse biological events involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and survival. The PKC isoform zeta (PKCζ) is an atypical member that has recently been found to play an essential role in promoting human uterine contractility and thus been raised as a new target for treating preterm labour and other tocolytic diseases. In this study, an integrative protocol was described to graft hundreds of inhibitor ligands from their complex crystal structures with cognate kinases into the active pocket of PKCζ and, based on the modeled structures, to evaluate the binding strength of these inhibitors to the non-cognate PKCζ receptor by using a consensus scoring strategy. A total of 32 inhibitors with top score were compiled, and eight out of them were tested for inhibitory potency against PKCζ. Consequently, five compounds, i.e. CDK6 inhibitor fisetin, PIM1 inhibitor myricetin, CDK9 inhibitor flavopiridol and PknB inhibitor mitoxantrone as well as the promiscuous kinase inhibitor staurosporine showed high or moderate inhibitory activity on PKCζ, with IC50 values of 58 ± 9, 1.7 ± 0.4, 108 ± 17, 280 ± 47 and 0.019 ± 0.004 μM, respectively, while other three compounds, including two marketed drugs dasatinib and sunitinib as well as the Rho inhibitor fasudil, have not been detected to possess observable activity. Next, based on the modeled structure data we modified three flavonoid kinase inhibitors, i.e. fisetin, myricetin and flavopiridol, to generate a number of more potential molecular entities, two of which were found to have a moderately improved activity as compared to their parent compounds.

  17. Homology modeling of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans CED3 protein-inhibitor complex.

    PubMed

    Azim, M K; Grossmann, J G; Zaidi, Z H

    2001-02-16

    CED3 protein, the product of a gene necessary for programmed cell death in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, is related to a highly specific cysteine protease family i.e., caspases. A tertiary-structural model has been constructed of a complex of the CED3 protein with tetrapeptide-aldehyde inhibitor, Ac-DEVD-CHO. The conformation of CED3 protein active site and the general binding features of inhibitor residues are similar to those observed in other caspases. The loop segment (Phe380-Pro387) binds with the P4 Asp in a different fashion compared to caspase-3. The comparative modeling of active sites from caspase-3 and CED3 protein indicated that although these enzymes require Asp at the position P4, variation could occur in the binding of this residue at the S4 subsite. This model allowed the definition of substrate specificity of CED3 protein from the structural standpoint and provided insight in designing of mutants for structure-function studies of this classical caspase homologue.

  18. Role of Protein Kinases and Their Inhibitors in Radiation Response of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Yoon, Wonsuck; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Jung, Haiyoung; Lim, Ji Hong; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Seo, MiRan; Lee, Tae Ho; Min, Sang-Hyun

    2017-06-07

    Phosphorylation, the addition of a phosphate group to a molecule, is an effective way of regulating the biological properties of that molecule. Protein phosphorylation is a post translational modification of proteins and affects cellular signaling transduction. Protein kinases induce phosphorylation by catalyzing the transfer of phosphate groups to serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues on protein substrates. Consistent with their roles in cancer, protein kinases have emerged as one of the most clinically useful target molecules in pharmacological cancer therapy. Intrinsic or acquired resistance of cancers against anti-cancer therapeutics, such as ionizing radiation, is a major obstacle for the effective treatment of many cancers. In this review, we describe key aspects of various kinases acting on proteins. We also discuss the roles of protein kinases in the pathophysiology and treatment of cancer. Because protein kinases correlate with radiation resistance in various types of cancer, we focus on several kinases responsible for radiation resistance and/or sensitivity and their therapeutic implications. Finally, we suggest some ongoing radiation-sensitization strategies using genetic loss and/or kinase inhibitors that can counteract radiation resistance-related protein kinases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Luciferin and derivatives as a DYRK selective scaffold for the design of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Ulli; Eriksson, Jonas; Stensen, Wenche; Leeson, Frederick; Engh, Richard A; Svendsen, John S

    2015-04-13

    D-Luciferin is widely used as a substrate in luciferase catalysed bioluminescence assays for in vitro studies. However, little is known about cross reactivity and potential interference of D-luciferin with other enzymes. We serendipitously found that firefly luciferin inhibited the CDK2/Cyclin A protein kinase. Inhibition profiling of D-luciferin over a 103-protein kinase panel showed significant inhibition of a small set of protein kinases, in particular the DYRK-family, but also other members of the CMGC-group, including ERK8 and CK2. Inhibition profiling on a 16-member focused library derived from D-luciferin confirms that D-luciferin represents a DYRK-selective chemotype of fragment-like molecular weight. Thus, observation of its inhibitory activity and the initial SAR information reported here promise to be useful for further design of protein kinase inhibitors with related scaffolds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular evolution of the Rab-escort-protein/guanine-nucleotide-dissociation-inhibitor superfamily.

    PubMed

    Alory, Christelle; Balch, William E

    2003-09-01

    Prenylation of Rab GTPases regulating vesicle traffic by Rab geranylgeranyltransferase (RabGGTase) requires a complex formed by the association of newly synthesized Rab proteins with Rab-escort-protein (REP), the choroideremia-gene-product that is mutated in disease, leading to loss of vision. After delivery to the membrane by the REP-Rab complex, subsequent recycling to the cytosol requires the REP-related guanine-nucleotide-dissociation-inhibitor (GDI). Although REP and GDI share common Rab-binding properties, GDI cannot assist in Rab prenylation and REP cannot retrieve Rab proteins from the membranes. We have now isolated REP mutant proteins that are able to partially function as both REP and GDI. These results provide molecular insight into the functional and evolutionary organization of the REP/GDI superfamily.

  1. Molecular Evolution of the Rab-Escort-Protein/Guanine-Nucleotide-Dissociation-Inhibitor Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Alory, Christelle; Balch, William E.

    2003-01-01

    Prenylation of Rab GTPases regulating vesicle traffic by Rab geranylgeranyltransferase (RabGGTase) requires a complex formed by the association of newly synthesized Rab proteins with Rab-escort-protein (REP), the choroideremia-gene-product that is mutated in disease, leading to loss of vision. After delivery to the membrane by the REP–Rab complex, subsequent recycling to the cytosol requires the REP-related guanine-nucleotide-dissociation-inhibitor (GDI). Although REP and GDI share common Rab-binding properties, GDI cannot assist in Rab prenylation and REP cannot retrieve Rab proteins from the membranes. We have now isolated REP mutant proteins that are able to partially function as both REP and GDI. These results provide molecular insight into the functional and evolutionary organization of the REP/GDI superfamily. PMID:12972569

  2. In vitro synthesis of pre-proteins of vacuolar compartmented proteinase inhibitors that accumulate in leaves of wounded tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, C E; Ryan, C A

    1980-04-01

    Two proteinase inhibitor proteins that are compartmented in leaf vacuoles (lysosomes) were synthesized in vitro. mRNA was isolated from 17-day-old expanding tomato leaves by extraction with chaotropic buffers followed by chromatography on oligo(dT)-cellulose and was translated with a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. Preparations of mRNA from leaves of both wounded plants and unwounded plants directed the incorporation of equivalent amounts of label into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable proteins. Only mRNA from leaves of wounded plants directed label into proteins that could be immunoprecipitated with rabbit IgG specific for either inhibitor I or inhibitor II. These results indicate that the wound-induced accumulation of proteinase inhibitors I and II in leaf vacuoles is a result of the presence of translatable mRNA species not present in leaves of unwounded plants. Gel electrophoresis of the immunoprecipitates in NaDodSO(4)/urea/polyacrylamide gels revealed that inhibitors I and II were translated in vitro as precursors about 2000 daltons larger than the inhibitors found in leaves. The presence of the additional polypeptide sequences in the newly synthesized inhibitors indicates that the inhibitors are processed either during or after synthesis, and the presequences may be signal peptides that are part of the process of inhibitor transport into the vacuolar compartments of tomato leaf cells.

  3. Computational analysis of calculated physicochemical and ADMET properties of protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lagorce, David; Douguet, Dominique; Miteva, Maria A.; Villoutreix, Bruno O.

    2017-01-01

    The modulation of PPIs by low molecular weight chemical compounds, particularly by orally bioavailable molecules, would be very valuable in numerous disease indications. However, it is known that PPI inhibitors (iPPIs) tend to have properties that are linked to poor Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity (ADMET) and in some cases to poor clinical outcomes. Previously reported in silico analyses of iPPIs have essentially focused on physicochemical properties but several other ADMET parameters would be important to assess. In order to gain new insights into the ADMET properties of iPPIs, computations were carried out on eight datasets collected from several databases. These datasets involve compounds targeting enzymes, GPCRs, ion channels, nuclear receptors, allosteric modulators, oral marketed drugs, oral natural product-derived marketed drugs and iPPIs. Several trends are reported that should assist the design and optimization of future PPI inhibitors, either for drug discovery endeavors or for chemical biology projects. PMID:28397808

  4. Computational analysis of calculated physicochemical and ADMET properties of protein-protein interaction inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagorce, David; Douguet, Dominique; Miteva, Maria A.; Villoutreix, Bruno O.

    2017-04-01

    The modulation of PPIs by low molecular weight chemical compounds, particularly by orally bioavailable molecules, would be very valuable in numerous disease indications. However, it is known that PPI inhibitors (iPPIs) tend to have properties that are linked to poor Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity (ADMET) and in some cases to poor clinical outcomes. Previously reported in silico analyses of iPPIs have essentially focused on physicochemical properties but several other ADMET parameters would be important to assess. In order to gain new insights into the ADMET properties of iPPIs, computations were carried out on eight datasets collected from several databases. These datasets involve compounds targeting enzymes, GPCRs, ion channels, nuclear receptors, allosteric modulators, oral marketed drugs, oral natural product-derived marketed drugs and iPPIs. Several trends are reported that should assist the design and optimization of future PPI inhibitors, either for drug discovery endeavors or for chemical biology projects.

  5. Novel Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interaction for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    lead compound to clinical testing . Since percent tumor development was lower than anticipated for C4-2 Control mice in this study, we are performing...preclinical models. Data from this research would identify the most efficacious drug to be further developed in preclinical toxicity testing and clinical...translation of the lead compound to clinical testing . Overall the data supports AR-JunD inhibitors as a new class of agents for further research and

  6. Separating the mechanism-based and off-target actions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors with CETP gene polymorphisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background—Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, but torcetrapib, the first-in-class inhibitor tested in a large outcome trial, caused an unexpected blood pressure elevation and increased cardiovascular events. Whether the hypertensive...

  7. JAK inhibitors suppress t(8;21) fusion protein-induced leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Miao-Chia; Peterson, Luke F.; Yan, Ming; Cong, Xiuli; Hickman, Justin H.; DeKelver, Russel C.; Niewerth, Denise; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in components of the JAK/STAT pathway, including those in cytokine receptors and JAKs, lead to increased activity of downstream signaling and are frequently found in leukemia and other hematological disorders. Thus, small-molecule inhibitors of this pathway have been the focus of targeted therapy in these hematological diseases. We previously showed that t(8;21) fusion protein AML1-ETO and its alternatively spliced variant AML1-ETO9a (AE9a) enhance the JAK/STAT pathway via down-regulation of CD45, a negative regulator of this pathway. To investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting JAK/STAT in t(8;21) leukemia, we examined the effects of a JAK2-selective inhibitor TG101209 and a JAK1/2-selective inhibitor INCB18424 on t(8;21) leukemia cells. TG101209 and INCB18424 inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of these cells. Furthermore, TG101209 treatment in AE9a leukemia mice reduced tumor burden and significantly prolonged survival. TG101209 also significantly impaired the leukemia-initiating potential of AE9a leukemia cells in secondary recipient mice. These results demonstrate the potential therapeutic efficacy of JAK inhibitors in treating t(8;21) AML. PMID:23812420

  8. Improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules in the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Shuchismita; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Feng, Zukang; Persikova, Irina; Sen, Sanchayita; Shao, Chenghua; Westbrook, John; Young, Jasmine; Zhuravleva, Marina A; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Berman, Helen M

    2014-06-01

    With the accumulation of a large number and variety of molecules in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) comes the need on occasion to review and improve their representation. The Worldwide PDB (wwPDB) partners have periodically updated various aspects of structural data representation to improve the integrity and consistency of the archive. The remediation effort described here was focused on improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules so that they can be easily identified and analyzed. Peptide-like inhibitors or antibiotics were identified in over 1000 PDB entries, systematically reviewed and represented either as peptides with polymer sequence or as single components. For the majority of the single-component molecules, their peptide-like composition was captured in a new representation, called the subcomponent sequence. A novel concept called "group" was developed for representing complex peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors that are composed of multiple polymer and nonpolymer components. In addition, a reference dictionary was developed with detailed information about these peptide-like molecules to aid in their annotation, identification and analysis. Based on the experience gained in this remediation, guidelines, procedures, and tools were developed to annotate new depositions containing peptide-like inhibitors and antibiotics accurately and consistently. © 2013 The Authors Biopolymers Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. New lipid modulating drugs: the role of microsomal transport protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2011-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is involved in the synthesis of very low density lipoprotein in the liver. Its deficiency results in abetalipoproteinemia. MTP inhibitors target the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins. These agents may potentially play a role, alone or in combination, in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia or hypertriglyceridaemia. Clinical applications of MTP inhibitors initially focused primarily on high-dose monotherapy in order to produce substantial reductions in LDL-cholesterol levels but these proved to induce significant hepatic steatosis and transaminase elevations. However, likely orphan indications for MTP inhibitors, where a different risk-benefit profile applies, include patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia where statins often show a low response. Development of MTP inhibitors has continued to enter clinical trials at lower doses or in formulations aimed at utilizing their efficacy while avoiding their side effects. These have shown promising results in reducing cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein B with a far lower incidence of, often, transient side-effects. The clinical efficacy and safety of MTP inhibition in patients with hyperlipidaemia remains to be fully determined and to be proven in both surrogate and clinical endpoint trials but there may be a role for these agents in orphan indications for rarer severe hyperlipidaemias.

  10. Up-Regulation of Inhibitors of Protein Phosphatase-2A in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanimukai, Hitoshi; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2005-01-01

    The activity of protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) is compromised and is believed to be a cause of the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain. We investigated in AD the role of the two known endogenous PP2A inhibitors, called I1PP2A and I2PP2A, which regulate the intracellular activity of PP2A in mammalian tissues. We found a significant increase in the neocortical levels of I1PP2A and I2PP2A in AD as compared to control cases by in situ hybridization. The immunohistochemical studies revealed that I2PP2A was translocated from neuronal nuclei to cytoplasm in AD. The 39-kd full-length I2PP2A was selectively cleaved into an ∼20-kd fragment in AD brain cytosol. Digestion of the recombinant human I2PP2A with AD brain extract showed an increase in the generation of the ∼20 kd and other fragments of the inhibitor as compared to control brain extract. Double-immunohistochemical studies revealed co-localization of PP2A with PP2A inhibitors in neuronal cytoplasm and co-localization of the inhibitors with abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. These studies suggest the possible involvement of I1PP2A and I2PP2A in the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in AD. PMID:15920161

  11. Application of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor to human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    Susceptibility of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), such as human iPS and embryonic stem (ES) cells, to single-cell dissociation has been a large obstacle to develop the efficient manipulation techniques required for stem cell research. When hPSCs are completely dissociated into single cells, programmed cell death (apoptosis) is immediately induced. A specific inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK inhibitor), Y-27632, is of particular interest as a useful reagent that allows hPSCs to escape the dissociation-induced apoptosis. ROCK inhibitor has been used in a variety of applications associated with cell dissociation in the process of stem cell research, such as passaging, expansion, cryopreservation, gene transfer, differentiation induction, and cell sorting, suggesting that it may be a crucial reagent for the handling of hPSCs. This article reviews the current applications of ROCK inhibitors to stem cell research from the viewpoint of quality control of hPSCs. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A web server for predicting inhibitors against bacterial target GlmU protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis poses a serious concern globally and researchers are in rigorous search for new drugs to fight against these dreadful bacteria. Recently, the bacterial GlmU protein, involved in peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide and techoic acid synthesis, has been identified as an important drug target. A unique C-terminal disordered tail, essential for survival and the absence of gene in host makes GlmU a suitable target for inhibitor design. Results This study describes the models developed for predicting inhibitory activity (IC50) of chemical compounds against GlmU protein using QSAR and docking techniques. These models were trained on 84 diverse compounds (GlmU inhibitors) taken from PubChem BioAssay (AID 1376). These inhibitors were docked in the active site of the C-terminal domain of GlmU protein (2OI6) using the AutoDock. A QSAR model was developed using docking energies as descriptors and achieved maximum correlation of 0.35/0.12 (r/r2) between actual and predicted pIC50. Secondly, QSAR models were developed using molecular descriptors calculated using various software packages and achieved maximum correlation of 0.77/0.60 (r/r2). Finally, hybrid models were developed using various types of descriptors and achieved high correlation of 0.83/0.70 (r/r2) between predicted and actual pIC50. It was observed that some molecular descriptors used in this study had high correlation with pIC50. We screened chemical libraries using models developed in this study and predicted 40 potential GlmU inhibitors. These inhibitors could be used to develop drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Conclusion These results demonstrate that docking energies can be used as descriptors for developing QSAR models. The current work suggests that docking energies based descriptors could be used along with commonly used molecular descriptors for predicting inhibitory activity (IC50) of molecules against GlmU. Based on this study an open source

  13. Protein inhibitors of serine proteinases: role of backbone structure and dynamics in controlling the hydrolysis constant.

    PubMed

    Song, Jikui; Markley, John L

    2003-05-13

    Standard mechanism protein inhibitors of serine proteinases bind as substrates and are cleaved by cognate proteinases at their reactive sites. The hydrolysis constant for this cleavage reaction at the P(1)-P(1)' peptide bond (K(hyd)) is determined by the relative concentrations at equilibrium of the "intact" (uncleaved, I) and "modified" (reactive site cleaved, I*) forms of the inhibitor. The pH dependence of K(hyd) can be explained in terms of a pH-independent term, K(hyd) degrees, plus the proton dissociation constants of the newly formed amino and carboxylate groups at the cleavage site. Two protein inhibitors that differ from one another by a single residue substitution have been found to have K(hyd) degrees values that differ by a factor of 5 [Ardelt, W., and Laskowski, M., Jr. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 220, 1041-1052]: turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3) has K(hyd) degrees = 1.0, and Indian peafowl ovomucoid third domain (OMIPF3), which differs from OMTKY3 by the substitution P(2)'-Tyr(20)His, has K(hyd) degrees = 5.15. What mechanism is responsible for this small difference? Is it structural (enthalpic) or dynamic (entropic)? Does the mutation affect the free energy of the I state, the I* state, or both? We have addressed these questions through NMR investigations of the I and I forms of OMTKY3 and OMIPF3. Information about structure was derived from measurements of NMR chemical shift changes and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings; information about dynamics was obtained through measurements of (15)N relaxation rates and (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOEs with model-free analysis of the results. Although the I forms of each variant are more dynamic than the corresponding I forms, the study revealed no appreciable difference in the backbone dynamics of either intact inhibitor (OMIPF3 vs OMTKY3) or modified inhibitor (OMIPF3* vs OMTKY3*). Instead, changes in chemical shifts and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings suggested that the K(hyd) degrees difference arises from

  14. Interaction of wheat monomeric and dimeric protein inhibitors with alpha-amylase from yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L. larva).

    PubMed

    Buonocore, V; Gramenzi, F; Pace, W; Petrucci, T; Poerio, E; Silano, V

    1980-06-01

    The highly purified alpha-amylase from Tenebrio molitor L. larva (yellow mealworm) reversibly combines with two closely related homogeneous glycoprotein inhibitors, one dimeric (termed 'inhibitor 0.19') and one monomeric (termed 'inhibitor 0.28'), from wheat flour. As established by means of difference spectroscopy and kinetic studies, molar combining ratios for the amylase--inhibitor-0.19 and amylase-inhibitor-0.28 complexes were 1:1 and 1:2 respectively. Two amylase--inhibitor-0.19 complexes with slightly different retention volumes on Bio-Gel P-300 and only one amylase--inhibitor-0.28 complex were observed. Dissociation constants of the amylase--inhibitor-0.19 and amylase--inhibitor-0.28 complexes were 0.85 nM and 0.13 nM respectively. A strong tendency of both complexes to precipitate under an ultracentrifugal field was observed; the minimum molecular weight calculated for the two complexes under such conditions was approx. 95 000. The two complexes showed difference spectra indicating involvement of structurally related or identical tryptophyl side chains in the binding of inhibitors 0.28 and 0.19 to the amylase. A model summarizing the main features of the inhibition of the insect amylase by the two wheat protein inhibitors is proposed.

  15. Total synthesis and structure-activity relationship studies of a series of selective G protein inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Hang; Underwood, Christina R.; Harpsøe, Kasper; Gardella, Thomas J.; Wöldike, Mie F.; Mannstadt, Michael; Gloriam, David E.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2016-11-01

    G proteins are key mediators of G protein-coupled receptor signalling, which facilitates a plethora of important physiological processes. The cyclic depsipeptides YM-254890 and FR900359 are the only known specific inhibitors of the Gq subfamily of G proteins; however, no synthetic route has been reported previously for these complex natural products and they are not easily isolated from natural sources. Here we report the first total synthesis of YM-254890 and FR900359, as well as of two known analogues, YM-385780 and YM-385781. The versatility of the synthetic approach also enabled the design and synthesis of ten analogues, which provided the first structure-activity relationship study for this class of compounds. Pharmacological characterization of all the compounds at Gq-, Gi- and Gs-mediated signalling provided succinct information on the structural requirements for inhibition, and demonstrated that both YM-254890 and FR900359 are highly potent inhibitors of Gq signalling, with FR900359 being the most potent. These natural products and their analogues represent unique tools for explorative studies of G protein inhibition.

  16. Discovery and mechanistic study of a class of protein arginine methylation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Feng, You; Li, Mingyong; Wang, Binghe; Zheng, Yujun George

    2010-08-26

    Protein arginine methylation regulates multiple biological processes such as chromatin remodeling and RNA splicing. Malfunction of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) is correlated with many human diseases. Thus, small molecule inhibitors of protein arginine methylation are of great potential for therapeutic development. Herein, we report a type of compound that blocks PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation at micromolar potency through a unique mechanism. Most of the discovered compounds bear naphthalene and sulfonate groups and are structurally different from typical PRMT substrates, for example, histone H4 and glycine- and arginine-rich sequences. To elucidate the molecular basis of inhibition, we conducted a variety of kinetic and biophysical assays. The combined data reveal that this type of naphthyl-sulfo (NS) molecule directly targets the substrates but not PRMTs for the observed inhibition. We also found that suramin effectively inhibited PRMT1 activity. These findings about novel PRMT inhibitors and their unique inhibition mechanism provide a new way for chemical regulation of protein arginine methylation.

  17. Modular mutagenesis of human placental ribonuclease inhibitor, a protein with leucine-rich repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F S; Vallee, B L

    1990-01-01

    Human placental ribonuclease inhibitor (PRI) is a potent protein inhibitor of pancreatic ribonucleases and the homologous blood vessel-inducing protein angiogenin. Although inhibition by PRI occurs with a 1:1 stoichiometry, its primary structure is composed predominantly of seven internal leucine-rich repeats. These internal repeats were systematically deleted either singly or in combination by "modular" mutagenesis. Deletion of repeat units 3 plus 4 or repeat unit 6 results in mutants that both bind to and inhibit ribonuclease A. Therefore, the angiogenin/ribonuclease binding site in PRI must reside primarily or entirely in repeats 1, 2, 5, or 7, the short N- or C-terminal segments, or a combination of these. Deletion of repeat units 3-5, 5-6, or 5 alone results in mutants that exhibit only binding activity. Hence, the binding site cannot reside exclusively in repeat 5. Other internal deletions or N- or C-terminal deletions of 6-86% of the protein all abolish activity. These results suggest that PRI has a modular structure, with one primary structural repeat constituting one module. The approach taken may be applicable to other proteins with repeat structures. Images PMID:2408043

  18. Protein synthesis inhibitors attenuate water flow in vasopressin-stimulated toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch, B.S.; Ast, M.B.; Fusco, M.J.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. )

    1988-01-01

    Vasopressin stimulates the introduction of aggregated particles, which may represent pathways for water flow, into the luminal membrane of toad urinary bladder. It is not known whether water transport pathways are degraded on removal from membrane or whether they are recycled. The authors examined the effect of the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and puromycin using repeated 30-min cycles of vasopressin followed by washout of vasopressin, all in the presence of an osmotic gradient, a protocol that maximizes aggregate turnover. High dose cycloheximide inhibited flow immediately. Low dose cycloheximide did not affect initial flow. In the absence of vasopressin, inhibition did not develop. Despite the inhibition of flow in vasopressin-treated tissues, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase ratio was elevated in cycloheximide-treated tissues, suggesting modulation at a distal site in the stimulatory cascade. ({sup 14}C)urea permeability was not inhibited by cycloheximide. Puromycin also inhibited water flow by the fourth challenge with vasopressin. The data suggest that protein synthesis inhibitors attenuate flow at a site that is distal to cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, the reversal of inhibition in MIX-treated tissues suggests that the water pathway can be fully manifested given suitable stimulation. They conclude that either large stores of the transport system are available or that the transport system is extensively recycled on retrieval from the membrane.

  19. Reduction of Factor VIII Inhibitor Titers During Immune Tolerance Induction With Recombinant Factor VIII-Fc Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Groomes, Charles L; Gianferante, David M; Crouch, Gary D; Parekh, Dina S; Scott, David W; Lieuw, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The development of inhibitors toward factor VIII (FVIII) is a common and serious complication of hemophilia A (HA) therapy. Patients with hemophilia who develop inhibitors often undergo time- and resource-intensive immune tolerance induction (ITI) protocols. We report a 15-month-old male with severe HA and a high-titer inhibitor that occurred while receiving prophylactic treatment with recombinant FVIII (rFVIII), in whom significant inhibitor titer reduction was achieved with thrice weekly infusions of a new, prolonged half-life rFVIII-Fc fusion protein product (trade name Eloctate). Further studies are warranted to explore the potential of Eloctate in ITI protocols.

  20. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors Sensitize GNAQ Mutant Uveal Melanoma Cells to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cerne, Jasmina Ziva; Hartig, Sean Michael; Hamilton, Mark Patrick; Chew, Sue Anne; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Poulaki, Vassiliki; McGuire, Sean Eric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Uveal melanoma (UM) tumors require large doses of radiation therapy (RT) to achieve tumor ablation, which frequently results in damage to adjacent normal tissues, leading to vision-threatening complications. Approximately 50% of UM patients present with activating somatic mutations in the gene encoding for G protein αq-subunit (GNAQ), which lead to constitutive activation of downstream pathways, including protein kinase C (PKC). In this study, we investigated the impact of small-molecule PKC inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I (BIM) and sotrastaurin (AEB071), combined with ionizing radiation (IR), on survival in melanoma cell lines. Methods. Cellular radiosensitivity was determined by using a combination of proliferation, viability, and clonogenic assays. Cell-cycle effects were measured by flow cytometry. Transcriptomic and proteomic profiling were performed by quantitative real-time PCR, reverse-phase protein array analysis, and immunofluorescence. Results. We found that the PKC inhibitors combined with IR significantly decreased the viability, proliferation, and clonogenic potential of GNAQmt, but not GNAQwt/BRAFmt cells, compared with IR alone. Combined treatment increased the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of IR in GNAQmt cells through delayed DNA-damage resolution and enhanced induction of proteins involved in cell-cycle arrest, cell-growth arrest, and apoptosis. Conclusions. Our preclinical results suggest that combined modality treatment may allow for reductions in the total RT dose and/or fraction size, which may lead to better functional organ preservation in the treatment of primary GNAQmt UM. These findings suggest future clinical trials combining PKC inhibitors with RT in GNAQmt UM warrant consideration. PMID:24595385

  1. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  2. Characterization of the biological effects of a novel protein kinase D inhibitor in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ian M.; Bagherzadeh, Azadeh; Charles, Mark; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Chris; Boakes, Alexandra; Kelland, Lloyd; Zachary, Ian C.

    2010-01-01

    VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) plays an essential role in angiogenesis during development and in disease largely mediated by signalling events initiated by binding of VEGF to its receptor, VEGFR2 (VEGF receptor 2)/KDR (kinase insert domain receptor). Recent studies indicate that VEGF activates PKD (protein kinase D) in endothelial cells to regulate a variety of cellular functions, including signalling events, proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. To better understand the role of PKD in VEGF-mediated endothelial function, we characterized the effects of a novel pyrazine benzamide PKD inhibitor CRT5 in HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells). The activity of the isoforms PKD1 and PKD2 were blocked by this inhibitor as indicated by reduced phosphorylation, at Ser916 and Ser876 respectively, after VEGF stimulation. The VEGF-induced phosphorylation of three PKD substrates, histone deacetylase 5, CREB (cAMP-response-element-binding protein) and HSP27 (heat-shock protein 27) at Ser82, was also inhibited by CRT5. In contrast, CRT6, an inactive analogue of CRT5, had no effect on PKD or HSP27 Ser82 phosphorylation. Furthermore, phosphorylation of HSP27 at Ser78, which occurs solely via the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway, was also unaffected by CRT5. In vitro kinase assays show that CRT5 did not significantly inhibit several PKC isoforms expressed in endothelial cells. CRT5 also decreased VEGF-induced endothelial migration, proliferation and tubulogenesis, similar to effects seen when the cells were transfected with PKD siRNA (small interfering RNA). CRT5, a novel specific PKD inhibitor, will greatly facilitate the study of the role of PKD signalling mechanisms in angiogenesis. PMID:20497126

  3. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  4. New functional assays to selectively quantify the activated protein C- and tissue factor pathway inhibitor-cofactor activities of protein S in plasma.

    PubMed

    Alshaikh, N A; Rosing, J; Thomassen, M C L G D; Castoldi, E; Simioni, P; Hackeng, T M

    2017-02-17

    Essentials Protein S is a cofactor of activated protein C (APC) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). There are no assays to quantify separate APC and TFPI cofactor activities of protein S in plasma. We developed assays to measure the APC- and TFPI-cofactor activities of protein S in plasma. The assays were sensitive to protein S deficiency, and not affected by the Factor V Leiden mutation.

  5. Asperentin B, a New Inhibitor of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Jutta; Aldemir, Hülya; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2017-01-01

    In the frame of studies on secondary metabolites produced by fungi from deep-sea environments we have investigated inhibitors of enzymes playing key roles in signaling cascades of biochemical pathways relevant for the treatment of diseases. Here we report on a new inhibitor of the human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a target in the signaling pathway of insulin. A new asperentin analog is produced by an Aspergillus sydowii strain isolated from the sediment of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Asperentin B (1) contains an additional phenolic hydroxy function at C-6 and exhibits an IC50 value against PTP1B of 2 μM in vitro, which is six times stronger than the positive control, suramin. Interestingly, asperentin (2) did not show any inhibition of this enzymatic activity. Asperentin B (1) is discussed as possible therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes and sleeping sickness. PMID:28635658

  6. Asperentin B, a New Inhibitor of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Jutta; Aldemir, Hülya; Schmaljohann, Rolf; Gulder, Tobias A M; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2017-06-21

    In the frame of studies on secondary metabolites produced by fungi from deep-sea environments we have investigated inhibitors of enzymes playing key roles in signaling cascades of biochemical pathways relevant for the treatment of diseases. Here we report on a new inhibitor of the human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), a target in the signaling pathway of insulin. A new asperentin analog is produced by an Aspergillussydowii strain isolated from the sediment of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Asperentin B (1) contains an additional phenolic hydroxy function at C-6 and exhibits an IC50 value against PTP1B of 2 μM in vitro, which is six times stronger than the positive control, suramin. Interestingly, asperentin (2) did not show any inhibition of this enzymatic activity. Asperentin B (1) is discussed as possible therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes and sleeping sickness.

  7. Sirtuin inhibitors, EX527 and AGK2, suppress cell migration by inhibiting HSF1 protein stability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Soo-A; Ahn, Sang-Gun

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylases (HDACs), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and Sirt2, play crucial roles in many biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. HDAC inhibitors have been considered as a potential therapeutic approach for various types of cancers. Here, we demonstrated that the Sirt1 and Sirt2 inhibitors EX527 and AGK2 suppressed cell growth and caused G1 phase arrest by inhibiting the expression of Cdk6 and/or Cdk4. An agar colony formation assay revealed that EX527 and AGK2 decreased colony formation in soft agar. Furthermore, EX527 and AGK2 pretreatment inhibited the expression of HSF1 and HSP27 and induced HSF1 ubiquitination. Sirt1 overexpression increased HSF1 expression and/or stabilization and induced cell migration in a scratch assay. Overall, these results indicate that EX527 and AGK2 suppress cell growth and migration by inhibiting HSF1 protein stability.

  8. A computational combinatorial approach identifies a protein inhibitor of superoxide dismutase 1 misfolding, aggregation, and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Victor; Oren, Ofek; Ben-Zeev, Efrat; Taube, Ran; Engel, Stanislav; Papo, Niv

    2017-09-22

    Molecular agents that specifically bind and neutralize misfolded and toxic superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutant proteins may find application in attenuating the disease progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, high structural similarities between the wild-type and mutant SOD1 proteins limit the utility of this approach. Here we addressed this challenge by converting a promiscuous natural human IgG-binding domain, the hyperthermophilic variant of protein G (HTB1), into a highly specific aggregation inhibitor (designated HTB1M) of two familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked SOD1 mutants, SOD1(G93A) and SOD1(G85R) We utilized a computational algorithm for mapping protein surfaces predisposed to HTB1 intermolecular interactions to construct a focused HTB1 library, complemented with an experimental platform based on yeast surface display for affinity and specificity screening. HTB1M displayed high binding specificity toward SOD1 mutants, inhibited their amyloid aggregation in vitro, prevented the accumulation of misfolded proteins in living cells, and reduced the cytotoxicity of SOD1(G93A) expressed in motor neuron-like cells. Competition assays and molecular docking simulations suggested that HTB1M binds to SOD1 via both its α-helical and β-sheet domains at the native dimer interface that becomes exposed upon mutated SOD1 misfolding and monomerization. Our results demonstrate the utility of computational mapping of the protein-protein interaction potential for designing focused protein libraries to be used in directed evolution. They also provide new insight into the mechanism of conversion of broad-spectrum immunoglobulin-binding proteins, such as HTB1, into target-specific proteins, thereby paving the way for the development of new selective drugs targeting the amyloidogenic proteins implicated in a variety of human diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Binding profiles of cholesterol ester transfer protein with current inhibitors: a look at mechanism and drawback.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiwei; Cao, Yang; Hao, Dongxiao; Yuan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-08-20

    Although the pharmacological inhibition of cholesterol ester transport protein (CETP) has been proposed as a method of preventing and treating cardiovascular disease (CVD), the adverse effects of current inhibitors have cast doubt on the interaction mechanisms of inhibitors and CETP. In response, a molecular dynamics simulation was used to investigate their interaction and shed light on the lipid exchange mechanism of CETP. Results showed that torcetrapib, anacetrapib, and evacetrapib can induce the incremental rigidity of CETP, yet decrease the stability of Helix X and the hydrophobic tunnel of CETP, with passable binding abilities (ΔGbind, -61.08, -64.23, and -61.57 kcal mol(-1)). During their binding processes, Van der Waals components (ΔEvdw + ΔGSA) play a dominant role, and the inhibitory effects closely correlated with residues Cys13, Val198, Gln199, Ser230, His232, and Phe263, which could reduce the flexibility of N- and C- termini and Helix X, as well as the stability of hydrophobic tunnel, into which the three inhibitors could enter and promote the formation of intramolecular H-bonds such as Thr138-Asn192 and Arg37-Glu186. Additionally, the three inhibitors could restrain the formation of an opening at the CETP N-terminal, which given the other findings suggests the tunneling mechanism of CETP transfer. The paper closes with an explanation of conceivable causes of the insufficient efficacy of the inhibitors, and puts forward the rationality in targeting the CETP distal end for CVD therapies.

  10. Evolutionary conservation and variation of protein folding pathways. Two protease inhibitor homologues from black mamba venom.

    PubMed

    Hollecker, M; Creighton, T E

    1983-08-05

    The pathways of unfolding and refolding of three homologous proteins are shown to be closely related. This implies that folding pathways, as well as the final folded conformation, have been largely conserved during the presumed evolutionary divergence of these proteins from a common ancestor. The pathways of the homologous proteins I and K from black mamba venom were determined here, using the disulphide interaction between their six cysteine residues to trap and identify the intermediate states, and are compared with those determined previously in the same way for the homologous bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The major one- and two-disulphide intermediates are the same with all three proteins; their kinetic roles are similar, although there are differences in the rates at which they are interconverted and in the minor intermediates that accumulate. As a consequence, different pathways may predominate with another homologous protein, even though the various most favourable pathways are the same. The energetics of the folding transitions and the stabilities of the folded states differ substantially for the three proteins. The differences in stabilities of the fully folded states are primarily reflected kinetically in the rate-determining rearrangements of the native-like conformation; the rates and equilibria of the other steps are not affected markedly. With the less stable proteins, the direct folding pathway of sequential formation of the three correct disulphide bonds becomes significant and is the most facile when considered on a solely intramolecular basis.

  11. Determination of cell survival by RING-mediated regulation of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein abundance

    PubMed Central

    Silke, John; Kratina, Tobias; Chu, Diep; Ekert, Paul G.; Day, Catherine L.; Pakusch, Miha; Huang, David C. S.; Vaux, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, which bind to caspases via their baculoviral IAP repeat domains, also bear RING domains that enable them to promote ubiquitylation of themselves and other interacting proteins. Here we show that the RING domain of cIAP1 allows it to bind directly to the RING of X-linked IAP, causing its ubiquitylation and degradation by the proteasome, thus revealing a mechanism by which IAPs can regulate their abundance. Expression of a construct containing the RING of cellular IAP1 was able to deplete melanoma cells of endogenous X-linked IAP, promoted apoptosis, and also markedly reduced their clonogenicity when treated with cisplatin. Cross control of protein levels by RING domains may therefore enable their levels to be manipulated therapeutically. PMID:16263936

  12. Purification and characterization of two potent heat-stable protein inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A from bovine kidney.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Guo, H; Damuni, Z

    1995-02-14

    Two heat-stable protein inhibitors of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), tentatively designated I1PP2A and I2PP2A, have been purified to apparent homogeneity from extracts of bovine kidney. The purified preparations of I1PP2A exhibited an apparent M(r) approximately 30,000 and 250,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel permeation chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, respectively. In contrast, the purified preparations of I2PP2A exhibited an apparent M(r) approximately 20,000 and 80,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel permeation chromatography on Sephacryl S-200, respectively. The purified preparations of I1PP2A and I2PP2A inhibited PP2A with 32P-labeled myelin basic protein, 32P-labeled histone H1, 32P-labeled pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, 32P-labeled phosphorylase, and protamine kinase as substrates. By contrast, I1PP2A and I2PP2A exhibited little effect, if any, on the activity of PP2A with 32P-labeled casein, and did not prevent the autodephosphorylation of PP2A in incubations with the autophosphorylation-activated protein kinase [Guo, H., & Damuni, Z. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 2500-2504]. The purified preparations of I1PP2A and I2PP2A had little effect, if any, on the activities of protein phosphatase 1, protein phosphatase 2B, protein phosphatase 2C, and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase. With 32P-labeled MBP as a substrate, kinetic analysis according to Henderson showed that I1PP2A and I2PP2A were noncompetitive and displayed a Ki of about 30 and 25 nM, respectively. Following cleavage with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, I1PP2A and I2PP2A displayed distinct peptide patterns, indicating that these inhibitor proteins are the products of distinct genes. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the purified preparations indicate that I1PP2A and I2PP2A are novel proteins.

  13. Inhibitors of protein disulfide isomerase suppress apoptosis induced by misfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hoffstrom, Benjamin G.; Kaplan, Anna; Letso, Reka; Schmid, Ralf; Turmel, Gregory J.; Lo, Donald C.; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases is accumulation of misfolded proteins within neurons, leading to cellular dysfunction and cell death. Although several mechanisms have been proposed to link protein misfolding to cellular toxicity, the connection remains enigmatic. Here, we report a cell death pathway involving protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), a protein chaperone that catalyzes isomerization, reduction, and oxidation of disulfides. Through a small-molecule-screening approach, we discovered five structurally distinct compounds that prevent apoptosis induced by mutant huntingtin protein. Using modified Huisgen cycloaddition chemistry, we then identified PDI as the molecular target of these small molecules. Expression of polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin exon 1 in PC12 cells caused PDI to accumulate at mitochondrial-associated-ER-membranes and trigger apoptotic cell death, via mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. Inhibiting PDI in rat brain cells suppressed the toxicity of mutant huntingtin exon1 and Aβ peptides processed from the amyloid precursor protein. This pro-apoptotic function of PDI provides a new mechanism linking protein misfolding and apoptotic cell death. PMID:21079601

  14. Characterization of a ranavirus inhibitor of the antiviral protein kinase PKR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ranaviruses (family Iridoviridae) are important pathogens of lower vertebrates. However, little is known about how they circumvent the immune response of their hosts. Many ranaviruses contain a predicted protein, designated vIF2α, which shows homology with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. In analogy to distantly related proteins found in poxviruses vIF2α might act as an inhibitor of the antiviral protein kinase PKR. Results We have characterized the function of vIF2α from Rana catesbeiana virus Z (RCV-Z). Multiple sequence alignments and secondary structure prediction revealed homology of vIF2α with eIF2α throughout the S1-, helical- and C-terminal domains. Genetic and biochemical analyses showed that vIF2α blocked the toxic effects of human and zebrafish PKR in a heterologous yeast system. Rather than complementing eIF2α function, vIF2α acted in a manner comparable to the vaccinia virus (VACV) K3L protein (K3), a pseudosubstrate inhibitor of PKR. Both vIF2α and K3 inhibited human PKR-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation, but not PKR autophosphorylation on Thr446. In contrast the E3L protein (E3), another poxvirus inhibitor of PKR, inhibited both Thr446 and eIF2α Ser51 phosphorylation. Interestingly, phosphorylation of eIF2α by zebrafish PKR was inhibited by vIF2α and E3, but not by K3. Effective inhibition of PKR activity coincided with increased PKR expression levels, indicative of relieved autoinhibition of PKR expression. Experiments with vIF2α deletion constructs, showed that both the N-terminal and helical domains were sufficient for inhibition of PKR, whereas the C-terminal domain was dispensable. Conclusions Our results show that RCV-Z vIF2α is a functional inhibitor of human and zebrafish PKR, and probably functions in similar fashion as VACV K3. This constitutes an important step in understanding the interaction of ranaviruses and the host innate immune system. PMID:21418572

  15. Investigating the dynamic aspects of drug-protein recognition through a combination of MD and NMR analyses: implications for the development of protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Meli, Massimiliano; Pagano, Katiuscia; Ragona, Laura; Colombo, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamic aspects of the molecular recognition between a small molecule ligand and a flat, exposed protein surface, representing a typical target in the development of protein-protein interaction inhibitors. Specifically, we analyze the complex between the protein Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) and a recently discovered small molecule inhibitor, labeled sm27 for which the binding site and the residues mainly involved in small molecule recognition have been previously characterized. We have approached this problem using microsecond MD simulations and NMR-based characterizations of the dynamics of the apo and holo states of the system. Using direct combination and cross-validation of the results of the two techniques, we select the set of conformational states that best recapitulate the principal dynamic and structural properties of the complex. We then use this information to generate a multi-structure representation of the sm27-FGF2 interaction. We propose this kind of representation and approach as a useful tool in particular for the characterization of systems where the mutual dynamic influence between the interacting partners is expected to play an important role. The results presented can also be used to generate new rules for the rational expansion of the chemical diversity space of FGF2 inhibitors.

  16. Structural studies of protein arginine methyltransferase 2 reveal its interactions with potential substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cura, Vincent; Marechal, Nils; Troffer-Charlier, Nathalie; Strub, Jean-Marc; van Haren, Matthijs J; Martin, Nathaniel I; Cianférani, Sarah; Bonnefond, Luc; Cavarelli, Jean

    2017-01-01

    PRMT2 is the less-characterized member of the protein arginine methyltransferase family in terms of structure, activity, and cellular functions. PRMT2 is a modular protein containing a catalytic Ado-Met-binding domain and unique Src homology 3 domain that binds proteins with proline-rich motifs. PRMT2 is involved in a variety of cellular processes and has diverse roles in transcriptional regulation through different mechanisms depending on its binding partners. PRMT2 has been demonstrated to have weak methyltransferase activity on a histone H4 substrate, but its optimal substrates have not yet been identified. To obtain insights into the function and activity of PRMT2, we solve several crystal structures of PRMT2 from two homologs (zebrafish and mouse) in complex with either the methylation product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine or other compounds including the first synthetic PRMT2 inhibitor (Cp1) studied so far. We reveal that the N-terminal-containing SH3 module is disordered in the full-length crystal structures, and highlights idiosyncratic features of the PRMT2 active site. We identify a new nonhistone protein substrate belonging to the serine-/arginine-rich protein family which interacts with PRMT2 and we characterize six methylation sites by mass spectrometry. To better understand structural basis for Cp1 binding, we also solve the structure of the complex PRMT4:Cp1. We compare the inhibitor-protein interactions occurring in the PRMT2 and PRMT4 complex crystal structures and show that this compound inhibits efficiently PRMT2. These results are a first step toward a better understanding of PRMT2 substrate recognition and may accelerate the development of structure-based drug design of PRMT2 inhibitors. All coordinates and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank: zPRMT21-408 -SFG = 5g02; zPRMT273-408 -SAH = 5fub; mPRMT21-445 -SAH = 5ful; mPRMT21-445 -Cp1 = 5fwa, mCARM1130-487 -Cp1 = 5k8v. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. [Proteasome degradation of protein C and plasmin inhibitor mutants: molecular mechanism of congenital protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Nishio, Miwako; Koyama, Takatoshi; Hirosawa, Shinsaku

    2009-08-01

    In many inherited disorders, protein deficiency is one of the major aetiologies, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the intracellular degradation of mutant proteins, using naturally occurring PC and PI mutants that lead to congenital deficiencies. We have shown that proteasomes are very important for the degradation of PC and PI mutants, irrespective of the presence or absence of N-glycosylation moieties. Furthermore, mannose trimming after glucose removal is very important for initiation of the degradation. Inhibition of glucose trimming of the mutant proteins accelerated degradation by the proteasomes, and initiation of the degradation occurs after mannose trimming of the middle chain of N-linked glycosylation by mannosidase I. The binding of molecular chaperons influenced by the presence of N-glycosylation moieties may affect the efficient degradation of the mutant proteins. Cotransfection of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) degradation enhancing alpha-mannosidase like protein (EDEM) accelerated the degradation of N-glycosylated PC. The mutant PC or PI molecules were ubiquitin-independently degraded by proteasomes. Autophagy does not appear to contribute to the degradation of PC and PI mutants. These findings might help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms and potential treatments of congenital deficiencies of proteins in a system of coagulation and fibrinolysis.

  18. PFI-1, a highly selective protein interaction inhibitor, targeting BET Bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Sarah; Da Costa, David; Thanasopoulou, Angeliki; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Fish, Paul V; Philpott, Martin; Fedorov, Oleg; Brennan, Paul; Bunnage, Mark E; Owen, Dafydd R; Bradner, James E; Taniere, Philippe; O'Sullivan, Brendan; Müller, Susanne; Schwaller, Juerg; Stankovic, Tatjana; Knapp, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT) are transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of several growth promoting and antiapoptotic genes as well as for cell-cycle progression. BET proteins are recruited on transcriptionally active chromatin via their two N-terminal bromodomains (BRD), a protein interaction module that specifically recognizes acetylated lysine residues in histones H3 and H4. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction results in transcriptional downregulation of a number of oncogenes, providing a novel pharmacologic strategy for the treatment of cancer. Here, we present a potent and highly selective dihydroquinazoline-2-one inhibitor, PFI-1, which efficiently blocks the interaction of BET BRDs with acetylated histone tails. Cocrystal structures showed that PFI-1 acts as an acetyl-lysine (Kac) mimetic inhibitor efficiently occupying the Kac binding site in BRD4 and BRD2. PFI-1 has antiproliferative effects on leukemic cell lines and efficiently abrogates their clonogenic growth. Exposure of sensitive cell lines with PFI-1 results in G1 cell-cycle arrest, downregulation of MYC expression, as well as induction of apoptosis and induces differentiation of primary leukemic blasts. Intriguingly, cells exposed to PFI-1 showed significant downregulation of Aurora B kinase, thus attenuating phosphorylation of the Aurora substrate H3S10, providing an alternative strategy for the specific inhibition of this well-established oncology target.

  19. Acetogenins from Annona muricata as potential inhibitors of antiapoptotic proteins: a molecular modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Priya; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly regulated process crucial for maintaining cellular homeostasis and development. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins play a crucial role in regulating apoptosis. Overexpressed Bcl-2 proteins are associated with the development and progression of several human cancers. Annona muricata is a tropical plant that belongs to the Annonaceae family and is well known for its anticancer properties. In this study, molecular docking and simulations were performed to investigate the inhibitory potential of phytochemicals present in A. muricata against antiapoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family including Bcl-2, B-cell lymphoma extra-large (Bcl-Xl), and Mcl-1. Docking results revealed that the acetogenins, such as annomuricin A, annohexocin, muricatocin A, annomuricin-D-one, and muricatetrocin A/B, exhibited strong binding interactions with Bcl-Xl when compared to Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. Binding score and interactions of these acetogenins were notably better than those of currently available synthetic and natural inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulations of the top-scoring lead molecules established that these molecules could bind strongly and consistently in the active site of Bcl-Xl. These results suggest that acetogenins could be explored as selective natural inhibitors of Bcl-Xl that could assist in promoting the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:27110097

  20. Acetogenins from Annona muricata as potential inhibitors of antiapoptotic proteins: a molecular modeling study.

    PubMed

    Antony, Priya; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly regulated process crucial for maintaining cellular homeostasis and development. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family of proteins play a crucial role in regulating apoptosis. Overexpressed Bcl-2 proteins are associated with the development and progression of several human cancers. Annona muricata is a tropical plant that belongs to the Annonaceae family and is well known for its anticancer properties. In this study, molecular docking and simulations were performed to investigate the inhibitory potential of phytochemicals present in A. muricata against antiapoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 family including Bcl-2, B-cell lymphoma extra-large (Bcl-Xl), and Mcl-1. Docking results revealed that the acetogenins, such as annomuricin A, annohexocin, muricatocin A, annomuricin-D-one, and muricatetrocin A/B, exhibited strong binding interactions with Bcl-Xl when compared to Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. Binding score and interactions of these acetogenins were notably better than those of currently available synthetic and natural inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulations of the top-scoring lead molecules established that these molecules could bind strongly and consistently in the active site of Bcl-Xl. These results suggest that acetogenins could be explored as selective natural inhibitors of Bcl-Xl that could assist in promoting the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis.

  1. PFI-1 – A highly Selective Protein Interaction Inhibitor Targeting BET Bromodomains

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Costa, David Da; Thanasopoulou, Angeliki; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Fish, Paul V.; Philpott, Martin; Fedorov, Oleg; Brennan, Paul; Bunnage, Mark E.; Owen, Dafydd R.; Bradner, James E.; Taniere, Philippe; O’Sullivan, Brendan; Müller, Susanne; Schwaller, Juerg; Stankovic, Tatjana; Knapp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and BRDT) are transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of several growth promoting and anti-apoptotic genes as well as for cell cycle progression. BET proteins are recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin via their two N-terminal bromodomains (BRDs), a protein interaction module that specifically recognizes acetylated lysine residues in histones H3 and H4. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction results in transcriptional down-regulation of a number of oncogenes providing a novel pharmacological strategy for the treatment of cancer. Here we present a potent and highly selective dihydroquinazoline-2-one inhibitor, PFI-1 that efficiently blocks the interaction of BET BRDs with acetylated histone tails. Co-crystal structures showed that PFI-1 acts as an acetyl-lysine (Kac) mimetic inhibitor efficiently occupying the Kac binding site in BRD4 and BRD2. PFI-1 has antiproliferative effects on leukaemic cell lines and efficiently abrogates their clonogenic growth. Exposure of sensitive cell lines with PFI-1 results in G1 cell cycle arrest, down-regulation of MYC expression as well as induction of apoptosis and induces differentiation of primary leukaemic blasts. Intriguingly, cells exposed to PFI-1 showed significant down-regulation of Aurora B kinase, thus attenuating phosphorylation of the Aurora substrate H3S10 providing an alternative strategy for the specific inhibition of this well established oncology target. PMID:23576556

  2. Opportunities to Target Specific Contractile Abnormalities with Smooth Muscle Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ulke-Lemée, Annegret; MacDonald, Justin A.

    2010-01-01

    Smooth muscle is a major component of most hollow organ systems (e.g., airways, vasculature, bladder and gut/gastrointestine); therefore, the coordinated regulation of contraction is a key property of smooth muscle. When smooth muscle functions normally, it contributes to general health and wellness, but its dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) is central to calcium-independent, actomyosin-mediated contractile force generation in the vasculature, thereby playing a role in smooth muscle contraction, cell motility and adhesion. Recent evidence supports an important role for ROCK in the increased vasoconstriction and remodeling observed in various models of hypertension. This review will provide a commentary on the development of specific ROCK inhibitors and their clinical application. Fasudil will be discussed as an example of bench-to-bedside development of a clinical therapeutic that is used to treat conditions of vascular hypercontractility. Due to the wide spectrum of biological processes regulated by ROCK, many additional clinical indications might also benefit from ROCK inhibition. Apart from the importance of ROCK in smooth muscle contraction, a variety of other protein kinases are known to play similar roles in regulating contractile force. The zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are two well-described regulators of contraction. The relative contribution of each kinase to contraction depends on the muscle bed as well as hormonal and neuronal stimulation. Unfortunately, specific inhibitors for ZIPK and ILK are still in the development phase, but the success of fasudil suggests that inhibitors for these other kinases may also have valuable clinical applications. Notably, the directed inhibition of ZIPK with a pseudosubstrate molecule shows unexpected effects on the contractility of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. PMID:27713327

  3. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Julie L; Nechiporchik, Nicole; Mueller, Kelly L; Polin, Lisa; Heilbrun, Lance; Boerner, Scott A; Zoratti, Gina L; Stark, Karri; LoRusso, Patricia M; Burger, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  4. [The heat shock protein 90 inhibitor induces apoptosis and differentiation of Kasumi-1 and its mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-juan; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Tian, Zheng; Liu, Xiang-rong; Lin, Dong; Wang, Jian-xiang

    2005-12-01

    To explore the effect of 17-allylamide-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG), a heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor, on the growth, differentiation and apoptosis of leukemic Kasumi-1 cells. Kasumi-1 cells were treated with 17AAG at different concentrations in suspension culture. Cell proliferation was analysed by MTT assay, expression of myeloid-specific differentiation antigen and cell cycle by flow cytometry, cell apoptosis by annexin V staining, agarose gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry. KIT protein was analysed by Western blot and c-kit mRNA by RT-PCR. 17AAG treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of the cell proliferation with the IC(50) of 0.62 micromol/L. A dose-dependent increase in early apoptosis occurred at 24 hours treatment and in late apoptosis at 48 hours treatment. 17AAG induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in expression of myeloid cell surface protein CD11b and CD15, a progressive decline in S-phase cell fraction and an increase in G(0)/G(1) cells. When Kasumi-1 cells were incubated with 1 micromol/L of 17AAG, KIT protein began to decrease at 2 hours and KIT protein could hardly be detected at 20 hours, but c-kit mRNA was not decreased. 17AAG treatment of Kasumi-1 cells could lower KIT protein expression, inhibit cell proliferation, induce cell partial differentiation, apoptosis and accumulation in G(0)/G(1) phase.

  5. Development of Certain Protein Kinase Inhibitors with the Components from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minghua; Zhao, Ge; Cao, Shousong; Zhang, Yangyang; Li, Xiaofang; Lin, Xiukun

    2017-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have been used in China for more than two thousand years, and some of them have been confirmed to be effective in cancer treatment. Protein kinases play critical roles in control of cell growth, proliferation, migration, survival, and angiogenesis and mediate their biological effects through their catalytic activity. In recent years, numerous protein kinase inhibitors have been developed and are being used clinically. Anticancer TCMs represent a large class of bioactive substances, and some of them display anticancer activity via inhibiting protein kinases to affect the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, serine/threonine-specific protein kinases, pechanistic target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR), P38, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) pathways. In the present article, we comprehensively reviewed several components isolated from anticancer TCMs that exhibited significantly inhibitory activity toward a range of protein kinases. These components, which belong to diverse structural classes, are reviewed herein, based upon the kinases that they inhibit. The prospects and problems in development of the anticancer TCMs are also discussed. PMID:28119606

  6. Effect of a protein synthetic inhibitor on in vivo estimates of protein synthesis in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenk, W.F.; Rubanyi, E.; Haymond, M.W.

    1987-05-01

    In vivo estimates of nonoxidative leucine disappearance have frequently been used as estimates of leucine incorporation into protein. To attempt to assess this extrapolation to protein synthesis, seven overnight fasted dogs received primed 4-h infusions of emetine, an alkaloid known to inhibit protein synthesis at the translational level. Protein metabolism was studied using infusions of (1-/sup 14/C)leucine and ..cap alpha..-(4,5-/sup 3/H)ketoisocaproate (KIC) and the steady-state specific activities of the leucine moiety (e.g., (/sup 14/C)KIC and (/sup 3/H)leucine) reciprocal to the infused isotopes as estimates of intracellular leucine specific activities. Plasma leucine and KIC concentrations increased, as did leucine oxidation. Estimates of nonoxidative leucine disappearance decreased by approx. 70%, and estimates of the endogenous leucine rate of appearance decreased by approx. 40% using either the /sup 14/C or /sup 3/H data. They conclude that, although in vivo estimates of leucine metabolism are not quantitative, rapid changes in whole-body estimates of protein synthesis can be predicted during infusion of labeled leucine.

  7. Human Intestinal Raf Kinase Inhibitor Protein (RKIP) Catalyzes Prasugrel as a Bioactivation Hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kazui, Miho; Ogura, Yuji; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Kubota, Kazuishi; Kurihara, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Prasugrel is a thienopyridine antiplatelet prodrug that undergoes rapid hydrolysis in vivo to a thiolactone metabolite by human carboxylesterase-2 (hCE2) during gastrointestinal absorption. The thiolactone metabolite is further converted to a pharmacologically active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoforms. The aim of the current study was to elucidate hydrolases other than hCE2 involved in the bioactivation step of prasugrel in human intestine. Using size-exclusion column chromatography of a human small intestinal S9 fraction, another peak besides the hCE2 peak was observed to have prasugrel hydrolyzing activity, and this protein was found to have a molecular weight of about 20 kDa. This prasugrel hydrolyzing protein was successfully purified from a monkey small intestinal cytosolic fraction by successive four-step column chromatography and identified as Raf-1 kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Second, we evaluated the enzymatic kinetic parameters for prasugrel hydrolysis using recombinant human RKIP and hCE2 and estimated the contributions of these two hydrolyzing enzymes to the prasugrel hydrolysis reaction in human intestine, which were approximately 40% for hRKIP and 60% for hCE2. Moreover, prasugrel hydrolysis was inhibited by anti-hRKIP antibody and carboxylesterase-specific chemical inhibitor (bis p-nitrophenyl phosphate) by 30% and 60%, respectively. In conclusion, another protein capable of hydrolyzing prasugrel to its thiolactone metabolite was identified as RKIP, and this protein may play a significant role with hCE2 in prasugrel bioactivation in human intestine. RKIP is known to have diverse functions in many intracellular signaling cascades, but this is the first report describing RKIP as a hydrolase involved in drug metabolism.

  8. An in-built proteinase inhibitor system for the protection of recombinant proteins recovered from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Daniel; Anguenot, Raphaël; Brunelle, France; Le, Van Quy; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Trépanier, Sonia; Michaud, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Proteolytic degradation represents a significant barrier to the efficient production of several recombinant proteins in plants, both in vivo during their expression and in vitro during their recovery from source tissues. Here, we describe a strategy to protect recombinant proteins during the recovery process, based on the coexpression of a heterologous proteinase inhibitor acting as a 'mouse trap' against the host proteases during extraction. After confirming the importance of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities in crude protein extracts of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) leaves, transgenic lines of potato expressing either tomato cathepsin D inhibitor (CDI) or bovine aprotinin, both active against trypsin and chymotrypsin, were generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation. Leaf crude protein extracts from CDI-expressing lines, showing decreased levels of cathepsin D-like and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase hydrolysing activities in vitro, conducted decreased turnover rates of the selection marker protein neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) relative to the turnover rates measured for transgenic lines expressing only the marker protein. A similar stabilizing effect on NPTII was observed in leaf protein extracts from plant lines coexpressing bovine aprotinin, confirming the ability of ectopically expressed broad-spectrum serine proteinase inhibitors to reproduce the protein-stabilizing effect of low-molecular-weight proteinase inhibitors generally added to protein extraction media.

  9. Biotin analogues with antibacterial activity are potent inhibitors of biotin protein ligase.

    PubMed

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Tieu, William; Yap, Min Y; Zvarec, Ondrej; Bell, Jan M; Turnidge, John D; Wallace, John C; Booker, Grant W; Wilce, Matthew C J; Abell, Andrew D; Polyak, Steven W

    2012-06-14

    There is a desperate need to develop new antibiotic agents to combat the rise of drug-resistant bacteria, such as clinically important Staphylococcus aureus. The essential multifunctional enzyme, biotin protein ligase (BPL), is one potential drug target for new antibiotics. We report the synthesis and characterization of a series of biotin analogues with activity against BPLs from S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Homo sapiens. Two potent inhibitors with K i < 100 nM were identified with antibacterial activity against a panel of clinical isolates of S. aureus (MIC 2-16 μg/mL). Compounds with high ligand efficiency and >20-fold selectivity between the isozymes were identified and characterized. The antibacterial mode of action was shown to be via inhibition of BPL. The bimolecular interactions between the BPL and the inhibitors were defined by surface plasmon resonance studies and X-ray crystallography. These findings pave the way for second-generation inhibitors and antibiotics with greater potency and selectivity.

  10. Preliminary studies of the effects of vascular adhesion protein-1 inhibitors on experimental corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Enzsöly, Anna; Dunkel, Petra; Récsán, Zsuzsa; Gyorffy, Hajnalka; Tóth, Jeanette; Marics, Gábor; Bori, Zoltán; Tóth, Miklós; Zelkó, Romána; Di Paolo, Maria Luisa; Mátyus, Péter; Németh, János

    2011-07-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) controls the adhesion of lymphocytes to endothelial cells and is upregulated at sites of inflammation. Moreover, it expresses amine oxidase activity, due to the sequence identity with semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase. Recent studies indicate a significant role for VAP-1 in neovascularization, besides its contribution to inflammation. Pathological blood vessel development in severe ocular diseases (such as diabetes, age-related macula degeneration, trauma and infections) might lead to decreased visual acuity and finally to blindness, yet there is no clear consensus as to its appropriate treatment. In the present case study, the effects of two VAP-1 inhibitors on experimentally induced corneal neovascularization in rabbits were compared with the effects of a known inhibitor of angiogenesis, bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody. In accordance with recent literature data, the results of the preliminary study reported here indicate that the administration of VAP-1 inhibitors is a potentially valuable therapeutic option in the treatment of corneal neovascularization.

  11. Integrating Virtual and Biochemical Screening for Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitor Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katie R.; Narang, Pooja; Franco, Jose L. Medina; Meurice, Nathalie; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) represent an important class of enzymes that mediate signal transduction and control diverse aspects of cell behavior. The importance of their activity is exemplified by their significant contribution to disease etiology with over half of all human PTP genes implicated in at least one disease. Small molecule inhibitors targeting individual PTPs are important biological tools, and are needed to fully characterize the function of these enzymes. Moreover, potent and selective PTP inhibitors hold the promise to transform the treatment of many diseases. While numerous methods exist to develop PTP-directed small molecules, we have found that complimentary use of both virtual (in silico) and biochemical (in vitro) screening approaches expedite compound identification and drug development. Here, we summarize methods pertinent to our work and others. Focusing on specific challenges and successes we have experienced, we discuss the considerable caution that must be taken to avoid enrichment of inhibitors that function by non-selective oxidation. We also discuss the utility of using “open” PTP structures to identify active-site directed compounds, a rather unconventional choice for virtual screening. When integrated closely, virtual and biochemical screening can be used in a productive workflow to identify small molecules targeting PTPs. PMID:23969317

  12. A Potent, Selective and Cell-Active Allosteric Inhibitor of Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 3 (PRMT3)**

    PubMed Central

    Kaniskan, H. Ümit; Szewczyk, Magdalena M.; Yu, Zhengtian; Eram, Mohammad S.; Yang, Xiaobao; Schmidt, Keith; Luo, Xiao; Dai, Miao; He, Feng; Zang, Irene; Lin, Ying; Kennedy, Steven; Li, Fengling; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Dong, Aiping; Smil, David; Min, Sun-Joon; Landon, Melissa; Lin-Jones, Jennifer; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L.; Schapira, Matthieu; Atadja, Peter; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Brown, Peter J.; Zhao, Kehao; Jin, Jian; Vedadi, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    PRMT3 catalyzes the asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues of various proteins. It is essential for maturation of ribosomes, may have a role in lipogenesis, and is implicated in several diseases. A potent, selective, and cell- active PRMT3 inhibitor would be a valuable tool for further investigating PRMT3 biology. Here we report the discovery of the first PRMT3 chemical probe, SGC707, by structure-based optimization of the allosteric PRMT3 inhibitors we reported previously, and thorough characterization of this probe in biochemical, biophysical, and cellular assays. SGC707 is a potent PRMT3 inhibitor (IC50 = 31 ± 2 nm, KD = 53 ± 2 nm) with outstanding selectivity (selective against 31 other methyltransferases and more than 250 non-epigenetic targets). The mechanism of action studies and crystal structure of the PRMT3-SGC707 complex confirm the allosteric inhibition mode. Importantly, SGC707 engages PRMT3 and potently inhibits its methyltransferase activity in cells. It is also bioavailable and suitable for animal studies. This well- characterized chemical probe is an excellent tool to further study the role of PRMT3 in health and disease. PMID:25728001

  13. Structural Determinants of CX-4945 Derivatives as Protein Kinase CK2 Inhibitors: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Xia; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jinghui; Li, Yan; Yang, Ling; Li, Guohui

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2, also known as casein kinase-2, is involved in a broad range of physiological events including cell growth, proliferation and suppression of apoptosis which are related to human cancers. A series of compounds were identified as CK2 inhibitors and their inhibitory activities varied depending on their structures. In order to explore the structure-activity correlation of CX-4945 derivatives as inhibitors of CK2, in the present study, a set of ligand- and receptor-based 3D-QSAR models were developed employing Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Index Analysis (CoMSIA). The optimum CoMFA (Rcv2 = 0.618, Rpred2 = 0.892) and CoMSIA (Rcv2 = 0.681, Rpred2 = 0.843) models exhibited reasonable statistical characteristics for CX-4945 derivatives. The results indicated that electrostatic effects contributed the most to both CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The combination of docking analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that Leu45, Lys68, Glu81, Val116, Asp175 and Trp176 of CK2 which formed several direct or water-bridged H-bonds with CX-4945 are crucial for CX-4945 derivatives recognition to CK2. These results can offer useful theoretical references for designing more potent CK2 inhibitors. PMID:22072932

  14. Structural determinants of CX-4945 derivatives as protein kinase CK2 inhibitors: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Xia; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jinghui; Li, Yan; Yang, Ling; Li, Guohui

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2, also known as casein kinase-2, is involved in a broad range of physiological events including cell growth, proliferation and suppression of apoptosis which are related to human cancers. A series of compounds were identified as CK2 inhibitors and their inhibitory activities varied depending on their structures. In order to explore the structure-activity correlation of CX-4945 derivatives as inhibitors of CK2, in the present study, a set of ligand- and receptor-based 3D-QSAR models were developed employing Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) and Comparative Molecular Similarity Index Analysis (CoMSIA). The optimum CoMFA (R(cv) (2) = 0.618, R(pred) (2) = 0.892) and CoMSIA (R(cv) (2) = 0.681, R(pred) (2) = 0.843) models exhibited reasonable statistical characteristics for CX-4945 derivatives. The results indicated that electrostatic effects contributed the most to both CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The combination of docking analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that Leu45, Lys68, Glu81, Val116, Asp175 and Trp176 of CK2 which formed several direct or water-bridged H-bonds with CX-4945 are crucial for CX-4945 derivatives recognition to CK2. These results can offer useful theoretical references for designing more potent CK2 inhibitors.

  15. Identification of para-Substituted Benzoic Acid Derivatives as Potent Inhibitors of the Protein Phosphatase Slingshot.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang-shuai; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Dao-lai; Hou, Xu-Ben; Ge, Lin; Yang, Du-xiao; Liu, Hong-da; He, Dong-fang; Chen, Xu; Han, Ke-rui; Song, Xiao-yuan; Yu, Xiao; Fang, Hao; Sun, Jin-peng

    2015-12-01

    Slingshot proteins form a small group of dual-specific phosphatases that modulate cytoskeleton dynamics through dephosphorylation of cofilin and Lim kinases (LIMK). Small chemical compounds with Slingshot-inhibiting activities have therapeutic potential against cancers or infectious diseases. However, only a few Slingshot inhibitors have been investigated and reported, and their cellular activities have not been examined. In this study, we identified two rhodanine-scaffold-based para-substituted benzoic acid derivatives as competitive Slingshot inhibitors. The top compound, (Z)-4-((4-((4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-(o-tolyl)thiazolidin-5-ylidene)methyl)phenoxy)methyl)benzoic acid (D3) had an inhibition constant (Ki) of around 4 μm and displayed selectivity over a panel of other phosphatases. Moreover, compound D3 inhibited cell migration and cofilin dephosphorylation after nerve growth factor (NGF) or angiotensin II stimulation. Therefore, our newly identified Slingshot inhibitors provide a starting point for developing Slingshot-targeted therapies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Piperazinobenzopyranones and phenalkylaminobenzopyranones: potent inhibitors of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    PubMed

    Boumendjel, Ahcène; Nicolle, Edwige; Moraux, Thomas; Gerby, Bastien; Blanc, Madeleine; Ronot, Xavier; Boutonnat, Jean

    2005-11-17

    In continuing research that led us to identify chromanone derivatives (J. Med. Chem. 2003, 46, 2125) as P-glycoprotein inhibitors, we obtained analogues able to modulate multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The linkage of 5-hydroxybenzopyran-4-one to piperazines or phenalkylamines affords highly potent inhibitors of BCRP. By using sensitive (HCT116) and resistant colon cancer cells expressing BCRP, we evaluated the effect of 14 benzopyranone (chromone) derivatives on the accumulation and the cytotoxic effect of the anticancer drug, mitoxantrone. At 10 microM, three compounds increased both intracellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of mitoxantrone in HCT116/R cells with a comparable rate as fumitremorgin C and Gleevec used as reference inhibitors. The most potent molecules 5b and 5c are still active at 1 microM, whereas FTC shows weak inhibition. These molecules do not induce cell death as shown by the cell cycle distribution study, which makes them potential candidates for in vivo studies.

  17. Embryonic Dorsal-Ventral Signaling: Secreted Frizzled-Related Proteins as Inhibitors of Tolloid Proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojoon X.; Ambrosio, Andrea L.; Reversade, Bruno; De Robertis, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we report an unexpected role for the secreted Frizzled-related protein (sFRP) Sizzled/Ogon as an inhibitor of the extracellular proteolytic reaction that controls BMP signaling during Xenopus gastrulation. Microinjection experiments suggest that the Frizzled domain of Sizzled regulates the activity of Xolloid-related (Xlr), a metalloproteinase that degrades Chordin, through the following molecular pathway: Szl ┤ Xlr ┤ Chd ┤ BMP → P-Smad1 → Szl. In biochemical assays, the Xlr proteinase has similar affinities for its endogenous substrate Chordin and for its competitive inhibitor Sizzled, which is resistant to enzyme digestion. Extracellular levels of Sizzled and Chordin in the gastrula embryo and enzyme reaction constants were all in the 10−8 M range, consistent with a physiological role in the regulation of dorsal-ventral patterning. Sizzled is also a natural inhibitor of BMP1, a Tolloid metalloproteinase of medical interest. Furthermore, mouse sFRP2 inhibited Xlr, suggesting a wider role for this molecular mechanism. PMID:16413488

  18. Design, Synthesis and in vitro Characterization of Novel Hybrid Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of STAT3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Vijay M.; Yue, Peibin; Fletcher, Steven; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Luu, Diana P.; Zhang, Xiaolei; Sun, Hong; Zhao, Wei; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Turkson, James; Gunning, Patrick T.

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of oncogenic signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein signaling pathways has been extensively implicated in human cancers. Given STAT3’s prominent dysregulatory role in malignant transformation and tumorigenesis, there has been a significant effort to discover STAT3-specific inhibitors as chemical probes for defining the aberrant STAT3-mediated molecular events that support the malignant phenotype. To identify novel, STAT3-selective inhibitors suitable for interrogating STAT3 signaling in tumor cells, we explored the design of hybrid molecules by conjugating a known STAT3 inhibitory peptidomimetic, ISS610 to the high-affinity STAT3-binding peptide motif derived from the ILR/gp-130. Several hybrid molecules were examined in in vitro biophysical and biochemical studies for inhibitory potency against STAT3. Lead inhibitor 14aa was shown to strongly bind to STAT3 (KD = 900 nM), disrupt STAT3:phosphopeptide complexes (Ki = 5 μM) and suppress STAT3 activity in in vitro DNA-binding activity/ electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Moreover, lead STAT3 inhibitor 14aa induced a time-dependent inhibition of constitutive STAT3 activation in v-Src transformed mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3/v-Src), with 80 % suppression of constitutively-active STAT3 at six hours following treatment of NIH3T3/v-Src. However, STAT3 activity recovered at 24 hours after treatment of cells, suggesting potential degradation of the compound. Results further showed a suppression of aberrant STAT3 activity in NIH3T3/v-Src by the treatment with compound 14aa-OH, which is the non-pTyr version of compound 14aa. The effect of compounds 14aa and 14aa-OH are accompanied by a moderate loss of cell viability. PMID:21216604

  19. New Pyrazolopyrimidine Inhibitors of Protein Kinase D as Potent Anticancer Agents for Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Manuj; Johnson, James; Li, Zhihong; Xu, Shuping; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Qiming Jane

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of protein kinase D (PKD) as a potential therapeutic target for several diseases including cancer has triggered the search for potent, selective, and cell-permeable small molecule inhibitors. In this study, we describe the identification, in vitro characterization, structure-activity analysis, and biological evaluation of a novel PKD inhibitory scaffold exemplified by 1-naphthyl PP1 (1-NA-PP1). 1-NA-PP1 and IKK-16 were identified as pan-PKD inhibitors in a small-scale targeted kinase inhibitor library assay. Both screening hits inhibited PKD isoforms at about 100 nM and were ATP-competitive inhibitors. Analysis of several related kinases indicated that 1-NA-PP1 was highly selective for PKD as compared to IKK-16. SAR analysis showed that 1-NA-PP1 was considerably more potent and showed distinct substituent effects at the pyrazolopyrimidine core. 1-NA-PP1 was cell-active, and potently blocked prostate cancer cell proliferation by inducing G2/M arrest. It also potently blocked the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells, demonstrating promising anticancer activities on multiple fronts. Overexpression of PKD1 or PKD3 almost completely reversed the growth arrest and the inhibition of tumor cell invasion caused by 1-NA-PP1, indicating that its anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities were mediated through the inhibition of PKD. Interestingly, a 12-fold increase in sensitivity to 1-NA-PP1 could be achieved by engineering a gatekeeper mutation in the active site of PKD1, suggesting that 1-NA-PP1 could be paired with the analog-sensitive PKD1M659G for dissecting PKD-specific functions and signaling pathways in various biological systems. PMID:24086585

  20. The Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Pathway Facilitates Resistance to the Src Inhibitor, Dasatinib, in Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beadnell, Thomas C.; Mishall, Katie M.; Zhou, Qiong; Riffert, Stephen M.; Wuensch, Kelsey E.; Kessler, Brittelle E.; Corpuz, Maia L.; Jing, Xia; Kim, Jihye; Wang, Guoliang; Tan, Aik Choon; Schweppe, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced stages of papillary and anaplastic thyroid cancer represent a highly aggressive subset, in which there are currently few effective therapies. We and others have recently demonstrated that c-Src is a key mediator of growth, invasion, and metastasis, and therefore represents a promising therapeutic target in thyroid cancer. However clinically, Src inhibitor efficacy has been limited, and therefore further insights are needed to define resistance mechanisms and determine rational combination therapies. We have generated four thyroid cancer cell lines with a greater than 30-fold increase in acquired resistance to the Src inhibitor, dasatinib. Upon acquisition of dasatinib-resistance, the two RAS-mutant cell lines acquired the c-Src gatekeeper mutation (T341M), whereas the two BRAF-mutant cell lines did not. Accordingly, Src signaling was refractory to dasatinib treatment in the RAS-mutant dasatinib-resistant cell lines. Interestingly, activation of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinase pathway was increased in all four of the dasatinib-resistant cell lines, likely due to B-Raf and c-Raf dimerization. Furthermore, MAP2K1/MAP2K2 (MEK1/2) inhibition restored sensitivity in all four of the dasatinib-resistant cell lines, and overcome acquired resistance to dasatinib in the RAS-mutant Cal62 cell line, in vivo. Together, these studies demonstrate that acquisition of the c-Src gatekeeper mutation and MAP Kinase pathway signaling play important roles in promoting resistance to the Src inhibitor, dasatinib. We further demonstrate that up-front combined inhibition with dasatinib and MEK1/2 or ERK1/2 inhibitors drives synergistic inhibition of growth and induction of apoptosis, indicating that combined inhibition may overcome mechanisms of survival in response to single agent inhibition. PMID:27222538

  1. Bis-ANS as a specific inhibitor for microtubule-associated protein induced assembly of tubulin.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, M; Parrack, P K; Mukhopadhyay, K; Bhattacharyya, B

    1992-07-21

    5,5'-Bis[8-(phenylamino)-1-naphthalenesulfonate] (bis-ANS), the fluorescent probe which binds to tubulin, inhibits its assembly into microtubules [Horowitz et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14647-14650]. The results described in this paper demonstrate that bis-ANS is quite distinct from other well-known microtubule inhibitors in its specificity of action. The inhibitory potentials of bis-ANS and its three structural analogues ANS, Prodan [6-propionyl-2-(dimethylamino)naphthalene], and NSA (naphthalenesulfonic acid) have been compared. It is found that they can be arranged in the following order according to their polymerization inhibitory potentials: bis-ANS approximately equal to Prodan much greater than ANS greater than NSA. Interestingly, the naphthalene nucleus is sufficient to cause inhibition of polymerization. Detailed experiments were carried out to examine the mode of assembly inhibition by aminonaphthalenes at the molecular level, using bis-ANS as a representative. It was found that there was little or no effect of bis-ANS on the assembly of tubulin when polymerization was induced by assembly promoters like taxol, DMSO, or glutamate, or on the assembly of subtilisin-digested protein (tubulin S), for all of which half-maximal inhibition could not be achieved even at 120 microM bis-ANS. On the contrary, bis-ANS acts as an inhibitor in the case of MAP- (MAP2 and tau) and poly(L-lysine)-induced assembly of tubulin, with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.6 microM. Our results place bis-ANS as a novel inhibitor, which seems to specifically inhibit C-termini-mediated assembly. Of all assembly inhibitors known so far, none exhibits such selection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Differential effects of protein kinase C inhibitors on chemokine production in human synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, N. J.; Watson, M. L.; Yoshimura, T.; Westwick, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with the accumulation and activation of selected populations of inflammatory cells within the arthritic joint. One putative signal for this process is the production, by resident cells, of a group of inflammatory mediators known as the chemokines. 2. The chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and RANTES (regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted) are target-cell specific chemoattractants produced by synovial fibroblasts in response to stimulation with interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) or tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). The signalling pathways involved in their production are not well defined. We therefore used four different protein kinase C inhibitors to investigate the role of this kinase in the regulation of chemokine mRNA and protein expression in human cultured synovial fibroblasts. 3. The non-selective PKC inhibitor, staurosporine (1-300 nM) significantly increased the production of IL-1 alpha-induced IL-8 mRNA and protein. A specific PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine chloride (0.1-3 microM), also caused a small concentration-dependent increase in IL-8 mRNA and protein production. In contrast, 3-[1-[3-(amidinothio)propyl]-3-indoly]-4-(1-methyl-3-indolyl )- 1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione methanesulphonate (Ro 31-8220) and 2[1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3- yl)-maleimide (GF 109203X), two selective PKC inhibitors of the substituted bisindolylmaleimide family had a concentration-dependent biphasic effect on IL-1 alpha or TNF alpha-induced chemokine expression. At low concentrations they caused a stimulation in chemokine production, which was especially evident at the mRNA level. At higher concentrations both inhibited IL-1 alpha or TNF alpha-induced chemokine mRNA and protein production. Ro 31-8220 was 10 fold more potent than GF 109203X, with an IC50 of 1.6 +/- 0.08 microM (mean +/- s.e.mean, n = 4) for IL-1 alpha induced IL-8 production. Ro 31

  3. A High-Throughput Screening Strategy for Development of RNF8-Ubc13 Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Weber, Elisabeth; Rothenaigner, Ina; Brandner, Stefanie; Hadian, Kamyar; Schorpp, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays an essential role in a broad range of cellular signaling pathways. Ubiquitination is a posttranslational protein modification that involves the action of an enzymatic cascade (E1, E2, and E3 enzymes) for the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to target proteins. The emerging knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and correlation of deregulation of the ubiquitin system in human diseases is uncovering new opportunities for therapeutics development. The E3 ligase RNF8 acts in cooperation with the heterodimeric E2 enzyme Ubc13/Uev1a to generate ubiquitin conjugates at the sides of DNA double-strand breaks, and recent findings suggest RNF8 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer. Here, we present a novel high-throughput screening (HTS)-compatible assay based on the AlphaScreen technology to identify inhibitors of the RNF8-Ubc13 protein-protein interaction, along with a follow-up strategy for subsequent validation. We have adapted the AlphaScreen assay to a 384-well format and demonstrate its reliability, reproducibility, and suitability for automated HTS campaigns. In addition, we have established a biochemical orthogonal homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) assay in HTS format and a cellular microscopy-based assay allowing verification of the primary hits. This strategy will be useful for drug screening programs aimed at RNF8-Ubc13 modulation.

  4. Activator of G protein signaling 3 is a guanine dissociation inhibitor for Gαi subunits

    PubMed Central

    De Vries, Luc; Fischer, Thierry; Tronchère, Hélène; Brothers, Greg M.; Strockbine, Bentley; Siderovski, David P.; Farquhar, Marilyn Gist

    2000-01-01

    Activator of G protein signaling 3 (AGS3) is a newly identified protein shown to act at the level of the G protein itself. AGS3 belongs to the GoLoco family of proteins, sharing the 19-aa GoLoco motif that is a Gαi/o binding motif. AGS3 interacts only with members of the Gαi/o subfamily. By surface plasmon resonance, we found that AGS3 binds exclusively to the GDP-bound form of Gαi3. In GTPγS binding assays, AGS3 behaves as a guanine dissociation inhibitor (GDI), inhibiting the rate of exchange of GDP for GTP by Gαi3. AGS3 interacts with both Gαi3 and Gαo subunits, but has GDI activity only on Gαi3, not on Gαo. The fourth GoLoco motif of AGS3 is a major contributor to this activity. AGS3 stabilizes Gαi3 in its GDP-bound form, as it inhibits the increase in tryptophan fluorescence of the Gαi3-GDP subunit stimulated by AlF4−. AGS3 is widely expressed as it is detected by immunoblotting in brain, testis, liver, kidney, heart, pancreas, and in PC-12 cells. Several different sizes of the protein are detected. By Northern blotting, AGS3 shows 2.3-kb and 3.5-kb mRNAs in heart and brain, respectively, suggesting tissue-specific alternative splicing. Taken together, our results demonstrate that AGS3 is a GDI. To the best of our knowledge, no other GDI has been described for heterotrimeric G proteins. Inhibition of the Gα subunit and stimulation of heterotrimeric G protein signaling, presumably by stimulating Gβγ, extend the possibilities for modulating signal transduction through heterotrimeric G proteins. PMID:11121039

  5. Anti-interleukin-6 therapy through application of a monogenic protein inhibitor via gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Görtz, Dieter; Braun, Gerald S.; Maruta, Yuichi; Djudjaj, Sonja; van Roeyen, Claudia R.; Martin, Ina V.; Küster, Andrea; Schmitz-Van de Leur, Hildegard; Scheller, Jürgen; Ostendorf, Tammo; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Newen, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cytokine therapies have substantially improved the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Cytokine-targeting drugs are usually biologics such as antibodies or other engineered proteins. Production of biologics, however, is complex and intricate and therefore expensive which might limit therapeutic application. To overcome this limitation we developed a strategy that involves the design of an optimized, monogenic cytokine inhibitor and the protein producing capacity of the host. Here, we engineered and characterized a receptor fusion protein, mIL-6-RFP-Fc, for the inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-established target in anti-cytokine therapy. Upon application in mice mIL-6-RFP-Fc inhibited IL-6-induced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and ERK1/2 kinases in liver and kidney. mIL-6-RFP-Fc is encoded by a single gene and therefore most relevant for gene transfer approaches. Gene transfer through hydrodynamic plasmid delivery in mice resulted in hepatic production and secretion of mIL-6-RFP-Fc into the blood in considerable amounts, blocked hepatic acute phase protein synthesis and improved kidney function in an ischemia and reperfusion injury model. Our study establishes receptor fusion proteins as promising agents in anti-cytokine therapies through gene therapeutic approaches for future targeted and cost-effective treatments. The strategy described here is applicable for many cytokines involved in inflammatory and other diseases. PMID:26423228

  6. Arabidopsis Bax Inhibitor-1 inhibits cell death induced by pokeweed antiviral protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is an active form of programmed cell death (PCD) that plays critical roles in the development, differentiation and resistance to pathogens in multicellular organisms. Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) are able to induce apoptotic cell death in mammalian cells. In this study, using yeast as a model system, we showed that yeast cells expressing pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a single-chain ribosome-inactivating protein, exhibit apoptotic-like features, such as nuclear fragmentation and ROS production. We studied the interaction between PAP and AtBI-1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Bax Inhibitor-1), a plant anti-apoptotic protein, which inhibits Bax induced cell death. Cells expressing PAP and AtBI-1 were able to survive on galactose media compared to PAP alone, indicating a reduction in the cytotoxicity of PAP in yeast. However, PAP was able to depurinate the ribosomes and to inhibit total translation in the presence of AtBI-1. A C-terminally deleted AtBI-1 was able to reduce the cytotoxicity of PAP. Since anti-apoptotic proteins form heterodimers to inhibit the biological activity of their partners, we used a co-immunoprecipitation assay to examine the binding of AtBI-1 to PAP. Both full length and C-terminal deleted AtBI-1 were capable of binding to PAP. These findings indicate that PAP induces cell death in yeast and AtBI-1 inhibits cell death induced by PAP without affecting ribosome depurination and translation inhibition. PMID:28357275

  7. Osthole induces lung cancer cell apoptosis through inhibition of inhibitor of apoptosis family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Man-Li; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Li

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of Osthole on the apoptosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and its synergistic effect with Embelin. Our results revealed that treatment with both Osthole and Embelin inhibited cell proliferation. Notably, combination treatment of Osthole and Embelin inhibited cell proliferation more significantly compared with monotherapy. In addition, morphological analysis and Annexin V/propidium iodide analysis revealed that the combination of Osthole and Embelin enhanced their effect on cell apoptosis. We further examined the effect of Osthole on the expression of inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family proteins. That treatment of A549 lung cancer cells with various concentrations of Osthole was observed to decrease the protein expression of X-chromosome-encoded IAP, c-IAP1, c-IAP2 and Survivin, and increase Smac expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it was noted that Osthole or Embelin alone increased the expression of BAX, caspase-3, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9, and decreased Bcl-2 levels following treatment. Osthole and Embelin combination treatment had a synergistic effect on the regulation of these proteins. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that Osthole inhibited proliferation and induced the apoptosis of lung cancer cells via IAP family proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Osthole enhances the antitumor effect of Embelin, indicating that combination of Osthole and Embelin has potential clinical significance in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27895730

  8. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV) on suppression of raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Ke; Yu, Guo-Zheng; Li, Xiao-Dong; Ren, Xue-Qun

    2017-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) has been shown to be a suppressor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and is reported to be involved in human malignancy. However, the molecular mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in regulating RKIP expression is not yet clarified. In this study, we compared RKIP expression in 107 pairs of matched liver cancer and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. Among seven HBV-encoded proteins, we found HBV X (HBX) protein could significantly inhibit the expression level of RKIP, indicating that HBV could suppress RKIP expression through regulating HBX. To further elucidate the mechanism, analyses on transcriptional regulation and promoter methylation inhibition were conducted in Huh7 cells. Our results showed that HBX can interact with AP1 protein to inhibit the RKIP transcription. Moreover, we observed that the promoter methylation level of RKIP could be enhanced by HBV. In conclusion, our study revealed that RKIP could act as a molecular marker for HBV-infected liver cancer, but had no tumor-suppressing effect. PMID:27902472

  9. Oleanolic acid and its derivatives: new inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with cellular activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Nan; Zhang, Wei; Hong, Di; Shi, Lei; Shen, Qiang; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Hu, Li-Hong

    2008-09-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a key factor in the negative regulation of insulin pathway and a promising target for treatment of diabetes and obesity. Herein, a series of competitive inhibitors were optimized from oleanolic acid, a natural triterpenoid identified against PTP1B by screening libraries of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs. Modifying at 3 and 28 positions, we obtained compound 13 with a K(i) of 130 nM, which exhibited good selectivity between other phosphatases involved in insulin pathway except T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase. Further evaluation in cell models illustrated that the derivatives enhanced insulin receptor phosphorylation in CHO/hIR cells and also stimulated glucose uptake in L6 myotubes with or addition of without insulin.

  10. Structure and evolution of the Ivy protein family, unexpected lysozyme inhibitors in Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Chantal; Monchois, Vincent; Byrne, Deborah; Chenivesse, Sabine; Lembo, Frédérique; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    Part of an ancestral bactericidal system, vertebrate C-type lysozyme targets the peptidoglycan moiety of bacterial cell walls. We report the crystal structure of a protein inhibitor of C-type lysozyme, the Escherichia coli Ivy protein, alone and in complex with hen egg white lysozyme. Ivy exhibits a novel fold in which a protruding five-residue loop appears essential to its inhibitory effect. This feature guided the identification of Ivy orthologues in other Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of the evolutionary distant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ivy orthologue was also determined in complex with hen egg white lysozyme, and its antilysozyme activity was confirmed. Ivy expression protects porous cell-wall E. coli mutants from the lytic effect of lysozyme, suggesting that it is a response against the permeabilizing effects of the innate vertebrate immune system. As such, Ivy acts as a virulence factor for a number of Gram-negative bacteria-infecting vertebrates. PMID:17405861

  11. Scaffold proteins LACK and TRACK as potential drug targets in kinetoplastid parasites: Development of inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qvit, Nir; Schechtman, Deborah; Pena, Darlene Aparecida; Berti, Denise Aparecida; Soares, Chrislaine Oliveira; Miao, Qianqian; Liang, Liying (Annie); Baron, Lauren A.; Teh-Poot, Christian; Martínez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Churchill, Eric; Cunningham, Anna D.; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Federspiel, Nancy A.; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Torrecilhas, Ana Claudia; Manso Alves, Maria Julia; Jardim, Armando; Momar, Ndao; Dumonteil, Eric; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases cause ∼500,000 deaths annually and remain a major challenge for therapeutic development. Using a rational design based approach, we developed peptide inhibitors with anti-parasitic activity that were derived from the sequences of parasite scaffold proteins LACK (Leishmania's receptor for activated C-kinase) and TRACK (Trypanosomareceptor for activated C-kinase). We hypothesized that sequences in LACK and TRACK that are conserved in the parasites, but not in the mammalian ortholog, RACK (Receptor for activated C-kinase), may be interaction sites for signaling proteins that are critical for the parasites' viability. One of these peptides exhibited leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activity in culture. Moreover, in infected mice, this peptide was also effective in reducing parasitemia and increasing survival without toxic effects. The identified peptide is a promising new anti-parasitic drug lead, as its unique features may limit toxicity and drug-resistance, thus overcoming central limitations of most anti-parasitic drugs. PMID:27054066

  12. Benzothiazole derivatives: novel inhibitors of methylglyoxal mediated glycation of proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Sanaullah; Mirza, Salma; Rasheed, Saima; Hussain, Shafqat; Khan, Jalaluddin A J; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Perveen, Shahnaz; Choudhary, Muhammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the protein anti-glycation activity of thirty-three (33) benzothiazoles, out of which twenty-seven were the newly synthesized benzothiazoles. Compound 1 (IC50= 187 ± 2.6 µM) was found to be the most active, while compounds 2 (IC50= 219 ± 3.6 µM), 3 (IC50= 224 ± 1.9 µM), 4 (IC50= 223 ± 3.3 µM), 5 (IC50= 238 ± 2.2 µM), 7 (IC50= 266 ± 5.4 µM), 17 (IC50= 226 ± 1.6 µM) and 18 (IC50= 274 ± 2.4 µM) were significantly active, when compared with the standard rutin (IC50= 294 ± 1.5 µM). This study identified potential inhibitors of methylglyoxal mediated glycation of proteins, which is the pathophysiology of late diabetic complications.

  13. FAM122A, a new endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li; Liu, Man-Hua; Guo, Meng; Hu, Chuan-Xi; Yan, Zhao-Wen; Chen, Jing; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the ubiquitously expressed protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is essential for various cellular functions such as cell proliferation, transformation, and fate determination. In this study, we demonstrate that the highly conserved protein in mammals, designated FAM122A, directly interacts with PP2A-Aα and B55α rather than B56α subunits, and inhibits the phosphatase activity of PP2A-Aα/B55α/Cα complex. Further, FAM122A potentiates the degradation of catalytic subunit PP2A-Cα with the increased poly-ubiquitination. In agreement, FAM122A silencing inhibits while its overexpression enhances cell growth and colony-forming ability. Collectively, we identify FAM122A as a new endogenous PP2A inhibitor and its physiological and pathophysiological significances warrant to be further investigated. PMID:27588481

  14. Structure and evolution of the Ivy protein family, unexpected lysozyme inhibitors in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Chantal; Monchois, Vincent; Byrne, Deborah; Chenivesse, Sabine; Lembo, Frédérique; Lazzaroni, Jean-Claude; Claverie, Jean-Michel

    2007-04-10

    Part of an ancestral bactericidal system, vertebrate C-type lysozyme targets the peptidoglycan moiety of bacterial cell walls. We report the crystal structure of a protein inhibitor of C-type lysozyme, the Escherichia coli Ivy protein, alone and in complex with hen egg white lysozyme. Ivy exhibits a novel fold in which a protruding five-residue loop appears essential to its inhibitory effect. This feature guided the identification of Ivy orthologues in other Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of the evolutionary distant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Ivy orthologue was also determined in complex with hen egg white lysozyme, and its antilysozyme activity was confirmed. Ivy expression protects porous cell-wall E. coli mutants from the lytic effect of lysozyme, suggesting that it is a response against the permeabilizing effects of the innate vertebrate immune system. As such, Ivy acts as a virulence factor for a number of Gram-negative bacteria-infecting vertebrates.

  15. IAPs on the move: role of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Oberoi-Khanuja, T K; Murali, A; Rajalingam, K

    2013-09-05

    Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are a class of highly conserved proteins predominantly known for the regulation of caspases and immune signaling. However, recent evidence suggests a crucial role for these molecules in the regulation of tumor cell shape and migration by controlling MAPK, NF-κB and Rho GTPases. IAPs directly control Rho GTPases, thus regulating cell shape and migration. For instance, XIAP and cIAP1 function as the direct E3 ubiquitin ligases of Rac1 and target it for proteasomal degradation. IAPs are differentially expressed in tumor cells and have been targeted by several cancer therapeutic drugs that are currently in clinical trials. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of IAPs in the regulation of cell migration and discuss the possible implications of these observations in regulating tumor cell metastases.

  16. Virtual screening studies to identify novel inhibitors for Sigma F protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mustyala, Kiran Kumar; Malkhed, Vasavi; Chittireddy, Venkataramana Reddy; Vuruputuri, Uma

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the oldest threats to public health. TB is caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The Sigma factors are essential for the survival of MTB. The Sigma factor Sigma F (SigF) regulates genes expression under stress conditions. The SigF binds to RNA polymerase and forms a holoenzyme, which initiates the transcription of various genes. The Usfx, an anti-SigF protein, binds to SigF and alters the transcription initiation and gene expression. In the present work, virtual screening studies are taken up to identify the interactions between SigF and small molecular inhibitors which can inhibit the formation of holoenzyme. The studies reveal that ARG 104 and ARG 224 amino acid residues of SigF protein are forming important binding interactions with the ligands. The in silico ADME properties for the ligand data set are calculated to check the druggability of the molecules.

  17. Why ice-binding type I antifreeze protein acts as a gas hydrate crystal inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A; Englezos, Peter

    2015-04-21

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) prevent ice growth by binding to a specific ice plane. Some AFPs have been found to inhibit the formation of gas hydrates which are a serious safety and operational challenge for the oil and gas industry. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the mechanism of action of the winter flounder AFP (wf-AFP) in inhibiting methane hydrate growth. The wf-AFP adsorbs onto the methane hydrate surface via cooperative binding of a set of hydrophobic methyl pendant groups to the empty half-cages at the hydrate/water interface. Each binding set is composed of the methyl side chain of threonine and two alanine residues, four and seven places further down in the sequence of the protein. Understanding the principle of action of AFPs can lead to the rational design of green hydrate inhibitor molecules with potential superior performance.

  18. A Potent, Selective and Cell-active Inhibitor of Human Type I Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Senisterra, Guillermo; Li, Fengling; Butler, Kyle V.; Kaniskan, H. Ümit; Speed, Brandon A.; dela Seña, Carlo; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; Schapira, Matthieu; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Liu, Jing; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Overexpression of PRMTs has been implicated in various human diseases including cancer. Consequently, selective small-molecule inhibitors of PRMTs have been pursued by both academia and pharmaceutical industry as chemical tools for testing biological and therapeutic hypotheses. PRMTs are divided into three categories: type I PRMTs which catalyze mono- and asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, type II PRMTs which catalyze mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, and type III PRMT which catalyzes only monomethylation of arginine residues. Here, we report the discovery of a potent, selective and cell-active inhibitor of human type I PRMTs, MS023, and characterization of this inhibitor in a battery of biochemical, biophysical and cellular assays. MS023 displayed high potency for type I PRMTs including PRMT1, 3, 4, 6 and 8, but was completely inactive against type II and type III PRMTs, protein lysine methyltransferases and DNA methyltransferases. A crystal structure of PRMT6 in complex with MS023 revealed that MS023 binds the substrate binding site. MS023 potently decreased cellular levels of histone arginine asymmetric dimethylation. It also reduced global levels of arginine asymmetric dimethylation and concurrently increased levels of arginine monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation in cells. We also developed MS094, a close analog of MS023, which was inactive in biochemical and cellular assays, as a negative control for chemical biology studies. MS023 and MS094 are useful chemical tools for investigating the role of type I PRMTs in health and disease. PMID:26598975

  19. Transcriptional responses to cantharidin a protein phosphatase inhibitor in Arabidopsis thaliana reveal the involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cantharidin is a natural compound isolated from the blister beetle (Epicauta spp.). It is a very potent inhibitor of serine/threonine protein phosphatases PPP, especially PP2A and PP4. Protein phosphatases and kinases maintain a sensitive balance between phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms of ...

  20. Increased sensitivity to protein synthesis inhibitors in cells lacking tmRNA.

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, J; Vioque, A

    2001-01-01

    tmRNA (also known as SsrA or 10Sa RNA) is involved in a trans-translation reaction that contributes to the recycling of stalled ribosomes at the 3' end of an mRNA lacking a stop codon or at an internal mRNA cluster of rare codons. Inactivation of the ssrA gene in most bacteria results in viable cells bearing subtle phenotypes, such as temperature-sensitive growth. Herein, we report on the functional characterization of the ssrA gene in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. Deletion of the ssrA gene in Synechocystis resulted in viable cells with a growth rate identical to wild-type cells. However, null ssrA cells (deltassrA) were not viable in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitors chloramphenicol, lincomycin, spiramycin, tylosin, erythromycin, and spectinomycin at low doses that do not significantly affect the growth of wild-type cells. Sensitivity of deltassrA cells similar to wild-type cells was observed with kasugamycin, fusidic acid, thiostrepton, and puromycin. Antibiotics unrelated to protein synthesis, such as ampicillin or rifampicin, had no differential effect on the deltassrA strain. Furthermore, deletion of the ssrA gene is sufficient to impair global protein synthesis when chloramphenicol is added at sublethal concentrations for the wild-type strain. These results indicate that ribosomes stalled by some protein synthesis inhibitors can be recycled by tmRNA. In addition, this suggests that the first elongation cycle with tmRNA, which incorporates a noncoded alanine on the growing peptide chain, may have mechanistic differences with the normal elongation cycles that bypasses the block produced by these specific antibiotics. tmRNA inactivation could be an useful therapeutic target to increase the sensitivity of pathogenic bacteria against antibiotics. PMID:11780628

  1. Sorafenib enhances proteasome inhibitor-mediated cytotoxicity via inhibition of unfolded protein response and keratin phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Honma, Yuichi; Harada, Masaru

    2013-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly resistant to conventional systemic therapies and prognosis for advanced HCC patients remains poor. Recent studies of the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumor initiation and progression have identified several potential molecular targets in HCC. Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor shown to have survival benefits in advanced HCC. It acts by inhibiting the serine/threonine kinases and the receptor type tyrosine kinases. In preclinical experiments sorafenib had anti-proliferative activity in hepatoma cells and it reduced tumor angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib include its inhibitory effects on protein ubiquitination, unfolded protein response (UPR) and keratin phosphorylation in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Moreover, we show that combined treatment with sorafenib and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) synergistically induced a marked increase in cell death in hepatoma- and hepatocyte-derived cells. These observations may open the way to potentially interesting treatment combinations that may augment the effect of sorafenib, possibly including drugs that promote ER stress. Because sorafenib blocked the cellular defense mechanisms against hepatotoxic injury not only in hepatoma cells but also in hepatocyte-derived cells, we must be careful to avoid severe liver injury. -- Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •We examined the cytotoxic mechanisms of sorafenib in hepatoma cells. •Sorafenib induces cell death via apoptotic and necrotic fashion. •Sorafenib inhibits protein ubiquitination and unfolded protein response. •Autophagy induced by sorafenib may affect its cytotoxicity. •Sorafenib inhibits keratin phosphorylation and cytoplasmic inclusion formation.

  2. Elucidating the Mechanism of Gain of Toxic Function from Mutant C1 Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary Angioedema

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0506 TITLE: Elucidating the Mechanism of Gain of Toxic Function From Mutant C1 Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary...Inhibitor Proteins in Hereditary Angioedema 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0506 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Bruce Zuraw, M.D. 5d...HAE is autosomal dominant. Cells, heterozygous for the SERPING1 mutation, express both mutant and WT C1INH proteins . HAE is clearly a loss-of

  3. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Targeting inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A as a therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Archana; Tabanor, Kayann; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Aldrich, Jane V

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A (I2PP2A), a biological inhibitor of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A, is associated with numerous cellular processes that often lead to the formation and progression of cancer. In this study we hypothesized that targeting the inhibition of I2PP2A’s multiple functions in prostate cancer cells might prevent cancer progression. We have investigated the effect of the small chain C6-ceramide, known to be a bioactive tumor suppressor lipid, on I2PP2A function, thereby affecting c-Myc signaling and histone acetylation in cells. Our data indicated that C6-ceramide treatment of prostate cancer cells induces cell death in PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells. C6-ceramide was able to disrupt the association between PP2A and I2PP2A. C6-ceramide inhibits I2PP2A’s upregulation of c-Myc and downregulation of histone acetylation in prostate cancer cells. Our data indicated that targeting cancer related signaling pathways through I2PP2A using ceramide as an anti-I2PP2A agent could have beneficial effects as a therapeutic approach to prevent prostate cancer. PMID:24025258

  5. Protein kinase CK-1 inhibitors as new potential drugs for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salado, Irene G; Redondo, Miriam; Bello, Murilo L; Perez, Concepción; Liachko, Nicole F; Kraemer, Brian C; Miguel, Laetitia; Lecourtois, Magalie; Gil, Carmen; Martinez, Ana; Perez, Daniel I

    2014-03-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease where motor neurons in cortex, brain stem, and spinal cord die progressively, resulting in muscle wasting, paralysis, and death. Currently, effective therapies for ALS are lacking; however, identification of pathological TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) as the hallmark lesion in sporadic ALS suggests new therapeutic targets for pharmacological intervention. Pathological TDP-43 phosphorylation appears to drive the onset and progression of ALS and may result from upregulation of the protein kinase CK-1 in affected neurons, resulting in postranslational TDP-43 modification. Consequently, brain penetrant specific CK-1 inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy for treating ALS and other TDP-43 proteinopathies. Using a chemical genetic approach, we report the discovery and further optimization of a number of potent CK-1δ inhibitors. Moreover, these small heterocyclic molecules are able to prevent TDP-43 phosphorylation in cell cultures, to increase Drosophila lifespan by reduction of TDP-43 neurotoxicity, and are predicted to cross the blood-brain barrier. Thus, N-(benzothiazolyl)-2-phenyl-acetamides are valuable drug candidates for further studies and may be a new therapeutic approach for ALS and others pathologies in which TDP-43 is involved.

  6. Discovery of Mer kinase inhibitors by Virtual Screening using Structural Protein-Ligand Interaction Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Da, C.; Stashko, M.; Jayakody, C.; Wang, X.; Janzen, W.; Frye, S.; Kireev, D.

    2015-01-01

    Mer is a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common malignancy in children. The currently available data provide a rationale for development of Mer kinase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics that can target both cell autologous and immune-modulatory anti-tumor effects. We have previously reported several series of potent Mer inhibitors and the objective of the current report is to identify a chemically dissimilar back-up series that might circumvent potential, but currently unknown, flaws inherent to the lead series. To this end, we virtually screened a database of ∼3.8 million commercially available compounds using high-throughput docking followed by a filter involving Structural Protein-Ligand Interaction Fingerprints (SPLIF). SPLIF permits a quantitative assessment of whether a docking pose interacts with the protein target similarly to an endogenous or known synthetic ligand, and therefore helps to improve both sensitivity and specificity with respect to the docking score alone. Of the total of 62 experimentally tested compounds, 15 demonstrated reliable dose-dependent responses in the Mer in vitro kinase activity assay with inhibitory potencies ranging from 0.46 μM to 9.9 μM. PMID:25638502

  7. Discovery of Mer kinase inhibitors by virtual screening using Structural Protein-Ligand Interaction Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Da, C; Stashko, M; Jayakody, C; Wang, X; Janzen, W; Frye, S; Kireev, D

    2015-03-01

    Mer is a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common malignancy in children. The currently available data provide a rationale for development of Mer kinase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics that can target both cell autologous and immune-modulatory anti-tumor effects. We have previously reported several series of potent Mer inhibitors and the objective of the current report is to identify a chemically dissimilar back-up series that might circumvent potential, but currently unknown, flaws inherent to the lead series. To this end, we virtually screened a database of ∼3.8million commercially available compounds using high-throughput docking followed by a filter involving Structural Protein-Ligand Interaction Fingerprints (SPLIF). SPLIF permits a quantitative assessment of whether a docking pose interacts with the protein target similarly to an endogenous or known synthetic ligand, and therefore helps to improve both sensitivity and specificity with respect to the docking score alone. Of the total of 62 experimentally tested compounds, 15 demonstrated reliable dose-dependent responses in the Mer in vitro kinase activity assay with inhibitory potencies ranging from 0.46μM to 9.9μM.

  8. Comparative studies of three cholesteryl ester transfer proteins and their interactions with known inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziyun; Niimi, Manabu; Ding, Qianzhi; Liu, Zhenming; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Jifeng; Xu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasma protein that mediates bidirectional transfers of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides between low-density lipoproteins and high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Because low levels of plasma CETP are associated with increased plasma HDL-cholesterol, therapeutic inhibition of CETP activity is considered an attractive strategy for elevating plasma HDL-cholesterol, thereby hoping to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Interestingly, only a few laboratory animals, such as rabbits, guinea pigs, and hamsters, have plasma CETP activity, whereas mice and rats do not. It is not known whether all CETPs in these laboratory animals are functionally similar to human CETP. In the current study, we compared plasma CETP activity and characterized the plasma lipoprotein profiles of these animals. Furthermore, we studied the three CETP molecular structures, physicochemical characteristics, and binding properties with known CETP inhibitors in silico. Our results showed that rabbits exhibited higher CETP activity than guinea pigs and hamsters, while these animals had different lipoprotein profiles. CETP inhibitors can inhibit rabbit and hamster CETP activity in a similar manner to human CETP. Analysis of CETP molecules in silico revealed that rabbit and hamster CETP showed many features that are similar to human CETP. These results provide novel insights into understanding CETP functions and molecular properties. PMID:28767652

  9. Green fluorescent protein chromophore derivatives as a new class of aldose reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ryota; Hoshi, Maiko; Kato, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Chikako; Komatsu, Toshiya

    2017-01-05

    A number of (Z)-4-arylmethylene-1H-imidazol-5(4H)-ones, which are related to the fluorescent chromophore of the Aequorea green fluorescent protein (GFP), have been synthesized and evaluated their in vitro inhibitory activity against recombinant human aldose reductase for the first time. The GFP chromophore model 1a, with a p-hydroxy group on the 4-benzylidene and a carboxymethyl group on the N1 position, exhibited strong bioactivity with an IC50 value of 0.36 μM. This efficacy is higher than that of sorbinil, a known highly potent aldose reductase inhibitor. Compound 1h, the 2-naphtylmethylidene analogue of 1a, exhibited the best inhibitory effect among the tested copounds with an IC50 value of 0.10 μM. Structure-activity relationship studies combined with docking simulations revealed the interaction mode of the newly synthesized inhibitors toward the target protein as well as the structural features required to gain a high inhibitory activity. In conclusion, the GFP chromophore model compounds synthesized in this study have proved to be potential drugs for diabetic complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A as a therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Archana; Tabanor, Kayann; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Aldrich, Jane V

    2013-10-01

    Inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A (I2PP2A), a biological inhibitor of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A, is associated with numerous cellular processes that often lead to the formation and progression of cancer. In this study we hypothesized that targeting the inhibition of I2PP2A's multiple functions in prostate cancer cells might prevent cancer progression. We have investigated the effect of the small chain C6-ceramide, known to be a bioactive tumor suppressor lipid, on I2PP2A function, thereby affecting c-Myc signaling and histone acetylation in cells. Our data indicated that C6-ceramide treatment of prostate cancer cells induces cell death in PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells. C6-ceramide was able to disrupt the association between PP2A and I2PP2A. C6-ceramide inhibits I2PP2A's upregulation of c-Myc and downregulation of histone acetylation in prostate cancer cells. Our data indicated that targeting cancer related signaling pathways through I2PP2A using ceramide as an anti-I2PP2A agent could have beneficial effects as a therapeutic approach to prevent prostate cancer.

  11. Interaction of protein C inhibitor with the type II transmembrane serine protease enteropeptidase.

    PubMed

    Prohaska, Thomas A; Wahlmüller, Felix C; Furtmüller, Margareta; Geiger, Margarethe

    2012-01-01

    The serine protease inhibitor protein C inhibitor (PCI) is expressed in many human tissues and exhibits broad protease reactivity. PCI binds glycosaminoglycans and certain phospholipids, which modulate its inhibitory activity. Enteropeptidase (EP) is a type II transmembrane serine protease mainly found on the brush border membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum, where it activates trypsinogen to initiate the digestion of food proteins. Some active EP is also present in duodenal fluid and has been made responsible for causing pancreatitis in case of duodeno-pancreatic reflux. Together with its substrate trypsinogen, EP is furthermore present in the epidermis and in some cancer cells. In this report, we show that PCI inhibited EP with an apparent 2nd order rate constant of 4.48 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). Low molecular weight (LMWH) and unfractionated heparin (UFH) slightly reduced the inhibitory effect of PCI. The SI (stoichiometry of inhibition) value for the inhibition of EP by PCI was 10.8 in the absence and 17.9 in the presence of UFH (10 U/ml). By inhibiting trypsin, chymotrypsin, and additionally EP, PCI might play a role in the protection of the pancreas from autodigestion. Furthermore the interaction of PCI with EP may influence the regulation of epithelial differentiation.

  12. An endogenous protein inhibitor, YjhX (TopAI), for topoisomerase I from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Inouye, Masayori

    2015-01-01

    Almost all free-living bacteria contain toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems on their genomes and the targets of toxins are highly diverse. Here, we found a novel, previously unidentified TA system in Escherichia coli named yjhX-yjhQ. Induction of YjhX (85 amino acid residues) causes cell-growth arrest resulting in cell death, while YjhQ (181 residues) co-induction resumes cell growth. The primary cellular target of YjhX was found to be topoisomerase I (TopA), inhibiting both DNA replication and RNA synthesis. Notably, YjhX has no homology to any other toxins of the TA systems. YjhX was expressed well with an N-terminal protein S (PrS) tag in soluble forms. PrS-YjhX specifically interacts with the N-terminal region of TopA (TopA67) but not full-TopA in the absence of plasmid DNA, while PrS-YjhX binds to full-TopA in the presence of DNA. Notably, YjhX does not directly interact with DNA and RNA. YjhX inhibits only topoisomerase I but not topoisomerase III and IV in vitro. Hence, yjhX is renamed as the gene for the TopA inhibitor (the topAI gene). TopAI is the first endogenous protein inhibitor specific for topoisomerase I. PMID:26553797

  13. The protein kinase 2 inhibitor tetrabromobenzotriazole protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Ka, Sun-O; Hwang, Hong Pil; Jang, Jong-Hwa; Hyuk Bang, In; Bae, Ui-Jin; Yu, Hee Chul; Cho, Baik Hwan; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase 2 (CK2) activation was reported to enhance reactive oxygen species production and activate the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Because oxidative stress and inflammation are critical events for tissue destruction during ischemia reperfusion (I/R), we sought to determine whether CK2 was important in the renal response to I/R. Mice underwent 25 min of renal ischemia and were then reperfused. We confirmed an increased expression of CK2α during the reperfusion period, while expression of CK2β remained consistent. We administered tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBBt), a selective CK2α inhibitor before inducing I/R injury. Mice subjected to I/R injury showed typical patterns of acute kidney injury; blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels, tubular necrosis and apoptosis, inflammatory cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine production, and oxidative stress were markedly increased when compared to sham mice. However, pretreatment with TBBt abolished these changes and improved renal function and architecture. Similar renoprotective effects of CK2α inhibition were observed for emodin. Renoprotective effects of CK2α inhibition were associated with suppression of NF-κB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Taken together, these results suggest that CK2α mediates proapoptotic and proinflammatory signaling, thus the CK2α inhibitor may be used to prevent renal I/R injuries observed in clinical settings. PMID:26423352

  14. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  15. Discovery of Sanggenon G as a natural cell-permeable small-molecular weight inhibitor of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP).

    PubMed

    Seiter, Maximilian A; Salcher, Stefan; Rupp, Martina; Hagenbuchner, Judith; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Mortier, Jérémie; Wolber, Gerhard; Rollinger, Judith M; Obexer, Petra; Ausserlechner, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Defects in the regulation of apoptosis are one main cause of cancer development and may result from overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). XIAP is frequently overexpressed in human leukemia and prostate and breast tumors. Inhibition of apoptosis by XIAP is mainly coordinated through direct binding to the initiator caspase-9 via its baculovirus-IAP-repeat-3 (BIR3) domain. XIAP inhibits caspases directly making it to an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. In the search for novel, non-peptidic XIAP inhibitors in this study we focused on the chemical constituents of sāng bái pí (mulberry root bark). Most promising candidates of this plant were tested biochemically in vitro by a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay and in vivo via protein fragment complementation analysis (PCA). We identified the Diels Alder adduct Sanggenon G (SG1) as a novel, small-molecular weight inhibitor of XIAP. As shown by FP and PCA analyses, SG1 binds specifically to the BIR3 domain of XIAP with a binding affinity of 34.26 μM. Treatment of the transgenic leukemia cell line Molt3/XIAP with SG1 enhances caspase-8, -3 and -9 cleavage, displaces caspase-9 from XIAP as determined by immunoprecipitation experiments and sensitizes these cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis. SG1 not only sensitizes the XIAP-overexpressing leukemia cell line Molt3/XIAP to etoposide treatment but also different neuroblastoma cell lines endogenously expressing high XIAP levels. Taken together, Sanggenon G (SG1) is a novel, natural, non-peptidic, small-molecular inhibitor of XIAP that can serve as a starting point to develop a new class of improved XIAP inhibitors.

  16. Discovery and structural characterization of a small molecule 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jing; Du, Yuhong; Horton, John R.; Upadhyay, Anup K.; Lou, Bin; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Xing; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe; Zhang, Lixin; Barbieri, Joseph T.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Cheng, Xiaodong; Fu, Haian

    2013-02-14

    The 14-3-3 family of phosphoserine/threonine-recognition proteins engage multiple nodes in signaling networks that control diverse physiological and pathophysiological functions and have emerged as promising therapeutic targets for such diseases as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, small molecule modulators of 14-3-3 are much needed agents for chemical biology investigations and therapeutic development. To analyze 14-3-3 function and modulate its activity, we conducted a chemical screen and identified 4-[(2Z)-2-[4-formyl-6-methyl-5-oxo-3-(phosphonatooxymethyl)pyridin-2-ylidene]hydrazinyl]benzoate as a 14-3-3 inhibitor, which we termed FOBISIN (FOurteen-three-three BInding Small molecule INhibitor) 101. FOBISIN101 effectively blocked the binding of 14-3-3 with Raf-1 and proline-rich AKT substrate, 40 kD{sub a} and neutralized the ability of 14-3-3 to activate exoenzyme S ADP-ribosyltransferase. To provide a mechanistic basis for 14-3-3 inhibition, the crystal structure of 14-3-3{zeta} in complex with FOBISIN101 was solved. Unexpectedly, the double bond linking the pyridoxal-phosphate and benzoate moieties was reduced by X-rays to create a covalent linkage of the pyridoxal-phosphate moiety to lysine 120 in the binding groove of 14-3-3, leading to persistent 14-3-3 inactivation. We suggest that FOBISIN101-like molecules could be developed as an entirely unique class of 14-3-3 inhibitors, which may serve as radiation-triggered therapeutic agents for the treatment of 14-3-3-mediated diseases, such as cancer.

  17. Pyrrolidine carboxamides as a novel class of inhibitors of enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Alian, Akram; Stroud, Robert; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2006-10-19

    In view of the worldwide spread of multidrug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, there is an urgent need to discover antituberculosis agent with novel structures. InhA, the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) from M. tuberculosis, is one of the key enzymes involved in the mycobacterial fatty acid elongation cycle and has been validated as an effective antimicrobial target. We report here the discovery, through high-throughput screening, of a series of pyrrolidine carboxamides as a novel class of potent InhA inhibitors. Crystal structures of InhA complexed with three inhibitors have been used to elucidate the inhibitor binding mode. The potency of the lead compound was improved over 160-fold by subsequent optimization through iterative microtiter library synthesis followed by in situ activity screening without purification. Resolution of racemic mixtures of several inhibitors indicate that only one enantiomer is active as an inhibitor of InhA.

  18. Pyrrolidine Carboxamides as a Novel Class of Inhibitors of Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (InhA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Alian, Akram; Stroud, Robert; de Montellano, Paul R. Ortiz

    2008-01-01

    In view of the worldwide spread of multidrug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, there is an urgent need to discover antituberculosis agent with novel structures. InhA, the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the key enzymes involved in the mycobacterial fatty acid elongation cycle and has been validated as an effective antimicrobial target. We report here discovery through high throughput screening of a series of pyrrolidine carboxamides as a novel class of potent InhA inhibitors. Crystal structures of InhA complexed with three inhibitors have been used to elucidate the inhibitor binding mode. The potency of the lead compound was improved over 160-fold by subsequent optimization through iterative microtiter library synthesis followed by in situ activity screening without purification. Resolution of racemic mixtures of several inhibitors indicate that only one enantiomer is active as an inhibitor of InhA. PMID:17034137

  19. Prefoldin Plays a Role as a Clearance Factor in Preventing Proteasome Inhibitor-induced Protein Aggregation*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Akira; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Takekoshi, Yuka; Shimizu, Takashi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone composed of six subunits, PFD1–6, and prevents misfolding of newly synthesized nascent polypeptides. Although it is predicted that prefoldin, like other chaperones, modulates protein aggregation, the precise function of prefoldin against protein aggregation under physiological conditions has never been elucidated. In this study, we first established an anti-prefoldin monoclonal antibody that recognizes the prefoldin complex but not its subunits. Using this antibody, it was found that prefoldin was localized in the cytoplasm with dots in co-localization with polyubiquitinated proteins and that the number and strength of dots were increased in cells that had been treated with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, and thapsigargin, an inducer of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Knockdown of prefoldin increased the level of SDS-insoluble ubiquitinated protein and reduced cell viability in lactacystin and thapsigargin-treated cells. Opposite results were obtained in prefoldin-overexpressed cells. It has been reported that mice harboring a missense mutation L110R of MM-1α/PFD5 exhibit neurodegeneration in the cerebellum. Although the prefoldin complex containing L110R MM-1α was properly formed in vitro and in cells derived from L110R MM-1α mice, the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and cytotoxicity were higher in L110R MM-1α cells than in wild-type cells under normal conditions and were increased by lactacystin and thapsigargin treatment, and growth of L110R MM-1α cells was attenuated. Furthermore, the polyubiquitinated protein aggregation level was increased in the brains of L110R MM-1α mice. These results suggest that prefoldin plays a role in quality control against protein aggregation and that dysfunction of prefoldin is one of the causes of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23946485

  20. Protein synthesis inhibitors enhance the expression of mRNAs for early inducible inflammatory genes via mRNA stabilization.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Soh; Takeshige, Koichiro

    2008-02-01

    Expression of inflammatory genes is regulated at multiple steps, including transcriptional activation and mRNA stabilization. During an investigation into the requirement of de novo protein synthesis for the induction of inflammatory genes, it was revealed that protein synthesis inhibitors unexpectedly potentiated the induction of mRNAs for primary response genes, while the inhibitors suppressed the induction of secondary inducible genes as previously described. Stimulus-induced nuclear translocation and promoter recruitment of NF-kappaB, which is responsible for the transcriptional activation of many inflammatory genes, were largely unaffected by the inhibitors. Instead, these inhibitors prolonged the half-lives of all of the primary inducible mRNAs tested. Thus, these findings emphasize the important contribution of regulated mRNA longevity to gene expression induced by pro-inflammatory stimulation.

  1. Universal and Quantitative Method To Evaluate Inhibitor Potency for Cysteinome Proteins Using a Nonspecific Activity-Based Protein Profiling Probe.

    PubMed

    Sameshima, Tomoya; Tanaka, Yukiya; Miyahisa, Ikuo

    2017-06-13

    Recently, there have been a limited number of new, validated targets for small-molecule drug discovery in the pharmaceutical industry. Although there are approximately 30 000 genes in the human genome, only 2% are targeted by currently approved small-molecule drugs. One reason that many targets remain neglected by drug discovery programs is the absence of biochemical assays enabling evaluation of the potency of inhibitors in a quantitative and high-throughput manner. To overcome this issue, we developed a biochemical assay to evaluate the potency of both reversible and irreversible inhibitors using a nonspecific thiol-labeling fluorescent probe. The assay can be applied to any targets with a cysteine residue in a pocket that can accommodate small-molecule ligands. By constructing a mathematical model, we showed that the potency of compounds can be quantitatively evaluated by performing an activity-based protein profiling assay. In addition, the validity of the theory was confirmed experimentally using epidermal growth factor receptor kinase as a model target. This approach provides an assay system for targets for which biochemical assays cannot be developed. Our approach can potentially not only expand the number of exploitable targets but also accelerate the lead optimization process by providing quantitative structure-activity relationship information.

  2. Protein isoprenylation regulates osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: effect of alendronate, and farnesyl and geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Duque, G; Vidal, C; Rivas, D

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Protein isoprenylation is an important step in the intracellular signalling pathway conducting cell growth and differentiation. In bone, protein isoprenylation is required for osteoclast differentiation and activation. However, its role in osteoblast differentiation and function remains unknown. In this study, we assessed the role of protein isoprenylation in osteoblastogenesis in a model of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) differentiation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We tested the effect of an inhibitor of farnesylation [farnesyl transferase inhibitor-277 (FTI-277)] and one of geranylgeranylation [geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor-298 (GGTI-298)] on osteoblast differentiating MSC. In addition, we tested the effect of alendronate on protein isoprenylation in this model either alone or in combination with other inhibitors of isoprenylation. KEY RESULTS Initially, we found that levels of unfarnesylated proteins (prelamin A and HDJ-2) increased after treatment with FTI-277 concomitantly affecting osteoblastogenesis and increasing nuclear morphological changes without affecting cell survival. Furthermore, inhibition of geranylgeranylation by GGTI-298 alone increased osteoblastogenesis. This effect was enhanced by the combination of GGTI-298 and alendronate in the osteogenic media. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data indicate that both farnesylation and geranylgeranylation play a role in osteoblastogenesis. In addition, a new mechanism of action for alendronate on protein isoprenylation in osteogenic differentiating MSC in vitro was found. In conclusion, protein isoprenylation is an important component of the osteoblast differentiation process that could constitute a new therapeutic target for osteoporosis in the future. PMID:21077849

  3. Design, synthesis and evaluation of 3-quinoline carboxylic acids as new inhibitors of protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Syniugin, Anatolii R; Ostrynska, Olga V; Chekanov, Maksym O; Volynets, Galyna P; Starosyla, Sergiy A; Bdzhola, Volodymyr G; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the derivatives of 3-quinoline carboxylic acid were studied as inhibitors of protein kinase CK2. Forty-three new compounds were synthesized. Among them 22 compounds inhibiting CK2 with IC50 in the range from 0.65 to 18.2 μM were identified. The most active inhibitors were found among tetrazolo-quinoline-4-carboxylic acid and 2-aminoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives.

  4. Phosphorylation of phosphatase inhibitor-2 (i-2) by a bovine thymus tyrosine protein kinase, p40

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli-Roach, A.A.; Votaw, P.; Zioncheck, T.F.; Harrison, M.L.; Geahlen, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Phosphatase inhibitor-2, a heat stable protein of Mr 22,800, is a regulatory component of the ATP-Mg-dependent phosphatase. It has been shown that in the cell tyrosine kinase activation can result in altered phosphorylation at serine and/or threonine residues, but the mechanism involved is unknown. The authors have found that i-2 is a substrate for a tyrosine specific protein kinase, p40, purified from bovine thymus. The purified enzyme is a monomer of Mr 40,000 that is autophosphorylated at tyrosine residue(s). The stoichiometry of phosphorylation of i-2 by this tyrosine protein kinase is up to 1 mol of phosphate per mol of i-2. Phosphoaminoacid analysis revealed that all the phosphate introduced was associated with tyrosine residues. Mapping of TSP-tryptic peptides by TLE and isoelectric focusing showed one major labeled fragment. Using the ATP-Mg-dependent phosphatase, a lesser extent of phosphorylation of i-2 by p40 was obtained although partial activation of the phosphatase was observed. The effect on the activity was not due to FA/GSK-3 contamination. These results could provide an important link between tyrosine protein kinase activity and modulation of phosphorylation at serine and/or threonine residues.

  5. A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor induced compound skin toxicity with oedema in metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C L; Mortimer, P S; Larkin, J M; Basu, T N; Gore, M E; Fearfield, L

    2016-04-01

    We report three cases of skin toxicity associated with oral mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma (MM). All three patients developed oedema, and a single patient experienced eyelash trichomegaly. This is the first known report of eyelash trichomegaly secondary to MEK inhibitor use. We also discuss possible mechanisms for MEK inhibitor-associated oedema development. This series supports the role of the dermatologist in the screening and management of patients in the rapidly developing oncology setting, as new targeted agents can give rise to marked skin toxicity.

  6. Thermodynamics parameters for binding of halogenated benzotriazole inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2α.

    PubMed

    Winiewska, Maria; Kucińska, Katarzyna; Makowska, Małgorzata; Poznański, Jarosław; Shugar, David

    2015-10-01

    The interaction of human CK2α (hCK2α) with nine halogenated benzotriazoles, TBBt and its analogues representing all possible patterns of halogenation on the benzene ring of benzotriazole, was studied by biophysical methods. Thermal stability of protein-ligand complexes, monitored by calorimetric (DSC) and optical (DSF) methods, showed that the increase in the mid-point temperature for unfolding of protein-ligand complexes (i.e. potency of ligand binding to hCK2α) follow the inhibitory activities determined by biochemical assays. The dissociation constant for the ATP-hCK2α complex was estimated with the aid of microscale thermophoresis (MST) as 4.3±1.8 μM, and MST-derived dissociation constants determined for halogenated benzotriazoles, when converted according to known ATP concentrations, perfectly reconstruct IC50 values determined by the biochemical assays. Ligand-dependent quenching of tyrosine fluorescence, together with molecular modeling and DSC-derived heats of unfolding, support the hypothesis that halogenated benzotriazoles bind in at least two alternative orientations, and those that are efficient hCK2α inhibitors bind in the orientation which TBBt adopts in its complex with maize CK2α. DSC-derived apparent heat for ligand binding (ΔΔHbind) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions between Lys68 and the triazole ring of the ligand, as indicated by a good correlation between ΔΔHbind and ligand pKa. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly (~40 kJ/mol), relative to possible intermolecular halogen/hydrogen bonding (less than 10 kJ/mol), in binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the ATP-binding site of hCK2α. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural studies of a baboon (Papio sp.) plasma protein inhibitor of cholesteryl ester transferase.

    PubMed

    Buchko, G W; Rozek, A; Kanda, P; Kennedy, M A; Cushley, R J

    2000-08-01

    A 38-residue protein associated with cholesteryl ester transfer inhibition has been identified in baboons (Papio sp.). The cholesteryl ester transfer inhibitor protein (CETIP) corresponds to the N-terminus of baboon apoC-I. Relative to CETIP, baboon apoC-I is a weak inhibitor of baboon cholesteryl ester transferase (CET). To study the structural features responsible for CET inhibition, CETIP was synthesized by solid-phase methods. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to model the lipoprotein environment, the solution structure of CETIP was probed by optical and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Circular dichroism data show that the protein lacks a well-defined structure in water but, upon the addition of SDS, becomes helical (56%). A small blue shift of 8 nm was observed in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of CETIP in the presence of saturating amounts of SDS, suggesting that tryptophan-23 is not buried deeply in the lipid environment. The helical nature of CETIP in the presence of SDS was confirmed by upfield 1Halpha secondary shifts and an average solution structure determined by distance geometry/simulated annealing calculations using 476 NOE-based distance restraints. The backbone (N-Calpha-C=O) root-mean-square deviation of an ensemble of 17 out of 25 calculated structures superimposed on the average structure was 1.06+0.30 A using residues V4-P35 and 0.51+/-0.17 A using residues A7-S32. Although the side-chain orientations fit the basic description of a class A amphipathic helix, both intramolecular salt bridge formation and "snorkeling" of basic side chains toward the polar face play minor, if any, roles in stabilizing the lipid-bound amphipathic structure. Conformational features of the calculated structures for CETIP are discussed relative to models of CETIP inhibition of cholesteryl ester transferase.

  8. Lipid oxidation inactivates the anticoagulant function of protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI).

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Liu, Baoxin; Wei, Yidong; Beyea, Ryan; Yan, Han; Olson, Steven T

    2017-09-01

    Lipid oxidation due to oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and thrombotic cardiovascular diseases. Several findings suggest that lipid peroxidation can alter the function of coagulation proteins and contribute to a hypercoagulable state, but the molecular mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report that oxidized phospholipids suppress the anticoagulant function of the serpin, protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI), a specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (FXa) that requires protein Z (PZ), phospholipid, and calcium as cofactors. We found that this suppression arises from a diminished ability of the oxidized membrane to function as a cofactor to promote ZPI inhibition of membrane-bound FXa, due fully or in part to the susceptibility of the bound ZPI-PZ complex to oxidative inactivation. Surprisingly, free ZPI was also susceptible to inactivation by oxidized membrane vesicles in the absence of calcium. Oxidized vesicles containing both phosphatidylserine and polyunsaturated fatty acids were required to promote inactivation of the ZPI-PZ complex or free ZPI, indicating that binding of the PZ-complexed or free ZPI to peroxide-modified phospholipid vesicles mediates the inactivation. Heparin protected the ZPI-PZ complex and free ZPI from inactivation, suggesting that blocking the heparin-binding site on ZPI interferes with ZPI binding to lipid or to PZ. This was confirmed by direct lipid-binding experiments. Native PAGE indicated that oxidization induced dissociation of the ZPI-PZ complex and increased the negative charge of ZPI. We conclude that compromised ZPI anticoagulant function could contribute to thrombus initiation and growth in oxidative stress-induced cardiovascular diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Activity of the Kinesin Spindle Protein Inhibitor Ispinesib (SB-715992) in Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, James W.; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Wood, Kenneth W.; Cases, Sylvaine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein, a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have shown a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities, or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer, we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination with several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. Experimental Design We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the antitumor activity of approved therapies. Results In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad antiproliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models and tumor-free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the antitumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine and exhibited activity comparable with paclitaxel and ixabepilone. Conclusions These findings support further clinical exploration of kinesin spindle protein inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:20068098

  10. Cloning and functional characterization of the guinea pig apoptosis inhibitor protein Survivin.

    PubMed

    Habtemichael, Negusse; Wünsch, Desiree; Bier, Carolin; Tillmann, Sarah; Unruhe, Britta; Frauenknecht, Katrin; Heinrich, Ulf-Rüdiger; Mann, Wolf J; Stauber, Roland H; Knauer, Shirley K

    2010-12-01

    The guinea pig is widely used as a model to study (patho)physiological processes, such as neurodegenerative disorders. Survivin's dual function as an apoptosis inhibitor and a mitotic regulator is crucial not only for ordered development but its modulation seems crucial also under disease conditions. However, data on the expression and function of the guinea pig Survivin protein (Survivin(Gp)) are currently lacking. Here, we here report the cloning and functional characterization of Survivin(Gp). The respective cDNA was cloned from spleen mRNA, containing a 426 bp open reading frame encoding for a protein of 142aa. Survivin(Gp) displays a high homology to the human and murine orthologue, especially in domains critical for function, such as binding sites for chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) proteins and the nuclear export signal (NES). Notably, phylogenetic analyses revealed that Survivin(Gp) is more related to humans than to rodents. Ectopic expression studies of a Survivin(Gp)-GFP fusion confirmed its dynamic intracellular localization, analogous to the human and murine counterparts. In interphase cells, Survivin(Gp)-GFP was predominantly cytoplasmic and accumulated in the nucleus following export inhibition with leptomycin B (LMB). A typical CPC protein localization during mitosis was observed for Survivin(Gp)-GFP. Microinjection experiments together with genetic knockout demonstrated that the NES is essential for the anti-apoptotic and regulatory role of Survivin(Gp) during cell division. In vivo protein interaction assays further demonstrated its dimerization with human Survivin and its interaction with human CPC proteins. Importantly, RNAi-depletion studies show that Survivin(Gp) can fully substitute for human Survivin as an apoptosis inhibitor and a mitotic effector. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and western blotting were employed to detect Survivin expression in guinea pig tissues. Besides its expression in proliferating tissues, such as

  11. Effects of the aspartic protease inhibitor from Lupinus bogotensis seeds on the growth and development of Hypothenemus hampei: an inhibitor showing high homology with storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Molina, Diana; Patiño, Luisa; Quintero, Mónica; Cortes, José; Bastos, Sara

    2014-02-01

    The coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei is a pest that causes great economic damage to coffee grains worldwide. Because the proteins consumed are digested by aspartic proteases in the insect's midgut, the inhibition of these proteases by transferring a gene encoding an aspartic protease inhibitor from Lupinus bogotensis Benth. to coffee plants could provide a promising strategy to control this pest. Five aspartic protease inhibitors from L. bogotensis (LbAPI) were accordingly purified and characterized. The gene encoding the L. bogotensis aspartic protease inhibitor (LbAPI), with the highest inhibitory activity against H. hampei, was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified recombinant protein (rLbAPI), with a molecular mass of 15 kDa, was subsequently assessed for its ability to inhibit the aspartic protease activity present in the H. hampei midgut in vitro, as well as its effects on the growth and development of H. hampei in vivo. The in vitro experiments showed that rLbAPI was highly effective against aspartic proteases from H. hampei guts, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.9 μg. The in vivo experiments showed that the concentration of rLbAPI (w/w) in the artificial diet necessary to cause 50% mortality (LD50) of the larvae was 0.91%. The amino acid sequence of LbAPI had high homology (52-80%) to the seed storage proteins, vicilin and β-conglutin, suggesting that this protein was generated by evolutionary events from a β-conglutin precursor. Based on these results, LbAPI may have a dual function as storage protein, and as defense protein against H. hampei. These results provide a promising alternative to obtain a coffee plant resistant to H. hampei.

  12. A Bacillus subtilis fusion protein system to produce soybean Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vogtentanz, Gudrun; Collier, Katherine D; Bodo, Michael; Chang, Judy H; Day, Anthony G; Estell, David A; Falcon, Brandy C; Ganshaw, Grant; Jarnagin, Alisha S; Kellis, James T; Kolkman, Marc A B; Lai, Cindy S; Meneses, Renato; Miller, Jeffrey V; de Nobel, Hans; Power, Scott; Weyler, Walter; Wong, David L; Schmidt, Brian F

    2007-09-01

    A fusion protein based expression system was developed in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis to produce the soybean Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (sBBI). The N-terminus of the mature sBBI was fused to the C-terminus of the 1st cellulose binding domain linker (CBD linker) of the BCE103 cellulase (from an alkalophilic Bacillus sp.). The strong aprE promoter was used to drive the transcription of the fusion gene and the AprE signal sequence was fused to the mature BCE103 cellulase for efficient secretion of the fusion protein into the culture medium. It was necessary to use a B. subtilis strain deficient in nine protease genes in order to reduce the proteolytic degradation of the fusion protein during growth. The fusion protein was produced in shake flasks at concentrations >1g/L. After growth, the sBBI was activated by treatment with 2-mercaptoethanol to allow the disulfide bonds to form correctly. An economical and scalable purification process was developed to purify sBBI based on acid precipitation of the fusion protein followed by acid/heat cleavage of the fusion protein at labile Asp-Pro bonds in the CBD linker. If necessary, non-native amino acids at the N- and C-termini were trimmed off using glutamyl endopeptidase I. After purification, an average of 72 mg of active sBBI were obtained from 1L of culture broth representing an overall yield of 21% based on the amount of sBBI activated before purification.

  13. Conformation-selective ATP-competitive inhibitors control regulatory interactions and noncatalytic functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-05-22

    Most potent protein kinase inhibitors act by competing with ATP to block the phosphotransferase activity of their targets. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that ATP-competitive inhibitors can affect kinase interactions and functions in ways beyond blocking catalytic activity. Here, we show that stabilizing alternative ATP-binding site conformations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38α and Erk2 with ATP-competitive inhibitors differentially, and in some cases divergently, modulates the abilities of these kinases to interact with upstream activators and deactivating phosphatases. Conformation-selective ligands are also able to modulate Erk2's ability to allosterically activate the MAPK phosphatase DUSP6, highlighting how ATP-competitive ligands can control noncatalytic kinase functions. Overall, these studies underscore the relationship between the ATP-binding and regulatory sites of MAPKs and provide insight into how ATP-competitive ligands can be designed to confer graded control over protein kinase function.

  14. Suppression of VEGF-induced angiogenesis by the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lavendustin A.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, D E; Fan, T P

    1995-01-01

    1. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a heparin-binding angiogenic factor which specifically acts on endothelial cells via distinct membrane-spanning tyrosine kinase receptors. Here we used the rat sponge implant model to test the hypothesis that the angiogenic activity of VEGF can be suppressed by protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors. 2. Neovascular responses in subcutaneous sponge implants were determined by measurements of relative sponge blood flow by use of a 133Xe clearance technique, and confirmed by histological studies and morphometric analysis. 3. Daily local administration of 250 ng VEGF165 accelerated the rate of 133Xe clearance from the sponges and induced an intense neovascularisation. This VEGF165-induced angiogenesis was inhibited by daily co-administration of the selective PTK inhibitor, lavendustin A (10 micrograms), but not its negative control, lavendustin B (10 micrograms). Blood flow measurements and morphometric analysis of 8-day-old sponges showed that lavendustin A reduced the 133Xe clearance of VEGF165-treated sponges from 32.9 +/- 1.5% to 20.9 +/- 1.6% and the total fibrovascular growth area from 62.4 +/- 6.1% to 21.6 +/- 6.8% (n = 12, P < 0.05). 4. Co-injection of suramin (3 mg), an inhibitor of heparin-binding growth factors, also suppressed the VEGF165-elicited neovascular response. In contrast, neither lavendustin A nor suramin produced any effect on the basal sponge-induced angiogenesis. 5. When given alone, low doses of VEGF165 (25 ng) or basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; 10 ng) did not modify the basal sponge-induced neovascularisation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 Figure 2 PMID:7533611

  15. A Fluorescence-Based Thermal Shift Assay Identifies Inhibitors of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Sankar N.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Mishra, Rama K.; Xu, Li; Scheidt, Karl A.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Bergan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second highest cause of cancer death in United States males. If the metastatic movement of PCa cells could be inhibited, then mortality from PCa could be greatly reduced. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) has previously been shown to activate pro-invasion signaling pathways in human PCa. Recognizing that MAP2K4 represents a novel and validated therapeutic target, we sought to develop and characterize an efficient process for the identification of small molecules that target MAP2K4. Using a fluorescence-based thermal shift assay (FTS) assay, we first evaluated an 80 compound library of known kinase inhibitors, thereby identifying 8 hits that thermally stabilized MAP2K4 in a concentration dependent manner. We then developed an in vitro MAP2K4 kinase assay employing the biologically relevant downstream substrates, JNK1 and p38 MAPK, to evaluate kinase inhibitory function. In this manner, we validated the performance of our initial FTS screen. We next applied this approach to a 2000 compound chemically diverse library, identified 7 hits, and confirmed them in the in vitro kinase assay. Finally, by coupling our structure-activity relationship data to MAP2K4's crystal structure, we constructed a model for ligand binding. It predicts binding of our identified inhibitory compounds to the ATP binding pocket. Herein we report the creation of a robust inhibitor-screening platform with the ability to inform the discovery and design of new and potent MAP2K4 inhibitors. PMID:24339940

  16. Protein structures of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shih-Chieh; Gepts, Paul L; Whitaker, John R

    2002-10-23

    Two nucleotide sequences for genes that encode alpha-amylase inhibitor 4 (alphaAI-4) from white kidney bean (WKB) cv. 858, designated gene alphaAI-4 (Accession No. ), and alpha-amylase inhibitor 5 (alphaAI-5) from black bean (BB), designated gene alphaAI-5 (Accession No. ), were determined. Genes alphaAI-4 and alphaAI-5 encode 244 amino acid prepro-alphaAI-4 and prepro-alphaAI-5 polypeptides that are 93 and 95% identical with alpha-amylase inhibitor l (alphaAI-l; Hoffman, L. M.; Ma, Y.; Barker, R. F. Nucleic Acids Res. 1982, 10, 7819-7828), 40 and 43% identical with red kidney bean lectin, and 52 and 55% identical with arcelin l of wild-type bean. The high degree of sequence similarity indicates the evolutionary relationship among these genes. PCR analysis of genomic DNA purified from six genotypes of Phaseolus vulgaris showed very similar band patterns in 2% agarose gel, another indication of the conserved size homology among these genes. Proteolytic processing sites were located between Asn77 and Ser78 for pro-alphaAI-4 and pro-alphaAI-5. A bend next to Asn77 in three-dimensional model structures of alphaAI-4 and alphaAI-5 proinhibitors indicates that the proteolytic cleavage is necessary to remove the conformational constraint for activation to the mature protein. Mature WKB alphaAI-4 was composed of four subunits (2alpha2beta) and had a molecular weight of 50000 determined by multiangle laser light scattering and 56714 determined by laser-assisted time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  17. High-Throughput Screening for Novel Inhibitors of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Penicillin-Binding Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Fedarovich, Alena; Djordjevic, Kevin A.; Swanson, Shauna M.; Peterson, Yuri K.; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae strains exhibiting decreased susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and the recent isolation of two distinct strains with high-level resistance to cefixime or ceftriaxone heralds the possible demise of β-lactam antibiotics as effective treatments for gonorrhea. To identify new compounds that inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), which are proven targets for β-lactam antibiotics, we developed a high-throughput assay that uses fluorescence polarization (FP) to distinguish the fluorescent penicillin, Bocillin-FL, in free or PBP-bound form. This assay was used to screen a 50,000 compound library for potential inhibitors of N. gonorrhoeae PBP 2, and 32 compounds were identified that exhibited >50% inhibition of Bocillin-FL binding to PBP 2. These included a cephalosporin that provided validation of the assay. After elimination of compounds that failed to exhibit concentration-dependent inhibition, the antimicrobial activity of the remaining 24 was tested. Of these, 7 showed antimicrobial activity against susceptible and penicillin- or cephalosporin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. In molecular docking simulations using the crystal structure of PBP 2, two of these inhibitors docked into the active site of the enzyme and each mediate interactions with the active site serine nucleophile. This study demonstrates the validity of a FP-based assay to find novel inhibitors of PBPs and paves the way for more comprehensive high-throughput screening against highly resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. It also provides a set of lead compounds for optimization of anti-gonococcal agents. PMID:23049763

  18. Protein kinase A inhibition facilitates the antitumor activity of xanthohumol, a valosin-containing protein inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Yuki; Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Komatsu, Masato; Katoh, Hiroto; Sato, Reiko; Kanagaki, Shuhei; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Tashiro, Etsu; Ishikawa, Shumpei; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Imoto, Masaya

    2017-01-25

    Xanthohumol (XN), a simple prenylated chalcone, can be isolated from hops and has the potential to be a cancer chemopreventive agent against several human tumor cell lines. We previously identified valosin-containing protein (VCP) as a target of XN; VCP can also play crucial roles in cancer progression and prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the contribution of VCP to the antitumor activity of XN. Several human tumor cell lines were treated with XN to investigate which human tumor cell lines are sensitive to XN. Several cell lines exhibited high sensitivity to XN both in vitro and in vivo. shRNA screening and bioinformatics analysis identified that the inhibition of the adenylate cyclase (AC) pathway synergistically facilitated apoptosis induced by VCP inhibition. These results suggest there is crosstalk between the AC pathway and VCP function, and targeting both VCP and the AC pathway is a potential chemotherapeutic strategy for a subset of tumor cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J.; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D.; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3’)-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. Previously we demonstrated that eukaryotic protein kinase (ePK) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, due to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. As well, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. Here, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3’)-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds – anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and pyrazolopyrimidine (PP) – and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3’)-Ia versus ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP-derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3’)-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant E. coli strain. The structures presented here and these inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23758273

  20. Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor: Multiple Anticoagulant Activities for a Single Protein.

    PubMed

    Mast, Alan E

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is an anticoagulant protein that inhibits early phases of the procoagulant response. Alternatively spliced isoforms of TFPI are differentially expressed by endothelial cells and human platelets and plasma. The TFPIβ isoform localizes to the endothelium surface where it is a potent inhibitor of TF-factor VIIa complexes that initiate blood coagulation. The TFPIα isoform is present in platelets. TFPIα contains a stretch of 9 amino acids nearly identical to those found in the B-domain of factor V that are well conserved in mammals. These amino acids provide exosite binding to activated factor V, which allows for TFPIα to inhibit prothrombinase during the initiation phase of blood coagulation. Endogenous inhibition at this point in the coagulation cascade was only recently recognized and has provided a biochemical rationale to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying several clinical disorders. These include the east Texas bleeding disorder that is caused by production of an altered form of factor V with high affinity for TFPI and a paradoxical procoagulant effect of heparins. In addition, these findings have led to ideas for pharmacological targeting of TFPI that may reduce bleeding in hemophilia patients.

  1. Enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase inhibitors: an updated patent review (2011 - 2015).

    PubMed

    Zitko, Jan; Doležal, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Enoyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) reductase (ENR) is a limiting step enzyme in the Fatty Acid Synthase II system. In mammals, there is no homologue to ENR, which makes it an optimal candidate target for selective anti-infective drugs. Up-to-date, only two ENR inhibitors are used in clinical practice. This review is a survey on important patents on low molecular weight compounds with ENR inhibiting activity published in 2011-2015. Common patent databases (SciFinder, esp@cenet, WIPO) were used to locate patent applications on the proposed topic and in the timespan of 2011-2015. In 2011-2015, we have observed patents in previously known structural groups of diphenyl ethers and acrylamides as well as new structural classes, often identified by high-throughput screening campaigns. The spectrum of activity of applied derivatives covers significant bacteria, mycobacteria, and apicomplexan parasites (Plasmodia and Toxoplasma). Good news from research of ENR inhibitors: a) four selective anti-staphylococcal compounds applied in 2011-2015 or earlier were pushed to Phase I or Phase II clinical trials and some of them proved safety and tolerability after peroral and/or intravenous administration; b) big pharma companies have renewed their interest in the development of new anti-infective compounds against resistant strains of clinical relevance.

  2. Antimyeloma Effects of the Heat Shock Protein 70 Molecular Chaperone Inhibitor MAL3-101.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Marc J; Scott, Sadeaqua S; Scott, Craig M; Behrman, Shannon; Walter, Peter; Wipf, Peter; Coplan, Jeremy D; Chrico, William; Joseph, Danielle; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Batuman, Olcay

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy and remains incurable, primarily due to the treatment-refractory/resistant nature of the disease. A rational approach to this compelling challenge is to develop new drugs that act synergistically with existing effective agents. This approach will reduce drug concentrations, avoid treatment resistance, and also improve treatment effectiveness by targeting new and nonredundant pathways in MM. Toward this goal, we examined the antimyeloma effects of MAL3-101, a member of a new class of non-ATP-site inhibitors of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 molecular chaperone. We discovered that MAL3-101 exhibited antimyeloma effects on MM cell lines in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft plasmacytoma model, as well as on primary tumor cells and bone marrow endothelial cells from myeloma patients. In combination with a proteasome inhibitor, MAL3-101 significantly potentiated the in vitro and in vivo antimyeloma effects. These data support a preclinical rationale for small molecule inhibition of Hsp70 function, either alone or in combination with other agents, as an effective therapeutic strategy for MM.

  3. Antimyeloma Effects of the Heat Shock Protein 70 Molecular Chaperone Inhibitor MAL3-101

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Marc J.; Scott, Sadeaqua S.; Scott, Craig M.; Behrman, Shannon; Walter, Peter; Wipf, Peter; Coplan, Jeremy D.; Chrico, William; Joseph, Danielle; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Batuman, Olcay

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy and remains incurable, primarily due to the treatment-refractory/resistant nature of the disease. A rational approach to this compelling challenge is to develop new drugs that act synergistically with existing effective agents. This approach will reduce drug concentrations, avoid treatment resistance, and also improve treatment effectiveness by targeting new and nonredundant pathways in MM. Toward this goal, we examined the antimyeloma effects of MAL3-101, a member of a new class of non-ATP-site inhibitors of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 molecular chaperone. We discovered that MAL3-101 exhibited antimyeloma effects on MM cell lines in vitro and in vivo in a xenograft plasmacytoma model, as well as on primary tumor cells and bone marrow endothelial cells from myeloma patients. In combination with a proteasome inhibitor, MAL3-101 significantly potentiated the in vitro and in vivo antimyeloma effects. These data support a preclinical rationale for small molecule inhibition of Hsp70 function, either alone or in combination with other agents, as an effective therapeutic strategy for MM. PMID:21977030

  4. Gyrase B Inhibitor Impairs HIV-1 Replication by Targeting Hsp90 and the Capsid Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Vozzolo, Luciano; Loh, Belinda; Gane, Paul J.; Tribak, Maryame; Zhou, Lihong; Anderson, Ian; Nyakatura, Elisabeth; Jenner, Richard G.; Selwood, David; Fassati, Ariberto

    2010-01-01

    Chemical genetics is an emerging approach to investigate the biology of host-pathogen interactions. We screened several inhibitors of ATP-dependent DNA motors and detected the gyrase B inhibitor coumermycin A1 (C-A1) as a potent antiretroviral. C-A1 inhibited HIV-1 integration and gene expression from acutely infected cell, but the two activities mapped to distinct targets. Target discovery identified Hsp90 as the C-A1 target affecting viral gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that Hsp90 associates with the viral promoter and may directly regulate gene expression. Molecular docking suggested that C-A1 binds to two novel pockets at the C terminal domain of Hsp90. C-A1 inhibited Hsp90 dimer formation, suggesting that it impairs viral gene expression by preventing Hsp90 dimerization at the C terminus. The inhibition of HIV-1 integration imposed by C-A1 was independent of Hsp90 and mapped to the capsid protein, and a point mutation at residue 105 made the virus resistant to this block. HIV-1 susceptibility to the integration block mediated by C-A1 was influenced by cyclophilin A. Our chemical genetic approach revealed an unexpected function of capsid in HIV-1 integration and provided evidence for a role of Hsp90 in regulating gene expression in mammalian cells. Both activities were amenable to inhibition by small molecules and represent novel antiretroviral drug targets. PMID:20937817

  5. Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor: Multiple Anticoagulant Activities for a Single Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor (TFPI) is an anticoagulant protein that inhibits early phases of the procoagulant response. Alternatively spliced isoforms of TFPI are differentially expressed by endothelial cells and human platelets and plasma. The TFPIβ isoform localizes to the endothelium surface where it is a potent inhibitor of tissue factor-factor VIIa complexes that initiate blood coagulation. The TFPIα isoform is present in platelets. TFPIα contains a stretch of 9 amino acids nearly identical to those found in the B-domain of factor V (fV) that are well conserved in mammals. These amino acids provide exosite binding to activated fV, which allows for TFPIα to inhibit prothrombinase during the initiation phase of blood coagulation. Endogenous inhibition at this point in the coagulation cascade was only recently recognized and has provided a biochemical rationale to explain the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying several clinical disorders. These include the east Texas bleeding disorder that is caused by production of an altered form of factor V with high affinity for TFPI, and a paradoxical procoagulant effect of heparins. In addition, these findings have led to ideas for pharmacological targeting of TFPI that may reduce bleeding in hemophilia patients. PMID:26603155

  6. Structure-guided optimization of protein kinase inhibitors reverses aminoglycoside antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Stogios, Peter J; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Evdokimova, Elena; Egorova, Olga; Shakya, Tushar; Todorovic, Nick; Capretta, Alfredo; Wright, Gerard D; Savchenko, Alexei

    2013-09-01

    Activity of the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase APH(3')-Ia leads to resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and contributes to the clinical obsolescence of this class of antibiotics. One strategy to rescue compromised antibiotics such as aminoglycosides is targeting the enzymes that confer resistance with small molecules. We demonstrated previously that ePK (eukaryotic protein kinase) inhibitors could inhibit APH enzymes, owing to the structural similarity between these two enzyme families. However, limited structural information of enzyme-inhibitor complexes hindered interpretation of the results. In addition, cross-reactivity of compounds between APHs and ePKs represents an obstacle to their use as aminoglycoside adjuvants to rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity. In the present study, we structurally and functionally characterize inhibition of APH(3')-Ia by three diverse chemical scaffolds, anthrapyrazolone, 4-anilinoquinazoline and PP (pyrazolopyrimidine), and reveal distinctions in the binding mode of anthrapyrazolone and PP compounds to APH(3')-Ia compared with ePKs. Using this observation, we identify PP derivatives that select against ePKs, attenuate APH(3')-Ia activity and rescue aminoglycoside antibiotic activity against a resistant Escherichia coli strain. The structures described in the present paper and the inhibition studies provide an important opportunity for structure-based design of compounds to target aminoglycoside phosphotransferases for inhibition, potentially overcoming this form of antibiotic resistance.

  7. [Cytopathological effects of protein synthesis inhibitor emetine on HeLa cells and their nucleoli].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, O Iu; Mishina, V A; Zatsepina, O V

    2003-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell nucleolus is a highly dynamic structure, which is sensitive to all changes within or outside cell borders. Numerous data are available on changes of the nucleolar structure and functions under different treatments. However, almost nothing is known about the action of translation inhibitors on the nucleolus, although these substances, together with TNF-alpha, are commonly used for apoptosis induction, both for scientific and therapeutic purposes. Emetine is one of such inhibitors. We have shown that emetine suppresses cell viability, decreases mitotic index, and induces apoptosis in HeLa cells. Emetine action is irreversible, and it sensitizes cells to unfavourable external conditions. The emetine action causes redistribution of UBF, one of RNA-polymerase I factor, from the nucleolus to nucleoplasm even after a short exposure, i.e. when the morphology of the nucleus and chromatin still keeps its native pattern. It is important that other nucleolar proteins, such as fibrillarin and B23, are not recognized in the nucleoplasm until the very late stages of apoptotic process. A suggestion is made that changes in UBF localization may be associated with the onset of ribosomal repeat cleavage and migration of rDNA-"free" fragments from the nucleolus to nucleoplasm. It looks likely that these changes can serve as an initial morphological indication of apoptosis.

  8. Effect of microwave field on trypsin inhibitors activity and protein quality of broad bean seeds (Vicia faba var. major).

    PubMed

    Pysz, Mirosław; Polaszczyk, Szymon; Leszczyńska, Teresa; Piątkowska, Ewa

    2012-04-02

    In human nutrition legume seeds are usually subjected to soaking and thermal processes, mainly by using traditional cooking method. This method which has been used for decades, does not allow to control and adjust the parameters of this process. Therefore it does not seem to be the optimal method. Undoubtedly, microwave field is an alternative thermal process to conventional technique. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of microwave field on the activity of trypsin inhibitors and protein quality of three varieties of broad bean seeds. The study was performed on dry seeds of broad bean varieties Windsor White, Bachus and Basta. The seeds were soaked and heated in a microwave. The seeds absorbed different energy doses from 500 J/g, through 750, 1000, 1250, 1500, 1750 to 2000 J/g. The study material prepared in this way was tested for trypsin inhibitor activity, protein solubility and in vitro protein digestibility. The results were analysed by the one-way analysis of variance. Microwave heating resulted in decreased activity of trypsin inhibitors and protein solubility and increased digestibility of protein in all tested varieties of broad bean seeds. With increasing doses of the microwave field energy a decrease in protein solubility was observed. Satisfactory reduction in trypsin inhibitors at the level of 70-75% and highest protein digestibility were obtained by using a microwave field with energy dose of 1000 J/g of seeds. It can be concluded that the optimal dose of microwave energy field which will produce a relatively low activity of trypsin inhibitors and the highest protein digestibility together with maintaining solubility of broad been seeds was 1000 J/g seed.

  9. Small‐Molecule and Peptide Inhibitors of the Pro‐Survival Protein Mcl‐1

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ability of protein–protein interactions to regulate cellular processes in both beneficial and detrimental ways has made them obvious drug targets. The Bcl‐2 family of proteins undergo a series of protein–protein interactions which regulate the intrinsic cell‐death pathway. The pro‐survival members of the Bcl‐2 family, including Bcl‐2, Bcl‐xL, and Mcl‐1, are commonly overexpressed in a number of human cancers. Effective modulators of members of the Bcl‐2 family have been developed and are undergoing clinical trials, but the efficient modulation of Mcl‐1 is still not represented in the clinic. In addition, Mcl‐1 is a major cause of resistance to radio‐ and chemotherapies, including inhibitors that target other Bcl‐2 family members. Subsequently, the inhibition of Mcl‐1 has become of significant interest to the scientific community. This review covers the progress made to date in modulating the activity of Mcl‐1, by both stapled peptides and small molecules. The development of peptides as drug candidates, and the advancement of experimental and computational techniques used to discover small molecules are also highlighted. PMID:26696548

  10. Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 functions as a caspase-3 inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Weiyong; Kimura, Hiromichi; Shiota, Kunio . E-mail: ashiota@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-04-14

    Proliferation related acidic leucine-rich protein PAL31 (PAL31) is expressed in proliferating cells and consists of 272 amino acids with a tandem structure of leucine-rich repeats in the N-terminus and a highly acidic region with a putative nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus. We previously reported that PAL31 is required for cell cycle progression. In the present study, we found that the antisense oligonucleotide of PAL31 induced apoptosis to the transfected Nb2 cells. Stable transfectants, in which PAL31 was regulated by an inducible promoter, were generated to gain further insight into the signaling role of PAL31 in the regulation of apoptosis. Expression of PAL31 resulted in the marked rescue of Rat1 cells from etoposide and UV radiation-induced apoptosis and the cytoprotection was correlated with the levels of PAL31 protein. Thus, cytoprotection from apoptosis is a physiological function of PAL31. PAL31 can suppress caspase-3 activity but not cytochrome c release in vitro, indicating that PAL31 is a direct caspase-3 inhibitor. In conclusion, PAL31 is a multifunctional protein working as a cell cycle progression factor as well as a cell survival factor.

  11. The tumor-suppressive reagent taurolidine is an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Braumann, Chris; Henke, Wolfgang; Jacobi, Christoph A; Dubiel, Wolfgang

    2004-11-01

    Taurolidine has been successfully used as a disinfectant and to prevent the spreading and growth of tumor cells after surgical excision. However, the underlying mechanisms regarding its effects remain obscure. Here, we show that taurolidine treatment reduces endogenous levels of IkappaBalpha, p105, c-Jun, p53 and p27 in a dose-dependent manner in colon adenocarcinoma cells, which can be in part due to massive cell death. Because expression of tested proteins was affected by taurolidine, its influence on protein expression was studied. In the coupled transcription/translation system, taurolidine inhibited c-Jun expression with an IC50 value of 1.4 mM. There was no or little effect on transcription. In contrast, translation of c-Jun or p53 mRNA was completely inhibited by taurolidine. To determine which step of translation was affected, prominent complexes occurring in the course of translation were analyzed by density gradient centrifugation. In the presence of taurolidine, no preinitiation translation complex was assembled. Taurolidine also suppressed protein expression in bacteria. Based on our data, we conclude that taurolidine blocks a fundamental early phase of translation, which might explain its effects as a disinfectant and inhibitor of tumor growth.

  12. A facile inhibitor screening of SARS coronavirus N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Roh, Changhyun

    2012-01-01

    Hundreds of million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and the rate of global death from SARS has remarkably increased. Hence, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of SARS is highly needed. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs)-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide is sensitive to the specific recognition of the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein. In this study, we found that a designed biochip could analyze inhibitors of the SARS-CoV N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on SARS-CoV N protein. (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide on a designed biochip. At a concentration of 0.05 μg mL(-1), (-)-catechin gallate and (-)-gallocatechin gallate showed more than 40% inhibition activity on a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system.

  13. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Canal, Clinton E; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E

    2007-07-24

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by approximately 1,000-17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation.

  14. A novel action of histone deacetylase inhibitors in a protein aggresome disease model.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Lisa J; Mitchison, Timothy J; Liu, Qing

    2004-03-23

    Protein inclusions are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Whether protein aggregates are toxic or beneficial to cells is not known. In ALS animal models, mutant SOD1 forms aggresome-like structures in motor neurons and astrocytes. To better understand the role of protein aggregation in the progression of disease etiology, we performed a screen for small molecules that disrupt aggresome formation in cultured cells. After screening 20,000 compounds, we obtained two groups of compounds that specifically prevented aggresome formation. One group consists mainly of cardiac glycosides and will be the subject of another study. The second group contains two compounds: one is a known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, Scriptaid, and the other is a Flavin analog, DPD. Cells treated with these molecules still contained microaggregates, but these microaggregates were not transported to microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). The defect in transport was linked to modulation of the dynein/dynactin machinery as treatment with Scriptaid or DPD reversed mSOD-induced insolubilization of the dynactin subunits P50 dynamitin and P150(glued). Our findings suggest a connection between HDAC activity and aggresome formation and also lay the groundwork for a direct test of the role of aggresome formation in ALS etiology.

  15. A cotton gene encoding a polygalacturonase inhibitor-like protein is specifically expressed in petals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haiyan; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Ying; Li, Gang; Chen, Liang; Li, Xuebao

    2009-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a polygalacturonase-inhibitor-like protein (PGIP) was isolated from cotton flower cDNA library. The cDNA, designated GhPS1 (GenBank accession No. ABO47744), encodes a protein with 370 amino acids that shares high similarity with the known plant PGIPs. Fluorescent microscopy indicated that GhPS1 protein localizes on the cell membranes as well as in cytoplasm. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Northern blot analyses showed that GhPS1 was specifically expressed in cotton petals. Furthermore, the GhPS1 expression was gradually up-regulated in petal development, and its transcripts were accumulated to the highest level in the petals at anthesis. However, its expression level was declined rapidly in senesced petals after flowering. At low temperature, the GhPS1 gene expression was gradually decreased to very low level in petals. Collectively, our results suggest that GhPS1 gene might be involved in cotton petal development and senescence, and in response to cold stress.

  16. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by ≈1,000–17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation. PMID:17640910

  17. Calcineurin inhibitor protein (CAIN) attenuates Group I metabotropic glutamate receptor endocytosis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucimar T; Dale, Lianne B; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Babwah, Andy V; Pampillo, Macarena; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2009-10-16

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are coupled via phospholipase Cbeta to the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides and function to modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission at glutamatergic synapses. The desensitization of Group I mGluR signaling is thought to be mediated primarily via second messenger-dependent protein kinases and G protein-coupled receptor kinases. We show here that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 interact with the calcineurin inhibitor protein (CAIN). CAIN is co-immunoprecipitated in a complex with Group I mGluRs from both HEK 293 cells and mouse cortical brain lysates. Purified CAIN and its C-terminal domain specifically interact with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins corresponding to the second intracellular loop and the distal C-terminal tail domains of mGluR1. The interaction of CAIN with mGluR1 could also be blocked using a Tat-tagged peptide corresponding to the mGluR1 second intracellular loop domain. Overexpression of full-length CAIN attenuates the agonist-stimulated endocytosis of both mGluR1a and mGluR5a in HEK 293 cells, but expression of the CAIN C-terminal domain does not alter mGluR5a internalization. In contrast, overexpression of either full-length CAIN or the CAIN C-terminal domain impairs agonist-stimulated inositol phosphate formation in HEK 293 cells expressing mGluR1a. This CAIN-mediated antagonism of mGluR1a signaling appears to involve the disruption of receptor-Galpha(q/11) complexes. Taken together, these observations suggest that the association of CAIN with intracellular domains involved in mGluR/G protein coupling provides an additional mechanism by which Group I mGluR endocytosis and signaling are regulated.

  18. Preclinical antitumor activity of SST0116CL1: a novel heat shock protein 90 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vesci, Loredana; Milazzo, Ferdinando Maria; Carollo, Valeria; Pace, Silvia; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    4-Amino substituted resorcino-isoxazole (SST0116CL1) (property of Sigma-Tau Research Switzerland S.A.) is a potent, second generation, small-molecule heat shock protein 90 inhibitor (Hsp90i). SST0116CL1 binds to the ATP binding pocket of Hsp90, and interferes with Hsp90 chaperone function thus resulting in client protein degradation and tumor growth inhibition. The aim of the study was to assess SST0116CL1 in various solid and haematological tumors. The antitumor properties of SST0116CL1 were assessed using in vitro cell proliferation and client protein degradation assays and in vivo different tumor xenograft models. Pharmacokinetic (PK) data were also generated in tumor-bearing mice to gain an understanding of optimal dosing schedules and regimens. SST0116CL1 was shown to inhibit recombinant Hsp90α and to induce the destabilization of different client proteins, often overexpressed and constitutively activated in different types of hematological or solid human tumors. In preclinical in vivo studies, it was revealed to induce antitumor effects in murine models of leukemia and of gastric and ovarian carcinoma. A modulation of PD biomarkers in terms of downregulation of Hsp90 client proteins in tumor-bearing mice was found. SST0116CL1 is a new clinical candidate for cancer therapy. The antitumor property of SST0116CL1, likely due to direct inhibition of the Hsp90 enzymatic activity, may prove to be a critical attribute as the compound enters phase I clinical trials.

  19. Specificity of Protein Covalent Modification by the Electrophilic Proteasome Inhibitor Carfilzomib in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Federspiel, Joel D; Codreanu, Simona G; Goyal, Sandeep; Albertolle, Matthew E; Lowe, Eric; Teague, Juli; Wong, Hansen; Guengerich, F Peter; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-10-01

    Carfilzomib (CFZ) is a second-generation proteasome inhibitor that is Food and Drug Administration and European Commission approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. CFZ is an epoxomicin derivative with an epoxyketone electrophilic warhead that irreversibly adducts the catalytic threonine residue of the β5 subunit of the proteasome. Although CFZ produces a highly potent, sustained inactivation of the proteasome, the electrophilic nature of the drug could potentially produce off-target protein adduction. To address this possibility, we synthesized an alkynyl analog of CFZ and investigated protein adduction by this analog in HepG2 cells. Using click chemistry coupled with streptavidin based IP and shotgun tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), we identified two off-target proteins, cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1), as targets of the alkynyl CFZ probe. We confirmed the adduction of CYP27A1 and GSTO1 by streptavidin capture and immunoblotting methodology and then site-specifically mapped the adducts with targeted MS/MS methods. Although CFZ adduction of CYP27A1 and GSTO1 in vitro decreased the activities of these enzymes, the small fraction of these proteins modified by CFZ in intact cells should limit the impact of these off-target modifications. The data support the high selectivity of CFZ for covalent modification of its therapeutic targets, despite the presence of a reactive electrophile. The approach we describe offers a generalizable method to evaluate the safety profile of covalent protein-modifying therapeutics.

  20. Posttranslational modifications of Rab proteins cause effective displacement of GDP dissociation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Oesterlin, Lena K; Goody, Roger S; Itzen, Aymelt

    2012-04-10

    Intracellular vesicular trafficking is regulated by approximately 60 members of the Rab subfamily of small Ras-like GDP/GTP binding proteins. Rab proteins cycle between inactive and active states as well as between cytosolic and membrane bound forms. Membrane extraction/delivery and cytosolic distribution of Rabs is mediated by interaction with the protein GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) that binds to prenylated inactive (GDP-bound) Rab proteins. Because the Rab:GDP:GDI complex is of high affinity, the question arises of how GDI can be displaced efficiently from Rab protein in order to allow the necessary recruitment of the Rab to its specific target membrane. While there is strong evidence that DrrA, as a bacterially encoded GDP/GTP exchange factor, contributes to this event, we show here that posttranslational modifications of Rabs can also modulate the affinity for GDI and thus cause effective displacement of GDI from Rab:GDI complexes. These activities have been found associated with the phosphocholination and adenylylation activities of the enzymes AnkX and DrrA/SidM, respectively, from the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila. Both modifications occur after spontaneous dissociation of Rab:GDI complexes within their natural equilibrium. Therefore, the effective GDI displacement that is observed is caused by inhibition of reformation of Rab:GDI complexes. Interestingly, in contrast to adenylylation by DrrA, AnkX can covalently modify inactive Rabs with high catalytic efficiency even when GDP is bound to the GTPase and hence can inhibit binding of GDI to Rab:GDP complexes. We therefore speculate that human cells could employ similar mechanisms in the absence of infection to effectively displace Rabs from GDI.

  1. Selective inhibitors of the FK506-binding protein 51 by induced fit.

    PubMed

    Gaali, Steffen; Kirschner, Alexander; Cuboni, Serena; Hartmann, Jakob; Kozany, Christian; Balsevich, Georgia; Namendorf, Christian; Fernandez-Vizarra, Paula; Sippel, Claudia; Zannas, Anthony S; Draenert, Rika; Binder, Elisabeth B; Almeida, Osborne F X; Rühter, Gerd; Uhr, Manfred; Schmidt, Mathias V; Touma, Chadi; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2015-01-01

    The FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP51, encoded by the FKBP5 gene) is an established risk factor for stress-related psychiatric disorders such as major depression. Drug discovery for FKBP51 has been hampered by the inability to pharmacologically differentiate against the structurally similar but functional opposing homolog FKBP52, and all known FKBP ligands are unselective. Here, we report the discovery of the potent and highly selective inhibitors of FKBP51, SAFit1 and SAFit2. This new class of ligands achieves selectivity for FKBP51 by an induced-fit mechanism that is much less favorable for FKBP52. By using these ligands, we demonstrate that selective inhibition of FKBP51 enhances neurite elongation in neuronal cultures and improves neuroendocrine feedback and stress-coping behavior in mice. Our findings provide the structural and functional basis for the development of mechanistically new antidepressants.

  2. Michelob_x is the missing inhibitor of apoptosis protein antagonist in mosquito genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Jiang, Guohua; Chan, Gina; Santos, Carl P; Severson, David W; Xiao, Lei

    2005-08-01

    Apoptosis is implicated in the life cycle of the malaria parasite in mosquitoes. The genome project for the primary malaria vector Anopheles gambiae showed a significant expansion of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) and caspase gene families in comparison with Drosophila. However, because of extensive sequence divergence, no orthologue was identified for the reaper/grim-like IAP antagonist genes that have a pivotal role in cell death regulation in Drosophila. Using a customized searching strategy, we identified michelob_x(mx), a gene not predicted by the genome project, as the missing IAP antagonist in the An. gambiae and other mosquito genomes. Mx has a highly conserved amino-terminal IAP-binding motif. Expression of Mx induces rapid cell death in insect cell lines and is a potent tissue ablator in vivo. Its proapoptotic activity is totally dependent on the IAP-binding motif. Like reaper in Drosophila, mx is transcriptionally induced by ultraviolet irradiation to mediate cell death.

  3. The protein kinase 2 inhibitor CX-4945 regulates osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Son, You Hwa; Moon, Seong Hee; Kim, Jiyeon

    2013-11-01

    Drug repositioning can identify new therapeutic applications for existing drugs, thus mitigating high R&D costs. The Protein kinase 2 (CK2) inhibitor CX-4945 regulates human cancer cell survival and angiogenesis. Here we found that CX-4945 significantly inhibited the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation, but enhanced the BMP2-induced osteoblast differentiation in a cell culture model. CX-4945 inhibited the RANKL-induced activation of TRAP and NFATc1 expression accompanied with suppression of Akt phosphorylation, but in contrast, it enhanced the BMP2-mediated ALP induction and MAPK ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CX-4945 is thus a novel drug candidate for bone-related disorders such as osteoporosis.

  4. A novel five-lipoxygenase activity protein inhibitor labeled with carbon-14 and deuterium.

    PubMed

    Latli, Bachir; Hrapchak, Matt; Gao, Joe J; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2015-07-01

    2-[4-(3-{(1R)-1-[4-(2-Aminopyrimidin-5-yl)phenyl]-1-cyclopropylethyl}-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]-N,N-dimethylacetamide (1), is a novel and selective five-lipoxygenase activity protein (FLAP) inhibitor with excellent pharmacokinetics properties. The availability of a key chiral intermediate allowed the synthesis of [(14) C]-(1) in six radiochemical steps and in 47% overall radiochemical yield with a specific activity of 51 mCi/mmol using carbon-14 zinc cyanide. 2-Chloro-N,N-dimethyl-(2)H6-acetamide was prepared and condensed with a penultimate intermediate to give [(2)H6]-(1) in very high yield and in more than 99% isotopic enrichment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins prevent clearance of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Gregor; Preston, Simon; Allison, Cody; Cooney, James; Toe, Jesse G; Stutz, Michael D; Ojaimi, Samar; Scott, Hamish W; Baschuk, Nikola; Nachbur, Ueli; Torresi, Joseph; Chin, Ruth; Colledge, Danielle; Li, Xin; Warner, Nadia; Revill, Peter; Bowden, Scott; Silke, John; Begley, C Glenn; Pellegrini, Marc

    2015-05-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can result in a spectrum of outcomes from immune-mediated control to disease progression, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The host molecular pathways that influence and contribute to these outcomes need to be defined. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of chronic HBV infection, we identified some of the host cellular and molecular factors that impact on infection outcomes. Here, we show that cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs) attenuate TNF signaling during hepatitis B infection, and they restrict the death of infected hepatocytes, thus allowing viral persistence. Animals with a liver-specific cIAP1 and total cIAP2 deficiency efficiently control HBV infection compared with WT mice. This phenotype was partly recapitulated in mice that were deficient in cIAP2 alone. These results indicate that antagonizing the function of cIAPs may promote the clearance of HBV infection.

  6. Virtual screening of protein kinase C inhibitors from natural product library to modulate general anaesthetic effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhui; Zhou, Chuixian

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) plays a key role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system, and targeting PKC domain is considered as a strategy to modulate the anaesthetic effects. In this study, we described a synthetic pipeline to perform high-throughput virtual screening against a large library of 3D structural natural products released recently in order to discover those potential PKC modulators. A total of 100 natural products with top scores were raised, from which 12 promising candidates were tested to determine their inhibitory potencies against PKC. As might be expected, the promiscuous kinase inhibitor staurosporine showed a high PKC inhibitory activity (IC50 = 64 nM), and other two tested compounds, i.e. fisetin and tetrahydropapaverine, were also highly potent with their activities at nanomolar level (IC50 = 370 and 190, respectively).

  7. Structure-activity relationship study of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cuny, Gregory D.; Yu, Paul B.; Laha, Joydev K.; Xing, Xuechao; Liu, Ji-Feng; Lai, Carol S.; Deng, Donna Y.; Sachidanandan, Chetana; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2008-01-01

    A structure-activity relationship study of dorsomorphin, a previously identified inhibitor of SMAD 1/5/8 phosphorylation by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type 1 receptors ALK2, 3, and 6, revealed that increased inhibitory activity could be accomplished by replacing the pendent 4-pyridine ring with 4-quinoline. The activity contributions of various nitrogen atoms in the core pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine ring were also examined by preparing and evaluating pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrimidine and pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine derivatives. In addition, increased mouse liver microsome stability was achieved by replacing the ether substituent on the pendent phenyl ring with piperazine. Finally, an optimized compound 13 (LDN-193189 or DM-3189) demonstrated moderate pharmacokinetic characteristics (e.g. plasma t1/2 = 1.6 h) following intraperitoneal administration in mice. These studies provide useful molecular probes for examining the in vivo pharmacology of BMP signaling inhibition. PMID:18621530

  8. Action of protein synthesis inhibitors in blocking electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux from corn roots

    SciTech Connect

    Chastain, C.J.; LaFayette, P.R.; Hanson, J.B.

    1981-04-01

    The block in the electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux produced by protein synthesis inhibitors in corn root tissue can be released or by-passed by addition of fusicoccin or nigericin. The inhibition also lowers cell potential, and the release repolarizes. Associated with the inhibition of H/sup +/ efflux is inhibition of K/sup +/ influx and the growth of the root tip; fusicoccin partially relieves these inhibitions, but nigericin does not. The inhibition of H/sup +/ efflux which arises from blocking the proton channel of the ATPase by oligomycin or N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide can also be partially relieved by fusicoccin, but not by nigericin; the inhibition produced by diethylstilbestrol is not relieved by fusicoccin. The results are discussed in terms of the presumed mode of action of fusicoccin on the plasmalemma ATPase.

  9. Substituted aminopyrimidine protein kinase B (PknB) inhibitors show activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Timothy M.; Bouloc, Nathalie; Buxton, Roger S.; Chugh, Jasveen; Lougheed, Kathryn E.A.; Osborne, Simon A.; Saxty, Barbara; Smerdon, Stephen J.; Taylor, Debra L.; Whalley, David

    2012-01-01

    A high-throughput screen against PknB, an essential serine–threonine protein kinase present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), allowed the identification of an aminoquinazoline inhibitor which was used as a starting point for SAR investigations. Although a significant improvement in enzyme affinity was achieved, the aminoquinazolines showed little or no cellular activity against M. tuberculosis. However, switching to an aminopyrimidine core scaffold and the introduction of a basic amine side chain afforded compounds with nanomolar enzyme binding affinity and micromolar minimum inhibitory concentrations against M. tuberculosis. Replacement of the pyrazole head group with pyridine then allowed equipotent compounds with improved selectivity against a human kinase panel to be obtained. PMID:22469702

  10. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid-associated protein HU with structure-based inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Tuhin; Ghosh, Soumitra; Dixit, Karuna; Ganesan, Varsha; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Dey, Debayan; Sarma, Siddhartha P.; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-06-01

    The nucleoid-associated protein HU plays an important role in maintenance of chromosomal architecture and in global regulation of DNA transactions in bacteria. Although HU is essential for growth in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), there have been no reported attempts to perturb HU function with small molecules. Here we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HU from Mtb. We identify a core region within the HU-DNA interface that can be targeted using stilbene derivatives. These small molecules specifically inhibit HU-DNA binding, disrupt nucleoid architecture and reduce Mtb growth. The stilbene inhibitors induce gene expression changes in Mtb that resemble those induced by HU deficiency. Our results indicate that HU is a potential target for the development of therapies against tuberculosis.

  11. 2-Anilino-4-aryl-1,3-thiazole inhibitors of valosin-containing protein (VCP or p97).

    PubMed

    Bursavich, Matthew G; Parker, Daniel P; Willardsen, J Adam; Gao, Zhong-Hua; Davis, Thaylon; Ostanin, Kirill; Robinson, Rosann; Peterson, Ashley; Cimbora, Daniel M; Zhu, Ju-Fen; Richards, Burt

    2010-03-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP; also known as p97) is a member of the AAA ATPase family with a central role in the ubiquitin-degradation of misfolded proteins. VCP also exhibits antiapoptotic function and metastasis via activation of nuclear factor kappa-B signaling pathway. We have discovered that 2-anilino-4-aryl-1,3-thiazoles are potent drug-like inhibitors of this enzyme. The identified compounds show low nanomolar VCP potency, demonstrate SAR trends, and show activity in a mechanism based cellular assay. This series of compounds represents the first steps towards a novel, small molecule VCP inhibitor as a cancer therapeutic.

  12. Zebra chip disease decreases tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) protein content by attenuating protease inhibitor levels and increasing protease activities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2015-11-01

    Zebra chip disease of potato decreases protease inhibitor levels resulting in enhanced serine-type protease activity, decreased protein content and altered protein profiles of fully mature tubers. Zebra-chip (ZC), caused by Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), is a relatively new disease of potato that negatively affects growth, yield, propagation potential, and fresh and process qualities of tubers. Diseased plants produce tubers with characteristic brown discoloration of vascular tissue accompanied by elevated levels of free amino acids and reducing sugars. Here we demonstrate that ZC disease induces selective protein catabolism in tubers through modulating protease inhibitor levels. Soluble protein content of tubers from CLso-infected plants was 33% lower than from non-infected plants and electrophoretic analyses revealed substantial reductions in major tuber proteins. Patatin (~40 kDa) and ser-, asp- (22 kDa) and cys-type (85 kDa) protease inhibitors were either absent or greatly reduced in ZC-afflicted tubers. In contrast to healthy (non-infected) tubers, the proteolytic activity in CLso infected tubers was high and the ability of extracts from infected tubers to inhibit trypsin (ser-type) and papain (cys-type) proteases greatly attenuated. Moreover, extracts from CLso-infected tubers rapidly catabolized proteins purified from healthy tubers (40 kDa patatin, 22 kDa protease inhibitors, 85 kDa potato multicystatin) when subjected to proteolysis individually. In contrast, crude extracts from non-infected tubers effectively inhibited the proteolytic activity from ZC-afflicted tubers. These results suggest that the altered protein profile of ZC afflicted tubers is largely due to loss of ser- and cys-type protease inhibitors. Further analysis revealed a novel PMSF-sensitive (ser) protease (ca. 80-120 kDa) in CLso infected tubers. PMSF abolished the proteolytic activities responsible for degrading patatin, the 22 kDa protease inhibitor(s) and potato

  13. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide, a Candidate Inhibitor of Protein Kinase Mζ, Is Excitotoxic to Cultured Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Noa; Verbitsky, Sima; Dudai, Yadin; Segal, Menahem

    2015-09-09

    The ζ-inhibitory peptide (ZIP) is considered a candidate inhibitor of the atypical protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ). ZIP has been shown to reverse established LTP and disrupt several forms of long-term memory. However, recent studies have challenged the specificity of ZIP, as it was reported to exert its effect also in PKMζ knock-out mice. These results raise the question of what are the targets of ZIP that may underlie its effect on LTP and memory. Here we report that ZIP as well as its inactive analog, scrambled ZIP, induced a dose-dependent increase in spontaneous activity of neurons in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. This was followed by a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) which could not be blocked by conventional channel blockers. Furthermore, ZIP caused an increase in frequency of mEPSCs followed by an increase in membrane noise in patch-clamped neurons both in culture and in acute brain slices. Finally, at 5-10 μM, ZIP-induced excitotoxic death of the cultured neurons. Together, our results suggest that the potential contribution of cellular toxicity should be taken into account in interpretation of ZIP's effects on neuronal and behavioral plasticity. Significance statement: The ζ-inhibitory peptide (ZIP) is considered a candidate inhibitor of the atypical protein kinase Mζ (PKMζ). ZIP has been shown to reverse established LTP and disrupt several forms of long-term memory. Here we report that ZIP as well as its inactive analog, scrambled ZIP, induced a dose-dependent increase in spontaneous activity of neurons in dissociated cultures and brain slices of rat hippocampus. Furthermore, ZIP caused a dose- and time-dependent neuronal death in the dissociated cultures. These findings impact on the assumption that ZIP erases memory due to specific inhibition of PKMz. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3512404-08$15.00/0.

  14. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors as Modulators of Vascular Function and Their Application in Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is regulated by multiple neuronal, hormonal, renal and vascular control mechanisms. Changes in signaling mechanisms in the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and extracellular matrix cause alterations in vascular tone and blood vessel remodeling and may lead to persistent increases in vascular resistance and hypertension (HTN). In VSM, activation of surface receptors by vasoconstrictor stimuli causes an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), which forms a complex with calmodulin, activates myosin light chain (MLC) kinase and leads to MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. Vasoconstrictor agonists could also increase the production of diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C (PKC). PKC is a family of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent isozymes that have different distributions in various blood vessels, and undergo translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, cytoskeleton or the nucleus during cell activation. In VSM, PKC translocation to the cell surface may trigger a cascade of biochemical events leading to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK), a pathway that ultimately increases the myofilament force sensitivity to [Ca2+]i, and enhances actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. PKC translocation to the nucleus may induce transactivation of various genes and promote VSM growth and proliferation. PKC could also affect endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the extracellular matrix further affecting vascular reactivity and remodeling. In addition to vasoactive factors, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic factors could affect PKC activity. Increased PKC expression and activity have been observed in vascular disease and in certain forms of experimental and human HTN. Targeting of vascular PKC using PKC inhibitors may function in concert with

  15. A Molecular Insight into Complement Evasion by the Staphylococcal Complement Inhibitor Protein Family1

    PubMed Central

    Ricklin, Daniel; Tzekou, Apostolia; Garcia, Brandon L.; Hammel, Michal; McWhorter, William J.; Sfyroera, Georgia; Wu, You-Qiang; Holers, V. Michael; Herbert, Andrew P.; Barlow, Paul N.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Lambris, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses an impressive arsenal of complement evasion proteins that help the bacterium escape attack of the immune system. The staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN) protein exhibits a particularly high potency and was previously shown to block complement by acting at the level of the C3 convertases. However, many details about the exact binding and inhibitory mechanism remained unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that SCIN directly binds with nanomolar affinity to a functionally important area of C3b that lies near the C terminus of its β-chain. Direct competition of SCIN with factor B for C3b slightly decreased the formation of surface-bound convertase. However, the main inhibitory effect can be attributed to an entrapment of the assembled convertase in an inactive state. Whereas native C3 is still able to bind to the blocked convertase, no generation and deposition of C3b could be detected in the presence of SCIN. Furthermore, SCIN strongly competes with the binding of factor H to C3b and influences its regulatory activities: the SCIN-stabilized convertase was essentially insensitive to decay acceleration by factor H and the factor I- and H-mediated conversion of surface-bound C3b to iC3b was significantly reduced. By targeting a key area on C3b, SCIN is able to block several essential functions within the alternative pathway, which explains the high potency of the inhibitor. Our findings provide an important insight into complement evasion strategies by S. aureus and may act as a base for further functional studies. PMID:19625656

  16. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors as Modulators of Vascular Function and their Application in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is regulated by multiple neuronal, hormonal, renal and vascular control mechanisms. Changes in signaling mechanisms in the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and extracellular matrix cause alterations in vascular tone and blood vessel remodeling and may lead to persistent increases in vascular resistance and hypertension (HTN). In VSM, activation of surface receptors by vasoconstrictor stimuli causes an increase in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which forms a complex with calmodulin, activates myosin light chain (MLC) kinase and leads to MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. Vasoconstrictor agonists could also increase the production of diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C (PKC). PKC is a family of Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent isozymes that have different distributions in various blood vessels, and undergo translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, cytoskeleton or the nucleus during cell activation. In VSM, PKC translocation to the cell surface may trigger a cascade of biochemical events leading to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase (MEK), a pathway that ultimately increases the myofilament force sensitivity to [Ca(2+)]i, and enhances actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. PKC translocation to the nucleus may induce transactivation of various genes and promote VSM growth and proliferation. PKC could also affect endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) in the extracellular matrix further affecting vascular reactivity and remodeling. In addition to vasoactive factors, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic factors could affect PKC activity. Increased PKC expression and activity have been observed in vascular disease and in certain forms of experimental and human HTN. Targeting of vascular PKC using PKC inhibitors may function in

  17. Advances in the discovery and development of heat-shock protein 90 inhibitors for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hardik J; Modi, Shanu; Chiosis, Gabriela; Taldone, Tony

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Over the last 15 – 20 years, targeted anticancer strategies have focused on therapies aimed at abrogating a single malignant protein. Agents that are directed towards the inhibition of a single oncoprotein have resulted in a number of useful drugs in the treatment of cancers (i.e., Gleevec, BCR-ABL; Tarceva and Iressa, EGFR). However, such a strategy relies on the notion that a cancer cell is dependent on a single signaling pathway for its survival. The possibility that a cancer cell may mutate or switch its dependence to another signaling pathway can result in the ineffectiveness of such agents. Recent advances in the biology of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) have revealed intimate details into the complexity of the chaperoning process that Hsp90 is engaged in and, at the same time, have offered those involved in drug discovery several unique ways to interfere in this process. Areas covered This review provides the current understanding of the chaperone cycle of Hsp90 and presents the multifaceted approaches used by researchers in the discovery of potential Hsp90 drugs. It discusses the phenotypic outcomes in cancer cells on Hsp90 inhibition by these several approaches and also addresses several distinctions observed among direct Hsp90 ATP-pocket competitors providing commentary on the potential biological outcomes as well as the clinical relevance of such features. Expert opinion The significantly different phenotypic outcomes observed from Hsp90 inhibition by the many inhibitors developed suggest that the clinical development of Hsp90 inhibitors would be better served by careful consideration of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties of individual candidates rather than a generic approach directed towards the target. PMID:22400044

  18. Enzastaurin (LY317615), a Protein Kinase C Beta Selective Inhibitor, Enhances Antiangiogenic Effect of Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, Christopher D.; Xiao Dakai; Tu Tianxiang; Kim, Kwang Woon; Moretti, Luigi; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Tawtawy, Mohammed N.; Quarles, Chad C. Ph.D.; Lu Bo

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Angiogenesis has generated interest in oncology because of its important role in cancer growth and progression, particularly when combined with cytotoxic therapies, such as radiotherapy. Among the numerous pathways influencing vascular growth and stability, inhibition of protein kinase B(Akt) or protein kinase C(PKC) can influence tumor blood vessels within tumor microvasculature. Therefore, we wanted to determine whether PKC inhibition could sensitize lung tumors to radiation. Methods and Materials: The combination of the selective PKC{beta} inhibitor Enzastaurin (ENZ, LY317615) and ionizing radiation were used in cell culture and a mouse model of lung cancer. Lung cancer cell lines and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined using immunoblotting, cytotoxic assays including cell proliferation and clonogenic assays, and Matrigel endothelial tubule formation. In vivo, H460 lung cancer xenografts were examined for tumor vasculature and proliferation using immunohistochemistry. Results: ENZ effectively radiosensitizes HUVEC within in vitro models. Furthermore, concurrent ENZ treatment of lung cancer xenografts enhanced radiation-induced destruction of tumor vasculature and proliferation by IHC. However, tumor growth delay was not enhanced with combination treatment compared with either treatment alone. Analysis of downstream effectors revealed that HUVEC and the lung cancer cell lines differed in their response to ENZ and radiation such that only HUVEC demonstrate phosphorylated S6 suppression, which is downstream of mTOR. When ENZ was combined with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in H460 lung cancer cells, radiosensitization was observed. Conclusion: PKC appears to be crucial for angiogenesis, and its inhibition by ENZ has potential to enhance radiotherapy in vivo.

  19. Characterization of a protein kinase B inhibitor in vitro and in insulin-treated liver cells.

    PubMed

    Logie, Lisa; Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio J; Keane, Michael; Woods, Yvonne L; Bain, Jennifer; Marquez, Rudolfo; Alessi, Dario R; Sutherland, Calum

    2007-09-01

    Abnormal expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes (glucose-6-phosphatase [G6Pase] and PEPCK) contributes to hyperglycemia. These genes are repressed by insulin, but this process is defective in diabetic subjects. Protein kinase B (PKB) is implicated in this action of insulin. An inhibitor of PKB, Akt inhibitor (Akti)-1/2, was recently reported; however, the specificity and efficacy against insulin-induced PKB was not reported. Our aim was to characterize the specificity and efficacy of Akti-1/2 in cells exposed to insulin and then establish whether inhibition of PKB is sufficient to prevent regulation of hepatic gene expression by insulin. Akti-1/2 was assayed against 70 kinases in vitro and its ability to block PKB activation in cells exposed to insulin fully characterized. Akti-1/2 exhibits high selectivity toward PKBalpha and PKBbeta. Complete inhibition of PKB activity is achieved in liver cells incubated with 1-10 mumol/l Akti-1/2, and this blocks insulin regulation of PEPCK and G6Pase expression. Our data demonstrate that only 5-10% of maximal insulin-induced PKB is required to fully repress PEPCK and G6Pase expression. Finally, we demonstrate reduced insulin sensitivity of these gene promoters in cells exposed to submaximal concentrations of Akti-1/2; however, full repression of the genes can still be achieved by high concentrations of insulin. This work establishes the requirement for PKB activity in the insulin regulation of PEPCK, G6Pase, and a third insulin-regulated gene, IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP1); suggests a high degree of functional reserve; and identifies Akti-1/2 as a useful tool to delineate PKB function in the liver.

  20. Differential protein stability of EGFR mutants determines responsiveness to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Paramita; Tan, Yee Sun; Somnay, Vishal; Mehta, Ranjit; Sitto, Merna; Ahsan, Aarif; Nyati, Shyam; Naughton, John P.; Bridges, Alexander; Zhao, Lili; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ray, Dipankar; Nyati, Mukesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carrying specific EGFR kinase activating mutations (L858R, delE746-A750) respond well to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, drug resistance develops within a year. In about 50% of such patients, acquired drug resistance is attributed to the enrichment of a constitutively active point mutation within the EGFR kinase domain (T790M). To date, differential drug-binding and altered ATP affinities by EGFR mutants have been shown to be responsible for differential TKI response. As it has been reported that EGFR stability plays a role in the survival of EGFR driven cancers, we hypothesized that differential TKI-induced receptor degradation between the sensitive L858R and delE746-A750 and the resistant T790M may also play a role in drug responsiveness. To explore this, we have utilized an EGFR-null CHO overexpression system as well as NSCLC cell lines expressing various EGFR mutants and determined the effects of erlotinib treatment. We found that erlotinib inhibits EGFR phosphorylation in both TKI sensitive and resistant cells, but the protein half-lives of L858R and delE746-A750 were significantly shorter than L858R/T790M. Third generation EGFR kinase inhibitor (AZD9291) inhibits the growth of L858R/T790M-EGFR driven cells and also induces EGFR degradation. Erlotinib treatment induced polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, primarily in a c-CBL-independent manner, in TKI sensitive L858R and delE746-A750 mutants when compared to the L858R/T790M mutant, which correlated with drug sensitivity. These data suggest an additional mechanism of TKI resistance, and we postulate that agents that degrade L858R/T790M-EGFR protein may overcome TKI resistance. PMID:27612423

  1. Discovery of potent Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction inhibitor based on molecular binding determinants analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zheng-Yu; Lu, Meng-Chen; Xu, Li Li; Yang, Ting-Ting; Xi, Mei-Yang; Xu, Xiao-Li; Guo, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2014-03-27

    Keap1 is known to mediate the ubiquitination of Nrf2, a master regulator of the antioxidant response. Directly interrupting the Keap1-Nrf2 interaction has been emerged as a promising strategy to develop novel class of antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and anticancer agents. On the basis of the molecular binding determinants analysis of Keap1, we successfully designed and characterized the most potent protein-protein interaction (PPI) inhibitor of Keap1-Nrf2, compound 2, with K(D) value of 3.59 nM binding to Keap1 for the first time to single-digit nanomolar. Compound 2 can effectively disrupt the Nrf2-Keap1 interaction with an EC50 of 28.6 nM in the fluorescence polarization assay. It can also activate the Nrf2 transcription activity in the cell-based ARE-luciferase reporter assay in a dose-dependent manner. The qRT-PCR results of Nrf2 transcription targets gave the consistent results. These results confirm direct and highly efficient interruption of the Keap1-Nrf2 PPI can be fully achieved by small molecules.

  2. An inhibitor of the kinesin spindle protein activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway independently of p53 and de novo protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weikang; South, Victoria J; Diehl, Ronald E; Davide, Joseph P; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Fraley, Mark E; Arrington, Kenneth L; Lobell, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a microtubule motor protein, is essential for the formation of bipolar spindles during mitosis. Inhibition of KSP activates the spindle checkpoint and causes apoptosis. It was shown that prolonged inhibition of KSP activates Bax and caspase-3, which requires a competent spindle checkpoint and couples with mitotic slippage. Here we investigated how Bax is activated by KSP inhibition and the roles of Bax and p53 in KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Bax greatly attenuates KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis and that Bax activation is upstream of caspase activation. This indicates that Bax mediates the lethality of KSP inhibitors and that KSP inhibition provokes apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway where Bax activation is prior to caspase activation. Although the BH3-only protein Puma is induced after mitotic slippage, suppression of de novo protein synthesis that abrogates Puma induction does not block activation of Bax or caspase-3, indicating that Bax activation is triggered by a posttranslational event. Comparison of KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis between matched cell lines containing either functional or deficient p53 reveals that inhibition of KSP induces apoptosis independently of p53 and that p53 is dispensable for spindle checkpoint function. Thus, KSP inhibitors should be active in p53-deficient tumors.

  3. An Inhibitor of the Kinesin Spindle Protein Activates the Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway Independently of p53 and De Novo Protein Synthesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; South, Victoria J.; Diehl, Ronald E.; Davide, Joseph P.; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Fraley, Mark E.; Arrington, Kenneth L.; Lobell, Robert B.

    2007-01-01

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a microtubule motor protein, is essential for the formation of bipolar spindles during mitosis. Inhibition of KSP activates the spindle checkpoint and causes apoptosis. It was shown that prolonged inhibition of KSP activates Bax and caspase-3, which requires a competent spindle checkpoint and couples with mitotic slippage. Here we investigated how Bax is activated by KSP inhibition and the roles of Bax and p53 in KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis. We demonstrate that small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Bax greatly attenuates KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis and that Bax activation is upstream of caspase activation. This indicates that Bax mediates the lethality of KSP inhibitors and that KSP inhibition provokes apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway where Bax activation is prior to caspase activation. Although the BH3-only protein Puma is induced after mitotic slippage, suppression of de novo protein synthesis that abrogates Puma induction does not block activation of Bax or caspase-3, indicating that Bax activation is triggered by a posttranslational event. Comparison of KSP inhibitor-induced apoptosis between matched cell lines containing either functional or deficient p53 reveals that inhibition of KSP induces apoptosis independently of p53 and that p53 is dispensable for spindle checkpoint function. Thus, KSP inhibitors should be active in p53-deficient tumors. PMID:17101792

  4. Flexibility of the Thrombin-activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor Pro-domain Enables Productive Binding of Protein Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Valnickova, Zuzana; Sanglas, Laura; Arolas, Joan L.; Petersen, Steen V.; Schar, Christine; Otzen, Daniel; Aviles, Francesc X.; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier; Enghild, Jan J.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) exhibits intrinsic proteolytic activity toward large peptides. The structural basis for this observation was clarified by the crystal structures of human and bovine TAFI. These structures evinced a significant rotation of the pro-domain away from the catalytic moiety when compared with other pro-carboxypeptidases, thus enabling access of large peptide substrates to the active site cleft. Here, we further investigated the flexible nature of the pro-domain and demonstrated that TAFI forms productive complexes with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors from potato, leech, and tick (PCI, LCI, and TCI, respectively). We determined the crystal structure of the bovine TAFI-TCI complex, revealing that the pro-domain was completely displaced from the position observed in the TAFI structure. It protruded into the bulk solvent and was disordered, whereas TCI occupied the position previously held by the pro-domain. The authentic nature of the presently studied TAFI-inhibitor complexes was supported by the trimming of the C-terminal residues from the three inhibitors upon complex formation. This finding suggests that the inhibitors interact with the active site of TAFI in a substrate-like manner. Taken together, these data show for the first time that TAFI is able to form a bona fide complex with protein carboxypeptidase inhibitors. This underlines the unusually flexible nature of the pro-domain and implies a possible mechanism for regulation of TAFI intrinsic proteolytic activity in vivo. PMID:20880845

  5. Acetyl-lysine Binding Site of Bromodomain-Containing Protein 4 (BRD4) Interacts with Diverse Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Members of the bromodomain and extra terminal (BET) family of proteins are essential for the recognition of acetylated lysine (KAc) residues in histones and have emerged as promising drug targets in cancer, inflammation, and contraception research. In co-crystallization screening campaigns using the first bromodomain of BRD4 (BRD4-1) against kinase inhibitor libraries, we identified and characterized 14 kinase inhibitors (10 distinct chemical scaffolds) as ligands of the KAc binding site. Among these, the PLK1 inhibitor BI2536 and the JAK2 inhibitor TG101209 displayed strongest inhibitory potential against BRD4 (IC50 = 25 nM and 130 nM, respectively) and high selectivity for BET bromodomains. Comparative structural analysis revealed markedly different binding modes of kinase hinge-binding scaffolds in the KAc binding site, suggesting that BET proteins are potential off-targets of diverse kinase inhibitors. Combined, these findings provide a new structural framework for the rational design of next-generation BET-selective and dual-activity BET-kinase inhibitors. PMID:24568369

  6. Crystal structure determination and inhibition studies of a novel xylanase and alpha-amylase inhibitor protein (XAIP) from Scadoxus multiflorus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjit; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Dube, Divya; Singh, S Baskar; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2010-07-01

    A novel plant protein isolated from the underground bulbs of Scadoxus multiflorus, xylanase and alpha-amylase inhibitor protein (XAIP), inhibits two structurally and functionally unrelated enzymes: xylanase and alpha-amylase. The mature protein contains 272 amino acid residues which show sequence identities of 48% to the plant chitinase hevamine and 36% to xylanase inhibitor protein-I, a double-headed inhibitor of GH10 and GH11 xylanases. However, unlike hevamine, it is enzymatically inactive and, unlike xylanase inhibitor protein-I, it inhibits two functionally different classes of enzyme. The crystal structure of XAIP has been determined at 2.0 A resolution and refined to R(cryst) and R(free) factors of 15.2% and 18.6%, respectively. The polypeptide chain of XAIP adopts a modified triosephosphate isomerase barrel fold with eight beta-strands in the inner circle and nine alpha-helices forming the outer ring. The structure contains three cis peptide bonds: Gly33-Phe34, Tyr159-Pro160 and Trp253-Asp254. Although hevamine has a long accessible carbohydrate-binding channel, in XAIP this channel is almost completely filled with the side-chains of residues Phe13, Pro77, Lys78 and Trp253. Solution studies indicate that XAIP inhibits GH11 family xylanases and GH13 family alpha-amylases through two independent binding sites located on opposite surfaces of the protein. Comparison of the structure of XAIP with that of xylanase inhibitor protein-I, and docking studies, suggest that loops alpha3-beta4 and alpha4-beta5 may be involved in the binding of GH11 xylanase, and that helix alpha7 and loop beta6-alpha6 are suitable for the interaction with alpha-amylase.

  7. An active twenty-amino-acid-residue peptide derived from the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H C; van Patten, S M; Smith, A J; Walsh, D A

    1985-01-01

    Digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase of the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase results in the sequential formation of three active inhibitory peptides. The smallest active peptide has the sequence Thr-Thr-Tyr-Ala-Asp-Phe-Ile-Ala-Ser-Gly-Arg-Thr-Gly-Arg-Arg-Asn-Ala-Ile- His-Asp . This 20-amino-acid-residue peptide has 20-40% of the activity of the native molecule and a Ki of 0.2 nM. Inhibition, as a minimum, appears to be based upon the inhibitor protein containing the recognition sequences that dictate protein-substrate-specificity. This inhibitory peptide also has sequence homology with the phosphorylation site for a protein kinase other than the cyclic AMP-dependent enzyme. PMID:3000357

  8. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors vildagliptin and K-579 inhibit a phospholipase C: a case of promiscuous scaffolds in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Mouparna; Ghosh, Anindya S.; Oda, Masataka; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.; Goñi, Félix M.

    2015-01-01

    The long term side effects of any newly introduced drug is a subject of intense research, and often raging controversies. One such example is the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP4) inhibitor used for treating type 2 diabetes, which is inconclusively implicated in increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis. Previously, based on a computational analysis of the spatial and electrostatic properties of active site residues, we have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus cereus is a prolyl peptidase using in vivo experiments. In the current work, we first report the inhibition of the native activity of PI-PLC by two DPP4 inhibitors - vildagliptin (LAF-237) and K-579. While vildagliptin inhibited PI-PLC at micromolar concentrations, K-579 was a potent inhibitor even at nanomolar concentrations. Subsequently, we queried a comprehensive, non-redundant set of 5000 human proteins (50% similarity cutoff) with known structures using serine protease (SPASE) motifs derived from trypsin and DPP4. A pancreatic lipase and a gastric lipase are among the proteins that are identified as proteins having promiscuous SPASE scaffolds that could interact with DPP4 inhibitors. The presence of such scaffolds in human lipases is expected since they share the same catalytic mechanism with PI-PLC. However our methodology also detects other proteins, often with a completely different enzymatic mechanism, that have significantly congruent domains with the SPASE motifs. The reported elevated levels of serum lipase, although contested, could be rationalized by inhibition of lipases reported here. In an effort to further our understanding of the spatial and electrostatic basis of DPP4 inhibitors, we have also done a comprehensive analysis of all 76 known DPP4 structures liganded to inhibitors till date. Also, the methodology presented here can be easily adopted for other drugs, and provide the first line of filtering in the identification of pathways that

  9. The dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors vildagliptin and K-579 inhibit a phospholipase C: a case of promiscuous scaffolds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Dutta, Mouparna; Ghosh, Anindya S; Oda, Masataka; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Rao, Basuthkar J; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Goñi, Félix M

    2013-01-01

    The long term side effects of any newly introduced drug is a subject of intense research, and often raging controversies. One such example is the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP4) inhibitor used for treating type 2 diabetes, which is inconclusively implicated in increased susceptibility to acute pancreatitis. Previously, based on a computational analysis of the spatial and electrostatic properties of active site residues, we have demonstrated that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Bacillus cereus is a prolyl peptidase using in vivo experiments. In the current work, we first report the inhibition of the native activity of PI-PLC by two DPP4 inhibitors - vildagliptin (LAF-237) and K-579. While vildagliptin inhibited PI-PLC at micromolar concentrations, K-579 was a potent inhibitor even at nanomolar concentrations. Subsequently, we queried a comprehensive, non-redundant set of 5000 human proteins (50% similarity cutoff) with known structures using serine protease (SPASE) motifs derived from trypsin and DPP4. A pancreatic lipase and a gastric lipase are among the proteins that are identified as proteins having promiscuous SPASE scaffolds that could interact with DPP4 inhibitors. The presence of such scaffolds in human lipases is expected since they share the same catalytic mechanism with PI-PLC. However our methodology also detects other proteins, often with a completely different enzymatic mechanism, that have significantly congruent domains with the SPASE motifs. The reported elevated levels of serum lipase, although contested, could be rationalized by inhibition of lipases reported here. In an effort to further our understanding of the spatial and electrostatic basis of DPP4 inhibitors, we have also done a comprehensive analysis of all 76 known DPP4 structures liganded to inhibitors till date. Also, the methodology presented here can be easily adopted for other drugs, and provide the first line of filtering in the identification of pathways that

  10. 3D model for Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A armadillo domain unveils highly conserved protein-protein interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A

    2015-12-07

    Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is a human oncoprotein, which exerts its cancer-promoting function through interaction with other proteins, for example Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and MYC. The lack of structural information for CIP2A significantly prevents the design of anti-cancer therapeutics targeting this protein. In an attempt to counteract this fact, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the N-terminal domain (CIP2A-ArmRP), analyzed key areas and amino acids, and coupled the results to the existing literature. The model reliably shows a stable armadillo repeat fold with a positively charged groove. The fact that this conserved groove highly likely binds peptides is corroborated by the presence of a conserved polar ladder, which is essential for the proper peptide-binding mode of armadillo repeat proteins and, according to our results, several known CIP2A interaction partners appropriately possess an ArmRP-binding consensus motif. Moreover, we show that Arg229Gln, which has been linked to the development of cancer, causes a significant change in charge and surface properties of CIP2A-ArmRP. In conclusion, our results reveal that CIP2A-ArmRP shares the typical fold, protein-protein interaction site and interaction patterns with other natural armadillo proteins and that, presumably, several interaction partners bind into the central groove of the modeled CIP2A-ArmRP. By providing essential structural characteristics of CIP2A, the present study significantly increases our knowledge on how CIP2A interacts with other proteins in cancer progression and how to develop new therapeutics targeting CIP2A.

  11. Comparative studies of the Spi1 proteins of three equine alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor haplotypes following isolation by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, A D; Miller, H R; John, H A; Scudamore, C L

    1993-09-01

    1. Antiproteinase deficiency can result in excessive proteinase-induced tissue damage. The major anti-elastase (Spi1) protein of equine alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI) was isolated from the plasma/serum of three common haplotypes (I, L and U). 2. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the three inhibitors were identical, but were only approx 65-77% homologous with two other published equine Spi1 sequences. 3. All three inhibitors complexed quickly and irreversibly with equine leucocyte proteinase 2A (kass = 2 x 10(7) M-1 sec-1). They were also efficient inhibitors of chymase (rat mast cell proteinase-II; kass = 2 x 10(5) M-1 sec-1; Ki = 2 x 10(-10) M). There was therefore no evidence of deficient inhibition in the Spi1 variants of the I,L and U haplotypes.

  12. Method for Identifying Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Protein-protein Interaction Between HCN1 and TRIP8b.

    PubMed

    Han, Ye; Lyman, Kyle A; Clutter, Matt; Schiltz, Gary E; Ismail, Quratul-Ain; Cheng, Xiangying; Luan, Chi-Hao; Chetkovich, Dane M

    2016-11-11

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed ubiquitously throughout the brain, where they function to regulate the excitability of neurons. The subcellular distribution of these channels in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal area CA1 is regulated by tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b interacting protein (TRIP8b), an auxiliary subunit. Genetic knockout of HCN pore forming subunits or TRIP8b, both lead to an increase in antidepressant-like behavior, suggesting that limiting the function of HCN channels may be useful as a treatment for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Despite significant therapeutic interest, HCN channels are also expressed in the heart, where they regulate rhythmicity. To circumvent off-target issues associated with blocking cardiac HCN channels, our lab has recently proposed targeting the protein-protein interaction between HCN and TRIP8b in order to specifically disrupt HCN channel function in the brain. TRIP8b binds to HCN pore forming subunits at two distinct interaction sites, although here the focus is on the interaction between the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains of TRIP8b and the C terminal tail of HCN1. In this protocol, an expanded description of a method for purifying TRIP8b and executing a high throughput screen to identify small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between HCN and TRIP8b, is described. The method for high throughput screening utilizes a Fluorescence Polarization (FP) -based assay to monitor the binding of a large TRIP8b fragment to a fluorophore-tagged eleven amino acid peptide corresponding to the HCN1 C terminal tail. This method allows 'hit' compounds to be identified based on the change in the polarization of emitted light. Validation assays are then performed to ensure that 'hit' compounds are not artifactual.

  13. The protein phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A affects catecholamine secretion and granular distribution in cultured adrenomedullary chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, L M; Quintanar, J L; Rueda, J; Viniegra, S; Reig, J A

    1995-09-01

    Calyculin-A, a potent inhibitor of types 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, increases basal catecholamine secretion in cultured chromaffin cells with a maximum effect observed at 100 nM. This effect was increased by forskolin and the calmodulin antagonist W7, but was modified neither by phorbol esters nor the protein kinase inhibitor, H7. The effect of the toxin, calyculin-A, on basal secretion was completely prevented by the protein kinase inhibitor K252a. In digitonin-permeabilized cells calyculin-A induced an increase in basal release, but, in contrast, it partially reduced calcium-induced secretion. Analysis of total proteins revealed that calyculin-A treatment of the cells increased the level of phosphorylation of different protein bands. Examination of the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction revealed a clear increase in the phosphorylation level of various proteins, including vimentin. Calyculin-A provoked a rapid morphological change in chromaffin cells in the same range of concentration (50-300 nM). Cells became rounder and were partially detached from the substratum forming clusters, this effect was also blocked by K252a. Transmission electron microscopy of calyculin-A-treated cells showed an increase in the proportion of chromaffin granules located closer to the membrane. These results suggest that calyculin-A induces changes both in the catecholamine secretory response and in the cytoskeletal elements of chromaffin cells by protein phosphorylation.

  14. Inhibitory effect of presenilin inhibitor LY411575 on maturation of hepatitis C virus core protein, production of the viral particle and expression of host proteins involved in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Otoguro, Teruhime; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Kasai, Hirotake; Yamashita, Atsuya; Moriishi, Kohji

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is responsible for the formation of infectious viral particles and induction of pathogenicity. The C-terminal transmembrane region of the immature core protein is cleaved by signal peptide peptidase (SPP) for maturation of the core protein. SPP belongs to the family of presenilin-like aspartic proteases. Some presenilin inhibitors are expected to suppress HCV infection and production; however, this anti-HCV effect has not been investigated in detail. In this study, presenilin inhibitors were screened to identify anti-HCV compounds. Of the 13 presenilin inhibitors tested, LY411575 was the most potent inhibitor of SPP-dependent cleavage of HCV core protein. Production of intracellular core protein and supernatant infectious viral particles from HCV-infected cells was significantly impaired by LY411575 in a dose-dependent manner (half maximum inhibitory concentration = 0.27 μM, cytotoxic concentration of the extracts to cause death to 50% of viable cells > 10 μM). No effect of LY411575 on intracellular HCV RNA in the subgenomic replicon cells was detected. LY411575 synergistically promoted daclatasvir-dependent inhibition of viral production, but not that of viral replication. Furthermore, LY411575 inhibited HCV-related production of reactive oxygen species and expression of NADPH oxidases and vascular endothelial growth factor. Taken together, our data suggest that LY411575 suppresses HCV propagation through SPP inhibition and impairs host gene expressions related to HCV pathogenicity.

  15. Knowledge-based Characterization of Similarity Relationships in the Human Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Family for Rational Inhibitor Design

    PubMed Central

    Vidović, Dušica; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation, controlled by the coordinated action of protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of numerous physiological processes. PTPs are implicated in a number of human diseases and their potential as prospective drug targets is increasingly being recognized. Despite their biological importance, until now no comprehensive overview has been reported describing how all members of the human PTP family are related. Here we review the entire human PTP family and present a systematic knowledge-based characterization of global and local similarity relationships, which are relevant for the development of small molecule inhibitors. We use parallel homology modeling to expand the current PTP structure space and analyze the human PTPs based on local three-dimensional catalytic sites and domain sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of binding site similarities in understanding cross-reactivity and inhibitor selectivity in the design of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:19810703

  16. Amadori Glycated Proteins: Role in Production of Autoantibodies in Diabetes Mellitus and Effect of Inhibitors on Non-Enzymatic Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Nadeem A.; Dash, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules, especially proteins leading to their oxidation is increased in diabetes mellitus due to hyperglycemia and play an important role in associated complications of the disease. The glycation primarily occurs at intrachain lysine residues of proteins and results in the formation of an early stage stable product as Amadori-lysine which undergo further irreversible chemical reactions to form advanced glycation endproducts. This review deals with the role of Amadori modified proteins in pathogenesis of diabetes. We aim to explain immunogenicity of Amadori-glycated proteins, which might be involve in production of serum autoantibodies in the diabetic patients, and effect of inhibitors on the glycation process. PMID:23423609

  17. Remodeling a DNA-binding protein as a specific in vivo inhibitor of bacterial secretin PulD

    PubMed Central

    Mouratou, Barbara; Schaeffer, Francis; Guilvout, Ingrid; Tello-Manigne, Diana; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Alzari, Pedro M.; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    We engineered a class of proteins that binds selected polypeptides with high specificity and affinity. Use of the protein scaffold of Sac7d, belonging to a protein family that binds various ligands, overcomes limitations inherent in the use of antibodies as intracellular inhibitors: it lacks disulfide bridges, is small and stable, and can be produced in large amounts. An in vitro combinatorial/selection approach generated specific, high-affinity (up to 140 pM) binders against bacterial outer membrane secretin PulD. When exported to the Escherichia coli periplasm, they inhibited PulD oligomerization, thereby blocking the type II secretion pathway of which PulD is part. Thus, high-affinity inhibitors of protein function can be derived from Sac7d and can be exported to, and function in, a cell compartment other than that in which they are produced. PMID:17984049

  18. Oxazin-5-Ones as a Novel Class of Penicillin Binding Protein Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Structure Activity Relationship.

    PubMed

    Onoabedje, Efeturi Abraham; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Okafor, Sunday Nwankwor; Onoabedje, Ufuoma Shalom; Okoro, Uchechukwu Chris

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) are normal constituents of bacterial which are absent in mammalian cells. The theoretical binding modes of known oxazin-5-ones toward the protein were used as a guide to synthesis new inhibitors. Structural studies of protein-ligand complexes revealed that conformational discrepancies of the derivatives in the protein's binding site gave rise to the variation in their inhibition constant which ranged from 68.58 μM to 2.04 mM. Biological assay results further confirmed the antibiotic potencies of the studied compounds. Although the outcome of biological screening does not parallel computational predictions, the results obtained from both methods suggest that the oxazin-5-one derivatives are potential PBP inhibitors, hence interesting antibiotic lead agents.

  19. Stimulus-Dependent Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein Expression Prolongs the Duration of B Cell Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Hisaaki; Inoue, Kentaro; Yumoto, Noriko; Nagashima, Takeshi; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Different dynamic behaviours of signalling activity can induce distinct biological responses in a variety of cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that determine the dynamics of kinase activities in immune cells are not well understood. In this study, we showed that the duration of both IκB kinase (IKK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activities in B cell receptor (BCR)- and CD40-signalling pathways in B cells were regulated by transcriptional feedback loops. We conducted a time-course transcriptome analysis after BCR or CD40 stimulation and identified the following four candidate genes as feedback regulators for IKK and ERK: inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP), TNF alpha-induced protein 3, dual-specificity phosphatase 5, and sprouty homolog 2. Quantitative experiments and mathematical modelling suggested that IAP inhibition shortened the duration of IKK and ERK activity following both BCR and CD40 pathway stimulation, indicating a positive role for IAP in B cell signalling. Furthermore, transient kinase activities induced by IAP blockage reduced the levels of delayed expression genes. Together, our findings suggest that IKK and ERK activity durations can be fine-tuned by the coordinated regulation of positive and negative transcriptional feedback and that these network properties determine the biological output of B cells. PMID:27277891

  20. Assessing the efficacy of protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors in mouse models of progeria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao H; Chang, Sandy Y; Andres, Douglas A; Spielmann, H Peter; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G

    2010-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by the accumulation of a farnesylated form of prelamin A (progerin). Previously, we showed that blocking protein farnesylation with a farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI) ameliorates the disease phenotypes in mouse model of HGPS (Lmna(HG/+)). However, the interpretation of the FTI treatment studies is open to question in light of recent studies showing that mice expressing a nonfarnesylated version of progerin (Lmna(nHG/+)) develop progeria-like disease phenotypes. The fact that Lmna(nHG/+) mice manifest disease raised the possibility that the beneficial effects of an FTI in Lmna(HG/+) mice were not due to the effects of the drug on the farnesylation of progerin, but may have been due to unanticipated secondary effects of the drug on other farnesylated proteins. To address this issue, we compared the ability of an FTI to improve progeria-like disease phenotypes in both Lmna(HG/+) and Lmna(nHG/+) mice. In Lmna(HG/+) mice, the FTI reduced disease phenotypes in a highly significant manner, but the drug had no effect in Lmna(nHG/+) mice. The failure of the FTI to ameliorate disease in Lmna(nHG/+) mice supports the idea that the beneficial effects of an FTI in Lmna(HG/+) mice are due to the effect of drug on the farnesylation of progerin.

  1. Entamoeba invadens: Identification of a SERCA protein and effect of SERCA inhibitors on encystation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Higuera, Aarón; Herrera-Martínez, Mayra; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Valle-Solís, Martha; Muñiz-Lino, Marcos A; Cázares-Apátiga, Javier; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2015-12-01

    Calcium has an important role on signaling of different cellular processes, including growth and differentiation. Signaling by calcium also has an essential function in pathogenesis and differentiation of the protozoan parasites Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba invadens. However, the proteins of these parasites that regulate the cytoplasmic concentration of this ion are poorly studied. In eukaryotic cells, the calcium-ATPase of the SERCA type plays an important role in calcium homeostasis by catalyzing the active efflux of calcium from cytoplasm to endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we reported the identification of SERCA of E. invadens (EiSERCA). This protein contains a putative sequence for endoplasmic reticulum retention and all domains involved in calcium transport identified in mammalian SERCA. By immunofluorescence assays, an antibody against SERCA of E. histolytica detected EiSERCA in a vesicular network in the cytoplasm of E. invadens trophozoites, co-localizing with calreticulin. Interestingly, EiSERCA was redistributed close to plasma membrane during encystation, suggesting that this pump could participate in regulate the calcium concentration during this process. In addition, thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, both specific inhibitors of SERCA, affected the number and structure of cysts, supporting the hypothesis that calcium flux mediated by SERCA has an important role in the life cycle of Entamoeba. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Long-term memory: disruption by inhibitors of protein synthesis and cytoplasmic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, J.F.; Landry, D.W.; Bennett, E.L.; Jarvik, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    Colchicine (60 ..mu..g/kg), an inhibitor of axoplasmic transport, administered subcutaneously to mice has no detectable effect on retention when given shortly after active avoidance training, nor did a pertaining injection of anisomycin (ANI) have an amnesic effect. However, when ANI was administered shortly prior to training and colchicine was administered after training, retention performance was impaired. The amnesic effect was dependent on the time at which colchicine was administered. The amnesic effect was also obtained when ANI was combined with either vinblastine (6 ..mu..g/kg) or podophyllotoxin (3 ..mu..g/kg), drugs that inhibit axoplasmic transport. Intracerebral injections of colchicine (60 ng to 60 pg) caused amnesia in subjects pretreated with ANI, but not in subjects pretreated with saline. Lumicolchicine, an isomer of colchicine, which has similar central nervous system effects but has a low binding affinity for microtubule protein, did not impair retention in ANI pretreated mice. It is suggested that axonal transport of recently synthesized protein is required for long-term memory storage.

  3. Dietary (-)-epicatechin as a potent inhibitor of βγ-secretase amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Cox, Carla J; Choudhry, Fahd; Peacey, Eleanor; Perkinton, Michael S; Richardson, Jill C; Howlett, David R; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Francis, Paul T; Williams, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids, a group of dietary polyphenols have been shown to possess cognitive health benefits. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that they could play a role in risk reduction in dementia. Amyloid precursor protein processing and the subsequent generation of amyloid beta (Aβ) are central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, as soluble, oligomeric Aβ is thought to be the toxic species driving disease progression. We undertook an in vitro screen to identify flavonoids with bioactivity at βγ-mediated amyloid precursor protein processing, which lead to identification of a number of flavonoids bioactive at 100 nM. Because of known bioavailability, we investigated the catechin family further and identified epigallocatechin and (-)-epicatechin as potent (nanomolar) inhibitors of amyloidogenic processing. Supporting this finding, we have shown reduced Aβ pathology and Aβ levels following short term, a 21-day oral delivery of (-)-epicatechin in 7-month-old TASTPM mice. Further, in vitro mechanistic studies suggest this is likely because of indirect BACE1 inhibition. Taken together, our results suggest that orally delivered (-)-epicatechin may be a potential prophylactic for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor Binds to Neisseria gonorrhoeae Outer Membrane Opacity Protein and is Bactericidal

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Morris D.; Roberts, Melissa H.; Barauskas, Ona L.; Jarvis, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    Problem Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is an innate immune peptide present on the genitourinary tract mucosa which has antimicrobial activity. In this study, we investigated the interaction of SLPI with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Method of study ELISA and far-western blots were used to analyze binding of SLPI to gonococci. The binding site for SLPI was identified by tryptic digests and mass spectrometry. Antimicrobial activity of SLPI for gonococci was determined using bactericidal assays. SLPI protein levels in cell supernatants were measured by ELISA, and SLPI mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results SLPI bound directly to the gonococcal Opa protein and was bactericidal. Epithelial cells from the reproductive tract constitutively expressed SLPI at different levels. Gonococcal infection of cells did not affect SLPI expression. Conclusion We conclude that SLPI is bactericidal for gonococci and is expressed by reproductive tract epithelial cells and thus is likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of gonococcal infection. PMID:22537232

  5. Matrix Gla-protein: the calcification inhibitor in need of vitamin K.

    PubMed

    Schurgers, Leon J; Cranenburg, Ellen C M; Vermeer, Cees

    2008-10-01

    Among the proteins involved in vascular calcium metabolism, the vitamin K-dependent matrix Gla-protein (MGP) plays a dominant role. Although on a molecular level its mechanism of action is not completely understood, it is generally accepted that MGP is a potent inhibitor of arterial calcification. Its pivotal importance for vascular health is demonstrated by the fact that there seems to be no effective alternative mechanism for calcification inhibition in the vasculature. An optimal vitamin K intake is therefore important to maintain the risk and rate of calcification as low as possible. With the aid of conformation-specific antibodies MGP species in both tissue and the circulation have been detected in the healthy population, and significant differences were found in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Using ELISA-based assays, uncarboxylated MGP (ucMGP) was demonstrated to be a promising biomarker for cardiovascular calcification detection. These assays may have potential value for identifying patients as well as apparently healthy subjects at high risk for CVD and/or cardiovascular calcification and for monitoring the treatment of CVD and vascular calcification.

  6. Ganetespib overcomes resistance to PARP inhibitors in breast cancer by targeting core proteins in the DNA repair machinery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juhong; Lu, Yuanzhi; Li, Zhi; Li, Liping; Niu, Daoli; Xu, Wenwei; Liu, Jing; Fu, Lin; Zhou, Ziqing; Gu, Yingying; Xia, Fen

    2017-06-01

    DNA damage repair plays essential roles in drug resistance, especially resistance to Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in the clinic. A subset of DNA repair proteins such as Breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1), BRCA2 and RecA homolog (RAD51) are client proteins of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Clearance of these DNA repair proteins by inhibition of Hsp90 is a promising strategy for overcoming resistance to PARP inhibitors. Here we report the pharmacological analysis of the highly potent second-generation Hsp90 inhibitor, ganetespib. Methods Nuclear BRCA1, BRCA2, and RAD51 expression in breast cancer cells were detected by subcellular fractionation and western blot analysis. Formation of nuclear RAD51 and γ-H2AX foci was analyzed by immunofluorescent staining. The cytotoxicity of ganetespib and ABT-888 in breast cancer cells were evaluated by cell proliferation, colony survival, and apoptosis assay. To investigate the efficacy of this therapy in vivo, SCID mice bearing MCF7 xenografts were treated with ganetespib and ABT-888, both as single agents and in combination. Results Ganetespib significantly destabilized nuclear BRCA1, BRCA2, and RAD51, and efficiently disrupted homologous recombination-mediated DNA double-strand break repair in breast cancer cells. The synergistic antitumor effects of ganetespib and the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888 were observed, and concurrent treatment with both inhibitors synergistically inhibited xenograft tumor growth. Importantly, the combined treatment was well tolerated, without significant loss of body weight or major histological changes in the breast cancer xenograft model. Conclusion These data provide a novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer with wild type BRCA1 using combination therapy targeting Hsp90 to overcome resistance to PARP inhibitors.

  7. Property Focused Structure-Based Optimization of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Protein-Protein Interaction between Menin and Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL).

    PubMed

    Borkin, Dmitry; Pollock, Jonathan; Kempinska, Katarzyna; Purohit, Trupta; Li, Xiaoqin; Wen, Bo; Zhao, Ting; Miao, Hongzhi; Shukla, Shirish; He, Miao; Sun, Duxin; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2016-02-11

    Development of potent small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions with optimized druglike properties represents a challenging task in lead optimization process. Here, we report synthesis and structure-based optimization of new thienopyrimidine class of compounds, which block the protein-protein interaction between menin and MLL fusion proteins that plays an important role in acute leukemias with MLL translocations. We performed simultaneous optimization of both activity and druglike properties through systematic exploration of substituents introduced to the indole ring of lead compound 1 (MI-136) to identify compounds suitable for in vivo studies in mice. This work resulted in the identification of compound 27 (MI-538), which showed significantly increased activity, selectivity, polarity, and pharmacokinetic profile over 1 and demonstrated a pronounced effect in a mouse model of MLL leukemia. This study, which reports detailed structure-activity and structure-property relationships for the menin-MLL inhibitors, demonstrates challenges in optimizing inhibitors of protein-protein interactions for potential therapeutic applications.

  8. Effects of a Number of Classes of 50S Inhibitors on Stop Codon Readthrough during Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jill; Pratt, Catherine A.; Dahlberg, Albert E.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of a number of antibiotics on stop codon readthrough during protein synthesis in Escherichia coli was examined. Inhibitors which bind close to the entrance of the peptide exit tunnel on the 50S ribosomal subunit promote substantial levels of readthrough, presumably by disrupting the mechanism of peptide release. PMID:15561874

  9. Oral delivery system for two-pulse colonic release of protein drugs and protease inhibitor/absorption enhancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Del Curto, Maria Dorly; Maroni, Alessandra; Palugan, Luca; Zema, Lucia; Gazzaniga, Andrea; Sangalli, Maria Edvige

    2011-08-01

    It is well known that the intestinal stability and absorption of protein drugs are improved when enzyme inhibitors/permeation enhancers are coadministered. Recently, it was hypothesized that an increased effectiveness of these adjuvants might be achieved by timing their release prior to that of the protein, so that a more favorable environment would be established in advance. Therefore, an oral system was proposed for two-pulse colonic release of insulin and the protease inhibitor camostat mesilate/absorption enhancer sodium glycocholate. The device consisted of a drug-containing core, an inner swellable/erodible low-viscosity hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) coating, an intermediate adjuvant layer, and an additional outer HPMC coating. HPMC coats and camostat mesilate/sodium glycocholate films with differing thicknesses were applied to immediate-release tablet cores by aqueous spray coating. The obtained units were characterized for weight, thickness, breaking force, and release performance. All systems showed satisfactory technological properties and the pursued pulsatile delivery behavior, with programmable delay phases preceding inhibitor/enhancer release and elapsing between inhibitor/enhancer and protein release, respectively. Indeed, both lag times linearly correlated with the relevant HPMC coating level. The system was thus proven suitable for yielding two-pulse release profiles, in which lag phases could be modulated to provide convenient concentration patterns for proteins and adjuvants.

  10. Paradoxical activation and RAF inhibitor resistance of BRAF protein kinase fusions characterizing pediatric astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Angela J.; Lang, Shih-Shan; Boucher, Katie L.; Madsen, Peter J.; Slaunwhite, Erin; Choudhari, Namrata; Kellet, Meghan; Storm, Phillip B.

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytomas are the most common type of brain tumors in children. Activated BRAF protein kinase mutations are characteristic of pediatric astrocytomas with KIAA1549-BRAF fusion genes typifying low-grade astrocytomas and V600EBRAF alterations characterizing distinct or higher-grade tumors. Recently, BRAF-targeted therapies, such as vemurafenib, have shown great promise in treating V600E-dependent melanomas. Like V600EBRAF, BRAF fusion kinases activate MAPK signaling and are sufficient for malignant transformation; however, here we characterized the distinct mechanisms of action of KIAA1549-BRAF and its differential responsiveness to PLX4720, a first-generation BRAF inhibitor and research analog of vemurafenib. We found that in cells expressing KIAA1549-BRAF, the fusion kinase functions as a homodimer that is resistant to PLX4720 and accordingly is associated with CRAF-independent paradoxical activation of MAPK signaling. Mutagenesis studies demonstrated that KIAA1549-BRAF fusion-mediated signaling is diminished with disruption of the BRAF kinase dimer interface. In addition, the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion displays increased binding affinity to kinase suppressor of RAS (KSR), an RAF relative recently demonstrated to facilitate MEK phosphorylation by BRAF. Despite its resistance to PLX4720, the KIAA1549-BRAF fusion is responsive to a second-generation selective BRAF inhibitor that, unlike vemurafenib, does not induce activation of wild-type BRAF. Our data support the development of targeted treatment paradigms for BRAF-altered pediatric astrocytomas and also demonstrate that therapies must be tailored to the specific mutational context and distinct mechanisms of action of the mutant kinase. PMID:23533272

  11. Screening to Identify Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein Inhibitors with Neuroblastoma-Selective Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishimoto, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Yoshihide; Masuo, Yusuke; Kato, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to discover multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) inhibitors with neuroblastoma-selective cytotoxicity by means of fluorescence assay with a membrane-permeable fluorescent dye, Fluo-8 AM, based on our observation that gene expression of Mrp3 in neuroblastoma Neuro2a cells was remarkably higher than that in primary cultured cortical neurons, as determined by real-time PCR. Neuro2a cells showed minimal fluorescence upon incubation with Fluo-8 AM. However, blocking of Mrp3 efflux function by small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection or inhibition with probenecid resulted in significant dye accumulation, observed as an increase of fluorescence. Interestingly, Mrp3 siRNA or probenecid treatment also resulted in increased cytotoxicity, as evidenced by decreased 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)-reducing activity of Neuro2a, with a concomitant increase in release of lactate dehydrogenase. On the other hand, primary cultured neurons exhibited higher fluorescence intensity after incubation with Fluo-8 AM regardless of addition of probenecid. Also, probenecid only minimally affected MTT-reducing activity. Thus, probenecid showed selective cytotoxicity towards Neuro2a cells. Based on these findings, we screened a series of established therapeutic agents for ability to induce Fluo-8 accumulation in Neuro2a cells. Several uricosuric and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were identified, and these drugs were confirmed to decrease MTT-reducing activity selectively in Neuro2a. There was a negative linear correlation between Fluo-8 accumulation and cytotoxicity of these agents. Although the compounds identified here are insufficiently potent for practical application, further screening to discover higher-affinity MRP3 inhibitors using larger chemical libraries may uncover drug candidates with potent neuroblastoma-selective cytotoxicity.

  12. Active Depletion of Host Cell Inhibitor-of-Apoptosis Proteins Triggers Apoptosis upon Baculovirus DNA Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Vandergaast, Rianna; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Cerio, Rebecca J.; Friesen, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important antivirus defense by virtue of its impact on virus multiplication and pathogenesis. To define molecular mechanisms by which viruses are detected and the apoptotic response is initiated, we examined the antiviral role of host inhibitor-of-apoptosis (IAP) proteins in insect cells. We report here that the principal IAPs, DIAP1 and SfIAP, of the model insects Drosophila melanogaster and Spodoptera frugiperda, respectively, are rapidly depleted and thereby inactivated upon infection with the apoptosis-inducing baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV). Virus-induced loss of these host IAPs triggered caspase activation and apoptotic death. Elevation of IAP levels by ectopic expression repressed caspase activation. Loss of host IAP in both species was triggered by AcMNPV DNA replication. By using selected inhibitors, we found that virus-induced IAP depletion was mediated in part by the proteasome but not by caspase cleavage. Consistent with this conclusion, mutagenic disruption of the SfIAP RING motif, which acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, stabilized SfIAP during infection. Importantly, SfIAP was also stabilized upon the removal of its 99-residue N-terminal leader, which serves as a critical determinant of IAP turnover. These data indicated that a host pathway initiated by virus DNA replication and acting through instability motifs embedded within IAP triggers IAP depletion and thereby causes apoptosis. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that host modulation of cellular IAP levels is a conserved mechanism by which insects mount an apoptotic antiviral response. Thus, host IAPs may function as critical sentinels of virus invasion in insects. PMID:21653668

  13. A novel small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair protein Ku70/80.

    PubMed

    Weterings, Eric; Gallegos, Alfred C; Dominick, Lauren N; Cooke, Laurence S; Bartels, Trace N; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2016-07-01

    Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. The NHEJ pathway is frequently upregulated in several solid cancers as a compensatory mechanism for a separate DSB repair defect or for innate genomic instability, making this pathway a powerful target for synthetic lethality approaches. In addition, NHEJ reduces the efficacy of cancer treatment modalities which rely on the introduction of DSBs, like radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapy. Consequently, inhibition of the NHEJ pathway can modulate a radiation- or chemo-refractory disease presentation. The Ku70/80 heterodimer protein plays a pivotal role in the NHEJ process. It possesses a ring-shaped structure with high affinity for DSBs and serves as the first responder and central scaffold around which the rest of the repair complex is assembled. Because of this central position, the Ku70/80 dimer is a logical target for the disruption of the entire NHEJ pathway. Surprisingly, specific inhibitors of the Ku70/80 heterodimer are currently not available. We here describe an in silico, pocket-based drug discovery methodology utilizing the crystal structure of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. We identified a novel putative small molecule binding pocket and selected several potential inhibitors by computational screening. Subsequent biological screening resulted in the first identification of a compound with confirmed Ku-inhibitory activity in the low micro-molar range, capable of disrupting the binding of Ku70/80 to DNA substrates and impairing Ku-dependent activation of another NHEJ factor, the DNA-PKCS kinase. Importantly, this compound synergistically sensitized human cell lines to radiation treatment, indicating a clear potential to diminish DSB repair. The chemical scaffold we here describe can be utilized as a lead-generating platform for the design and development of a novel class of anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  14. Dissection of the Dislocation Pathway for Type I Membrane Proteins with a New Small Molecule Inhibitor, Eeyarestatin

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Edda; Hirsch, Christian; Vyas, Jatin M.; Gordon, Eva; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Tortorella, Domenico

    2004-01-01

    The mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-cytosol degradation pathway for disposal of misfolded proteins is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in diseases that are characterized by impaired protein degradation. The ability to do so is hampered by the small number of specific inhibitors available and by our limited understanding of the individual steps involved in this pathway. Cells that express a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) heavy chain-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein and the human cytomegalovirus protein US11, which catalyzes dislocation of the class I MHC EGFP reporter, show only little fluorescence. Treatment with proteasome inhibitors increases their fluorescence by stabilizing EGFP-tagged MHC class I molecules. We used this change in signal intensity as a readout to screen a chemical library of 16,320 compounds and identified two structurally related compounds (eeyarestatin I and II) that interfered with the degradation of both EGFP-heavy chain and its endogenous unmodified class I MHC heavy chain counterpart. Eeyarestatin I also inhibited degradation of a second misfolded type I membrane protein, T-cell receptor α. Both compounds stabilize these dislocation substrates in the ER membrane, without preventing proteasomal turnover of cytosolic substrates. The new inhibitors must therefore interfere with a step that precedes proteasomal degradation. The use of eeyarestatin I thus allows the definition of a new intermediate in dislocation. PMID:14767067

  15. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates transcription factor NF-kappaB by acting on multiple cytoplasmic inhibitors of rel-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Su, F; Schneider, R J

    1996-07-01

    The HBx protein is a small polypeptide encoded by mammalian hepadnaviruses that is essential for viral infectivity and is thought to play a role in development of hepatocellular carcinoma during chronic hepatitis B virus infection. HBx is a transactivator that stimulates Ras signal transduction pathways in the cytoplasm and certain transcription elements in the nucleus. To better understand the activities of HBx protein and its mechanism of action, we have explored the manner by which HBx activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB during transient expression. We show that HBx induces prolonged formation, in a Ras-dependent manner, of transcriptionally active NF-kappaB DNA-binding complexes, which make up the family of Rel-related proteins, p50, p52, RelA, and c-Rel. HBx was found to activate NF-kappaB through two distinct cytoplasmic pathways by acting on both the 37-kDa IkappaBalpha inhibitor and the 105-kappaDa NF-kappaB1 precursor inhibitor protein, known as p105. HBx induces phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha, a three- to fourfold reduction in IKBalpha stability, and concomitant nuclear accumulation of NF-kappaB DNA-binding complexes, similar to that reported for human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax protein. In addition, HBx mediates a striking reduction in cytoplasmic p105 NF-kappaB1 inhibitor and p50 protein levels and release of RelA protein that was sequestered by the p105 inhibitor, concomitant with nuclear accumulation of NF-kappaB complexes. HBx mediated only a slight reduction in the cytoplasmic levels of NF-kappaB2 p100 protein, an additional precursor inhibitor of NF-kappaB, which is thought to be less efficiently processed or less responsive to release of NF-kappaB. No evidence was found for HBx activation of NF-kappaB by targeting acidic sphingomyelinase- controlled pathways. Studies also suggest that stimulation of NF-kappaB by HBx does not involve activation of Ras via the neutral sphingomyelin-ceramide pathway. Thus, HBx protein is shown to

  16. Structure-based discovery of an inhibitor of Arf activation by Sec7 domains through targeting of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Viaud, Julien; Zeghouf, Mahel; Barelli, Hélène; Zeeh, Jean-Christophe; Padilla, André; Guibert, Bernard; Chardin, Pierre; Royer, Catherine A; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Chavanieu, Alain

    2007-06-19

    Small molecules that produce nonfunctional protein-protein complexes are an alternative to competitive inhibitors for the inhibition of protein functions. Here we target the activation of the small GTP-binding protein Arf1, a major regulator of membrane traffic, by the Sec7 catalytic domain of its guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO. The crystal structure of the Arf1-GDP/ARNO complex, which initiates the exchange reaction, was used to discover an inhibitor, LM11, using in silico screening of a flexible pocket near the Arf1/ARNO interface. Using fluorescence kinetics and anisotropy, NMR spectroscopy and mutagenesis, we show that LM11 acts following a noncompetitive mechanism in which the inhibitor targets both Arf1-GDP and the Arf1-GDP/ARNO complex and produces a nonfunctional Arf-GDP/ARNO complex whose affinity is similar to that of the native complex. In addition, LM11 recognizes features of both Arf and ARNO near the Arf/Sec7 interface, a characteristic reminiscent of the paradigm interfacial inhibitor Brefeldin A. We then show that LM11 is a cell-active inhibitor that impairs Arf-dependent trafficking structures at the Golgi. Furthermore, LM11 inhibits ARNO-dependent migration of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, demonstrating that ARNO is a target of LM11 in cells. Remarkably, LM11 inhibits the activation of Arf1 but not Arf6 in vitro, pointing to a possible synergy between Arf1 and Arf6 activation by ARNO in cell migration. Our design method shows that flexible regions in protein-protein complexes provide drugable sites with the potential to develop novel tools for investigating and inhibiting signaling pathways.

  17. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) Acts as a BMP and Wnt Inhibitor during Early Embryogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Di Pasquale, Elisa; Brivanlou, Ali H.

    2009-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) belongs to an unusual subgroup of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of signaling ligands as it lacks a key cysteine residue in the mature region required for proper intermolecular dimerization. Naturally occurring BMP15 mutation leads to early ovarian failure in humans, and BMP15 has been shown to activate the Smad1/5/8 pathway in that context. Despite its important role in germ cell specification, the embryological function of BMP15 remains unknown. Surprisingly, we find that during early Xenopus embryogenesis BMP15 acts solely as an inhibitor of the Smad1/5/8 pathway and the Wnt pathway. BMP15 gain-of-function leads to embryos with secondary ectopic heads and to direct neural induction in intact explants. BMP15 inhibits BMP4-mediated epidermal induction in dissociated explants. BMP15 strongly inhibits BRE response induced by BMP4 and blocks phosphorylation and activation of Smad1/5/8 MH2-domain. Mechanistically, BMP15 protein specifically interacts with BMP4 protein, suggesting inhibition upstream of receptor binding. Loss-of-function experiments using morpholinos or a naturally occurring human BMP15 dominant-negative mutant (BMP15-Y235C) leads to embryos lacking head. BMP15-Y235C also eliminates the inhibitory activity of BMP15 on BRE (BMP-responsive element). Finally, we show that BMP15 inhibits the canonical branch of the Wnt pathway, upstream of β-catenin. We, thus, demonstrate that BMP15 is necessary and sufficient for the specification of dorso-anterior structures and highlight novel mechanisms of BMP15 function that strongly suggest a reinterpretation of its function in ovaries specially for ovarian failure. PMID:19553676

  18. Antiviral Activity of a Small Molecule Deubiquitinase Inhibitor Occurs via Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jeffrey W.; Ahmed, Mohammad; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Donato, Nicholas J.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Wobus, Christiane E.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub) cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs). However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR). WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies. PMID:22792064

  19. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jeffrey W; Ahmed, Mohammad; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub) cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs). However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR). WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  20. Kinetic characterization of the protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor reaction with blood coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Swanson, Richard; Broze, George J; Olson, Steven T

    2008-10-31

    Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) is a recently identified member of the serpin superfamily that functions as a cofactor-dependent regulator of blood coagulation factors Xa (FXa) and XIa. Here we show that ZPI and its cofactor, protein Z (PZ), inhibit procoagulant membrane-bound factor Xa by the branched pathway acyl-intermediate trapping mechanism used by other serpins, but with significant variations of this mechanism that are unique to ZPI. Rapid kinetic analyses showed that the reaction proceeded by the initial assembly of a membrane-associated PZ-ZPI-FXa Michaelis complex (K(M) 53+/-5 nM) followed by conversion to a stable ZPI-FXa complex (k(lim) 1.2+/-0.1 s(-1)). Cofactor premixing experiments together with independent kinetic analyses of ZPI-PZ and factor Xa-PZ-membrane complex formation suggested that assembly of the Michaelis complex through either ZPI-PZ-lipid or factor Xa-PZ-lipid intermediates was rate-limiting. Reaction stoichiometry analyses and native PAGE showed that for every factor Xa molecule inhibited by ZPI, two serpin molecules were cleaved. Native PAGE and immunoblotting showed that PZ dissociated from ZPI once ZPI forms a stable complex with FXa, and kinetic analyses confirmed that PZ acted catalytically to accelerate the membrane-dependent ZPI-factor Xa reaction. The ZPI-FXa complex was only transiently stable and dissociated with a rate constant that showed a bell-shaped pH dependence indicative of participation of factor Xa active-site residues. The complex was detectable by SDS-PAGE when denatured at low pH, consistent with it being a kinetically trapped covalent acyl-intermediate. Together our findings show that ZPI functions like other serpins to regulate the activity of FXa but in a manner uniquely dependent on protein Z, procoagulant membranes, and pH.

  1. Novel Protein Disulfide Isomerase Inhibitor with Anticancer Activity in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Vatolin, Sergei; Phillips, James G; Jha, Babal K; Govindgari, Shravya; Hu, Jennifer; Grabowski, Dale; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J; Zhong, Fei; Distelhorst, Clark W; Smith, Mitchell R; Cotta, Claudiu; Xu, Yan; Chilakala, Sujatha; Kuang, Rebecca R; Tall, Samantha; Reu, Frederic J

    2016-06-01

    Multiple myeloma cells secrete more disulfide bond-rich proteins than any other mammalian cell. Thus, inhibition of protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) required for protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) should increase ER stress beyond repair in this incurable cancer. Here, we report the mechanistically unbiased discovery of a novel PDI-inhibiting compound with antimyeloma activity. We screened a 30,355 small-molecule library using a multilayered multiple myeloma cell-based cytotoxicity assay that modeled disease niche, normal liver, kidney, and bone marrow. CCF642, a bone marrow-sparing compound, exhibited a submicromolar IC50 in 10 of 10 multiple myeloma cell lines. An active biotinylated analog of CCF642 defined binding to the PDI isoenzymes A1, A3, and A4 in MM cells. In vitro, CCF642 inhibited PDI reductase activity about 100-fold more potently than the structurally distinct established inhibitors PACMA 31 and LOC14. Computational modeling suggested a novel covalent binding mode in active-site CGHCK motifs. Remarkably, without any further chemistry optimization, CCF642 displayed potent efficacy in an aggressive syngeneic mouse model of multiple myeloma and prolonged the lifespan of C57BL/KaLwRij mice engrafted with 5TGM1-luc myeloma, an effect comparable to the first-line multiple myeloma therapeutic bortezomib. Consistent with PDI inhibition, CCF642 caused acute ER stress in multiple myeloma cells accompanied by apoptosis-inducing calcium release. Overall, our results provide an illustration of the utility of simple in vivo simulations as part of a drug discovery effort, along with a sound preclinical rationale to develop a new small-molecule therapeutic to treat multiple myeloma. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3340-50. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Carbimazole is an inhibitor of protein synthesis and protects from neuronal hypoxic damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lehane, Cornelius; Guelzow, Timo; Zenker, Simone; Erxleben, Anika; Schwer, Christian I; Heimrich, Bernd; Buerkle, Hartmut; Humar, Matjaz

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen deprivation during ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke results in ATP depletion, loss of ion homeostasis, membrane depolarization, and excitotoxicity. Pharmacologic restoration of cellular energy supply may offer a promising concept to reduce hypoxic cell injury. In this study, we investigated whether carbimazole, a thionamide used to treat hyperthyroidism, reduces neuronal cell damage in oxygen-deprived human SK-N-SH cells or primary cortical neurons. Our results revealed that carbimazole induces an inhibitory phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) that was associated with a marked inhibition of global protein synthesis. Translational inhibition resulted in significant bioenergetic savings, preserving intracellular ATP content in oxygen-deprived neuronal cells and diminishing hypoxic cellular damage. Phosphorylation of eEF2 was mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase and eEF2 kinase. Carbimazole also induced a moderate calcium influx and a transient cAMP increase. To test whether translational inhibition generally diminishes hypoxic cell damage when ATP availability is limiting, the translational repressors cycloheximide and anisomycin were used. Cycloheximide and anisomycin also preserved ATP content in hypoxic SK-N-SH cells and significantly reduced hypoxic neuronal cell damage. Taken together, these data support a causal relation between the pharmacologic inhibition of global protein synthesis and efficient protection of neurons from ischemic damage by preservation of high-energy metabolites in oxygen-deprived cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that carbimazole or other translational inhibitors may be interesting candidates for the development of new organ-protective compounds. Their chemical structure may be used for computer-assisted drug design or screening of compounds to find new agents with the potential to diminish neuronal damage under ATP-limited conditions.

  3. Vanadium oxoanions and cAMP-dependent protein kinase: an anti-substrate inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Pluskey, S; Mahroof-Tahir, M; Crans, D C; Lawrence, D S

    1997-01-15

    Vanadium oxoions have been shown to elicit a wide range of effects in biological systems, including an increase in the quantity of phosphorylated proteins. This response has been attributed to the inhibition of protein phosphatases, the indirect activation of protein kinases via stimulation of enzymes at early steps in signal transduction pathways and/or the direct activation of protein kinases. We have evaluated the latter possibility by exploring the effects of vanadate, decavanadate and vanadyl cation species on the activity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a serine/threonine kinase. Vanadate, in the form of monomer, dimer, tetramer and pentamer species, neither inhibits nor activates PKA. In marked contrast, decavandate is a competitive inhibitor (Ki = 1.8 +/- 0.1 mM) of kemptide (Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly), a peptide-based substrate. This inhibition pattern is especially surprising, since the negatively charged decavanadate would not be predicted to bind to the region of the active site of the enzyme that accommodates the positively charged kemptide substrate. Our studies suggest that decavanadate can associate with kemptide in solution, which would prevent kemptide from interacting with the enzyme. Vanadium(IV) also inhibits the PKA-catalysed phosphorylation of kemptide, but with an IC50 of 366 +/- 10 microM. However, in this case V4+ appears to bind to the Mg(2+)-binding site, since it can substitute for Mg2+. In the absence of Mg2+, the optimal concentration of vanadium(IV) for the PKA-catalysed phosphorylation of kemptide is 100 microM, with concentrations above 100 microM being markedly inhibitory. However, even at the optimal 100 microM V4+ concentration, the Vmax and K(m) values (for kemptide) are significantly less favourable than those obtained in the presence of 100 microM Mg2+. In summary, we have found that oxovanadium ions can directly alter the activity of the serine/threonine-specific PKA.

  4. Vanadium oxoanions and cAMP-dependent protein kinase: an anti-substrate inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Pluskey, S; Mahroof-Tahir, M; Crans, D C; Lawrence, D S

    1997-01-01

    Vanadium oxoions have been shown to elicit a wide range of effects in biological systems, including an increase in the quantity of phosphorylated proteins. This response has been attributed to the inhibition of protein phosphatases, the indirect activation of protein kinases via stimulation of enzymes at early steps in signal transduction pathways and/or the direct activation of protein kinases. We have evaluated the latter possibility by exploring the effects of vanadate, decavanadate and vanadyl cation species on the activity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), a serine/threonine kinase. Vanadate, in the form of monomer, dimer, tetramer and pentamer species, neither inhibits nor activates PKA. In marked contrast, decavandate is a competitive inhibitor (Ki = 1.8 +/- 0.1 mM) of kemptide (Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly), a peptide-based substrate. This inhibition pattern is especially surprising, since the negatively charged decavanadate would not be predicted to bind to the region of the active site of the enzyme that accommodates the positively charged kemptide substrate. Our studies suggest that decavanadate can associate with kemptide in solution, which would prevent kemptide from interacting with the enzyme. Vanadium(IV) also inhibits the PKA-catalysed phosphorylation of kemptide, but with an IC50 of 366 +/- 10 microM. However, in this case V4+ appears to bind to the Mg(2+)-binding site, since it can substitute for Mg2+. In the absence of Mg2+, the optimal concentration of vanadium(IV) for the PKA-catalysed phosphorylation of kemptide is 100 microM, with concentrations above 100 microM being markedly inhibitory. However, even at the optimal 100 microM V4+ concentration, the Vmax and K(m) values (for kemptide) are significantly less favourable than those obtained in the presence of 100 microM Mg2+. In summary, we have found that oxovanadium ions can directly alter the activity of the serine/threonine-specific PKA. PMID:9020863

  5. An inhibitor of apoptosis protein antagonist T-3256336 potentiates the antitumor efficacy of the Nedd8-activating enzyme inhibitor pevonedistat (TAK-924/MLN4924).

    PubMed

    Sumi, Hiroyuki; Inazuka, Masakazu; Morimoto, Megumi; Hibino, Ryosuke; Hashimoto, Kentaro; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Kuida, Keisuke; Smith, Peter G; Yoshida, Sei; Yabuki, Masato

    2016-11-18

    Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are antiapoptotic regulators that block cell death, and are frequently overexpressed in several human cancers, where they facilitate evasion of apoptosis and promote cell survival. IAP antagonists are also known as second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (SMAC)-mimetics, and have recently been considered as novel therapeutic agents for inducing apoptosis, alone and in combination with other anticancer drugs. In this study, we showed that T-3256336, the orally available IAP antagonist has synergistically enhances the antiproliferative effects of the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor pevonedistat (TAK-924/MLN4924), and these effects were attenuated by a TNFα-neutralizing antibody. In the present mechanistic analyses, pevonedistat induced TNFα mRNA and triggered IAP antagonist-dependent extrinsic apoptotic cell death in cancer cell lines. Furthermore, synergistic effects of the combination of T-3256336 and pevonedistat were demonstrated in a HL-60 mouse xenograft model. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence of the effects of IAP antagonists in combination with NAE inhibitors, and demonstrate the potential of a new combination therapy for cancer.

  6. Comparison of protease-resistant prion protein inhibitors in cell cultures infected with two strains of mouse and sheep scrapie.

    PubMed

    Kocisko, David A; Engel, Abbi L; Harbuck, Kristin; Arnold, Kevin M; Olsen, Emily A; Raymond, Lynne D; Vilette, Didier; Caughey, Byron

    2005-11-11

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurodegenerative diseases. A primary therapeutic target for TSE intervention has been a protease-resistant form of prion protein known as PrP(Sc) or PrP-res. In vitro testing of mouse scrapie-infected cell cultures has identified many PrP-res inhibitors that also have activity in vivo. Here we identify 32 new inhibitors of two strains of mouse scrapie PrP-res. Furthermore, to investigate the species-specificity of these and other PrP-res inhibitors, we have developed a high-throughput cell culture assay based on Rov9 cells chronically-infected with sheep scrapie. Of 32 inhibitors of murine PrP-res that were also tested in the Rov9 cells, only six showed inhibitory activity against sheep PrP-res. The three most potent inhibitors of both murine and ovine PrP-res formation (with 50% inhibition at < or =5 microM) were tannic acid, pentosan polysulfate and Fe(III) deuteroporphyrin 2,4-bisethyleneglycol. The latter two have anti-mouse scrapie activity in vivo. These results identify new inhibitors of murine and ovine PrP-res formation and reinforce the idea that compounds effective against PrP-res from one species or strain cannot be assumed to be active against others.

  7. Development of natural product-derived receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors based on conservation of protein domain fold.

    PubMed

    Kissau, Lars; Stahl, Petra; Mazitschek, Ralph; Giannis, Athannasios; Waldmann, Herbert

    2003-07-03

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) such as Tie-2, IGF1R, Her-2/Neu, EGFR, and VEGFR1-3 play crucial roles in the control of cell growth and differentiation. Inhibition of such RTKs has become a major focus of current anticancer drug development, and therefore the discovery of new classes of inhibitors for these signal-transducing proteins is of prime importance. We have recently proposed a novel concept for improving the hit-finding process by employing natural products as biologically validated starting points in structural space for compound library development. In this concept, natural products are regarded as evolutionary chosen ligands for protein domains which are structurally conserved yet genetically mobile. Here we report on the discovery of novel and highly selective VEGFR-2 and -3, Tie-2, and IGF1R inhibitors derived from the naturally occurring Her-2/Neu kinase inhibitor nakijiquinone C and developed on the basis of this concept. Based on the structure of the natural product, a small library (74 members) was synthesized and investigated for inhibition of kinases with highly similar ATP-binding domains. The library yielded inhibitors with IC(50)s in the low micromolar range with high frequency (7 out of 74). In particular, four inhibitors of Tie-2 were found, a kinase critically involved in the formation of new blood vessels from preexisting ones (angiogenesis) and believed to be a new promising target in antitumor therapy. These results support the "domain concept". To advance the development of improved inhibitors, extensive molecular modeling studies were undertaken, including the construction of new homology models for VEGFR-2 and Tie-2. These studies revealed residues in the kinase structure which are crucial to the development of tailor-made receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  8. Active Inhibitor-1 Maintains Protein Hyper-Phosphorylation in Aging Hearts and Halts Remodeling in Failing Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Haghighi, Kobra; Anjak, Ahmad; Cai, Wenfeng; Jiang, Min; Nicolaou, Persoulla; Pylar, George; Karakikes, Ioannis; Rapti, Kleopatra; Rubinstein, Jack; Hajjar, Roger J.; Kranias, Evangelia G.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium cycling and depressed contractility are key characteristics in heart failure. Defects in sarcoplasmic reticulum function are characterized by decreased SERCA2a Ca-transport that is partially attributable to dephosphorylation of its regulator phospholamban by increased protein phosphatase 1 activity. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 through activation of its endogenous inhibitor-1 has been shown to enhance cardiac Ca-handling and contractility as well as protect from pathological stress remodeling in young mice. In this study, we assessed the long-term effects of inducible expression of constitutively active inhibitor-1 in the adult heart and followed function and remodeling through the aging process, up to 20 months. Mice with inhibitor-1 had normal survival and similar function to WTs. There was no overt remodeling as evidenced by measures of left ventricular end-systolic and diastolic diameters and posterior wall dimensions, heart weight to tibia length ratio, and histology. Higher phosphorylation of phospholamban at both Ser16 and Thr17 was maintained in aged hearts with active inhibitor-1, potentially offsetting the effects of elevated Ser2815-phosphorylation in ryanodine receptor, as there were no increases in arrhythmias under stress conditions in 20-month old mice. Furthermore, long-term expression of active inhibitor-1 via recombinant adeno-associated virus type 9 gene transfer in rats with pressure-overload induced heart failure improved function and prevented remodeling, associated with increased phosphorylation of phospholamban at Ser16 and Thr17. Thus, chronic inhibition of protein phosphatase 1, through increases in active inhibitor-1, does not accelerate age-related cardiomyopathy and gene transfer of this molecule in vivo improves function and halts remodeling in the long term. PMID:24312496

  9. The covalent structure of the elastase inhibitor from Anemonia sulcata--a "non-classical" Kazal-type protein.

    PubMed

    Tschesche, H; Kolkenbrock, H; Bode, W

    1987-10-01

    The amino-acid sequence of the proteinase inhibitor specific for elastases from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata was determined from performic-acid oxidized inhibitor and from three cyanogen bromide fragments of reduced and carboxymethylated inhibitor. The molecule consists of a single polypeptide chain formed from 48 amino-acid residues and is stabilized by three intramolecular disulfide bridges. After cyanogen bromide cleavage of the native protein at methionines 10 and 28 followed by chymotryptic cleavage two fragments each containing a single disulfide bridge were isolated. These indicated the location of three intramolecular disulfide linkages between Cys4 and Cys34 (part of A-loop), Cys8 and Cys27 (B-loop) and Cys16 and Cys48 (C-loop). The sequential homology and the disulfide pattern identified the elastase inhibitor as a Kazal-type inhibitor in which, however, not only the CysI-CysII segment is rather short but interestingly the Cys4-Cys34 disulfide anchoring point (i.e. CysI-CysV) in the C-loop is shifted by one turn in the alpha-helical segment towards the C-terminus. Thus, the elastase inhibitor is a non-classical Kazal-type inhibitor with respect to the positioning of the half-cystines. The inhibitor molecule was modelled based on the known three-dimensional structure of the silver pheasant ovomucoid third domain. The shortened amino-terminal segment was arranged in such a manner to allow disulfide bridge formation between the first cysteine Cys4 and the replaced Cys34 under maintenance of a suitable binding loop conformation. The characteristic ovomucoid scaffold consisting of a central alpha-helix, an adjacent three-stranded beta-sheet and the proteinase-binding loop cross-connected through disulfide bridges CysI-CysV and CysIII-CysVI was conserved.

  10. Protein digestion in cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) as a target for plant defence by endogenous proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Prashant; Bandani, Ali R; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2011-07-01

    Gut extracts from cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) showed significant levels of proteolytic activity, which was inhibited by reagents specific for cysteine proteases and chymotrypsin-like proteases. Gut tissue contained cDNAs encoding cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinases, similar to those identified in the closely related pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). Analysis of honeydew (liquid excreta) from cereal aphids fed on diet containing ovalbumin showed that digestion of ingested proteins occurred in vivo. Protein could partially substitute for free amino acids in diet, although it could not support complete development. Recombinant wheat proteinase inhibitors (PIs) fed in diet were antimetabolic to cereal aphids, even when normal levels of free amino acids were present. PIs inhibited proteolysis by aphid gut extracts in vitro, and digestion of protein fed to aphids in vivo. Wheat subtilisin/chymotrypsin inhibitor, which was found to inhibit serine and cysteine proteinases, was more effective in both inhibitory and antimetabolic activity than wheat cystatin, which inhibited cysteine proteases only. Digestion of ingested protein is unlikely to contribute significantly to nutritional requirements when aphids are feeding on phloem, and the antimetabolic activity of dietary proteinase inhibitors is suggested to result from effects on proteinases involved in degradation of endogenous proteins.

  11. Protein kinase C inhibitors prevent induction and continued expression of cell memory in Hermissenda type B photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Farley, J; Schuman, E

    1991-01-01

    Injections of cAMP-dependent, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, or Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinases into Hermissenda crassicornis type B photoreceptors are sufficient to induce many of the changes in B-cell excitability produced by associative conditioning. We report that inhibitors of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinases, but not inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide- or Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, prevent the induction as well as continued expression of learning-produced changes in type-B-cell excitability: reductions of voltage-dependent and Ca2(+)-activated K+ currents. Our results represent a direct demonstration of long-term (days) experientially induced modulation of ion-channel activity that is dependent upon persistent kinase activity. Images PMID:2000409

  12. Oxazin-5-Ones as a Novel Class of Penicillin Binding Protein Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Structure Activity Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Onoabedje, Efeturi Abraham; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Okafor, Sunday Nwankwor; Onoabedje, Ufuoma Shalom; Okoro, Uchechukwu Chris

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) are normal constituents of bacterial which are absent in mammalian cells. The theoretical binding modes of known oxazin-5-ones toward the protein were used as a guide to synthesis new inhibitors. Structural studies of protein-ligand complexes revealed that conformational discrepancies of the derivatives in the protein’s binding site gave rise to the variation in their inhibition constant which ranged from 68.58 μM to 2.04 mM. Biological assay results further confirmed the antibiotic potencies of the studied compounds. Although the outcome of biological screening does not parallel computational predictions, the results obtained from both methods suggest that the oxazin-5-one derivatives are potential PBP inhibitors, hence interesting antibiotic lead agents. PMID:27749913

  13. Inhibitors Alter the Stochasticity of Regulatory Proteins to Force Cells to Switch to the Other State in the Bistable System.

    PubMed

    Jhang, Wun-Sin; Lo, Shih-Chiang; Yeh, Chen-Chao; Shu, Che-Chi

    2017-06-30

    The cellular behaviors under the control of genetic circuits are subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. The stochasticity in gene regulation, far from a nuisance, has been gradually appreciated for its unusual function in cellular activities. In this work, with Chemical Master Equation (CME), we discovered that the addition of inhibitors altered the stochasticity of regulatory proteins. For a bistable system of a mutually inhibitory network, such a change of noise led to the migration of cells in the bimodal distribution. We proposed that the consumption of regulatory protein caused by the addition of inhibitor is not the only reason for pushing cells to the specific state; the change of the intracellular stochasticity is also the main cause for the redistribution. For the level of the inhibitor capable of driving 99% of cells, if there is no consumption of regulatory protein, 88% of cells were guided to the specific state. It implied that cells were pushed, by the inhibitor, to the specific state due to the change of stochasticity.

  14. Discovery of Novel Oral Protein Synthesis Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis That Target Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Palencia, Andrés; Li, Xianfeng; Bu, Wei; Choi, Wai; Ding, Charles Z.; Easom, Eric E.; Feng, Lisa; Hernandez, Vincent; Houston, Paul; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Rock, Fernando L.; Sexton, Holly; Zhang, Suoming; Zhou, Yasheen; Wan, Baojie; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G.; Woolhiser, Lisa; Gruppo, Veronica; Lenaerts, Anne J.; O'Malley, Theresa; Parish, Tanya; Cooper, Christopher B.; Waters, M. Gerard; Ma, Zhenkun; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; Rullas, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Mendoza, Alfonso; Barros, David; Cusack, Stephen; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent development and spread of extensively drug-resistant and totally drug-resistant resistant (TDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis highlight the need for new antitubercular drugs. Protein synthesis inhibitors have played an important role in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) starting with the inclusion of streptomycin in the first combination therapies. Although parenteral aminoglycosides are a key component of therapy for multidrug-resistant TB, the oxazolidinone linezolid is the only orally available protein synthesis inhibitor that is effective against TB. Here, we show that small-molecule inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs), which are known to be excellent antibacterial protein synthesis targets, are orally bioavailable and effective against M. tuberculosis in TB mouse infection models. We applied the oxaborole tRNA-trapping (OBORT) mechanism, which was first developed to target fungal cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), to M. tuberculosis LeuRS. X-ray crystallography was used to guide the design of LeuRS inhibitors that have good biochemical potency and excellent whole-cell activity against M. tuberculosis. Importantly, their good oral bioavailability translates into in vivo efficacy in both the acute and chronic mouse models of TB with potency comparable to that of the frontline drug isoniazid. PMID:27503647

  15. Inhibitors of BRD4 Protein from a Marine-Derived Fungus Alternaria sp. NH-F6

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hui; Zhang, Dashan; Zhou, Biao; Ma, Zhongjun

    2017-01-01

    Bromodomains (BRD) are readers of the epigenetic code that regulate gene transcription through their recognition of acetyl-lysine modified histone tails. Recently, bromodomain-containing proteins such as BRD4 have been demonstrated to be druggable through the discovery of potent inhibitors. These protein–protein interaction inhibitors have the potential to modulate multiple diseases by their profound anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effects. In order to explore new BRD4 inhibitors as well as lead compounds for the development of new drugs, the secondary metabolites of Alternaria sp. NH-F6, a fungus isolated from deep-sea sediment samples, were analyzed systematically. Five new compounds including two new perylenequinones (1–2), one new alternaric acid (3), 2-(N-vinylacetamide)-4-hydroxymethyl-3-ene-butyrolactone (4), one new cerebroside (5), together with 19 known compounds (6–24) were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of this strain. Their structures were elucidated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) analyses. Finally, all these compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activity against BRD4 protein, and compound 2 exhibited a potent inhibition rate of 88.1% at a concentration of 10 µM. This research provides a new BRD4 inhibitor which may possess potential antitumoral, antiviral, or anti-inflammatory pharmaceutical values. PMID:28300771

  16. Basis for the Specificity and Activation of the Serpin Protein Z-dependent Proteinase Inhibitor (ZPI) as an Inhibitor of Membrane-associated Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T.; Gettins, Peter G.W.

    2012-12-13

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction {approx}2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca{sup 2+}. To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ{sub {Delta}GD}) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing {approx}5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only {approx}2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional {approx}1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  17. Basis for the specificity and activation of the serpin protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI) as an inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T; Gettins, Peter G W

    2010-06-25

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction approximately 2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca(2+). To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ(DeltaGD)) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing approximately 5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only approximately 2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional approximately 1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  18. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a Purported Inhibitor of Chaperone Protein GRP78, as an Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Reyna; Pao, Peng-Wen; Hofman, Florence M.; Chen, Thomas C.; Louie, Stan G.; Pirrung, Michael C.; Schönthal, Axel H.

    2013-01-01

    Verrucosidin (VCD) belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78) expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD’s anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose), but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin). However, VCD’s strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin) might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed. PMID:23755268

  19. Virtual Screening for Potential Inhibitors of NS3 Protein of Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Maheswata; Jena, Lingaraja; Daf, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito borne pathogen, belongs to Flaviviridae family having a positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome, currently known for causing large epidemics in Brazil. Its infection can cause microcephaly, a serious birth defect during pregnancy. The recent outbreak of ZIKV in February 2016 in Brazil realized it as a major health risk, demands an enhanced surveillance and a need to develop novel drugs against ZIKV. Amodiaquine, prochlorperazine, quinacrine, and berberine are few promising drugs approved by Food and Drug Administration against dengue virus which also belong to Flaviviridae family. In this study, we performed molecular docking analysis of these drugs against nonstructural 3 (NS3) protein of ZIKV. The protease activity of NS3 is necessary for viral replication and its prohibition could be considered as a strategy for treatment of ZIKV infection. Amongst these four drugs, berberine has shown highest binding affinity of –5.8 kcal/mol and it is binding around the active site region of the receptor. Based on the properties of berberine, more similar compounds were retrieved from ZINC database and a structure-based virtual screening was carried out by AutoDock Vina in PyRx 0.8. Best 10 novel drug-like compounds were identified and amongst them ZINC53047591 (2-(benzylsulfanyl)-3-cyclohexyl-3H-spiro[benzo[h]quinazoline-5,1'-cyclopentan]-4(6H)-one) was found to interact with NS3 protein with binding energy of –7.1 kcal/mol and formed H-bonds with Ser135 and Asn152 amino acid residues. Observations made in this study may extend an assuring platform for developing anti-viral competitive inhibitors against ZIKV infection. PMID:27729840

  20. Targeting inhibitor of apoptosis proteins in combination with dacarbazine or TRAIL in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Engesæter, Birgit O; Sathermugathevan, Menaka; Hellenes, Tina; Engebråten, Olav; Holm, Ruth; Flørenes, Vivi Ann; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M

    2011-07-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive malignant tumor with an exceptional ability to develop resistanc