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Sample records for inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic

  1. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, attenuates postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Min; Liu, Wen-Xue; Sun, He-Liang; Chang, Yan-Qing; Yang, Jiao-Jiao; Ji, Mu-Huo; Yang, Jian-Jun; Feng, Chen-Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a recognized clinical entity characterized with cognitive deficits after anesthesia and surgery, especially in aged patients. Previous studies have shown that histone acetylation plays a key role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, its role in POCD remains to be determined. Here, we show that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, attenuates POCD in aging Mice. After exposed to the laparotomy, a surgical procedure involving an incision into abdominal walls to examine the abdominal organs, 16- but not 3-month old male C57BL/6 mice developed obvious cognitive impairments in the test of long-term contextual fear conditioning. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of SAHA at the dose of (20 μg/2 μl) 3 h before and daily after the laparotomy restored the laparotomy-induced reduction of hippocampal acetyl-H3 and acetyl-H4 levels and significantly attenuated the hippocampus-dependent long-term memory (LTM) impairments in 16-month old mice. SAHA also reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-calcium/calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) pathway, and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin 1, and postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95). Taken together, our data suggest that the decrease of histone acetylation contributes to POCD and may serve as a target to improve the neurological outcome of POCD. PMID:26441515

  2. The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis, down-regulates the CXCR4 chemokine receptor and impairs migration of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Stamatopoulos, Basile; Meuleman, Nathalie; De Bruyn, Cécile; Delforge, Alain; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a neoplastic disorder that arises largely as a result of defective apoptosis leading to chemoresistance. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor, CXCR4, have been shown to play an important role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell trafficking and survival. Design and Methods Since histone acetylation is involved in the modulation of gene expression, we evaluated the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and in particular on cell survival, CXCR4 expression, migration, and drug sensitization. Results Here, we showed that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (20 μM) for 48 hours induced a decrease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell viability via apoptosis (n=20, P=0.0032). Using specific caspase inhibitors, we demonstrated the participation of caspases-3, -6 and -8, suggesting an activation of the extrinsic pathway. Additionally, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid significantly decreased CXCR4 mRNA (n=10, P=0.0010) and protein expression (n=40, P<0.0001). As a result, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell migration in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 (n=23, P<0.0001) or through bone marrow stromal cells was dramatically impaired. Consequently, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid reduced the protective effect of the microenvironment and thus sensitized chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to chemotherapy such as fludarabine. Conclusions In conclusion, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells via the extrinsic pathway and down-regulates CXCR4 expression leading to decreased cell migration. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with other drugs represents a promising therapeutic approach to inhibiting migration, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival and potentially overcoming drug resistance. PMID:20145270

  3. In silico modification of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) as potential inhibitor for class II histone deacetylase (HDAC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer for the woman in the world. It is caused by the oncogenic human papilloma virus (HPV). The inhibition activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is widely known as a low toxicity HDAC inhibitor. This research presents in silico SAHA modification by utilizing triazole, in order to obtain a better inhibitor. We conducted docking of the SAHA inhibitor and 12 modified versions to six class II HDAC enzymes, and then proceeded with drug scanning of each one of them. Results The docking results show that the 12 modified inhibitors have much better binding affinity and inhibition potential than SAHA. Based on drug scan analysis, six of the modified inhibitors have robust pharmacological attributes, as revealed by drug likeness, drug score, oral bioavailability, and toxicity levels. Conclusions The binding affinity, free energy and drug scan screening of the best inhibitors have shown that 1c and 2c modified inhibitors are the best ones to inhibit class II HDAC. PMID:22373132

  4. In vivo efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in combination with radiotherapy in a malignant rhabdoid tumor mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase inhibitors are promising new substances in cancer therapy and have also been shown to sensitize different tumor cells to irradiation (XRT). We explored the effect as well as the radiosensitizing properties of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in vivo in a malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) mouse model. Methods and material Potential radiosensitization by SAHA was assessed in MRT xenografts by analysis of tumor growth delay, necrosis (HE), apoptosis (TUNEL), proliferation (ki-67) and γH2AX expression as well as dynamic 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18F-FDG -PET) after treatment with either SAHA alone, single-dose (10 Gy) or fractionated XRT (3 × 3Gy) solely as well as in combination with SAHA compared to controls. Results SAHA only had no significant effect on tumor growth. Combination of SAHA for 8 days with single-dose XRT resulted in a higher number of complete remissions, but failed to prove a significant growth delay compared to XRT only. In contrast fractionated XRT plus SAHA for 3 weeks did induce significant tumor growth delay in MRT-xenografts. The histological examination showed a significant effect of XRT in tumor necrosis, expression of Ki-67, γH2AX and apoptosis. SAHA only had no significant effect in the histological examination. Comparison of xenografts treated with XRT and XRT plus SAHA revealed a significantly increased γH2AX expression and apoptosis induction in the mice tumors after combination treatment with single-dose as well as fractionated XRT. The combination of SAHA with XRT showed a tendency to increased necrosis and decrease of proliferation compared to XRT only, which, however, was not significant. The 18F-FDG-PET results showed no significant differences in the standard uptake value or glucose transport kinetics after either treatment. Conclusion SAHA did not have a significant effect alone, but proved to enhance the effect of XRT in our MRT in vivo model. PMID:22458853

  5. Synergistic effects of combined treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and TRAIL on human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiqiang; Feng, Xiuyan; Han Han; Guo, Shanchun; Wang, Guangdi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that either histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors or tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can induce apoptosis in tumor cells including breast cancer. However, the underling mechanisms of combining HDAC inhibitors with TRAIL in the treatment of breast cancer are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the ability of SAHA and TRAIL as single agents or in combination to inhibit the growth and survival of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that the distinct effects of SAHA or TRAIL individually and in combination on the proliferation, cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, and morphological changes of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. We further determined the different effects of SAHA or TRAIL alone and combining SAHA with TRAIL on the expression of a number of apoptosis-related molecules, cell cycle, growth factors and their receptors in cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that the combinatorial treatment of SAHA and TRAIL may target multiple pathways and serve as an effective therapeutic strategy against breast cancer. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms may facilitate either SAHA or TRAIL targeted use and the selection of suitable combinations. PMID:27292433

  6. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  7. Effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on rat cytochrome P450 enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kezhi; Zhang, Qingwei; Liu, Zezheng; Yang, Suping; Lin, Yingying; Wen, Congcong; Zheng, Yuancai

    2015-01-01

    Vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, SAHA) is the first approved histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma after progressive disease following two systemic therapies. The rats were randomly divided into SAHA groups (low, medium and high dosage) and control group. The SAHA group rats were given 12.3, 24.5, and 49 mg/kg SAHA, respectively, by continuous intragastric administration for 7 days. The influence of SAHA on the activities of CYP450 isoforms CYP2B6, CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP2C9 were evaluated by cocktail method, they were responsed by the changes of pharmacokinetic parameters of bupropion, phenacetin, tolbutamide, metroprolol and omeprazole. The five probe drugs were given to rats through intragastric administration, and the plasma concentration were determined by UPLC-MS/MS. The result of SAHA group compared to control group, there were statistical pharmacokinetics difference for bupropion, phenacetin, tolbutamide and metroprolol. Continuous intragastric administration for 7 days may induce the activities of CYP2C19 of rats, inhibit CYP1A2 and slightly inhibit CYP2B6 and CYP2D6 of rats. This may give advising for reasonable drug use after co-used with SAHA. The results indicated that drug co-administrated with SAHA may need dose adjustment. Furthermore, continuous intragastric administration of SAHA for 7 days, liver cell damaged, causing liver cell edema, in liver metabolism process.

  8. In Vivo PET-imaging of Histone Deacetylases by 18F-Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (18F-SAHA)1

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, J. Adam; Keliher, Edmund J.; Marinelli, Brett; Reiner, Thomas; Weissleder, Ralph; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a group of enzymes that modulate gene expression and cell state by deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins. A variety of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have already undergone clinical testing in cancer. Real-time in vivo imaging of HDACs and their inhibition would be invaluable; however, the development of appropriate imaging agents has remained a major challenge. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of 18F-suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (18F-SAHA 1a), a close analog of the most clinically relevant HDACi, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We demonstrate that 1a has near identical biochemical activity profiles to SAHA, and report findings from pharmacokinetic studies. Using a murine ovarian cancer model, we likewise show that HDACi target binding efficacy can be quantitated within 24 hours of administration. 1a thus represents the first 18F-positron emission tomography (PET) HDAC imaging agent, which also exhibits low nanomolar potency and is pharmacologically analogous to a clinically relevant HDACi. PMID:21721525

  9. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Restores Estrogen Reduced-cTnI Expression in Neonatal Hearts of Mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chang; Luo, Xiaomei; Xing, Qianlu; Sun, Huichao; Huang, Xupei

    2016-10-01

    Diastolic cardiac dysfunction can be caused by abnormality in cTnI expression during cardiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of estrogen on the abnormal expression of cTnI in the hearts of neonatal mice and its potential epigenetic mechanisms. We then evaluated suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a HDAC inhibitor, as a new target treatment of diastolic cardiac dysfunction. Postnatal day 0.5 C57BL/6 mice were injected with estrogen for 1 week, then the hearts of 7-day-old neonatal mice were retrieved for examination. The activities of HDAC and HAT were assayed by colorimetry, and the interaction of cTnI with HDAC5 in mice hearts were examined using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. The expression of cTnI was tested by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. Estrogen treated groups displayed a significantly increased HDAC activity in the hearts of neonatal mice while HAT activity remained unchanged. Additionally, HDAC5 was higher at the cTnI promoter, as compared to the saline treated control groups. The acetylation of histone H3K9ac on cTnI promoter significantly decreased in the hearts of neonatal mice treated with estrogen, and the expression of cTnI at transcriptional and protein levels also decreased. SAHA was shown to increase the acetylation of histone H3K9ac and upregulate the expression of cTnI. The data demonstrated that SAHA can correct cTnI expression abnormality caused by estrogen through inhibiting the binding of HDAC5 to the promoter of cTnI. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2377-2384, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27379430

  10. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of SuberoylanilideHydroxamic Acid in Cats

    PubMed Central

    McDonnel, Samantha J; Tell, Lisa A; Murphy, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Suberoylanilidehydroxamic acid (SAHA), or vorinostat, is a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved for use as chemotherapy for lymphoma in humans. The goal of this study was to establish pharmacological parameters of SAHA in cats. Our interest in treating cats with SAHA is two-fold: as an anti-cancer chemotherapeutic and as anti-latency therapy for feline retroviral infections. Relying solely on data from studies in other animals would be inappropriate as SAHA is partially metabolized by glucuronidation, which is absent in feline metabolism. SAHA was administered to cats intravenously (2 mg/kg) or orally (250 mg/m2, ~17 mg/kg) in a cross-over study design. Clinically, SAHA was well tolerated at these dosages as no abnormalities were noted following administration. The pharmacokinetics of SAHA in cats was found to be similar to that of dogs, but the overall serum drug exposure was much less than that of humans at an equivalent dose. The pharmacodynamic effect of an increase in acetylated histone proteins in blood was detected after both routes of administration. An increased oral dose of 60 mg SAHA/kg administered to one animal resulted in a surprisingly modest increase in peak drug concentration, suggesting possible saturation of absorption kinetics. This study provides a foundation for future studies of the clinical efficacy of SAHA in treating feline disease. PMID:24236915

  11. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid attenuates paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis by preventing Smad7 from deacetylation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Xiang-Yan; Shi, Ming-Jun; Xiao, Ying; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Chang-Zhi; Shao, Song-Jun; Liu, Xin-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), has anti-fibrotic effect. However, the exact mechanism of its anti-fibrotic potential remains is unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of SAHA in attenuating pulmonary fibrosis by regulating stability of Smad7 in paraquat (PQ)-induced lung fibrosis animal model and cultured pulmonary fibroblasts. Methods Rats with paraquat-induced lung fibrosis were fed with a SAHA solution (15 mg/kg) by gastric gavage. Human pulmonary fibroblasts (HFL1) pre-treated with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) were treated with SAHA (5 µM). Results SAHA (histone deacetylase inhibitor, HDACi) suppressed PQ-induced lung fibrosis in rats by stabilizing Smad7 level, thus attenuating Smad3 activity, resulting in the inhibition of fibroblast differentiation and collagen expression. In vitro study showed that SAHA suppressed TGF-β1-induced fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts. SAHA exerted its antifibrotic effect through preventing Smad7 from deacetylation most maybe by inhibiting TGF-β1-induced HDAC1 activity. Conclusions SAHA repressed PQ-induced lung fibrosis via preventing Smad7 from deacetylation. PMID:27747000

  12. Altering histone acetylation status in donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid does not affect dog cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Suh, Han Na; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-10-15

    Although dog cloning technology has been applied to conservation of endangered canids, propagation of elite dogs, and production of transgenic dogs, the efficiency of cloning is still very low. To help overcome this problem, we evaluated the effect of treating donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on dog cloning efficiency. Relative messenger RNA expressions of the bax1/bcl2 ratio and Dnmt1 in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 μM) of SAHA and durations (0, 20, 44 hours) were compared. Treatment with 1 μM for 20 hours showed significantly lower bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcript abundance. Acetylation of H3K9 was significantly increased after SAHA treatment, but H4K5, H4K8 and H4K16 were not changed. After SCNT using control or donor cells treated with SAHA, a total of 76 and 64 cloned embryos were transferred to seven and five recipients, respectively. Three fetuses were diagnosed in both control and SAHA-treated groups by ultrasonography 29 days after the embryo transfer, but there was no significant difference in the pregnancy rate (4.2% vs. 4.3%). In conclusion, although SAHA treatment as used in this study significantly decreased bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcripts of donor nuclei, as well as increased H3 acetylation, it was not enough to increase in vivo developmental competence of cloned dog embryos.

  13. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid radiosensitizes tumor hypoxic cells in vitro through the oxidation of nitroxyl to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Samuni, Yuval; Wink, David A; Krishna, Murali C; Mitchell, James B; Goldstein, Sara

    2014-08-01

    The pharmacological effects of hydroxamic acids are partially attributed to their ability to serve as HNO and/or NO donors under oxidative stress. Previously, it was concluded that oxidation of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by the metmyoglobin/H2O2 reaction system releases NO, which was based on spin trapping of NO and accumulation of nitrite. Reinvestigation of this system demonstrates the accumulation of N2O, which is a marker of HNO formation, at similar rates under normoxia and anoxia. In addition, the yields of nitrite that accumulated in the absence and the presence of O2 did not differ, implying that the source of nitrite is other than autoxidation of NO. In this system metmyoglobin is instantaneously and continuously converted into compound II, leading to one-electron oxidation of SAHA to its respective transient nitroxide radical. Studies using pulse radiolysis show that one-electron oxidation of SAHA (pKa=9.56 ± 0.04) yields the respective nitroxide radical (pKa=9.1 ± 0.2), which under all experimental conditions decomposes bimolecularly to yield HNO. The proposed mechanism suggests that compound I oxidizes SAHA to the respective nitroxide radical, which decomposes bimolecularly in competition with its oxidation by compound II to form HNO. Compound II also oxidizes HNO to NO and NO to nitrite. Given that NO, but not HNO, is an efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, we hypothesized that under an oxidizing environment SAHA might act as a NO donor and radiosensitize hypoxic cells. Preincubation of A549 and HT29 cells with 2.5 μM SAHA for 24h resulted in a sensitizer enhancement ratio at 0.01 survival levels (SER0.01) of 1.33 and 1.59, respectively. Preincubation of A549 cells with oxidized SAHA had hardly any effect and, with 2mM valproic acid, which lacks the hydroxamate group, resulted in SER0.01=1.17. Preincubation of HT29 cells with SAHA and Tempol, which readily oxidizes HNO to NO, enhanced the

  14. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid-induced HeLa cell death is closely correlated with oxidative stress and thioredoxin 1 levels.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2014-05-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor which has anticancer effects. We evaluated the growth inhibitory effects of SAHA on HeLa cervical cancer cells in relation to reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. SAHA inhibited the growth of HeLa cells with an IC(50) of approximately 10 µM at 24 h, and induced apoptosis which was accompanied by the cleavage of PARP, caspase-3 activation and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP; ∆ψ(m)). All the tested caspase inhibitors prevented HeLa cell death induced by SAHA whereas TNF-α intensified apoptotic cell death in SAHA-treated HeLa cells. With respect to ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels, SAHA increased ROS levels, especially mitochondrial O(2)•- in HeLa cells and also induced GSH depletion. Caspase inhibitors reduced the levels of ROS and GSH depletion in SAHA-treated HeLa cells whereas TNF-α enhanced the levels in these cells. The well-known antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) attenuated cell death and an increase in ROS levels was caused by SAHA. Moreover, SAHA decreased the levels of thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) in HeLa cells. While the downregulation of Trx1 enhanced cell death and ROS levels in SAHA-treated HeLa cells, the overexpression of Trx1 attenuated the levels in these cells. In conclusion, SAHA inhibited the growth of HeLa cell via caspase-dependent apoptosis, which was influenced by the mitochondrial O(2)•- and Trx1 levels.

  15. The levels of HDAC1 and thioredoxin1 are related to the death of mesothelioma cells by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    You, Bo Ra; Park, Woo Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor which is mainly derived from the pleura of lung. In the present study, we evaluated the anticancer effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor on human mesothelioma cells in relation to the levels of HDAC1, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thioredoxin (Trx). While 1 µM SAHA inhibited cell growth in Phi and ROB cells at 24 h, it did not affect the growth in ADA and Mill cells. Notably, the level of HDAC1 was relatively overexpressed among Phi, REN and ROB cells. SAHA induced necrosis and apoptosis, which was accompanied by the cleavages of PARP and caspase-3 in Phi cells. This agent also increased the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm) in Phi cells. All the tested caspase inhibitors attenuated apoptosis in SAHA-treated Phi cells whereas HDAC1 siRNA enhanced the apoptotic cell death. SAHA increased intracellular ROS levels including O2•- in Phi cells. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and vitamin C (Vit.C) significantly reduced the growth inhibition and death of Phi cells caused by SAHA. This drug decreased the mRNA and protein levels of Trx1 in Phi and ROB cells. Furthermore, Trx1 siRNA increased cell death and O2•- level in SAHA-treated Phi cells. In conclusion, SAHA selectively inhibited the growth of Phi and ROB mesothelioma cells, which showed the higher basal level of HDAC1. SAHA-induced Phi cell death was related to oxidative stress and Trx1 levels. PMID:26936390

  16. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  17. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Treatment Reveals Crosstalks among Proteome, Ubiquitylome and Acetylome in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer A549 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Quan; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Weiqing; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Chuangbin; Li, Wenting; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Lejie; Yi, Xingling; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been used as practical therapy for breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is previously demonstrated that SAHA treatment could extensively change the profile of acetylome and proteome in cancer cells. However, little is known about the impact of SAHA on other protein modifications and the crosstalks among different modifications and proteome, hindering the deep understanding of SAHA-mediated cancer therapy. In this work, by using SILAC technique, antibody-based affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis, we investigated quantitative proteome, acetylome and ubiquitylome as well as crosstalks among the three datasets in A549 cells toward SAHA treatment. In total, 2968 proteins, 1099 acetylation sites and 1012 ubiquitination sites were quantified in response to SAHA treatment, respectively. With the aid of intensive bioinformatics, we revealed that the proteome and ubiquitylome were negatively related upon SAHA treatment. Moreover, the impact of SAHA on acetylome resulted in 258 up-regulated and 99 down-regulated acetylation sites at the threshold of 1.5 folds. Finally, we identified 55 common sites with both acetylation and ubiquitination, among which ubiquitination level in 43 sites (78.2%) was positive related to acetylation level. PMID:25825284

  18. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid treatment reveals crosstalks among proteome, ubiquitylome and acetylome in non-small cell lung cancer A549 cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Quan; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Weiqing; Peng, Xiaojun; Chen, Chuangbin; Li, Wenting; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Lejie; Yi, Xingling; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Jing; Fan, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a well-known histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and has been used as practical therapy for breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is previously demonstrated that SAHA treatment could extensively change the profile of acetylome and proteome in cancer cells. However, little is known about the impact of SAHA on other protein modifications and the crosstalks among different modifications and proteome, hindering the deep understanding of SAHA-mediated cancer therapy. In this work, by using SILAC technique, antibody-based affinity enrichment and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis, we investigated quantitative proteome, acetylome and ubiquitylome as well as crosstalks among the three datasets in A549 cells toward SAHA treatment. In total, 2968 proteins, 1099 acetylation sites and 1012 ubiquitination sites were quantified in response to SAHA treatment, respectively. With the aid of intensive bioinformatics, we revealed that the proteome and ubiquitylome were negatively related upon SAHA treatment. Moreover, the impact of SAHA on acetylome resulted in 258 up-regulated and 99 down-regulated acetylation sites at the threshold of 1.5 folds. Finally, we identified 55 common sites with both acetylation and ubiquitination, among which ubiquitination level in 43 sites (78.2%) was positive related to acetylation level. PMID:25825284

  19. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  20. Pretreatment with anti-oxidants sensitizes oxidatively stressed human cancer cells to growth inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)

    PubMed Central

    Mahlum, Amy; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Kegel, Stacy J.; Guo, Song; Peters, Noel R.; Wilding, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Most prostate, colon and breast cancer cells are resistant to growth inhibitory effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We have examined whether the high oxidative stress in these cells causes a loss of SAHA activity and if so, whether pretreatment with an anti-oxidant can sensitize these cells to SAHA. Methods A DNA-Hoechst dye fluorescence measured cell growth and dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCF-DA) dye fluorescence measured reactive oxygen species (ROS). Growth inhibitory and ROS-generating activities of SAHA in androgen-treated or untreated LNCaP cells and PC-3 prostate cancer cells, HT-29 and HCT-115 colon cancer cells, MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells and A549 and NCI-H460 lung cancer cells with or without pretreatment with an anti-oxidant Vitamin E was determined. SAHA activity against LNCaP cells treated with another anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) was also determined. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) was used to determine intracellular SAHA level. Results SAHA treatment markedly inhibits LNCaP cell growth, when the cells are at a low ROS level. SAHA is, however, inactive against the same cell line, when the cells are at a high ROS level. A significant decrease in SAHA level was observed in LNCaP cells with high ROS after 24-and 72-h treatment when compared to cells with low ROS. Vitamin E pretreatment that reduces cellular ROS, synergistically sensitizes oxidatively stressed LNCaP, PC-3, HT-29, HCT-115 and MDA-MB231 cells, but not the A-549 and NCI-H460 cells with low ROS to SAHA. NAC treatment also sensitized androgen-treated LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of SAHA. Conclusion Response to SAHA could be improved by combining anti-oxidants such as Vitamin E with SAHA for the treatment of oxidatively stressed human malignancies that are otherwise resistant to SAHA. PMID:20512578

  1. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and cladribine synergistically induce apoptosis in NK-LGL leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoshen; Hasanali, Zainul S; Chen, Allshine; Zhang, Dianzheng; Liu, Xin; Wang, Hong-Gang; Feith, David J; Loughran, Thomas P; Xu, Kailin

    2015-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukaemia features a clonal proliferation of CD3(-) NK cells that can be classified into either aggressive or chronic categories. The NKL cell line, derived from an aggressive Asian NK cell leukaemia, and patient samples from chronic NK-LGL leukaemia were used in our study to probe for synergistic efficacy of the epigenetic drugs vorinostat (SAHA) and cladribine in this disease. We demonstrate that histone deacetylases (HDACs) are over-expressed in both aggressive and chronic NK leukaemia. Administration of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA reduces class I and II HDAC expression and enhances histone acetylation in leukaemic NK cells. In vitro combination treatment with SAHA and cladribine dose-dependently exerts synergistic cytotoxic and apoptotic effects on leukaemic NK cells. Expression profiling of apoptotic regulatory genes suggests that both compounds led to caspase-dependent apoptosis through activation of intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathways. Collectively, these data show that combined epigenetic therapy, using HDAC and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, may be a promising therapeutic approach for NK-LGL leukaemia.

  2. Dose-Responsive Gene Expression in Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Treated Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, Brian; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Spina, Celsa A.; Singhania, Akul; Margolis, David M.; Richman, Douglas R.; Woelk, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Design Persistent latently infected CD4+ T cells represent a major obstacle to HIV eradication. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are a proposed activation therapy. However, off-target effects on expression in host immune cells are poorly understood. We hypothesized that HDACi-modulated genes would be best identified with dose-response analysis. Methods Resting primary CD4+ T cells were treated with 0.34, 1, 3, or 10 μM of the HDACi, SAHA, for 24 hours and subjected to microarray gene expression analysis. Genes with dose-correlated expression were filtered to identify a subset with consistent up or downregulation at each SAHA dose. Histone modifications were characterized in 6 SAHA dose-responsive genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-RT-qPCR). Results A large number of genes were shown to be up (N=657) or downregulated (N=725) by SAHA in a dose-responsive manner (FDR p-value < 0.05, fold change ≥ |2|). Several genes (CTNNAL1, DPEP2, H1F0, IRGM, PHF15, and SELL) are potential in vivo biomarkers of SAHA activity. SAHA dose-responsive genes included transcription factors, HIV restriction factors, histone methyltransferases, and host proteins that interact with HIV. Pathway analysis suggested net downregulation of T cell activation with increasing SAHA dose. Histone acetylation was not correlated with host gene expression, but plausible alternative mechanisms for SAHA-modulated gene expression were identified. Conclusions Numerous genes in CD4+ T cells are modulated by SAHA in a dose-responsive manner, including genes that may negatively influence HIV activation from latency. Our study suggests that SAHA influences gene expression through a confluence of several mechanisms, including histone modification, and altered expression and activity of transcription factors. PMID:26258524

  3. Activation of lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid leads to apoptosis and tumor growth suppression of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hui, K F; Ho, Dona N; Tsang, C M; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Tsao, George S W; Chiang, Alan K S

    2012-10-15

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is strongly associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We reported that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) induced EBV lytic cycle in EBV-positive gastric carcinoma cells and mediated enhanced cell death. However, expression of EBV lytic proteins was thought to exert antiapoptotic effect in EBV-infected cells. Here, we examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of SAHA on EBV lytic cycle induction in NPC cells and investigated the cellular consequences. Micromolar concentrations of SAHA significantly induced EBV lytic cycle in EBV-positive NPC cells. Increased apoptosis and proteolytic cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and caspase-3, -7 and -9 in EBV-positive versus EBV-negative NPC cells were observed. More than 85% of NPC cells expressing immediate-early (Zta), early (BMRF1) or late (gp350/220) lytic proteins coexpressed cleaved caspase-3. Tracking of expression of EBV lytic proteins and cleaved caspase-3 over time demonstrated that NPC cells proceeded to apoptosis following EBV lytic cycle induction. Inhibition of EBV DNA replication and late lytic protein expression by phosphonoformic acid did not impact on SAHA's induced cell death in NPC, indicating that early rather than late phase of EBV lytic cycle contributed to the apoptotic effect. In vivo effects of SAHA on EBV lytic cycle induction and tumor growth suppression were also observed in NPC xenografts in nude mice. Taken together, our data indicated that activation of lytic cycle from latent cycle of EBV by SAHA leads to apoptosis and tumor growth suppression of NPC thereby providing experimental evidence for virus-targeted therapy against EBV-positive cancer.

  4. Mixed effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the host transcriptome and proteome and their implications for HIV reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    White, Cory H; Johnston, Harvey E; Moesker, Bastiaan; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Margolis, David M; Richman, Douglas D; Spina, Celsa A; Garbis, Spiros D; Woelk, Christopher H; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda

    2015-11-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) has been assessed in clinical trials as part of a "shock and kill" strategy to cure HIV-infected patients. While it was effective at inducing expression of HIV RNA ("shock"), treatment with SAHA did not result in a reduction of reservoir size ("kill"). We therefore utilized a combined analysis of effects of SAHA on the host transcriptome and proteome to dissect its mechanisms of action that may explain its limited success in "shock and kill" strategies. CD4+ T cells from HIV seronegative donors were treated with 1μM SAHA or its solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 24h. Protein expression and post-translational modifications were measured with iTRAQ proteomics using ultra high-precision two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Gene expression was assessed by Illumina microarrays. Using limma package in the R computing environment, we identified 185 proteins, 18 phosphorylated forms, 4 acetylated forms and 2982 genes, whose expression was modulated by SAHA. A protein interaction network integrating these 4 data types identified the HIV transcriptional repressor HMGA1 to be upregulated by SAHA at the transcript, protein and acetylated protein levels. Further functional category assessment of proteins and genes modulated by SAHA identified gene ontology terms related to NFκB signaling, protein folding and autophagy, which are all relevant to HIV reactivation. In summary, SAHA modulated numerous host cell transcripts, proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins, which would be expected to have very mixed effects on the induction of HIV-specific transcription and protein function. Proteome profiling highlighted a number of potential counter-regulatory effects of SAHA with respect to viral induction, which transcriptome profiling alone would not have identified. These observations could lead to a more informed selection and design of other HDACi with a more refined targeting profile, and

  5. Mixed effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the host transcriptome and proteome and their implications for HIV reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    White, Cory H; Johnston, Harvey E; Moesker, Bastiaan; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Margolis, David M; Richman, Douglas D; Spina, Celsa A; Garbis, Spiros D; Woelk, Christopher H; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda

    2015-11-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) has been assessed in clinical trials as part of a "shock and kill" strategy to cure HIV-infected patients. While it was effective at inducing expression of HIV RNA ("shock"), treatment with SAHA did not result in a reduction of reservoir size ("kill"). We therefore utilized a combined analysis of effects of SAHA on the host transcriptome and proteome to dissect its mechanisms of action that may explain its limited success in "shock and kill" strategies. CD4+ T cells from HIV seronegative donors were treated with 1μM SAHA or its solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for 24h. Protein expression and post-translational modifications were measured with iTRAQ proteomics using ultra high-precision two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Gene expression was assessed by Illumina microarrays. Using limma package in the R computing environment, we identified 185 proteins, 18 phosphorylated forms, 4 acetylated forms and 2982 genes, whose expression was modulated by SAHA. A protein interaction network integrating these 4 data types identified the HIV transcriptional repressor HMGA1 to be upregulated by SAHA at the transcript, protein and acetylated protein levels. Further functional category assessment of proteins and genes modulated by SAHA identified gene ontology terms related to NFκB signaling, protein folding and autophagy, which are all relevant to HIV reactivation. In summary, SAHA modulated numerous host cell transcripts, proteins and post-translational modifications of proteins, which would be expected to have very mixed effects on the induction of HIV-specific transcription and protein function. Proteome profiling highlighted a number of potential counter-regulatory effects of SAHA with respect to viral induction, which transcriptome profiling alone would not have identified. These observations could lead to a more informed selection and design of other HDACi with a more refined targeting profile, and

  6. Pyridone Methylsulfone Hydroxamate LpxC Inhibitors for the Treatment of Serious Gram-Negative Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Justin I.; Brown, Matthew F.; Reilly, Usa; Price, Loren M.; Abramite, Joseph A.; Arcari, Joel; Barham, Rose; Che, Ye; Chen, Jinshan Michael; Chung, Seung Won; Collantes, Elizabeth M.; Desbonnet, Charlene; Doroski, Matthew; Doty, Jonathan; Engtrakul, Juntyma J.; Harris, Thomas M.; Huband, Michael; Knafels, John D.; Leach, Karen L.; Liu, Shenping; Marfat, Anthony; McAllister, Laura; McElroy, Eric; Menard, Carol A.; Mitton-Fry, Mark; Mullins, Lisa; Noe, Mark C.; O’Donnell, John; Oliver, Robert; Penzien, Joseph; Plummer, Mark; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Thoma, Christy; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Uccello, Daniel P.; Vaz, Alfin; Wishka, Donn G.

    2012-11-09

    The synthesis and biological activity of a new series of LpxC inhibitors represented by pyridone methylsulfone hydroxamate 2a is presented. Members of this series have improved solubility and free fraction when compared to compounds in the previously described biphenyl methylsulfone hydroxamate series, and they maintain superior Gram-negative antibacterial activity to comparator agents.

  7. Synthesis and biological characterization of amidopropenyl hydroxamates as HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Florian; Varasi, Mario; Colombo, Andrea; Boggio, Roberto; Munari, Davide; Regalia, Nickolas; Rozio, Marco G; Reali, Veronica; Resconi, Anna E; Mai, Antonello; Gagliardi, Stefania; Dondio, Giulio; Minucci, Saverio; Mercurio, Ciro

    2010-08-01

    A series of amidopropenyl hydroxamic acid derivatives were prepared as novel inhibitors of human histone deacetylases (HDACs). Several compounds showed potency at <100 nM in the HDAC inhibition assays, sub-micromolar IC(50) values in tests against three tumor cell lines, and remarkable stability in human and mouse microsomes was observed. Three representative compounds were selected for further characterization and submitted to a selectivity profile against a series of class I and class II HDACs as well as to preliminary in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) experiments. Despite their high microsomal stability, the compounds showed medium-to-high clearance rates in in vivo PK studies as well as in rat and human hepatocytes, indicating that a major metabolic pathway is catalyzed by non-microsomal enzymes.

  8. Structure of 'linkerless' hydroxamic acid inhibitor-HDAC8 complex confirms the formation of an isoform-specific subpocket.

    PubMed

    Tabackman, Alexa A; Frankson, Rochelle; Marsan, Eric S; Perry, Kay; Cole, Kathryn E

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the hydrolysis of acetylated lysine side chains in histone and non-histone proteins, and play a critical role in the regulation of many biological processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and apoptosis. Aberrant HDAC activity is associated with cancer, making these enzymes important targets for drug design. In general, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) block the proliferation of tumor cells by inducing cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and/or apoptosis, and comprise some of the leading therapies in cancer treatments. To date, four HDACi have been FDA approved for the treatment of cancers: suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, Vorinostat, Zolinza®), romidepsin (FK228, Istodax®), belinostat (Beleodaq®), and panobinostat (Farydak®). Most current inhibitors are pan-HDACi, and non-selectively target a number of HDAC isoforms. Six previously reported HDACi were rationally designed, however, to target a unique sub-pocket found only in HDAC8. While these inhibitors were indeed potent against HDAC8, and even demonstrated specificity for HDAC8 over HDACs 1 and 6, there were no structural data to confirm the mode of binding. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of Compound 6 complexed with HDAC8 to 1.98Å resolution. We also describe the use of molecular docking studies to explore the binding interactions of the other 5 related HDACi. Our studies confirm that the HDACi induce the formation of and bind in the HDAC8-specific subpocket, offering insights into isoform-specific inhibition. PMID:27374062

  9. Thiol containing compounds and amino acid hydroxamates as reversible synthetic inhibitors of Astacus protease.

    PubMed

    Wolz, R L; Zeggaf, C; Stöcker, W; Zwilling, R

    1990-09-01

    Reversible synthetic inhibitors are characterized for Astacus protease, a 22,614-Da zinc containing neutral endopeptidase from the digestive tract of crayfish. Effective inhibition was demonstrated for several simple thiol containing compounds and a series of amino acid hydroxamates. Both classes of inhibitors had ID50 values ranging from 10(-2) to 10(-4) M for inhibition of hydrolysis of succinyl-Ala-Ala-Ala-p-nitroanilide. Tyrosine hydroxamate was found to be the most effective inhibitor with an ID50 of 175 microM and the mode of inhibition by this compound was determined to be of the simple noncompetitive type. In contrast to the other inhibitors tested, cysteine was seen to partially inactivate the enzyme in a time-dependent manner. The kinetics of this process was studied in detail using progress curve analysis. It was determined that cysteine was acting as a weak chelator and slowly establishing an equilibrium between metallo- and apoenzyme. In the presence of the strong zinc scavenger EDTA, cysteine can, in effect, function as a catalyst in transferring the metal from the protein to the secondary chelator at a rate 10,000 times faster than the rate of unassisted zinc dissociation. The series of amino acid hydroxamates served as probes into the microenvironment of the active site. Possible binding modes of the inhibitors are discussed on the basis of the relationship between the chemical nature of the inhibitor side chains and the strength of inhibition.

  10. Lactam based 7-amino suberoylamide hydroxamic acids as potent HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Maurizio; Cini, Elena; Giannotti, Luca; Giannini, Giuseppe; Battistuzzi, Gianfranco; Vignola, Davide; Vesci, Loredana; Cabri, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A series of SAHA-like molecules were prepared introducing different lactam-carboxyamides in position 7 of the suberoylanilide skeleton. The activity against different HDAC isoforms was tested and the data compared with the corresponding linear products, without substituent in position 7. In general, this modification provided an effective reinforcement of in vitro activity. While the lactam size or the CO/NH group orientation did not strongly influence the inhibition, the contemporary modification of the suberoylamide fragment gave vary active variants in the lactam series, with compound 28 (ST8078AA1) that showed IC50 values between 2 and 10nM against all Class I HDAC isoforms, demonstrating it to be a large spectrum pan-inhibitor. This strong affinity with HDAC was also confirmed by the value of IC50=0.5μM against H460 cells, ranking 28 as one of the most potent HDAC inhibitors described so far. PMID:24345446

  11. A Rational Approach for the Identification of Non-Hydroxamate HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goracci, Laura; Deschamps, Nathalie; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Petit, Charlotte; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Simões-Pires, Claudia; Nurisso, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    The human histone deacetylase isoform 6 (HDAC6) has been demonstrated to play a major role in cell motility and aggresome formation, being interesting for the treatment of multiple tumour types and neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, most HDAC inhibitors in preclinical or clinical evaluations are non-selective inhibitors, characterised by a hydroxamate zinc-binding group (ZBG) showing off-target effects and mutagenicity. The identification of selective HDAC6 inhibitors with novel chemical properties has not been successful yet, also because of the absence of crystallographic information that makes the rational design of HDAC6 selective inhibitors difficult. Using HDAC inhibitory data retrieved from the ChEMBL database and ligand-based computational strategies, we identified 8 original new non-hydroxamate HDAC6 inhibitors from the SPECS database, with activity in the low μM range. The most potent and selective compound, bearing a hydrazide ZBG, was shown to increase tubulin acetylation in human cells. No effects on histone H4 acetylation were observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an HDAC6 selective inhibitor bearing a hydrazide ZBG. Its capability to passively cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as observed through PAMPA assays, and its low cytotoxicity in vitro, suggested its potential for drug development.

  12. A Rational Approach for the Identification of Non-Hydroxamate HDAC6-Selective Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Goracci, Laura; Deschamps, Nathalie; Randazzo, Giuseppe Marco; Petit, Charlotte; Dos Santos Passos, Carolina; Carrupt, Pierre-Alain; Simões-Pires, Claudia; Nurisso, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The human histone deacetylase isoform 6 (HDAC6) has been demonstrated to play a major role in cell motility and aggresome formation, being interesting for the treatment of multiple tumour types and neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, most HDAC inhibitors in preclinical or clinical evaluations are non-selective inhibitors, characterised by a hydroxamate zinc-binding group (ZBG) showing off-target effects and mutagenicity. The identification of selective HDAC6 inhibitors with novel chemical properties has not been successful yet, also because of the absence of crystallographic information that makes the rational design of HDAC6 selective inhibitors difficult. Using HDAC inhibitory data retrieved from the ChEMBL database and ligand-based computational strategies, we identified 8 original new non-hydroxamate HDAC6 inhibitors from the SPECS database, with activity in the low μM range. The most potent and selective compound, bearing a hydrazide ZBG, was shown to increase tubulin acetylation in human cells. No effects on histone H4 acetylation were observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an HDAC6 selective inhibitor bearing a hydrazide ZBG. Its capability to passively cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as observed through PAMPA assays, and its low cytotoxicity in vitro, suggested its potential for drug development. PMID:27404291

  13. HDACi Valproic Acid (VPA) and Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) Delay but Fail to Protect against Warm Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ruess, Dietrich A.; Probst, Moriz; Marjanovic, Goran; Wittel, Uwe A.; Hopt, Ulrich T.; Keck, Tobias; Bausch, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylases (HDAC) catalyze N-terminal deacetylation of lysine-residues on histones and multiple nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. In various animal models, such as trauma/hemorrhagic shock, ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction, HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) application is cyto- and organoprotective and promotes survival. HDACi reduce stress signaling, cell death and inflammation. Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury during major liver resection or transplantation increases morbidity and mortality. Assuming protective properties, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the HDACi VPA and SAHA on warm hepatic I/R. Material and Methods Male Wistar-Kyoto rats (age: 6–8 weeks) were randomized to VPA, SAHA, vehicle control (pre-) treatment or sham-groups and underwent partial no-flow liver ischemia for 90 minutes with subsequent reperfusion for 6, 12, 24 and 60 hours. Injury and regeneration was quantified by serum AST and ALT levels, by macroscopic aspect and (immuno-) histology. HDACi treatment efficiency, impact on MAPK/SAPK-activation and Hippo-YAP signaling was determined by Western blot. Results Treatment with HDACi significantly enhanced hyperacetylation of Histone H3-K9 during I/R, indicative of adequate treatment efficiency. Liver injury, as measured by macroscopic aspect, serum transaminases and histology, was delayed, but not alleviated in VPA and SAHA treated animals. Importantly, tissue destruction was significantly more pronounced with VPA. SAPK-activation (p38 and JNK) was reduced by VPA and SAHA in the early (6h) reperfusion phase, but augmented later on (JNK, 24h). Regeneration appeared enhanced in SAHA and VPA treated animals and was dependent on Hippo-YAP signaling. Conclusions VPA and SAHA delay warm hepatic I/R injury at least in part through modulation of SAPK-activation. However, these HDACi fail to exert organoprotective effects, in this setting. For VPA, belated damage is even aggravated. PMID:27513861

  14. Discovery, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of spiropiperidine hydroxamic acid based derivatives as structurally novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Varasi, Mario; Thaler, Florian; Abate, Agnese; Bigogno, Chiara; Boggio, Roberto; Carenzi, Giacomo; Cataudella, Tiziana; Dal Zuffo, Roberto; Fulco, Maria Carmela; Rozio, Marco Giulio; Mai, Antonello; Dondio, Giulio; Minucci, Saverio; Mercurio, Ciro

    2011-04-28

    New spiro[chromane-2,4'-piperidine] and spiro[benzofuran-2,4'-piperidine] hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDAC inhibitors have been identified by combining privileged structures with a hydroxamic acid moiety as zinc binding group. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit nuclear extract HDACs and for their in vitro antiproliferative activity on different tumor cell lines. This work resulted in the discovery of spirocycle 30d that shows good oral bioavailability and tumor growth inhibition in an HCT-116 murine xenograft model.

  15. Structure-based rational design of peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors to target tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme as potential therapeutics for hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Gu, Qiuhong; Zhao, Ning; Xia, Fei; Li, Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    The human tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) has recently been raised as a new and promising therapeutic target of hepatitis and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we reported a successful application of the solved crystal structure of TACE complex with a peptide-like ligand INN for rational design of novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors with high potency and selectivity to target and inhibit TACE. First, the intermolecular interactions between TACE catalytic domain and INN were characterized through an integrated bioinformatics approach, with which the key substructures of INN that dominate ligand binding were identified. Subsequently, the INN molecular structure was simplified to a chemical sketch of peptide hydroxamic acid compound, which can be regarded as a linear tripeptide capped by a N-terminal carboxybenzyl group (chemically protective group) and a C-terminal hydroxamate moiety (coordinated to the Zn(2+) at TACE active site). Based on the sketch, a virtual combinatorial library containing 180 peptide hydroxamic acids was generated, from which seven samples were identified as promising candidates by using a knowledge-based protein-peptide affinity predictor and were then tested in vitro with a standard TACE activity assay protocol. Consequently, three designed peptide hydroxamic acids, i.e. Cbz-Pro-Ile-Gln-hydroxamic acid, Cbz-Leu-Ile-Val-hydroxamic acid and Cbz-Phe-Val-Met-hydroxamic acid, exhibited moderate or high inhibitory activity against TACE, with inhibition constants Ki of 36 ± 5, 510 ± 46 and 320 ± 26 nM, respectively. We also examined the structural basis and non-bonded profile of TACE interaction with a designed peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitor, and found that the inhibitor ligand is tightly buried in the active pocket of TACE, forming a number of hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic forces and van der Waals contacts at the interaction interface, conferring both stability and specificity for TACE-inhibitor complex

  16. Hydroxamic acid derivatives of mycophenolic acid inhibit histone deacetylase at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Batovska, Daniela I; Kim, Dong Hoon; Mitsuhashi, Shinya; Cho, Yoon Sun; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Ubukata, Makoto

    2008-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA, 1), an inhibitor of IMP-dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and a latent PPARgamma agonist, is used as an effective immunosuppressant for clinical transplantation and recently entered clinical trials in advanced multiple myeloma patients. On the other hand, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a non-specific histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, has been approved for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. MPA seemed to bear a cap, a linker, and a weak metal-binding site as a latent inhibitor of HDAC. Therefore, the hydroxamic acid derivatives of mycophenolic acid having an effective metal-binding site, mycophenolic hydroxamic acid (MPHA, 2), 7-O-acetyl mycophenolic acid (7-O-Ac MPHA, 3), and 7-O-lauroyl mycophenolic hydroxamic acid (7-O-L MPHA, 4) were designed and synthesized. All these compounds inhibited histone deacetylase with IC50 values of 1, 0.9 and 0.5 microM, and cell proliferation at concentrations of 2, 1.5 and 1 microM, respectively. PMID:18838793

  17. Fragment based G-QSAR and molecular dynamics based mechanistic simulations into hydroxamic-based HDAC inhibitors against spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Siddharth; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-10-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (CAG) triplets within the coding gene ataxin 2 results in transcriptional repression, forming the molecular basis of the neurodegenerative disorder named spinocerebellar ataxia type-2 (SCA2). HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been elements of great interest in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's and Ataxia's. In this study, we have selected hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDACi and performed fragment-based G-QSAR, molecular docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations for elucidating the dynamic mode of action of HDACi with His-Asp catalytic dyad of HDAC4. The model was statistically validated to establish its predictive robustness. The model was statistically significant with r(2) value of .6297, cross-validated co-relation coefficient q(2) value of .5905 and pred_r(2) (predicted square co-relation coefficient) value of .85. An F-test value of 56.11 confirms absolute robustness of the model. Two combinatorial libraries comprising of 3180 compounds were created with hydroxamate moiety as the template and their pIC50 activities were predicted based on the G-QSAR model. The combinatorial library created was screened on the basis of predicted activity (pIC50), with two resultant top scoring compounds, HIC and DHC. The interaction of the compounds with His-Asp dyad in terms of H-bond interactions with His802, Asp840, Pro942, and Gly975 residues of HDAC4 was evaluated by docking and 20 ns long molecular dynamics simulations. This study provides valuable leads for structural substitutions required for hydroxamate moiety to exhibit enhanced inhibitory activity against HDAC4. The reported compounds demonstrated good binding and thus can be considered as potent therapeutic leads against ataxia. PMID:26510381

  18. Fragment based G-QSAR and molecular dynamics based mechanistic simulations into hydroxamic-based HDAC inhibitors against spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Siddharth; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-10-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (CAG) triplets within the coding gene ataxin 2 results in transcriptional repression, forming the molecular basis of the neurodegenerative disorder named spinocerebellar ataxia type-2 (SCA2). HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been elements of great interest in polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's and Ataxia's. In this study, we have selected hydroxamic acid derivatives as HDACi and performed fragment-based G-QSAR, molecular docking studies and molecular dynamics simulations for elucidating the dynamic mode of action of HDACi with His-Asp catalytic dyad of HDAC4. The model was statistically validated to establish its predictive robustness. The model was statistically significant with r(2) value of .6297, cross-validated co-relation coefficient q(2) value of .5905 and pred_r(2) (predicted square co-relation coefficient) value of .85. An F-test value of 56.11 confirms absolute robustness of the model. Two combinatorial libraries comprising of 3180 compounds were created with hydroxamate moiety as the template and their pIC50 activities were predicted based on the G-QSAR model. The combinatorial library created was screened on the basis of predicted activity (pIC50), with two resultant top scoring compounds, HIC and DHC. The interaction of the compounds with His-Asp dyad in terms of H-bond interactions with His802, Asp840, Pro942, and Gly975 residues of HDAC4 was evaluated by docking and 20 ns long molecular dynamics simulations. This study provides valuable leads for structural substitutions required for hydroxamate moiety to exhibit enhanced inhibitory activity against HDAC4. The reported compounds demonstrated good binding and thus can be considered as potent therapeutic leads against ataxia.

  19. Hydroxamate based inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase. Part 2: the effect of cyclic linkers on P-site binding.

    PubMed

    Levy, Daniel; Bao, Ming; Tomlinson, James; Scarborough, Robert

    2002-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a family of enzymes that are key elements of signal transduction by virtue of their ability to convert ATP to cAMP. The catalytic mechanism of this transformation proceeds through initial binding of ATP to the purine binding site (P-site) followed by metal mediated cyclization with loss of pyrophosphate. Previous work in our group identified novel inhibitors which possess an adenine ring joined to a metal-coordinating hydroxamic acid through flexible linkers. Considering the spatial positioning of the metals with respect to the adenine binding site coupled with potentially favorable entropic factors, conformational restriction of the tether through a stereochemistry based SAR employing a rigid cyclic scaffold was explored. PMID:12372508

  20. Hybrids from 4-anilinoquinazoline and hydroxamic acid as dual inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fan-Wei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Ren, Zi-Wei; Xue, Jia-Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-15

    A series of hybrids derived from 4-anilinoquinazoline and hydroxamic acid were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as dual inhibitors of vascular endothelia growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) tyrosine kinase and histone deacetylase (HDAC). Most of these compounds exhibited potent HDAC inhibition and moderate VEGFR-2 inhibition. Among them, compound 6l exhibited the most potent inhibitory activities against VEGFR-2 (IC50=84 nM) and HDAC (IC50=2.8 nM). It also showed the most potent antiproliferative ability against MCF-7, a human breast cancer line, with IC50 of 1.2 μM. Docking simulation supported the initial pharmacophoric hypothesis and suggested a common mode of interaction of compound 6l at the active binding sites of VEGFR-2 and HDAC. PMID:26475519

  1. Hydroxamate based inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase. Part 1: the effect of acyclic linkers on P-site binding.

    PubMed

    Levy, Daniel; Marlowe, Charles; Kane-Maguire, Kim; Bao, Ming; Cherbavaz, Diana; Tomlinson, James; Sedlock, David; Scarborough, Robert

    2002-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a family of enzymes that are key elements of signal transduction by virtue of their ability to convert ATP to cAMP. The catalytic mechanism of this transformation proceeds through initial binding of ATP to the purine binding site (P-site) followed by metal mediated cyclization with loss of pyrophosphate. Crystallographic analysis of ACs with known inhibitors reveals the presence of two metals in the active site. Presently, nine isoforms of adenylyl cyclase are known and unique isoform combinations are expressed in a tissue specific manner. The development of isoform specific inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase may prove to be a useful strategy toward the design of novel therapeutic agents. In order to develop novel AC inhibitors, we have chosen a design approach utilizing molecules with the adenine ring system joined to a metal-coordinating hydroxamic acid via flexible acyclic linkers. The designed inhibitors were assayed against type V AC with the size and heteroatom content of the linkers varied to probe the interaction of the nucleotide and metal binding sites within the enzyme. PMID:12372507

  2. Azaindole N-methyl hydroxamic acids as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors-II. The impact of physicochemical properties on ADME and PK.

    PubMed

    Tanis, Steven P; Plewe, Michael B; Johnson, Ted W; Butler, Scott L; Dalvie, Deepak; DeLisle, Dorothy; Dress, Klaus R; Hu, Qiyue; Huang, Buwen; Kuehler, Jon E; Kuki, Atsuo; Liu, Wen; Peng, Qinghai; Smith, Graham L; Solowiej, Jim; Tran, Khanh T; Wang, Hai; Yang, Anle; Yin, Chunfeng; Yu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Junhu; Zhu, Huichun

    2010-12-15

    HIV-1 integrase is one of three enzymes encoded by the HIV genome and is essential for viral replication, and HIV-1 IN inhibitors have emerged as a new promising class of therapeutics. Recently, we reported the discovery of azaindole hydroxamic acids that were potent inhibitors of the HIV-1 IN enzyme. N-Methyl hydroxamic acids were stable against oxidative metabolism, however were cleared rapidly through phase 2 glucuronidation pathways. We were able to introduce polar groups at the β-position of the azaindole core thereby altering physical properties by lowering calculated log D values (c Log D) which resulted in attenuated clearance rates in human hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic data in dog for representative compounds demonstrated moderate oral bioavailability and reasonable half-lives. These ends were accomplished without a large negative impact on enzymatic and antiviral activity, thus suggesting opportunities to alter clearance parameters in future series.

  3. Molecular and cellular effects of a novel hydroxamate-based HDAC inhibitor - belinostat - in glioblastoma cell lines: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kusaczuk, Magdalena; Krętowski, Rafał; Stypułkowska, Anna; Cechowska-Pasko, Marzanna

    2016-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are now intensively investigated as potential cytostatic agents in many malignancies. Here, we provide novel information concerning the influence of belinostat (Bel), a hydroxamate-based pan-HDAC inhibitor, on glioblastoma LN-229 and LN-18 cells. We found that LN-229 cells stimulated with 2 μmol/L of Bel for 48 h resulted in 70 % apoptosis, while equivalent treatment of LN-18 cells resulted in only 28 % apoptosis. In LN-229 cells this effect was followed by up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes including Puma, Bim, Chop and p21. In treated LN-18 cells only p21 was markedly overexpressed. Simultaneously, LN-229 cells treated with 2 μmol/L of Bel for 48 h exhibited down-regulation of molecular chaperones GRP78 and GRP94 at the protein level. In contrast, in LN-18 cells Western blot analysis did not show any marked changes in GRP78 nor GRP94 expression. Despite noticeable overexpression of p21, there were no signs of evident G1 nor G2/M cell cycle arrest, however, the reduction in number of the S phase cells was observed in both cell lines. These results collectively suggest that Bel can be considered as potential anti-glioblastoma agent. To our knowledge this is the first report presenting the effects of belinostat treatment in glioblastoma cell lines. PMID:27468826

  4. Discovery of novel hydroxamates as highly potent tumor necrosis factor-[alpha] converting enzyme inhibitors. Part II: Optimization of the S3′ pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzola Jr., Robert D.; Zhu, Zhaoning; Sinning, Lisa; McKittrick, Brian; Lavey, Brian; Spitler, James; Kozlowski, Joseph; Neng-Yang, Shih; Zhou, Guowei; Guo, Zhuyan; Orth, Peter; Madison, Vincent; Sun, Jing; Lundell, Daniel; Niu, Xiaoda

    2010-10-01

    A series of cyclopropyl hydroxamic acids were prepared. Many of the compounds displayed picomolar affinity for the TACE enzyme while maintaining good to excellent selectivity profiles versus MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -14, and ADAM-10. X-ray analysis of an inhibitor in the TACE active site indicated that the molecules bound to the enzyme in the S1{prime}-S3{prime} pocket.

  5. Dual-Mode HDAC Prodrug for Covalent Modification and Subsequent Inhibitor Release

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) target abnormal epigenetic states associated with a variety of pathologies, including cancer. Here, the development of a prodrug of the canonical broad-spectrum HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is described. Although hydroxamic acids are utilized universally in the development of metalloenzyme inhibitors, they are considered to be poor pharmacophores with reduced activity in vivo. We developed a prodrug of SAHA by appending a promoiety, sensitive to thiols, to the hydroxamic acid warhead (termed SAHA-TAP). After incubation of SAHA-TAP with an HDAC, the thiol of a conserved HDAC cysteine residue becomes covalently tagged with the promoiety, initiating a cascade reaction that leads to the release of SAHA. Mass spectrometry and enzyme kinetics experiments validate that the cysteine residue is covalently appended with the TAP promoiety. SAHA-TAP demonstrates cytotoxicity activity against various cancer cell lines. This strategy represents an original prodrug design with a dual mode of action for HDAC inhibition. PMID:25974739

  6. Optimization of the in vitro cardiac safety of hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Michael D; Cao, Xueying; Chen, Christine H; Cho, Young Shin; Davis, Nicole R; Eckman, Joe; Fan, Jianmei; Fekete, Alex; Firestone, Brant; Flynn, Julie; Green, Jack; Growney, Joseph D; Holmqvist, Mats; Hsu, Meier; Jansson, Daniel; Jiang, Lei; Kwon, Paul; Liu, Gang; Lombardo, Franco; Lu, Qiang; Majumdar, Dyuti; Meta, Christopher; Perez, Lawrence; Pu, Minying; Ramsey, Tim; Remiszewski, Stacy; Skolnik, Suzanne; Traebert, Martin; Urban, Laszlo; Uttamsingh, Vinita; Wang, Ping; Whitebread, Steven; Whitehead, Lewis; Yan-Neale, Yan; Yao, Yung-Mae; Zhou, Liping; Atadja, Peter

    2011-07-14

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have shown promise in treating various forms of cancer. However, many HDAC inhibitors from diverse structural classes have been associated with QT prolongation in humans. Inhibition of the human ether a-go-go related gene (hERG) channel has been associated with QT prolongation and fatal arrhythmias. To determine if the observed cardiac effects of HDAC inhibitors in humans is due to hERG blockade, a highly potent HDAC inhibitor devoid of hERG activity was required. Starting with dacinostat (LAQ824), a highly potent HDAC inhibitor, we explored the SAR to determine the pharmacophores required for HDAC and hERG inhibition. We disclose here the results of these efforts where a high degree of pharmacophore homology between these two targets was discovered. This similarity prevented traditional strategies for mitigating hERG binding/modulation from being successful and novel approaches for reducing hERG inhibition were required. Using a hERG homology model, two compounds, 11r and 25i, were discovered to be highly efficacious with weak affinity for the hERG and other ion channels.

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of di-substituted cinnamic hydroxamic acids bearing urea/thiourea unit as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chengqing; Bi, Yanjing; He, Yujun; Huang, WenYuan; Liu, Lifei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Sihan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Niefang

    2013-12-01

    A novel class of di-substituted cinnamic hydroxamic acid derivatives containing urea or thiourea unit was designed, synthesized and evaluated as HDAC inhibitors. All tested compounds demonstrated significant HDAC inhibitory activities and anti-proliferative effects against diverse human tumor cell lines. Among them, 7l exhibited most potent pan-HDAC inhibitory activity, with an IC50 value of 130 nM. It also showed strong cellular inhibition against diverse cell lines including HCT-116, MCF-7, MDB-MB-435 and NCI-460, with GI50 values of 0.35, 0.22, 0.51 and 0.48 μM, respectively.

  8. Chemistry, Biology, and QSAR Studies of Substituted Biaryl Hydroxamates and Mercaptoacetamides as HDAC inhibitors - Nanomolar Potency Inhibitors of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kozikowski, Alan P.; Chen, Yufeng; Gaysin, Arsen M.; Savoy, Doris N.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2009-01-01

    The histone deacetylases (HDACs) are able to regulate gene expression and inhibitors of the HDACs (HDACIs) hold promise in the treatment of cancer as well as a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate the possibility to achieve some measure of isoform selectivity in the inhibition of the HDACs, we prepared a small series of 2,4′-diaminobiphenyl ligands functionalized at the para-amino group with an appendage containing either a hydroxamate or a mercaptoacetamide group and coupled to an amino acid residue at the ortho-amino group. A smaller series of substituted phenylthiazoles was also explored. Some of these newly synthesized ligands show low nM potency in the HDAC inhibition assays and display micromolar to low nanomolar IC50 values when tested against five pancreatic cancer cell lines. The isoform selectivity of these ligands for the Class I HDACs (HDAC1-3 and 8) and Class IIb HDACs (HDAC6 and HDAC10) together with QSAR studies of their correlation with the lipophilicity are presented. Of particular interest is the HDAC6 selectivity of the mercaptoacetamides. PMID:18181121

  9. 4-Biphenylalanine- and 3-Phenyltyrosine-Derived Hydroxamic Acids as Inhibitors of the JumonjiC-Domain-Containing Histone Demethylase KDM4A.

    PubMed

    Morera, Ludovica; Roatsch, Martin; Fürst, Michael C D; Hoffmann, Inga; Senger, Johanna; Hau, Mirjam; Franz, Henriette; Schüle, Roland; Heinrich, Markus R; Jung, Manfred

    2016-09-20

    Overexpression of the histone lysine demethylase KDM4A, which regulates H3K9 and H3K36 methylation states, has been related to the pathology of several human cancers. We found that a previously reported hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor (SW55) was also able to weakly inhibit this demethylase with an IC50 value of 25.4 μm. Herein we report the synthesis and biochemical evaluations, with two orthogonal in vitro assays, of a series of derivatives of this lead structure. With extensive chemical modifications on the lead structure, also by exploiting the versatility of the radical arylation with aryldiazonium salts, we were able to increase the potency of the derivatives against KDM4A to the low-micromolar range and, more importantly, to obtain demethylase selectivity with respect to HDACs. Cell-permeable derivatives clearly showed a demethylase-inhibition-dependent antiproliferative effect against HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  10. Complex structure of a bacterial class 2 histone deacetylase homologue with a trifluoromethylketone inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Tine Kragh; Hildmann, Christian; Riester, Daniel; Wegener, Dennis; Schwienhorst, Andreas; Ficner, Ralf

    2007-04-01

    The crystal structure of HDAH FB188 in complex with a trifluoromethylketone at 2.2 Å resolution is reported and compared to a previously determined inhibitor complex. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have emerged as attractive targets in anticancer drug development. To date, a number of HDAC inhibitors have been developed and most of them are hydroxamic acid derivatives, typified by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Not surprisingly, structural information that can greatly enhance the design of novel HDAC inhibitors is so far only available for hydroxamic acids in complex with HDAC or HDAC-like enzymes. Here, the first structure of an enzyme complex with a nonhydroxamate HDAC inhibitor is presented. The structure of the trifluoromethyl ketone inhibitor 9,9,9-trifluoro-8-oxo-N-phenylnonanamide in complex with bacterial FB188 HDAH (histone deacetylase-like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes strain FB188) has been determined. HDAH reveals high sequential and functional homology to human class 2 HDACs and a high structural homology to human class 1 HDACs. Comparison with the structure of HDAH in complex with SAHA reveals that the two inhibitors superimpose well. However, significant differences in binding to the active site of HDAH were observed. In the presented structure the O atom of the trifluoromethyl ketone moiety is within binding distance of the Zn atom of the enzyme and the F atoms participate in interactions with the enzyme, thereby involving more amino acids in enzyme–inhibitor binding.

  11. Utilization of Boron Compounds for the Modification of Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid as Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase Class II Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Ridla; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Satriyanto, Cipta Prio; Kerami, Djati; Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) has a critical function in regulating gene expression. The inhibition of HDAC has developed as an interesting anticancer research area that targets biological processes such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and cell differentiation. In this study, an HDAC inhibitor that is available commercially, suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), has been modified to improve its efficacy and reduce the side effects of the compound. Hydrophobic cap and zinc-binding group of these compounds were substituted with boron-based compounds, whereas the linker region was substituted with p-aminobenzoic acid. The molecular docking analysis resulted in 8 ligands with ΔGbinding value more negative than the standards, SAHA and trichostatin A (TSA). That ligands were analyzed based on the nature of QSAR, pharmacological properties, and ADME-Tox. It is conducted to obtain a potent inhibitor of HDAC class II Homo sapiens. The screening process result gave one best ligand, Nova2 (513246-99-6), which was then further studied by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25214833

  12. Potent Reversible Inhibition of Myeloperoxidase by Aromatic Hydroxamates*

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Louisa V.; Sjögren, Tove; Auchère, Françoise; Jenkins, David W.; Thong, Bob; Laughton, David; Hemsley, Paul; Pairaudeau, Garry; Turner, Rufus; Eriksson, Håkan; Unitt, John F.; Kettle, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) promotes oxidative stress in numerous inflammatory pathologies by producing hypohalous acids. Its inadvertent activity is a prime target for pharmacological control. Previously, salicylhydroxamic acid was reported to be a weak reversible inhibitor of MPO. We aimed to identify related hydroxamates that are good inhibitors of the enzyme. We report on three hydroxamates as the first potent reversible inhibitors of MPO. The chlorination activity of purified MPO was inhibited by 50% by a 5 nm concentration of a trifluoromethyl-substituted aromatic hydroxamate, HX1. The hydroxamates were specific for MPO in neutrophils and more potent toward MPO compared with a broad range of redox enzymes and alternative targets. Surface plasmon resonance measurements showed that the strength of binding of hydroxamates to MPO correlated with the degree of enzyme inhibition. The crystal structure of MPO-HX1 revealed that the inhibitor was bound within the active site cavity above the heme and blocked the substrate channel. HX1 was a mixed-type inhibitor of the halogenation activity of MPO with respect to both hydrogen peroxide and halide. Spectral analyses demonstrated that hydroxamates can act variably as substrates for MPO and convert the enzyme to a nitrosyl ferrous intermediate. This property was unrelated to their ability to inhibit MPO. We propose that aromatic hydroxamates bind tightly to the active site of MPO and prevent it from producing hypohalous acids. This mode of reversible inhibition has potential for blocking the activity of MPO and limiting oxidative stress during inflammation. PMID:24194519

  13. Metal complexes of salicylhydroxamic acid (H2Sha), anthranilic hydroxamic acid and benzohydroxamic acid. Crystal and molecular structure of [Cu(phen)2(Cl)]Cl x H2Sha, a model for a peroxidase-inhibitor complex.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, E C; Farkas, E; Gil, M J; Fitzgerald, D; Castineras, A; Nolan, K B

    2000-04-01

    Stability constants of iron(III), copper(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) complexes of salicylhydroxamic acid (H2Sha), anthranilic hydroxamic acid (HAha) and benzohydroxamic acid (HBha) have been determined at 25.0 degrees C, I=0.2 mol dm(-3) KCl in aqueous solution. The complex stability order, iron(III) > copper(II) > nickel(II) approximately = zinc(II) was observed whilst complexes of H2Sha were found to be more stable than those of the other two ligands. In the preparation of ternary metal ion complexes of these ligands and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) the crystalline complex [Cu(phen)2(Cl)]Cl x H2Sha was obtained and its crystal structure determined. This complex is a model for hydroxamate-peroxidase inhibitor interactions.

  14. Proteome analyses of the growth inhibitory effects of NCH-51, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, on lymphoid malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Sanda, T; Okamoto, T; Uchida, Y; Nakagawa, H; Iida, S; Kayukawa, S; Suzuki, T; Oshizawa, T; Suzuki, T; Miyata, N; Ueda, R

    2007-11-01

    Recent reports showing successful inhibition of cancer and leukemia cell growth using histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) compounds have highlighted the potential use of HDACi as anti-cancer agents. However, high incidence of toxicity and low stability in vivo were observed with hydroxamic acid-based HDACi such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), thus limiting its clinical applicability. In this study, we found that a novel non-hydroxamate HDACi NCH-51 could inhibit the cell growth of a variety of lymphoid malignant cells through apoptosis induction, more effectively than SAHA. Activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9, but not -7 was detected after the treatment with NCH-51. Gene expression profiles showed that NCH-51 and SAHA similarly upregulated p21 and downregulated anti-apoptotic molecules including survivin, bcl-w and c-FLIP. Proteome analysis using two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that NCH-51 upregulated anti-oxidant molecules including peroxiredoxin 1 and 2 and glutathione S-transferase at the protein level. Interestingly, NCH-51 induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 8 h whereas SAHA continuously declined ROS. Pretreatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, abolished the cytotoxicity of NCH-51. These findings suggest that NCH-51 exhibits cytotoxicity by sustaining ROS at the higher level greater than SAHA. This study indicates the therapeutic efficacy of NCH-51 and novel insights for anti-HDAC therapy.

  15. Hydroxamic Acids in Asymmetric Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed stereoselective reactions are a central theme in organic chemistry research. In these reactions, the stereoselection is achieved predominantly by introducing chiral ligands at the metal catalyst’s center. For decades, researchers have sought better chiral ligands for asymmetric catalysis and have made great progress. Nevertheless, to achieve optimal stereoselectivity and to catalyze new reactions, new chiral ligands are needed. Due to their high metal affinity, hydroxamic acids play major roles across a broad spectrum of fields from biochemistry to metal extraction. Dr. K. Barry Sharpless first revealed their potential as chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis in 1977: He published the chiral vanadium-hydroxamic-acid-catalyzed, enantioselective epoxidation of allylic alcohols before his discovery of Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation, which uses titanium-tartrate complex as the chiral reagent. However, researchers have reported few highly enantioselective reactions using metal-hydroxamic acid as catalysts since then. This Account summarizes our research on metal-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation using hydroxamic acids as chiral ligands. We designed and synthesized a series of new hydroxamic acids, most notably the C2-symmetric bis-hydroxamic acid (BHA) family. V-BHA-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic and homoallylic alcohols achieved higher activity and stereoselectivity than Sharpless Asymmetric Epoxidation in many cases. Changing the metal species led to a series of unprecedented asymmetric epoxidation reactions, such as (i) single olefins and sulfides with Mo-BHA, (ii) homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols with Zr- and Hf-BHA, and (iii) N-alkenyl sulfonamides and N-sulfonyl imines with Hf-BHA. These reactions produce uniquely functionalized chiral epoxides with good yields and enantioselectivities. PMID:23157425

  16. Discovery of HDAC Inhibitors with Potent Activity Against Multiple Malaria Parasite Life Cycle Stages

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Finn K.; Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D. M.; Stenzel, Katharina; Duffy, Sandra; Meister, Stephan; Marek, Linda; Schmetter, Rebekka; Kuna, Krystina; Hamacher, Alexandra; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Kassack, Matthias U.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Avery, Vicky M.; Andrews, Katherine T.; Kurz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigated the antiplasmodial activity of a series of HDAC inhibitors containing an alkoxyamide connecting-unit linker region. HDAC inhibitor 1a (LMK235), previously shown to be a novel and specific inhibitor of human HDAC4 and 5, was used as a starting point to rapidly construct a mini-library of HDAC inhibitors using a straightforward solid-phase supported synthesis. Several of these novel HDAC inhibitors were found to have potent in vitro activity against asexual stage P. falciparum malaria parasites. Representative compounds were shown to hyperacetylate P. falciparum histones and to inhibit deacetylase activity of recombinant PfHDAC1 and P. falciparum nuclear extracts. All compounds were also screened in vitro for activity against P. berghei exo-erythrocytic stages and selected compounds were further tested against late stage (IV and V) P. falciparum gametocytes. Of note, some compounds showed nanomolar activity against all three life cycle stages tested (asexual, exo-erythrocytic and gametocyte stages) and several compounds displayed significantly increased parasite selectivity compared to the reference HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). These data suggest that it may be possible to develop HDAC inhibitors that target multiple malaria parasite life cycle stages. PMID:24904967

  17. Cross metathesis with hydroxamate and benzamide BOC-protected alkenes to access HDAC inhibitors and their biological evaluation highlighted intrinsic activity of BOC-protected dihydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Vincent; Nurisso, Alessandra; Simões-Pires, Claudia; Bouchet, Samuel; Martinet, Nadine; Lehotzky, Attila; Ovadi, Judit; Cuendet, Muriel; Blanquart, Christophe; Bertrand, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Conditions for the metathesis of alkenes in the convergent synthesis of HDAC inhibitors have been improved by continuous catalyst flow injection in the reaction media. Intermediate and target compounds obtained were tested for their ability to induce HDAC inhibition and tubulin acetylation, revealing the key role of the tert-butyloxycarbonyl (BOC) group for more HDAC6 selectivity. Molecular modelling added rationale for this BOC effect.

  18. Cross metathesis with hydroxamate and benzamide BOC-protected alkenes to access HDAC inhibitors and their biological evaluation highlighted intrinsic activity of BOC-protected dihydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Vincent; Nurisso, Alessandra; Simões-Pires, Claudia; Bouchet, Samuel; Martinet, Nadine; Lehotzky, Attila; Ovadi, Judit; Cuendet, Muriel; Blanquart, Christophe; Bertrand, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Conditions for the metathesis of alkenes in the convergent synthesis of HDAC inhibitors have been improved by continuous catalyst flow injection in the reaction media. Intermediate and target compounds obtained were tested for their ability to induce HDAC inhibition and tubulin acetylation, revealing the key role of the tert-butyloxycarbonyl (BOC) group for more HDAC6 selectivity. Molecular modelling added rationale for this BOC effect. PMID:26611919

  19. Exploring the potential binding sites of some known HDAC inhibitors on some HDAC8 conformers by docking studies.

    PubMed

    Sixto-López, Yudibeth; Gómez-Vidal, José A; Correa-Basurto, José

    2014-08-01

    We describe the conformational behavior of histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. HDAC8 conformers were used for the docking studies using some known HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), valproic acid (VPA), aroyl-pyrrole-hydroxy-amide (APHA-8) and tubacin to explore their interactions, binding modes, free energy values. The MD simulation show that HDAC8 make important surface changes at the catalytic site (CS) entrance as well as at two entrances locations in the 14-Å tunnel. In addition, we identify an alternate entrance to the 14-Å tunnel named adjacent to the catalytic site pocket (ACSP). By using docking studies, it was possible to elucidate the importance of hydrophobic and π-π interactions that are the most important for the ligand-HDAC8 complex structural stabilization. In conclusion, the ligand flexibility, molecular weight and chemical moieties (hydroxamic acid, aryl and aliphatic moieties) are the principal properties required to increase the binding affinity on HDAC8.

  20. HDAC Inhibitors as Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Cristabelle; Chatterji, Biswa Prasun

    2015-01-01

    Malignant growth of cells is a condition characterized by unchecked cellular proliferation, genetic instability and epigenetic dysregulation. Up-regulated HDAC (Histone Deacetylase) enzyme activity is associated with a closed chromatin assembly and subsequent gene repression, forming a characteristic feature of malignantly transformed cells. Novel therapeutics are now targeting the zinc containing HDAC enzymes for treating various types of cancers. Recently, a spate of drugs acting via HDAC inhibition have been undergoing clinical trials and several patents present exciting molecules like PCI-24781 (Abexinostat), ITF- 2357 (Givinostat); MS-275 (Entinostat), MGCD 0103 (Mocetinostat), LBH-589 (Panobinostat), FK228 (Romidepsin), PXD-101 (Belinostat) and Valproic Acid to be used as alternatives or adjuvants to traditional chemotherapeutics. However, only three HDAC inhibitors have acquired FDA approval till date. Recently, PXD-101 obtained FDA approval for the treatment of Refractory or Relapsed Peripheral T cell lymphoma. The current article reviews patents that have introduced novel molecules that are HDAC isoform specific, superior to first generation HDAC inhibitors like SAHA (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid) and TSA (Trichostatin A) and can be modified structurally to reduce toxic side effects and increase specificity. These molecules can combine the best characteristics of an ideal HDAC inhibiting drug either as monotherapy or in combinatorial therapy for cancer treatment thus, indicating promise to be included in the next generation of target specific HDAC inhibiting drugs.

  1. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid in Treating Patients With Metastatic and/or Locally Advanced or Locally Recurrent Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-23

    Insular Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage II Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IV Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  2. Pyridine hydroxamic acids are specific anti-HCV agents affecting HDAC6.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Maxim V; Kleymenova, Alla A; Romanova, Lyudmila I; Konduktorov, Konstantin A; Kamarova, Kamila A; Smirnova, Olga A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Kochetkov, Sergey N

    2015-06-01

    Recently we reported benzohydroxamic acids (BHAs) as potent and selective inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon propagation. In this work 12 pyridine hydroxamic acids (PHAs) were synthesized and tested in full-genome replicon assay. It was found that PHAs possessed very similar anti-HCV properties compared to BHAs. Both classes of hydroxamic acids caused hyperacetylation of α-tubulin pointing to inhibition of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) as part of their antiviral activity. The tested compounds did not inhibit the growth of poliovirus, displaying high selectivity against HCV.

  3. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Antagonize Distinct Pathways to Suppress Tumorigenesis of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Vleeshouwer-Neumann, Terra; Phelps, Michael; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Jenkins, Isaac; Chen, Eleanor Y.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. The prognosis of patients with relapsed or metastatic disease remains poor. ERMS genomes show few recurrent mutations, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation might play a major role in driving ERMS tumor biology. In this study, we have demonstrated the diverse roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the pathogenesis of ERMS by characterizing effects of HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; also known as vorinostat) in vitro and in vivo. TSA and SAHA suppress ERMS tumor growth and progression by inducing myogenic differentiation as well as reducing the self-renewal and migratory capacity of ERMS cells. Differential expression profiling and pathway analysis revealed downregulation of key oncogenic pathways upon HDAC inhibitor treatment. By gain-of-function, loss-of-function, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies, we show that Notch1- and EphrinB1-mediated pathways are regulated by HDACs to inhibit differentiation and enhance migratory capacity of ERMS cells, respectively. Our study demonstrates that aberrant HDAC activity plays a major role in ERMS pathogenesis. Druggable targets in the molecular pathways affected by HDAC inhibitors represent novel therapeutic options for ERMS patients. PMID:26636678

  4. Long-Term Culture of Porcine Induced Pluripotent Stem-Like Cells Under Feeder-Free Conditions in the Presence of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Stoyan; Glage, Silke; Nowak-Imialek, Monika; Niemann, Heiner

    2016-03-01

    The reprogramming of somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is a complex process that involves significant epigenetic alterations in the reprogrammed cells. Epigenetic modifiers such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been shown to increase the efficiency of derivation of iPSCs in humans and mice. In this study, we used three HDAC inhibitors, valproic acid, sodium butyrate, and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, together with ascorbic acid, for derivation and long-term feeder-free culture of porcine iPS-like cells. In the absence of exogenous growth factors and/or small molecules, these inhibitors were able to maintain the expression of key pluripotency markers, including genes known to be specific for naive pluripotent state in mouse stem cells, for over 60 passages under feeder-free conditions. Surprisingly, the cells became dependent on HDAC inhibitors for the maintenance of proliferation. Moreover, despite showing successful integration into blastocysts upon injection, the cells were unable to undergo normal differentiation in vitro and in vivo in the form of teratomas. Our results suggest that HDAC inhibitors maintain pluripotency gene expression of porcine iPSC-like cells in long-term culture, but prevent lineage specification, requiring further optimization of culture conditions for porcine iPSC derivation. PMID:26691930

  5. Designing Hydroxamates and Reversed Hydroxamates to Inhibit Zinc-containing Proteases but not Cytochrome P450s: Insights from Quantum Mechanics and Protein-ligand Crystal Structures.

    PubMed

    Barker, Charlotte; Lukac, Iva; Leach, Andrew G

    2015-09-01

    The Hydroxamate is a useful functional group that binds to metals in a range of enzymes, notably zinc in matrix metalloproteases and histone deacetylases. The group is also able to form interactions with iron leading to inhibition of the cytochromes P450, particularly the 3A4 isoform. We have studied the available crystal structures of zinc-containing proteins bound to hydroxamates and compared the observed geometries with those found by quantum mechanical calculations. This has revealed the likely binding mode preferences for neutral and anionic protonation states and highlighted the importance of electrostatic complementarity. Calculations were also performed for the interaction of the hydroxamate with iron in a heme environment, as found in the cytochromes P450. These reveal that the preferred binding mode of hydroxamates in this environment involves the s-trans conformation. These calculations provide design guidelines for those interested in designing inhibitors of metalloenzymes that do not block metabolism of other drugs. The ability to predict the geometries and energies of binding modes that cannot be studied experimentally is an advantage offered by this kind of study.

  6. Designing Hydroxamates and Reversed Hydroxamates to Inhibit Zinc-containing Proteases but not Cytochrome P450s: Insights from Quantum Mechanics and Protein-ligand Crystal Structures.

    PubMed

    Barker, Charlotte; Lukac, Iva; Leach, Andrew G

    2015-09-01

    The Hydroxamate is a useful functional group that binds to metals in a range of enzymes, notably zinc in matrix metalloproteases and histone deacetylases. The group is also able to form interactions with iron leading to inhibition of the cytochromes P450, particularly the 3A4 isoform. We have studied the available crystal structures of zinc-containing proteins bound to hydroxamates and compared the observed geometries with those found by quantum mechanical calculations. This has revealed the likely binding mode preferences for neutral and anionic protonation states and highlighted the importance of electrostatic complementarity. Calculations were also performed for the interaction of the hydroxamate with iron in a heme environment, as found in the cytochromes P450. These reveal that the preferred binding mode of hydroxamates in this environment involves the s-trans conformation. These calculations provide design guidelines for those interested in designing inhibitors of metalloenzymes that do not block metabolism of other drugs. The ability to predict the geometries and energies of binding modes that cannot be studied experimentally is an advantage offered by this kind of study. PMID:27490712

  7. Inhibitors of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) activate tumor-suppressor microRNAs in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hibino, S; Saito, Y; Muramatsu, T; Otani, A; Kasai, Y; Kimura, M; Saito, H

    2014-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) enhances tumorigenesis and is commonly overexpressed in several types of cancer. To investigate the anticancer effects of EZH2 inhibitors, microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles were examined in gastric and liver cancer cells treated with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep). We confirmed that SAHA and DZNep suppressed EZH2 expression in AGS and HepG2 cells and inhibited their proliferation. The results of microarray analyses demonstrated that miR-1246 was commonly upregulated in cancer cells by treatment with SAHA and DZNep. MiR-302a and miR-4448 were markedly upregulated by treatment with SAHA and DZNep, respectively. DYRK1A, CDK2, BMI-1 and Girdin, which are targets of miR-1246, miR-302a and miR-4448, were suppressed by treatment with SAHA and DZNep, leading to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and reduced migration of AGS and HepG2 cells. ChIP assay revealed that SAHA and DZNep inhibited the binding of EZH2 to the promoter regions of miR-1246, miR-302a and miR-4448. These findings suggest that EZH2 inhibitors such as SAHA and DZNep exert multiple anticancer effects through activation of tumor-suppressor miRNAs. PMID:24861464

  8. Design, synthesis, and antitumor evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors with l-phenylglycine scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Xiaoguang; Hou, Jinning; Huang, Yongxue; Xu, Wenfang

    2015-01-01

    In our previous research, a novel series of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors with l-phenylglycine scaffold were designed and synthesized, among which amides D3 and D7 and ureido D18 were far superior to the positive control (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA]) in HDAC inhibition, but were only comparable to SAHA in antiproliferation on tumor cell lines. Herein, further structural derivation of lead compounds D3, D7, and D18 was carried out to improve their cellular activities. Most of our newly synthesized compounds exhibited more potent HDAC inhibitory activities than the positive control SAHA, and several derivatives were even better than their parent compounds. However, compared with SAHA and our lead compounds, only secondary amine series compounds exhibited improved antiproliferative activities, likely due to their appropriate topological polar surface area values and cell permeabilities. In a human histiocytic lymphoma (U937) xenograft model, the most potent secondary amine 9d exhibited similar in vivo antitumor activity to that of SAHA. PMID:26504374

  9. HDAC inhibitors as cognitive enhancers in fear, anxiety and trauma therapy: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Whittle, Nigel; Singewald, Nicolas

    2014-04-01

    A novel strategy to treat anxiety and fear-related disorders such as phobias, panic and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) is combining CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), including extinction-based exposure therapy, with cognitive enhancers. By targeting and boosting mechanisms underlying learning, drug development in this field aims at designing CBT-augmenting compounds that help to overcome extinction learning deficits, promote long-term fear inhibition and thus support relapse prevention. Progress in revealing the role of epigenetic regulation of specific genes associated with extinction memory generation has opened new avenues in this direction. The present review examines recent evidence from pre-clinical studies showing that increasing histone acetylation, either via genetic or pharmacological inhibition of HDACs (histone deacetylases) by e.g. vorinostat/SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), entinostat/MS-275, sodium butyrate, TSA (trichostatin A) or VPA (valproic acid), or by targeting HATs (histone acetyltransferases), augments fear extinction and, importantly, generates a long-term extinction memory that can protect from return of fear phenomena. The molecular mechanisms and pathways involved including BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor signalling are just beginning to be revealed. First studies in healthy humans are in support of extinction-facilitating effects of HDAC inhibitors. Very recent evidence that HDAC inhibitors can rescue deficits in extinction-memory-impaired rodents indicates a potential clinical utility of this approach also for exposure therapy-resistant patients. Important future work includes investigation of the long-term safety aspects of HDAC inhibitor treatment, as well as design of isotype(s)-specific inhibitors. Taken together, HDAC inhibitors display promising potential as pharmacological adjuncts to augment the efficacy of exposure-based approaches in anxiety and trauma therapy.

  10. HDAC inhibitors as cognitive enhancers in fear, anxiety and trauma therapy: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Nigel; Singewald, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A novel strategy to treat anxiety and fear-related disorders such as phobias, panic and PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) is combining CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), including extinction-based exposure therapy, with cognitive enhancers. By targeting and boosting mechanisms underlying learning, drug development in this field aims at designing CBT-augmenting compounds that help to overcome extinction learning deficits, promote long-term fear inhibition and thus support relapse prevention. Progress in revealing the role of epigenetic regulation of specific genes associated with extinction memory generation has opened new avenues in this direction. The present review examines recent evidence from pre-clinical studies showing that increasing histone acetylation, either via genetic or pharmacological inhibition of HDACs (histone deacetylases) by e.g. vorinostat/SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), entinostat/MS-275, sodium butyrate, TSA (trichostatin A) or VPA (valproic acid), or by targeting HATs (histone acetyltransferases), augments fear extinction and, importantly, generates a long-term extinction memory that can protect from return of fear phenomena. The molecular mechanisms and pathways involved including BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor signalling are just beginning to be revealed. First studies in healthy humans are in support of extinction-facilitating effects of HDAC inhibitors. Very recent evidence that HDAC inhibitors can rescue deficits in extinction-memory-impaired rodents indicates a potential clinical utility of this approach also for exposure therapy-resistant patients. Important future work includes investigation of the long-term safety aspects of HDAC inhibitor treatment, as well as design of isotype(s)-specific inhibitors. Taken together, HDAC inhibitors display promising potential as pharmacological adjuncts to augment the efficacy of exposure-based approaches in anxiety and trauma therapy

  11. Biological Effect of a Hybrid Anticancer Agent Based on Kinase and Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors on Triple-Negative (MDA-MB231) Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Librizzi, Mariangela; Spencer, John; Luparello, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) combined with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1/2 inhibitor (3Z)-5-hydroxy-3-(1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethylidene)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-2-one on MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells (triple-negative) in the form of both a cocktail of the separate compounds and a chemically synthesized hybrid (N-hydroxy-N'-[(3Z)-2-oxo-3-(1H-pyrrol-2-ylmethylidene)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-5-yl]octanediamide). Comparative flow cytometric and Western blot analyses were performed on cocktail- and hybrid-treated cells to evaluate cell cycle distribution, autophagy/apoptosis modulation, and mitochondrial metabolic state in order to understand the cellular basis of the cytotoxic effect. Cell cycle analysis showed a perturbation of the rate of progression through the cycle, with aspects of redistribution of cells over different cycle phases for the two treatments. In addition, the results suggest that the two distinct classes of compounds under investigation could induce cell death by different preferential pathways, i.e., autophagy inhibition (the cocktail) or apoptosis promotion (the hybrid), thus confirming the enhanced potential of the hybrid approach vs. the combination approach in finely tuning the biological activities of target cells and also showing the hybrid compound as an additional promising drug-like molecule for the prevention or therapy of “aggressive” breast carcinoma. PMID:27483253

  12. CD1d induction in solid tumor cells by histone deacetylase inhibitors through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and activation of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Lin, Pei-Jie; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2012-04-01

    CD1d is a MHC class-like molecule that presents glycolipids to natural killer T (NKT) cells, then regulates innate and adaptive immunity. The regulation of CD1d gene expression in solid tumors is still largely unknown. Gene expression can be epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation and histone acetylation. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), induced CD1d gene expression in human (A549 and NCI-H292) and mouse (TC-1 and B16/F0) cancer cells. Simultaneous knockdown of HDAC1 and 2 induced CD1d gene expression. Sp1 inhibitor mitramycin A (MTM) blocked TSA- and SAHA-induced CD1d mRNA expression and Sp1 luciferase activity. Co-transfection of GAL4-Sp1 and Fc-luciferase reporters demonstrated that TSA and SAHA induced Sp1 luciferase reporter activity by enhancing Sp1 transactivation activity. The binding of Sp1 to CD1d promoter and histone H3 acetylation on Sp1 sites were increased by TSA and SAHA. These results indicate that TSA and SAHA could up-regulate CD1d expression in tumor cells through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and activation of Sp1. PMID:22419072

  13. PLGA-PEG Nanoparticles Coated with Anti-CD45RO and Loaded with HDAC Plus Protease Inhibitors Activate Latent HIV and Inhibit Viral Spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaolong; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xinkuang; Zhou, Shuping; Liu, Liang; Zhang, Fujina; Xie, Chunmei; Cai, Shuyu; Wei, Jia; Zhu, Yongqiang; Hou, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Activating HIV-1 proviruses in latent reservoirs combined with inhibiting viral spread might be an effective anti-HIV therapeutic strategy. Active specific delivery of therapeutic drugs into cells harboring latent HIV, without the use of viral vectors, is a critical challenge to this objective. In this study, nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol diblock copolymers conjugated with anti-CD45RO antibody and loaded with the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and/or protease inhibitor nelfinavir (Nel) were tested for activity against latent virus in vitro. Nanoparticles loaded with SAHA, Nel, and SAHA + Nel were characterized in terms of size, surface morphology, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, drug release, and toxicity to ACH-2 cells. We show that SAHA- and SAHA + Nel-loaded nanoparticles can target latently infected CD4+ T-cells and stimulate virus production. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with SAHA + NEL were capable of both activating latent virus and inhibiting viral spread. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel reagent for targeting and eliminating latent HIV reservoirs.

  14. 45Ti extraction using hydroxamate resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, K.; Severin, G. W.; Barnhart, T. E.; Engle, J. W.; Valdovinos, H. F.; Nickles, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    As an attractive radionuclide for positron emission tomography, this study explores the extraction and reactivity of 45Ti produced via the 45Sc(p,n)45Ti reaction on a GE PETtrace. Using a small hydroxamate column, we have demonstrated an overall recovery of >50% of 45Ti in ˜1 mL of 1M oxalic acid. Conditions for reacting with desferal were also explored, with effective specific activities up to 38 GBq/μmol obtained.

  15. Neuronal developmental gene and miRNA signatures induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors in human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Meganathan, K; Jagtap, S; Srinivasan, S P; Wagh, V; Hescheler, J; Hengstler, J; Leist, M; Sachinidis, A

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may be applied to develop human-relevant sensitive in vitro test systems for monitoring developmental toxicants. The aim of this study was to identify potential developmental toxicity mechanisms of the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC) valproic acid (VPA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and trichostatin A (TSA) relevant to the in vivo condition using a hESC model in combination with specific differentiation protocols and genome-wide gene expression and microRNA profiling. Analysis of the gene expression data showed that VPA repressed neural tube and dorsal forebrain (OTX2, ISL1, EMX2 and SOX10)-related transcripts. In addition, VPA upregulates axonogenesis and ventral forebrain-associated genes, such as SLIT1, SEMA3A, DLX2/4 and GAD2. HDACi-induced expression of miR-378 and knockdown of miR-378 increases the expression of OTX2 and EMX2, which supports our hypothesis that HDACi targets forebrain markers through miR-378. In conclusion, multilineage differentiation in vitro test system is very sensitive for monitoring molecular activities relevant to in vivo neuronal developmental toxicity. Moreover, miR-378 seems to repress the expression of the OTX2 and EMX2 and therefore could be a regulator of the development of neural tube and dorsal forebrain neurons. PMID:25950486

  16. An HDAC inhibitor enhances cancer therapeutic efficiency of RNA polymerase III promoter-driven IDO shRNA.

    PubMed

    Yen, M-C; Weng, T-Y; Chen, Y-L; Lin, C-C; Chen, C-Y; Wang, C-Y; Chao, H-L; Chen, C-S; Lai, M-D

    2013-06-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are used in treating certain human malignancies. Our laboratories demonstrated their capability in enhancing antitumor effect of DNA vaccine driven by an RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) promoter. However, it is unknown whether HDAC inhibitors enhance the therapeutic short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expressed by an RNA polymerase III (RNA pol III) promoter. We investigated whether HDAC inhibitors augmented antitumor effect of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) shRNA. HDAC inhibitor OSU-HDAC42 and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid enhanced RNA pol III-driven U6 and H1 promoter activity in three different cell types in vitro: 293, NIH3T3 and dendritic cell line DC2.4. Subcutaneous injection of OSU-HDAC42 enhanced U6 and H1 promoter activity on abdominal skin of mice in vivo. Combination of IDO shRNA and OSU-HDAC42 increased antitumor effect of IDO shRNA in MBT-2 murine bladder tumor model. IDO shRNA induced tumor-infiltrating CD8⁺ and CD4⁺ T cells, whereas OSU-HDAC42 treatment induced tumor-infiltrating CD4⁺ T cells. Combination of OSU-HDAC42 and IDO shRNA further induced tumor-infiltrating natural killer cells and enhanced interferon-γ in lymphocytes, but suppressed interleukin (IL)-4 expression of lymphocytes. In addition, OSU-HDAC42 treatment did not alter mRNA expression of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In conclusion, HDAC inhibitor OSU-HDAC42 may serve as adjuvant of the therapeutic shRNA expressed by an RNA pol III promoter.

  17. Profiling the anti-protozoal activity of anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors against Plasmodium and Trypanosoma parasites

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica A.; Jones, Amy J.; Avery, Vicky M.; Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D.M.; Ng, Susanna S.; Fairlie, David P.; Adams, Tina S.; Andrews, Katherine T.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes work together with histone acetyltransferases (HATs) to reversibly acetylate both histone and non-histone proteins. As a result, these enzymes are involved in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression as well as other important cellular processes. HDACs are validated drug targets for some types of cancer, with four HDAC inhibitors clinically approved. However, they are also showing promise as novel drug targets for other indications, including malaria and other parasitic diseases. In this study the in vitro activity of four anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors was examined against parasites that cause malaria and trypanosomiasis. Three of these inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat®), romidepsin (Istodax®) and belinostat (Beleodaq®), are clinically approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma, while the fourth, panobinostat, has recently been approved for combination therapy use in certain patients with multiple myeloma. All HDAC inhibitors were found to inhibit the growth of asexual-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in the nanomolar range (IC50 10–200 nM), while only romidepsin was active at sub-μM concentrations against bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasites (IC50 35 nM). The compounds were found to have some selectivity for malaria parasites compared with mammalian cells, but were not selective for trypanosome parasites versus mammalian cells. All compounds caused hyperacetylation of histone and non-histone proteins in P. falciparum asexual stage parasites and inhibited deacetylase activity in P. falciparum nuclear extracts in addition to recombinant PfHDAC1 activity. P. falciparum histone hyperacetylation data indicate that HDAC inhibitors may differentially affect the acetylation profiles of histone H3 and H4. PMID:26199860

  18. NBM-T-L-BMX-OS01, Semisynthesized from Osthole, Is a Novel Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase and Enhances Learning and Memory in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Chen; Chen, Chia-Nan; Wu, Carol-Imei; Huang, Wei-Jan; Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Kuan, Ming-Chung; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Huang, Jing-Shi; Huang, Chung-Yang

    2013-01-01

    NBM-T-L-BMX-OS01 (BMX) was derived from the semisynthesis of osthole, isolated from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cuss., and was identified to be a potent inhibitor of HDAC8. This study shows that HDAC8 is highly expressed in the pancreas and the brain. The function of HDAC8 in the brain has not been adequately studied. Because BMX enhances neurite outgrowth and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation, the effect of BMX on neural plasticity such as learning and memory is examined. To examine declarative and nondeclarative memory, a water maze, a passive one-way avoidance task, and a novel object recognition task were performed. Results from the water maze revealed that BMX and suberoylanilide-hydroxamic-acid-(SAHA-) treated rats showed shorter escape latency in finding the hidden platform. The BMX-treated animals spent more time in the target quadrant in the probe trial performance. An analysis of the passive one-way avoidance results showed that the BMX-treated animals stayed longer in the illuminated chamber by 1 day and 7 days after footshock. The novel object recognition task revealed that the BMX-treated animals showed a marked increase in the time spent exploring novel objects. Furthermore, BMX ameliorates scopolamine-(Sco-) induced learning and memory impairment in animals, indicating a novel role of BMX in learning and memory. PMID:23606881

  19. NBM-T-L-BMX-OS01, Semisynthesized from Osthole, Is a Novel Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase and Enhances Learning and Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Chen; Chen, Chia-Nan; Wu, Carol-Imei; Huang, Wei-Jan; Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Kuan, Ming-Chung; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Huang, Jing-Shi; Huang, Chung-Yang

    2013-01-01

    NBM-T-L-BMX-OS01 (BMX) was derived from the semisynthesis of osthole, isolated from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cuss., and was identified to be a potent inhibitor of HDAC8. This study shows that HDAC8 is highly expressed in the pancreas and the brain. The function of HDAC8 in the brain has not been adequately studied. Because BMX enhances neurite outgrowth and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation, the effect of BMX on neural plasticity such as learning and memory is examined. To examine declarative and nondeclarative memory, a water maze, a passive one-way avoidance task, and a novel object recognition task were performed. Results from the water maze revealed that BMX and suberoylanilide-hydroxamic-acid-(SAHA-) treated rats showed shorter escape latency in finding the hidden platform. The BMX-treated animals spent more time in the target quadrant in the probe trial performance. An analysis of the passive one-way avoidance results showed that the BMX-treated animals stayed longer in the illuminated chamber by 1 day and 7 days after footshock. The novel object recognition task revealed that the BMX-treated animals showed a marked increase in the time spent exploring novel objects. Furthermore, BMX ameliorates scopolamine-(Sco-) induced learning and memory impairment in animals, indicating a novel role of BMX in learning and memory. PMID:23606881

  20. The histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA induces HSP60 nitration and its extracellular release by exosomal vesicles in human lung-derived carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Bavisotto, Celeste Caruso; Barone, Rosario; Emanuele, Sonia; Lo Cascio, Filippa; Mocciaro, Emanuele; Fais, Stefano; De Macario, Everly Conway; Macario, Alberto J.L.; Cappello, Francesco; Lauricella, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    HSP60 undergoes changes in quantity and distribution in some types of tumors suggesting a participation of the chaperonin in the mechanism of transformation and cancer progression. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a member of a family of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), has anti-cancer potential but its interaction, if any, with HSP60 has not been elucidated. We investigated the effects of SAHA in a human lung-derived carcinoma cell line (H292). We analysed cell viability and cycle; oxidative stress markers; mitochondrial integrity; HSP60 protein and mRNA levels; and HSP60 post-translational modifications, and its secretion. We found that SAHA is cytotoxic for H292 cells, interrupting the cycle at the G2/M phase, which is followed by death; cytotoxicity is associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and diminution of intracellular levels of HSP60; HSP60 undergoes a post-translational modification and becomes nitrated; and nitrated HSP60 is exported via exosomes. We propose that SAHA causes ROS overproduction and mitochondrial dysfunction, which leads to HSP60 nitration and release into the intercellular space and circulation to interact with the immune system. These successive steps might constitute the mechanism of the anti-tumor action of SAHA and provide a basis to design supplementary therapeutic strategies targeting HSP60, which would be more efficacious than the compound alone. PMID:26700624

  1. Transcript, methylation and molecular docking analyses of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, SAHA and Dacinostat, on SMN2 expression in fibroblasts of SMA patients.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Jafar; Al-Najjar, Belal O; Wahab, Habibah A; Zabidi-Hussin, Z A M H; Sasongko, Teguh Haryo

    2016-09-01

    Several histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are known to increase Survival Motor Neuron 2 (SMN2) expression for the therapy of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). We aimed to compare the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and Dacinostat, a novel HDACi, on SMN2 expression and to elucidate their acetylation effects on the methylation of the SMN2. Cell-based assays using type I and type II SMA fibroblasts examined changes in transcript expressions, methylation levels and protein expressions. In silico methods analyzed the intermolecular interactions between each compound and HDAC2/HDAC7. SMN2 mRNA transcript levels and SMN protein levels showed notable increases in both cell types, except for Dacinostat exposure on type II cells. However, combined compound exposures showed less pronounced increase in SMN2 transcript and SMN protein level. Acetylation effects of SAHA and Dacinostat promoted demethylation of the SMN2 promoter. The in silico analyses revealed identical binding sites for both compounds in HDACs, which could explain the limited effects of the combined exposure. With the exception on the effect of Dacinostat in Type II cells, we have shown that SAHA and Dacinostat increased SMN2 transcript and protein levels and promoted demethylation of the SMN2 gene.

  2. Proteasome inhibitor MG-132 enhances histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA-induced cell death of chronic myeloid leukemia cells by an ROS-mediated mechanism and downregulation of the Bcr-Abl fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, WENJING; ZHU, WEIWEI; MA, LIYA; XIAO, FENG; QIAN, WENBIN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been progress in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, novel therapeutic strategies are required in order to address the emerging problem of imatinib resistance. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and proteasome inhibitors are promising alternatives, and may be amenable to integration with current therapeutic approaches. However, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between these two agents remain unclear. The present study assessed the cytotoxic effect of the HDACi, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), in combination with the proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, in imatinib-sensitive K562 and imatinib-resistant K562G cells, and investigated the mechanism underlying this effect. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method and protein expression levels were determined by western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation levels were observed under a fluorescence microscope The results indicated that SAHA and MG-132 act in a synergistic manner to induce cell death in K562 and K562G cells. This effect was associated with Bcr-Abl downregulation and the production of ROS. Notably, the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, almost fully reversed the cell death and Bcr-Abl downregulation that was induced by the combination of SAHA and MG-132. By contrast, the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, only partially reversed the cell death induced by these two drugs in CML cells. These results indicated that increased intracellular ROS levels are important in the induction of cell death and the downregulation of Bcr-Abl. In conclusion, the present results suggested that combined SAHA and MG-132 may be a promising treatment for CML. PMID:26722260

  3. Transcriptome Analysis of Pig In Vivo, In Vitro–Fertilized, and Nuclear Transfer Blastocyst-Stage Embryos Treated with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Postfusion and Activation Reveals Changes in the Lysosomal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Kristin M.; Mao, Jiude; Lee, Kiho; Spollen, William G.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Walters, Eric M.; Spate, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Genetically modified pigs are commonly created via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Treatment of reconstructed embryos with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) immediately after activation improves cloning efficiency. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the transcriptome of SCNT embryos treated with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), 4-iodo-SAHA (ISAHA), or Scriptaid as compared to untreated SCNT, in vitro–fertilized (IVF), and in vivo (IVV) blastocyst-stage embryos. SAHA (10 μM) had the highest level of blastocyst development at 43.9%, and all treatments except 10 μM ISAHA had the same percentage of blastocyst development as Scriptaid (p<0.05). Two treatments, 1.0 μM ISAHA and 1.0 μM SAHA, had higher mean cell number than No HDACi treatment (p<0.021). Embryo transfers performed with 10 μM SAHA- and 1 μM ISAHA-treated embryos resulted in the birth of healthy piglets. GenBank accession numbers from up- and downregulated transcripts were loaded into the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery to identify enriched biological themes. HDACi treatment yielded the highest enrichment for transcripts within the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Pathway, lysosome. The mean intensity of LysoTracker was lower in IVV embryos compared to IVF and SCNT embryos (p<0.0001). SAHA and ISAHA can successfully be used to create healthy piglets from SCNT. PMID:26731590

  4. Tandem mass spectrometry of coprogen and deferoxamine hydroxamic siderophores.

    PubMed

    Simionato, Ana V C; de Souza, Gezimar D; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Glick, James; Vouros, Paul; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms of fragmentation of hydroxamic siderophores are proposed comparing deuterated and nondeuterated samples. Standard siderophores (e.g. deferoxamine and coprogen) were directly injected into both ion trap and linear quadrupole mass spectrometers with electrospray ionization (ESI). Four and two fragmentation steps were carried out for deferoxamine and coprogen (analyzed by positive and negative ESI, respectively). Deferoxamine cleavages occurred in both peptide and hydroxamic bonds while the coprogen fragmentation pattern is more elaborate, since it contains Fe(III) in its structure.

  5. Identification of the hydroxamate siderophore ferricrocin in Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Nina; Gagnon, René; Wichard, Thomas; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The hydroxamate siderophore ferricrocin was identified in Cladosporium cladosporioides growth medium by solid phase extraction and ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometer (UHPLC/QTOF-MS). Both desferricrocin and ferricrocin were detected in the extracellular medium assisted by high resolution mass spectrometry. This is the first identification of a hydroxamate siderophore in Cladosporium cladosporioides. This finding emphasizes the common meaning of ferricrocin in fungi. PMID:24868878

  6. Identification of the hydroxamate siderophore ferricrocin in Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Nina; Gagnon, René; Wichard, Thomas; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The hydroxamate siderophore ferricrocin was identified in Cladosporium cladosporioides growth medium by solid phase extraction and ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometer (UHPLC/QTOF-MS). Both desferricrocin and ferricrocin were detected in the extracellular medium assisted by high resolution mass spectrometry. This is the first identification of a hydroxamate siderophore in Cladosporium cladosporioides. This finding emphasizes the common meaning of ferricrocin in fungi.

  7. MicroPET Evaluation of a Hydroxamate-Based MMP Inhibitor, [(18)F]FB-ML5, in a Mouse Model of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Acute Airway Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Nathalie; van Waarde, Aren; Rozeveld, Dennie; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Heijink, Irene H; Castelli, Riccardo; Overkleeft, Herman S; Bischoff, Rainer; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Elsinga, Philip H

    2015-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the main proteolytic enzymes involved in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A radiolabeled MMP inhibitor, [(18)F]FB-ML5, was prepared, and its in vivo kinetics were tested in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation. BALB/c mice were exposed for 4 days to cigarette smoke (CS) or air. On the fifth day, a dynamic microPET scan was made with [(18)F]FB-ML5. Standardized uptake values (PET-SUVmean) were 0.19 ± 0.06 in the lungs of CS-exposed mice (n = 6) compared to 0.11 ± 0.03 (n = 5) in air-exposed controls (p < 0.05), 90 min post-injection MMP-9 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were increased from undetectable level to 4615 ± 1963 pg/ml by CS exposure. Increased MMP expression in a COPD mouse model was shown to lead to increased retention of [(18)F]FB-ML5.

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cancer stem cells exhibit high pentose phosphate pathway metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Debeb, Bisrat G.; Lacerda, Lara; Larson, Richard; Wolfe, Adam R.; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Reuben, James M.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Gilcrease, Michael; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We recently demonstrated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can “reprogram” differentiated triple-negative breast cancer cells to become quiescent stem-like cancer cells. We hypothesized that the metabolic state of such cells differs from that of their differentiated progeny. Results In untreated cells, glucose uptake was higher in ALDH+ cells than in ALDH− cells (p = 0.01) but lactate production was not different; treating ALDH− or ALDH+ cells with VA or SAHA similarly increased glucose uptake without changing lactate production but upregulated G6PD, a rate-limiting enzyme in pentose phosphate pathway metabolism. NADPH production was higher in HDAC inhibitor-treated stem-like cells than in vehicle-treated cells (p < 0.05). Two G6PD inhibitors, 6-aminonicotinamide and dehydroepiandrosterone, decreased mammosphere formation efficiency and ALDH activity and 6-aminonicotinamide reduced the VA-induced increase in ALDH+ cells. Finally, patients expressing high G6PD mRNA had significantly worse overall survival (p < 0.001), and patients with high G6PD protein showed a similar trend towards worse disease-specific survival (p = 0.06). Methods Glucose consumption, lactate and NADPH production, and reactive oxygen species generation were compared in aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive and –negative cells in the presence or absence of the HDAC inhibitors valproic acid (VA) or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) expression was evaluated in a tissue microarray from 94 patients with node-positive invasive breast carcinoma and in two publically available databases and correlated with overall survival. Conclusions Energy metabolism in HDAC inhibitor-induced stem-like cancer cells differed sharply from that of differentiated cell types. HDAC inhibitor-induced dedifferentiation promoted metabolic reprogramming into the pentose phosphate pathway, which is targeted effectively by G6PD inhibition. These findings

  9. HDAC inhibitor reduces cytokine storm and facilitates induction of chimerism that reverses lupus in anti-CD3 conditioning regimen.

    PubMed

    Li, Nainong; Zhao, Dongchang; Kirschbaum, Mark; Zhang, Chunyan; Lin, Chia-Lei; Todorov, Ivan; Kandeel, Fouad; Forman, Stephen; Zeng, Defu

    2008-03-25

    In allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), donor T cell-mediated graft versus host leukemia (GVL) and graft versus autoimmune (GVA) activity play critical roles in treatment of hematological malignancies and refractory autoimmune diseases. However, graft versus host disease (GVHD), which sometimes can be fatal, remains a major obstacle in classical HCT, where recipients are conditioned with total body irradiation or high-dose chemotherapy. We previously reported that anti-CD3 conditioning allows donor CD8(+) T cells to facilitate engraftment and mediate GVL without causing GVHD. However, the clinical application of this radiation-free and GVHD preventative conditioning regimen is hindered by the cytokine storm syndrome triggered by anti-CD3 and the high-dose donor bone marrow (BM) cells required for induction of chimerism. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) are known to induce apoptosis of cancer cells and reduce production of proinflammatory cytokines by nonmalignant cells. Here, we report that SAHA inhibits the proliferative and cytotoxic activity of anti-CD3-activated T cells. Administration of low-dose SAHA reduces cytokine production and ameliorates the cytokine storm syndrome triggered by anti-CD3. Conditioning with anti-CD3 and SAHA allows induction of chimerism with lower doses of donor BM cells in old nonautoimmune and autoimmune lupus mice. In addition, conditioning with anti-CD3 and SAHA allows donor CD8(+) T cell-mediated GVA activity to reverse lupus glomerulonephritis without causing GVHD. These results indicate that conditioning with anti-CD3 and HDAC inhibitors represent a radiation-free and GVHD-preventative regimen with clinical application potential.

  10. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Upregulates Peroxisomal Fatty Acid Oxidation and Inhibits Apoptotic Cell Death in Abcd1-Deficient Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaspreet; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Pujol, Aurora; Baarine, Mauhamad; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-01-01

    In X-ALD, mutation/deletion of ALD gene (ABCD1) and the resultant very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derangement has dramatically opposing effects in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While loss of Abcd1 in astrocytes produces a robust inflammatory response, the oligodendrocytes undergo cell death leading to demyelination in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). The mechanisms of these distinct pathways in the two cell types are not well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Abcd1-knockdown and the subsequent alteration in VLCFA metabolism in human U87 astrocytes and rat B12 oligodendrocytes. Loss of Abcd1 inhibited peroxisomal β-oxidation activity and increased expression of VLCFA synthesizing enzymes, elongase of very long chain fatty acids (ELOVLs) (1 and 3) in both cell types. However, higher induction of ELOVL's in Abcd1-deficient B12 oligodendrocytes than astrocytes suggests that ELOVL pathway may play a prominent role in oligodendrocytes in X-ALD. While astrocytes are able to maintain the cellular homeostasis of anti-apoptotic proteins, Abcd1-deletion in B12 oligodendrocytes downregulated the anti-apototic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and cell survival (phospho-Erk1/2) proteins, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bim, Bax and Bid) leading to cell loss. These observations provide insights into different cellular signaling mechanisms in response to Abcd1-deletion in two different cell types of CNS. The apoptotic responses were accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-9-dependent mechanism in Abcd1-deficient oligodendrocytes. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) corrected the VLCFA derangement both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the oligodendrocytes loss. These observations provide a proof-of principle that HDAC inhibitor SAHA may have a therapeutic potential for X-ALD. PMID:23923017

  11. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Treatment Attenuates Coagulation Imbalance in a Lethal Sepsis Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ting; Li, Yongqing; Liu, Baoling; Wu, Erxi; Sillesen, Martin; Velmahos, George C.; Halaweish, Ihab; Alam, Hasan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis has a profound impact on the inflammatory and hemostatic systems. In addition to systemic inflammation, it can produce disseminated intravascular coagulation, microvascular thrombosis, consumptive coagulopathy, and multiple organ failure. We have shown that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), improves survival in a lethal model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice. However, its effect on coagulation remains unknown. The goal of this study was to quantify the impact of SAHA treatment on coagulopathy in sepsis. Methods C57BL/6J mice were subjected to CLP, and 1 hour later given intraperitoneally either SAHA dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or DMSO only. Sham-operated animals were handled in similar manner without CLP. Blood samples were collected by cardiac puncture and evaluated using the TEG® 5000 Thrombelastograph® Hemostasis Analyzer System. Results Compared to the sham group, all animals in DMSO vehicle group died within 72 hrs, and developed coagulopathy that manifested as prolonged initial fibrin formation and fibrin cross-linkage time, and decreased clot formation speed, platelet function and clot rigidity. SAHA treatment significantly improved survival and was also associated with improvement in fibrin cross-linkage, clot formation, as well as platelet function and clot rigidity, without a significant impact on the clot initiation parameters. Conclusions SAHA treatment enhances survival and attenuates sepsis-associated coagulopathy by improving fibrin cross-linkage, rate of clot formation, platelet function and clot strength. HDACI may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for correcting sepsis-associated coagulopathy. PMID:24957668

  12. Grouping of histone deacetylase inhibitors and other toxicants disturbing neural crest migration by transcriptional profiling.

    PubMed

    Dreser, Nadine; Zimmer, Bastian; Dietz, Christian; Sügis, Elena; Pallocca, Giorgia; Nyffeler, Johanna; Meisig, Johannes; Blüthgen, Nils; Berthold, Michael R; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2015-09-01

    Functional assays, such as the "migration inhibition of neural crest cells" (MINC) developmental toxicity test, can identify toxicants without requiring knowledge on their mode of action (MoA). Here, we were interested, whether (i) inhibition of migration by structurally diverse toxicants resulted in a unified signature of transcriptional changes; (ii) whether statistically-identified transcript patterns would inform on compound grouping even though individual genes were little regulated, and (iii) whether analysis of a small group of biologically-relevant transcripts would allow the grouping of compounds according to their MoA. We analyzed transcripts of 35 'migration genes' after treatment with 16 migration-inhibiting toxicants. Clustering, principal component analysis and correlation analyses of the data showed that mechanistically related compounds (e.g. histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), PCBs) triggered similar transcriptional changes, but groups of structurally diverse toxicants largely differed in their transcriptional effects. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) confirmed the specific clustering of HDACi across multiple separate experiments. Similarity of the signatures of the HDACi trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid to the one of valproic acid (VPA), suggested that the latter compound acts as HDACi when impairing neural crest migration. In conclusion, the data suggest that (i) a given functional effect (e.g. inhibition of migration) can be associated with highly diverse signatures of transcript changes; (ii) statistically significant grouping of mechanistically-related compounds can be achieved on the basis of few genes with small regulations. Thus, incorporation of mechanistic markers in functional in vitro tests may support read-across procedures, also for structurally un-related compounds.

  13. Probing the S2' Subsite of the Anthrax Toxin Lethal Factor Using Novel N-Alkylated Hydroxamates.

    PubMed

    Kurbanov, Elbek K; Chiu, Ting-Lan; Solberg, Jonathan; Francis, Subhashree; Maize, Kimberly M; Fernandez, Jenna; Johnson, Rodney L; Hawkinson, Jon E; Walters, Michael A; Finzel, Barry C; Amin, Elizabeth Ambrose

    2015-11-12

    The lethal factor (LF) enzyme secreted by Bacillus anthracis is a zinc hydrolase that is chiefly responsible for anthrax-related cell death. Although many studies of the design of small molecule LF inhibitors have been conducted, no LF inhibitor is yet available as a therapeutic agent. Inhibitors with considerable chemical diversity have been developed and investigated; however, the LF S2' subsite has not yet been systematically explored as a potential target for lead optimization. Here we present synthesis, experimental evaluation, modeling, and structural biology for a novel series of sulfonamide hydroxamate LF inhibitor analogues specifically designed to extend into, and probe chemical preferences of, this S2' subsite. We discovered that this region accommodates a wide variety of chemical functionalities and that a broad selection of ligand structural modifications directed to this area can be incorporated without significant deleterious alterations in biological activity. We also identified key residues in this subsite that can potentially be targeted to improve inhibitor binding.

  14. Ionic liquid containing hydroxamate and N-alkyl sulfamate ions

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2016-03-15

    Embodiments of the invention are related to ionic liquids and more specifically to ionic liquids used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the ionic liquid includes a cation and an anion selected from hydroxamate and/or N-alkyl sulfamate anions.

  15. Hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid under UREX+ conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Alyapyshev, M.; Paulenova, A.; Tkac, P.; Cleveland, M.A.; Bruso, J.E.

    2007-07-01

    Aceto-hydroxamic acid (AHA) is used as a stripping agent In the UREX process. While extraction yields of uranium remain high upon addition of AHA, hexavalent plutonium and neptunium are rapidly reduced to the pentavalent state while the tetravalent species and removed from the product stream. However, under acidic conditions, aceto-hydroxamic acid undergoes hydrolytic degradation. In this study, the kinetics of the hydrolysis of aceto-hydroxamic acid in nitric and perchloric acid media was investigated at several temperatures. The decrease of the concentration of AHA was determined via its ferric complex using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The data obtained were analyzed using the method of initial rates. The data follow the pseudo-first order reaction model. Gamma irradiation of AHA/HNO{sub 3} solutions with 33 kGy/s caused two-fold faster degradation of AHA. The rate equation and thermodynamic data will be presented for the hydrolysis reaction with respect to the concentrations of aceto-hydroxamic acid, nitrate and hydronium ions, and radiation dose. (authors)

  16. The reduction of actinide ions by hydroxamic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. J.; May, I.

    1999-01-01

    Simple hydroxamic acids have been shown to have useful applications in an Advanced Purex process for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. They are especially suited to the separation of neptunium (IV) from uranium (VI) by the selective formation of a hydrophilic complex with Np(IV). U(VI) extraction in to 30% tributyl phosphate is unaffected. However, they have also been shown to be very fast reducing agents for Np(VI). The timescales of the reduction have been defined under a range of typical Purex Process conditions although the accurate determination of the reaction kinetics was not possible due to the rapidity of the reaction. U(VI) was shown not to be reduced. Therefore, Np(VI) can be efficiently reductively stripped when solvent phase (30% tributyl phosphate in odourless kerosene) solutions of Np(VI) and U(VI) are contacted with aqueous phase hydroxamic acid solutions. The slow reduction of plutonium (IV) to Pu(III) has also been observed and this is apparently enhanced by the presence of U(VI) ions. The observed reactions of these actinide ions was shown to be compatible with experimentally determined onset potentials for hydroxamic acids. The hydrolysis of hydroxamic acids to hydroxylamine in nitric acid also affects the reduction of Pu(IV), particularly by FHA.

  17. The combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat and synthetic triterpenoids reduces tumorigenesis in mouse models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liby, Karen T.

    2013-01-01

    Novel drugs and drug combinations are needed for the chemoprevention and treatment of cancer. We show that the histone deacetylase inhibitor vorinostat [suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)] and the methyl ester or ethyl amide derivatives of the synthetic triterpenoid 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO-Me and CDDO-Ea, respectively) cooperated to inhibit the de novo synthesis of nitric oxide in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells and in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. Additionally, SAHA enhanced the ability of synthetic triterpenoids to delay formation of estrogen receptor-negative mammary tumors in MMTV-polyoma middle T (PyMT) mice. CDDO-Me (50mg/kg diet) and SAHA (250mg/kg diet) each significantly delayed the initial development of tumors by 4 (P < 0.001) and 2 (P < 0.05) weeks, respectively, compared with the control group in the time required to reach 50% tumor incidence. CDDO-Ea (400mg/kg diet), as a single agent, did not delay tumor development. The combination of either triterpenoid with SAHA was significantly more potent than the individual drugs for delaying tumor development, with a 7 week (P < 0.001) delay before 50% tumor incidence was reached. SAHA, alone and in combination with CDDO-Me, also significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages into the mammary glands of PyMT mice and levels of the chemokine macrophage colony-stimulating factor in primary PyMT tumor cells. In addition, SAHA and the synthetic triterpenoids cooperated to suppress secreted levels of the pro-angiogenic factor matrix metalloproteinase-9. Similar results were observed in mouse models of pancreatic and lung cancer. At concentrations that were anti-inflammatory, SAHA had no effect on histone acetylation. These studies suggest that both SAHA and triterpenoids effectively delay tumorigenesis, thereby demonstrating a promising, novel drug combination for chemoprevention. PMID:23042302

  18. Design and synthesis of an activity-based protein profiling probe derived from cinnamic hydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Ai, Teng; Qiu, Li; Xie, Jiashu; Geraghty, Robert J; Chen, Liqiang

    2016-02-15

    In our continued effort to discover new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) agents, we validated the anti-replicon activity of compound 1, a potent and selective anti-HCV hydroxamic acid recently reported by us. Generally favorable physicochemical and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties exhibited by 1 made it an ideal parent compound from which activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probe 3 was designed and synthesized. Evaluation of probe 3 revealed that it possessed necessary anti-HCV activity and selectivity. Therefore, we have successfully obtained compound 3 as a suitable ABPP probe to identify potential molecular targets of compound 1. Probe 3 and its improved analogs are expected to join a growing list of ABPP probes that have made important contributions to not only the studies of biochemical and cellular functions but also discovery of selective inhibitors of protein targets.

  19. Blockade of histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced RelA/p65 acetylation and NF-kappaB activation potentiates apoptosis in leukemia cells through a process mediated by oxidative damage, XIAP downregulation, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 activation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yun; Rahmani, Mohamed; Dent, Paul; Grant, Steven

    2005-07-01

    NF-kappaB activation is reciprocally regulated by RelA/p65 acetylation and deacetylation, which are mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases (HDACs). Here we demonstrate that in leukemia cells, NF-kappaB activation by the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) MS-275 and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid was associated with hyperacetylation and nuclear translocation of RelA/p65. The latter events, as well as the association of RelA/p65 with IkappaBalpha, were strikingly diminished by either coadministration of the IkappaBalpha phosphorylation inhibitor Bay 11-7082 (Bay) or transfection with an IkappaBalpha superrepressor. Inhibition of NF-kappaB by pharmacological inhibitors or genetic strategies markedly potentiated apoptosis induced by HDACIs, and this was accompanied by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, downregulation of Mn-superoxide dismutase and XIAP, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) activation. Conversely, N-acetyl L-cysteine blocked apoptosis induced by Bay/HDACIs by abrogating ROS generation. Inhibition of JNK1 activation attenuated Bay/HDACI lethality without affecting NF-kappaB inactivation and ROS generation. Finally, XIAP overexpression dramatically protected cells against the Bay/HDACI regimen but failed to prevent ROS production and JNK1 activation. Together, these data suggest that HDACIs promote the accumulation of acetylated RelA/p65 in the nucleus, leading to NF-kappaB activation. Moreover, interference with these events by either pharmacological or genetic means leads to a dramatic increase in HDACI-mediated lethality through enhanced oxidative damage, downregulation of NF-kappaB-dependent antiapoptotic proteins, and stress-related JNK1 activation.

  20. Thermodynamics of binding of structurally similar ligands to histone deacetylase 8 sheds light on challenges in the rational design of potent and isozyme-selective inhibitors of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raushan K; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Mandal, Tanmay; Balsubramanian, Narayanaganesh; Haldar, Manas; Mueller, Dustin J; Strode, Jerrod A; Cook, Gregory; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D K

    2014-12-01

    Among the different histone deacetylase (HDAC) isozymes, HDAC8 is the most highly malleable enzyme, and it exhibits the potential to accommodate structurally diverse ligands (albeit with moderate binding affinities) in its active site pocket. To probe the molecular basis of this feature, we performed detailed thermodynamic studies of the binding of structurally similar ligands, which differed with respect to the "cap", "linker", and "metal-binding" regions of the suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) pharmacophore, to HDAC8. The experimental data revealed that although the enthalpic (ΔH°) and entropic (ΔS°) changes for the binding of individual SAHA analogues to HDAC8 were substantially different, their binding free energies (ΔG°) were markedly similar, conforming to a strong enthalpy-entropy compensation effect. This effect was further observed in the temperature-dependent thermodynamics of binding of all SAHA analogues to the enzyme. Notably, in contrast to other metalloenzymes, our isothermal titration calorimetry experiments (performed in different buffers of varying ionization enthalpies) suggest that depending on the ligand, its zinc-binding group may or may not be deprotonated upon the binding to HDAC8. Furthermore, the heat capacity changes (ΔCp°) associated with the ligand binding to HDAC8 markedly differed from one SAHA analogue to the other, and such features could primarily be rationalized in light of the dynamic flexibility in the enzyme structure in conjunction with the reorganization of the active site resident water molecules. Arguments are presented that although the binding thermodynamic features described above would facilitate identification of weak to moderately tight-binding HDAC8 inhibitors (by a high-throughput and/or virtual screening of libraries of small molecules), they would pose major challenges for the structure-based rational design of highly potent and isozyme-selective inhibitors of human HDAC8.

  1. Thermodynamics of Binding of Structurally Similar Ligands to Histone Deacetylase 8 Sheds Light on Challenges in the Rational Design of Potent and Isozyme-Selective Inhibitors of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Among the different histone deacetylase (HDAC) isozymes, HDAC8 is the most highly malleable enzyme, and it exhibits the potential to accommodate structurally diverse ligands (albeit with moderate binding affinities) in its active site pocket. To probe the molecular basis of this feature, we performed detailed thermodynamic studies of the binding of structurally similar ligands, which differed with respect to the “cap”, “linker”, and “metal-binding” regions of the suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) pharmacophore, to HDAC8. The experimental data revealed that although the enthalpic (ΔH°) and entropic (ΔS°) changes for the binding of individual SAHA analogues to HDAC8 were substantially different, their binding free energies (ΔG°) were markedly similar, conforming to a strong enthalpy–entropy compensation effect. This effect was further observed in the temperature-dependent thermodynamics of binding of all SAHA analogues to the enzyme. Notably, in contrast to other metalloenzymes, our isothermal titration calorimetry experiments (performed in different buffers of varying ionization enthalpies) suggest that depending on the ligand, its zinc-binding group may or may not be deprotonated upon the binding to HDAC8. Furthermore, the heat capacity changes (ΔCp°) associated with the ligand binding to HDAC8 markedly differed from one SAHA analogue to the other, and such features could primarily be rationalized in light of the dynamic flexibility in the enzyme structure in conjunction with the reorganization of the active site resident water molecules. Arguments are presented that although the binding thermodynamic features described above would facilitate identification of weak to moderately tight-binding HDAC8 inhibitors (by a high-throughput and/or virtual screening of libraries of small molecules), they would pose major challenges for the structure-based rational design of highly potent and isozyme-selective inhibitors of human HDAC8. PMID:25407689

  2. Thermodynamics of binding of structurally similar ligands to histone deacetylase 8 sheds light on challenges in the rational design of potent and isozyme-selective inhibitors of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raushan K; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Mandal, Tanmay; Balsubramanian, Narayanaganesh; Haldar, Manas; Mueller, Dustin J; Strode, Jerrod A; Cook, Gregory; Mallik, Sanku; Srivastava, D K

    2014-12-01

    Among the different histone deacetylase (HDAC) isozymes, HDAC8 is the most highly malleable enzyme, and it exhibits the potential to accommodate structurally diverse ligands (albeit with moderate binding affinities) in its active site pocket. To probe the molecular basis of this feature, we performed detailed thermodynamic studies of the binding of structurally similar ligands, which differed with respect to the "cap", "linker", and "metal-binding" regions of the suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) pharmacophore, to HDAC8. The experimental data revealed that although the enthalpic (ΔH°) and entropic (ΔS°) changes for the binding of individual SAHA analogues to HDAC8 were substantially different, their binding free energies (ΔG°) were markedly similar, conforming to a strong enthalpy-entropy compensation effect. This effect was further observed in the temperature-dependent thermodynamics of binding of all SAHA analogues to the enzyme. Notably, in contrast to other metalloenzymes, our isothermal titration calorimetry experiments (performed in different buffers of varying ionization enthalpies) suggest that depending on the ligand, its zinc-binding group may or may not be deprotonated upon the binding to HDAC8. Furthermore, the heat capacity changes (ΔCp°) associated with the ligand binding to HDAC8 markedly differed from one SAHA analogue to the other, and such features could primarily be rationalized in light of the dynamic flexibility in the enzyme structure in conjunction with the reorganization of the active site resident water molecules. Arguments are presented that although the binding thermodynamic features described above would facilitate identification of weak to moderately tight-binding HDAC8 inhibitors (by a high-throughput and/or virtual screening of libraries of small molecules), they would pose major challenges for the structure-based rational design of highly potent and isozyme-selective inhibitors of human HDAC8. PMID:25407689

  3. The Therapeutic Potential of AN-7, a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, for Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome Alone or with Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Moyal, Lilach; Feldbaum, Nataly; Goldfeiz, Neta; Rephaeli, Ada; Nudelman, Abraham; Weitman, Michal; Tarasenko, Nataly; Gorovitz, Batia; Maron, Leah; Yehezkel, Shiran; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Lubin, Ido; Hodak, Emmilia

    2016-01-01

    The 2 histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides/sezary syndrome (MF/SS), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and romidepsin, are associated with low rates of overall response and high rates of adverse effects. Data regarding combination treatments with HDACIs is sparse. Butyroyloxymethyl diethylphosphate (AN-7) is a novel HDACI, which was found to have selective anticancer activity in several cell lines and animal models. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer effects of AN-7 and SAHA, either alone or combined with doxorubicin, on MF/SS cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with Sezary syndrome (SPBL). MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, SPBL, and PBL from healthy normal individuals (NPBL) were exposed to the test drugs, and the findings were analyzed by a viability assay, an apoptosis assay, and Western blot. AN-7 was more selectively toxic to MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, and SPBL (relative to NPBL) than SAHA and also acted more rapidly. Both drugs induced apoptosis in MF/SS cell lines, SAHA had a greater effect on MyLa cell line, while AN-7 induced greater apoptosis in SPBL; both caused an accumulation of acetylated histone H3, but AN-7 was associated with earlier kinetics; and both caused a downregulation of the HDAC1 protein in MF/SS cell lines. AN-7 acted synergistically with doxorubicin in both MF/SS cell lines and SPBL, and antagonistically with doxorubicin in NPBL. By contrast, SAHA acted antagonistically with doxorubicin on MF/SS cell lines, SPBL, and NPBL, leaving <50% viable cells. In conclusion, AN-7 holds promise as a therapeutic agent in MF/SS and has several advantages over SAHA. Our data provide a rationale for combining AN-7, but not SAHA, with doxorubicin to induce the cell death in MF/SS.

  4. The Therapeutic Potential of AN-7, a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, for Treatment of Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome Alone or with Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeiz, Neta; Rephaeli, Ada; Nudelman, Abraham; Weitman, Michal; Tarasenko, Nataly; Gorovitz, Batia; Maron, Leah; Yehezkel, Shiran; Amitay-Laish, Iris; Lubin, Ido; Hodak, Emmilia

    2016-01-01

    The 2 histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides/sezary syndrome (MF/SS), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and romidepsin, are associated with low rates of overall response and high rates of adverse effects. Data regarding combination treatments with HDACIs is sparse. Butyroyloxymethyl diethylphosphate (AN-7) is a novel HDACI, which was found to have selective anticancer activity in several cell lines and animal models. The aim of this study was to compare the anticancer effects of AN-7 and SAHA, either alone or combined with doxorubicin, on MF/SS cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with Sezary syndrome (SPBL). MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, SPBL, and PBL from healthy normal individuals (NPBL) were exposed to the test drugs, and the findings were analyzed by a viability assay, an apoptosis assay, and Western blot. AN-7 was more selectively toxic to MyLa cells, Hut78 cells, and SPBL (relative to NPBL) than SAHA and also acted more rapidly. Both drugs induced apoptosis in MF/SS cell lines, SAHA had a greater effect on MyLa cell line, while AN-7 induced greater apoptosis in SPBL; both caused an accumulation of acetylated histone H3, but AN-7 was associated with earlier kinetics; and both caused a downregulation of the HDAC1 protein in MF/SS cell lines. AN-7 acted synergistically with doxorubicin in both MF/SS cell lines and SPBL, and antagonistically with doxorubicin in NPBL. By contrast, SAHA acted antagonistically with doxorubicin on MF/SS cell lines, SPBL, and NPBL, leaving <50% viable cells. In conclusion, AN-7 holds promise as a therapeutic agent in MF/SS and has several advantages over SAHA. Our data provide a rationale for combining AN-7, but not SAHA, with doxorubicin to induce the cell death in MF/SS. PMID:26752418

  5. Ferric hydroxamate transport without subsequent iron utilization in Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1976-01-01

    Iron transport and utilization were examined in Bacillus megaterium Ard1, a mutant that is resistant to the hydroxymate antibiotic A22765 and whose growth is inhibited by the structurally similar hydroxamate Desferal. Rapid, low-level uptake of Desferal-50Fe was observed; such uptake was temperature and energy independent. Gel filtration chromatography of the cytoplasmic fraction of protoplasts labeled with Desferal-55Fe for 30 to 120 s demonstrated only unchanged esferal-55Fe in the cytoplasm. Although B. megaterium Ard1 showed transport of Desferal-59Fe by a process that resembles facilitated diffusion, this organism was unable to transfer iron from this chelate to cellular macromolecules for metabolic use. High-level transport of the ferric hydroxamate schizokinen-59Fe by B. megaterium Ard1 was both temperature and energy dependent. Within 30 s, protoplasts labeled with schizokinen-55Fe contained iron associated with certain macromolecules and in an apparent "pool" of schizokinen-55Fe in the cytoplasmic fraction. Prior transport of Dseferal-55Fe by protoplasts of strain Ard1 did not interfere with subsequent transport and utilization of schizokinen-59Fe. These studies suggest that transport of ferric hydroxamates may occur by a facilitated diffusion-type process; transfer of iron to cellular macromolecules may drive high-level transport of the chelate and may be the step at which energy is required in the iron transport-assimilation process. PMID:821926

  6. HDAC inhibitor SAHA normalizes the levels of VLCFAs in human skin fibroblasts from X-ALD patients and downregulates the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in Abcd1/2-silenced mouse astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspreet; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Singh, Inderjit

    2011-11-01

    X-adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene encoding the peroxisomal ABC transporter adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP). The consistent metabolic abnormality in all forms of X-ALD is an inherited defect in the peroxisomal β-oxidation of very long chain FAs (VLCFAs >C22:0) and the resultant pathognomic accumulation of VLCFA. The accumulation of VLCFA leads to a neuroinflammatory disease process associated with demyelination of the cerebral white matter. The present study underlines the importance of a potent histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in inducing the expression of ABCD2 [adrenoleukodystrophy-related protein (ALDRP)], and normalizing the peroxisomal β-oxidation, as well as the saturated and monounsaturated VLCFAs in cultured human skin fibroblasts of X-ALD patients. The expression of ELOVL1, the single elongase catalyzing the synthesis of both saturated VLCFA (C26:0) and monounsaturated VLCFA (C26:1), was also reduced by SAHA treatment. In addition, using Abcd1/Abcd2-silenced mouse primary astrocytes, we also examined the effects of SAHA in VLCFA-induced inflammatory response. SAHA treatment decreased the inflammatory response as expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, inflammatory cytokine, and activation of NF-κB in Abcd1/Abcd2-silenced mouse primary astrocytes was reduced. These observations indicate that SAHA corrects both the metabolic disease of VLCFA as well as secondary inflammatory disease; therefore, it may be an ideal drug candidate to be tested for X-ALD therapy in humans.

  7. Characterization of iron uptake from hydroxamate siderophores by Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Allnutt, F.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Iron uptake by Chlorella vulgaris from ferric-hydroxamate siderophores and the possible production of siderophores by these algae was investigated. No production of siderophores or organic acids was observed. Iron from the two hydroxamate siderophores tested, ferrioximine B (Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB) and ferric-rhodotorulate (Fe/sup 3 +/-RA), was taken up at the same rate as iron chelated by citrate or caffeate. Two synthetic chelates, Fe/sup 3 +/-EDTA and Fe/sup 3 +/-EDDHA, provided iron at a slower rate. Iron uptake was inhibited by 50 ..mu..M CCCP or 1 mM vanadate. Cyanide (100 ..mu..M KCN) or 25 ..mu..M antimycin A failed to demonstrate a link between uptake and respiration. Labeled iron (/sup 55/Fe) was taken up while labeled ligands ((/sup 14/C) citrate or RA) were not accumulated. Cation competition from Ni/sup 2 +/ and Co/sup 2 +/ observed using Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB and Fe/sup 3 +/-RA while iron uptake from Fe/sup 3 +/-citrate was stimulated. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from the hydroxamate siderophores. Ferric reduction from the ferric-siderophores was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and bathophenathroline disulfonate (BPDS). Ferric reduction was induced by iron-stress and inhibited by CCCP. A close correlation between iron uptake and ferric reduction was measured by the EPR method. Ferric reduction measured by the BPDS method was greater than that measure by EPR. BPDS reduction was interpreted to indicate a potential for reduction while EPR measures the physiological rate of reduction. BPDS inhibition of iron uptake and ferricyanide interference with reduction indicate that reduction and uptake occur exposed to the external medium. Presumptive evidence using a binding dose response curve for Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB indicated that a receptor may be involved in this mechanism.

  8. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  9. Zinc cross-linked hydroxamated alginates for pulsed drug release

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Neha S; Deshmukh, Prasad R; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Alginates can be tailored chemically to improve solubility, physicochemical, and biological properties and its complexation with metal ion is useful for controlling the drug release. Materials And Methods: Synthesized N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were subsequently complexed with zinc to form beads. Hydroxamation of sodium alginate was confirmed by Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results: The synthesized polymeric material exhibited reduced aqueous, HCl and NaOH solubility. The hydroxamated derivatives demonstrated pulsed release where change in pH of the dissolution medium stimulated the atenolol release. Conclusion: Atenolol loaded Zn cross-linked polymeric beads demonstrated the sustained the plasma drug levels with increased half-life. Although the synthesized derivatives greatly altered the aqueous solubility of sodium alginate, no significant differences in in vitro and in vivo atenolol release behavior amongst the N,O-dimethyl, N-methyl, or N-Benzyl hydroxylamine derivatives of sodium alginate were observed. PMID:24350039

  10. Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D.; Wang, Xuming; Li, Minhua

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress RSV infection and alleviate virus-induced airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qiuqin; Su, Zhonglan; Song, Shiyu; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Bin; Yi, Long; Tian, Man; Wang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. However, the majority of RSV-infected patients only show mild symptoms. Different severities of infection and responses among the RSV-infected population indicate that epigenetic regulation as well as personal genetic background may affect RSV infectivity. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is an important epigenetic regulator in lung diseases. The present study aimed to explore the possible connection between HDAC expression and RSV-induced lung inflammation. To address this question, RSV-infected airway epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were prepared and a mouse model of RSV infection was established, and then treated with various concentrations of HDAC inhibitors (HDACis), namely trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Viral replication and markers of virus-induced airway inflammation or oxidative stress were assessed. The activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathways was evaluated by western blot analysis. Our results showed that RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (AECs) significantly decreased histone acetylation levels by altering HDAC2 expression. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis significantly restricted RSV replication by upregulating the interferon-α (IFN-α) related signaling pathways. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis also significantly inhibited RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release [interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8] and oxidative stress-related molecule production [malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitrogen monoxide (NO)]. The activation of NF-κB, COX-2, MAPK and Stat3, which orchestrate pro-inflammatory gene expression and oxidative stress injury, was also significantly inhibited. Our in vivo study using a mouse model of RSV infection

  12. Growth stimulating effect on queen bee larvae of histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Yang; Chi, Li-Ling; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chen, Yue-Wen; Chen, Wei-Jung; Kuo, Yu-Cheng; Yuan, Cheng Mike; Chen, Chia-Nan

    2012-06-20

    Royal jelly (RJ) is a widely used natural food. It is also a major source of nutrition for queen bees and plays a key role in their development. RJ is secreted from the hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of young adult worker bees. The regulation of gene expression in these two glands may influence the development of queen bees by affecting the content of RJ. This study investigated the epigenetic effects in these two glands in young adult worker bees treated with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), and NBM-HD-1, a novel compound synthesized in this laboratory. Western blot analyses indicated that the levels of acetyl-histone 3 and p21 protein expression in MCF-7 cells increased markedly after treatment with NBM-HD-1. The data proved that NBM-HD-1 was a novel and potent HDACi. Furthermore, a method of affecting epigenetic regulation of the mrjp family gene in the hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of young adult worker bees was developed by feeding young adult worker bees HDACi. Epigenetic regulation produced several important biological effects. A marked change in the protein composition of the RJ secreted from these treated bees was found. Only the ratio of specific major royal jelly protein 3 (MRJP3) was significantly altered in the treated bees versus the untreated controls. Other MRJP family proteins did not change. This alteration in the ratio of royal jelly proteins resulted in a significant increase in the body size of queen bee larvae. The data seem to suggest that HDACis may play an important role in the epigenetic regulation of the hypopharyngeal and mandibular glands of young adult worker bees. They appear to change mrjp3 gene expression and alter the ratio of MRJP3 protein in RJ. This study presents the first evidence that HDACis are capable of regulating the ratio of MRJP3 proteins in RJ, which has the potential to change the body size of queen bees

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress RSV infection and alleviate virus-induced airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiuqin; Su, Zhonglan; Song, Shiyu; Χu, Hui; Zhang, Bin; Yi, Long; Tian, Man; Wang, Hongwei

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. However, the majority of RSV-infected patients only show mild symptoms. Different severities of infection and responses among the RSV-infected population indicate that epigenetic regulation as well as personal genetic background may affect RSV infectivity. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is an important epigenetic regulator in lung diseases. The present study aimed to explore the possible connection between HDAC expression and RSV-induced lung inflammation. To address this question, RSV-infected airway epithelial cells (BEAS‑2B) were prepared and a mouse model of RSV infection was established, and then treated with various concentrations of HDAC inhibitors (HDACis), namely trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Viral replication and markers of virus-induced airway inflammation or oxidative stress were assessed. The activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathways was evaluated by western blot analysis. Our results showed that RSV infection in airway epithelial cells (AECs) significantly decreased histone acetylation levels by altering HDAC2 expression. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis significantly restricted RSV replication by upregulating the interferon-α (IFN-α) related signaling pathways. The treatment of RSV-infected AECs with HDACis also significantly inhibited RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release [interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8] and oxidative stress-related molecule production [malondialdehyde (MDA), and nitrogen monoxide (NO)]. The activation of NF-κB, COX-2, MAPK and Stat3, which orchestrate pro‑inflammatory gene expression and oxidative stress injury, was also significantly inhibited. Our in vivo study using a mouse model of

  14. EXPRESS: Histone hyperacetylation modulates spinal type II metabotropic glutamate receptor alleviating stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Bai, Guang; Ji, Yaping; Karpowicz, Jane M; Traub, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Stress is often a trigger to exacerbate chronic pain including visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome, a female predominant functional bowel disorder. Epigenetic mechanisms that mediate stress responses are a potential target to interfere with visceral pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, on visceral hypersensitivity induced by a subchronic stressor in female rats and to investigate the involvement of spinal glutamate receptors. Three daily sessions of forced swim induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid prevented or reversed the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, increased spinal histone 3 acetylation and increased mGluR2 and mGluR3 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed enrichment of H3K9Ac and H3K18Ac at several promoter Grm2 and Grm3 regions. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 reversed the inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In surprising contrast, stress and/or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid had no effect on spinal NMDA receptor expression or function. These data reveal histone modification modulates mGluR2/3 expression in the spinal cord to attenuate stressinduced visceral hypersensitivity. HDAC inhibitors may provide a potential approach to relieve visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27385724

  15. Histone hyperacetylation modulates spinal type II metabotropic glutamate receptor alleviating stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Bai, Guang; Ji, Yaping; Karpowicz, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Stress is often a trigger to exacerbate chronic pain including visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome, a female predominant functional bowel disorder. Epigenetic mechanisms that mediate stress responses are a potential target to interfere with visceral pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, on visceral hypersensitivity induced by a subchronic stressor in female rats and to investigate the involvement of spinal glutamate receptors. Three daily sessions of forced swim induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid prevented or reversed the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, increased spinal histone 3 acetylation and increased mGluR2 and mGluR3 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed enrichment of H3K9Ac and H3K18Ac at several promoter Grm2 and Grm3 regions. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 reversed the inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In surprising contrast, stress and/or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid had no effect on spinal NMDA receptor expression or function. These data reveal histone modification modulates mGluR2/3 expression in the spinal cord to attenuate stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. HDAC inhibitors may provide a potential approach to relieve visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27385724

  16. Inhibition of class IIb histone deacetylase significantly improves cloning efficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Tetsuo; Li, Chong; Mizutani, Eiji; Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-12-01

    Since the first mouse clone was produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer, the success rate of cloning in mice has been extremely low. Some histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and scriptaid, have improved the full-term development of mouse clones significantly, but the mechanisms allowing for this are unclear. Here, we found that two other specific inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and oxamflatin, could also reduce the rate of apoptosis in blastocysts, improve the full-term development of cloned mice, and increase establishment of nuclear transfer-generated embryonic stem cell lines significantly without leading to obvious abnormalities. However, another inhibitor, valproic acid, could not improve cloning efficiency. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, oxamflatin, trichostatin A, and scriptaid are inhibitors for classes I and IIa/b histone deacetylase, whereas valproic acid is an inhibitor for classes I and IIa, suggesting that inhibiting class IIb histone deacetylase is an important step for reprogramming mouse cloning efficiency.

  17. Structures of Clostridium Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain Complexed with Small-Molecule Inhibitors Highlight Active-Site Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Silvaggi,N.; Boldt, G.; Hixon, M.; Kennedy, J.; Tzipori, S.; Janda, K.; Allen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential for the use of Clostridial neurotoxins as bioweapons makes the development of small-molecule inhibitors of these deadly toxins a top priority. Recently, screening of a random hydroxamate library identified a small-molecule inhibitor of C. botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain (BoNT/A-LC), 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate, a derivative of which has been shown to have in vivo efficacy in mice and no toxicity. We describe the X-ray crystal structures of BoNT/A-LC in complexes with two potent small-molecule inhibitors. The structures of the enzyme with 4-chlorocinnamic hydroxamate or 2,4-dichlorocinnamic hydroxamate bound are compared to the structure of the enzyme complexed with L-arginine hydroxamate, an inhibitor with modest affinity. Taken together, this suite of structures provides surprising insights into the BoNT/A-LC active site, including unexpected conformational flexibility at the S1' site that changes the electrostatic environment of the binding pocket. Information gained from these structures will inform the design and optimization of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of BoNT/A-LC.

  18. Salinomycin Hydroxamic Acids: Synthesis, Structure, and Biological Activity of Polyether Ionophore Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Björn; Huang, Xiaoli; Chygorin, Eduard; Oredsson, Stina; Strand, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The polyether ionophore salinomycin has recently gained attention due to its exceptional ability to selectively reduce the proportion of cancer stem cells within a number of cancer cell lines. Efficient single step strategies for the preparation of hydroxamic acid hybrids of this compound varying in N- and O-alkylation are presented. The parent hydroxamic acid, salinomycin-NHOH, forms both inclusion complexes and well-defined electroneutral complexes with potassium and sodium cations via 1,3-coordination by the hydroxamic acid moiety to the metal ion. A crystal structure of an cationic sodium complex with a noncoordinating anion corroborates this finding and, moreover, reveals a novel type of hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the head-to-tail conformation that encapsulates the cation analogously to the native structure. The hydroxamic acid derivatives display down to single digit micromolar activity against cancer cells but unlike salinomycin selective reduction of ALDH(+) cells, a phenotype associated with cancer stem cells was not observed. Mechanistic implications are discussed. PMID:27326340

  19. A `Clicked' Tetrameric Hydroxamic Acid Glycopeptidomimetic Antagonizes Sugar-Lectin Interactions On The Cellular Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Lin; Zang, Yi; Xie, Juan; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; He, Xiao-Peng; Tian, He

    2014-07-01

    A tetrameric N-acetyl galactosaminyl (GalNAc) peptidomimetic was constructed by N-acetylation of repeating proline-based hydroxamic acid units, followed by a convergent `click chemistry' coupling. This novel glycopeptidomimetic was determined to effectively antagonize the interaction between a transmembrane hepatic lectin and GalNAc on the cellular level.

  20. Hydroxamic acid content and toxicity of rye at selected growth stages.

    PubMed

    Rice, Clifford P; Park, Yong Bong; Adam, Frédérick; Abdul-Baki, Aref A; Teasdale, John R

    2005-08-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L.) is an important cover crop that provides many benefits to cropping systems including weed and pest suppression resulting from allelopathic substances. Hydroxamic acids have been identified as allelopathic compounds in rye. This research was conducted to improve the methodology for quantifying hydroxamic acids and to determine the relationship between hydroxamic acid content and phytotoxicity of extracts of rye root and shoot tissue harvested at selected growth stages. Detection limits for an LC/MS-MS method for analysis of hydroxamic acids from crude aqueous extracts were better than have been reported previously. (2R)-2-beta-D-Glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIBOA-G), 2,4-dihydroxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIBOA), benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (BOA), and the methoxy-substituted form of these compounds, (2R)-2-beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA glucose), 2,4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA), and 6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (MBOA), were all detected in rye tissue. DIBOA and BOA were prevalent in shoot tissue, whereas the methoxy-substituted compounds, DIMBOA glucose and MBOA, were prevalent in root tissue. Total hydroxamic acid concentration in rye tissue generally declined with age. Aqueous crude extracts of rye shoot tissue were more toxic than extracts of root tissue to lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) root length. Extracts of rye seedlings (Feekes growth stage 2) were most phytotoxic, but there was no pattern to the phytotoxicity of extracts of rye sampled at growth stages 4 to 10.5.4, and no correlation of hydroxamic acid content and phytotoxicity (I50 values). Analysis of dose-response model slope coefficients indicated a lack of parallelism among models for rye extracts from different growth stages, suggesting that phytotoxicity may be attributed to compounds with different modes of action at

  1. Structures of Staphylococcus aureus peptide deformylase in complex with two classes of new inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Seung Kyu; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Lee, Hyung Ho; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Lee, Bong Jin; Lee, Byung Il; Suh, Se Won

    2012-07-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the removal of the formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residue in newly synthesized polypeptides, which is an essential process in bacteria. Four new inhibitors of PDF that belong to two different classes, hydroxamate/pseudopeptide compounds [PMT387 (7a) and PMT497] and reverse-hydroxamate/nonpeptide compounds [PMT1039 (15e) and PMT1067], have been developed. These compounds inhibited the growth of several pathogens involved in respiratory-tract infections, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Haemophilus influenzae, and leading nosocomial pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) in the range 0.1-0.8 mg ml(-1). Interestingly, the reverse-hydroxamate/nonpeptide compounds showed a 250-fold higher antimicrobial activity towards S. aureus, although the four compounds showed similar K(i) values against S. aureus PDF enzymes, with K(i) values in the 11-85 nM range. To provide a structural basis for the discovery of additional PDF inhibitors, the crystal structures of S. aureus PDF in complex with the four inhibitors were determined at resolutions of 1.90-2.30 Å. The inhibitor-bound structures displayed distinct deviations depending on the inhibitor class. The distance between the Zn(2+) ion and the carbonyl O atom of the hydroxamate inhibitors (or the hydroxyl O atom of the reverse-hydroxamate inhibitors) appears to be correlated to S. aureus inhibition activity. The structural information reported in this study should aid in the discovery of new PDF inhibitors that can be used as novel antibacterial drugs. PMID:22751663

  2. Simultaneous determination of decitabine and vorinostat (Suberoylanalide hydroxamic acid, SAHA) by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Katan; Guichard, Sylvie M; Jodrell, Duncan I

    2008-02-15

    A reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method with electrospray ionization and detection by tandem mass spectrometry is described for the simultaneous quantitative determination of decitabine (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and vorinostat (Suberoylanalide hydroxamic acid, SAHA) in human plasma. The method involves a simple acetonitrile precipitation step and centrifugation followed by injection of the supernatant onto a C18 150mmx2.1mm I.D., 3microm HPLC column at 36 degrees C. Separation of decitabine, SAHA and their respective internal standards was achieved with a gradient elution and detection was via the mass spectrometer operated in selected reaction monitoring mode. The method was within the defined validation parameters for linearity, repeatability, reproducibility and stability. The limit of detection was determined as 1.0 and 0.125ngml(-1) and lower limits of quantitation were 10 and 1ngml(-1) for decitabine and SAHA, respectively. Effects of sample preparation on stability were also evaluated in human plasma. For clinical sample handling tetrahydrouridine, an inhibitor of cytidine deaminase was found to help prevent decitabine degradation. The method is currently being used in clinical pharmacokinetic studies for the evaluation of decitabine and SAHA combination therapies.

  3. Investigating the selectivity of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Day, Joshua A; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-10-24

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY), was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe(3+) from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe(3+) from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity.

  4. Investigating the Selectivity of Metalloenzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Day, Joshua A.; Cohen, Seth M.

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory activity of a broad group of known metalloenzyme inhibitors against a panel of metalloenzymes was evaluated. Clinically approved inhibitors were selected as well as several other reported metalloprotein inhibitors, in order to represent a broad range of metal binding groups (MBGs), including hydroxamic acid, carboxylate, hydroxypyridinonate, thiol, and N-hydroxyurea functional groups. A panel of metalloenzymes, including carbonic anhydrase (hCAII), several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), histone deacetylase (HDAC-2), and tyrosinase (TY) was selected based on their clinical importance for a range of pathologies. In addition, each inhibitor was evaluated for its ability to remove Fe3+ from holo-transferrin to gauge the ability of the inhibitors to access Fe3+ from a primary transport protein. The results show that the metalloenzyme inhibitors are quite selective for their intended targets, suggesting that despite their ability to bind metal ions, metalloprotein inhibitors are not prone to widespread off-target enzyme inhibition activity. PMID:24074025

  5. Water-Stable, Hydroxamate Anchors for Functionalization of TiO2 Surfaces with Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, W.R.; Milot, R.L.; Song, H.; Snoeberger III, R.C.; Batista, Victor S.; Schmuttenmaer, C.A.; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2010-01-01

    A novel class of derivatized hydroxamic acid linkages for robust sensitization of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) under various aqueous conditions is described. The stability of linkages bound to metal oxides under various conditions is important in developing photocatalytic cells which incorporate transition metal complexes for solar energy conversion. In order to compare the standard carboxylate anchor to hydroxamates, two organic dyes differing only in anchoring groups were synthesized and attached to TiO{sub 2} NPs. At acidic, basic, and close to neutral pH, hydroxamic acid linkages resist detachment compared to the labile carboxylic acids. THz spectroscopy was used to compare ultrafast interfacial electron transfer (IET) into the conduction band of TiO{sub 2} for both linkages and found similar IET characteristics. Observable electron injection and stronger binding suggest that hydroxamates are a suitable class of anchors for designing water stable molecules for functionalizing TiO{sub 2}.

  6. Potent, Selective, and CNS-Penetrant Tetrasubstituted Cyclopropane Class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luckhurst, Christopher A; Breccia, Perla; Stott, Andrew J; Aziz, Omar; Birch, Helen L; Bürli, Roland W; Hughes, Samantha J; Jarvis, Rebecca E; Lamers, Marieke; Leonard, Philip M; Matthews, Kim L; McAllister, George; Pollack, Scott; Saville-Stones, Elizabeth; Wishart, Grant; Yates, Dawn; Dominguez, Celia

    2016-01-14

    Potent and selective class IIa HDAC tetrasubstituted cyclopropane hydroxamic acid inhibitors were identified with high oral bioavailability that exhibited good brain and muscle exposure. Compound 14 displayed suitable properties for assessment of the impact of class IIa HDAC catalytic site inhibition in preclinical disease models.

  7. Potent, Selective, and CNS-Penetrant Tetrasubstituted Cyclopropane Class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Luckhurst, Christopher A; Breccia, Perla; Stott, Andrew J; Aziz, Omar; Birch, Helen L; Bürli, Roland W; Hughes, Samantha J; Jarvis, Rebecca E; Lamers, Marieke; Leonard, Philip M; Matthews, Kim L; McAllister, George; Pollack, Scott; Saville-Stones, Elizabeth; Wishart, Grant; Yates, Dawn; Dominguez, Celia

    2016-01-14

    Potent and selective class IIa HDAC tetrasubstituted cyclopropane hydroxamic acid inhibitors were identified with high oral bioavailability that exhibited good brain and muscle exposure. Compound 14 displayed suitable properties for assessment of the impact of class IIa HDAC catalytic site inhibition in preclinical disease models. PMID:26819662

  8. A series of novel, potent, and selective histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Philip; Altamura, Sergio; Chakravarty, Prasun K; Cecchetti, Ottavia; De Francesco, Raffaele; Gallinari, Paola; Ingenito, Raffaele; Meinke, Peter T; Petrocchi, Alessia; Rowley, Michael; Scarpelli, Rita; Serafini, Sergio; Steinkühler, Christian

    2006-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors offer a promising strategy for cancer therapy and the first generation HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical trials. A structurally novel series of HDAC inhibitors based on the natural cyclic tetrapeptide Apicidin is described. Selected screening of the sample collection looking for L-2-amino-8-oxodecanoic acid (L-Aoda) derivatives identified a small acyclic lead molecule 1 with the unusual ketone zinc binding group. SAR studies around this lead resulted in optimization to potent, low molecular weight, selective, non-hydroxamic acid HDAC inhibitors, equipotent to current clinical candidates.

  9. The interaction of zinc(II) and hydroxamic acids and a metal-triggered Lossen rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Duchácková, Lucie; Roithová, Jana

    2009-12-14

    The structure and reactivity of a complex of zinc(II), water, acetic acid, and acetohydroxamic acid, in which one of the acids is deprotonated, is investigated by means of mass spectrometry, labeling studies, and density functional calculations to unravel the exceptional binding properties of hydroxamic acids towards zinc-containing enzymes at the molecular level. It is shown that acetohydroxamic acid is deprotonated in the complex, whereas acetic acid is present in its neutral form. The binding energies of the ligands towards zinc increase in the following order: waterhydroxamic acids. Furthermore, coordinatively unsaturated complexes of zinc and acetohydroxamic acid undergo a zinc-assisted Lossen rearrangement followed by elimination of water if acetohydroxamic acid is present as a neutral ligand, or by loss of methylisocyanate if acetohydroxamic acid is deprotonated. PMID:19937618

  10. Growth of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is promoted by exogenous hydroxamate and catechol siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, M S; Dolence, J A; Dolence, E K; Darwish, I; Miller, M J; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1996-01-01

    Siderophores bind ferric ions and are involved in receptor-specific iron transport into bacteria. Six types of siderophores were tested against strains representing the 12 different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Ferrichrome and bis-catechol-based siderophores showed strong growth-promoting activities for A. pleuropneumoniae in a disk diffusion assay. Most strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested were able to use ferrichrome (21 of 22 or 95%), ferrichrome A (20 of 22 or 90%), and lysine-based bis-catechol (20 of 22 or 90%), while growth of 36% (8 of 22) was promoted by a synthetic hydroxamate, N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine tripeptide. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 (strain FMV 87-682) and serotype 5 (strain 2245) exhibited a distinct yellow halo around colonies on Chrome Azurol S agar plates, suggesting that both strains can produce an iron chelator (siderophore) in response to iron stress. The siderophore was found to be neither a phenolate nor a hydroxamate by the chemical tests of Arnow and Csaky, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the production of an iron chelator and the use of exogenous siderophores by A. pleuropneumoniae. A spermidine-based bis-catechol siderophore conjugated to a carbacephalosporin was shown to inhibit growth of A. pleuropneumoniae. A siderophore-antibiotic-resistant strain was isolated and shown to have lost the ability to use ferrichrome, synthetic hydroxamate, or catechol-based siderophores when grown under conditions of iron restriction. This observation indicated that a common iron uptake pathway, or a common intermediate, for hydroxamate- and catechol-based siderophores may exist in A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:8975614

  11. Hydroxamate-based colorimetric method for direct screening of transglutaminase-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bourneow, Chaiwut; Benjakul, Soottawat; H-Kittikun, Aran

    2012-05-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) is a commercial enzyme that has been applied to many protein containing foods to improve their textural property. The screening of MTGase-producing microorganisms from various sources might lead to the discovery of a new MTGase with different characteristics. This report demonstrates the use of a direct detection method for MTGase-producing bacteria grown on an agar plate by filter paper disc (FPD) assay. The principle of the assay is the formation of a red burgundy color by the hydroxamate-ferric complex. The color developed intensity was linearly correlated by the concentration of hydroxamic acid in the range of 0.1-0.8 μM and was visually scored at 4 levels: 0, 1, 2 and 3. Streptoverticillium mobaraense DSM 40847, a positive MTGase-producer, was chosen for the verification and improving of the proposed method. The colonies grown on the nutrient agar plate at 37°C for 24 h were covered with FPDs and 30 μl of substrates (CBZ-Gln-Gly and hydroxylamine). After incubation, 10 μl of the ferric-TCA-HCl solution was placed on the FPD. The optimal time taken to catalyze the formation of CBZ-Gln-Gly-hydroxamic acid by the MTGase and the time taken for the hydroxamate-ferric complex to form color were 180 and 60 min, respectively. Using this assay, 30 of 189 colonies isolated from wastewater and floating-floc samples showed MTGase-positive colonies which were well correlated to the quantitative screening of MTGase activity (R(2) = 0.9758). The results revealed that the FPD assay could be used for the qualitative screening of MTGase-producing bacteria.

  12. Development and application of versatile bis-hydroxamic acids for catalytic asymmetric oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Barlan, Allan U.; Zhang, Wei; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we describe the development and preliminary results of our new designed C2-symmetric bis-hydroxamic acid (BHA) ligands and the application of the new ligands for vanadium-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation of allylic alcohols as well as homoallylic alcohols. From this success we demonstrate the versatile nature of BHA in the molybdenum catalyzed asymmetric oxidation of unfunctionalized olefins and sulfides. PMID:21152351

  13. Epigenetic modifier-induced biosynthesis of novel acetylenic sterols from Cladosporium colocasiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Ze; Liang, Bo-Wen; Li, Xiao-Fei; Yu, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-09-01

    The addition of an HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SBHA), to the culture medium of Cladosporium colocasiae, dramatically altered its metabolic profiles. Analysis of the culture broth extract led to the isolation of two new acetylenic sterols (1-2). The isolated compounds were further evaluated for their cytotoxic and antibacterial activities. Compound 1 showed activity against Bacillus subtilis, affording a zone of inhibition of 12mm at 100μg/disk. However, none of them showed noticeable growth inhibitory effects.

  14. Design and synthesis of procollagen C-proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Eric; Chow, Nicholas; Yang, Charles; Sosa, Sergio; Bauer, Udo; Brenner, Mitch; Solow-Cordero, David; Ho, Wen-Bin

    2012-12-15

    Non-peptidic inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase (PCP) were designed from substrate leads. Compounds were optimized for potency and selectivity, with N-substituted aryl sulfonamide hydroxamates having the best combination of these properties. Compounds 89 and 60 have IC(50) values of 10 and 80 nM, respectively, against PCP; excellent selectivity over MMP's 1, 2, and 9; and activity in cell-based collagen deposition assays.

  15. A new approach to cyclic hydroxamic acids: Intramolecular cyclization of N-benzyloxy carbamates with carbon nucleophiles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Jacobs, Hollie K.

    2011-01-01

    N-Alkyl-N-benzyloxy carbamates, 2, undergo facile intramolecular cyclization with a variety of carbon nucleophiles to give functionalized 5- and 6-membered protected cyclic hydroxamic acids, 3, in good to excellent yields. This method can be extended to prepare seven-membered cyclic hydroxamic acids in moderate yields. The sulfone intermediates 3 from this study can be alkylated while the corresponding phosphonates have been shown to undergo HWE reaction. The α,β-unsaturated synthon, 8, prepared by thermal elimination of sulfoxide 3m, undergoes Michael addition with secondary amines. The usefulness of this approach to prepare polydentate chelators has been demonstrated by the synthesis of bis cyclic hydroxamic acids 12, 14, and 15. PMID:21499514

  16. A novel hydroxamic acid-containing antibiotic produced by a Saharan soil-living Streptomyces strain.

    PubMed

    Yekkour, A; Meklat, A; Bijani, C; Toumatia, O; Errakhi, R; Lebrihi, A; Mathieu, F; Zitouni, A; Sabaou, N

    2015-06-01

    During screening for potentially antimicrobial actinobacteria, a highly antagonistic strain, designated WAB9, was isolated from a Saharan soil of Algeria. A polyphasic approach characterized the strain taxonomically as a member of the genus Streptomyces. The strain WAB9 exhibited a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity toward various multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. A PCR-based assay of genomic potential for producing bioactive metabolites revealed the presence of PKS-II gene. After 6 days of strain fermentation, one bioactive compound was extracted from the remaining aqueous phase and then purified by HPLC. The chemical structure of the compound was determined by spectroscopic (UV-visible, and (1)H and (13)C NMR) and spectrometric analysis. The compound was identified to be 2-amino-N-(2-amino-3-phenylpropanoyl)-N-hydroxy-3-phenylpropanamide, a novel hydroxamic acid-containing molecule. The pure molecule showed appreciable minimum inhibitory concentration values against a selection of drug-resistant bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts. Significance and impact of the study: This study presents the isolation of a Streptomyces strain, named WAB9, from a Saharan soil in Algeria. This strain was found to produce a new hydroxamic acid-containing molecule with interesting antimicrobial activities towards various multidrug-resistant micro-organisms. Although hydroxamic acid-containing molecules are known to exhibit low toxicities in general, only real evaluations of the toxicity levels could decide on the applications for which this new molecule is potentially most appropriate. Thus, this article provides a new framework of research.

  17. Thermospectroscopic study of the adsorption mechanism of the hydroxamic siderophore ferrioxamine B by calcium montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Siebner-Freibach, Hagar; Hadar, Yitzhak; Yariv, Shmuel; Lapides, Isaak; Chen, Yona

    2006-02-22

    The behavior of iron-chelating agents in soils is highly affected by interactions with the solid phase. Still this aspect is frequently ignored. In this research the adsorption of the siderophore ferrioxamine B by Ca-montmorillonite, as a free ligand (desferrioxamine B, DFOB) and as a complex with Fe3+ (ferrioxamine B, FOB), was studied, using thermo X-ray diffraction (thermo-XRD) in the temperature range 25-360 degrees C and thermo-FTIR spectroscopy in the temperature range 25-170 degrees C. The effect of pH (4-7.5) on the adsorption was examined. Extensive use of curve-fitting analysis was required due to significant overlapping of the characteristic absorption bands of the various functional groups. Thermo-XRD analysis showed that both DFOB and FOB penetrated into the interlayer space of Ca-montmorillonite. FTIR results indicated strong interactions of DFOB within the interlayer, which involved all functional groups (NH3+, secondary amide groups, and hydroxamate groups). In contrast, the folded Fe complex of FOB retained its molecular configuration upon adsorption, and the basal spacing of the clay increased correspondingly. FOB interacted in the interlayer space of the clay, mainly through the NH of the secondary amide groups and NH3+, while the functional groups bound to the central Fe cation remained unchanged. The suspension pH had no significant effect on both DFOB and FOB adsorption at the examined range. Adsorption protected the adsorbates from thermal degradation compared to the nonadsorbed samples up to 105 degrees C. At 170 degrees C both DFOB and FOB were already partially degraded, but to a lesser extent than the nonadsorbed samples. Degradation of the molecules occurred mainly through the hydroxamic groups, which constitute the Fe-chelating center in the hydroxamic siderophore. PMID:16478266

  18. Antioxidant and nitric oxide production inhibitory activities of galacturonyl hydroxamic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuh-Hwa; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Lee, Chi-Ching; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2008-07-01

    The self-prepared pectin hydroxamic acid has been reported to have antioxidant activities [Yang, S. S., Cheng, K. D., Lin, Y. S., Liu, Y. W., & Hou, W. C. (2004). Pectin hydroxamic acids exhibit antioxidant activities in vitro. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 52, 4270-4273]. In this study, the galacturonic acid (GalA), the monomer unit of the pectin polymer, was esterified with acidic methanol (1N HCl) at 4°C with gentle stirring for 5days to get galacturonic acid methyl ester which was further reacted with alkaline hydroxylamine to get galacturonyl hydroxamic acid (GalA-NHOH). The GalA-NHOH was used to test the antioxidant and antiradical activities in the comparison with GalA. The scavenging activities of GalA-NHOH against DPPH radicals (half-inhibition concentration, IC50, was 82μM), hydroxyl radicals detected by electron spin resonance (IC50 was 0.227nM in the comparison with Trolox of 0.433μM), superoxide radicals (IC50 was 830μM) were determined. The protection activities of GalA-NHOH against hydroxyl radicals-mediated calf thymus DNA damages, linoleic acid peroxidation and peroxynitrite-mediated dihydrorhodamine 123 oxidations were also investigated. It was found that the GalA-NHOH exhibited dose-dependently antioxidant activity and few or none was found in GalA. The GalA-NHOH was used to evaluate the suppressed activity of nitric oxide (NO) productions of RAW264.7 cells in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100ng/ml) as inducers. It was found that GalA-NHOH (0.02-0.1mg/ml) could dose-dependently suppress the NO productions (expressed as nitrite concentrations) in RAW264.7 cells without significant cytotoxicity.

  19. Recent advances in the discovery of zinc-binding motifs for the development of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-04-01

    In addition to the sulfonamides and their isosteres, recently novel carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) which act by binding to the metal ion from the active site were discovered. Based on the X-ray crystal structure of the CA II-trithiocarbonate adduct, dithiocarbamates, xanthates and thioxanthates were shown to potently inhibit α- and β-CAs. The hydroxamates constitute another class of recently studied CAIs both against mammalian and protozoan enzymes. Another chemotype for which CA inhibitory properties were recently reported is the salicylaldoxime scaffold. X-ray crystal structures were reported for CA II complexed with dithiocarbamates and hydroxamates, whereas the xanthates and salicylaldoximes were investigated by kinetic measurements and docking studies. The dithiocarbamates and the xanthates showed potent antiglaucoma activity in animal models of the disease whereas some hydroxamates inhibited the growth of Trypanosoma cruzii probably by inhibiting the protozoan CA.

  20. Recent advances in the discovery of zinc-binding motifs for the development of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-04-01

    In addition to the sulfonamides and their isosteres, recently novel carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors (CAIs) which act by binding to the metal ion from the active site were discovered. Based on the X-ray crystal structure of the CA II-trithiocarbonate adduct, dithiocarbamates, xanthates and thioxanthates were shown to potently inhibit α- and β-CAs. The hydroxamates constitute another class of recently studied CAIs both against mammalian and protozoan enzymes. Another chemotype for which CA inhibitory properties were recently reported is the salicylaldoxime scaffold. X-ray crystal structures were reported for CA II complexed with dithiocarbamates and hydroxamates, whereas the xanthates and salicylaldoximes were investigated by kinetic measurements and docking studies. The dithiocarbamates and the xanthates showed potent antiglaucoma activity in animal models of the disease whereas some hydroxamates inhibited the growth of Trypanosoma cruzii probably by inhibiting the protozoan CA. PMID:24939097

  1. Efficient Route to Highly Water-Soluble Aromatic Cyclic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Michael; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-06

    2-Hydroxyisoquinolin-1-one (1,2-HOIQO) is a new member of the important class of aromatic cyclic hydroxamic acid ligands which are widely used in metal sequestering applications and metal chelating therapy. The first general approach for the introduction of substituents at the aromatic ring of the chelating moiety is presented. As a useful derivative, the highly water-soluble sulfonic acid has been synthesized by an efficient route that allows general access to 1,2-HOQIO 3-carboxlic acid amides, which are the most relevant for applications.

  2. Sorption of arsenate and arsenite anions by iron(III)-poly(hydroxamic acid) complex.

    PubMed

    Haron, M J; Wan Yunus, W M; Yong, N L; Tokunaga, S

    1999-12-01

    Iron(III)-poly(hydroxamic acid) resin complex has been studied for its sorption abilities with respect to arsenate and arsenite anions from an aqueous solution. The complex was found effective in removing the arsenate anion in the pH range of 2.0 to 5.5. The maximum sorption capacity was found to be 1.15 mmol/g. The sorption selectivity showed that arsenate sorption was not affected by chloride, nitrate and sulphate. The resin was tested and found effective for removal of arsenic ions from industrial wastewater samples.

  3. An enthalpic basis of additivity in biphenyl hydroxamic acid ligands for stromelysin-1

    PubMed Central

    Wilfong, Erin M.; Du, Yu; Toone, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Fragment based drug discovery remains a successful tool for pharmaceutical lead discovery. Although based upon the principle of thermodynamic additivity, the underlying thermodynamic basis is poorly understood. A thermodynamic additivity analysis was performed using stromelysin-1 and a series of biphenyl hydroxamate ligands identified through fragment additivity. Our studies suggest that, in this instance, additivity arises from enthalpic effects, while interaction entropies are unfavorable; this thermodynamic behavior is masked by proton transfer. Evaluation of the changes in constant pressure heat capacities during binding suggest that solvent exclusion from the binding site does not account for the dramatic affinity enhancements observed. PMID:22985855

  4. Radical scavengers as ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arijit; Sinha, Barij Nayan

    2012-01-01

    This paper compiled all the previous reports on radical scavengers, an interesting class of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors. We have highlighted three key research areas: chemical classification of radical scavengers, structural and functional aspects of the radical site, and progress in drug designing for radical scavengers. Under the chemical classification section, we have recorded the discovery of hydroxyurea followed by discussions on hydroxamic acids, amidoximes, hydroxyguanidines, and phenolic compounds. In the next section, we have compiled the structural information for the radical site obtained from different crystallographic and theoretical studies. Finally, we have included the reported ligand based and structure based drug-designing studies.

  5. A novel collector 2-ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid: Flotation performance and adsorption mechanism to ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haifeng; Zhong, Hong; Tang, Qing; Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Guangyi

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a novel collector, 2-ethyl-2-hexenoic hydroxamic acid (EHHA) was prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra. The flotation performance and adsorption mechanism of EHHA to ilmenite were investigated by micro-flotation tests, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, FTIR spectra, zeta potential and solution chemistry analyses. The micro-flotation results indicated that EHHA exhibited superior flotation performance compared to isooctyl hydroximic acid (IOHA) and octyl hydroxamic acid (OHA), and floated out 84.03% ilmenite at pH 8.0 with 250 mg/L dosage. The analyses of FTIR spectra and zeta potential demonstrated that EHHA might chemisorb onto ilmenite surfaces by form of five-membered chelates. The solution chemistry analyses further inferred that at pH 6.3-10.5, both Fe and Ti species on ilmenite surfaces could chelate EHHA. DFT calculation results implied EHHA owned the strongest affinity to ilmenite among the three C8 hydroximic acids. To discern the sharply improving floatability of ilmenite at pH 8-10, a schematic co-adsorption molecule-ion model of EHHA on ilmenite surfaces was suggested.

  6. What Makes Hydroxamate a Promising Anchoring Group in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells? Insights from Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Rego, Luis G C; Bai, Fu-Quan; Wang, Jian; Jia, Ran; Xie, Li-Ming; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2014-11-20

    We report, from a theoretical point of view, the first comparative study between the highly water-stable hydroxamate and the widely used carboxylate, in addition to the robust phosphate anchors. Theoretical calculations reveal that hydroxamate would be better for photoabsorption. A quantum dynamics description of the interfacial electron transfer (IET), including the underlying nuclear motion effect, is presented. We find that both hydroxamate and carboxylate would have efficient IET character; for phosphate the injection time is significantly longer (several hundred femtoseconds). We also verified that the symmetry of the geometry of the anchoring group plays important roles in the electronic charge delocalization. We conclude that hydroxamate can be a promising anchoring group, as compared to carboxylate and phosphate, due to its better photoabsorption and comparable IET time scale as well as the experimental advantage of water stability. We expect the implications of these findings to be relevant for the design of more efficient anchoring groups for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) application.

  7. From α-nucleophiles to functionalized aggregates: exploring the reactivity of hydroxamate ion towards esterolytic reactions in micelles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Karpichev, Yevgen; Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Bhanushree; Sahu, Arvind K; Satnami, Manmohan L; Ghosh, Kallol K

    2015-03-14

    Owing to the rising threats of neurotoxic organophosphosphorus compounds, facile and efficient decontamination systems are required. Since the last few decades, the search for promising α-nucleophiles for straightforward and eco-friendly decontamination reactions using α-nucleophiles has been considerably boosted up. Among these, hydroxamic acids have been widely studied due to their potential α-nucleophilicity towards carbon and phosphorus based esters. This account summarizes our research on α-nucleophilicity of hydroxamate ions in water and micelles towards esterolytic reactions. Efforts of our group in the last few years have been collectively judged and compared with the crucial findings of researchers in the relevant field. The present article sheds light on the rich chemistry of the hydroxamate ion as a perfect candidate to degrade organophosphorus esters (i.e. nerve agents, pesticides and their simulants) in water, in micelles of conventional surfactants, and in functionalized micelles. The current report also provides an insight into the possible nature and mechanisms of these reactions. A brief account of the biological activities of hydroxamic acids that have recently spurred research in medicine against some fatal diseases has been included.

  8. Iron-Binding Compounds from Agrobacterium spp.: Biological Control Strain Agrobacterium rhizogenes K84 Produces a Hydroxamate Siderophore

    PubMed Central

    Penyalver, Ramón; Oger, Philippe; López, María M.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron-binding compounds were produced in various amounts in response to iron starvation by a collection of Agrobacterium strains belonging to the species A. tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, and A. vitis. The crown gall biocontrol agent A. rhizogenes strain K84 produced a hydroxamate iron chelator in large amounts. Production of this compound, and also of a previously described antibiotic-like substance called ALS84, occurred only in cultures of strain K84 grown in iron-deficient medium. Similarly, sensitivity to ALS84 was expressed only when susceptible cells were tested in low-iron media. Five independent Tn5-induced mutants of strain K84 affected in the production of the hydroxamate iron chelator showed a similar reduction in the production of ALS84. One of these mutants, M8-10, was completely deficient in the production of both agents and grew poorly compared to the wild type under iron-limiting conditions. Thus, the hydroxamate compound has siderophore activity. A 9.1-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA containing the Tn5 insertion from this mutant was cloned and marker exchanged into wild-type strain K84. The homogenote lost the ability to produce the hydroxamate siderophore and also ALS84. A cosmid clone was isolated from a genomic library of strain K84 that restored to strain M8-10 the ability to produce of the siderophore and ALS84, as well as growth in iron-deficient medium. This cosmid clone contained the region in which Tn5 was located in the mutant. Sequence analysis showed that the Tn5 insert in this mutant was located in an open reading frame coding for a protein that has similarity to those of the gramicidin S synthetase repeat superfamily. Some such proteins are required for synthesis of hydroxamate siderophores by other bacteria. Southern analysis revealed that the biosynthetic gene from strain K84 is present only in isolates of A. rhizogenes that produce hydroxamate-type compounds under low-iron conditions. Based on physiological and genetic analyses showing

  9. Covalency-Driven Dimerization of Plutonium(IV) in a Hydroxamate Complex.

    PubMed

    Silver, Mark A; Cary, Samantha K; Stritzinger, Jared T; Parker, T Gannon; Maron, Laurent; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    The reaction of formohydroxamic acid [NH(OH)CHO, FHA] with Pu(III) should result in stabilization of the trivalent oxidation state. However, slow oxidation to Pu(IV) occurs, which leads to formation of the dimeric plutonium(IV) formohydroxamate complex Pu2(FHA)8. In addition to being reductants, hydroxamates are also strong π-donor ligands. Here we show that formation of the Pu2(FHA)8 dimer occurs via covalency between the 5f orbitals on plutonium and the π* orbitals of FHA(-) anions, which gives rise to a broad and intense ligand-to-metal charge-transfer feature. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations corroborate this assignment. PMID:27228095

  10. Hydroxamic acid derivatives: a promising scaffold for rational compound optimization in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Dayanne da Rocha; Calvet, Claudia Magalhães; Rodrigues, Giseli Capaci; de Souza Pereira, Mirian Claudia; Almeida, Igor Rodrigues; de Aguiar, Alcino Palermo; Supuran, Claudiu T; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2016-12-01

    This work describes the antitrypanocidal activity of two hydroxamic acid derivatives containing o-ethoxy (HAD1) and p-ethoxy (HAD2) as substituent in the aromatic ring linked to the isoxazoline ring. HAD1 and HAD2 induced a significant reduction in the number of intracellular parasites and consequently showed activity on the multiplication of the parasite. Treatment of cardiomyocytes and macrophages with the compounds revealed no significant loss in cell viability. Ultrastructural alterations after treatment of cardiomyocytes or macrophages infected by Trypanosoma cruzi with the IC50 value of HAD1 revealed alterations to amastigotes, showing initial damage seen as swelling of the kinetoplast. This gave a good indication of the ability of the drug to permeate through the host cell membrane as well as its selectivity to the parasite target. Both compounds HAD1 and 2 were able to reduce the cysteine peptidases and decrease the activity of metallopeptidases.

  11. The Hydroxamate Siderophore Rhequichelin Is Required for Virulence of the Pathogenic Actinomycete Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Garry B.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Hondalus, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that the facultative intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi produces a nondiffusible and catecholate-containing siderophore (rhequibactin) involved in iron acquisition during saprophytic growth. Here, we provide evidence that the rhbABCDE cluster directs the biosynthesis of a hydroxamate siderophore, rhequichelin, that plays a key role in virulence. The rhbC gene encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase that is predicted to produce a tetrapeptide consisting of N5-formyl-N5-hydroxyornithine, serine, N5-hydroxyornithine, and N5-acyl-N5-hydroxyornithine. The other rhb genes encode putative tailoring enzymes mediating modification of ornithine residues incorporated into the hydroxamate product of RhbC. Transcription of rhbC was upregulated during growth in iron-depleted medium, suggesting that it plays a role in iron acquisition. This was confirmed by deletion of rhbCD, rendering the resulting strain R. equi SID2 unable to grow in the presence of the iron chelator 2,2-dipyridyl. Supernatant of the wild-type strain rescued the phenotype of R. equi SID2. The importance of rhequichelin in virulence was highlighted by the rapid increase in transcription levels of rhbC following infection and the inability of R. equi SID2 to grow within macrophages. Unlike the wild-type strain, R. equi SID2 was unable to replicate in vivo and was rapidly cleared from the lungs of infected mice. Rhequichelin is thus a key virulence-associated factor, although nonpathogenic Rhodococcus species also appear to produce rhequichelin or a structurally closely related compound. Rhequichelin biosynthesis may therefore be considered an example of cooption of a core actinobacterial trait in the evolution of R. equi virulence. PMID:22966042

  12. Composite IS1 elements encoding hydroxamate-mediated iron uptake in FIme plasmids from epidemic Salmonella spp.

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, B; Nicoletti, M; Visca, P; Casalino, M; Valenti, P; Maimone, F

    1985-01-01

    Eleven FIme plasmids representative of those identified in epidemic strains of Salmonella wien and Salmonella typhimurium isolated in North Africa, Europe, and the Middle East have been examined for the presence of determinants of toxigenicity, adherence, and iron-sequestering mechanisms. Chemical and genetic data indicated that all plasmids code for a hydroxamate-mediated iron assimilation system. Detailed analysis of derivative plasmids and cloned fragments of FIme plasmid pZM61 demonstrated that the general genetic and structural organization of the DNA region containing the genes for hydroxamate biosynthesis and cloacin DF13 receptor was virtually identical to that described for the aerobactin-mediated iron uptake system of pColV-K30. This DNA region is part of a composite element that is 16.7 kilobases long and carries its IS1 modules as inverted repeats. A very similar element is present in either orientation in all nine FIme plasmids analyzed. Images PMID:2984176

  13. Identifying Novel Type ZBGs and Nonhydroxamate HDAC Inhibitors Through a SVM Based Virtual Screening Approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, X H; Song, H Y; Zhang, J X; Han, B C; Wei, X N; Ma, X H; Cui, W K; Chen, Y Z

    2010-05-17

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been successfully used for the treatment of cancers and other diseases. Search for novel type ZBGs and development of non-hydroxamate HDACi has become a focus in current research. To complement this, it is desirable to explore a virtual screening (VS) tool capable of identifying different types of potential inhibitors from large compound libraries with high yields and low false-hit rates similar to HTS. This work explored the use of support vector machines (SVM) combined with our newly developed putative non-inhibitor generation method as such a tool. SVM trained by 702 pre-2008 hydroxamate HDACi and 64334 putative non-HDACi showed good yields and low false-hit rates in cross-validation test and independent test using 220 diverse types of HDACi reported since 2008. The SVM hit rates in scanning 13.56 M PubChem and 168K MDDR compounds are comparable to HTS rates. Further structural analysis of SVM virtual hits suggests its potential for identification of non-hydroxamate HDACi. From this analysis, a series of novel ZBG and cap groups were proposed for HDACi design.

  14. UV-Visible Spectroscopy Detection of Iron(III) Ion on Modified Gold Nanoparticles With a Hydroxamic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami, C.; Alizadeh, A.; Taher, M. A.; Hamidi, Z.; Bahrami, B.

    2016-09-01

    The present work describes the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with hydroxamic acid and the use of them in UV-visible spectroscopy detection of iron(III) ions. The prepared AuNPs were thoroughly characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy, TEM, and 1H NMR techniques. The newly synthesized hydroxamic acid-AuNPs are brown in color due to the intense surface plasmon absorption band centered at 527 nm. In the presence of Fe(III), the surface plasmon absorption band is centered at 540 nm. However, the sensitivity of hydroxamic acid-AuNPs towards other metal ions such as Mg(II), Ca(II), Ag(I), Cu(II), Mn(II), Cr(II), Ni(II), Co(II),Fe(II), Hg(II), and Pb(II) can be negligible. This highly selective sensor allows a direct quantitative assay of Fe(III) with a UVvisible spectroscopy detection limited to 45.8 nM.

  15. Therapeutic effects of D-aspartic acid beta-hydroxamate (DAH) on Friend erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Tournaire, R; Malley, S; Hamedi-Sangsari, F; Thomasset, N; Grange, J; Dore, J F; Vila, J

    1994-08-01

    D-aspartic acid beta-hydroxamate (DAH), an aspartic acid analogue, exerts anti-tumoral activity against murine leukemia L5178Y both in vitro and in vivo. We show here that DAH displays activity against Friend leukemia cells (FLC) in vitro: a concentration of 2 mM results in a total inhibition of cell growth. DAH is also active in vivo against Friend virus (FV-P)-induced erythroleukemia. Treatment with DAH, given for 95 days as a single daily i.p. injection to DBA/2 mice 3 days following FV-P inoculation, induced a marked increase of 212% in the mean survival time (MST) of treated animals. Since FV-P-induced erythroleukemia is characterized by the proliferation of mature erythroid precursors, we examined the effect of DAH treatment on erythroid colony-forming cells (CFU-E) and observed that the number of CFU-E per spleen was 30 times lower in DAH-treated mice than in the controls. To gain further insight into the early effects of DAH treatment on the early phase of Friend disease, we examined the effects of short DAH treatment on spleen size, hematocrit and viremia in FV-P-infected mice. DAH treatment initiated 3 days post infection (p.i.) inhibited splenomegaly, prevented virus-induced polycythemia, and reduced serum viremia. Late DAH treatment (18 days p.i.) induced regression of FVP-induced disease as evidenced by reduction of spleen weight.

  16. Activity of Hydroxamic Acids from Secale cereale Against the Plant-Parasitic Nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and Xiphinema americanum.

    PubMed

    Zasada, I A; Meyer, S L F; Halbrendt, J M; Rice, C

    2005-10-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic hydroxamic acids are secondary metabolites found in the family Poaceae and have been implicated in the allelopathy of rye (Secale cereale). The toxicity of these compounds against plant-parasitic nematodes is unknown. DIBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one), DIMBOA (2,4-hydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one), and their degradation products BOA (benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one) and MBOA (6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one) were screened in vitro against Meloidogyne incognita second-stage juveniles (J2) and eggs and mixed-stages of Xiphinema americanum. Xiphinema americanum was more sensitive to DIBOA and DIMBOA than M. incognita J2, with a maximum apparent mortality of 96 and 92% compared to 73 and 72% at 90 mug/ml. Eggs of M. incognita were less sensitive to the hydroxamic acids than J2; only DIBOA resulted in a 50% reduction in egg hatch, with a lethal concentration (LC(50)) of 74 mug/ml compared to 21 mug/ml for J2. When M. incognita J2 were exposed to DIBOA for 48 h and the compound was removed and replaced with water, the LC(50) value increased from 21.0 to 40.7 mug/ml. MBOA was not toxic to X. americanum or M. incognita eggs, but was toxic to M. incognita J2, with LC(50) values of 44 and 20 mug/ml before and after the compound was removed and replaced with water. BOA was the least toxic hydroxamic acid tested; it did not reduce M. incognita egg hatch after 1 week of exposure or increase X. americanum mortality after 24 h of exposure. While in vitro studies provide a valuable starting point in determining the toxicity of the chemical component of rye, the relevance of the data to soil remains to be determined.

  17. Bioactive conformation of stromelysin inhibitors determined by transferred nuclear Overhauser effects.

    PubMed Central

    Gonnella, N C; Bohacek, R; Zhang, X; Kolossváry, I; Paris, C G; Melton, R; Winter, C; Hu, S I; Ganu, V

    1995-01-01

    The transferred nuclear Overhauser effect has been used to determine the biologically active conformations of two stromelysin inhibitors. Both inhibitors used in this study were hydroxamic acids generated via chemical synthesis. These structures, representing the conformation of each inhibitor bound to stromelysin, superimposed with excellent agreement. The study also provided information on the shape and orientation of the S2' and S1' pockets of the enzyme relative to thermolysin. Comparisons were made between stromelysin and thermolysin inhibitors to critically examine thermolysin as a template for stromelysin-inhibitor design. The enzyme-bound conformations of these stromelysin inhibitors were determined for use as a template in conformationally restricted drug design. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7831311

  18. FhuD1, a Ferric Hydroxamate-binding Lipoprotein in Staphylococcus aureus - A case of gene duplication and lateral transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Sebulsky, M. Tom; Speziali, Craig D.; Shilton, Brian H.; Edgell, David R.

    2010-11-16

    Staphylococcus aureus can utilize ferric hydroxamates as a source of iron under iron-restricted growth conditions. Proteins involved in this transport process are: FhuCBG, which encodes a traffic ATPase; FhuD2, a post-translationally modified lipoprotein that acts as a high affinity receptor at the cytoplasmic membrane for the efficient capture of ferric hydroxamates; and FhuD1, a protein with similarity to FhuD2. Gene duplication likely gave rise to fhuD1 and fhuD2. While the genomic locations of fhuCBG and fhuD2 in S. aureus strains are conserved, both the presence and the location of fhuD1 are variable. The apparent redundancy of FhuD1 led us to examine the role of this protein. We demonstrate that FhuD1 is expressed only under conditions of iron limitation through the regulatory activity of Fur. FhuD1 fractions with the cell membrane and binds hydroxamate siderophores but with lower affinity than FhuD2. Using small angle x-ray scattering, the solution structure of FhuD1 resembles that of FhuD2, and only a small conformational change is associated with ferrichrome binding. FhuD1, therefore, appears to be a receptor for ferric hydroxamates, like FhuD2. Our data to date suggest, however, that FhuD1 is redundant to FhuD2 and plays a minor role in hydroxamate transport. However, given the very real possibility that we have not yet identified the proper conditions where FhuD1 does provide an advantage over FhuD2, we anticipate that FhuD1 serves an enhanced role in the transport of untested hydroxamate siderophores and that it may play a prominent role during the growth of S. aureus in its natural environments.

  19. Alleviation of aluminum toxicity to Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae by the hydroxamate siderophore vicibactin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, N J; Carson, K C; Glenn, A R; Dilworth, M J; Hughes, M N; Poole, R K

    2001-03-01

    Acid rain solubilises aluminum which can exert toxic effects on soil bacteria. The root nodule bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae synthesises the hydroxamate siderophore vicibactin in response to iron limitation. We report the effect of vicibactin on the toxicity of aluminum(III) to R. leguminosarum and kinetic studies on the reaction of vicibactin with Al(III) and Fe(III). Aluminum (added as the nitrate) completely inhibited bacterial growth at 25 microM final concentration, whereas the preformed Al-vicibactin complex had no effect. When aluminum and vicibactin solutions were added separately to growing cultures, growth was partly inhibited at 25 microM final concentration of each, but fully inhibited at 50 microM final concentration of each. Growth was not inhibited at 50 microM Al and 100 microM vicibactin, probably reflecting the slow reaction between Al and vicibactin; this results in some aluminum remaining uncomplexed long enough to exert toxic effects on growth, partly at 25 microM Al and vicibactin and fully at 50 microM Al and vicibactin. At 100 microM vicibactin and 50 microM Al, Al was complexed more effectively and there was no toxic effect. It was anticipated that vicibactin might enhance the toxicity of Al by transporting it into the cell, but the Al-vicibactin complex was not toxic. Several explanations are possible: the Al-vicibactin complex is not taken up by the cell; the complex is taken up but Al is not released from vicibactin; Al is released in the cell but is precipitated immediately. However, vicibactin reduces the toxicity of Al by complexing it outside the cell.

  20. Synthesis, biological characterization and molecular modeling insights of spirochromanes as potent HDAC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Florian; Moretti, Loris; Amici, Raffaella; Abate, Agnese; Colombo, Andrea; Carenzi, Giacomo; Fulco, Maria Carmela; Boggio, Roberto; Dondio, Giulio; Gagliardi, Stefania; Minucci, Saverio; Sartori, Luca; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro

    2016-01-27

    In the last decades, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDAC) have become an important class of anti-cancer agents. In a previous study we described the synthesis of spiro[chromane-2,4'-piperidine]hydroxamic acid derivatives able to inhibit histone deacetylase enzymes. Herein, we present our exploration for new derivatives by replacing the piperidine moiety with various cycloamines. The goal was to obtain highly potent compounds with a good in vitro ADME profile. In addition, molecular modeling studies unravelled the binding mode of these inhibitors.

  1. Boronic Acid-Catalyzed, Highly Enantioselective Aza-Michael Additions of Hydroxamic Acid to Quinone Imine Ketals.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Gálvez, Alberto Osuna; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-12-30

    Boronic acid is one of the most versatile organic molecules in chemistry. Its uses include organic reactions, molecular recognition, assembly, and even medicine. While boronic acid catalysis, which utilizes an inherent catalytic property, has become an important research objective, it still lags far behind other boronic acid chemistries. Here, we report our discovery of a new boronic acid catalysis that enables the aza-Michael addition of hydroxamic acid to quinone imine ketals. By using 3-borono-BINOL as a chiral boronic acid catalyst, this reaction could be implemented in a highly enantioselective manner, paving the way to densely functionalized cyclohexanes.

  2. Synthesis and metabolism of inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.T.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to prepare more effective inhibitors of ribo-nucleotide reductase a series of 2-substituted-4,6-dihydroxypyrimidines was prepared via the appropriately substituted benzamidine. None of the compounds exhibited in vivo activity against L1210 leukemia. No further testing was performed. In order to investigate the metabolism of 3,4-dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid, a known inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, radiolabeled 3,4-dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid was synthesized by a modification of the procedure of Pichat and Tostain. /sup 14/C-3,4-Dihydroxybenzoic acid was converted to the methyl ester and subsequently reacted with hydroxylamine to give the hydroxamic acid. /sup 14/C-3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid was given i.p. to Sprague-Dawley rats. Excretion occurred mainly (72%) via the urine. HPLC coupled with GC/MS analyses showed that the compound was excreted mainly unchanged. The compound was metabolized to 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide, 4-methoxy-3-hydroxybenzohydroxamic acid, and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzohydroxamic acid. HPLC analysis also showed the lack of formation of any glucuronide or sulfate conjugates through either the hydroxamic acid or catechol functionalities.

  3. Coordination diversity in mono- and oligonuclear copper(II) complexes of pyridine-2-hydroxamic and pyridine-2,6-dihydroxamic acids.

    PubMed

    Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Golenya, Irina A; Szebesczyk, Agnieszka; Haukka, Matti; Krämer, Roland; Fritsky, Igor O

    2013-07-01

    Solution and solid state studies on Cu(II) complexes of pyridine-2-hydroxamic acid (HPicHA) and pyridine-2,6-dihydroxamic acid (H2PyDHA) were carried out. The use of methanol/water solvent allowed us to investigate the Cu(II)-HPicHA equilibria under homogeneous conditions between pH 1 and 11. In agreement with ESI-MS indication, the potentiometric data fitted very well with the model usually reported for copper(II) complexes of α-aminohydroxamate complexes ([CuL](+), [Cu5(LH-1)4](2+), [CuL2], [CuL2H-1](-)), however with much higher stability of the 12-MC-4 species. A series of copper(II) complexes has been isolated in the solid state and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic methods, X-ray structure analysis, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The ligands show the tendency to form bi- and trinuclear species with copper(II) ions due to the {(N,N'); (O,O')} bis-(bidentate) chelating-and-bridging mode involving (O,O')-hydroxamate chelate formation combined with (N,N') chelating with participation of the pyridine and hydroxamic nitrogen atoms, so that the hydroxamate groups play a μ2-(N,O)-bridging role. Molecular and crystal structures of three synthesized complexes [Cu3(PicHA-H)2(dipy)2](ClO4)2·4/3DMSO·2/3H2O (1), [Cu2(PyDHA)(dipy)2(ClO4)2]·DMF·H2O (4), and [Cu3(PyDHA-2H)(tmeda)3](ClO4)2 (5) (dipy, 2,2'-dipyridyl; tmeda, N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,2-diaminoethane) have been determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. In 1, two trans-situated doubly deprotonated hydroxamic ligands play a {(O,O')(N,N')}-(bis)bidentate-bridging function forming bridges between the medial, Cu(2) (CuN4), and the terminal, Cu(1) and Cu(3) (CuN2O2), copper(II) ions; the chelating dipy ligands are coordinated to the latter. In 4, the ligand is coordinated in a classical (O,O')-hydroxamate chelating mode with the help of two separate hydroxamic groups while the central tridentate donor compartment remains vacant. In 5, the hydroxamate ligand is coordinated by the {(O

  4. Identification of New Snake Venom Metalloproteinase Inhibitors Using Compound Screening and Rational Peptide Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The majority of snakebite envenomations in Central America are caused by the viperid species Bothrops asper, whose venom contains a high proportion of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases that play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of hemorrhage characteristic of these envenomations. Broad metalloproteinase inhibitors, such as the peptidomimetic hydroxamate Batimastat, have been shown to inhibit snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP). However, the difficulty in having open public access to Batimastat and similar molecules highlights the need to design new inhibitors of SVMPs that could be applied in the treatment of snakebite envenomations. We have chosen the SVMP BaP1 as a model to search for new inhibitors using different strategies, that is, screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library and rational peptide design. Results from these approaches provide clues on the structural requirements for efficient BaP1 inhibition and pave the way for the design of new inhibitors of SVMP. PMID:24900507

  5. Identification of new snake venom metalloproteinase inhibitors using compound screening and rational Peptide design.

    PubMed

    Villalta-Romero, Fabián; Gortat, Anna; Herrera, Andrés E; Arguedas, Rebeca; Quesada, Javier; de Melo, Robson Lopes; Calvete, Juan J; Montero, Mavis; Murillo, Renato; Rucavado, Alexandra; Gutiérrez, José María; Pérez-Payá, Enrique

    2012-07-12

    The majority of snakebite envenomations in Central America are caused by the viperid species Bothrops asper, whose venom contains a high proportion of zinc-dependent metalloproteinases that play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of hemorrhage characteristic of these envenomations. Broad metalloproteinase inhibitors, such as the peptidomimetic hydroxamate Batimastat, have been shown to inhibit snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMP). However, the difficulty in having open public access to Batimastat and similar molecules highlights the need to design new inhibitors of SVMPs that could be applied in the treatment of snakebite envenomations. We have chosen the SVMP BaP1 as a model to search for new inhibitors using different strategies, that is, screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library and rational peptide design. Results from these approaches provide clues on the structural requirements for efficient BaP1 inhibition and pave the way for the design of new inhibitors of SVMP. PMID:24900507

  6. Synthesis, structure and antibiotic activity of aryl-substituted LpxC inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinshi; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2013-01-01

    The zinc-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria and is a validated target for development of novel antibiotics to combat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. Many potent LpxC inhibitors contain an essential threonyl-hydroxamate head group for high-affinity interaction with LpxC. We report the synthesis, antibiotic activity, and structural and enzymatic characterization of novel LpxC inhibitors containing an additional aryl-group in the threonyl-hydroxamate moiety, which expands the inhibitor-binding surface in LpxC. These compounds display enhanced potency against LpxC in enzymatic assays and superior antibiotic activity against F. novicida in cell culture. Comparison of the antibiotic activities of these compounds against a leaky E. coli strain and the wild-type strain reveals the contribution of the formidable outer membrane permeability barrier that reduces the compound efficacy in cell culture and emphasizes the importance of maintaining a balanced hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity profile in developing effective LpxC-targeting antibiotics. PMID:23914798

  7. Hydroxamic acid interactions with solvated cerium hydroxides in the flotation of monazite and bastnäsite-Experiments and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvaramini, A.; Azizi, D.; Larachi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) simulations and experiments were performed to clarify the interaction mechanisms between hydroxamic acid collectors and cerium hydroxides during the flotation of bastnäsite and monazite minerals. These minerals showed considerable floatability at moderately alkaline pH which was related to the adsorption of hydroxamic acids on their surfaces as confirmed by vibrational spectroscopic and zeta potential measurements. DFT simulations showed that at moderately alkaline pH, the interactions between solvated Ce(OH)2+ and Ce(OH)2+ and heptyl-hydroxamic acid (HHA) anions resulted in the formation of, respectively, [Ce(OH)(HHA)x(H2O)y]2-x (x[y = ] = 1[6],2[3],3[1]) and [Ce(OH)2(HHA)x(H2O)y]1-x (x[y = ] = 1[5],2[1],3[0]) complexes. The collector anions were found to interact directly through formation of two covalent bonds between their two polar-head oxygen atoms and cerium in the hydroxide complexes. However, formation of such new bonds resulted in breakage of a few covalent/electrostatic bonds between cerium and water molecules initially present in the first hydration shell of the rare-earth metal cation. Building up in the electric double layer of the semi-soluble minerals, these complexes, and by extension, those from other rare-earth elements belonging to monazite and bastnäsite, are speculated to play a role in the interactions between rare-earth minerals and hydroxamic acid collectors.

  8. Iron chelating active packaging: Influence of competing ions and pH value on effectiveness of soluble and immobilized hydroxamate chelators.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Yoshiko; Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-04-01

    Many packaged foods utilize synthetic chelators (e.g. ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, EDTA) to inhibit iron-promoted oxidation or microbial growth which would result in quality loss. To address consumer demands for all natural products, we have previously developed a non-migratory iron chelating active packaging material by covalent immobilization of polyhydroxamate and demonstrated its efficacy in delaying lipid oxidation. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of this hydroxamate-functionalized iron chelating active packaging to retain iron chelating capacity; even in the presence of competing ions common in food. Both immobilized and soluble hydroxamate chelators retained iron chelating capacity in the presence of calcium, magnesium, and sodium competing ions, although at pH 5.0 the presence of calcium reduced immobilized hydroxamate iron chelation. A strong correlation was found between colorimetric and mass spectral analysis of iron chelation by the chelating packaging material. Such chelating active packaging may support reducing additive use in product formulations, while retaining quality and shelf life.

  9. Targeting histone deacetylase inhibitors for anti-malarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Katherine T; Tran, Thanh N; Wheatley, Nicole C; Fairlie, David P

    2009-01-01

    It is now clear that histone acetylation plays key roles in regulating gene transcription in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the acetylated form inducing gene expression while deacetylation silences genes. Recent studies have identified roles for histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and/or histone deacetylases (HDACs) in a number of parasites including Entamoeba histolytica, Toxoplasma gondii, Schistosoma mansoni, Cryptosporidium sp., Leishmania donovani, Neospora caninum, and Plasmodium falciparum. Here we survey fairly limited efforts to date in profiling antimalarial activities of HDAC inhibitors, showing that such compounds are potent inhibitors of the growth of P. falciparum in vitro and in vivo. Most of the compounds evaluated so far have borne a zinc-binding hydroxamate group that tends to be metabolized in vivo, and thus new zinc-binding groups need to be incorporated into second generation inhibitors in order to mask the catalytic zinc in the active site of HDACs. Also the development of compounds that are selective for parasitic HDACs over mammalian HDACs is still in relative infancy and it will take some time to derive antiparasitic HDAC inhibitor compounds with minimal toxicity for the host and acceptable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles for human treatment. Nevertheless, results to date suggest that HDAC inhibitor development represents a promising new approach to the potential treatment of parasitic infections, including those induced by malaria protozoa, and may offer new therapeutic targets within increasingly drug-resistant malarial parasites. PMID:19355992

  10. Peptide deformylase inhibitors as potent antimycobacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jeanette W P; Thayalan, Pamela; Beer, David; Yap, Amelia S L; Nanjundappa, Mahesh; Ngew, Xinyi; Duraiswamy, Jeyaraj; Liung, Sarah; Dartois, Veronique; Schreiber, Mark; Hasan, Samiul; Cynamon, Michael; Ryder, Neil S; Yang, Xia; Weidmann, Beat; Bracken, Kathryn; Dick, Thomas; Mukherjee, Kakoli

    2006-11-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the hydrolytic removal of the N-terminal formyl group from nascent proteins. This is an essential step in bacterial protein synthesis, making PDF an attractive target for antibacterial drug development. Essentiality of the def gene, encoding PDF from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was demonstrated through genetic knockout experiments with Mycobacterium bovis BCG. PDF from M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was cloned, expressed, and purified as an N-terminal histidine-tagged recombinant protein in Escherichia coli. A novel class of PDF inhibitors (PDF-I), the N-alkyl urea hydroxamic acids, were synthesized and evaluated for their activities against the M. tuberculosis PDF enzyme as well as their antimycobacterial effects. Several compounds from the new class had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of <100 nM. Some of the PDF-I displayed antibacterial activity against M. tuberculosis, including MDR strains with MIC90 values of <1 microM. Pharmacokinetic studies of potential leads showed that the compounds were orally bioavailable. Spontaneous resistance towards these inhibitors arose at a frequency of < or =5 x 10(-7) in M. bovis BCG. DNA sequence analysis of several spontaneous PDF-I-resistant mutants revealed that half of the mutants had acquired point mutations in their formyl methyltransferase gene (fmt), which formylated Met-tRNA. The results from this study validate M. tuberculosis PDF as a drug target and suggest that this class of compounds have the potential to be developed as novel antimycobacterial agents.

  11. Rational Design Synthesis and Evaluation of New Selective Inhibitors of Microbial Class II (Zinc Dependent) Fructose Bis-phosphate Aldolases

    SciTech Connect

    R Daher; M Coincon; M Fonvielle; P Gest; M Guerin; M Jackson; J Sygusch; M Therisod

    2011-12-31

    We report the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of several selective inhibitors of class II (zinc dependent) fructose bis-phosphate aldolases (Fba). The products were designed as transition-state analogues of the catalyzed reaction, structurally related to the substrate fructose bis-phosphate (or sedoheptulose bis-phosphate) and based on an N-substituted hydroxamic acid, as a chelator of the zinc ion present in active site. The compounds synthesized were tested on class II Fbas from various pathogenic microorganisms and, by comparison, on a mammalian class I Fba. The best inhibitor shows Ki against class II Fbas from various pathogens in the nM range, with very high selectivity (up to 105). Structural analyses of inhibitors in complex with aldolases rationalize and corroborate the enzymatic kinetics results. These inhibitors represent lead compounds for the preparation of new synthetic antibiotics, notably for tuberculosis prophylaxis.

  12. Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitor Kinetic Rate Constants Correlate with Cellular Histone Acetylation but Not Transcription and Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Lauffer, Benjamin E. L.; Mintzer, Robert; Fong, Rina; Mukund, Susmith; Tam, Christine; Zilberleyb, Inna; Flicke, Birgit; Ritscher, Allegra; Fedorowicz, Grazyna; Vallero, Roxanne; Ortwine, Daniel F.; Gunzner, Janet; Modrusan, Zora; Neumann, Lars; Koth, Christopher M.; Lupardus, Patrick J.; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Heise, Christopher E.; Steiner, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are critical in the control of gene expression, and dysregulation of their activity has been implicated in a broad range of diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, and neurological diseases. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) employing different zinc chelating functionalities such as hydroxamic acids and benzamides have shown promising results in cancer therapy. Although it has also been suggested that HDACi with increased isozyme selectivity and potency may broaden their clinical utility and minimize side effects, the translation of this idea to the clinic remains to be investigated. Moreover, a detailed understanding of how HDACi with different pharmacological properties affect biological functions in vitro and in vivo is still missing. Here, we show that a panel of benzamide-containing HDACi are slow tight-binding inhibitors with long residence times unlike the hydroxamate-containing HDACi vorinostat and trichostatin-A. Characterization of changes in H2BK5 and H4K14 acetylation following HDACi treatment in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y revealed that the timing and magnitude of histone acetylation mirrored both the association and dissociation kinetic rates of the inhibitors. In contrast, cell viability and microarray gene expression analysis indicated that cell death induction and changes in transcriptional regulation do not correlate with the dissociation kinetic rates of the HDACi. Therefore, our study suggests that determining how the selective and kinetic inhibition properties of HDACi affect cell function will help to evaluate their therapeutic utility. PMID:23897821

  13. Development of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, M; Eckhardt, S G

    2001-02-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent proteinases involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix. The MMPs have been implicated in the processes of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis; are frequently overexpressed in malignant tumors; and have been associated with an aggressive malignant phenotype and adverse prognosis in patients with cancer. A number of MMP inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of cancer. The most extensively studied class of MMP inhibitors includes collagen peptidomimetics and nonpeptidomimetic inhibitors of the MMP active site, tetracycline derivatives, and bisphosphonates. The hydroxamate peptidomimetic inhibitor batimastat and its orally bioavailable analogue marimastat, which bind covalently to the zinc atom at the MMP-active site, were the first MMP inhibitors to be studied in detail. Marimastat is currently being studied in randomized clinical trials. The nonpeptidic MMP inhibitors were synthesized in an attempt to improve the oral bioavailability and pharmaceutical properties of the peptidic inhibitors. Several members of this class of compounds are undergoing evaluation in phase III clinical trials. The tetracyclines and, particularly, the nonantibiotic chemically modified tetracyclines, interfere with several aspects of MMP expression and activation and inhibit tumor growth and metastases in preclinical models. A representative agent of this class, Col-3, is currently undergoing phase I clinical trials. The development of the MMP inhibitors, like that of other targeted and predominantly antiproliferative compounds, poses a challenge because the paradigms that have governed the design of clinical oncology trials may not be relevant to this new class of agents. The anticipated need for long-term administration of these drugs, together with their cytostatic mechanism of action, will require novel clinical trial design strategies.

  14. A base-mediated self-propagative Lossen rearrangement of hydroxamic acids for the efficient and facile synthesis of aromatic and aliphatic primary amines.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Naoya; Okuno, Moriaki; Hoshino, Yujiro; Honda, Kiyoshi

    2016-10-14

    A variety of aromatic and aliphatic hydroxamic acids were converted to the corresponding primary amines via base-mediated rearrangement. This rearrangement could proceed with less than 1 equiv. of K2CO3 in polar solvents under thermal conditions with no external reagents. This rearrangement has several features including no external activating agents needed for promoting the rearrangement, less than one equivalent of a base is sufficient for the reaction, and a clean reaction in which only carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product. A self-propagating mechanism via an isocyanate intermediate is proposed and elementary reaction steps, namely, chain propagation reactions are supported by experiments. PMID:27605448

  15. Copper(II)-catalyzed room temperature aerobic oxidation of hydroxamic acids and hydrazides to acyl-nitroso and azo intermediates, and their Diels-Alder trapping.

    PubMed

    Chaiyaveij, Duangduan; Cleary, Leah; Batsanov, Andrei S; Marder, Todd B; Shea, Kenneth J; Whiting, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    CuCl(2), in the presence of a 2-ethyl-2-oxazoline ligand, is an effective catalyst for the room temperature, aerobic oxidation of hydroxamic acids and hydrazides, to acyl-nitroso and azo dienophiles respectively, which are efficiently trapped in situ via both inter- and intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder reactions with dienes. Both inter- and intramolecular variants of the Diels-Alder reaction are suitable under the reaction conditions using a variety of solvents. Under the same conditions, an acyl hydrazide was also oxidized to give an acyl-azo dienophile which was trapped intramolecularly by a diene. PMID:21644530

  16. A base-mediated self-propagative Lossen rearrangement of hydroxamic acids for the efficient and facile synthesis of aromatic and aliphatic primary amines.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Naoya; Okuno, Moriaki; Hoshino, Yujiro; Honda, Kiyoshi

    2016-10-14

    A variety of aromatic and aliphatic hydroxamic acids were converted to the corresponding primary amines via base-mediated rearrangement. This rearrangement could proceed with less than 1 equiv. of K2CO3 in polar solvents under thermal conditions with no external reagents. This rearrangement has several features including no external activating agents needed for promoting the rearrangement, less than one equivalent of a base is sufficient for the reaction, and a clean reaction in which only carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product. A self-propagating mechanism via an isocyanate intermediate is proposed and elementary reaction steps, namely, chain propagation reactions are supported by experiments.

  17. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  18. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Global Proteome and Lysine Acetylome Reveal the Differential Impacts of VPA and SAHA on HL60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xin; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Wang, Fengsong; Qi, Wulin; Yan, Jiawei; Liu, Ning; Sun, Zimin; Liu, Huilan; Peng, Xiaojun; Hao, Yingchan; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Quan

    2016-01-29

    Valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) are both HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Previous studies indicated that both inhibitors show therapeutic effects on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), while the differential impacts of the two different HDACi on AML treatment still remains elusive. In this study, using 3-plex SILAC based quantitative proteomics technique, anti-acetyllysine antibody based affinity enrichment, high resolution LC-MS/MS and intensive bioinformatic analysis, the quantitative proteome and acetylome in SAHA and VPA treated AML HL60 cells were extensively studied. In total, 5,775 proteins and 1,124 lysine acetylation sites were successfully obtained in response to VAP and SAHA treatment. It is found that VPA and SAHA treatment differently induced proteome and acetylome profiling in AML HL60 cells. This study revealed the differential impacts of VPA and SAHA on proteome/acetylome in AML cells, deepening our understanding of HDAC inhibitor mediated AML therapeutics.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Global Proteome and Lysine Acetylome Reveal the Differential Impacts of VPA and SAHA on HL60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xin; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Wang, Fengsong; Qi, Wulin; Yan, Jiawei; Liu, Ning; Sun, Zimin; Liu, Huilan; Peng, Xiaojun; Hao, Yingchan; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) are both HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Previous studies indicated that both inhibitors show therapeutic effects on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), while the differential impacts of the two different HDACi on AML treatment still remains elusive. In this study, using 3-plex SILAC based quantitative proteomics technique, anti-acetyllysine antibody based affinity enrichment, high resolution LC-MS/MS and intensive bioinformatic analysis, the quantitative proteome and acetylome in SAHA and VPA treated AML HL60 cells were extensively studied. In total, 5,775 proteins and 1,124 lysine acetylation sites were successfully obtained in response to VAP and SAHA treatment. It is found that VPA and SAHA treatment differently induced proteome and acetylome profiling in AML HL60 cells. This study revealed the differential impacts of VPA and SAHA on proteome/acetylome in AML cells, deepening our understanding of HDAC inhibitor mediated AML therapeutics. PMID:26822725

  1. Induced production of mycotoxins in an endophytic fungus from the medicinal plant Datura stramonium L.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jieyin; Awakawa, Takayoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Abe, Ikuro

    2012-10-15

    Epigenetic modifiers, including DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) or histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, are useful to induce the expression of otherwise dormant biosynthetic genes under standard laboratory conditions. We isolated several endophytic fungi from the medicinal plant Datura stramonium L., which produces pharmaceutically important tropane alkaloids, including scopolamine and hyoscyamine. Although none of the endophytic fungi produced the tropane alkaloids, supplementation of a DNMT inhibitor, 5-azacytidine, and/or a HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, to the culture medium induced the production of mycotoxins, including alternariol, alternariol-5-O-methyl ether, 3'-hydroxyalternariol-5-O-methyl ether, altenusin, tenuazonic acid, and altertoxin II, by the endophytic fungus Alternaria sp. This is the first report of a mycotoxin-producing endophytic fungus from the medicinal plant D. stramonium L. This work demonstrates that treatments with epigenetic modifiers induce the production of mycotoxins, thus providing a useful tool to explore the biosynthetic potential of the microorganisms. PMID:22967766

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Global Proteome and Lysine Acetylome Reveal the Differential Impacts of VPA and SAHA on HL60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xin; Cheng, Zhongyi; Zhu, Jun; Xu, Lei; Wang, Fengsong; Qi, Wulin; Yan, Jiawei; Liu, Ning; Sun, Zimin; Liu, Huilan; Peng, Xiaojun; Hao, Yingchan; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) are both HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Previous studies indicated that both inhibitors show therapeutic effects on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), while the differential impacts of the two different HDACi on AML treatment still remains elusive. In this study, using 3-plex SILAC based quantitative proteomics technique, anti-acetyllysine antibody based affinity enrichment, high resolution LC-MS/MS and intensive bioinformatic analysis, the quantitative proteome and acetylome in SAHA and VPA treated AML HL60 cells were extensively studied. In total, 5,775 proteins and 1,124 lysine acetylation sites were successfully obtained in response to VAP and SAHA treatment. It is found that VPA and SAHA treatment differently induced proteome and acetylome profiling in AML HL60 cells. This study revealed the differential impacts of VPA and SAHA on proteome/acetylome in AML cells, deepening our understanding of HDAC inhibitor mediated AML therapeutics. PMID:26822725

  3. FptA, the Fe(III)-pyochelin receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a phenolate siderophore receptor homologous to hydroxamate siderophore receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Ankenbauer, R G; Quan, H N

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin is structurally unique among siderophores and possesses neither hydroxamate- nor catecholate-chelating groups. The structural gene encoding the 75-kDa outer membrane Fe(III)-pyochelin receptor FptA has been isolated by plasmid rescue techniques and sequenced. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the isolated FptA protein corresponded to that deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the fptA structural gene. The mature FptA protein has 682 amino acids and a molecular mass of 75,993 Da and has considerable overall homology with the hydroxamate siderophore receptors FpvA of P. aeruginosa, PupA and PupB of Pseudomonas putida, and FhuE of Escherichia coli. This observation indicates that homologies between siderophore receptors are an unreliable predictor of siderophore ligand class recognition by a given receptor. The fptA gene was strongly regulated by iron; fptA transcription was totally repressed by 30 microM FeCl3, as determined by Northern (RNA) blotting. The promoter of the fptA gene contained the sequence 5'-ATAATGATAAGCATTATC-3', which matches the consensus E. coli Fur-binding site at 17 of 18 positions. The -10 promoter region and transcriptional start site of the fptA gene reside within this Fur-binding site. Images PMID:8288523

  4. Inhibition and stimulation of root respiration in pisum and plantago by hydroxamate : its consequences for the assessment of alternative path activity.

    PubMed

    de Visser, R; Blacquière, T

    1984-07-01

    The contribution of the alternative pathway in root respiration of Pisum sativum L. cv Rondo, Plantago lanceolata L., and Plantago major L. ssp major was determined by titration with salicylhydroxamate (SHAM) in the absence and presence of cyanide. SHAM completely inhibited the cyanide-resistant component of root respiration at 5 to 10 millimolar with an apparent K(i) of 600 micromolar. In contrast, SHAM enhanced pea root respiration by 30% at most, at concentrations below 15 millimolar. An unknown oxidase appeared to be responsible for this stimulation. Its maximum activity in the presence of low SHAM concentrations (1-5 millimolar) was 40% of control respiration rate in pea roots, since 25 millimolar SHAM resulted in 10% inhibition. In plantain roots, the maximum activity was found to be 15%. This hydroxamate-activated oxidase was distinct from the cytochrome path by its resistance to antimycin. The results of titrations with cyanide and antimycin indicated that high SHAM concentrations (up to 25 millimolar) block the hydroxamate-activated oxidase, but do not affect the cytochrome path and, therefore, are a reliable tool for estimating the activity of the alternative path in vivo. A considerable fraction of root respiration was mediated by the alternative path in plantain (45%) and pea (15%), in the latter because of the saturation of the cytochrome path.

  5. Structural basis of the promiscuous inhibitor susceptibility of Escherichia coli LpxC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Najeeb, Javaria; Ark, Eugene D; Toone, Eric J; Zhou, Pei

    2014-01-17

    The LpxC enzyme in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway is one of the most promising and clinically unexploited antibiotic targets for treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. Progress in medicinal chemistry has led to the discovery of potent LpxC inhibitors with a variety of chemical scaffolds and distinct antibiotic profiles. The vast majority of these compounds, including the nanomolar inhibitors L-161,240 and BB-78485, are highly effective in suppressing the activity of Escherichia coli LpxC (EcLpxC) but not divergent orthologs such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa LpxC (PaLpxC) in vitro. The molecular basis for such promiscuous inhibition of EcLpxC has remained poorly understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcLpxC bound to L-161,240, providing the first molecular insight into L-161,240 inhibition. Additionally, structural analysis of the EcLpxC/L-161,240 complex together with the EcLpxC/BB-78485 complex reveals an unexpected backbone flipping of the Insert I βa-βb loop in EcLpxC in comparison with previously reported crystal structures of EcLpxC complexes with l-threonyl-hydroxamate-based broad-spectrum inhibitors. Such a conformational switch, which has only been observed in EcLpxC but not in divergent orthologs such as PaLpxC, results in expansion of the active site of EcLpxC, enabling it to accommodate LpxC inhibitors with a variety of head groups, including compounds containing single (R- or S-enantiomers) or double substitutions at the neighboring Cα atom of the hydroxamate warhead group. These results highlight the importance of understanding inherent conformational plasticity of target proteins in lead optimization. PMID:24117400

  6. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  7. Comparative QSAR studies on peptide deformylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Doddareddy, Munikumar Reddy; Cho, Yong Seo; Choo, Hyunah; Koh, Hun Yeong; Kang, Jae-Hoon; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2007-05-01

    Comparative quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses of peptide deformylase (PDF) inhibitors were performed with a series of previously published (British Biotech Pharmaceuticals, Oxford, UK) reverse hydroxamate derivatives having antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli PDF, using 2D and 3D QSAR methods, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and hologram QSAR (HQSAR). Statistically reliable models with good predictive power were generated from all three methods (CoMFA r (2) = 0.957, q (2) = 0.569; CoMSIA r (2) = 0.924, q (2) = 0.520; HQSAR r (2) = 0.860, q (2) = 0.578). The predictive capability of these models was validated by a set of compounds that were not included in the training set. The models based on CoMFA and CoMSIA gave satisfactory predictive r (2) values of 0.687 and 0.505, respectively. The model derived from the HQSAR method showed a low predictability of 0.178 for the test set. In this study, 3D prediction models showed better predictive power than 2D models for the test set. This might be because 3D information is more important in the case of datasets containing compounds with similar skeletons. Superimposition of CoMFA contour maps in the active site of the PDF crystal structure showed a meaningful correlation between receptor-ligand binding and biological activity. The final QSAR models, along with information gathered from 3D contour and 2D contribution maps, could be useful for the design of novel active inhibitors of PDF. PMID:17333308

  8. Modeling of inhibitor-metalloenzyme interactions and selectivity using molecular mechanics grounded in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Garmer, D R; Gresh, N; Roques, B P

    1998-04-01

    We investigated the binding properties of the metalloprotease inhibitors hydroxamate, methanethiolate, and methylphosphoramidate to a model coordination site occurring in several Zn2+ metalloproteases, including thermolysin. This was carried out using both the SIBFA (sum of interactions between fragments ab initio-computed) molecular mechanics and the SCF/MP2 procedures for the purpose of evaluating SIBFA as a metalloenzyme modeling tool. The energy-minimized structures were closely similar to the X-ray crystallographic structures of related thermolysin-inhibitor complexes. We found that selectivity between alternative geometries and between inhibitors usually stemmed from multiple interaction components included in SIBFA. The binding strength sequence is hydroxamate > methanethiolate > or = methylphosphoramidate from multiple interaction components included in SIBFA. The trends in interaction energy components, rankings, and preferences for mono- or bidentate binding were consistent in both computational procedures. We also compared the Zn2+ vs. Mg2+ selectivities in several other polycoordinated sites having various "hard" and "soft" qualities. This included a hexahydrate, a model representing Mg2+/Ca2+ binding sites, a chlorophyll-like structure, and a zinc finger model. The latter three favor Zn2+ over Mg2+ by a greater degree than the hydrated state, but the selectivity varies widely according to the ligand "softness." SIBFA was able to match the ab initio binding energies by < 2%, with the SIBFA terms representing dispersion and charge-transfer contributing the most to Zn2+/Mg2+ selectivity. These results showed this procedure to be a very capable modeling tool for metalloenzyme problems, in this case giving valuable information about details and limitations of "hard" and "soft" selectivity trends.

  9. Antiproliferative effect of D-aspartic acid beta-hydroxamate (DAH) on Friend virus-infected erythropoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Tournaire, R; Arnaud, S; Hamedi-Sangsari, F; Malley, S; Grange, J; Blanchet, J P; Doré, J F; Vila, J

    1994-10-01

    D-aspartic beta-hydroxamate (DAH), an aspartic acid analog, exerts antitumoral activity on murine leukemia L5178Y, both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we show that DAH is also active in vivo against Friend virus (FV-P)-induced erythroleukemia, and we report the effects of DAH in vivo an in vitro on FV-P target cells, i.e. the mature erythroid colony-forming cells (CFU-E). DAH treatment (2 g/kg/day) given for 95 days as a single daily i.p. injection to DBA/2 mice either 3 or 12 days following inoculation with a high dose (10(3) plaque-forming units) of FV-P resulted in a marked increase in the mean survival time of treated animals (212 and 191%, respectively). Since FV-P elicits spleen enlargement and polycythemia, we examined the effects of DAH on spleen size, spleen-nucleated cell number, and hematocrit, in normal and FV-P infected mice, at different times in the course of continuous DAH treatments. DAH treatment initiated 3 days after viral infection inhibits the virus-induced splenomegaly, with at day 26 p.i. 1.15 x 10(8) and 12.6 x 10(8) nucleated cells per spleen observed in DAH-treated mice and untreated mice respectively, whereas only 1.03 x 10(8) nucleated cells were observed in uninfected mice. Furthermore, DAH prevents virus-induced polycythemia: on day 26, an hematocrit of 39% was measured in DAH-treated mice as compared to 60% in untreated mice. DAH treatment initiated 12 days after viral infection reduces splenomegaly, the number of nucleated spleen cells and the hematocrit of infected mice. DAH treatment initiated 3 days after viral infection prevents the tremendous increase of CFU-E in the spleen of infected mice: on day 11, the spleen of infected mice contained 4.6 x 10(6) CFU-E, while the spleen of treated mice only contained 26 x 10(3) CFU-E, and on day 26 the spleen CFU-E numbers were 45.4 x 10(6) and 1.5 x 10(6) in untreated and treated infected mice, respectively. In control uninfected mice, DAH treatment induced a transient decrease in

  10. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum fegA gene encodes an iron-regulated outer membrane protein with similarity to hydroxamate-type siderophore receptors.

    PubMed Central

    LeVier, K; Guerinot, M L

    1996-01-01

    Iron is important in the symbiosis between soybean and its nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum, yet little is known about rhizobial iron acquisition strategies. Analysis of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from B. japonicum 61A152 identified three iron-regulated OMPs in the size range of several known receptors for Fe(III)-scavenging siderophores. One of the iron-regulated proteins, FegA, was purified and microsequenced, and a reverse genetics approach was used to clone a fegA-containing DNA fragment. Sequencing of this fragment revealed a single open reading frame of 750 amino acids. A putative N-terminal signal sequence of 14 amino acids which would result in a mature protein of 736 amino acids with a molecular mass of 80,851 Da was predicted. FegA shares significant amino acid similarity with several Fe(III)-siderophore receptors from gram-negative bacteria and has greater than 50% amino acid similarity and 33% amino acid identity with two [corrected] bacterial receptors for hydroxamate-type Fe(III)-siderophores. A dendrogram describing total inferred sequence similarity among 36 TonB-dependent OMPs was constructed; FegA grouped with Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptors. The transcriptional start site of fegA was mapped by primer extension analysis, and a putative Fur-binding site was found in the promoter. Primer extension and RNA slot blot analysis demonstrated that fegA was expressed only in cells grown under iron-limiting conditions. This is the first report of the cloning of a gene encoding a putative Fe(III)-siderophore receptor from nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. PMID:8955412

  11. Pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5-ones: A Novel Class of Antiinflammatory Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hui; Hutta, Daniel A.; Rinker, James M.; Hu, Huaping; Parsons, William H.; Schubert, Carsten; DesJarlais, Renee L.; Crysler, Carl S.; Chaikin, Margery A.; Donatelli, Robert R.; Chen, Yanmin; Cheng, Deping; Zhou, Zhao; Yurkow, Edward; Manthey, Carl L.; Player, Mark R.

    2010-10-01

    A series of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5-ones has been synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of the kinase domain of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (FMS). FMS inhibitors may be useful in treating rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Structure-based optimization of the lead amide analogue 10 led to hydroxamate analogue 37, which possessed excellent potency and an improved pharmacokinetic profile. During the chronic phase of streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis in rats, compound 37 (10, 3, and 1 mg/kg) was highly effective at reversing established joint swelling. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats, 37 prevented joint swelling partially at 10 mg/kg. In this model, osteoclastogenesis and bone erosion were prevented by low doses (1 or 0.33 mg/kg) that had minimal impact on inflammation. These data underscore the potential of FMS inhibitors to prevent erosions and reduce symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5-ones: a novel class of antiinflammatory macrophage colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Hutta, Daniel A; Rinker, James M; Hu, Huaping; Parsons, William H; Schubert, Carsten; DesJarlais, Renee L; Crysler, Carl S; Chaikin, Margery A; Donatelli, Robert R; Chen, Yanmin; Cheng, Deping; Zhou, Zhao; Yurkow, Edward; Manthey, Carl L; Player, Mark R

    2009-02-26

    A series of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5-ones has been synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of the kinase domain of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (FMS). FMS inhibitors may be useful in treating rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Structure-based optimization of the lead amide analogue 10 led to hydroxamate analogue 37, which possessed excellent potency and an improved pharmacokinetic profile. During the chronic phase of streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis in rats, compound 37 (10, 3, and 1 mg/kg) was highly effective at reversing established joint swelling. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats, 37 prevented joint swelling partially at 10 mg/kg. In this model, osteoclastogenesis and bone erosion were prevented by low doses (1 or 0.33 mg/kg) that had minimal impact on inflammation. These data underscore the potential of FMS inhibitors to prevent erosions and reduce symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Development of novel ferulic acid derivatives as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Lu, Wen; Zhang, Tao; Dong, Jinyun; Gao, Hongping; Li, Pengfei; Wang, Sicen; Zhang, Jie

    2013-11-15

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) offer a promising strategy for cancer therapy. The discovery of potent ferulic acid-based HDACIs with hydroxamic acid or 2-aminobenzamide group as zinc binding group was reported. The halogeno-acetanilide was introduced as novel surface recognition moiety (SRM). The majority of title compounds displayed potent HDAC inhibitory activity. In particular, FA6 and FA16 exhibited significant enzymatic inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 3.94 and 2.82 μM, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds showed moderate antiproliferative activity against a panel of human cancer cells. FA17 displayed promising profile as an antitumor candidate. The results indicated that these ferulic acid derivatives could serve as promising lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:24095016

  14. Concerted Amidation of Activated Esters: Reaction Path and Origins of Selectivity in the Kinetic Resolution of Cyclic Amines via N-Heterocyclic Carbenes and Hydroxamic Acid Cocatalyzed Acyl Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-heterocyclic carbene and hydroxamic acid cocatalyzed kinetic resolution of cyclic amines generates enantioenriched amines and amides with selectivity factors up to 127. In this report, a quantum mechanical study of the reaction mechanism indicates that the selectivity-determining aminolysis step occurs via a novel concerted pathway in which the hydroxamic acid plays a key role in directing proton transfer from the incoming amine. This modality was found to be general in amide bond formation from a number of activated esters including those generated from HOBt and HOAt, reagents that are broadly used in peptide coupling. For the kinetic resolution, the proposed model accurately predicts the faster reacting enantiomer. A breakdown of the steric and electronic control elements shows that a gearing effect in the transition state is responsible for the observed selectivity. PMID:25050843

  15. 2-Benzazolyl-4-Piperazin-1-Ylsulfonylbenzenecarbohydroxamic Acids as Novel Selective Histone Deacetylase-6 Inhibitors with Antiproliferative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Kofler, Marina; Brosch, Gerald; Melesina, Jelena; Sippl, Wolfgang; Martinez, Elisabeth D.; Easmon, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    We have screened our compound collection in an established cell based assay that measures the derepression of an epigenetically silenced transgene, the locus derepression assay. The screen led to the identification of 4-[4-(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)piperazin-1-yl]sulfonylbenzenecarbohydroxamic acid (9b) as an active which was found to inhibit HDAC1. In initial structure activity relationships study, the 1-methylbenzimidazole ring was replaced by the isosteric heterocycles benzimidazole, benzoxazole, and benzothiazole and the position of the hydroxamic acid substituent on the phenyl ring was varied. Whereas compounds bearing a para substituted hydroxamic acid (9a-d) were active HDAC inhibitors, the meta substituted analogues (8a-d) were appreciably inactive. Compounds 9a-d selectively inhibited HDAC6 (IC50 = 0.1–1.0μM) over HDAC1 (IC50 = 0.9–6μM) and moreover, also selectively inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells vs. patient matched normal cells. The compounds induce a cell cycle arrest in the S-phase while induction of apoptosis is neglible as compared to controls. Molecular modeling studies uncovered that the MM-GBSA energy for interaction of 9a-d with HDAC6 was higher than for HDAC1 providing structural rationale for the HDAC6 selectivity. PMID:26698121

  16. Impact of the uranium (VI) speciation in mineralised urines on its extraction by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups used in chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, S; Bouvier-Capely, C; Ritt, A; Peroux, A; Fevrier, L; Rebiere, F; Agarande, M; Cote, G

    2015-11-01

    Actinides determination in urine samples is part of the analyses performed to monitor internal contamination in case of an accident or a terrorist attack involving nuclear matter. Mineralisation is the first step of any of these analyses. It aims at reducing the sample volume and at destroying all organic compounds present. The mineralisation protocol is usually based on a wet ashing step, followed by actinides co-precipitation and a furnace ashing step, before redissolution and the quantification of the actinides by the appropriate techniques. Amongst the existing methods to perform the actinides co-precipitation, alkali-earth (typically calcium) precipitation is widely used. In the present work, the extraction of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV) and americium(III) from the redissolution solutions (called "mineralised urines") on calix[6]arene columns bearing hydroxamic groups was investigated as such an extraction is a necessary step before their determination by ICP-MS or alpha spectrometry. Difficulties were encountered in the transfer of uranium(VI) from raw to mineralised urines, with yield of transfer ranging between 0% and 85%, compared to about 90% for Pu and Am, depending on the starting raw urines. To understand the origin of such a difficulty, the speciation of uranium (VI) in mineralised urines was investigated by computer simulation using the MEDUSA software and the associated HYDRA database, compiled with recently published data. These calculations showed that the presence of phosphates in the "mineralised urines" leads to the formation of strong uranyl-phosphate complexes (such as UO2HPO4) which compete with the uranium (VI) extraction by the calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups. The extraction constant of uranium (VI) by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups was determined in a 0.04 mol L(-1) sodium nitrate solution (logK=4.86±0.03) and implemented in an extraction model taking into account the speciation in the aqueous phase. This model allowed to

  17. Impact of the uranium (VI) speciation in mineralised urines on its extraction by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups used in chromatography columns.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, S; Bouvier-Capely, C; Ritt, A; Peroux, A; Fevrier, L; Rebiere, F; Agarande, M; Cote, G

    2015-11-01

    Actinides determination in urine samples is part of the analyses performed to monitor internal contamination in case of an accident or a terrorist attack involving nuclear matter. Mineralisation is the first step of any of these analyses. It aims at reducing the sample volume and at destroying all organic compounds present. The mineralisation protocol is usually based on a wet ashing step, followed by actinides co-precipitation and a furnace ashing step, before redissolution and the quantification of the actinides by the appropriate techniques. Amongst the existing methods to perform the actinides co-precipitation, alkali-earth (typically calcium) precipitation is widely used. In the present work, the extraction of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV) and americium(III) from the redissolution solutions (called "mineralised urines") on calix[6]arene columns bearing hydroxamic groups was investigated as such an extraction is a necessary step before their determination by ICP-MS or alpha spectrometry. Difficulties were encountered in the transfer of uranium(VI) from raw to mineralised urines, with yield of transfer ranging between 0% and 85%, compared to about 90% for Pu and Am, depending on the starting raw urines. To understand the origin of such a difficulty, the speciation of uranium (VI) in mineralised urines was investigated by computer simulation using the MEDUSA software and the associated HYDRA database, compiled with recently published data. These calculations showed that the presence of phosphates in the "mineralised urines" leads to the formation of strong uranyl-phosphate complexes (such as UO2HPO4) which compete with the uranium (VI) extraction by the calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups. The extraction constant of uranium (VI) by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups was determined in a 0.04 mol L(-1) sodium nitrate solution (logK=4.86±0.03) and implemented in an extraction model taking into account the speciation in the aqueous phase. This model allowed to

  18. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are ∼106 times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-à-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's “closed,” inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:20498699

  19. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  20. Non-coding nucleotides and amino acids near the active site regulate peptide deformylase expression and inhibitor susceptibility in Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaofeng; Pachikara, Niseema D.; Oey, Christopher B.; Balakrishnan, Amit; Westblade, Lars F.; Tan, Ming; Chase, Theodore; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is a highly prevalent human pathogen. Hydroxamic-acid-based matrix metalloprotease inhibitors can effectively inhibit the pathogen both in vitro and in vivo, and have exhibited therapeutic potential. Here, we provide genome sequencing data indicating that peptide deformylase (PDF) is the sole target of the inhibitors in this organism. We further report molecular mechanisms that control chlamydial PDF (cPDF) expression and inhibition efficiency. In particular, we identify the σ66-dependent promoter that controls cPDF gene expression and demonstrate that point mutations in this promoter lead to resistance by increasing cPDF transcription. Furthermore, we show that substitution of two amino acids near the active site of the enzyme alters enzyme kinetics and protein stability. PMID:21719536

  1. Novel β-Carboline/Hydroxamic Acid Hybrids Targeting Both Histone Deacetylase and DNA Display High Anticancer Activity via Regulation of the p53 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yong; Xu, Chenjun; Luo, Lin; Cao, Jingyi; Feng, Jiao; Xue, Yu; Zhu, Qing; Ju, Caoyun; Li, Fengzhi; Zhang, Yihua; Zhang, Yanan; Ling, Xiang

    2015-12-10

    A novel series of hybrids from β-carboline and hydroxamic acid were designed and synthesized. Several compounds (5m, 11b-d, and 11h) not only exerted significant antiproliferation activity against four human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines but also showed histone deacetylase inhibitory effects in vitro. The most potent compound, 11c, exhibited anticancer potency sevenfold higher than that of SAHA. 11c triggered more significant cancer cell apoptosis than did SAHA by cleavage of both PARP and caspase 3 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, 11c simultaneously increased the acetylation of histone H3 and α-tubulin, enhanced expression of DNA damage markers histone H2AX phosphorylation and p-p53 (Ser15), and activated p53 signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Finally, 11c showed low acute toxicity in mice and inhibited the growth of implanted human CRC in mice more potently than did SAHA. Together, 11c possessed potent antitumor activity and may be a promising candidate for the potential treatment of human CRC.

  2. A comparison of the levels of hydroxamic acids in Aegilops speltoides and a hexaploid wheat and effects on Rhopalosiphum padi behaviour and fecundity.

    PubMed

    Elek, Henriett; Smart, Lesley; Ahmad, S; Anda, Angéla; Werner, C P; Pickett, J A

    2014-03-01

    Hydroxamic acids (HAs) are plant secondary metabolites produced by certain cereals, which have been found to be toxic to pest aphids in artificial diet assays. Previous studies have shown that tetraploid and hexaploid wheat varieties, the leaf tissues of which contained higher levels of these compounds than used in artificial diets, did not reduce aphid settling or fecundity. This current study reports findings on a high HA producing B genome accession of the diploid ancestor of wheat, Aegilops speltoides. We found that this accession does have a negative impact on aphid host selection and substantially reduces nymph production. Whole leaf tissue assays showed very high levels of HAs, well in excess of the toxic level determined in the artificial diet assays. Extraction of the apoplast fluid (AF) from this accession showed that the HA level is much lower than that of the whole tissue, but is still close to the artificial diet toxic level. Furthermore the HA level in the AF increases in response to aphid feeding. These observations could explain why hexaploid wheat remains susceptible to aphids, despite having whole leaf tissue HA levels in excess of the toxic levels determined in artificial diets.

  3. Evidence for Hydroxamate Siderophores and Other N-Containing Organic Compounds Controlling (239,240)Pu Immobilization and Remobilization in a Wetland Sediment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Kaplan, Daniel I; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Roberts, Kimberly A; Chen, Hongmei; DiDonato, Nicole; Athon, Matthew; Hatcher, Patrick G; Santschi, Peter H

    2015-10-01

    Pu concentrations in wetland surface sediments collected downstream of a former nuclear processing facility in F-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), USA, were ∼2.5 times greater than those measured in the associated upland aquifer sediments; similarly, the Pu concentration solid/water ratios were orders of magnitude greater in the wetland than in the low-organic matter content aquifer soils. Sediment Pu concentrations were correlated to total organic carbon and total nitrogen contents and even more strongly to hydroxamate siderophore (HS) concentrations. The HS were detected in the particulate or colloidal phases of the sediments but not in the low molecular weight fractions (<1000 Da). Macromolecules which scavenged the majority of the potentially mobile Pu were further separated from the bulk mobile organic matter fraction ("water extract") via an isoelectric focusing experiment (IEF). An electrospray ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (ESI FTICR-MS) spectral comparison of the IEF extract and a siderophore standard (desferrioxamine; DFO) suggested the presence of HS functionalities in the IEF extract. This study suggests that while HS are a very minor component in the sediment particulate/colloidal fractions, their concentrations greatly exceed those of ambient Pu, and HS may play an especially important role in Pu immobilization/remobilization in wetland sediments.

  4. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Fe-S Targeted Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Suzuki, Yuta; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR) is an iron-sulfur enzyme that is vital for survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during dormancy and is an attractive target for the treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection. The 4Fe-4S cluster is coordinated to APR by sulfur atoms of four cysteine residues, is proximal to substrate, adenosine 5′-phopsphosulfate (APS), and is essential for catalytic activity. Herein, we present an approach for the development of a new class of APR inhibitors. As an initial step, we have employed an improved solid-phase chemistry method to prepare a series of N6-substituted adenosine analogues and their 5′-phosphates as well as adenosine 5′-phosphate diesters bearing different Fe and S binding groups, such as thiols or carboxylic and hydroxamic acid moieties. Evaluation of the resulting compounds indicates a clearly defined spacing requirement between the Fe-S targeting group and adenosine scaffold and that smaller Fe-S targeting groups are better tolerated. Molecular docking analysis suggests that the S atom of the most potent inhibitor may establish a favorable interaction with an S atom in the cluster. In summary, this study showcases an improved solid-phase method that expedites the preparation of adenosine and related 5′-phosphate derivatives and presents a unique Fe-S targeting strategy for the development of APR inhibitors. PMID:25710356

  5. 4-(1-Ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide - A new pleiotropic HDAC inhibitor targeting cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation.

    PubMed

    Mahal, Katharina; Kahlen, Philip; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer

    2015-08-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) which play a crucial role in cancer cell proliferation are promising drug targets. However, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) modelled on natural hydroxamic acids such as trichostatin A frequently lead to resistance or even an increased agressiveness of tumours. As a workaround we developed 4-(1-ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide (etacrox), a hydroxamic acid that combines HDAC inhibition with synergistic effects of the 4,5-diarylimidazole residue. Etacrox proved highly cytotoxic against a panel of metastatic and resistant cancer cell lines while showing greater specificity for cancer over non-malignant cells when compared to the approved HDACi vorinostat. Like the latter, etacrox and the closely related imidazoles bimacroxam and animacroxam acted as pan-HDACi yet showed some specificity for HDAC6. Akt signalling and interference with nuclear beta-catenin localisation were elicited by etacrox at lower concentrations when compared to vorinostat. Moreover, etacrox disrupted the microtubule and focal adhesion dynamics of cancer cells and inhibited the proteolytic activity of prometastatic and proangiogenic matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, etacrox acted strongly antimigratory and antiinvasive against various cancer cell lines in three-dimensional transwell invasion assays and also antiangiogenic in vivo with respect to blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. These pleiotropic effects and its water-solubility and tolerance by mice render etacrox a promising new HDACi candidate. PMID:26101158

  6. HDAC Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olzscha, Heidi; Bekheet, Mina E; Sheikh, Semira; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is one of the most abundant posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic homeostasis of lysine acetylation and deacetylation is dictated by the action of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Important substrates for HATs and HDACs are histones, where lysine acetylation generally leads to an open and transcriptionally active chromatin conformation. Histone deacetylation forces the compaction of the chromatin with subsequent inhibition of transcription and reduced gene expression. Unbalanced HAT and HDAC activity, and therefore aberrant histone acetylation, has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression of malignancy in different types of cancer. Therefore, the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as therapeutic agents against cancer is of great interest. However, treatment with HDIs can also affect the acetylation status of many other non-histone proteins which play a role in different pathways including angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, autophagy and apoptosis. These effects have led HDIs to become anticancer agents, which can initiate apoptosis in tumor cells. Hematological malignancies in particular are responsive to HDIs, and four HDIs have already been approved as anticancer agents. There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to predict the response to HDI treatment. This chapter provides information on how to assess HDAC activity in vitro and determine the potency of HDIs on different HDACs. It also gives information on how to analyze cellular markers following HDI treatment and to analyze tissue biopsies from HDI-treated patients. Finally, a protocol is provided on how to detect HDI sensitivity determinants in human cells, based on a pRetroSuper shRNA screen upon HDI treatment. PMID:27246222

  7. Evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) as therapeutic leads for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT).

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Angela K; Guiguemde, W Armand; Guy, R Kiplin

    2015-08-15

    Two of the histone deacetylases, TbDAC1 and TbDAC3, have been reported to be essential genes in trypanosomes. Therefore, we tested the activity of a panel of human histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) for their ability to block proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among the HDACi's, the hydroxamic acid derivatives panobinostat and belinostat exhibited potency that appeared to make them viable candidates for development due to their reported pharmacokinetic characteristics. However, cellular pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated that these drugs were unable to kill cultured parasites at exposures seen in patients at their tolerated doses and additionally failed to show any synergistic effects in combination with pentamidine, suramin, melarsoprol, or nifurtimox. Analysis of the potency of the entire HDACi panel revealed no correlations between potency against any human HDAC isoform and inhibition of T. brucei proliferation, suggesting that the trypanosome histone deacetylases possess a unique specificity. These studies confirmed that HDAC inhibitors have potential as leads against human African trypanosomiasis but that none of the current clinical candidates can be directly repurposed. Therefore, development of HDACi's with appropriate specificity and potency may be a viable route to a new class of anti-trypanosomal drugs.

  8. The new low-toxic histone deacetylase inhibitor S-(2) induces apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Cellai, C; Balliu, M; Laurenzana, A; Guandalini, L; Matucci, R; Miniati, D; Torre, E; Nebbioso, A; Carafa, V; Altucci, L; Romanelli, M N; Paoletti, F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) induce tumour cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis, and some of them are currently used in cancer therapy. Recently, we described a series of powerful HDACi characterized by a 1,4-benzodiazepine (BDZ) ring hybridized with a linear alkyl chain bearing a hydroxamate function as Zn++-chelating group. Here, we explored the anti-leukaemic properties of three novel hybrids, namely the chiral compounds (S)-2 and (R)-2, and their non-chiral analogue 4, which were first comparatively tested in promyelocytic NB4 cells. (S)-2 and partially 4– but not (R)-2 – caused G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest by up-regulating cyclin G2 and p21 expression and down-regulating cyclin D2 expression, and also apoptosis as assessed by cell morphology and cytofluorimetric assay, histone H2AX phosphorylation and PARP cleavage. Notably, these events were partly prevented by an anti-oxidant. Moreover, novel HDACi prompted p53 and α-tubulin acetylation and, consistently, inhibited HDAC1 and 6 activity. The rank order of potency was (S)-2 > 4 > (R)-2, reflecting that of other biological assays and addressing (S)-2 as the most effective compound capable of triggering apoptosis in various acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cell lines and blasts from patients with different AML subtypes. Importantly, (S)-2 was safe in mice (up to 150 mg/kg/week) as determined by liver, spleen, kidney and bone marrow histopathology; and displayed negligible affinity for peripheral/central BDZ-receptors. Overall, the BDZ-hydroxamate (S)-2 showed to be a low-toxic HDACi with powerful anti-proliferative and pro-apototic activities towards different cultured and primary AML cells, and therefore of clinical interest to support conventional anti-leukaemic therapy. PMID:22004558

  9. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  10. 4-(1-Ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide – A new pleiotropic HDAC inhibitor targeting cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahal, Katharina; Kahlen, Philip; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer

    2015-08-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) which play a crucial role in cancer cell proliferation are promising drug targets. However, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) modelled on natural hydroxamic acids such as trichostatin A frequently lead to resistance or even an increased agressiveness of tumours. As a workaround we developed 4-(1-ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide (etacrox), a hydroxamic acid that combines HDAC inhibition with synergistic effects of the 4,5-diarylimidazole residue. Etacrox proved highly cytotoxic against a panel of metastatic and resistant cancer cell lines while showing greater specificity for cancer over non-malignant cells when compared to the approved HDACi vorinostat. Like the latter, etacrox and the closely related imidazoles bimacroxam and animacroxam acted as pan-HDACi yet showed some specificity for HDAC6. Akt signalling and interference with nuclear beta-catenin localisation were elicited by etacrox at lower concentrations when compared to vorinostat. Moreover, etacrox disrupted the microtubule and focal adhesion dynamics of cancer cells and inhibited the proteolytic activity of prometastatic and proangiogenic matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, etacrox acted strongly antimigratory and antiinvasive against various cancer cell lines in three-dimensional transwell invasion assays and also antiangiogenic in vivo with respect to blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. These pleiotropic effects and its water-solubility and tolerance by mice render etacrox a promising new HDACi candidate. - Graphical abstract: A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with pleiotropic anticancer effects. - Highlights: • Etacrox is a new HDACi with cytotoxic, antiangiogenic and antiinvasive activity. • Etacrox causes aberrant cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal reorganisation. • Pro-metastatic and angiogenic matrix metalloproteinases are inhibited by etacrox. • Etacrox impairs blood vessel maturation in vivo and cancer cell

  11. Solution structure of the catalytic domain of human stromelysin complexed with a hydrophobic inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Van Doren, S. R.; Kurochkin, A. V.; Hu, W.; Ye, Q. Z.; Johnson, L. L.; Hupe, D. J.; Zuiderweg, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    Stromelysin, a representative matrix metalloproteinase and target of drug development efforts, plays a prominent role in the pathological proteolysis associated with arthritis and secondarily in that of cancer metastasis and invasion. To provide a structural template to aid the development of therapeutic inhibitors, we have determined a medium-resolution structure of a 20-kDa complex of human stromelysin's catalytic domain with a hydrophobic peptidic inhibitor using multinuclear, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. This domain of this zinc hydrolase contains a mixed beta-sheet comprising one antiparallel strand and four parallel strands, three helices, and a methionine-containing turn near the catalytic center. The ensemble of 20 structures was calculated using, on average, 8 interresidue NOE restraints per residue for the 166-residue protein fragment complexed with a 4-residue substrate analogue. The mean RMS deviation (RMSD) to the average structure for backbone heavy atoms is 0.91 A and for all heavy atoms is 1.42 A. The structure has good stereochemical properties, including its backbone torsion angles. The beta-sheet and alpha-helices of the catalytic domains of human stromelysin (NMR model) and human fibroblast collagenase (X-ray crystallographic model of Lovejoy B et al., 1994b, Biochemistry 33:8207-8217) superimpose well, having a pairwise RMSD for backbone heavy atoms of 2.28 A when three loop segments are disregarded. The hydroxamate-substituted inhibitor binds across the hydrophobic active site of stromelysin in an extended conformation. The first hydrophobic side chain is deeply buried in the principal S'1 subsite, the second hydrophobic side chain is located on the opposite side of the inhibitor backbone in the hydrophobic S'2 surface subsite, and a third hydrophobic side chain (P'3) lies at the surface. PMID:8580839

  12. Drug forecast – the peptide deformylase inhibitors as antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Guay, David R P

    2007-01-01

    The relatively rapid development of microbial resistance after the entry of every new antimicrobial into the marketplace necessitates a constant supply of new agents to maintain effective pharmacotherapy. Despite extensive efforts to identify novel lead compounds from molecular targets, only the peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDIs) have shown any real promise, with some advancing to phase I human trials. Bacterial peptide deformylase, which catalyzes the removal of the N-formyl group from N-terminal methionine following translation, is essential for bacterial protein synthesis, growth, and survival. The majority of PDIs are pseudopeptide hydroxamic acids and two of these (IV BB-83698 and oral NVP LBM-415) entered phase I human trials. However, agents to the present have suffered from major potential liabilities. Their in vitro activity has been limited to gram-positive aerobes and some anaerobes and has been quite modest against the majority of such species (MIC90 values ranging from 1–8 mg/L). They have exerted bacteriostatic, not bacteriocidal, activity, thus reducing their potential usefulness in the management of serious infections in the immunocompromised. The relative ease with which microorganisms have been able to develop resistance and the multiple available mechanisms of resistance (mutations in fmt, defB, folD genes; AcrAB/TolC efflux pump; overexpression of peptide deformylase) are worrisome. These could portend a short timespan of efficacy after marketing. Despite these current liabilities, further pursuit of more potent and broader spectrum PDIs which are less susceptible to bacterial mechanisms of resistance is still warranted. PMID:18472972

  13. Forward and reverse (retro) iron(III) or gallium(III) desferrioxamine E and ring-expanded analogues prepared using metal-templated synthesis from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers.

    PubMed

    Lifa, Tulip; Tieu, William; Hocking, Rosalie K; Codd, Rachel

    2015-04-01

    A metal-templated synthesis (MTS) approach was used to preorganize the forward endo-hydroxamic acid monomer 4-[(5-aminopentyl)(hydroxy)amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid (for-PBH) about iron(III) in a 1:3 metal/ligand ratio to furnish the iron(III) siderophore for-[Fe(DFOE)] (ferrioxamine E) following peptide coupling. Substitution of for-PBH with the reverse (retro) hydroxamic acid analogue 3-(6-amino-N-hydroxyhexanamido)propanoic acid (ret-PBH) furnished ret-[Fe(DFOE)] (ret-ferrioxamine E). As isomers, for-[Fe(DFOE)] and ret-[Fe(DFOE)] gave identical mass spectrometry signals ([M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 654.3, m/zobs 654.3), yet for-[Fe(DFOE)] eluted in a more polar window (tR = 23.44 min) than ret-[Fe(DFOE)] (tR = 28.13 min) on a C18 reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) column. for-[Ga(DFOE)] (tR = 22.99 min) and ret-[Ga(DFOE)] (tR = 28.11 min) were prepared using gallium(III) as the metal-ion template and showed the same trend for the retention time. Ring-expanded analogues of for-[Fe(DFOE)] and ret-[Fe(DFOE)] were prepared from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers with one additional methylene unit in the amine-containing region, 4-[(6-aminohexyl)(hydroxy)amino]-4-oxobutanoic acid (for-HBH) or 3-(7-amino-N-hydroxyheptanamido)propanoic acid (ret-HBH), to give the corresponding tris(homoferrioxamine E) macrocycles, for-[Fe(HHDFOE)] or ret-[Fe(HHDFOE)] ([M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 696.3, m/zobs 696.4). The MTS reaction using a constitutional isomer of for-HBH that transposed the methylene unit to the carboxylic acid containing region, 5-[(5-aminopentyl)(hydroxy)amino]-5-oxopentanoic acid (for-PPH), gave the macrocycle for-[Fe(HPDFOE)] in a yield significantly less than that for for-[Fe(HHDFOE)], with the gallium(III) analogue for-[Ga(HPDFOE)] unable to be detected. The work demonstrates the utility and limits of MTS for the assembly of macrocyclic siderophores from endo-hydroxamic acid monomers. Indirect measures (RP-HPLC order of elution, c log P values

  14. Biosynthesis, characterization and biological evalutation of Fe(III) and Cu(II) complexes of neoaspergillic acid, a hydroxamate siderophore produced by co-cultures of two marine-derived mangrove epiphytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Wu, Jingshu; Chen, Guangying; Lu, Weihong; Pan, Jiahui

    2011-08-01

    A hydroxamate siderophore, neoaspergillic acid (1), and a red pigment, ferrineoaspergillin (2) which is an Fe(III) complex of 1, were produced by co-cultures of two epiphytic fungi from a rotten fruit of the mangrove Avicennia marina from the South China Sea, and a new Cu(II) complex of 1, designated as cuprineoaspergillin (3), was also prepared by treatment of 1 with cupric acetate. All the compounds (1-3) were characterized by physical and chemical techniques, including 1H NMR, ESIMS, and photoelectron energy spectra. In the bioassays, compounds 1-3 showed significant inhibitory activities against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and compound 1 also exhibited moderate inhibitory activities against human cancer cell lines SPC-A-1, BEL-7402, SGC-7901 and K562.

  15. PET imaging demonstrates histone deacetylase target engagement and clarifies brain penetrance of known and novel small molecule inhibitors in rat.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, F A; Wang, C; Van de Bittner, G C; Neelamegam, R; Takakura, W R; Karunakaran, A; Wey, H Y; Reis, S A; Gale, J; Zhang, Y L; Holson, E B; Haggarty, S J; Hooker, J M

    2014-10-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes have been demonstrated as critical components in maintaining chromatin homeostasis, CNS development, and normal brain function. Evidence in mouse models links HDAC expression to learning, memory, and mood-related behaviors; small molecule HDAC inhibitor tool compounds have been used to demonstrate the importance of specific HDAC subtypes in modulating CNS-disease-related behaviors in rodents. So far, no direct evidence exists to understand the quantitative changes in HDAC target engagement that are necessary to alter biochemistry and behavior in a living animal. Understanding the relationship between target engagement and in vivo effect is essential in refining new ways to alleviate disease. We describe here, using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of rat brain, the in vivo target engagement of a subset of class I/IIb HDAC enzymes implicated in CNS-disease (HDAC subtypes 1, 2, 3, and 6). We found marked differences in the brain penetrance of tool compounds from the hydroxamate and benzamide HDAC inhibitor classes and resolved a novel, highly brain penetrant benzamide, CN147, chronic treatment with which resulted in an antidepressant-like effect in a rat behavioral test. Our work highlights a new translational path for understanding the molecular and behavioral consequences of HDAC target engagement. PMID:25188794

  16. Potent dual inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum M1 and M17 aminopeptidases through optimization of S1 pocket interactions.

    PubMed

    Drinkwater, Nyssa; Vinh, Natalie B; Mistry, Shailesh N; Bamert, Rebecca S; Ruggeri, Chiara; Holleran, John P; Loganathan, Sasdekumar; Paiardini, Alessandro; Charman, Susan A; Powell, Andrew K; Avery, Vicky M; McGowan, Sheena; Scammells, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Malaria remains a global health problem, and though international efforts for treatment and eradication have made some headway, the emergence of drug-resistant parasites threatens this progress. Antimalarial therapeutics acting via novel mechanisms are urgently required. Plasmodium falciparum M1 and M17 are neutral aminopeptidases which are essential for parasite growth and development. Previous work in our group has identified inhibitors capable of dual inhibition of PfA-M1 and PfA-M17, and revealed further regions within the protease S1 pockets that could be exploited in the development of ligands with improved inhibitory activity. Herein, we report the structure-based design and synthesis of novel hydroxamic acid analogues that are capable of potent inhibition of both PfA-M1 and PfA-M17. Furthermore, the developed compounds potently inhibit Pf growth in culture, including the multi-drug resistant strain Dd2. The ongoing development of dual PfA-M1/PfA-M17 inhibitors continues to be an attractive strategy for the design of novel antimalarial therapeutics.

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of enantiomerically pure glyceric acid derivatives as LpxC inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tangherlini, Giovanni; Torregrossa, Tullio; Agoglitta, Oriana; Köhler, Jens; Melesina, Jelena; Sippl, Wolfgang; Holl, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitors of the UDP-3-O-[(R)-3-hydroxymyristoyl]-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (LpxC) represent a promising class of novel antibiotics, selectively combating Gram-negative bacteria. In order to elucidate the impact of the hydroxymethyl groups of diol (S,S)-4 on the inhibitory activity against LpxC, glyceric acid ethers (R)-7a, (S)-7a, (R)-7b, and (S)-7b, lacking the hydroxymethyl group in benzylic position, were synthesized. The compounds were obtained in enantiomerically pure form by a chiral pool synthesis and a lipase-catalyzed enantioselective desymmetrization, respectively. The enantiomeric hydroxamic acids (R)-7b (Ki=230nM) and (S)-7b (Ki=390nM) show promising enzyme inhibition. However, their inhibitory activities do not substantially differ from each other leading to a low eudismic ratio. Generally, the synthesized glyceric acid derivatives 7 show antibacterial activities against two Escherichia coli strains exceeding the ones of their respective regioisomes 6.

  18. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  19. Molecular sequelae of histone deacetylase inhibition in human malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsiades, Nicholas; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Richardson, Paul G; McMullan, Ciaran; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Fanourakis, Galinos; Schlossman, Robert; Chauhan, Dharminder; Munshi, Nikhil C; Hideshima, Teru; Richon, Victoria M; Marks, Paul A; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2003-05-15

    Histone acetylation modulates gene expression, cellular differentiation, and survival and is regulated by the opposing activities of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HDAC inhibition results in accumulation of acetylated nucleosomal histones and induces differentiation and/or apoptosis in transformed cells. In this study, we characterized the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the prototype of a series of hydroxamic acid-based HDAC inhibitors, in cell lines and patient cells from B-cell malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM) and related disorders. SAHA induced apoptosis in all tumor cells tested, with increased p21 and p53 protein levels and dephosphorylation of Rb. We also detected cleavage of Bid, suggesting a role for Bcl-2 family members in regulation of SAHA-induced cell death. Transfection of Bcl-2 cDNA into MM.1S cells completely abrogated SAHA-induced apoptosis, confirming its protective role. SAHA did not induce cleavage of caspase-8, -9, or -3 in MM.1S cells during the early phase of apoptosis, and the pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD-FMK did not protect against SAHA. Conversely, poly(ADP)ribose polymerase (PARP) was cleaved in a pattern indicative of calpain activation, and the calpain inhibitor calpeptin abrogated SAHA-induced cell death. Importantly, SAHA sensitized MM.1S cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis and inhibited the secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) induced in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) by binding of MM cells, suggesting that it can overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance. Our studies delineate the mechanisms whereby HDAC inhibitors mediate anti-MM activity and overcome drug resistance in the BM milieu and provide the framework for clinical evaluation of SAHA, which is bioavailable, well tolerated, and bioactive after oral administration, to improve patient outcome.

  20. Differences in Expression of Key DNA Damage Repair Genes after Epigenetic-Induced BRCAness Dictate Synthetic Lethality with PARP1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wiegmans, Adrian P; Yap, Pei-Yi; Ward, Ambber; Lim, Yi Chieh; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2015-10-01

    The triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype represents a cancer that is highly aggressive with poor patient outcome. Current preclinical success has been gained through synthetic lethality, targeting genome instability with PARP inhibition in breast cancer cells that harbor silencing of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are a class of drugs that mediate epigenetic changes in expression of HR pathway genes. Here, we compare the activity of the pan-HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the class I/IIa HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA), and the HDAC1/2-specific inhibitor romidepsin (ROMI) for their capability to regulate DNA damage repair gene expression and in sensitizing TNBC to PARPi. We found that two of the HDACis tested, SAHA and ROMI, but not VPA, indeed inhibit HR repair and that RAD51, BARD1, and FANCD2 represent key proteins whose inhibition is required for HDACi-mediated therapy with PARP inhibition in TNBC. We also observed that restoration of BRCA1 function stabilizes the genome compared with mutant BRCA1 that results in enhanced polyploid population after combination treatment with HDACi and PARPi. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of the key HR protein RAD51 represents a mechanism for this resistance, promoting aberrant repair and the enhanced polyploidy observed. These findings highlight the key components of HR in guiding synthetic lethality with PARP inhibition and support the rationale for utilizing the novel combination of HDACi and PARPi against TNBC in the clinical setting. PMID:26294743

  1. Phenol sulphotransferase and uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase from rat liver in vivo and in vitro. 2,6-Dichloro-4-nitrophenol as selective inhibitor of sulphation

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Gerard J.; Scholtens, Egbert

    1977-01-01

    Microsomal UDP-glucuronyltransferase and cytosolic sulphotransferase share many substrates, such as phenols and hydroxamic acids. In a search for a selective inhibitor of sulphation, several phenolic compounds were tested. 2,6-Dichloro-4-nitrophenol is introduced as a selective inhibitor of sulphation in vivo, having no effect on UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity. As substrate for both conjugating enzymes the phenolic drug harmol (7-hydroxy-1-methyl-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole) was used. In the rat in vivo 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol caused almost complete inhibition of harmol sulphation after a single intraperitoneal injection (26μmol/kg) for 48h; the percentage of harmol sulphated decreased from 75% in controls to 5% in the treated rats. The percentage of harmol glucuronidated increased from 25 to 95%. Pentachlorophenol was equally effective but also highly toxic. Salicylamide had only a very-short-lasting inhibitory effect on sulphation. In vitro, 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol inhibited sulphation of harmol by a rat liver postmitochondrial supernatant completely at 1μm, whereas even at 100μm it had no effect on glucuronidation of harmol. It is concluded that 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol is a selective inhibitor of sulphation and, further, that its long duration of action makes it suitable for studies on the regulatory role of sulphation in some biological processes. PMID:411489

  2. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  3. Update on TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerdel, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors dramatically improved the management of psoriasis. Some newer or investigational biologics with different mechanisms of action have demonstrated noninferiority or superiority to etanercept, the first self-injectable anti-TNF-α agent to become available in the United States. Nonetheless, TNF-α inhibitors are likely to remain a mainstay of therapy for many years.

  4. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  5. SCL/TAL1-mediated Transcriptional Network Enhances Megakaryocytic Specification of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Miguel G; Navarro-Montero, Oscar; Ayllon, Veronica; Ramos-Mejia, Veronica; Guerrero-Carreno, Xiomara; Bueno, Clara; Romero, Tamara; Lamolda, Mar; Cobo, Marien; Martin, Francisco; Menendez, Pablo; Real, Pedro J

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a unique in vitro model for studying human developmental biology and represent a potential source for cell replacement strategies. Platelets can be generated from cord blood progenitors and hESCs; however, the molecular mechanisms and determinants controlling the in vitro megakaryocytic specification of hESCs remain elusive. We have recently shown that stem cell leukemia (SCL) overexpression accelerates the emergence of hemato-endothelial progenitors from hESCs and promotes their subsequent differentiation into blood cells with higher clonogenic potential. Given that SCL participates in megakaryocytic commitment, we hypothesized that it may potentiate megakaryopoiesis from hESCs. We show that ectopic SCL expression enhances the emergence of megakaryocytic precursors, mature megakaryocytes (MKs), and platelets in vitro. SCL-overexpressing MKs and platelets respond to different activating stimuli similar to their control counterparts. Gene expression profiling of megakaryocytic precursors shows that SCL overexpression renders a megakaryopoietic molecular signature. Connectivity Map analysis reveals that trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), both histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, functionally mimic SCL-induced effects. Finally, we confirm that both TSA and SAHA treatment promote the emergence of CD34+ progenitors, whereas valproic acid, another HDAC inhibitor, potentiates MK and platelet production. We demonstrate that SCL and HDAC inhibitors are megakaryopoiesis regulators in hESCs. PMID:25292191

  6. Combinatorial Treatment of DNA and Chromatin-Modifying Drugs Cause Cell Death in Human and Canine Osteosarcoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Park, ChangWon; Sarver, Aaron L.; Kartha, Reena V.; Korpela, Derek M.; Graef, Ashley J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Modiano, Jaime F.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2012-01-01

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) at the 14q32 locus stabilizes the expression of cMYC, thus significantly contributing to osteosarcoma (OS) pathobiology. Here, we show that downregulation of 14q32 miRNAs is epigenetically regulated. The predicted promoter regions of miRNA clusters at 14q32 locus showed no recurrent patterns of differential methylation, but Saos2 cells showed elevated histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. Treatment with 4-phenylbutyrate increased acetylation of histones associated with 14q32 miRNAs, but interestingly, robust restoration of 14q32 miRNA expression, attenuation of cMYC expression, and induction of apoptosis required concomitant treatment with 5-Azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation. These events were associated with genome-wide gene expression changes including induction of pro-apoptotic genes and downregulation of cell cycle genes. Comparable effects were achieved in human and canine OS cells using the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat) and the DNA methylation inhibitor Zebularine (Zeb), with significantly more pronounced cytotoxicity in cells whose molecular phenotypes were indicative of aggressive biological behavior. These results suggested that the combination of these chromatin-modifying drugs may be a useful adjuvant in the treatment of rapidly progressive OS. PMID:22957032

  7. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  8. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  9. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  10. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  11. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  12. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cockrill, Barbara A; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a key role in modulating vascular tone and remodeling in the pulmonary circulation. The guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanylate monophosphate-signaling pathway primarily mediates nitric oxide signaling. This pathway is critical in normal regulation of the pulmonary vasculature, and is an important target for therapy in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In the pulmonary vasculature, degradation of cGMP is primarily regulated by PDE-5, and inhibition of this enzyme has important effects on pulmonary vasculature smooth muscle tone. Large randomized placebo-controlled trials of PDE-5 inhibitors demonstrated improved exercise capacity, hemodynamics and quality of life in adult patients with PAH. This chapter will discuss the mechanisms of NO signaling in the vasculature, characteristics of the PDE5-inhibitors approved for treatment of PH, and review available data on the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in PH. PMID:24092343

  13. Constructing and Validating 3D-pharmacophore Models to a Set of MMP-9 Inhibitors for Designing Novel Anti-melanoma Agents.

    PubMed

    Medeiros Turra, Kely; Pineda Rivelli, Diogo; Berlanga de Moraes Barros, Silvia; Mesquita Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda

    2016-07-01

    A receptor-independent (RI) four-dimensional structure-activity relationship (4D-QSAR) formalism was applied to a set of sixty-four β-N-biaryl ether sulfonamide hydroxamate derivatives, previously reported as potent inhibitors against matrix metalloproteinase subtype 9 (MMP-9). MMP-9 belongs to a group of enzymes related to the cleavage of several extracellular matrix components and has been associated to cancer invasiveness/metastasis. The best RI 4D-QSAR model was statistically significant (N=47; r(2) =0.91; q(2) =0.83; LSE=0.09; LOF=0.35; outliers=0). Leave-N-out (LNO) and y-randomization approaches indicated the QSAR model was robust and presented no chance correlation, respectively. Furthermore, it also had good external predictability (82 %) regarding the test set (N=17). In addition, the grid cell occupancy descriptors (GCOD) of the predicted bioactive conformation for the most potent inhibitor were successfully interpreted when docked into the MMP-9 active site. The 3D-pharmacophore findings were used to predict novel ligands and exploit the MMP-9 calculated binding affinity through molecular docking procedure. PMID:27492238

  14. Abrogation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Akt Signaling by Vandetanib Synergistically Potentiates Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor-Induced Apoptosis in Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jane, Esther P.; Premkumar, Daniel R.; Addo-Yobo, Steven O.

    2009-01-01

    Vandetanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our initial studies demonstrated that this agent blocks vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor phosphorylation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signaling in glioma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Despite these effects, we observed that vandetanib had little effect on apoptosis induction at clinically achievable concentrations. Because histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been suggested to regulate signaling protein transcription and downstream interactions via modulation of protein chaperone function through the 90-kDa heat shock protein, we investigated whether combining vandetanib with an HDACI could synergistically potentiate signaling pathway inhibition and apoptosis induction in a panel of malignant human glioma cell lines. Proliferation assays, apoptosis induction studies, and Western immunoblot analysis were conducted in cells treated with vandetanib and HDACIs as single agents or in combination. Vandetanib and suberoylanalide hydroxamic acid reduced proliferation in all cell lines when used as single agents, and the combination produced marked potentiation of growth inhibition as assessed by combinatorial methods. These effects were paralleled by potentiation of Akt signaling inhibition and apoptosis induction. Our results indicate that inhibition of histone deacetylation enhances the antiproliferative effect of vandetanib in malignant human glioma cell lines by enhancing inhibition of MAPK, Akt, and other downstream effectors that may have application in combinatorial therapeutics for these tumors. PMID:19622715

  15. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors as potent antihemorrhagic agents: from hit identification to an optimized lead.

    PubMed

    Orbe, Josune; Sánchez-Arias, Juan A; Rabal, Obdulia; Rodríguez, José A; Salicio, Agustina; Ugarte, Ana; Belzunce, Miriam; Xu, Musheng; Wu, Wei; Tan, Haizhong; Ma, Hongyu; Páramo, José A; Oyarzabal, Julen

    2015-03-12

    Growing evidence suggests that matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are involved in thrombus dissolution; then, considering that new therapeutic strategies are required for controlling hemorrhage, we hypothesized that MMP inhibition may reduce bleeding by delaying fibrinolysis. Thus, we designed and synthesized a novel series of MMP inhibitors to identify potential candidates for acute treatment of bleeding. Structure-based and knowledge-based strategies were utilized to design this novel chemical series, α-spiropiperidine hydroxamates, of potent and soluble (>75 μg/mL) pan-MMP inhibitors. The initial hit, 12, was progressed to an optimal lead 19d. Racemic 19d showed a remarkable in vitro phenotypic response and outstanding in vivo efficacy; in fact, the mouse bleeding time at 1 mg/kg was 0.85 min compared to 29.28 min using saline. In addition, 19d displayed an optimal ADME and safety profile (e.g., no thrombus formation). Its corresponding enantiomers were separated, leading to the preclinical candidate 5 (described in Drug Annotations series, J. Med. Chem. 2015, ). PMID:25686153

  16. Synthesis and biological characterization of spiro[2H-(1,3)-benzoxazine-2,4'-piperidine] based histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Florian; Varasi, Mario; Abate, Agnese; Carenzi, Giacomo; Colombo, Andrea; Bigogno, Chiara; Boggio, Roberto; Zuffo, Roberto Dal; Rapetti, Daniela; Resconi, Anna; Regalia, Nickolas; Vultaggio, Stefania; Dondio, Giulio; Gagliardi, Stefania; Minucci, Saverio; Mercurio, Ciro

    2013-06-01

    Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) have become important targets for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. In previous studies we described the development of novel spirocyclic HDAC inhibitors based on the combination of privileged structures with hydroxamic acid moieties as zinc binding group. Herein, we report further explorations, which resulted in the discovery of a new class of spiro[2H-(1,3)-benzoxazine-2,4'-piperidine] derivatives. Several compounds showed good potency of around 100 nM and less in the HDAC inhibition assays, submicromolar IC50 values when tested against tumour cell lines and a remarkable stability in human and mouse microsomes. Two representative examples exhibited a good pharmacokinetic profile with an oral bioavailability equal or higher than 35% and one of them studied in an HCT116 murine xenograft model showing a robust tumour growth inhibition. In addition, the two benzoxazines were found to have a minor affinity for the hERG potassium channel compared to their corresponding ketone analogues.

  17. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-phenylquinazolin-4-amine hybrids as dual inhibitors of VEGFR-2 and HDAC.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fan-Wei; Xuan, Ji; Wu, Ting-Ting; Xue, Jia-Yu; Ren, Zi-Wei; Liu, Da-Ke; Wang, Xiu-Qi; Chen, Xin-Hang; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Xu, Yun-Gen; Shi, Lei

    2016-02-15

    A single agent that simultaneously inhibits multiple targets may offer greater therapeutic benefits in cancer than single-acting agents through interference with multiple pathways and potential synergistic action. In this work, a series of hybrids bearing N-phenylquinazolin-4-amine and hydroxamic acid moieties were designed and identified as dual VEGFR-2/HDAC inhibitors. Compound 6fd exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against HDAC with IC50 of 2.2 nM and strong inhibitory effect against VEGFR-2 with IC50 of 74 nM. It also showed the most potent inhibitory activity against a human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 with IC50 of 0.85 μM. Docking simulation supported the initial pharmacophoric hypothesis and suggested a common mode of interaction at the active binding sites of VEGFR-2 and HDLP ((Histone Deacetylase-Like Protein), which demonstrates that compound 6fd is a potential agent for cancer therapy deserving further researching. PMID:26741358

  18. Preclinical Pharmacokinetics Study of R- and S-Enantiomers of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, AR-42 (NSC 731438), in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Xie, Zhiliang; Jones, William P; Wei, Xiaohui Tracey; Liu, Zhongfa; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K; Wang, Jiang; Coss, Christopher C; Chen, Ching-Shih; Marcucci, Guido; Garzon, Ramiro; Covey, Joseph M; Phelps, Mitch A; Chan, Kenneth K

    2016-05-01

    AR-42, a new orally bioavailable, potent, hydroxamate-tethered phenylbutyrate class I/IIB histone deacetylase inhibitor currently is under evaluation in phase 1 and 2 clinical trials and has demonstrated activity in both hematologic and solid tumor malignancies. This report focuses on the preclinical characterization of the pharmacokinetics of AR-42 in mice and rats. A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay has been developed and applied to the pharmacokinetic study of the more active stereoisomer, S-AR-42, when administered via intravenous and oral routes in rodents, including plasma, bone marrow, and spleen pharmacokinetics (PK) in CD2F1 mice and plasma PK in F344 rats. Oral bioavailability was estimated to be 26 and 100% in mice and rats, respectively. R-AR-42 was also evaluated intravenously in rats and was shown to display different pharmacokinetics with a much shorter terminal half-life compared to that of S-AR-42. Renal clearance was a minor elimination pathway for parental S-AR-42. Oral administration of S-AR-42 to tumor-bearing mice demonstrated high uptake and exposure of the parent drug in the lymphoid tissues, spleen, and bone marrow. This is the first report of the pharmacokinetics of this novel agent, which is now in early phase clinical trials.

  19. Pectin methylesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Giovane, A; Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Raiola, A; D'Avino, R; Tamburrini, M; Ciardiello, M A; Camardella, L

    2004-02-12

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) is the first enzyme acting on pectin, a major component of plant cell wall. PME action produces pectin with different structural and functional properties, having an important role in plant physiology. Regulation of plant PME activity is obtained by the differential expression of several isoforms in different tissues and developmental stages and by subtle modifications of cell wall local pH. Inhibitory activities from various plant sources have also been reported. A proteinaceous inhibitor of PME (PMEI) has been purified from kiwi fruit. The kiwi PMEI is active against plant PMEs, forming a 1:1 non-covalent complex. The polypeptide chain comprises 152 amino acid residues and contains five Cys residues, four of which are connected by disulfide bridges, first to second and third to fourth. The sequence shows significant similarity with the N-terminal pro-peptides of plant PME, and with plant invertase inhibitors. In particular, the four Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges are conserved. On the basis of amino acid sequence similarity and Cys residues conservation, a large protein family including PMEI, invertase inhibitors and related proteins of unknown function has been identified. The presence of at least two sequences in the Arabidopsis genome having high similarity with kiwi PMEI suggests the ubiquitous presence of this inhibitor. PMEI has an interest in food industry as inhibitor of endogenous PME, responsible for phase separation and cloud loss in fruit juice manufacturing. Affinity chromatography on resin-bound PMEI can also be used to concentrate and detect residual PME activity in fruit and vegetable products.

  20. Visualization of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) activation in living cells.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Koh; Luo, Zeping; Schaufele, Fred; Peterlin, B Matija

    2015-01-16

    Regulation of transcription elongation by positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) plays a central role in determining the state of cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. In cells, P-TEFb exists in active and inactive forms. Its release from the inactive 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex is a critical step for P-TEFb to activate transcription elongation. However, no good method exists to analyze this P-TEFb equilibrium in living cells. Only inaccurate and labor-intensive cell-free biochemical assays are currently available. In this study, we present the first experimental system to monitor P-TEFb activation in living cells. We created a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay to detect interactions between P-TEFb and its substrate, the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. When cells were treated with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, which releases P-TEFb from the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, they turned green. Other known P-TEFb-releasing agents, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, bromodomain and extraterminal bromodomain inhibitors, and protein kinase C agonists, also scored positive in this assay. Finally, we identified 5'-azacytidine as a new P-TEFb-releasing agent. This release of P-TEFb correlated directly with activation of human HIV and HEXIM1 transcription. Thus, our visualization of P-TEFb activation by fluorescent complementation assay could be used to find new P-TEFb-releasing agents, compare different classes of agents, and assess their efficacy singly and/or in combination.

  1. Combination therapies improve the anticancer activities of retinoids in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Belamy B

    2015-01-01

    Most therapeutic protocols for child cancers use cytotoxic agents which have a narrow therapeutic index, and resulting in severe acute and chronic toxicities to normal tissues. Despite the fact that most child cancer patients achieve complete remission after chemotherapy, death still occurs due to relapse of persistent minimal residual disease (MRD) which remaining after initial cytotoxic chemotherapy. Advanced neuroblastoma (NB) is a leading cause of cancer deaths in young children. Retinoids are an important component of advanced NB therapy at the stage of MRD, yet half of all patients treated with 13-cis-retinoic acid still relapse and die. More effective combination therapies, with a lower side-effect profile, are required to improve outcomes for NB. Fenretinide or N-4-hydroxyphenyl retinamide is a synthetic derivative of retinoic acid which works on cancer cells through nuclear receptor-dependent and -independent signalling mechanisms. Moreover, several histone deacetylase inhibitors have entered early phase trials, and, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid has been approved for use in adult cutaneous T cell lymphoma. A number of studies suggest that retinoid signal activation is necessary for histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. A better understanding of their mechanism of actions will lead to more evidence-based retinoid combination therapies. PMID:26677433

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibition downregulates collagen 3A1 in fibrotic lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Liu, Hui; Hock, Thomas; Thannickal, Victor J; Sanders, Yan Y

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a deadly disease characterized by chronic inflammation and excessive collagen accumulation in the lung. Myofibroblasts are the primary collagen-producing cells in pulmonary fibrosis. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) can affect gene expression, and some, such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), are US FDA approved for cancer treatment. In this study, we investigated SAHA's effects on the expression of collagen III alpha 1 (COL3A1) in primary human IPF fibroblasts and in a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis. We observed that increased COL3A1 expression in IPF fibroblasts can be substantially reduced by SAHA treatment at the level of transcription as detected by RT-PCR; collagen III protein level was also reduced, as detected by Western blots and immunofluorescence. The deacetylation inhibitor effect of SAHA was verified by observing higher acetylation levels of both histone H3 and H4 in treated IPF cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments demonstrated that the reduced expression of COL3A1 by SAHA is with increased association of the repressive chromatin marker, H3K27Me3, and decreased association of the active chromatin marker, H3K9Ac. In our murine model of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, the SAHA treated group demonstrated significantly less collagen III, as detected by immunohistochemistry. Our data indicate that the HDACi SAHA alters the chromatin associated with COL3A1, resulting in its decreased expression. PMID:24084714

  3. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  4. mTORC1/C2 and pan-HDAC inhibitors synergistically impair breast cancer growth by convergent AKT and polysome inhibiting mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Edell, Kathleen A; Yevtushenko, Mariya A; Rothschild, Daniel E; Rogers, Aric N; Benz, Christopher C

    2014-04-01

    Resistance of breast cancers to targeted hormone receptor (HR) or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) inhibitors often occurs through dysregulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, protein kinase B/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway. Presently, no targeted therapies exist for breast cancers lacking HR and HER2 overexpression, many of which also exhibit PI3K/AKT/mTOR hyper-activation. Resistance of breast cancers to current therapeutics also results, in part, from aberrant epigenetic modifications including protein acetylation regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs). We show that the investigational drug MLN0128, which inhibits both complexes of mTOR (mTORC1 and mTORC2), and the hydroxamic acid pan-HDAC inhibitor TSA synergistically inhibit the viability of a phenotypically diverse panel of five breast cancer cell lines (HR-/+, HER2-/+). The combination of MLN0128 and TSA induces apoptosis in most breast cancer cell lines tested, but not in the non-malignant MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. In parallel, the MLN0128/TSA combination reduces phosphorylation of AKT at S473 more than single agents alone and more so in the 5 malignant breast cancer cell lines than in the non-malignant mammary epithelial cells. Examining polysome profiles from one of the most sensitive breast cancer cell lines (SKBR3), we demonstrate that this MLN0128/TSA treatment combination synergistically impairs polysome assembly in conjunction with enhanced inhibition of 4eBP1 phosphorylation at S65. Taken together, these data indicate that the synergistic growth inhibiting consequence of combining a mTORC1/C2 inhibitor like MLN0128 with a pan-HDAC inhibitor like TSA results from their mechanistic convergence onto the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, profoundly inhibiting both AKT S473 and 4eBP1 S65 phosphorylation, reducing polysome formation and cancer cell viability.

  5. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  6. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  7. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  8. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; de Diego, Iñaki; Riise, Erik; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2013-05-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18) to matrix metalloproteinases suggests that karilysin was acquired by horizontal gene transfer from an animal host. Previous studies by phage display identified peptides with the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG (single-letter amino-acid codes; X represents any residue) as karilysin inhibitors with low-micromolar binding affinities. Subsequent refinement revealed that inhibition comparable to that of longer peptides could be achieved using the tetrapeptide SWFP. To analyze its binding, the high-resolution crystal structure of the complex between Kly18 and SWFP was determined and it was found that the peptide binds to the primed side of the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. The catalytic zinc ion is clamped by the α-amino group and the carbonyl O atom of the serine, thus distantly mimicking the general manner of binding of hydroxamate inhibitors to metallopeptidases and contributing, together with three zinc-binding histidines from the protein scaffold, to an octahedral-minus-one metal-coordination sphere. The tryptophan side chain penetrates the deep partially water-filled specificity pocket of Kly18. Together with previous serendipitous product complexes of Kly18, the present results provide the structural determinants of inhibition of karilysin and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies aimed at the treatment of human periodontal disease based on a peptidic hit molecule.

  9. Dual inhibition of histone deacetylases and phosphoinositide 3-kinases: effects on Burkitt lymphoma cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Carolina dos Santos; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, Jose Andres; Ridley, Anne J; Klumb, Claudete Esteves

    2016-04-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is characterized by MYC deregulation. Recently, the PI3K pathway has emerged as a cooperative prosurvival mechanism in Burkitt lymphoma. Despite the highly successful results of treatment that use high-dose chemotherapy regimens in pediatric Burkitt lymphoma patients, the survival rate of pediatric patients with progressive or recurrent disease is low. PI3Ks are also known to regulate cell migration, and abnormal cell migration may contribute to cancer progression and dissemination in Burkitt lymphoma. Little is known about Burkitt lymphoma cell migration, but the cooperation between MYC and PI3K in Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis suggests that a drug combination could be used to target the different steps involved in Burkitt lymphoma cell dissemination and disease progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid combined with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 on Burkitt lymphoma cell growth and migration. The combination enhanced the cell growth inhibition and cell-cycle arrest induced by the PI3K inhibitor or histone deacetylase inhibitor individually. Moreover, histone deacetylase inhibitor/PI3K inhibitor cotreatment suppressed Burkitt lymphoma cell migration and decreased cell polarization, Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and leads to RhoB induction. In summary, the histone deacetylase inhibitor/PI3Ki combination inhibits cell proliferation and migration via alterations in PI3K signaling and histone deacetylase activity, which is involved in the acetylation of α-tubulin and the regulation of RhoB expression. PMID:26561567

  10. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  11. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  12. High performance oilfield scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Duccini, Y.; Dufour, A.; Hann, W.M.; Sanders, T.W.; Weinstein, B.

    1997-08-01

    Sea water often reacts with the formation water in offshore fields to produce barium, calcium and strontium sulfate deposits that hinder oil production. Newer fields often have more difficult to control scale problems than older ones, and current technology scale inhibitors are not able to control the deposits as well as needed. In addition, ever more stringent regulations designed to minimize the impact of inhibitors on the environment are being enacted. Three new inhibitors are presented that overcome many of the problems of older technology scale inhibitors.

  13. Oral Administration of the Pimelic Diphenylamide HDAC Inhibitor HDACi 4b Is Unsuitable for Chronic Inhibition of HDAC Activity in the CNS In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beconi, Maria; Aziz, Omar; Matthews, Kim; Moumné, Lara; O’Connell, Catherine; Yates, Dawn; Clifton, Steven; Pett, Hannah; Vann, Julie; Crowley, Lynsey; Haughan, Alan F.; Smith, Donna L.; Woodman, Ben; Bates, Gillian P.; Brookfield, Fred; Bürli, Roland W.; McAllister, George; Dominguez, Celia; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Beaumont, Vahri

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have received considerable attention as potential therapeutics for a variety of cancers and neurological disorders. Recent publications on a class of pimelic diphenylamide HDAC inhibitors have highlighted their promise in the treatment of the neurodegenerative diseases Friedreich’s ataxia and Huntington’s disease, based on efficacy in cell and mouse models. These studies’ authors have proposed that the unique action of these compounds compared to hydroxamic acid-based HDAC inhibitors results from their unusual slow-on/slow-off kinetics of binding, preferentially to HDAC3, resulting in a distinctive pharmacological profile and reduced toxicity. Here, we evaluate the HDAC subtype selectivity, cellular activity, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties, as well as the central pharmacodynamic profile of one such compound, HDACi 4b, previously described to show efficacy in vivo in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington’s disease. Based on our data reported here, we conclude that while the in vitro selectivity and binding mode are largely in agreement with previous reports, the physicochemical properties, metabolic and p-glycoprotein (Pgp) substrate liability of HDACi 4b render this compound suboptimal to investigate central Class I HDAC inhibition in vivo in mouse per oral administration. A drug administration regimen using HDACi 4b dissolved in drinking water was used in the previous proof of concept study, casting doubt on the validation of CNS HDAC3 inhibition as a target for the treatment of Huntington’s disease. We highlight physicochemical stability and metabolic issues with 4b that are likely intrinsic liabilities of the benzamide chemotype in general. PMID:22973455

  14. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  15. Osteocompatibility of biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  16. Enhancement of Radiation Response in Osteosarcoma and Rhabomyosarcoma Cell Lines by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Ehemann, Volker

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) can enhance the sensitivity of cells to photon radiation treatment (XRT) by altering numerous molecular pathways. We investigated the effect of pan-HDACIs such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on radiation response in two osteosarcoma (OS) and two rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis were examined in OS (KHOS-24OS, SAOS2) and RMS (A-204, RD) cell lines treated with HDACI and HDACI plus XRT, respectively. Protein expression was investigated via immunoblot analysis, and cell cycle analysis and measurement of apoptosis were performed using flow cytometry. Results: SAHA induced an inhibition of cell proliferation and clonogenic survival in OS and RMS cell lines and led to a significant radiosensitization of all tumor cell lines. Other HDACI such as M344 and valproate showed similar effects as investigated in one OS cell line. Furthermore, SAHA significantly increased radiation-induced apoptosis in the OS cell lines, whereas in the RMS cell lines radiation-induced apoptosis was insignificant with and without SAHA. In all investigated sarcoma cell lines, SAHA attenuated radiation-induced DNA repair protein expression (Rad51, Ku80). Conclusion: Our results show that HDACIs enhance radiation action in OS and RMS cell lines. Inhibition of DNA repair, as well as increased apoptosis induction after exposure to HDACIs, can be mechanisms of radiosensitization by HDACIs.

  17. Radiosensitization by SAHA in Experimental Colorectal Carcinoma Models-In Vivo Effects and Relevance of Histone Acetylation Status

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Ree, Anne Hansen; Furre, Torbjorn; Halvorsen, Thomas; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors are being evaluated as antitumor agents in ongoing clinical trials, and promising preclinical results, combined with favorable toxicity profiles, have rendered the drugs as interesting candidates for combination with other treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radiosensitizing properties of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and the possible requirement of histone hyperacetylation at radiation exposure. Methods and materials: Radiosensitization by SAHA was assessed in a colorectal carcinoma cell line and in two colorectal xenograft models by analysis of clonogenic survival and tumor growth delay, respectively. Histone acetylation status at radiation exposure was evaluated by Western blot. Results: In vitro, radiosensitization was demonstrated when cells were preincubated with SAHA, and, in the xenografts, tumor growth was delayed when the mice were treated with fractionated radiation combined with daily SAHA injections compared with radiation alone. Surprisingly, the SAHA-dependent growth delay was still present when radiation was delivered at restored baseline acetylation levels compared with maximal histone hyperacetylation. Conclusion: SAHA was an effective radiosensitizer in experimental colorectal carcinoma models, suggesting that histone deacetylase inhibition might constitute a valuable supplement to current multimodal treatment strategies in rectal cancer. The presence of histone hyperacetylation at radiation was not required to obtain an increased radiation response, questioning the validity of using histone hyperacetylation as a molecular marker for radiosensitivity.

  18. Predicting chemotherapeutic drug combinations through gene network profiling

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Thuy Trang; Chua, Jacqueline Kia Kee; Seah, Kwi Shan; Koo, Seok Hwee; Yee, Jie Yin; Yang, Eugene Guorong; Lim, Kim Kiat; Pang, Shermaine Yu Wen; Yuen, Audrey; Zhang, Louxin; Ang, Wee Han; Dymock, Brian; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon; Chen, Ee Sin

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary chemotherapeutic treatments incorporate the use of several agents in combination. However, selecting the most appropriate drugs for such therapy is not necessarily an easy or straightforward task. Here, we describe a targeted approach that can facilitate the reliable selection of chemotherapeutic drug combinations through the interrogation of drug-resistance gene networks. Our method employed single-cell eukaryote fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model of proliferating cells to delineate a drug resistance gene network using a synthetic lethality workflow. Using the results of a previous unbiased screen, we assessed the genetic overlap of doxorubicin with six other drugs harboring varied mechanisms of action. Using this fission yeast model, drug-specific ontological sub-classifications were identified through the computation of relative hypersensitivities. We found that human gastric adenocarcinoma cells can be sensitized to doxorubicin by concomitant treatment with cisplatin, an intra-DNA strand crosslinking agent, and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Our findings point to the utility of fission yeast as a model and the differential targeting of a conserved gene interaction network when screening for successful chemotherapeutic drug combinations for human cells. PMID:26791325

  19. Inhibition of histone deacetylase in cancer cells slows down replication forks, activates dormant origins and induces DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Chiara; Leo, Elisabetta; Eichler, Gabriel S.; Sordet, Olivier; Martin, Melvenia M.; Fan, Angela; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Pommier, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a reversible process regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) that is often altered in human cancers. SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) is the first histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) to be approved for clinical use as an anticancer agent. Given that histone acetylation is a key determinant of chromatin structure, we investigated how SAHA may affect DNA replication and integrity to gain deeper insights into the basis for its anticancer activity. Nuclear replication factories were visualized with confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and with single-replicon analyses conducted by genome-wide molecular combing after pulse labeling with two thymidine-analogues. Additionally, nascent strand real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the human β-globin locus was used to assess the effects of SAHA on replication fork origin firing. We found that pharmacological concentrations of SAHA induce replication-mediated DNA damage, on the basis of single-cell and single-DNA molecule analyses. Molecular combing indicated slowdown in replication speed along with activation of dormant replication origins in response to SAHA. Similar results were obtained using siRNA-mediated depletion of HDAC3 expression, implicating this HDAC member as a likely target in the SAHA response. Activation of dormant origins was confirmed by molecular analyses of the β-globin locus control region. Our findings indicate that SAHA produces profound alterations in DNA replication that cause DNA damage, establishing a critical link between robust chromatin acetylation and DNA replication in human cancer cells. PMID:20460513

  20. ABCD1 deletion-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is corrected by SAHA: implication for adrenoleukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Baarine, Mauhamad; Beeson, Craig; Singh, Avtar; Singh, Inderjit

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), an inherited peroxisomal metabolic neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by mutations/deletions in the ABCD1 gene encoding peroxisomal ABC transporter adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP). Metabolic dysfunction in X-ALD is characterized by the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs; ≥ C22:0) in the tissues and plasma of patients. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial status following deletion of ABCD1 in B12 oligodendrocytes and U87 astrocytes. This study provides evidence that silencing of peroxisomal protein ABCD1 produces structural and functional perturbations in mitochondria. Activities of electron transport chain-related enzymes and of citric acid cycle (TCA cycle) were reduced; mitochondrial redox status was dysregulated and the mitochondrial membrane potential was disrupted following ABCD1 silencing. A greater reduction of ATP levels and citrate synthase activities was observed in oligodendrocytes as compared to astrocytes. Further, most of the mitochondrial perturbations induced by ABCD1 silencing were corrected by treating cells with SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), an HDAC inhibitor. These observations indicate a novel relationship between peroxisomes and mitochondria in cellular homeostasis and the importance of intact peroxisomes in relation to mitochondrial integrity and function in the cell types that participate in the pathobiology of X-ALD. These observations suggest SAHA as a potential therapy for X-ALD. PMID:25393703

  1. Stimulating the RIG-I pathway to kill cells in the latent HIV reservoir following viral reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peilin; Kaiser, Philipp; Lampiris, Harry W.; Kim, Peggy; Yukl, Steven A.; Havlir, Diane V.; Greene, Warner C.; Wong, Joseph K.

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of latent HIV proviruses in long-lived CD4+ T cells despite antiretroviral therapy (ART)1–3 is a major obstacle to viral eradication4–6. Because current candidate latency-reversing agents (LRAs) induce HIV transcription but fail to clear these cellular reservoirs,7–8 new approaches for killing these reactivated latent HIV reservoir cells are urgently needed. HIV latency depends upon transcriptional quiescence of the integrated provirus and circumvention of immune defense mechanisms4–6,9. These defenses include cell-intrinsic innate responses that use pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) to detect viral pathogens and subsequently induce apoptosis of the infected cell10. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) forms one class of pattern-recognition receptors that mediates apoptosis and elimination of infected cells after recognition of viral RNA11–14. Here we show that acitretin, an FDA-approved retinoic-acid derivative, enhances RIG-I signaling ex vivo, increases HIV transcription, and induces preferential apoptosis of HIV-infected cells. These effects are abrogated by RIG-I knockdown. Acitretin also decreases proviral DNA levels in CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected subjects on suppressive ART, an effect amplified by combination with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Pharmacologic enhancement of an innate cellular defense network could provide a means to eliminate reactivated cells in the latent HIV reservoir. PMID:27294875

  2. Productively Infected Murine Kaposi's Sarcoma-Like Tumors Define New Animal Models for Studying and Targeting KSHV Oncogenesis and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ashlock, Brittany M.; Ma, Qi; Issac, Biju; Mesri, Enrique A.

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an AIDS-defining cancer caused by the KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). KS tumors are composed of KSHV-infected spindle cells of vascular origin with aberrant neovascularization and erythrocyte extravasation. KSHV genes expressed during both latent and lytic replicative cycles play important roles in viral oncogenesis. Animal models able to recapitulate both viral and host biological characteristics of KS are needed to elucidate oncogenic mechanisms, for developing targeted therapies, and to trace cellular components of KS ontogeny. Herein, we describe two new murine models of Kaposi's sarcoma. We found that murine bone marrow-derived cells, whether established in culture or isolated from fresh murine bone marrow, were infectable with rKSHV.219, formed KS-like tumors in immunocompromised mice and produced mature herpesvirus-like virions in vivo. Further, we show in vivo that the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat) enhanced viral lytic reactivation. We propose that these novel models are ideal for studying both viral and host contributions to KSHV-induced oncogenesis as well as for testing virally-targeted antitumor strategies for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, our isolation of bone marrow-derived cell populations containing a cell type that, when infected with KSHV, renders a tumorigenic KS-like spindle cell, should facilitate systematic identification of KS progenitor cells. PMID:24489895

  3. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  4. Anthranilamide inhibitors of factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Mendel, David; Marquart, Angela L; Joseph, Sajan; Waid, Philip; Yee, Ying K; Tebbe, Anne Louise; Ratz, Andrew M; Herron, David K; Goodson, Theodore; Masters, John J; Franciskovich, Jeffry B; Tinsley, Jennifer M; Wiley, Michael R; Weir, Leonard C; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Smith, Gerald F; Towner, Richard D; Froelich, Larry L; Buben, John; Craft, Trelia J

    2007-09-01

    SAR about the B-ring of a series of N(2)-aroyl anthranilamide factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors is described. B-ring o-aminoalkylether and B-ring p-amine probes of the S1' and S4 sites, respectively, afforded picomolar fXa inhibitors that performed well in in vitro anticoagulation assays.

  5. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  6. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  7. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  8. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  9. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  10. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  11. Glycosylasparaginase inhibition studies: competitive inhibitors, transition state mimics, noncompetitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Risley, J M; Huang, D H; Kaylor, J J; Malik, J J; Xia, Y Q

    2001-01-01

    Glycosylasparaginase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosylic bond between asparagine and N-acetylglucosamine in the catabolism of N-linked glycoproteins. Previously only three competitive inhibitors, one noncompetitive inhibitor, and one irreversible inhibitor of glycosylasparaginase activity had been reported. Using human glycosylasparaginase from human amniotic fluid, L-aspartic acid and four of its analogues, where the alpha-amino group was substituted with a chloro, bromo, methyl or hydrogen, were competitive inhibitors having Ki values between 0.6-7.7 mM. These results provide supporting evidence for a proposed intramolecular autoproteolytic activation reaction. A proposed phosphono transition state mimic and a sulfo transition state mimic were competitive inhibitors with Ki values 0.9 mM and 1.4 mM, respectively. These results support a mechanism for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction involving formation of a tetrahedral high-energy intermediate. Three analogues of the natural substrate were noncompetitive inhibitors with Ki values between 0.56-0.75 mM, indicating the presence of a second binding site that may recognize (substituted)acetamido groups.

  12. 2-Alkylamino- and alkoxy-substituted 2-amino-1,3,4-oxadiazoles-O-Alkyl benzohydroxamate esters replacements retain the desired inhibition and selectivity against MEK (MAP ERK kinase)

    SciTech Connect

    Warmus, Joseph S; Flamme, Cathlin; Zhang, Lu Yan; Barrett, Stephen; Bridges, Alexander; Chen, Huifen; Gowan, Richard; Kaufman, Michael; Sebolt-Leopold, Judy; Leopold, Wilbur; Merriman, Ronald; Ohren, Jeffrey; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Przybranowski, Sally; Tecle, Haile; Valik, Heather; Whitehead, Christopher; Zhang, Erli

    2009-07-23

    This paper reports a second generation MEK inhibitor. The previously reported potent and efficacious MEK inhibitor, PD-184352 (CI-1040), contains an integral hydroxamate moiety. This compound suffered from less than ideal solubility and metabolic stability. An oxadiazole moiety behaves as a bioisostere for the hydroxamate group, leading to a more metabolically stable and efficacious MEK inhibitor.

  13. Adamantanyl-Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor H6CAHA Exhibits Favorable Pharmacokinetics and Augments Prostate Cancer Radiation Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Konsoula, Zacharoula; Cao Hong; Velena, Alfredo; Jung, Mira

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate pharmacological properties of H6CAHA, an adamantyl-hydroxamate histone deacetylase inhibitor, and to investigate its effect on prostate cancer cells following exposure to {gamma}-radiation in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: H6CAHA was assessed for in vitro solubility, lipophilicity and growth inhibition, and in vivo plasma pharmacokinetics. The effect of H6CAHA on radiation clonogenic survival and DNA damage repair was evaluated in human prostate cancer (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) and nonmalignant control epithelial (RWPE1 and 267B1) cell lines. The effect of this agent on the growth of prostate cancer xenografts was also assessed in mice. Results: H6CAHA demonstrated good solubility and permeability profiles and preferentially inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells over nonmalignant cells. Plasma pharmacokinetics revealed that the area under the curve of H6CAHA was 8.08 {+-} 0.91 {mu}M x h, and its half-life was 11.17 {+-} 0.87 h. Radiation clonogenic assays revealed that H6CAHA decreased the survival of prostate cancer cells at the dose that exerted limited effect on normal cells. Concomitantly, delayed DNA damage repair following combination treatment was evident in cancer cells, indicated by the prolonged appearance of {gamma}H2AX and Rad51 foci and suppression of DNA damage repair genes (ATM, BRCA1, and BRCA2). Combined modality of H6CAHA (daily intraperitoneal injections for 10 days) with {gamma}-radiation (10 x 2 Gy) completely blocked the growth of PC3 tumor xenografts (p < 0.001) over 60 days. Conclusion: These results support the potential therapeutic value of H6CAHA in combination with radiation and support the rationale for further clinical investigation.

  14. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  15. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  16. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate miRNA and mRNA expression, block metaphase, and induce apoptosis in inflammatory breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Namita; Wang, Wei-Lin Winnie; Conklin, Tucker; Chittur, Sridar; Tenniswood, Martin

    2013-01-01

    To develop new therapies for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) we have compared the effects of two hydroxamic acid-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, CG-1521 and Trichostatin A (TSA) on the biology of two IBC cell lines: SUM149PT and SUM190PT. CG-1521 and TSA induce dose (0−10 µM) and time-dependent (0−96 h) increases in the proportion of cells undergoing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the presence or absence of 17β-estradiol. In SUM 149PT cells, both CG-1521 and TSA increase the levels of acetylated α-tubulin; however the morphological effects are different: CG-1521 blocks mitotic spindle formation and prevents abscission during cytokinesis while TSA results in an increase in cell size. In SUM190PT cells CG-1521 does not cause an increase in acetylated-α-tubulin and even though TSA significantly increases the levels of acetylated tubulin, neither inhibitor alters the morphology of the cells. Microarray analysis demonstrates that CG-1521 modulates the expression of 876 mRNAs and 63 miRNAs in SUM149PT cells, and 1227 mRNAs and 35 miRNAs in SUM190PT cells. Only 9% of the genes are commonly modulated in both cell lines, suggesting that CG-1521 and TSA target different biological processes in the two cell lines most likely though the inhibition of different HDACs in these cell lines. Gene ontology (GO) analysis reveals that CG-1521 affects the expression of mRNAs that encode proteins associated with the spindle assembly checkpoint, chromosome segregation, and microtubule-based processes in both cell lines and has cell-type specific effects on lipid biosynthesis, response to DNA damage, and cell death. PMID:23792638

  18. Provirus activation plus CD59 blockage triggers antibody-dependent complement-mediated lysis of latently HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jie; Yang, Kai; Byrd, Daniel; Hu, Ningjie; Amet, Tohti; Shepherd, Nicole; Desai, Mona; Gao, Jimin; Gupta, Samir; Sun, Yongtao; Yu, Qigui

    2014-10-01

    Latently HIV-1-infected cells are recognized as the last barrier toward viral eradication and cure. To purge these cells, we combined a provirus stimulant with a blocker of human CD59, a key member of the regulators of complement activation, to trigger Ab-dependent complement-mediated lysis. Provirus stimulants including prostratin and histone deacetylase inhibitors such as romidepsin and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid activated proviruses in the latently HIV-1-infected T cell line ACH-2 as virion production and viral protein expression on the cell surface were induced. Romidepsin was the most attractive provirus stimulant as it effectively activated proviruses at nanomolar concentrations that can be achieved clinically. Antiretroviral drugs including two protease inhibitors (atazanavir and darunavir) and an RT inhibitor (emtricitabine) did not affect the activity of provirus stimulants in the activation of proviruses. However, saquinavir (a protease inhibitor) markedly suppressed virus production, although it did not affect the percentage of cells expressing viral Env on the cell surface. Provirus-activated ACH-2 cells expressed HIV-1 Env that colocalized with CD59 in lipid rafts on the cell surface, facilitating direct interaction between them. Blockage of CD59 rendered provirus-activated ACH-2 cells and primary human CD4(+) T cells that were latently infected with HIV-1 sensitive to Ab-dependent complement-mediated lysis by anti-HIV-1 polyclonal Abs or plasma from HIV-1-infected patients. Therefore, a combination of provirus stimulants with regulators of complement activation blockers represents a novel approach to eliminate HIV-1.

  19. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, G; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Dhatchana Moorthy, Nachiappan; Gopalaswamy, Radha; Narayanan, Shridhar

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush) infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of  HOS2 (High Osmolarity  Sensitive) , a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from  C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This  in  vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity. PMID:25110576

  20. ADAM17 Inhibitors Attenuate Corneal Epithelial Detachment Induced by Mustard Exposure

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis-Rodrigues, Andrea; Chang, Yoke-Chen; A. Hahn, Rita; P. Po, Iris; Zhou, Peihong; Lacey, C. Jeffrey; Pillai, Abhilash; C. Young, Sherri; A. Flowers II, Robert; A. Gallo, Michael; D. Laskin, Jeffrey; R. Gerecke, Donald; K. H. Svoboda, Kathy; D. Heindel, Ned; Gordon, Marion K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Sulfur mustard, nitrogen mustard (NM), and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide all cause corneal injury with epithelial–stromal separation, differing only by degree. Injury can resolve in a few weeks or develop into chronic corneal problems. These vesicants induce microbullae at the epithelial–stromal junction, which is partially caused by cleavage of transmembranous hemidesmosomal collagen XVII, a component anchoring the epithelium to the stroma. ADAM17 is an enzyme involved in wound healing and is able to cleave collagen XVII. The activity of ADAM17 was inhibited in vesicant-exposed corneas by four different hydroxamates, to evaluate their therapeutic potential when applied 2 hours after exposure, thereby allowing ADAM17 to perform its early steps in wound healing. Methods Rabbit corneal organ cultures exposed to NM for 2 hours were washed, then incubated at 37°C for 22 hours, with or without one of the four hydroxamates (dose range, 0.3–100 nmol in 20 μL, applied four times). Corneas were analyzed by light and immunofluorescence microscopy, and ADAM17 activity assays. Results Nitrogen mustard–induced corneal injury showed significant activation of ADAM17 levels accompanying epithelial–stromal detachment. Corneas treated with hydroxamates starting 2 hours post exposure showed a dose-dependent ADAM17 activity inhibition up to concentrations of 3 nmol. Of the four hydroxamates, NDH4417 (N-octyl-N-hydroxy-2-[4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl] acetamide) was most effective for inhibiting ADAM17 and retaining epithelial–stromal attachment. Conclusions Mustard exposure leads to corneal epithelial sloughing caused, in part, by the activation of ADAM17 at the epithelial–stromal junction. Select hydroxamate compounds applied 2 hours after NM exposure mitigated epithelial–stromal separation. PMID:27058125

  1. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  2. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  3. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  4. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  5. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  6. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  7. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  8. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  9. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  10. An environmentally friendly scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, J.B.; Brown, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a method of inhibiting the formation of scales such as barium and strontium sulfate in low pH aqueous systems, and calcium carbonate in systems containing high concentrations of dissolved iron. The solution, chemically, involves treating the aqueous system with an inhibitor designed to replace organic-phosphonates. Typical low pH aqueous systems where the inhibitor is particularly useful are oilfield produced-water, resin bed water softeners that form scale during low pH, acid regeneration operations. Downhole applications are recommended where high concentrations of dissolved iron are present in the produced water. This new approach to inhibition replaces typical organic phosphonates and polymers with a non-toxic, biodegradable scale inhibitor that performs in harsh environments.

  11. Diverse inhibitors of aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Robert A; Boston, Rebecca S; Payne, Gary A

    2008-03-01

    Pre-harvest and post-harvest contamination of maize, peanuts, cotton, and tree nuts by members of the genus Aspergillus and subsequent contamination with the mycotoxin aflatoxin pose a widespread food safety problem for which effective and inexpensive control strategies are lacking. Since the discovery of aflatoxin as a potently carcinogenic food contaminant, extensive research has been focused on identifying compounds that inhibit its biosynthesis. Numerous diverse compounds and extracts containing activity inhibitory to aflatoxin biosynthesis have been reported. Only recently, however, have tools been available to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which these inhibitors affect aflatoxin biosynthesis. Many inhibitors are plant-derived and a few may be amenable to pathway engineering for tissue-specific expression in susceptible host plants as a defense against aflatoxin contamination. Other compounds show promise as protectants during crop storage. Finally, inhibitors with different modes of action could be used in comparative transcriptional and metabolomic profiling experiments to identify regulatory networks controlling aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  12. Regulation of acetylation restores proteolytic function of diseased myocardium in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Fang, Caiyun; Zong, Nobel C; Liem, David A; Cadeiras, Martin; Scruggs, Sarah B; Yu, Hongxiu; Kim, Allen K; Yang, Pengyuan; Deng, Mario; Lu, Haojie; Ping, Peipei

    2013-12-01

    Proteasome complexes play essential roles in maintaining cellular protein homeostasis and serve fundamental roles in cardiac function under normal and pathological conditions. A functional detriment in proteasomal activities has been recognized as a major contributor to the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, approaches to restore proteolytic function within the setting of the diseased myocardium would be of great clinical significance. In this study, we discovered that the cardiac proteasomal activity could be regulated by acetylation. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and sodium valproate) enhanced the acetylation of 20S proteasome subunits in the myocardium and led to an elevation of proteolytic capacity. This regulatory paradigm was present in both healthy and acutely ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injured murine hearts, and HDAC inhibition in vitro restored proteolytic capacities to baseline sham levels in injured hearts. This mechanism of regulation was also viable in failing human myocardium. With 20S proteasomal complexes purified from murine myocardium treated with HDAC inhibitors in vivo, we confirmed that acetylation of 20S subunits directly, at least in part, presents a molecular explanation for the improvement in function. Furthermore, using high-resolution LC-MS/MS, we unraveled the first cardiac 20S acetylome, which identified the acetylation of nine N-termini and seven internal lysine residues. Acetylation on four lysine residues and four N-termini on cardiac proteasomes were novel discoveries of this study. In addition, the acetylation of five lysine residues was inducible via HDAC inhibition, which correlated with the enhancement of 20S proteasomal activity. Taken as a whole, our investigation unveiled a novel mechanism of proteasomal function regulation in vivo and established a new strategy for the potential rescue of compromised proteolytic function in the failing heart using HDAC inhibitors.

  13. Evaluation of 6-([18F] fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoic-anilide (18F-FAHA) as imaging probe in tumor xenograft mice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fiona; Cho, Sung Ju; Yu, Lihai; Hudson, Robert H. E.; Luyt, Leonard G.; Pin, Christopher L.; Kovacs, Michael S.; Koropatnick, James; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-03-01

    Alteration in genetic expression is as important as gene mutation in cancer development and proliferation. Epigenetic changes affect gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. Histone deacetylase (HDAC), an enzyme facilitating histone remodelling, can lead to silencing of tumor suppressor genes making HDAC inhibitors viable anticancer drugs against tumors with increased activity of the enzyme. In this study we evaluated 18F-fluroacetamido-1-hexanoicanilide (18F-FAHA), an artificial HDAC substrate, as imaging probe of HDAC activity of human tumor xenografts in immunocompromised host mice. Human breast and melanoma cell lines, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-435 respectively, known to overexpress HDAC activity were xenografted into immunocompromised mice and HDAC activity was imaged using 18F-FAHA. The melanoma group was treated with saline, SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, an approved anticancer HDAC inhibitor) in DMSO, or DMSO as positive control. Tracer kinetic modelling and SUV were used to estimate HDAC activity from dynamic PET data. Both breast tumor and melanoma group showed great variability in binding rate constant (BRC) of 18F-FAHA suggesting highly variable inter- and intra-tumoral HDAC activity. For the SAHA treated melanoma group, HDAC activity, as monitored by BRC of 18F-FAHA, decreased more than the two (positive and negative) control groups but not tumor growth. Our preliminary study showed that noninvasive PET imaging with 18F-FAHA has the potential to identify patients for whom treatment with HDAC inhibitors are appropriate, to assess the effectiveness of that treatment as an early marker of target reduction, and also eliminate the need for invasive tissue biopsy to individualize treatment.

  14. Histone deacetylase enzymes as drug targets for the control of the sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina.

    PubMed

    Kotze, Andrew C; Hines, Barney M; Bagnall, Neil H; Anstead, Clare A; Gupta, Praveer; Reid, Robert C; Ruffell, Angela P; Fairlie, David P

    2015-12-01

    The Australian sheep blowfly, Lucilia cuprina, is an ecto-parasite that causes significant economic losses in the sheep industry. Emerging resistance to insecticides used to protect sheep from this parasite is driving the search for new drugs that act via different mechanisms. Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs), enzymes essential for regulating eukaryotic gene transcription, are prospective new insecticides based on their capacity to kill human parasites. The blowfly genome was found here to contain five HDAC genes corresponding to human HDACs 1, 3, 4, 6 and 11. The catalytic domains of blowfly HDACs 1 and 3 have high sequence identity with corresponding human and other Dipteran insect HDACs (Musca domestica and Drosophila melanogaster). On the other hand, HDACs 4, 6 and 11 from the blowfly and the other Dipteran species showed up to 53% difference in catalytic domain amino acids from corresponding human sequences, suggesting the possibility of developing HDAC inhibitors specific for insects as desired for a commercial insecticide. Differences in transcription patterns for different blowfly HDACs through the life cycle, and between the sexes of adult flies, suggest different functions in regulating gene transcription within this organism and possibly different vulnerabilities. Data that supports HDACs as possible new insecticide targets is the finding that trichostatin A and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid retarded growth of early instar blowfly larvae in vitro, and reduced the pupation rate. Trichostatin A was 8-fold less potent than the commercial insecticide cyromazine in inhibiting larval growth. Our results support further development of inhibitors of blowfly HDACs with selectivity over human and other mammalian HDACs as a new class of prospective insecticides for sheep blowfly. PMID:27120067

  15. Structure based design of novel 6,5 heterobicyclic mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors leading to the discovery of imidazo[1,5-a] pyrazine G-479.

    PubMed

    Robarge, Kirk D; Lee, Wendy; Eigenbrot, Charles; Ultsch, Mark; Wiesmann, Christian; Heald, Robert; Price, Steve; Hewitt, Joanne; Jackson, Philip; Savy, Pascal; Burton, Brenda; Choo, Edna F; Pang, Jodie; Boggs, Jason; Yang, April; Yang, Xioaye; Baumgardner, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Use of the tools of SBDD including crystallography led to the discovery of novel and potent 6,5 heterobicyclic MEKi's [J. Med. Chem.2012, 55, 4594]. The core change from a 5,6 heterobicycle to a 6,5 heterobicycle was driven by the desire for increased structural diversity and aided by the co-crystal structure of G-925 [J. Med. Chem.2012, 55, 4594]. The key design feature was the shift of the attachment of the five-membered heterocyclic ring towards the B ring while maintaining the key hydroxamate and anilino pharamcophoric elements in a remarkably similar position as in G-925. From modelling, changing the connection point of the five membered ring heterocycle placed the H-bond accepting nitrogen within a good distance and angle to the Ser212 [J. Med. Chem.2012, 55, 4594]. The resulting novel 6,5 benzoisothiazole MEKi G-155 exhibited improved potency versus aza-benzofurans G-925 and G-963 but was a potent inhibitor of cytochrome P450's 2C9 and 2C19. Lowering the logD by switching to the more polar imidazo[1,5-a] pyridine core significantly diminished 2C9/2C19 inhibition while retaining potency. The imidazo[1,5-a] pyridine G-868 exhibited increased potency versus the starting point for this work (aza-benzofuran G-925) leading to deprioritization of the azabenzofurans. The 6,5-imidazo[1,5-a] pyridine scaffold was further diversified by incorporating a nitrogen at the 7 position to give the imidazo[1,5-a] pyrazine scaffold. The introduction of the C7 nitrogen was driven by the desire to improve metabolic stability by blocking metabolism at the C7 and C8 positions (particularly the HLM stability). It was found that improving on G-868 (later renamed GDC-0623) required combining C7 nitrogen with a diol hydroxamate to give G-479. G-479 with polarity distributed throughout the molecule was improved over G-868 in many aspects.

  16. Nonnucleoside inhibitors of adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous inhibitory neuromodulator that increases nociceptive thresholds in response to tissue trauma and inflammation. Adenosine kinase (AK) is a key intracellular enzyme regulating intra- and extracellular concentrations of ADO. AK inhibition selectively amplifies extracellular ADO levels at cell and tissue sites where accelerated release of ADO occurs. AK inhibitors have been shown to provide effective antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anticonvulsant activity in animal models, thus suggesting their potential therapeutic utility for pain, inflammation, epilepsy and possibly other central and peripheral nervous system diseases associated with cellular trauma and inflammation. This beneficial outcome may potentially lack nonspecific effects associated with the systemic administration of ADO receptor agonists. Until recently all of the reported AK inhibitors contained adenosine-like structural motif. The present review will discuss design, synthesis and analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the novel nonnucleoside AK inhibitors that do not have close structural resemblance with the natural substrate ADO. Two classes of the nonnucleoside AK inhibitors are built on pyridopyrimidine and alkynylpyrimidine cores.

  17. C1-inhibitor and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirschfink, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Excessive activation of the protein cascade systems has been associated with post-transplantation inflammatory disorders. There is increasing evidence that complement not only significantly contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury upon cold storage of the organ but also, although to a different degree, to allograft rejection. Complement activation is most fulminant in hyperacute rejection but seems also to contribute to acute transplant rejection. Therapeutic substitution of appropriate regulators, therefore, appears to be a reasonable approach to reduce undesirable inflammatory reactions in the grafted organ. C1-inhibitor, a multifunctional regulator of the various kinin-generating cascade systems (for review see: E. Hack, chapter in this issue), is frequently reduced in patients suffering from severe inflammatory disorders. Studies applying pathophysiologically relevant animal models of allo- and xenotransplantation as well as promising first clinical results from successful allotransplantation now provide evidence that C1-inhibitor may also serve as an effective means to protect the grafted organ against inflammatory tissue injury. In xenotransplantation, complement inhibition by specific regulators such as C1-inhibitor may help to overcome hyperacute graft rejection. After a brief introduction on the significance of complement to allo- and xenotransplantation the following review will focus on the impact of C1-inhibitor treatment on transplantation-associated inflammatory disorders, where complement contributes to the pathogenesis.

  18. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  19. PDE-5 inhibitors: clinical points.

    PubMed

    Doumas, Michael; Lazaridis, Antonios; Katsiki, Niki; Athyros, Vasilios

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is usually of vascular origin and is frequently encountered in men with cardiovascular disease. The introduction of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors has revolutionized the management of patients with erectile dysfunction. Currently available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have distinct pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, thus permitting for tailoring sexual therapy according to patient characteristics and needs. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors possess vasorelaxing properties and exert systemic hemodynamic effects, which need to be taken into account when other cardiovascular drugs are co-administered. Special caution is needed with alpha-blockers, while the co-administration with nitrates is contra-indicated due to the risk of life-threatening hypotension. This review presents the advent of sexual therapy, describes the mechanism of action and the specific characteristics of commercially available phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, summarizes the efficacy and safety of these drugs with special emphasis on the cardiovascular system, and discusses the clinical criteria used for the selection of each drug for the individual patient. PMID:25392015

  20. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors: Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Čolović, Mirjana B; Krstić, Danijela Z; Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara D; Bondžić, Aleksandra M; Vasić, Vesna M

    2013-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is involved in the termination of impulse transmission by rapid hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in numerous cholinergic pathways in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The enzyme inactivation, induced by various inhibitors, leads to acetylcholine accumulation, hyperstimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and disrupted neurotransmission. Hence, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, interacting with the enzyme as their primary target, are applied as relevant drugs and toxins. This review presents an overview of toxicology and pharmacology of reversible and irreversible acetylcholinesterase inactivating compounds. In the case of reversible inhibitors being commonly applied in neurodegenerative disorders treatment, special attention is paid to currently approved drugs (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) in the pharmacotherapy of Alzheimer’s disease, and toxic carbamates used as pesticides. Subsequently, mechanism of irreversible acetylcholinesterase inhibition induced by organophosphorus compounds (insecticides and nerve agents), and their specific and nonspecific toxic effects are described, as well as irreversible inhibitors having pharmacological implementation. In addition, the pharmacological treatment of intoxication caused by organophosphates is presented, with emphasis on oxime reactivators of the inhibited enzyme activity administering as causal drugs after the poisoning. Besides, organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides can be detoxified in mammals through enzymatic hydrolysis before they reach targets in the nervous system. Carboxylesterases most effectively decompose carbamates, whereas the most successful route of organophosphates detoxification is their degradation by corresponding phosphotriesterases. PMID:24179466

  1. Biocatalysts with enhanced inhibitor tolerance

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Shihui; Linger, Jeffrey; Franden, Mary Ann; Pienkos, Philip T.; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed herein are biocatalysts for the production of biofuels, including microorganisms that contain genetic modifications conferring tolerance to growth and fermentation inhibitors found in many cellulosic feedstocks. Methods of converting cellulose-containing materials to fuels and chemicals, as well as methods of fermenting sugars to fuels and chemicals, using these biocatalysts are also disclosed.

  2. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors.

  3. KID, a Kinase Inhibitor Database project.

    PubMed

    Collin, O; Meijer, L

    1999-01-01

    The Kinase Inhibitor Database is a small specialized database dedicated to the gathering of information on protein kinase inhibitors. The database is accessible through the World Wide Web system and gives access to structural and bibliographic information on protein kinase inhibitors. The data in the database will be collected and submitted by researchers working in the kinase inhibitor field. The submitted data will be checked by the curator of the database before entry.

  4. Salicylanilide inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P; Ferreira, Leandra R; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patricia J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Welsh, William J; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-10-11

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose antiapicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles.

  5. Salicylanilide Inhibitors of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Fomovska, Alina; Wood, Richard D.; Mui, Ernest; Dubey, Jitenter P.; Ferriera, Leandra R.; Hickman, Mark R.; Lee, Patricia J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Welsh, William J.; Sommerville, Caroline; Woods, Stuart; Roberts, Craig; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) is an apicomplexan parasite that can cause eye disease, brain disease, and death, especially in congenitally infected and immune-compromised people. Novel medicines effective against both active and latent forms of the parasite are greatly needed. The current study focused on the discovery of such medicines by exploring a family of potential inhibitors whose anti-apicomplexan activity has not been previously reported. Initial screening efforts revealed that niclosamide, a drug approved for anthelmintic use, possessed promising activity in vitro against T. gondii. This observation inspired the evaluation of the activity of a series of salicylanilides and derivatives. Several inhibitors with activities in the nanomolar range with no appreciable in vitro toxicity to human cells were identified. An initial structure-activity relationship was explored. Four compounds were selected for evaluation in an in vivo model of infection, and two derivatives with potentially enhanced pharmacological parameters demonstrated the best activity profiles. PMID:22970937

  6. Macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Quraishi, M.A.; Rawat, J.; Ajmal, M.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of three macrocyclic compounds on corrosion of mild steel (MS) in hydrochloric acid (HCl) was investigated using weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, alternating current (AC) impedance, and hydrogen permeation techniques. All the investigated compounds showed significant efficiencies and reduced permeation of hydrogen through MS in HCl. Inhibition efficiency (IE) varied with the nature and concentrations of the inhibitors, temperature, and concentrations of the acid solutions. The addition of iodide ions (I{sup {minus}}) increased IE of all the tested compounds as a result of the synergistic effect. Potentiodynamic polarization results revealed that macrocyclic compounds acted as mixed inhibitors in 1 M HCl to 5 M HCl. Adsorption on the metal surface obeyed Temkin`s adsorption isotherm. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) of the polished MS surface, exposed with tetraphenyldithia-octaazacyclotetradeca-hexaene (PTAT) proved adsorption of this compound on the surface through nitrogen and sulfur atoms.

  7. [Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Agnieszka Ewa; Zińczuk, Justyna; Kłoczko, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are multisubunit enzyme complexes. They contain three enzymatic active sites which are termed chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like. The elementary function of the proteasomes is degradation of damaged proteins. Proteasome inhibition leads to accumulation of damaged protein, which leads to caspase activation and cell death. This relationship is used in cancer therapy. Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Carfilzomib belongs to the second generation of drugs, which was approved by the US FDA in 2012. Currently in the study phase there are four new inhibitors: ixazomib (MLN9780/MLN2238), delanzomib (CEP-18770), oprozomib (ONX0912/PR-047) and marizomib (NPI-0052). PMID:27259216

  8. Aromatase Inhibitors and Other Compounds for Lowering Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... References Aromatase inhibitors and other compounds for lowering breast cancer risk Aromatase inhibitors (drugs that lower estrogen levels) ... day. Can aromatase inhibitors lower the risk of breast cancer? Aromatase inhibitors are used mainly to treat hormone ...

  9. Conformation-specific inhibitors of Raf kinases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolun; Schleicher, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery linking B-Raf mutations to human tumors in 2002, significant advances in the development of Raf inhibitors have been made, leading to the recent approval of two Raf inhibitor drugs. This chapter includes a brief introduction to B-Raf as a validated target and focuses on the three different binding modes observed with Raf small-molecule inhibitors. These various binding modes lock the Raf kinase in different conformations that impact the toxicity profiles of the inhibitors. Possible solutions to mitigate the side effects caused by inhibitor-induced dimerization are also discussed.

  10. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  11. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  12. ANTIDEPRESSANT ACTIONS OF HDAC INHIBITORS

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Herbert E.; Maze, Ian; LaPlant, Quincey C.; Vialou, Vincent F.; Yoshinori, Ohnishi N.; Berton, Olivier; Fass, Dan M.; Renthal, William; Rush, Augustus J.; Wu, Emma Y.; Ghose, Subroto; Krishnan, Vaishnav; Russo, Scott J.; Tamminga, Carol; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Persistent symptoms of depression suggest the involvement of stable molecular adaptations in brain, which may be reflected at the level of chromatin remodeling. We find that chronic social defeat stress in mice causes a transient decrease, followed by a persistent increase, in levels of acetylated histone H3 in the nucleus accumbens, an important limbic brain region. This persistent increase in H3 acetylation is associated with decreased levels of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the nucleus accumbens. Similar effects were observed in the nucleus accumbens of depressed humans studied postmortem. These changes in H3 acetylation and HDAC2 expression mediate long-lasting positive neuronal adaptations, since infusion of HDAC inhibitors into the nucleus accumbens, which increases histone acetylation, exerts robust antidepressant-like effects in the social defeat paradigm and other behavioral assays. HDAC inhibitor (MS-275) infusion also reverses the effects of chronic defeat stress on global patterns of gene expression in the nucleus accumbens, as determined by microarray analysis, with striking similarities to the effects of the standard antidepressant, fluoxetine. Stress-regulated genes whose expression is normalized selectively by MS-275 may provide promising targets for the future development of novel antidepressant treatments. Together, these findings provide new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of depression and antidepressant action, and support the antidepressant potential of HDAC inhibitors and perhaps other agents that act at the level of chromatin structure. PMID:19759294

  13. RuvBL2 Is Involved in Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor PCI-24781-Induced Cell Death in SK-N-DZ Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Qinglei; Tsai, Sauna; Lu, Yonghai; Wang, Chunmei; Kwan, Yiuwa; Ngai, Saiming

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the second most common solid tumor diagnosed during infancy. The survival rate among children with high-risk neuroblastoma is less than 40%, highlighting the urgent needs for new treatment strategies. PCI-24781 is a novel hydroxamic acid-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that has high efficacy and safety for cancer treatment. However, the underlying mechanisms of PCI-24781 are not clearly elucidated in neuroblastoma cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that PCI-24781 treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth at very low doses in neuroblastoma cells SK-N-DZ, not in normal cell line HS-68. However, PCI-24781 caused the accumulation of acetylated histone H3 both in SK-N-DZ and HS-68 cell line. Treatment of SK-N-DZ with PCI-24781 also induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and activated apoptosis signaling pathways via the up-regulation of DR4, p21, p53 and caspase 3. Further proteomic analysis revealed differential protein expression profiles between non-treated and PCI-24781 treated SK-N-DZ cells. Totally 42 differentially expressed proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF MS system. Western blotting confirmed the expression level of five candidate proteins including prohibitin, hHR23a, RuvBL2, TRAP1 and PDCD6IP. Selective knockdown of RuvBL2 rescued cells from PCI-24781-induced cell death, implying that RuvBL2 might play an important role in anti-tumor activity of PCI-24781 in SK-N-DZ cells. The present results provide a new insight into the potential mechanism of PCI-24781 in SK-N-DZ cell line. PMID:23977108

  14. The novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, LBH589, induces expression of DNA damage response genes and apoptosis in Ph- acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Scuto, Anna; Kirschbaum, Mark; Kowolik, Claudia; Kretzner, Leo; Juhasz, Agnes; Atadja, Peter; Pullarkat, Vinod; Bhatia, Ravi; Forman, Stephen; Yen, Yun; Jove, Richard

    2008-05-15

    We investigated the mechanism of action of LBH589, a novel broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitor belonging to the hydroxamate class, in Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Two model human Ph(-) ALL cell lines (T-cell MOLT-4 and pre-B-cell Reh) were treated with LBH589 and evaluated for biologic and gene expression responses. Low nanomolar concentrations (IC(50): 5-20 nM) of LBH589 induced cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and histone (H3K9 and H4K8) hyperacetylation. LBH589 treatment increased mRNA levels of proapoptosis, growth arrest, and DNA damage repair genes including FANCG, FOXO3A, GADD45A, GADD45B, and GADD45G. The most dramatically expressed gene (up to 45-fold induction) observed after treatment with LBH589 is GADD45G. LBH589 treatment was associated with increased histone acetylation at the GADD45G promoter and phosphorylation of histone H2A.X. Furthermore, treatment with LBH589 was active against cultured primary Ph(-) ALL cells, including those from a relapsed patient, inducing loss of cell viability (up to 70%) and induction of GADD45G mRNA expression (up to 35-fold). Thus, LBH589 possesses potent growth inhibitory activity against including Ph(-) ALL cells associated with up-regulation of genes critical for DNA damage response and growth arrest. These findings provide a rationale for exploring the clinical activity of LBH589 in the treatment of patients with Ph(-) ALL.

  15. The burden of inhibitors in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christopher E; Jiménez-Yuste, Víctor; Auerswald, Guenter; Grancha, Salvador

    2016-08-31

    The burden of disease in haemophilia patients has wide ranging implications for the family and to society. There is evidence that having a current inhibitor increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Morbidity is increased by the inability to treat adequately and its consequent disabilities, which then equates to a poor quality of life compared with non-inhibitor patients. The societal cost of care, or `burden of inhibitors', increases with the ongoing presence of an inhibitor. Therefore, it is clear that successful eradication of inhibitors by immune tolerance induction (ITI) is the single most important milestone one can achieve in an inhibitor patient. The type of factor VIII (FVIII) product used in ITI regimens varies worldwide. Despite ongoing debate, there is in vitro and retrospective clinical evidence to support the use of plasma-derived VWF-containing FVIII concentrates in ITI regimens in order to achieve early and high inhibitor eradication success rates. PMID:27528280

  16. Bisindole-PBD regulates breast cancer cell proliferation via SIRT-p53 axis

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Pranjal; Bag, Indira; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Kamal, Ahmed; Bhadra, Utpal; Pal Bhadra, Manika

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study we reported the role of potent bisindole-PBD conjugate as an inclusion in the arsenal of breast cancer therapeutics. In breast cancer cell proliferation, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway plays a crucial role by prosurvival mechanism that inhibits programmed cell death. Here, 2 breast cancer cells lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 were treated with Vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid / SAHA) and bisindole-PBD (5b). We have investigated the effect on PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and SIRT expression including epigenetic regulation. There was consistent decrease in the level of PI3K, AKT, mTOR proteins upon treatment of 5b in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines compared to untreated controls. Treatment with caspase inhibitor (Q-VD-OPH) confirmed that the effect of 5b on PI3K signaling was ahead of apoptosis. Real time PCR and western blot analysis showed profound reduction in the mRNA and protein levels of SIRT1 and SIRT2. Molecular docking studies also supported the interaction of 5b with various amino acids of SIRT2 proteins. Treatment with 5b caused epigenetic changes that include increase of acetylated forms of p53, increase of histone acetylation at p21 promoter as well as decrease in methylation state of p21 gene. Compound 5b thus acts as SIRT inhibitor and cause p53 activation via inhibition of growth factor signaling and activation of p53 dependent apoptotic signaling. This present study focuses bisindole-PBD on epigenetic alteration putting 5b as a promising therapeutic tool in the realm of breast cancer research. PMID:26192233

  17. Epigenetic silencing of microRNA-373 to epithelial-mesenchymal transition in non-small cell lung cancer through IRAK2 and LAMP1 axes.

    PubMed

    Seol, Hyang Sook; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Shimada, Shu; Lee, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Im; Chun, Sung Min; Singh, Shree Ram; Jang, Se Jin

    2014-10-28

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in carcinogenesis as tumor suppressors or oncogenes has been widely reported. Epigenetic change is one of the mechanisms of transcriptional silencing of miRNAs in cancer. To identify lung cancer-related miRNAs that are mediated by histone modification, we conducted microarray analysis in the Calu-6 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line after treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. The expression level of miR-373 was enhanced by SAHA treatment in this cell line by microarray and the following quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Treatment with another HDAC inhibitor, Trichostatin A, restored the levels of miR-373 expression in A549 and Calu-6 cells, while demethylation drug treatment did not. Importantly, miR-373 was found to be down-regulated in NSCLC tissues and cell lines. Transfection of miR-373 into A549 and Calu-6 cells attenuated cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and reduced the expression of mesenchymal markers. Additional microarray analysis of miR-373-transfected cells and computational predictions identified IRAK2 and LAMP1 as targets of miR-373. Knockdown of these two genes showed similar biological effects to those of miR-373 overexpression. In clinical samples, overexpression of IRAK2 correlated with decreased disease-free survival of patients with non-adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, we found that miR-373 is silenced by histone modification in lung cancer cells and identified its function as a tumor suppressor and negative regulator of the mesenchymal phenotype through downstream IRAK2 and LAMP1 target genes.

  18. Xenograft models for undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified are essential for preclinical testing of therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Marc; Graf, Claudine; Tonak, Marcus; Radsak, Markus P.; Bopp, Tobias; Bals, Robert; Bohle, Rainer M.; Theobald, Matthias; Rommens, Pol-Maria; Proschek, Dirk; Wehler, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma not otherwise specified belongs to the heterogeneous group of soft tissue tumors. It is preferentially located in the upper and lower extremities of the body, and surgical resection remains the only curative treatment. Preclinical animal models are crucial to improve the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. However, this approach has been hampered by the lack of reproducible animal models. The present study established two xenograft animal models generated from stable non-clonal cell cultures, and investigated the difference in chemotherapeutic effects on tumor growth between undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma in vivo and in vitro. The cell cultures were generated from freshly isolated tumor tissues of two patients with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. For the in vivo analysis, these cells were injected subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. The mice were monitored for tumor appearance and treated with the most common or innovative chemotherapeutic agents available to date. Furthermore, the same drugs were administered to in vitro cell cultures. The most effective tumor growth inhibition in vitro was observed with doxorubicin and the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), also known as vorinostat. In the in vivo xenograft mouse model, the combination of doxorubicin and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor pazopanib induced a significant tumor reduction. By contrast, treatment with vorinostat did not reduce the tumor growth. Taken together, the results obtained from drug testing in vitro differed significantly from the in vivo results. Therefore, the novel and reproducible xenograft animal model established in the present study demonstrated that in vivo models are required to test potential chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma prior to clinical use, since animal models are more similar

  19. Combined treatment with SAHA, bortezomib, and clarithromycin for concomitant targeting of aggresome formation and intracellular proteolytic pathways enhances ER stress-mediated cell death in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Seiichiro; Moriya, Shota; Che, Xiao-Fang; Yokoyama, Tomohisa; Kohno, Norio; Miyazawa, Keisuke

    2013-07-19

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagy-lysosome pathway are two major intracellular protein degradation systems. We previously reported that clarithromycin (CAM) blocks autophagy flux, and that combined treatment with CAM and proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (BZ) enhances ER-stress-mediated apoptosis in breast cancer cells, whereas treatment with CAM alone results in almost no cytotoxicity. Since HDAC6 is involved in aggresome formation, which is recognized as a cytoprotective response serving to sequester misfolded proteins and facilitate their clearance by autophagy, we further investigated the combined effect of vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA)), which has a potent inhibitory effect for HDAC6, with CAM and BZ in breast cancer cell lines. SAHA exhibited some cytotoxicity along with an increased acetylation level of α-tubulin, a substrate of HDAC6. Combined treatment of SAHA, CAM, and BZ potently enhanced the apoptosis-inducing effect compared with treatment using each reagent alone or a combination of two of the three. Expression levels of ER-stress-related genes, including the pro-apoptotic transcription factor CHOP (GADD153), were maximally induced by the simultaneous combination of three reagents. Like breast cancer cell lines, a wild-type murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell line exhibited enhanced cytotoxicity and maximally up-regulated Chop after combined treatment with SAHA, CAM, and BZ; however, a Chop knockout MEF cell line almost completely canceled this enhanced effect. The specific HDAC6 inhibitor tubacin also exhibited a pronounced cytocidal effect with a combination of CAM plus BZ. These data suggest that simultaneous targeting of intracellular proteolytic pathways and HDAC6 enhances ER-stress-mediated apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

  20. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  1. Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Remick, Ronald A.; Froese, Colleen

    1990-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are effective antidepressant agents. They are increasingly and effectively used in a number of other psychiatric and non-psychiatric medical syndromes. Their potential for serious toxicity (i.e., hypertensive reaction) is far less than original reports suggest, and newer reversible substrate-specific MAOIs may offer even less toxicity. The author reviews the pharmacology, mechanism of action, clinical indications, and dosing strategies of MAOIs. The common MAOI side-effects (hypotension, weight gain, sexual dysfunction, insomnia, daytime sedation, myoclonus, and hypertensive episodes) are described and management techniques suggested. Recent clinical developments involving MAOIs are outlined. PMID:21233984

  2. Techniques for Screening Translation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Sergiev, Petr V.

    2016-01-01

    The machinery of translation is one of the most common targets of antibiotics. The development and screening of new antibiotics usually proceeds by testing antimicrobial activity followed by laborious studies of the mechanism of action. High-throughput methods for new antibiotic screening based on antimicrobial activity have become routine; however, identification of molecular targets is usually a challenge. Therefore, it is highly beneficial to combine primary screening with the identification of the mechanism of action. In this review, we describe a collection of methods for screening translation inhibitors, with a special emphasis on methods which can be performed in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27348012

  3. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition.

  4. Carborane-based carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brynda, Jiří; Mader, Pavel; Šícha, Václav; Fábry, Milan; Poncová, Kristýna; Bakardiev, Mario; Grüner, Bohumír; Cígler, Petr; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2013-12-16

    CA inhibitors: Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Various carborane cages are shown to act as active-site-directed inhibitors, and substitution with a sulfamide group and other substituents leads to compounds with high selectivity towards the cancer-specific isozyme IX. Crystal structures of the carboranes in the active site provide information that can be applied to the structure-based design of specific inhibitors. PMID:24307504

  5. KH-30 Parafin Inhibitor Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rochelle, J.

    2001-09-30

    United Energy Corporation (UNRG) and the U.S. Department of Energy personnel tested KH-30 at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) outside Casper, Wyoming on two separate occasions. KH-30 is a non-toxic, non-hazardous product, which combines the functions of a solvent dispersant, crystal modifier and inhibitor into a single solution. The first test was held in March of 2001, wherein five wells were treated with a mixture of KH-30 and brine water, heated to 180 degrees F. No increase in production was attained in these tests. In June, 2001, three shallow, low pressure RMOTC wells with 30 years of production were treated with a mixture of 40% KH-30 and 60% diesel. Increases were seen in three wells. The wells then returned to their original rates.

  6. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  7. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monika; Perrotti, Alessio Pio; De Fabritiis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) during pregnancy has become recently a matter of continuous debate. The introduction of the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (TKIs) in clinical practice has dramatically changed the prognosis of CML patients; in fact, patients diagnosed in chronic phase can reasonably expect many years of excellent disease control and good quality of life, as well as a normal life expectancy, including the necessity to address issues relating to fertility and pregnancy. Physicians are frequently being asked for advice regarding the need for, and/or the appropriateness of, stopping treatment in order to conceive. In this report, we will review the data published in terms of fertility, conception, pregnancy, pregnancy outcome and illness control for TKI treated CML patients, as well as how to manage a planned and/or unplanned pregnancy. PMID:24804001

  8. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  9. Enzyme-Inhibitor Association Thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Resat, Haluk; Marrone, Tami J.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Studying the thermodynamics of biochemical association reactions at the microscopic level requires efficient sampling of the configurations of the reactants and solvent as a function of the reaction pathways. In most cases, the associating ligand and receptor have complementary interlocking shapes. Upon association, loosely connected or disconnected solvent cavities at and around the binding site are formed. Disconnected solvent regions lead to severe statistical sampling problems when simulations are performed with explicit solvent. It was recently proposed that, when such limitations are encountered, they might be overcome by the use of the grand canonical ensemble. Here we investigate one such case and report the association free energy profile (potential of mean force) between trypsin and benzamidine along a chosen reaction coordinate as calculated using the grand canonical Monte Carlo method. The free energy profile is also calculated for a continuum solvent model using the Poisson equation, and the results are compared to the explicit water simulations. The comparison shows that the continuum solvent approach is surprisingly successful in reproducing the explicit solvent simulation results. The Monte Carlo results are analyzed in detail with respect to solvation structure. In the binding site channel there are waters bridging the carbonyl oxygen groups of Asp189 with the NH2 groups of benzamidine, which are displaced upon inhibitor binding. A similar solvent-bridging configuration has been seen in the crystal structure of trypsin complexed with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. The predicted locations of other internal waters are in very good agreement with the positions found in the crystal structures, which supports the accuracy of the simulations. ImagesFIGURE 5 PMID:9017183

  10. Pyridopyrimidine analogues as novel adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G Z; Lee, C; Pratt, J K; Perner, R J; Jiang, M Q; Gomtsyan, A; Matulenko, M A; Mao, Y; Koenig, J R; Kim, K H; Muchmore, S; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K; Alexander, K M; McGaraughty, S; Chu, K L; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Jarvis, M F; Marsh, K; Kowaluk, E A; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O

    2001-08-20

    A novel series of pyridopyrimidine analogues 9 was identified as potent adenosine kinase inhibitors based on the SAR and computational studies. Substitution of the C7 position of the pyridopyrimidino core with C2' substituted pyridino moiety increased the in vivo potency and enhanced oral bioavailability of these adenosine kinase inhibitors.

  11. Rust inhibitor and oil composition containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Bialy, J.J.; Cullen, W.P.; Dorn, P.; Nebzydoski, J.W.; Sung, R.L.

    1981-04-21

    A rust inhibitor comprising the reaction product of a hydrocarbylsuccinic anhydride in which the hydrocarbyl radical has from about 6 to 30 carbon atoms and an aminotriazole is provided. The rust inhibitor is effective in motor fuel and lubricating oil compositions.

  12. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  13. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  14. Computer simulation of inhibitor application -- A review

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, G.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1997-12-01

    The rapid development of powerful software as well as hardware in computer technology has changed the traditional approach to all areas of science and technology. In the field of corrosion inhibitors, computers are used to model, simulate, analyze and monitor inhibitor applications in both laboratory and industrial environments. This paper will present an up-to-date critical review of such simulation studies.

  15. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  16. Aminofurazans as potent inhibitors of AKT kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, Meagan B.; Seefeld, Mark A.; Leber, Jack D.; McNulty, Kenneth C.; Sun, Lihui; Miller, William H.; Zhang, ShuYun; Minthorn, Elisabeth A.; Concha, Nestor O.; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Schaber, Michael D.; Heerding, Dirk A.

    2009-06-24

    AKT inhibitors containing an imidazopyridine aminofurazan scaffold have been optimized. We have previously disclosed identification of the AKT inhibitor GSK690693, which has been evaluated in clinical trials in cancer patients. Herein we describe recent efforts focusing on investigating a distinct region of this scaffold that have afforded compounds (30 and 32) with comparable activity profiles to that of GSK690693.

  17. Trypsin inhibitors of buffalo seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, N; Ramesh, V

    1992-03-01

    Two trypsin inhibitors from acid-treated buffalo seminal plasma were purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography. These acid-stable trypsin inhibitors having charge heterogeneity were homogeneous with respect to size as revealed by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE. Gel filtration data suggest molecular weight value of 9,900 Da for inhibitor I and 10,900 Da for inhibitor II. Molecular weight estimated by SDS-PAGE was found to be 10,600 Da and 11,200 Da for inhibitors I and II, respectively. The hydrodynamic properties such as Stokes radii (1.58 nm and 1.62 nm); intrinsic viscosity (2.5725 ml/g and 2.5025 ml/g) and diffusion coefficient (13.499 x 10(-11) m2/sec. and 13.166X10(-11) m2/sec) respectively for inhibitor I and II were determined by analytical gel filtration. These inhibitors were fairly thermostable and could not be stained by PAS reagent. Both the inhibitors were found to inhibit buffalo acrosin but not bovine chymotrypsin.

  18. MAO inhibitors: risks, benefits, and lore.

    PubMed

    Wimbiscus, Molly; Kostenko, Olga; Malone, Donald

    2010-12-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were the first antidepressants introduced, but their use has dwindled because of their reported side effects, their food and drug interactions, and the introduction of other classes of agents. However, interest in MAO inhibitors is reviving. Here, we discuss their use, risks, and benefits in clinical medicine.

  19. Exploring the scaffold universe of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The scaffold concept was applied to systematically determine, analyze, and compare core structures of kinase inhibitors. From publicly available inhibitors of the human kinome, scaffolds and cyclic skeletons were systematically extracted and organized taking activity data, structural relationships, and retrosynthetic criteria into account. Scaffold coverage varied greatly across the kinome, and many scaffolds representing compounds with different activity profiles were identified. The majority of kinase inhibitor scaffolds were involved in well-defined yet distinct structural relationships, which had different consequences on compound activity. Scaffolds exclusively representing highly potent compounds were identified as well as structurally analogous scaffolds with very different degrees of promiscuity. Scaffold relationships presented herein suggest a variety of hypotheses for inhibitor design. Our detailed organization of the kinase inhibitor scaffold universe with respect to different activity and structural criteria, all scaffolds, and the original compound data assembled for our analysis are made freely available.

  20. Paradoxical effects of a synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor that blocks both p55 and p75 TNF receptor shedding and TNF alpha processing in RA synovial membrane cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L M; Gibbons, D L; Gearing, A; Maini, R N; Feldmann, M; Brennan, F M

    1996-01-01

    We have previously hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF alpha has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It mediates its effects by cross-linking surface p55 TNF receptors (TNF-R), which can be proteolytically cleaved to yield soluble fragments. Upon binding TNF alpha soluble TNF-R (sTNF-R) can inhibit its function. We investigated the enzymatic nature of the proteases involved in TNF-R cleavage, and found that this process is blocked by a synthetic inhibitor of matrix metallo-proteinase activity (MMP), BB-2275. Inhibition of TNF-R cleavage was observed in a number of different cell types, as detected by retention of surface bound TNF receptor and by less sTNF-R released into the cell supernatant. The augmentation of surface TNF-R expression was of biological relevance as TNF alpha-mediated necrosis of human KYM.1D4 rhabdosarcoma cells was enhanced approximately 15-fold in the presence of BB-2275. The addition of BB-2275 to rheumatoid synovial membrane cell cultures totally inhibited MMP activity and also significantly reduced the levels of soluble TNF alpha (P < 0.006), p55 sTNF-R (P < 0.006), and p75 sTNF-R (P < 0.004). Paradoxically, despite the reduction in soluble TNF alpha levels, the production of IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8, cytokines whose production was previously demonstrated to be inhibited by the addition of neutralizing anti-TNF alpha antibody were not down-regulated by BB-2275. These results raise the interesting possibility that a close relationship exits between the enzyme(s) which process membrane-bound TNF alpha, and those involved in surface TNF-R cleavage. Furthermore our observations suggest that hydroxamate inhibitors of MMP activity which block TNF alpha secretion and TNF-R cleavage may not modulate down-stream effects of TNA alpha, and as such suggest that the precise specificity of these compounds will be highly relevant to their clinical efficacy in inflammatory diseases. PMID:8675695

  1. A Spider-Derived Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor That Acts as a Plasmin Inhibitor and an Elastase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hu; Lee, Kwang Sik; Kim, Bo Yeon; Zou, Feng Ming; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Je, Yeon Ho; Li, Jianhong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2013-01-01

    Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitors are involved in various physiological processes, such as ion channel blocking, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. While spider-derived Kunitz-type proteins show activity in trypsin or chymotrypsin inhibition and K+ channel blocking, no additional role for these proteins has been elucidated. In this study, we identified the first spider (Araneus ventricosus) Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (AvKTI) that acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor. AvKTI possesses a Kunitz domain consisting of a 57-amino-acid mature peptide that displays features consistent with Kunitz-type inhibitors, including six conserved cysteine residues and a P1 lysine residue. Recombinant AvKTI, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, showed a dual inhibitory activity against trypsin (Ki 7.34 nM) and chymotrypsin (Ki 37.75 nM), defining a role for AvKTI as a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. Additionally, AvKTI showed no detectable inhibitory effects on factor Xa, thrombin, or tissue plasminogen activator; however, AvKTI inhibited plasmin (Ki 4.89 nM) and neutrophil elastase (Ki 169.07 nM), indicating that it acts as an antifibrinolytic factor and an antielastolytic factor. These findings constitute molecular evidence that AvKTI acts as a plasmin inhibitor and an elastase inhibitor and also provide a novel view of the functions of a spider-derived Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor. PMID:23308198

  2. Identification of an epigenetic signature of early mouse liver regeneration that is disrupted by Zn-HDAC inhibition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Schriefer, Andrew E; Yang, Wei; Cliften, Paul F; Rudnick, David A

    2014-11-01

    Liver regeneration has been well studied with hope of discovering strategies to improve liver disease outcomes. Nevertheless, the signals that initiate such regeneration remain incompletely defined, and translation of mechanism-based pro-regenerative interventions into new treatments for hepatic diseases has not yet been achieved. We previously reported the isoform-specific regulation and essential function of zinc-dependent histone deacetylases (Zn-HDACs) during mouse liver regeneration. Those data suggest that epigenetically regulated anti-proliferative genes are deacetylated and transcriptionally suppressed by Zn-HDAC activity or that pro-regenerative factors are acetylated and induced by such activity in response to partial hepatectomy (PH). To investigate these possibilities, we conducted genome-wide interrogation of the liver histone acetylome during early PH-induced liver regeneration in mice using acetyL-histone chromatin immunoprecipitation and next generation DNA sequencing. We also compared the findings of that study to those seen during the impaired regenerative response that occurs with Zn-HDAC inhibition. The results reveal an epigenetic signature of early liver regeneration that includes both hyperacetylation of pro-regenerative factors and deacetylation of anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic genes. Our data also show that administration of an anti-regenerative regimen of the Zn-HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) not only disrupts gene-specific pro-regenerative changes in liver histone deacetylation but also reverses PH-induced effects on histone hyperacetylation. Taken together, these studies offer new insight into and suggest novel hypotheses about the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate liver regeneration.

  3. Association between histone deacetylases and the loss of cochlear hair cells: Role of the former in noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Ting; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ye; Chen, Fu-Quan

    2015-08-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most frequent disabilities in industrialized countries. It has been demonstrated that hair cell loss in the auditory end organ may account for the majority of ear pathological conditions. Previous studies have indicated that histone deacetylases (HDACs) play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases, including hearing impairment, in older persons. Thus, we hypothesized that the inhibition of HDACs would prevent hair cell loss and, consequently, NIHL. In the present study, a CBA/J mouse model of NIHL was established. Following an injection with the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the expression levels of HDAC1, HDAC4 and acetyl-histone H3 (Lys9) (H3-AcK9) were measured. The number of hair cells was quantified and their morphology was observed. The results revealed that 1 h following exposure to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, there was a significant increase in HDAC1 and HDAC4 expression, and a marked decrease in the H3-AcK9 protein levels, as shown by western blot analysis. Pre-treatment with SAHA significantly inhibited these effects. Two weeks following exposure to noise, the mice exhibited significant hearing impairment and an obvious loss in the number of outer hair cells. An abnormal cell morphology with cilia damage was also observed. Pre-treatment with SAHA markedly attenuated these noise-induced effects. Taken together, the findings of our study suggest that HDAC expression is associated with outer hair cell function and plays a significant role in NIHL. Our data indicate that SAHA may be a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of NIHL.

  4. Functional redundancy of the Notch pathway in ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda; Félix, Ana; Serpa, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, despite advances in treatment. The most common histological type, high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC) is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, and although these types of tumors frequently respond to surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, they usually recur. Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is an unusual histological type, which is known to be intrinsically chemoresistant and is associated with poor prognosis in advanced stages. In recent years, genetic alterations and epigenetic modulation of signaling pathways have been reported in OSC and OCCC, including the overexpression of Notch pathway elements and histone deacetylases. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), alter the transcription of genes involved in cell growth, survival and apoptosis, and have become an attractive therapeutic approach. However, no previous work has addressed the effect of HDACis, and in particular vorinostat, on Notch signaling in ovarian cancer. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the modulation of the Notch pathway by vorinostat in ovarian cancer. Using immunofluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the present results revealed that vorinostat activated the Notch pathway in OCCC and OSC cell lines, through different Notch ligands. In OCCC, the activation of the Notch pathway appeared to occur through Delta-like (Dll) ligands 1, 2 and 3, whereas in OSC Dll1 and Jagged 1 and 2 ligands were involved. The activation of the Notch pathway by vorinostat, in OCCC and OSC cell lines, culminated in the increased expression of the same downstream transcription factors, hairy enhancer of split (Hes) 1 and 5, and Hes-related proteins 1 and 2. In conclusion, vorinostat modulates the expression of several downstream targets of the Notch pathway and independent Notch receptors and ligands that are expressed in OSC and OCCC. This

  5. SAHA-induced loss of tumor suppressor Pten gene promotes thyroid carcinogenesis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuguang; Kim, Dong Wook; Zhao, Li; Willingham, Mark C; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2016-07-01

    Thyroid cancer is on the rise. Novel approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with recurrent and advanced metastatic thyroid cancers. FDA approval of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, for the treatment of hematological malignancies led to the clinical trials of vorinostat for advanced thyroid cancer. However, patients were resistant to vorinostat treatment. To understand the molecular basis of resistance, we tested the efficacy of SAHA in two mouse models of metastatic follicular thyroid cancer: Thrb(PV/PV) and Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. In both, thyroid cancer is driven by overactivation of PI3K-AKT signaling. However, the latter exhibit more aggressive cancer progression due to haplodeficiency of the tumor suppressor, the Pten gene. SAHA had no effects on thyroid cancer progression in Thrb(PV/PV) mice, indicative of resistance to SAHA. Unexpectedly, thyroid cancer progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice with accelerated occurrence of vascular invasion, anaplastic foci, and lung metastasis. Molecular analyses showed further activated PI3K-AKT in thyroid tumors of SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice, resulting in the activated effectors, p-Rb, CDK6, p21(Cip1), p-cSrc, ezrin, and matrix metalloproteinases, to increase proliferation and invasion of tumor cells. Single-molecule DNA analysis indicated that the wild-type allele of the Pten gene was progressively lost, whereas carcinogenesis progressed in SAHA-treated Thrb(PV/PV)Pten(+/-) mice. Thus, this study has uncovered a novel mechanism by which SAHA-induced loss of the tumor suppressor Pten gene to promote thyroid cancer progression. Effectors downstream of the Pten loss-induced signaling may be potential targets to overcome resistance of thyroid cancer to SAHA.

  6. The synergistic effect of SAHA and parthenolide in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Carlisi, Daniela; Lauricella, Marianna; D'Anneo, Antonella; Buttitta, Giuseppina; Emanuele, Sonia; di Fiore, Riccardo; Martinez, Roberta; Rolfo, Christian; Vento, Renza; Tesoriere, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    The sesquiterpene lactone Parthenolide (PN) exerted a cytotoxic effect on MDA-MB231 cells, a triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line, but its effectiveness was scarce when employed at low doses. This represents an obstacle for a therapeutic utilization of PN. In order to overcome this difficulty we associated to PN the suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), an histone deacetylase inhibitor. Our results show that SAHA synergistically sensitized MDA-MB231 cells to the cytotoxic effect of PN. It is noteworthy that treatment with PN alone stimulated the survival pathway Akt/mTOR and the consequent nuclear translocation of Nrf2, while treatment with SAHA alone induced autophagic activity. However, when the cells were treated with SAHA/PN combination, SAHA suppressed PN effect on Akt/mTOR/Nrf2 pathway, while PN reduced the prosurvival autophagic activity of SAHA. In addition SAHA/PN combination induced GSH depletion, fall in Δψm, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase 3 and apoptosis. Finally we demonstrated that combined treatment maintained both hyperacetylation of histones H3 and H4 induced by SAHA and down-regulation of DNMT1 expression induced by PN. Inhibition of the DNA-binding activity of NF-kB, which is determined by PN, was also observed after combined treatment. In conclusion, combination of PN to SAHA inhibits the cytoprotective responses induced by the single compounds, but does not alter the mechanisms leading to the cytotoxic effects. Taken together our results suggest that this combination could be a candidate for TNBC therapy.

  7. Increasing progranulin levels and blockade of the ERK1/2 pathway: upstream and downstream strategies for the treatment of progranulin deficient frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Alquezar, Carolina; Esteras, Noemí; de la Encarnación, Ana; Moreno, Fermín; López de Munain, Adolfo; Martín-Requero, Ángeles

    2015-03-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a neurodegenerative disorder marked by mild-life onset and progressive changes in behavior, social cognition, and language. Loss-of-function progranulin gene (GRN) mutations are the major cause of FTLD with TDP-43 protein inclusions (FTLD-TDP). Disease-modifying treatments for FTLD-TDP are not available yet. Mounting evidence indicates that cell cycle dysfunction may play a pathogenic role in neurodegenerative disorders including FTLD. Since cell cycle re-entry of posmitotic neurons seems to precede neuronal death, it was hypothesized that strategies aimed at preventing cell cycle progression would have neuroprotective effects. Recent research in our laboratory revealed cell cycle alterations in lymphoblasts from FTLD-TDP patients carrying a null GRN mutation, and in PGRN deficient SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, involving overactivation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. In this work, we have investigated the effects of PGRN enhancers drugs and ERK1/2 inhibitors, in these cellular models of PGRN-deficient FTLD. We report here that both restoring the PGRN content, by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) or chloroquine (CQ), as blocking ERK1/2 activation by selumetinib (AZD6244) or MEK162 (ARRY-162), normalized the CDK6/pRb pathway and the proliferative activity of PGRN deficient cells. Moreover, we found that SAHA and selumetinib prevented the cytosolic TDP-43 accumulation in PGRN-deficient lymphoblasts. Considering that these drugs are able to cross the blood-brain barrier, and assuming that the alterations in cell cycle and signaling observed in lymphoblasts from FTLD patients could be peripheral signs of the disease, our results suggest that these treatments may serve as novel therapeutic drugs for FTLD associated to GRN mutations.

  8. Vorinostat with sustained exposure and high solubility in poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(DL-lactic acid) micelle nanocarriers: characterization and effects on pharmacokinetics in rat serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Elham A; Zhao, Yunqi; Meshali, Mahasen M; Remsberg, Connie M; Borg, Thanaa M; Foda, Abdel Monem M; Takemoto, Jody K; Sayre, Casey L; Martinez, Stephanie E; Davies, Neal M; Forrest, M Laird

    2012-10-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, known as vorinostat, is a promising anticancer drug with a unique mode of action; however, it is plagued by low water solubility, low permeability, and suboptimal pharmacokinetics. In this study, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(DL-lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) micelles of vorinostat were developed. Vorinostat's pharmacokinetics in rats was investigated after intravenous (i.v.) (10 mg/kg) and oral (p.o.) (50 mg/kg) micellar administrations and compared with a conventional polyethylene glycol 400 solution and methylcellulose suspension. The micelles increased the aqueous solubility of vorinostat from 0.2 to 8.15 ± 0.60 and 10.24 ± 0.92 mg/mL at drug to nanocarrier ratios of 1:10 and 1:15, respectively. Micelles had nanoscopic mean diameters of 75.67 ± 7.57 and 87.33 ± 8.62 nm for 1:10 and 1:15 micelles, respectively, with drug loading capacities of 9.93 ± 0.21% and 6.91 ± 1.19%, and encapsulation efficiencies of 42.74 ± 1.67% and 73.29 ± 4.78%, respectively. The micelles provided sustained exposure and improved pharmacokinetics characterized by a significant increase in serum half-life, area under curve, and mean residence time. The micelles reduced vorinostat clearance particularly after i.v. dosing. Thus, PEG-b-PLA micelles significantly improved the p.o. and i.v. pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of vorinostat, which warrants further investigation.

  9. Studies Using an in Vitro Model Show Evidence of Involvement of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Endometrial Epithelial Cells in Human Embryo Implantation*

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Nishikawa-Uchida, Sayaka; Oda, Hideyuki; Miyazaki, Kaoru; Yamasaki, Akiko; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    Human embryo implantation is a critical multistep process consisting of embryo apposition/adhesion, followed by penetration and invasion. Through embryo penetration, the endometrial epithelial cell barrier is disrupted and remodeled by an unknown mechanism. We have previously developed an in vitro model for human embryo implantation employing the human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR and the human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line Ishikawa. Using this model we have shown that stimulation with ovarian steroid hormones (17β-estradiol and progesterone, E2P4) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances the attachment and adhesion of JAR spheroids to Ishikawa. In the present study we showed that the attachment and adhesion of JAR spheroids and treatment with E2P4 or SAHA individually induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Ishikawa cells. This was evident by up-regulation of N-cadherin and vimentin, a mesenchymal cell marker, and concomitant down-regulation of E-cadherin in Ishikawa cells. Stimulation with E2P4 or SAHA accelerated Ishikawa cell motility, increased JAR spheroid outgrowth, and enhanced the unique redistribution of N-cadherin, which was most prominent in proximity to the adhered spheroids. Moreover, an N-cadherin functional blocking antibody attenuated all events but not JAR spheroid adhesion. These results collectively provide evidence suggesting that E2P4- and implanting embryo-induced EMT of endometrial epithelial cells may play a pivotal role in the subsequent processes of human embryo implantation with functional control of N-cadherin. PMID:22174415

  10. SAHA enhances synaptic function and plasticity in vitro but has limited brain availability in vivo and does not impact cognition.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; La, Hank; Plise, Emile; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Ding, Xiao; Hanania, Taleen; Sabath, Emily V; Alexandrov, Vadim; Brunner, Dani; Leahy, Emer; Steiner, Pascal; Liu, Lichuan; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs) used for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) and under consideration for other indications. In vivo studies suggest reducing HDAC function can enhance synaptic function and memory, raising the possibility that SAHA treatment could have neurological benefits. We first examined the impacts of SAHA on synaptic function in vitro using rat organotypic hippocampal brain slices. Following several days of SAHA treatment, basal excitatory but not inhibitory synaptic function was enhanced. Presynaptic release probability and intrinsic neuronal excitability were unaffected suggesting SAHA treatment selectively enhanced postsynaptic excitatory function. In addition, long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synapses was augmented, while long-term depression (LTD) was impaired in SAHA treated slices. Despite the in vitro synaptic enhancements, in vivo SAHA treatment did not rescue memory deficits in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Along with the lack of behavioral impact, pharmacokinetic analysis indicated poor brain availability of SAHA. Broader assessment of in vivo SAHA treatment using high-content phenotypic characterization of C57Bl6 mice failed to demonstrate significant behavioral effects of up to 150 mg/kg SAHA following either acute or chronic injections. Potentially explaining the low brain exposure and lack of behavioral impacts, SAHA was found to be a substrate of the blood brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporters Pgp and Bcrp1. Thus while our in vitro data show that HDAC inhibition can enhance excitatory synaptic strength and potentiation, our in vivo data suggests limited brain availability may contribute to the lack of behavioral impact of SAHA following peripheral delivery. These results do not predict CNS effects of SAHA during clinical use and also emphasize the importance of analyzing brain drug levels when interpreting preclinical

  11. Functional redundancy of the Notch pathway in ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Fernanda; Félix, Ana; Serpa, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy, despite advances in treatment. The most common histological type, high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC) is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, and although these types of tumors frequently respond to surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, they usually recur. Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCCC) is an unusual histological type, which is known to be intrinsically chemoresistant and is associated with poor prognosis in advanced stages. In recent years, genetic alterations and epigenetic modulation of signaling pathways have been reported in OSC and OCCC, including the overexpression of Notch pathway elements and histone deacetylases. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), including vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), alter the transcription of genes involved in cell growth, survival and apoptosis, and have become an attractive therapeutic approach. However, no previous work has addressed the effect of HDACis, and in particular vorinostat, on Notch signaling in ovarian cancer. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the modulation of the Notch pathway by vorinostat in ovarian cancer. Using immunofluorescence and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the present results revealed that vorinostat activated the Notch pathway in OCCC and OSC cell lines, through different Notch ligands. In OCCC, the activation of the Notch pathway appeared to occur through Delta-like (Dll) ligands 1, 2 and 3, whereas in OSC Dll1 and Jagged 1 and 2 ligands were involved. The activation of the Notch pathway by vorinostat, in OCCC and OSC cell lines, culminated in the increased expression of the same downstream transcription factors, hairy enhancer of split (Hes) 1 and 5, and Hes-related proteins 1 and 2. In conclusion, vorinostat modulates the expression of several downstream targets of the Notch pathway and independent Notch receptors and ligands that are expressed in OSC and OCCC. This

  12. Sequential treatment of CD34+ cells from patients with primary myelofibrosis with chromatin-modifying agents eliminate JAK2V617F-positive NOD/SCID marrow repopulating cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wei; Tripodi, Joseph; Lu, Min; Xu, Mingjiang; Najfeld, Vesna; Li, Yan; Hoffman, Ronald

    2010-12-23

    Because primary myelofibrosis (PMF) originates at the level of the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), we examined the effects of various therapeutic agents on the in vitro and in vivo behavior of PMF CD34(+) cells. Treatment of PMF CD34(+) cells with chromatin-modifying agents (CMAs) but not hydroxyurea, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) inhibitors, or low doses of interferon-α led to the generation of greater numbers of CD34(+) chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR)4(+) cells, which were capable of migrating in response to chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)12 and resulted in a reduction in the proportion of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) that were JAK2V617F(+). Furthermore, sequential treatment of PMF CD34(+) cells but not normal CD34(+) cells with decitabine (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine [5azaD]), followed by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; 5azaD/SAHA), or trichostatin A (5azaD/TSA) resulted in a higher degree of apoptosis. Two to 6 months after the transplantation of CMAs treated JAK2V617F(+) PMF CD34(+) cells into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)/IL-2Rγ(null) mice, the percentage of JAK2V617F/JAK2(total) in human CD45(+) marrow cells was dramatically reduced. These findings suggest that both PMF HPCs, short-term and long-term SCID repopulating cells (SRCs), are JAK2V617F(+) and that JAK2V617F(+) HPCs and SRCs can be eliminated by sequential treatment with CMAs. Sequential treatment with CMAs, therefore, represents a possible effective means of treating PMF at the level of the malignant SRC.

  13. Designing Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates, and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems” once again demonstrated the importance of the tailored drug discovery that reduces the role of the trial and error approach to a minimum. The “rational drug design” term is rather comprehensive as it includes all contemporary methods of drug discovery where serendipity and screening are substituted by the information-guided search for new and existing compounds. Successful implementation of these innovative drug discovery approaches is inevitably preceded by learning the physics, chemistry, and physiology of functioning of biological structures under normal and pathological conditions. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the recent rational drug design approaches to discover inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Some of the examples include small-molecule and peptide-based post-exposure therapeutic agents as well as several polyvalent compounds. The review also directs the reader to the vast literature on the recognized advances and future possibilities in the field. Expert opinion Existing options to combat anthrax toxin lethality are limited. With the only anthrax toxin inhibiting therapy (PA-targeting with a monoclonal antibody, raxibacumab) approved to treat inhalational anthrax, in our view, the situation is still insecure. The FDA’s animal rule for drug approval, which clears compounds without validated efficacy studies on humans, creates a high level of uncertainty, especially when a well-characterized animal model does not exist. Besides, unlike PA, which is known to be unstable, LF remains active in cells and in animal tissues for days. Therefore, the effectiveness of the post-exposure treatment of the individuals

  14. High-affinity Cyclic Peptide Matriptase Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Quimbar, Pedro; Malik, Uru; Sommerhoff, Christian P.; Kaas, Quentin; Chan, Lai Y.; Huang, Yen-Hua; Grundhuber, Maresa; Dunse, Kerry; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine protease matriptase is a key activator of multiple signaling pathways associated with cell proliferation and modification of the extracellular matrix. Deregulated matriptase activity correlates with a number of diseases, including cancer and hence highly selective matriptase inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. The plant-derived cyclic peptide, sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1), is a promising drug scaffold with potent matriptase inhibitory activity. In the current study we have analyzed the structure-activity relationships of SFTI-1 and Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II (MCoTI-II), a structurally divergent trypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis that also contains a cyclic backbone. We show that MCoTI-II is a significantly more potent matriptase inhibitor than SFTI-1 and that all alanine mutants of both peptides, generated using positional scanning mutagenesis, have decreased trypsin affinity, whereas several mutations either maintain or result in enhanced matriptase inhibitory activity. These intriguing results were used to design one of the most potent matriptase inhibitors known to date with a 290 pm equilibrium dissociation constant, and provide the first indication on how to modulate affinity for matriptase over trypsin in cyclic peptides. This information might be useful for the design of more selective and therapeutically relevant inhibitors of matriptase. PMID:23548907

  15. Leflunomide, a Reversible Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél

    2016-01-01

    A screening study aimed at identifying inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), among clinically used drugs have indicated that the antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, is an inhibitor of both MAO isoforms. Leflunomide inhibits human MAO-A and MAO-B and exhibits IC50 values of 19.1 μM and 13.7 μM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values are 17.7 μM (MAO-A) and 10.1 μM (MAO-B). Dialyses of mixtures of the MAO enzymes and leflunomide show that inhibition of the MAOs by leflunomide is reversible. The principal metabolite of leflunomide, teriflunomide (A77 1726), in contrast is not an MAO inhibitor. This study concludes that, although leflunomide is only moderately potent as an MAO inhibitor, isoxazole derivatives may represent a general class of MAO inhibitors and this heterocycle may find application in MAO inhibitor design. In this respect, MAO inhibitors are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease, and are under investigation as therapy for certain types of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and age-related impairment of cardiac function. PMID:26299850

  16. SGLT2 Inhibitors May Predispose to Ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Jenny E.; Rother, Kristina I.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that increase urinary excretion of glucose, thereby improving glycemic control and promoting weight loss. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that these drugs increase the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. In May 2015, the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning that SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to ketoacidosis. Evidence Acquisition: Using PubMed and Google, we conducted Boolean searches including terms related to ketone bodies or ketoacidosis with terms for SGLT2 inhibitors or phlorizin. Priority was assigned to publications that shed light on molecular mechanisms whereby SGLT2 inhibitors could affect ketone body metabolism. Evidence Synthesis: SGLT2 inhibitors trigger multiple mechanisms that could predispose to diabetic ketoacidosis. When SGLT2 inhibitors are combined with insulin, it is often necessary to decrease the insulin dose to avoid hypoglycemia. The lower dose of insulin may be insufficient to suppress lipolysis and ketogenesis. Furthermore, SGLT2 is expressed in pancreatic α-cells, and SGLT2 inhibitors promote glucagon secretion. Finally, phlorizin, a nonselective inhibitor of SGLT family transporters decreases urinary excretion of ketone bodies. A decrease in the renal clearance of ketone bodies could also increase the plasma ketone body levels. Conclusions: Based on the physiology of SGLT2 and the pharmacology of SGLT2 inhibitors, there are several biologically plausible mechanisms whereby this class of drugs has the potential to increase the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis. Future research should be directed toward identifying which patients are at greatest risk for this side effect and also to optimizing pharmacotherapy to minimize the risk to patients. PMID:26086329

  17. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Marx, Pauline F

    2004-09-01

    The coagulation system is a potent mechanism that prevents blood loss after vascular injury. It consists of a number of linked enzymatic reactions resulting in thrombin generation. Thrombin converts soluble fibrinogen into a fibrin clot. The clot is subsequently removed by the fibrinolytic system upon wound healing. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), which is identical to the previously identified proteins procarboxypeptidase B, R, and U, forms a link between blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. TAFI circulates as an inactive proenzyme in the bloodstream, and becomes activated during blood clotting. The active form, TAFIa, inhibits fibrinolysis by cleaving off C-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin that stimulates the tissue-type plasminogen activator-mediated conversion of plasminogen to plasmin. Consequently, removal of these lysines leads to less plasmin formation and subsequently to protection of the fibrin clot from break down. Moreover, TAFI may also play a role in other processes such as, inflammation and tissue repair. In this review, recent developments in TAFI research are discussed. PMID:15379716

  18. HIV Protease Inhibitors and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Bremer, Andrew; Berglund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the current scientific literature and recent clinical trials on HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and their potential role in the pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic disorders. Recent findings HIV PI treatment may affect the normal stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose and fat storage. Further, chronic inflammation from HIV infection and PI treatment trigger cellular homeostatic stress responses with adverse effects on intermediary metabolism. The physiologic outcome is such that total adipocyte storage capacity is decreased, and the remaining adipocytes resist further fat storage. This process leads to a pathologic cycle of lipodystrophy and lipotoxicity, a pro-atherogenic lipid profile, and a clinical phenotype of increased central body fat distribution similar to the metabolic syndrome. Summary PIs are a key component of antiretroviral therapy and have dramatically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected individuals. However, they are also associated with abnormalities in glucose/lipid metabolism and body fat distribution. Further studies are needed to better define the pathogenesis of PI-associated metabolic and body fat changes and their potential treatment. PMID:20717021

  19. MMP Inhibitors: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Jillian M; Cao, Jian

    2015-01-01

      Development of inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been fraught with challenges. Early compounds largely failed due to poor selectivity and bioavailability. Dose-limiting side effects, off-target interactions, and improperly designed clinical trials significantly impeded clinical success. As information becomes available and technology evolves, tools to combat these obstacles have been developed. Improved methods for high throughput screening and drug design have led to identification of compounds exhibiting high potency, binding affinity, and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles. Current research into MMP inhibitors employs innovative approaches for drug delivery methods and allosteric inhibitors. Such innovation is key for development of clinically successful compounds.

  20. An updated review of tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Te-Sheng

    2009-06-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional, glycosylated, and copper-containing oxidase, which catalyzes the first two steps in mammalian melanogenesis and is responsible for enzymatic browning reactions in damaged fruits during post-harvest handling and processing. Neither hyperpigmentation in human skin nor enzymatic browning in fruits are desirable. These phenomena have encouraged researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods and cosmetics. This article surveys tyrosinase inhibitors newly discovered from natural and synthetic sources. The inhibitory strength is compared with that of a standard inhibitor, kojic acid, and their inhibitory mechanisms are discussed. PMID:19582213

  1. An Updated Review of Tyrosinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Te-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a multifunctional, glycosylated, and copper-containing oxidase, which catalyzes the first two steps in mammalian melanogenesis and is responsible for enzymatic browning reactions in damaged fruits during post-harvest handling and processing. Neither hyperpigmentation in human skin nor enzymatic browning in fruits are desirable. These phenomena have encouraged researchers to seek new potent tyrosinase inhibitors for use in foods and cosmetics. This article surveys tyrosinase inhibitors newly discovered from natural and synthetic sources. The inhibitory strength is compared with that of a standard inhibitor, kojic acid, and their inhibitory mechanisms are discussed. PMID:19582213

  2. H3K27 Demethylation at the Proviral Promoter Sensitizes Latent HIV to the Effects of Vorinostat in Ex Vivo Cultures of Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Manoj K.; McManamy, Mary E. M.; Burch, Brandon D.; Archin, Nancie M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histone methyltransferase inhibitors (HMTis) and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) are reported to synergistically induce the expression of latent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but studies have largely been performed with cell lines. As specific and potent HMTis directed at EZH1 (enhancer of zeste 2 Polycomb repressive complex 2 subunit 1)/EZH2 are now in human testing, we wished to rigorously test such an inhibitor in a primary resting T-cell model of HIV latency. We found that GSK343, a potent and selective EZH2/EZH1 inhibitor, reduced trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 (H3K27) of the HIV provirus in resting cells. Remarkably, this epigenetic change was not associated with increased proviral expression in latently infected resting cells. However, following the reduction in H3K27 at the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR), subsequent exposure to the HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid or vorinostat (VOR) resulted in increases in HIV gag RNA and HIV p24 antigen production that were up to 2.5-fold greater than those induced by VOR alone. Therefore, in primary resting CD4+ T cells, true mechanistic synergy in the reversal of HIV latency may be achieved by the combination of HMTis and HDACis. Although other cellular effects of EZH2 inhibition may contribute to the sensitization of the HIV LTR to subsequent exposure to VOR, and to increase viral antigen production, this synergistic effect is directly associated with H3K27 demethylation at nucleosome 1 (Nuc-1). Based upon our findings, the combination of HMTis and HDACis should be considered for testing in animal models or clinical trials. IMPORTANCE Demethylation of H3K27 mediated by the histone methyltransferase inhibitor GSK343 in primary resting T cells is slow, occurring over 96 h, but by itself does not result in a significant upregulation of cell-associated HIV RNA expression or viral antigen production. However, following H3K27 demethylation, latent viral expression within

  3. Musical Hallucinations Treated with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan F.; Lauw, René; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2015-01-01

    Musical hallucinations are relatively rare auditory percepts which, due to their intrusive nature and the accompanying fear of impending mental decline, tend to cause significant distress and impairment. Although their etiology and pathophysiology appear to be heterogeneous and no evidence-based treatment methods are available, case reports indicate that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may yield positive results in patients with comorbid hearing loss. We present two female patients (aged 76 and 78 years) both of whom suffered from hearing impairment and practically incessant musical hallucinations. Both patients were successfully treated with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine. Based on these two case descriptions and an overview of studies describing the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in similar patients, we discuss possible mechanisms and propose further research on the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for musical hallucinations experienced in concordance with hearing loss. PMID:25904872

  4. A tyrosinase inhibitor from Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Vasantha, K Y; Murugesh, C S; Sattur, A P

    2014-10-01

    Tyrosinase, in the presence of oxygen, is the main culprit in post harvest browning of food products, resulting in the drop in its commercial value. In an effort to seek natural tyrosinase inhibitors for food applications, a screening programme was undertaken. Of the 26 fungal cultures isolated from soil samples of Agumbe forest, India, one isolate S16, identified as Aspergillus niger, gave an inhibition of 84 % against the enzyme. The inhibitor was isolated by following an enzyme inhibition assay guided purification protocol. The structure of the inhibitor was elucidated and found to be kojic acid. The IC50 of the Competitive inhibitor was found to be 8.8 μg with a Ki of 0.085 mM.

  5. Inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase meet immunity.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-06-02

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system.

  6. Ocular Toxicity of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review common tyrosine kinase inhibitors, as well as their ocular side effects and management. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search was conducted using cINahl®, Pubmed, and cochrane databases for articles published since 2004 with the following search terms: ocular toxicities, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, ophthalmology, adverse events, eye, and vision. Data Synthesis Tyrosine kinase inhibitors can cause significant eye toxicity. Conclusions Given the prevalence of new tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapies and the complexity of possible pathogenesis of ocular pathology, oncology nurses can appreciate the occurrence of ocular toxicities and the role of nursing in the management of these problems. Implications for Nursing Knowledge of the risk factors and etiology of ocular toxicity of targeted cancer therapies can guide nursing assessment, enhance patient education, and improve care management. Including a review of eye symptoms and vision issues in nursing assessment can enhance early detection and treatment of ocular toxicity. PMID:26906134

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Urea Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Esteva-Font, Cristina; Cil, Onur; Anderson, Marc O.; Li, Fei; Li, Min; Lei, Tianluo; Ren, Huiwen; Yang, Baoxue

    2015-01-01

    Urea transporter (UT) proteins, which include isoforms of UT-A in kidney tubule epithelia and UT-B in vasa recta endothelia and erythrocytes, facilitate urinary concentrating function. Inhibitors of urea transporter function have potential clinical applications as sodium-sparing diuretics, or ‘urearetics,’ in edema from different etiologies, such as congestive heart failure and cirrhosis, as well as in syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). High-throughput screening of drug-like small molecules has identified UT-A and UT-B inhibitors with nanomolar potency. Inhibitors have been identified with different UT-A versus UT-B selectivity profiles and putative binding sites on UT proteins. Studies in rodent models support the utility of UT inhibitors in reducing urinary concentration, though testing in clinically relevant animal models of edema has not yet been done. PMID:25298345

  8. Small-molecule inhibitors of myosin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M; Tumbarello, David A; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2014-01-01

    Advances in screening and computational methods have enhanced recent efforts to discover/design small-molecule protein inhibitors. One attractive target for inhibition is the myosin family of motor proteins. Myosins function in a wide variety of cellular processes, from intracellular trafficking to cell motility, and are implicated in several human diseases (e.g., cancer, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, deafness and many neurological disorders). Potent and selective myosin inhibitors are, therefore, not only a tool for understanding myosin function, but are also a resource for developing treatments for diseases involving myosin dysfunction or overactivity. This review will provide a brief overview of the characteristics and scientific/therapeutic applications of the presently identified small-molecule myosin inhibitors before discussing the future of myosin inhibitor and activator design. PMID:23256812

  9. Polyaspartate scale inhibitors -- Biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylates

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.J.; Low, K.C.; Shannon, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    Polyaspartates are highly biodegradable alternatives to polyacrylate-based scale inhibitors. This article presents laboratory testing data on polyaspartate inhibitors of calcium and barium mineral scales. The optimum molecular weight (Mw) for polyaspartate inhibitors of calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, and barium sulfate mineral scales was determined to be between 1,000 Mw and 4,000 Mw. For inhibition of calcium carbonate and barium sulfate, polyaspartates in the range of 3,000 Mw to 4,000 Mw were most effective. For calcium sulfate inhibition, the optimum Mw lies in the 1,000 Mw to 2,000 Mw range. Biodegradability data (OECD 301B Ready Biodegradability) on polyaspartates of a variety of Mw is also presented, which demonstrates the high biodegradability of this class of mineral scale inhibitors.

  10. Drug design from the cryptic inhibitor envelope

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Qinglin; Najeeb, Javaria; Zhao, Jinshi; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Titecat, Marie; Sebbane, Florent; Lemaitre, Nadine; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Conformational dynamics plays an important role in enzyme catalysis, allosteric regulation of protein functions and assembly of macromolecular complexes. Despite these well-established roles, such information has yet to be exploited for drug design. Here we show by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that inhibitors of LpxC—an essential enzyme of the lipid A biosynthetic pathway in Gram-negative bacteria and a validated novel antibiotic target—access alternative, minor population states in solution in addition to the ligand conformation observed in crystal structures. These conformations collectively delineate an inhibitor envelope that is invisible to crystallography, but is dynamically accessible by small molecules in solution. Drug design exploiting such a hidden inhibitor envelope has led to the development of potent antibiotics with inhibition constants in the single-digit picomolar range. The principle of the cryptic inhibitor envelope approach may be broadly applicable to other lead optimization campaigns to yield improved therapeutics. PMID:26912110

  11. Inhibitors of Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Meet Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  12. Selective Phosphodiesterase 4B Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Tripuraneni, Naga Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) is a member of the phosphodiesterase family of proteins that plays a critical role in regulating intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by controlling its rate of degradation. It has been demonstrated that this isoform is involved in the orchestra of events which includes inflammation, schizophrenia, cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, contractility of the myocardium, and psoriatic arthritis. Phosphodiesterase 4B has constituted an interesting target for drug development. In recent years, a number of PDE4B inhibitors have been developed for their use as therapeutic agents. In this review, an up-to-date status of the inhibitors investigated for the inhibition of PDE4B has been given so that this rich source of structural information of presently known PDE4B inhibitors could be helpful in generating a selective and potent inhibitor of PDE4B. PMID:25853062

  13. Inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase meet immunity.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More recent use is for myasthenia gravis. Many of these inhibitors interact with the second known cholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Further, evidence shows that acetylcholine plays a role in suppression of cytokine release through a "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" which raises questions about the role of these inhibitors in the immune system. This review covers research and discussion of the role of the inhibitors in modulating the immune response using as examples the commonly available drugs, donepezil, galantamine, huperzine, neostigmine and pyridostigmine. Major attention is given to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, a well-described link between the central nervous system and terminal effector cells in the immune system. PMID:24893223

  14. Update on TNF Inhibitors in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data describe new potential indications for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors in dermatology, including pediatric psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa. New biosimilar TNF agents are in late stages of development and may be available in the United States in the near future. Biosimilar agents are similar but not identical to available TNF inhibitors, and approval requires extensive analytic, toxicity, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and clinical testing. Semin Cutan Med Surg 35(supp6):S104-S106. PMID:27537073

  15. Heterocyclics as corrosion inhibitors for acid media

    SciTech Connect

    Ajmal, M.; Khan, M.A.W.; Ahmad, S.; Quraishi, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    The available literature on the use of heterocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors in acid media has been reviewed. It has been noted that the workers in this field have either used sulfur or nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds for studying inhibition action. The authors have synthesized compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen both in the same ring and studied their inhibition action in acid media. These compounds were found to be better inhibitors than those containing either atoms alone.

  16. 2,4-Diaminopyrimidine MK2 inhibitors. Part I: Observation of an unexpected inhibitor binding mode

    SciTech Connect

    Argiriadi, Maria A.; Ericsson, Anna M.; Harris, Christopher M.; Banach, David L.; Borhani, David W.; Calderwood, David J.; Demers, Megan D.; DiMauro, Jennifer; Dixon, Richard W.; Hardman, Jennifer; Kwak, Silvia; Li, Biqin; Mankovich, John A.; Marcotte, Douglas; Mullen, Kelly D.; Ni, Baofu; Pietras, M.; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Sousa, Silvino; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Wang, L.; Xiang, T.; Talanian, R.V.

    2010-09-17

    MK2 is a Ser/Thr kinase of significant interest as an anti-inflammatory drug discovery target. Here we describe the development of in vitro tools for the identification and characterization of MK2 inhibitors, including validation of inhibitor interactions with the crystallography construct and determination of the unique binding mode of 2,4-diaminopyrimidine inhibitors in the MK2 active site.

  17. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Męczekalski, Błażej

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia), pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs). A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body's oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis. PMID:27095958

  18. CHK1 Inhibitors in Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Paul; Tang, Yong; Yacoub, Adly; Dai, Yun; Fisher, Paul B.; Grant, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Cellular sensing of DNA damage, along with concomitant cell cycle arrest, is mediated by a great many proteins and enzymes. One focus of pharmaceutical development has been the inhibition of DNA damage signaling, and checkpoint kinases (Chks) in particular, as a means to sensitize proliferating tumor cells to chemotherapies that damage DNA. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine, or UCN-01, is a clinically relevant and well-studied kinase activity inhibitor that exerts chemosensitizing effects by inhibition of Chk1, and a multitude of Chk1 inhibitors have entered development. Clinical development of UCN-01 has overcome many initial obstacles, but the drug has nevertheless failed to show a high level of clinical activity when combined with chemotherapeutic agents. One very likely reason for the lack of clinical efficacy of Chk1 inhibitors may be that the inhibition of Chk1 causes the compensatory activation of ATM and ERK1/2 pathways. Indeed, inhibition of many enzyme activities, not necessarily components of cell cycle regulation, may block Chk1 inhibitor–induced ERK1/2 activation and enhance the toxicity of Chk1 inhibitors. This review examines the rationally hypothesized actions of Chk1 inhibitors as cell cycle modulatory drugs as well as the impact of Chk1 inhibition upon other cell survival signaling pathways. An understanding of Chk1 inhibition in multiple signaling contexts will be essential to the therapeutic development of Chk1 inhibitors. PMID:21540473

  19. Novel inhibitors of advanced glycation endproducts.

    PubMed

    Rahbar, Samuel; Figarola, James L

    2003-11-01

    A number of natural or synthetic compounds as AGE inhibitors have been proposed, discovered or currently being advanced by others and us. We have identified two new classes of aromatic compounds; aryl- (and heterocyclic) ureido and aryl (and heterocyclic) carboxamido phenoxyisobutyric acids, and benzoic acid derivatives and related compounds, as potential inhibitors of glycation and AGE formation. Some of these novel compounds also showed "AGE-breaking" activities in vitro. Current evidence is that chelation of transition metals and/or trapping or indirect inhibition of formation of reactive carbonyl compounds are involved in the mechanisms of action of these novel AGE inhibitors and breakers. Here, we review the inhibitors of glycation and AGE-breakers published to date and present the results of our in vitro and in vivo investigations on a number of these novel AGE inhibitors. These AGE-inhibitors and AGE-breakers may find therapeutic use in the treatment of diseases that AGE formation and accumulation may be responsible for their pathogenesis such as diabetes, Alzheimer's, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. PMID:14568010

  20. Aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Słopień, Radosław; Męczekalski, Błażej

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory condition in which foci of endometrial tissue grow outside of the uterine cavity. Endometriosis was estimated to affect 176 million women of childbearing potential all over the world in 2010. The presence of extrauterine endometrial tissue is associated with pain and infertility. Typical symptoms of endometriosis include dysmenorrhoea, dyspareunia, heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia), pelvic pain that is not related to menstrual cycles, dysuria, and chronic fatigue. Medical treatments for endometriosis include combined oral contraceptive pills, danazol, gestrinone, medroxyprogesterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (aGnRHs). A new class of medications called aromatase inhibitors has been identified in recent years as potential therapeutic agents for endometriosis. This article provides general information about aromatase inhibitors, their use in gynaecology, and their adverse effects. In particular, the paper discusses the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of endometriosis in postmenopausal women. Unlike oral contraceptives, gestagens, aGnRHs, and danazol, which suppress ovarian oestrogen synthesis, aromatase inhibitors inhibit mainly extra-ovarian synthesis of oestrogens. Therefore, the use of aromatase inhibitors seems to be particularly relevant in older patients, as most of the body's oestrogen is produced outside the ovaries after menopause. The paper discusses also the use of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of pain associated with endometriosis and infertility caused by endometriosis. PMID:27095958

  1. Discovery of Novel Haloalkane Dehalogenase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Buryska, Tomas; Daniel, Lukas; Kunka, Antonin; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenases (HLDs) have recently been discovered in a number of bacteria, including symbionts and pathogens of both plants and humans. However, the biological roles of HLDs in these organisms are unclear. The development of efficient HLD inhibitors serving as molecular probes to explore their function would represent an important step toward a better understanding of these interesting enzymes. Here we report the identification of inhibitors for this enzyme family using two different approaches. The first builds on the structures of the enzymes' known substrates and led to the discovery of less potent nonspecific HLD inhibitors. The second approach involved the virtual screening of 150,000 potential inhibitors against the crystal structure of an HLD from the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The best inhibitor exhibited high specificity for the target structure, with an inhibition constant of 3 μM and a molecular architecture that clearly differs from those of all known HLD substrates. The new inhibitors will be used to study the natural functions of HLDs in bacteria, to probe their mechanisms, and to achieve their stabilization. PMID:26773086

  2. Discovering Anti-platelet Drug Combinations with an Integrated Model of Activator-Inhibitor Relationships, Activator-Activator Synergies and Inhibitor-Inhibitor Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Federica; Golla, Kalyan; Fitzpatrick, Darren J.; Casey, Fergal P.; Moran, Niamh; Shields, Denis C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying effective therapeutic drug combinations that modulate complex signaling pathways in platelets is central to the advancement of effective anti-thrombotic therapies. However, there is no systems model of the platelet that predicts responses to different inhibitor combinations. We developed an approach which goes beyond current inhibitor-inhibitor combination screening to efficiently consider other signaling aspects that may give insights into the behaviour of the platelet as a system. We investigated combinations of platelet inhibitors and activators. We evaluated three distinct strands of information, namely: activator-inhibitor combination screens (testing a panel of inhibitors against a panel of activators); inhibitor-inhibitor synergy screens; and activator-activator synergy screens. We demonstrated how these analyses may be efficiently performed, both experimentally and computationally, to identify particular combinations of most interest. Robust tests of activator-activator synergy and of inhibitor-inhibitor synergy required combinations to show significant excesses over the double doses of each component. Modeling identified multiple effects of an inhibitor of the P2Y12 ADP receptor, and complementarity between inhibitor-inhibitor synergy effects and activator-inhibitor combination effects. This approach accelerates the mapping of combination effects of compounds to develop combinations that may be therapeutically beneficial. We integrated the three information sources into a unified model that predicted the benefits of a triple drug combination targeting ADP, thromboxane and thrombin signaling. PMID:25875950

  3. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Inhibitors which appeared promising in previous tests and additional inhibitors including several proprietary products were evaluated. Evaluation of the inhibitors was based on corrosion protection afforded an aluminum-mild steel-copper-stainless steel assembly in a hot corrosive water. Of the inhibitors tested two were found to be effective and show promise for protecting multimetallic solar heating systems.

  4. Potent pyrrolidine- and piperidine-based BACE-1 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Iserloh, U.; Wu, Y.; Cumming, J.N.; Pan, J.; Wang, L.Y.; Stamford, A.W.; Kennedy, M.E.; Kuvelkar, R.; Chen, X.; Parker, E.M.; Strickland, C.; Voigt, J.

    2008-08-18

    Based on lead compound 1 identified from the patent literature, we developed novel patentable BACE-1 inhibitors by introducing a cyclic amine scaffold. Extensive SAR studies on both pyrrolidines and piperidines ultimately led to inhibitor 2f, one of the most potent inhibitors synthesized to date. The discovery and development of novel BACE-1 inhibitors incorporating a cyclic amine scaffold is described.

  5. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  7. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Hong, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang Soon; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  8. Three Decades of β-Lactamase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Sarah M.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Since the introduction of penicillin, β-lactam antibiotics have been the antimicrobial agents of choice. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these life-saving antibiotics is significantly threatened by bacterial β-lactamases. β-Lactamases are now responsible for resistance to penicillins, extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and carbapenems. In order to overcome β-lactamase-mediated resistance, β-lactamase inhibitors (clavulanate, sulbactam, and tazobactam) were introduced into clinical practice. These inhibitors greatly enhance the efficacy of their partner β-lactams (amoxicillin, ampicillin, piperacillin, and ticarcillin) in the treatment of serious Enterobacteriaceae and penicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. However, selective pressure from excess antibiotic use accelerated the emergence of resistance to β-lactam-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. Furthermore, the prevalence of clinically relevant β-lactamases from other classes that are resistant to inhibition is rapidly increasing. There is an urgent need for effective inhibitors that can restore the activity of β-lactams. Here, we review the catalytic mechanisms of each β-lactamase class. We then discuss approaches for circumventing β-lactamase-mediated resistance, including properties and characteristics of mechanism-based inactivators. We next highlight the mechanisms of action and salient clinical and microbiological features of β-lactamase inhibitors. We also emphasize their therapeutic applications. We close by focusing on novel compounds and the chemical features of these agents that may contribute to a “second generation” of inhibitors. The goal for the next 3 decades will be to design inhibitors that will be effective for more than a single class of β-lactamases. PMID:20065329

  9. Cardiovascular effects of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krum, Henry; Liew, Danny; Aw, Juan; Haas, Steven

    2004-03-01

    Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors represent a significant advance in the management of inflammatory disorders. They have similar efficacy to nonselective 'conventional' nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but a superior gastrointestinal safety profile. However, a significant caveat is the perceived potential of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to cause adverse cardiovascular effects, an issue first raised by the Vioxx Gastrointestinal Outcomes Research (VIGOR) study of rofecoxib (Vioxx, Merck & Co. Inc.). Mechanisms by which cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors may increase cardiovascular risk are selective inhibition of prostaglandin I2 over thromboxane A2 within the eicosanoid pathway, which promotes thrombosis, and inhibition of prostaglandins E2 and I2 within the kidney, which leads to sodium and water retention and blood pressure elevation. In spite of this, the cardiovascular findings from VIGOR are not firmly supported by observations from large cohort studies and other clinical trials of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, including the Celecoxib Long-term Arthritis Safety Study. The two main theories that explain the VIGOR findings are that the comparator used (naproxen; Naprosyn, Roche) is cardioprotective and that very high doses of rofecoxib were used, but at present neither is backed by firm evidence. Indeed, there is now early evidence that selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition with celecoxib may even protect against the progression of cardiovascular disease, on the basis that cyclooxygenase-2 mediates key processes in atherothrombosis. Currently, it is not clear what the net cardiovascular effects of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors are. The data are inconsistent and at best, speculative. It may be also that celecoxib and rofecoxib differ in their cardiovascular effects. Clarification of these issues is of vital importance given the vast number of patients presently taking both types of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. Therefore, what is clear in this situation is

  10. Versatile templates for the development of novel kinase inhibitors: Discovery of novel CDK inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Michael P.; Paruch, Kamil; Alvarez, Carmen; Doll, Ronald J.; Keertikar, Kerry; Duca, Jose; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Hruza, Alan; Madison, Vincent; Lees, Emma; Parry, David; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Sgambellone, Nicole; Shanahan, Frances; Wiswell, Derek; Guzi, Timothy J.

    2008-06-30

    A series of four bicyclic cores were prepared and evaluated as cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) inhibitors. From the in-vitro and cell-based analysis, the pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core (represented by 9) emerged as the superior core for further elaboration in the identification of novel CDK2 inhibitors.

  11. Polyphenol oxidase inhibitor(s) from German cockroach (Blattella germanica) extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An extract from German cockroach appears effective in inhibiting browning on apples and potatoes. Successful identification of inhibitor(s) of PPO from German cockroach would be useful to the fruit and vegetable segments of the food industry, due to the losses they incur from enzymatic browning. Ide...

  12. Epidemiological aspects of inhibitor development redefine the clinical importance of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, H M

    2014-05-01

    Inhibitor development is a serious complication of treatment with coagulation products. Presently, 25-30% of all newly diagnosed patients with severe haemophilia A are diagnosed with inhibitors. An increasing number of genetic and non-genetic risk factors have been reported to be involved, although the impact of them in understanding the aetiology is still limited. Much attention has been focused on factor VIII products, but more recent studies show very little, if any, difference between class plasma and recombinant factor VIII products. More intensive treatment and higher dosing are probably more important factors. More than 10% of the inhibitors diagnosed in the last decade are of low titre. A first goal should be to understand their importance. It is argued that the impact of different risk factors should be studied in high-titre inhibitors to prevent dilution by non-significant low-titre inhibitors.

  13. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  14. Inhibitors in LPE growth of garnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roode, W. H.; Robertson, J. M.

    1983-09-01

    The growth rate of LPE growth garnets can be reduced considerably by the addition of small amounts of group II oxides. This effect can be helpful for the controlled growth of very thin garnet films for sub-micron bubbles and optical devices. The largest effect was found with the addition of Mg 2+ and Ca 2+, resulting in a maximum decrease of the growth rate of approximately 70%. A semi-empirical formula was used to describe the growth rate as a function of the dipping temperature. The change in the growth rate on the addition of the inhibitor ion at constant temperature was found to be proportional to ( aMO)/( aMO+2 Ln 2O 3), where M is a group II element, Ln 2O 2 is the sum of the yttrium and RE oxides in the melt, and a is the inhibitor factor. The value of the inhibitor factor depends on both the inhibitor ion as well as the composition of the garnet. The lowering of the growth rate on the addition of an inhibitor ion is explained by the introduction of an extra growth resistance due to the charge compensation mechanism of the divalent ions. The influence of the different charge compensation possibilities in the garnet system is examined and the relative importance of these possibilities for charge compensation is discussed.

  15. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allison B; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LFinhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and highthroughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  16. Inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Fesen, M R; Kohn, K W; Leteurtre, F; Pommier, Y

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to further extend the number of targets for development of antiretroviral agents, we have used an in vitro integrase assay to investigate a variety of chemicals, including topoisomerase inhibitors, antimalarial agents, DNA binders, naphthoquinones, the flavone quercetin, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester as potential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors. Our results show that although several topoisomerase inhibitors--including doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, ellipticines, and quercetin--are potent integrase inhibitors, other topoisomerase inhibitors--such as amsacrine, etoposide, teniposide, and camptothecin--are inactive. Other intercalators, such as chloroquine and the bifunctional intercalator ditercalinium, are also active. However, DNA binding does not correlate closely with integrase inhibition. The intercalator 9-aminoacridine and the polyamine DNA minor-groove binders spermine, spermidine, and distamycin have no effect, whereas the non-DNA binders primaquine, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibit the integrase. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester was the only compound that inhibited the integration step to a substantially greater degree than the initial cleavage step of the enzyme. A model of 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone interaction with the zinc finger region of the retroviral integrase protein is proposed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8460151

  17. Resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Powles, Stephen B

    2014-09-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) inhibitor herbicides currently comprise the largest site-of-action group (with 54 active ingredients across five chemical groups) and have been widely used in world agriculture since they were first introduced in 1982. Resistance evolution in weeds to AHAS inhibitors has been rapid and identified in populations of many weed species. Often, evolved resistance is associated with point mutations in the target AHAS gene; however non-target-site enhanced herbicide metabolism occurs as well. Many AHAS gene resistance mutations can occur and be rapidly enriched owing to a high initial resistance gene frequency, simple and dominant genetic inheritance and lack of major fitness cost of the resistance alleles. Major advances in the elucidation of the crystal structure of the AHAS (Arabidopsis thaliana) catalytic subunit in complex with various AHAS inhibitor herbicides have greatly improved current understanding of the detailed molecular interactions between AHAS, cofactors and herbicides. Compared with target-site resistance, non-target-site resistance to AHAS inhibitor herbicides is less studied and hence less understood. In a few well-studied cases, non-target-site resistance is due to enhanced rates of herbicide metabolism (metabolic resistance), mimicking that occurring in tolerant crop species and often involving cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. However, the specific herbicide-metabolising, resistance-endowing genes are yet to be identified in resistant weed species. The current state of mechanistic understanding of AHAS inhibitor herbicide resistance is reviewed, and outstanding research issues are outlined.

  18. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Cheol; Hwang, Indeok; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Nah, Jae-Woon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (peptides) are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides). Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides) that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins). Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides) with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:19582234

  19. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  20. SHH inhibitors for the treatment of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Samkari, Ayman; White, Jason; Packer, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. It is currently stratified into four molecular variants through the advances in transcriptional profiling. They include: wingless, sonic hedgehog (SHH), Group III, and Group IV. The SHH group is characterized by constitutive activation of the SHH signaling pathway, and genetically characterized by mutations in patched homolog 1 (PTCH1) or other downstream pathway mutations. SHH inhibitors have become of great clinical interest in treating SHH-driven medulloblastoma. Many inhibitors are currently in different stages of development, some already approved for other SHH-driven cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma. In vitro and in vivo medulloblastoma studies have shown efficacy and these findings have been translated into Phase I and II clinical trials. In this review, we present an overview of SHH medulloblastoma, as well as a discussion of currently available SHH inhibitors, and the challenges associated with their use. PMID:26027634

  1. LDL Cholesterol, Statins And PCSK 9 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20–30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through ‘Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)’. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  2. LDL cholesterol, statins and PCSK 9 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20-30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through 'Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)'. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  3. Calcification inhibitors in human ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Maruta, K; Ichimura, K; Matsui, H; Yamagami, T; Sano, A; Tsuji, H

    1993-01-01

    To examine the presence of substances which inhibit calcification in human ligamentum flavum, the inhibitory effect of an Na2HPO4 extract of the flavum was determined in terms of the in vitro calcium uptake of the ligamentum flavum matrix. Additionally, grafts of extracted and non-extracted dry ligamentum flavum matrices were transplanted into the dorsal muscles of rats, and calcification in the grafts was examined radiologically and histochemically. In order to determine if component cells of human ligamentum flavum produce calcification inhibitors, ligamentum flavum cells were cultured, and the crystal inhibitor activity of the culture medium was measured by a seed test which used hydroxyapatite as the nucleus of precipitation. The calcification reaction system demonstrated that the ligamentum flavum extract contains an inhibitory factor for calcium uptake by the ligamentum flavum matrix. The seed test revealed that human ligamentum flavum cells produce calcification inhibitor activity.

  4. Orally Bioavailable Potent Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Liu, Jun-Yan; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    A series of N,N′-disubstituted ureas having a conformationally restricted cis- or trans-1,4-cyclohexane α to the urea were prepared and tested as soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors. This series of compounds showed low nanomolar to picomolar activities against recombinant human sEH. Both isomers showed similar potencies, but the trans isomers were more metabolically stable in human hepatic microsomes. Furthermore, these new potent inhibitors show a greater metabolic stability in vivo than previously described sEH inhibitors. We demonstrated that trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy]benzoic acid 13g (t-AUCB, IC50 = 1.3 ± 0.05 nM) had excellent oral bioavailability (98%, n = 2) and blood area under the curve in dogs and was effective in vivo to treat hypotension in lipopolysaccharide challenged murine models. PMID:17616115

  5. Serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors: a pharmacological comparison.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2014-03-01

    The serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are a family of antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake of both serotonin and norepinephrine. While these drugs are traditionally considered a group of inter-related antidepressants based upon reuptake inhibition, they generally display different chemical structures as well as different pharmacological properties. In this article, we discuss these and other differences among the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, including the year of approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration, generic availability, approved clinical indications, half-lives, metabolism and excretion, presence or not of active metabolites, dosing schedules, proportionate effects on serotonin and norepinephrine, and the timing of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). Again, while serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are grouped as a family of antidepressants, they exhibit a surprising number of differences- differences that may ultimately relate to clinical nuances in patient care. PMID:24800132

  6. Novel hemagglutinin-based influenza virus inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xintian; Zhang, Xuanxuan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus has caused seasonal epidemics and worldwide pandemics, which caused tremendous loss of human lives and socioeconomics. Nowadays, only two classes of anti-influenza drugs, M2 ion channel inhibitors and neuraminidase inhibitors respectively, are used for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infection. Unfortunately, influenza virus strains resistant to one or all of those drugs emerge frequently. Hemagglutinin (HA), the glycoprotein in influenza virus envelope, plays a critical role in viral binding, fusion and entry processes. Therefore, HA is a promising target for developing anti-influenza drugs, which block the initial entry step of viral life cycle. Here we reviewed recent understanding of conformational changes of HA in protein folding and fusion processes, and the discovery of HA-based influenza entry inhibitors, which may provide more choices for preventing and controlling potential pandemics caused by multi-resistant influenza viruses. PMID:23977436

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: promise or peril?

    PubMed Central

    Mengle-Gaw, Laurel J; Schwartz, Benjamin D

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of two isoforms of the cyclooxygenase enzyme, COX-1 and COX-2, and the development of COX-2-specific inhibitors as anti-inflammatories and analgesics have offered great promise that the therapeutic benefits of NSAIDs could be optimized through inhibition of COX-2, while minimizing their adverse side effect profile associated with inhibition of COX-1. While COX-2 specific inhibitors have proven to be efficacious in a variety of inflammatory conditions, exposure of large numbers of patients to these drugs in postmarketing studies have uncovered potential safety concerns that raise questions about the benefit/risk ratio of COX-2-specific NSAIDs compared to conventional NSAIDs. This article reviews the efficacy and safety profiles of COX-2-specific inhibitors, comparing them with conventional NSDAIDs. PMID:12467519

  8. Transgenic inhibitors of RNA interference in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chou, Yu-ting; Tam, Bergin; Linay, Fabien; Lai, Eric C

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing functions as an adaptive antiviral defense in both plants and animals. In turn, viruses commonly encode suppressors of RNA silencing, which enable them to mount productive infection. These inhibitor proteins may be exploited as reagents with which to probe mechanisms and functions of RNA silencing pathways. In this report, we describe transgenic Drosophila strains that allow inducible expression of the viral RNA silencing inhibitors Flock House virus-B2, Nodamura virus-B2, vaccinia virus-E3L, influenza A virus-NS1 and tombusvirus P19. Some of these, especially the B2 proteins, are effective transgenic inhibitors of double strand RNA-induced gene silencing in flies. On the other hand, none of them is effective against the Drosophila microRNA pathway. Their functional selectivity makes these viral silencing proteins useful reagents with which to study biological functions of the Drosophila RNA interference pathway.

  9. DNA microarray profiling of genes differentially regulated by the histone deacetylase inhibitors vorinostat and LBH589 in colon cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the significant progress made in colon cancer chemotherapy, advanced disease remains largely incurable and novel efficacious chemotherapies are urgently needed. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) represent a novel class of agents which have demonstrated promising preclinical activity and are undergoing clinical evaluation in colon cancer. The goal of this study was to identify genes in colon cancer cells that are differentially regulated by two clinically advanced hydroxamic acid HDACi, vorinostat and LBH589 to provide rationale for novel drug combination partners and identify a core set of HDACi-regulated genes. Methods HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells were treated with LBH589 or vorinostat and growth inhibition, acetylation status and apoptosis were analyzed in response to treatment using MTS, Western blotting and flow cytometric analyses. In addition, gene expression was analyzed using the Illumina Human-6 V2 BeadChip array and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis. Results Treatment with either vorinostat or LBH589 rapidly induced histone acetylation, cell cycle arrest and inhibited the growth of both HCT116 and HT29 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of the microarray profiling revealed significant similarity in the genes altered in expression following treatment with the two HDACi tested within each cell line. However, analysis of genes that were altered in expression in the HCT116 and HT29 cells revealed cell-line-specific responses to HDACi treatment. In addition a core cassette of 11 genes modulated by both vorinostat and LBH589 were identified in both colon cancer cell lines analyzed. Conclusion This study identified HDACi-induced alterations in critical genes involved in nucleotide metabolism, angiogenesis, mitosis and cell survival which may represent potential intervention points for novel therapeutic combinations in colon cancer. This information will assist in the identification of novel pathways and targets that are modulated by HDACi

  10. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  11. Identification of potent, selective KDM5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gehling, Victor S; Bellon, Steven F; Harmange, Jean-Christophe; LeBlanc, Yves; Poy, Florence; Odate, Shobu; Buker, Shane; Lan, Fei; Arora, Shilpi; Williamson, Kaylyn E; Sandy, Peter; Cummings, Richard T; Bailey, Christopher M; Bergeron, Louise; Mao, Weifeng; Gustafson, Amy; Liu, Yichin; VanderPorten, Erica; Audia, James E; Trojer, Patrick; Albrecht, Brian K

    2016-09-01

    This communication describes the identification and optimization of a series of pan-KDM5 inhibitors derived from compound 1, a hit initially identified against KDM4C. Compound 1 was optimized to afford compound 20, a 10nM inhibitor of KDM5A. Compound 20 is highly selective for the KDM5 enzymes versus other histone lysine demethylases and demonstrates activity in a cellular assay measuring the increase in global histone 3 lysine 4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3). In addition compound 20 has good ADME properties, excellent mouse PK, and is a suitable starting point for further optimization. PMID:27476424

  12. Presence of aromatase inhibitors in cycads.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M T; Itzhak, Y; Puett, D

    1995-07-28

    Cycads, the most primitive of the living gymnosperms, have been used and continue to be used for food and medicinal purposes by many cultures, although toxins must be removed before ingestion. In our quest to identify tropical plants that contain inhibitors of the cytochrome P-450 aromatase and thus may be efficacious in treating estrogen-dependent tumors, we have screened extracts from 5 species of cycad folia encompassing 3 genera: Cycas cairnsiana F. Muell., Cycas revoluta Thunb., Cycas rumphii Miq., Dioon spinulosum Dyer and Encephalartos ferox Bertol. All extracts were found to contain inhibitors of the human enzyme.

  13. Inhibition of elastase by a synthetic cotton-bound serine protease inhibitor: in vitro kinetics and inhibitor release.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J V; Bopp, A F; Batiste, S; Ullah, A J; Cohen, I K; Diegelmann, R F; Montante, S J

    1999-01-01

    A cotton-bound serine protease inhibitor of elastase (fiber-inhibitor) has been formulated for in vitro evaluation in chronic wound fluid. As a model to understand the properties of the inhibitor in wound dressings, the kinetic profile and in vitro release of the fiber-inhibitor formulation have been examined. The elastase inhibitor N-Methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone was modified onto cotton cellulose fibers and assayed as a colloidal system. Amino acid analysis and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography were compared as semiquantitative methods to assess elastase inhibitor release from the cotton fibers. The kinetics of inhibition was assessed on treated fibers of synthetic dressings such that a colloidal suspension of the fiber-inhibitor and elastase was employed as an assay. A dose-response relationship was observed in the kinetics of substrate hydrolysis catalyzed by three elastases: porcine pancreatic elastase, which was employed to model this approach; human leukocyte elastase; and elastase in human chronic wound fluid. Both freely dissolved and fiber-bound inhibitors were studied. The initial rates of substrate hydrolysis were inversely linear with freely dissolved inhibitor dose. The apparent first order rate constants, kobs, for the elastase-inhibitor complex were calculated from the kinetic profiles. The kobs for inhibitor bound enzyme varied as a function of inhibitor vs. enzyme concentration and based on the order of mixing of substrate, inhibitor and enzyme in the assay. Enzyme inhibition by the fiber-inhibitor was measured as inhibitor concentration at 50% inhibition (I50). I50 values measured from the colloidal assay with fiber-released inhibitor were within the same range to those for freely dissolved inhibitor. Inhibition of elastase activity in chronic wound fluid was observed with 1-5 mg of fiber-inhibitor formulation. This approach constitutes an in vitro assessment of synthetic serine protease inhibitors on

  14. Cyclic amidine sugars as transition-state analogue inhibitors of glycosidases: potent competitive inhibitors of mannosidases.

    PubMed

    Heck, Marie-Pierre; Vincent, Stéphane P; Murray, Brion W; Bellamy, François; Wong, Chi-Huey; Mioskowski, Charles

    2004-02-25

    A series of monocyclic glycoamidines bearing different exocyclic amine, alcohol, or alkyl functionalities and bicyclic amidines derived from D-glucose and D-mannose were synthesized and tested as inhibitors of various glycosidases. All the prepared compounds demonstrated good to excellent inhibition toward glycosidases. In particular, the biscationic D-mannoamidine 9b bearing an exocyclic ethylamine moiety proved to be a selective competitive inhibitor of alpha- and beta-mannosidases (K(i) = 6 nM) making it the most potent inhibitor of these glycosidases reported to date. A favorable B(2,5) boat conformation might explain the selectivity of mannosidase inhibition compared to other glycosidases.

  15. Effect of Chirality of Small Molecule Organofluorine Inhibitors of Amyloid Self-Assembly on Inhibitor Potency

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Abha; Abid, Mohammed; Hailemichael, Samson; Foster, Michelle; Török, Béla

    2009-01-01

    The effect of enantiomeric trifluromethyl-indolyl-acetic acid ethyl esters on the fibrillogenesis of Alzheimer's amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is described. These compounds have been previously identified as effective inhibitors of the Aβ self-assembly in their racemic form. Thioflavin-T Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy were applied to assess the potency of the chiral target compounds. Both enantiomers showed significant inhibition in the in vitro assays. The potency of the enantiomeric inhibitors appeared to be very similar to each other suggesting the lack of the stereospecific binding interactions between these small molecule inhibitors and the Aβ peptide. PMID:19880318

  16. Polyphenolic Compounds as Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Tina; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and its associated diseases such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart diseases are a major challenge for our society. An important target for the treatment of obesity includes the development of inhibitors of nutrient digestion and absorption. Inhibition of pancreatic lipase and the associated reduction of lipid absorption is an attractive approach for the discovery of potent agents. Currently, the only clinically approved pharmacologic agent as pancreatic lipase inhibitor is Orlistat. However, its usage is compromised by unpleasant gastrointestinal adverse reactions (oily stools, oily spotting, flatulence). The use of botanical materials as a potential source of new drugs is of increasing importance and application. Natural products that are interesting for obesity treatment are generally considered to have less toxic and side effects than totally synthetic drugs. One of the most important sources of potential pancreatic lipase inhibitors represents the class of polyphenols. This article summarizes most studied subclasses of polyphenols including flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and lignans with pancreatic lipase inhibitory effects. A structural comparison of potent inhibitors shows an increased inhibitory effect depending on number and position of phenolic hydroxyl groups, degree of polymerization and elimination of glycosylation during digestion. PMID:26132857

  17. Small Molecule Inhibitor of AICAR Transformylase Homodimerization

    PubMed Central

    Spurr, Ian B.; Birts, Charles N.; Cuda, Francesco; Benkovic, Stephen J; Blaydes, Jeremy P.; Tavassoli, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (ATIC) is a bifunctional homodimeric enzyme that catalyses the last two steps of de novo purine biosynthesis. Homodimerization of ATIC, a protein-protein interaction with an interface of over 5000 Å2, is required for its aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase activity, with the active sites forming at the interface of the interacting proteins. Here, we report the development of a small-molecule inhibitor of AICAR transformylase that functions by preventing the homodimerization of ATIC. The compound is derived from a previously reported cyclic hexa-peptide inhibitor of AICAR transformylase (with a Ki of 17 μM), identified by high-throughput screening. The active motif of the cyclic peptide is identified as an arginine-tyrosine dipeptide, a capped analogue of which inhibits AICAR transformylase with a Ki of 84 μM. A library of non-natural analogues of this dipeptide was designed, synthesized, and assayed. The most potent compound inhibits AICAR transformylase with a Ki of 685 nM, a 25-fold improvement in activity from the parent cyclic peptide. The potential for this AICAR transformylase inhibitor in cancer therapy is assessed by studying its effect on the proliferation of a model breast cancer cell line. Using a non-radioactive proliferation assay and live cell imaging, a dose-dependent reduction in cell numbers and cell division rates was observed in cells treated with our ATIC dimerization inhibitor. PMID:22764122

  18. Alcalase rapeseed inhibitors: purification and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Vioque, J; Sánchez-Vioque, R; Clemente, A; Pedroche, J; Mar Yust, M; Millán, F

    2001-01-01

    Extensive rapeseed protein hydrolysate obtained sequentially with Alcalase and Flavourzyme showed inhibitory activity towards Alcalase. Inhibitory activity decreased as the hydrolytic process progressed probably by heat denaturation and/or partial protease degradation. Alcalase rapeseed inhibitors were purified by gel filtration and subsequent ion exchange chromatography. They are composed of peptides of 8.4 and 6.1 kDa linked by interchain disulphide bonds, as observed by reducing SDS-PAGE, with a native molecular weight of 18 kDa. Aminoacid composition of the inhibitors was characterized by the high proportion of methionine (4.2%) and cysteine (4.6%). Alcalase inhibitors were partially resistant to heat treatment; after heating at 70 degrees C for 45 minutes more than 50% of the original inhibitory activity remained in the purified protein but after heating at 90 degrees C for 5 minutes, inhibitory activity decreased very fast to a basal level. The possible relation of these protease inhibitors with the 2S albumin storage proteins is discussed.

  19. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  20. Therapeutic potential of peptide deformylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Yuan, Z

    2005-09-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is an attractive target for antibacterial drug discovery. Progress in the biological characterisation of the enzyme, coupled with newly obtained mechanistic and structural insight, enabled the pharmaceutical industry to discover potent PDF inhibitors that can be considered as clinical development candidates for this new class of antibacterial agents. The in vitro and in vivo data for several lead PDF inhibitors suggest that the current PDF inhibitors are most suitable for the treatment of respiratory tract infections and they are not cross-resistant to the current clinically used antibiotics. Two PDF inhibitors, BB-83698 and VIC-104959, have progressed to Phase I clinical trials by intravenous and oral administration, respectively. Both of these compounds show promising in vitro and in vivo efficacy and an excellent safety profile. The pharmacokinetics in humans for both of the compounds suggest the possibility of a twice-daily dosing regimen for clinical use. Thus far, all of the data suggest a promising future for this new class of antibacterial agents.

  1. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis.

  2. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  3. Resistant mechanisms to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Layos, Laura; Bugés, Cristina; de los Llanos Gil, María; Vila, Laia; Martínez-Balibrea, Eva; Martínez-Cardús, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced melanoma have traditionally had very poor prognosis. However, since 2011 better understanding of the biology and epidemiology of this disease has revolutionized its treatment, with newer therapies becoming available. These newer therapies can be classified into immunotherapy and targeted therapy. The immunotherapy arsenal includes inhibitors of CTLA4, PD-1 and PDL-1, while targeted therapy focuses on BRAF and MEK. BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib, dabrafenib) have shown benefit in terms of overall survival (OS) compared to chemotherapy, and their combination with MEK inhibitors has recently been shown to improve progression-free survival (PFS), compared with monotherapy with BRAF inhibitors. However, almost 20% of patients initially do not respond, due to intrinsic resistance to therapy and, of those who do, most eventually develop mechanisms of acquired resistance, including reactivation of the MAP kinase pathway, persistent activation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTKS) receptor, activation of phosphatidyinositol-3OH kinase, overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and interactions with the tumor microenvironment. Herein we comment in detail on mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy and discuss the strategies to overcome them. PMID:27429963

  4. FAAH inhibitors in the limelight, but regrettably

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Christophe; Dubray, Claude; Dualé, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. This short review focuses on the recent drug development of FAAH inhibitors, as recent serious adverse events have been reported in a phase I study with a compound of this class. The authors overview the potential interest in targeting FAAH inhibition, the current programs, and the available information on the recent dramatic events. PMID:27191771

  5. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26590309

  6. Novel Cytoprotective Inhibitors for Apoptotic Endonuclease G

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dae Song; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Wang, Xiaoying; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptotic endonuclease G (EndoG) is responsible for DNA fragmentation both during and after cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that genetic inactivation of EndoG is cytoprotective against various pro-apoptotic stimuli; however, specific inhibitors for EndoG are not available. In this study, we have developed a high-throughput screening assay for EndoG and have used it to screen a chemical library. The screening resulted in the identification of two potent EndoG inhibitors, PNR-3-80 and PNR-3-82, which are thiobarbiturate analogs. As determined by their IC50s, the inhibitors are more potent than ZnCl2 or EDTA. They inhibit EndoG at one or two orders of magnitude greater than another apoptotic endonuclease, DNase I, and do not inhibit the other five tested cell death-related enzymes: DNase II, RNase A, proteinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase 1. Exposure of natural EndoG-expressing 22Rv1 or EndoG-overexpressing PC3 cells rendered them significantly resistant to Cisplatin and Docetaxel, respectively. These novel EndoG inhibitors have the potential to be utilized for amelioration of cell injuries in which participation of EndoG is essential. PMID:25401220

  7. Tetra- versus Pentavalent Inhibitors of Cholera Toxin**

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ou; Pukin, Aliaksei V; van Ufford, H C Quarles; Branson, Thomas R; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Turnbull, W Bruce; Visser, Gerben M; Pieters, Roland J

    2015-01-01

    The five B-subunits (CTB5) of the Vibrio cholerae (cholera) toxin can bind to the intestinal cell surface so the entire AB5 toxin can enter the cell. Simultaneous binding can occur on more than one of the monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) units present on the cell surface. Such simultaneous binding arising from the toxins multivalency is believed to enhance its affinity. Thus, blocking the initial attachment of the toxin to the cell surface using inhibitors with GM1 subunits has the potential to stop the disease. Previously we showed that tetravalent GM1 molecules were sub-nanomolar inhibitors of CTB5. In this study, we synthesized a pentavalent version and compared the binding and potency of penta- and tetravalent cholera toxin inhibitors, based on the same scaffold, for the first time. The pentavalent geometry did not yield major benefits over the tetravalent species, but it was still a strong inhibitor, and no major steric clashes occurred when binding the toxin. Thus, systems which can adopt more geometries, such as those described here, can be equally potent, and this may possibly be due to their ability to form higher-order structures or simply due to more statistical options for binding. PMID:26478842

  8. Haemophilia pseudotumours in patients with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, H; Candela, M; Landro, M E; Douglas Price, A L; Neme, D; Galatro, G A

    2015-09-01

    Development of inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII) or FIX is the most serious complication of replacement therapy in patients with haemophilia. Haemophilic pseudotumours in a patient with inhibitors can lead to devastating consequences. The aim of this study is to show our experience in the treatment of 10 pseudotumours in 7 patients with inhibitors who were treated by the same multidisciplinary team in the period between January 2000 and March 2013. Seven severe haemophilia A patients were treated at the Haemophilia Foundation in Buenos Aires, Argentina, for 10 pseudotumours. Eight were bone pseudotumours and two soft tissue. All patients underwent imaging studies at baseline to assess the size and content of the lesion. The patients received Buenos Aires protocol as conservative treatment of their pseudotumours for 6 weeks, after which they were evaluated. Only one patient responded to conservative treatment. Surgery was performed on the others six patients, since their pseudotumours did not shrink to less than half their original size. Any bleeding in the musculoskeletal system must be treated promptly in order to prevent pseudotumours. When pseudotumours do appear in inhibitor patients, they can be surgically removed when patients received proper haemostatic coverage, improving the quality of life of these patients.

  9. Synthesis and Assays of Inhibitors of Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-C; Kapilashrami, K; Luo, M

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation requires site-specific modification of the genome and is involved in multiple physiological processes and disease etiology. Methyltransferases, which catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to various substrates, are critical components of the epigenetic machinery. This group of enzymes can methylate diverse substrates including DNA, RNA, proteins, and small-molecule metabolites. Their dysregulation has also been implicated in multiple disease states such as cancer, neurological, and cardiovascular disorders. Developing potent and selective small-molecule inhibitors of methyltransferases is valuable not only for therapeutic intervention but also for investigating the roles of these enzymes in disease progression. In this chapter, we will discuss the strategies of designing and synthesizing methyltransferases inhibitors based on the SAM scaffold. Following the section of inhibitor design, we will briefly review representative assays that are available to evaluate the potency of these inhibitors along with a detailed description of the most commonly used radiometric assay. PMID:27423865

  10. [Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bernardeau-Mozer, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2004-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2) is an inductible isoenzyme of cyclooxygenase undetectable in normal colonic mucosa and overexpressed in 80% colonic tumor. Several works in vitro and in vivo showed that Cox2 plays a key role in the multistep process of colorectal tumorigenesis such apoptosis inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis induction. So that Cox2 represent a potential molecular target in colorectal management and specific Cox2 inhibitors may be useful as chemopreventive as well as therapeutic agent in humans. In animals study Cox2 inhibitors was shown to be effective and in humans Cox2 inhibitors are approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an adjunct to endoscopic surveillance and surgery in patients with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP). The purpose of this article is to review the relationship between Cox2/Cox2 inhibitors and differents signaling pathways of colorectal carcinogenesis and to precise their possible molecular mechanisms of action. This work although review clinicals data of their efficacy as chemopreventive agent as well as therapeutic in the differents group at risk for colorectal cancer. PMID:15239336

  11. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications.

  12. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, β-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications. PMID:25260821

  13. DNA Methyltransferases Inhibitors from Natural Sources.

    PubMed

    Zwergel, Clemens; Valente, Sergio; Mai, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) catalyze the methylation at cytosine-C5 mainly in a CpG dinucleotide context. Although DNA methylation is essential for fundamental processes like embryonic development or differentiation, aberrant expression and/or activities of DNMTs are involved in several pathologies, from neurodegeneration to cancer. DNMTs inhibition can arrest tumor growth, cells invasiveness and induce differentiation, whereas their increased expression is shown in numerous cancer types. Moreover, hypermethylated promoters of tumor suppressor genes lead to their silencing. Hence, the use of specific inhibitors of DNMT might reactivate those genes and stop or even reverse the aberrant cell processes. To date, the only approved DNMTs inhibitors for therapy belong to the nucleoside-based family of drugs, but they display relevant side effects as well as high chemical instability. Thus, there is a keen interest actually exists to develop novel, potent and safe inhibitors possessing a nonnucleoside structure. Increasing literature evidence is highlighting that natural sources could help the researchers to achieve this goal. Indeed, several polyphenols, flavonoids, antraquinones, and others are described able to inhibit DNMTs activity and/or expression, thus decreasing the methylation/silencing of different genes involved in tumorigenesis. These events can lead to re-expression of such genes and to cell death in diverse cancer cell lines. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (1) and laccaic acid A (11) resulted the most effective DNMT1 inhibitors with submicromolar IC50 values, acting as competitive inhibitors. Compound 1 and 11 both displayed gene demethylation and re-activation in several cancers. However, all of the natural compounds described in this review showed important results, from gene reactivation to cell growth inhibition. Moreover, some of them displayed interesting activity even in rodent cancer models and very recently entered clinical trials. PMID:26303417

  14. Cost of care of haemophilia with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Di Minno, M N D; Di Minno, G; Di Capua, M; Cerbone, A M; Coppola, A

    2010-01-01

    In Western countries, the treatment of patients with inhibitors is presently the most challenging and serious issue in haemophilia management, direct costs of clotting factor concentrates accounting for >98% of the highest economic burden absorbed for the healthcare of patients in this setting. Being designed to address questions of resource allocation and effectiveness, decision models are the golden standard to reliably assess the overall economic implications of haemophilia with inhibitors in terms of mortality, bleeding-related morbidity, and severity of arthropathy. However, presently, most data analyses stem from retrospective short-term evaluations, that only allow for the analysis of direct health costs. In the setting of chronic diseases, the cost-utility analysis, that takes into account the beneficial effects of a given treatment/healthcare intervention in terms of health-related quality of life, is likely to be the most appropriate approach. To calculate net benefits, the quality adjusted life year, that significantly reflects such health gain, has to be compared with specific economic impacts. Differences in data sources, in medical practice and/or in healthcare systems and costs, imply that most current pharmacoeconomic analyses are confined to a narrow healthcare payer perspective. Long-term/lifetime prospective or observational studies, devoted to a careful definition of when to start a treatment; of regimens (dose and type of product) to employ, and of inhibitor population (children/adults, low-responding/high responding inhibitors) to study, are thus urgently needed to allow for newer insights, based on reliable data sources into resource allocation, effectiveness and cost-utility analysis in the treatment of haemophiliacs with inhibitors.

  15. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alternative substrate of the enzyme, providing a product that was tentatively suggested to be either a spiroepoxy cyclopropanone or a gamma-lactone. Thus, a single family of compounds exhibits an unusual variety of activities, being reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors and alternative substrates towards enzymes of the same family. PMID:23553793

  16. Therapeutic substitution post-patent expiry: the cases of ACE inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vandoros, Sotiris

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines whether there is a switch in total (originator and generic) consumption after generic entry from molecules that face generic competition towards other molecules of the same class, which are still in-patent. Data from six European countries for the time period 1991 to 2006 are used to study the cases of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors. Empirical evidence shows that patent expiry of captopril and enalapril led to a switch in total (off-patent originator and generic) consumption towards other in-patent angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, whereas patent expiry of omeprazole led to a switch in consumption towards other proton pump inhibitors. This phenomenon makes generic policies ineffective and results in an increase in pharmaceutical expenditure due to the absence of generic alternatives in the market of in-patent molecules.

  17. Neuroprotective Tri- and Tetracyclic BChE Inhibitors Releasing Reversible Inhibitors upon Carbamate Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tri- and tetracyclic nitrogen-bridgehead compounds were designed and synthesized to yield micromolar cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors. Structure–activity relationships identified potent compounds with butyrylcholinesterase selectivity. These compounds were selected as starting points for the design and synthesis of carbamate-based (pseudo)irreversible inhibitors. Compounds with superior inhibitory activity and selectivity were obtained and kinetically characterized also with regard to the velocity of enzyme carbamoylation. Structural elements were identified and introduced that additionally showed neuroprotective properties on a hippocampal neuronal cell line (HT-22) after glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. We have identified potent and selective pseudoirreversible butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors that release reversible inhibitors with neuroprotective properties after carbamate transfer to the active site of cholinesterases. PMID:24900407

  18. Dermatologic adverse events to chemotherapeutic agents, Part 2: BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jennifer Nam

    2014-03-01

    The advent of novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents and immunotherapies has dramatically changed the arena of cancer treatment in recent years. BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors, and ipilimumab are among the newer chemotherapy drugs that are being used at an increasing rate. Dermatologic adverse events to these medications are common, and it is important for dermatologists and oncologists alike to learn to recognize and treat such side effects in order to maintain both patients' quality of life and their anticancer treatment. This review describes the cutaneous side effects seen with BRAF inhibitors (eg, maculopapular eruption, photosensitivity, squamoproliferative growths, melanocytic proliferations), MEK inhibitors (eg, papulopustular eruption), and ipilimumab (eg, maculopapular eruption, vitiligo), with a mention of vismodegib and anti-PD-1 agents.

  19. Development of covalent inhibitors that can overcome resistance to first-generation FGFR kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Wang, Jun; Tanizaki, Junko; Huang, Zhifeng; Aref, Amir R.; Rusan, Maria; Zhu, Su-Jie; Zhang, Yiyun; Ercan, Dalia; Liao, Rachel G.; Capelletti, Marzia; Zhou, Wenjun; Hur, Wooyoung; Kim, NamDoo; Sim, Taebo; Gaudet, Suzanne; Barbie, David A.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Yun, Cai-Hong; Hammerman, Peter S.; Mohammadi, Moosa; Jänne, Pasi A.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2014-01-01

    The human FGF receptors (FGFRs) play critical roles in various human cancers, and several FGFR inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. Resistance usually results from selection for mutant kinases that are impervious to the action of the drug or from up-regulation of compensatory signaling pathways. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that resistance to FGFR inhibitors can be acquired through mutations in the FGFR gatekeeper residue, as clinically observed for FGFR4 in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroendocrine breast carcinomas. Here we report on the use of a structure-based drug design to develop two selective, next-generation covalent FGFR inhibitors, the FGFR irreversible inhibitors 2 (FIIN-2) and 3 (FIIN-3). To our knowledge, FIIN-2 and FIIN-3 are the first inhibitors that can potently inhibit the proliferation of cells dependent upon the gatekeeper mutants of FGFR1 or FGFR2, which confer resistance to first-generation clinical FGFR inhibitors such as NVP-BGJ398 and AZD4547. Because of the conformational flexibility of the reactive acrylamide substituent, FIIN-3 has the unprecedented ability to inhibit both the EGF receptor (EGFR) and FGFR covalently by targeting two distinct cysteine residues. We report the cocrystal structure of FGFR4 with FIIN-2, which unexpectedly exhibits a “DFG-out” covalent binding mode. The structural basis for dual FGFR and EGFR targeting by FIIN3 also is illustrated by crystal structures of FIIN-3 bound with FGFR4 V550L and EGFR L858R. These results have important implications for the design of covalent FGFR inhibitors that can overcome clinical resistance and provide the first example, to our knowledge, of a kinase inhibitor that covalently targets cysteines located in different positions within the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:25349422

  20. Inhibitor analysis for a solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A study of potential corrosion inhibitors for the NASA solar heating and cooling system which uses aluminum solar panels is provided. Research consisted of testing using a dynamic corrosion system, along with an economic analysis of proposed corrosion inhibitors. Very good progress was made in finding a suitable inhibitor for the system.

  1. Controlled-release scale inhibitor for use in fracturing treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.J.; Gdanski, R.D.; McCabe, M.A.; Buster, D.C.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes results of laboratory and field testing of a solid, controlled-release scale inhibitor for use in fracturing treatments. Laboratory testing with a continuous flow apparatus has yielded inhibitor release rates under dynamic conditions. The inhibitor was tested to determine the minimum inhibitor concentration required to inhibit the formation of CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4}, and BaSO{sub 4} scales in a brine. A model to predict the long-term release rate of the inhibitor was developed from data collected on the continuous flow apparatus. Data from treated wells will be compared with predictions of the model. Inhibitor release-rate testing in a continuous-flow apparatus shows that a solid, calcium-magnesium polyphosphate inhibitor has a sustained release profile. Release-rate testing shows that the inhibitor can be used up to 175 F. The inhibitor is compatible with both borate and zirconium crosslinked fracturing fluids and foamed fluids. The effective lifetime of the scale treatment can be predicted based on a model developed from laboratory data. The input variables required for the prediction include: temperature, water production, amount of inhibitor, minimum effective concentration of inhibitor for the specific brine. The model can be used to aid in the design of the scale inhibitor treatment.

  2. Deletion Mutations Keep Kinase Inhibitors in the Loop

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Daniel M.; Park, Jin H.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Effective clinical application of conformationally selective kinase inhibitors requires tailoring drug choice to the tumor's activating mutation(s). In this issue of Cancer Cell, Foster et al. (2016) describe how activating deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 cause primary resistance to common inhibitors, suggesting strategies for improved inhibitor selection. PMID:27070691

  3. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  4. Penicillin inhibitors of purple acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Faridoon; Hussein, Waleed M; Ul Islam, Nazar; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard; McGeary, Ross P

    2012-04-01

    Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) are binuclear metallohydrolases that have a multitude of biological functions and are found in fungi, bacteria, plants and animals. In mammals, PAP activity is linked with bone resorption and over-expression can lead to bone disorders such as osteoporosis. PAP is therefore an attractive target for the development of drugs to treat this disease. A series of penicillin conjugates, in which 6-aminopenicillanic acid was acylated with aromatic acid chlorides, has been prepared and assayed against pig PAP. The binding mode of most of these conjugates is purely competitive, and some members of this class have potencies comparable to the best PAP inhibitors yet reported. The structurally related penicillin G was shown to be neither an inhibitor nor a substrate for pig PAP. Molecular modelling has been used to examine the binding modes of these compounds in the active site of the enzyme and to rationalise their activities.

  5. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology.

  6. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target. PMID:23859210

  7. New tyrosinase inhibitors, (+)-catechin-aldehyde polycondensates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Chung, Joo Eun; Kurisawa, Motoichi; Uyama, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2004-01-01

    In this study, new tyrosinase inhibitors, (+)-catechin-aldehyde polycondensates, have been developed. Tyrosinase is a copper-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of a monophenol (monophenolase activity) and the oxidation of an o-diphenol (diphenolase activity). In the measurement of tyrosinase inhibition activity, (+)-catechin acted as substrate and cofactor of tyrosinase. On the other hand, the polycondensates inhibited the tyrosine hydroxylation and L-DOPA oxidation by chelation to the active site of tyrosinase. The UV-visible spectrum of a mixture of tyrosinase and the polycondensate exhibited a characteristic shoulder peak ascribed to the chelation of the polycondensate to the active site of tyrosinase. Furthermore, circular dichroism measurement showed a small red shift of the band due to the interaction between tyrosinase and the polycondensate. These data support that the polycondensate acts as an inhibitor of tyrosinase. PMID:15003008

  8. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology. PMID:27635236

  9. Automated colorimetric screen for apyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J B; Thomas, C; Hurley, L; Roux, S J; Lloyd, A M

    2002-11-01

    Apyrases are enzymes that efficiently hydrolyze ATP and ADP and may operate both inside and outside the cell. Although apyrases are important to a variety of cellular mechanisms and uses in industry, there are no available apyrase-specific inhibitors. Colorimetric assays based on the Fiske-Subbarow method for measuring inorganic phosphate are able to detect the release of inorganic phosphate from ATP and other nucleotides. We found that this type of assay could be automated and used to screen for apyrase-inhibiting compounds by assaying for a reduction in released phosphate in the presence of potential inhibitors. The automation of this assay allowed for the successful screening of a commercially available compound library. Several low molecular weight compounds were identified that, when used at micromolar concentrations, effectively inhibited apyrase activity.

  10. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target.

  11. SGLT2 Inhibitors: Benefit/Risk Balance.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2016-10-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. They have been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with diet/exercise, metformin, dual oral therapy or insulin. Three agents are available in Europe and the USA (canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, empagliflozin) and others are commercialized in Japan or in clinical development. SGLT2 inhibitors reduce glycated hemoglobin, with a minimal risk of hypoglycemia. They exert favorable effects beyond glucose control with consistent body weight, blood pressure, and serum uric acid reductions. Empagliflozin showed remarkable reductions in cardiovascular/all-cause mortality and in hospitalization for heart failure in patients with previous cardiovascular disease. Positive renal outcomes were also shown with empagliflozin. Mostly reported adverse events are genital mycotic infections, while urinary tract infections and events linked to volume depletion are rather rare. Concern about a risk of ketoacidosis and bone fractures has been recently raised, which deserves caution and further evaluation.

  12. Proteasome Inhibitors Block Development of Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren M.; Myung, Joon Mo; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Li, Wei Dong; Corey, E. J.; Omura, Satoshi; Nussenzweig, Victor; Sinnis, Photini

    1998-01-01

    Proteasomes degrade most of the proteins inside eukaryotic cells, including transcription factors and regulators of cell cycle progression. Here we show that nanomolar concentrations of lactacystin, a specific irreversible inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, inhibit development of the exoerythrocytic and erythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite. Although lactacystin-treated Plasmodium berghei sporozoites are still invasive, their development into exoerythrocytic forms (EEF) is inhibited in vitro and in vivo. Erythrocytic schizogony of P. falciparum in vitro is also profoundly inhibited when drug treatment of the synchronized parasites is prior, but not subsequent, to the initiation of DNA synthesis, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of lactacystin is cell cycle specific. Lactacystin reduces P. berghei parasitemia in rats, but the therapeutic index is very low. Along with other studies showing that lactacystin inhibits stage-specific transformation in Trypanosoma and Entamoeba spp., these findings highlight the potential of proteasome inhibitors as drugs for the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. PMID:9756786

  13. Prospective therapeutic applications of p53 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gudkov, Andrei V. . E-mail: gudkov@ccf.org; Komarova, Elena A.

    2005-06-10

    p53, in addition to being a key cancer preventive factor, is also a determinant of cancer treatment side effects causing excessive apoptotic death in several normal tissues during cancer therapy. p53 inhibitory strategy has been suggested to protect normal tissues from chemo- and radiotherapy, and to treat other pathologies associated with stress-mediated activation of p53. This strategy was validated by isolation and testing of small molecule p53 inhibitor pifithrin-{alpha} that demonstrated broad tissue protecting capacity. However, in some normal tissues and tumors p53 plays protective role by inducing growth arrest and preventing cells from premature entrance into mitosis and death from mitotic catastrophe. Inhibition of this function of p53 can sensitize tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy, thus opening new potential application of p53 inhibitors and justifying the need in pharmacological agents targeting specifically either pro-apoptotic or growth arrest functions of p53.

  14. Protein synthesis inhibitor from potato tuber

    SciTech Connect

    Romaen, R. )

    1989-04-01

    A protein fraction capable of inhibit in vitro protein synthesis was found in potato tubers in fresh and wounded tissue. Inhibitor activity from fresh tissue decays with wounding. Inhibition activity was detected absorbed to ribsomal fraction and cytosol of potato tuber tissue by a partially reconstituted in vitro system from potato tuber and wheat germ. Adsorbed ribosomal fraction was more suitable of purification. This fraction was washed from ribosomes with 0.3M KCl, concentrated with ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified through sephadex G100 and sephadex G-75 columns chromatography. After 61 fold purification adsorbed protein fraction can inhibit germination of maize, wheat and sesame seeds, as well as {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into protein by imbibed maize embryos. Inhibition activity was lost by temperature, alkali and protease-K hydrolysis. Preliminar analysis could not show presence of reductor sugars. Physiological role of this inhibitor in relation to rest and active tissue remains to be studied.

  15. mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Xuemin; Proud, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, plays key roles in cell growth and proliferation, acting at the catalytic subunit of two protein kinase complexes: mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2). mTORC1 signaling is switched on by several oncogenic signaling pathways and is accordingly hyperactive in the majority of cancers. Inhibiting mTORC1 signaling has therefore attracted great attention as an anti-cancer therapy. However, progress in using inhibitors of mTOR signaling as therapeutic agents in oncology has been limited by a number of factors, including the fact that the classic mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibits only some of the effects of mTOR; the existence of several feedback loops; and the crucial importance of mTOR in normal physiology. PMID:27635236

  16. Replacing sulfa drugs with novel DHPS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudeh, Dalia I; Zhao, Ying; White, Stephen W; Lee, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    More research effort needs to be invested in antimicrobial drug development to address the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant organisms. The enzyme DHPS has been a validated drug target for over 70 years as the target for the highly successful sulfa drugs. The use of sulfa drugs has been compromised by the widespread presence of resistant organisms and the adverse side effects associated with their use. Despite the large amount of structural information available for DHPS, few recent publications address the possibility of using this knowledge for novel drug design. This article reviews the relevant papers and patents that report promising new small-molecule inhibitors of DHPS, and discuss these data in light of new insights into the DHPS catalytic mechanism and recently determined crystal structures of DHPS bound to potent small-molecule inhibitors. This new functional understanding confirms that DHPS deserves further consideration as an antimicrobial drug target. PMID:23859210

  17. Inhibitor prevents corrosion, scale in Chinese waterflood

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, W.; Jianhua, W. )

    1994-03-14

    An imidazoline derivative-based series inhibitor has prevented both corrosion and scale formation in produced-water treatment and water-injection equipment in China National Petroleum Co.'s (CNPC) Shengli oil field. Development of the inhibitor started in 1986, and after successful field trials the chemical is now being extensively applied. To increase oil recovery, water injection is widely used in China's onshore oil fields. Oil production in the Shengli oil field, for example, requires injection of about 4 bbl of water/1 bbl of oil produced. The large volumes of produced formation water contain many substances that can cause serious corrosion and scale. Also, the makeup water from other sources, subsurface or surface, complicates water handling. The paper discusses the following: corrosion and scale, oxygen, carbon dioxide, H[sub 2]S and sulfur reducing bacteria, temperature, inhibition, field tests, applications, and economics.

  18. A Bacterial Cell Shape-Determining Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Frirdich, Emilisa; Taylor, Jennifer A; Chan, Anson C K; Blair, Kris M; Vermeulen, Jenny; Ha, Reuben; Murphy, Michael E P; Salama, Nina R; Gaynor, Erin C; Tanner, Martin E

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni are human pathogens and causative agents of gastric ulcers/cancer and gastroenteritis, respectively. Recent studies have uncovered a series of proteases that are responsible for maintaining the helical shape of these organisms. The H. pylori metalloprotease Csd4 and its C. jejuni homologue Pgp1 cleave the amide bond between meso-diaminopimelate and iso-d-glutamic acid in truncated peptidoglycan side chains. Deletion of either csd4 or pgp1 results in bacteria with a straight rod phenotype, a reduced ability to move in viscous media, and reduced pathogenicity. In this work, a phosphinic acid-based pseudodipeptide inhibitor was designed to act as a tetrahedral intermediate analog against the Csd4 enzyme. The phosphinic acid was shown to inhibit the cleavage of the alternate substrate, Ac-l-Ala-iso-d-Glu-meso-Dap, with a Ki value of 1.5 μM. Structural analysis of the Csd4-inhibitor complex shows that the phosphinic acid displaces the zinc-bound water and chelates the metal in a bidentate fashion. The phosphinate oxygens also interact with the key acid/base residue, Glu222, and the oxyanion-stabilizing residue, Arg86. The results are consistent with the "promoted-water pathway" mechanism for carboxypeptidase A catalysis. Studies on cultured bacteria showed that the inhibitor causes significant cell straightening when incubated with H. pylori at millimolar concentrations. A diminished, yet observable, effect on the morphology of C. jejuni was also apparent. Cell straightening was more pronounced with an acapsular C. jejuni mutant strain compared to the wild type, suggesting that the capsule impaired inhibitor accessibility. These studies demonstrate that a highly polar compound is capable of crossing the outer membrane and altering cell shape, presumably by inhibiting cell shape determinant proteases. Peptidoglycan proteases acting as cell shape determinants represent novel targets for the development of antimicrobials

  19. Inhibitors of the AAA+ Chaperone p97

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Eli; Maksim, Nick; de la Cruz, Fabian; La Clair, James J.

    2015-01-01

    It is remarkable that a pathway as ubiquitous as protein quality control can be targeted to treat cancer. Bortezomib, an inhibitor of the proteasome, was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) more than 10 years ago to treat refractory myeloma and later extended to lymphoma. Its use has increased the survival rate of myeloma patients by as much as three years. This success was followed with the recent accelerated approval of the natural product derived proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (Kyprolis®), which is used to treat patients with bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. The success of these two drugs has validated protein quality control as a viable target to fight select cancers, but begs the question why are proteasome inhibitors limited to lymphoma and myeloma? More recently, these limitations have encouraged the search for additional targets within the protein quality control system that might offer heightened cancer cell specificity, enhanced clinical utility, a lower rate of resistance, reduced toxicity, and mitigated side effects. One promising target is p97, an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) chaperone. p97 figures prominently in protein quality control as well as serving a variety of other cellular functions associated with cancer. More than a decade ago, it was determined that up-regulation of p97 in many forms of cancer correlates with a poor clinical outcome. Since these initial discoveries, a mechanistic explanation for this observation has been partially illuminated, but details are lacking. Understandably, given this clinical correlation, myriad roles within the cell, and its importance in protein quality control, p97 has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. This review provides an overview of efforts towards the discovery of small molecule inhibitors of p97, offering a synopsis of efforts that parallel the excellent reviews that currently exist on p97 structure, function, and physiology. PMID

  20. Corrosion protection with eco-friendly inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    Corrosion occurs as a result of the interaction of a metal with its environment. The extent of corrosion depends on the type of metal, the existing conditions in the environment and the type of aggressive ions present in the medium. For example, CO3‑2 and NO‑3 produce an insoluble deposit on the surface of iron, resulting in the isolation of metal and consequent decrease of corrosion. On the other hand, halide ions are adsorbed selectively on the metal surface and prevent formation of the oxide phase on the metal surface, resulting in continuous corrosion. Iron, aluminum and their alloys are widely used, both domestically and industrially. Linear alkylbenzene and linear alkylbenzene sulfonate are commonly used as detergents. They have also been found together in waste water. It is claimed that these chemicals act as inhibitors for stainless steel and aluminum. Release of toxic gases as a result of corrosion in pipelines may lead in certain cases to air pollution and possible health hazards. Therefore, there are two ways to look at the relationship between corrosion and pollution: (i) corrosion of metals and alloys due to environmental pollution and (ii) environmental pollution as a result of corrosion protection. This paper encompasses the two scenarios and possible remedies for various cases, using 'green' inhibitors obtained either from plant extracts or from pharmaceutical compounds. In the present study, the effect of piperacillin sodium as a corrosion inhibitor for mild steel was investigated using a weight-loss method as well as a three-electrode dc electrochemical technique. It was found that the corrosion rate decreased as the concentration of the inhibitor increased up to 9×10‑4 M 93% efficiency was exhibited at this concentration.

  1. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors from Gentiana lutea.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Kabbash, Amal; Fujioka, Toshihiro; Ishizu, Takashi; Yagi, Akira

    2004-08-01

    Three monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors were isolated from Gentiana lutea. Their structures were elucidated to be 3-3''linked-(2'-hydroxy-4-O-isoprenylchalcone)-(2'''-hydroxy-4''-O-isoprenyldihydrochalcone) (1), 2-methoxy-3-(1,1'-dimethylallyl)-6a,10a-dihydrobenzo(1,2-c)chroman-6-one and 5-hydroxyflavanone. These compounds, and the hydrolysis product of 1, displayed competitive inhibitory properties against MAO-B which was more effective than MAO-A.

  2. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called “ubiquitin-proteasome system” (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  3. Quinoxaline derivatives: novel and selective butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Aurang; Hameed, Abdul; Khan, Latifullah; Khan, Imran; Dalvandi, Kourosh; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Basha, Fatima Z

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain disorder which occurs due to lower levels of acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitters, and results in a gradual decline in memory and other cognitive processes. Acetycholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are considered to be primary regulators of the ACh levels in the brain. Evidence shows that AChE activity decreases in AD, while activity of BChE does not change or even elevate in advanced AD, which suggests a key involvement of BChE in ACh hydrolysis during AD symptoms. Therefore, inhibiting the activity of BChE may be an effective way to control AD associated disorders. In this regard, a series of quinoxaline derivatives 1-17 was synthesized and biologically evaluated against cholinesterases (AChE and BChE) and as well as against α- chymotrypsin and urease. The compounds 1-17 were found to be selective inhibitors for BChE, as no activity was found against other enzymes. Among the series, compounds 6 (IC50 = 7.7 ± 1.0 µM) and 7 (IC50 = 9.7 ± 0.9 µM) were found to be the most active inhibitors against BChE. Their IC50 values are comparable to the standard, galantamine (IC50 = 6.6 ± 0.38 µM). Their considerable BChE inhibitory activity makes them selective candidates for the development of BChE inhibitors. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) of this new class of selective BChE inhibitors has been discussed.

  4. Serendipity in discovery of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Derek; Iqbal, Mohamed; Husten, Jean; Ator, Mark A; Chatterjee, Sankar

    2012-05-15

    Among its various catalytic activities, the 'chymotrypsin-like' activity of the proteasome, a large multicatalytic proteinase complex has emerged as the focus of drug discovery efforts in cancer therapy. Herein, a series of first generation (2S, 3R)-2-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid derived proteasome inhibitors that were discovered serendipitously en route to original goal of generating a series of sterically constrained oxazoline derivatives has been reported. PMID:22503349

  5. Rust Inhibitor And Fungicide For Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James F.; Greer, D. Clay

    1988-01-01

    Mixture of benzotriazole, benzoic acid, and fungicide prevents growth of rust and fungus. Water-based cooling mixture made from readily available materials prevents formation of metallic oxides and growth of fungi in metallic pipes. Coolant remains clear and does not develop thick sludge tending to collect in low points in cooling systems with many commercial rust inhibitors. Coolant compatible with iron, copper, aluminum, and stainless steel. Cannot be used with cadmium or cadmium-plated pipes.

  6. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Elias, Rawad; Morales, Joshua; Rehman, Yasser; Khurshid, Humera

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is primarily a disease of older adults. The treatment of advanced stage tumors usually involves the use of systemic agents that may be associated with significant risk of toxicity, especially in older patients. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are newcomers to the oncology world with improved efficacy and better safety profiles when compared to traditional cytotoxic drugs. This makes them an attractive treatment option. While there are no elderly specific trials, this review attempts to look at the current available data from a geriatric oncology perspective. We reviewed data from phase III studies that led to newly approved indications of checkpoint inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal cell cancer. Data were reviewed with respect to response, survival, and toxicity according to three groups: <65 years, 65-75 years, and >75 years. Current literature does not allow one to draw definitive conclusions regarding the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in older adults. However, they may offer a potentially less toxic but equally efficacious treatment option for the senior adult oncology patient. PMID:27287329

  7. PTEN inhibitors: an evaluation of current compounds.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Laura; Lindsay, Yvonne E; Leslie, Nicholas R

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of many classes of enzymes, including phosphatases, have widespread use as experimental tools and as therapeutics. Efforts to develop inhibitors against the lipid phosphatase and tumour suppressor, PTEN, was for some time limited by concerns that their use as therapy could result in increased risk of cancer. However, the accumulation of evidence that short term PTEN inhibition may be valuable in conditions such as nerve injury has raised interest. Here we investigate the inhibition of PTEN by four available PTEN inhibitors, bpV(phen), bpV(pic), VO-OHpic and SF1670 and compared this inhibition with that of only 3 other related enzymes, the tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 and the phosphoinositide phosphatases INPP4A and INPP4B. Even with this very small number of comparators, for all compounds, inhibition of multiple enzymes was observed and with all three vanadate compounds, this was similar or more potent than the inhibition of PTEN. In particular, the bisperoxovanadate compounds were found to inhibit PTEN poorly in the presence of reducing agents including the cellular redox buffer glutathione.

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Clawson, Gary A

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cells contain significant alterations in their epigenomic landscape, which several enzyme families reversibly contribute to. One class of epigenetic modifying enzymes is that of histone deacetylases (HDAC), which are receiving considerable scrutiny clinically as a therapeutic target in many cancers. The underlying rationale is that inhibiting HDACs will reverse dysregulated target gene expression by modulating functional histone (or other) acetylation marks. This perspective will discuss a recent paper by Markozashvili and co-workers which appeared in Gene, which indicates that the mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) alter the epigenetic landscape include widespread alternative effects beyond simply controlling regional epigenetic marks. HDACs are involved in many processes/diseases, and it is not surprising that HDACis have considerable off-target effects, and thus a major effort is being directed toward identification of inhibitors which are selective for HDAC isoforms often uniquely implicated in various cancers. This Perspective will also discuss some representative work with inhibitors targeting individual HDAC classes or isoforms. At present, it is not really clear that isoform-specific HDACis will avoid non-selective effects on other unrecognized activities of HDACs. PMID:27568481

  9. Optogenetic Inhibitor of the Transcription Factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed M; Reis, Jakeb M; Xia, Yan; Rashid, Asim J; Mercaldo, Valentina; Walters, Brandon J; Brechun, Katherine E; Borisenko, Vitali; Josselyn, Sheena A; Karanicolas, John; Woolley, G Andrew

    2015-11-19

    Current approaches for optogenetic control of transcription do not mimic the activity of endogenous transcription factors, which act at numerous sites in the genome in a complex interplay with other factors. Optogenetic control of dominant negative versions of endogenous transcription factors provides a mechanism for mimicking the natural regulation of gene expression. Here we describe opto-DN-CREB, a blue-light-controlled inhibitor of the transcription factor CREB created by fusing the dominant negative inhibitor A-CREB to photoactive yellow protein (PYP). A light-driven conformational change in PYP prevents coiled-coil formation between A-CREB and CREB, thereby activating CREB. Optogenetic control of CREB function was characterized in vitro, in HEK293T cells, and in neurons where blue light enabled control of expression of the CREB targets NR4A2 and c-Fos. Dominant negative inhibitors exist for numerous transcription factors; linking these to optogenetic domains offers a general approach for spatiotemporal control of native transcriptional events. PMID:26590638

  10. Functional Stability of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Pinar; Toksoy Oner, Ebru; Agirbasli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), and a major regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 plays a pivotal role in acute thrombotic events such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and myocardial infarction (MI). The biological effects of PAI-1 extend far beyond thrombosis including its critical role in fibrotic disorders, atherosclerosis, renal and pulmonary fibrosis, type-2 diabetes, and cancer. The conversion of PAI-1 from the active to the latent conformation appears to be unique among serpins in that it occurs spontaneously at a relatively rapid rate. Latency transition is believed to represent a regulatory mechanism, reducing the risk of thrombosis from a prolonged antifibrinolytic action of PAI-1. Thus, relying solely on plasma concentrations of PAI-1 without assessing its function may be misleading in interpreting the role of PAI-1 in many complex diseases. Environmental conditions, interaction with other proteins, mutations, and glycosylation are the main factors that have a significant impact on the stability of the PAI-1 structure. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge on PAI-1 especially importance of PAI-1 level and stability and highlights the potential use of PAI-1 inhibitors for treating cardiovascular disease. PMID:25386620

  11. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results.

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitors as cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells contain significant alterations in their epigenomic landscape, which several enzyme families reversibly contribute to. One class of epigenetic modifying enzymes is that of histone deacetylases (HDAC), which are receiving considerable scrutiny clinically as a therapeutic target in many cancers. The underlying rationale is that inhibiting HDACs will reverse dysregulated target gene expression by modulating functional histone (or other) acetylation marks. This perspective will discuss a recent paper by Markozashvili and co-workers which appeared in Gene, which indicates that the mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) alter the epigenetic landscape include widespread alternative effects beyond simply controlling regional epigenetic marks. HDACs are involved in many processes/diseases, and it is not surprising that HDACis have considerable off-target effects, and thus a major effort is being directed toward identification of inhibitors which are selective for HDAC isoforms often uniquely implicated in various cancers. This Perspective will also discuss some representative work with inhibitors targeting individual HDAC classes or isoforms. At present, it is not really clear that isoform-specific HDACis will avoid non-selective effects on other unrecognized activities of HDACs. PMID:27568481

  13. Selective Water-Soluble Gelatinase Inhibitor Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Gooyit, Major; Lee, Mijoon; Schroeder, Valerie A.; Ikejiri, Masahiro; Suckow, Mark A.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2011-01-01

    SB-3CT (1), a selective and potent thiirane-based gelatinase inhibitor, is effective in animal models of cancer metastasis and stroke; however, it is limited by poor aqueous solubility and extensive metabolism. We addressed these issues by blocking the primary site of metabolism and capitalizing on a prodrug strategy to achieve >5000-fold increased solubility. The amide prodrugs were quantitatively hydrolyzed in human blood to a potent gelatinase inhibitor, ND-322 (3). The arginyl amide prodrug (ND-478, 5d) was metabolically stable in mouse, rat, and human liver microsomes. Both 5d and 3 were non-mutagenic in the Ames II mutagenicity assay. The prodrug 5d showed moderate clearance of 0.0582 L/min/kg, remained mostly in the extracellular fluid compartment (Vd = 0.0978 L/kg), and had a terminal half-life of >4 h. The prodrug 5d had superior pharmacokinetic properties than 3, making the thiirane class of selective gelatinase inhibitors suitable for intravenous administration in treatment of acute gelatinase-dependent diseases. PMID:21866961

  14. Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates as cholinesterases inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína; Vinšová, Jarmila

    2015-02-01

    Based on the presence of dialkyl phosphate moiety, we evaluated twenty-seven salicylanilide diethyl phosphates (diethyl [2-(phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl] phosphates) for the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) from electric eel (Electrophorus electricus L.) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) from equine serum. Ellman's spectrophotometric method was used. The inhibitory activity (expressed as IC50 values) was compared with that of the established drugs galantamine and rivastigmine. Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates showed significant activity against both cholinesterases with IC50 values from 0.903 to 86.3 μM. IC50s for BChE were comparatively lower than those obtained for AChE. All of the investigated compounds showed higher inhibition of AChE than rivastigmine, and six of them inhibited BChE more effectively than both rivastigmine and galantamine. In general, derivatives of 4-chlorosalicylic acid showed enhanced activity when compared to derivatives of 5-halogenated salicylic acids, especially against BChE. The most effective inhibitor of AChE was O-{5-chloro-2-[(3-bromophenyl)carbamoyl]phenyl} O,O-diethyl phosphate with IC50 of 35.4 μM, which is also one of the most potent inhibitors of BChE. O-{5-Chloro-2-[(3,4-dichlorophenyl)carbamoyl]phenyl} O,O-diethyl phosphate exhibited in vitro the strongest inhibition of BChE (0.90 μM). Salicylanilide diethyl phosphates act as pseudo-irreversible cholinesterases inhibitors. PMID:25462625

  15. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Elias, Rawad; Morales, Joshua; Rehman, Yasser; Khurshid, Humera

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is primarily a disease of older adults. The treatment of advanced stage tumors usually involves the use of systemic agents that may be associated with significant risk of toxicity, especially in older patients. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are newcomers to the oncology world with improved efficacy and better safety profiles when compared to traditional cytotoxic drugs. This makes them an attractive treatment option. While there are no elderly specific trials, this review attempts to look at the current available data from a geriatric oncology perspective. We reviewed data from phase III studies that led to newly approved indications of checkpoint inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal cell cancer. Data were reviewed with respect to response, survival, and toxicity according to three groups: <65 years, 65-75 years, and >75 years. Current literature does not allow one to draw definitive conclusions regarding the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in older adults. However, they may offer a potentially less toxic but equally efficacious treatment option for the senior adult oncology patient.

  16. Inhibitory spectrum of alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Goldsmith, G H; Moroi, M; Aoki, N

    1979-04-01

    alpha 2-Plasmin inhibitor (alpha 2PI) has been recently characterized as a fast-reacting inhibitor of plasmin in human plasma and appears to play an important role in the regulation of fibrinolysis in vivo. We have studied the effect of purified alpha 2PI upon various proteases participating in human blood coagulation and kinin generation. At physiological concentration (50 microgram/ml), alpha 2PI inhibited the clot-promoting and prekallikrein-activating activity of Hageman factor fragments, the amidolytic, kininogenase, and clot-promoting activities of plasma kallikrein, and the clot-promoting properties of activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, Factor XIa) and thrombin. alpha 2PI had minimal inhibitory effect on surface-bound activated PTA and activated Stuart factor (Factor Xa). alpha 2PI did not inhibit the activity of activated Christmas factor (Factor IXa) or urinary kallikrein. Heparin (1.5-2.0 units/ml) did not enhance the inhibitory function of alpha 2PI. These results suggest that, like other plasma protease inhibitors, alpha 2PI possesses a broad in vitro spectrum of inhibitory properties.

  17. Recent advances in designing substrate-competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki-Cheol; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in cellular signaling pathways and their abnormal phosphorylation activity is inseparably linked with various human diseases. Therefore, modulation of kinase activity using potent inhibitors is an attractive strategy for the treatment of human disease. While most protein kinase inhibitors in clinical development are mainly targeted to the highly conserved ATP-binding sites and thus likely promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases including kinases unrelated to diseases, protein substrate-competitive inhibitors are more selective and expected to be promising therapeutic agents. Most substrate-competitive inhibitors mimic peptides derived from substrate proteins, or from inhibitory domains within kinases or inhibitor proteins. In addition, bisubstrate inhibitors are generated by conjugating substrate-competitive peptide inhibitors to ATP-competitive inhibitors to improve affinity and selectivity. Although structural information on protein kinases provides invaluable guidance in designing substrate-competitive inhibitors, other strategies including bioinformatics, computational modeling, and high-throughput screening are often employed for developing specific substrate-competitive kinase inhibitors. This review focuses on recent advances in the design and discovery of substrate-competitive inhibitors of protein kinases.

  18. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer.

  19. Solution structures of stromelysin complexed to thiadiazole inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Stockman, B. J.; Waldon, D. J.; Gates, J. A.; Scahill, T. A.; Kloosterman, D. A.; Mizsak, S. A.; Jacobsen, E. J.; Belonga, K. L.; Mitchell, M. A.; Mao, B.; Petke, J. D.; Goodman, L.; Powers, E. A.; Ledbetter, S. R.; Kaytes, P. S.; Vogeli, G.; Marshall, V. P.; Petzold, G. L.; Poorman, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Unregulated or overexpressed matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including stromelysin, collagenase, and gelatinase. have been implicated in several pathological conditions including arthritis and cancer. Small-molecule MMP inhibitors may have therapeutic value in the treatment of these diseases. In this regard, the solution structures of two stromelysin/ inhibitor complexes have been investigated using 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Both-inhibitors are members of a novel class of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor that contain a thiadiazole group and that interact with stromelysin in a manner distinct from other classes of inhibitors. The inhibitors coordinate the catalytic zinc atom through their exocyclic sulfur atom, with the remainder of the ligand extending into the S1-S3 side of the active site. The binding of inhibitor containing a protonated or fluorinated aromatic ring was investigated using 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopy. The fluorinated ring was found to have a reduced ring-flip rate compared to the protonated version. A strong, coplanar interaction between the fluorinated ring of the inhibitor and the aromatic ring of Tyr155 is proposed to account for the reduced ring-flip rate and for the increase in binding affinity observed for the fluorinated inhibitor compared to the protonated inhibitor. Binding interactions observed for the thiadiazole class of ligands have implications for the design of matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors. PMID:9827994

  20. Molecular mechanism of respiratory syncytial virus fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Battles, Michael B; Langedijk, Johannes P; Furmanova-Hollenstein, Polina; Chaiwatpongsakorn, Supranee; Costello, Heather M; Kwanten, Leen; Vranckx, Luc; Vink, Paul; Jaensch, Steffen; Jonckers, Tim H M; Koul, Anil; Arnoult, Eric; Peeples, Mark E; Roymans, Dirk; McLellan, Jason S

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in young children and the elderly. Therapeutic small molecules have been developed that bind the RSV F glycoprotein and inhibit membrane fusion, yet their binding sites and molecular mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Here we show that these inhibitors bind to a three-fold-symmetric pocket within the central cavity of the metastable prefusion conformation of RSV F. Inhibitor binding stabilizes this conformation by tethering two regions that must undergo a structural rearrangement to facilitate membrane fusion. Inhibitor-escape mutations occur in residues that directly contact the inhibitors or are involved in the conformational rearrangements required to accommodate inhibitor binding. Resistant viruses do not propagate as well as wild-type RSV in vitro, indicating a fitness cost for inhibitor escape. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into class I viral fusion proteins and should facilitate development of optimal RSV fusion inhibitors.

  1. Advances in algal drug research with emphasis on enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Kulkarni, Manoj G; Stirk, Wendy A; Van Staden, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Enzyme inhibitors are now included in all kinds of drugs essential to treat most of the human diseases including communicable, metabolic, cardiovascular, neurological diseases and cancer. Numerous marine algae have been reported to be a potential source of novel enzyme inhibitors with various pharmaceutical values. Thus, the purpose of this review is to brief the enzyme inhibitors from marine algae of therapeutic potential to treat common diseases. As per our knowledge this is the first review for the potential enzyme inhibitors from marine origin. This review contains 86 algal enzyme inhibitors reported during 1989-2013 and commercial enzyme inhibitors available in the market. Compounds in the review are grouped according to the disease conditions in which they are involved; diabetes, obesity, dementia, inflammation, melanogenesis, AIDS, hypertension and other viral diseases. The structure-activity relationship of most of the compounds are also discussed. In addition, the drug likeness properties of algal inhibitors were evaluated using Lipinski's 'Rule of Five'. PMID:25195189

  2. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  3. Phosphorylation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2006-08-25

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr(35). Moreover, Ser(67) of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser(67) inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser(65) in vitro. In contrast, Ser(67) phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser(65). Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser(65) and Ser(67), but not Ser(65) alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser(67) protects phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(65) and/or Ser(67) did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser(67) and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  4. Studies on bacterial cell wall inhibitors. VI. Screening method for the specific inhibitors of peptidoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Tanaka, H; Oiwa, R; Nagai, T; Koyama, Y; Takahashi, Y

    1979-10-01

    A screening method was established for selecting new specific inhibitors of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis. In the primary test, culture broths of soil isolates were selected based on relative microbial activity. A culture, to be retained, must be active against Bacillus subtilis and lack activities against Acholeplasma laidawii. In the secondary test, inhibitors of bacterial cell wall synthesis were identified by their ability to prevent the incorporation of meso-[3H]diaminopimelic acid but not to prevent the incorporation of L-[4C]leucine into the acid-insoluble macromolecular fraction of growing cells of Bacillus sp. ATCC 21206 (Dpm-). As the tertiary test, inhibitors with molecular weights under 1,000 were selected by passage through a Diaflo UM-2 membrane. By this screening procedure, six known antibiotics and one new one were picked out from ten thousand soil isolates. PMID:528376

  5. The "SWOT" of BRAF inhibition in melanoma: RAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors or both?

    PubMed

    Nissan, Moriah H; Solit, David B

    2011-12-01

    Activating mutations in the BRAF gene are among the most prevalent kinase mutations in human cancer. BRAF mutations are most frequent in patients with melanoma where they occur in approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease. Remarkable clinical activity has recently been reported with highly selective RAF inhibitors in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor V600E BRAF mutations. The response rates of RAF inhibitors in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas far exceed the activity level of any prior therapy studied in this disease. The results suggest that we have entered an era of personalized therapy for patients with metastatic melanoma in which treatment selection will be guided by BRAF mutational status. This review will discuss the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats ("SWOT") of developing RAF and MEK selective inhibitors as anti-cancer therapies, recent insights into the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to these agents, and current efforts to develop mechanism-based combination therapies. PMID:21997758

  6. Designing Inhibitors Against Fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase: Exploring Natural Products for Novel Inhibitor Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Sabrina; Harris, Katharine M.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products often contain unusual scaffold structures that may be elaborated by combinatorial methods to develop new drug-like molecules. Visual inspection of more than 128 natural products with some type of anti-diabetic activity suggested that a subset might provide novel scaffolds for designing potent inhibitors against fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), an enzyme critical in the control of gluconeogenesis. Using in silico docking methodology, these were evaluated to determine those that exhibited affinity for the AMP binding site. Achyrofuran from the South American plant Achyrocline satureoides, was selected for further investigation. Using the achyrofuran scaffold, inhibitors against FBPase were developed. Compounds 15 and 16 inhibited human liver and pig kidney FBPases at IC50 values comparable to that of AMP, the natural allosteric inhibitor. PMID:20116906

  7. The "SWOT" of BRAF inhibition in melanoma: RAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors or both?

    PubMed

    Nissan, Moriah H; Solit, David B

    2011-12-01

    Activating mutations in the BRAF gene are among the most prevalent kinase mutations in human cancer. BRAF mutations are most frequent in patients with melanoma where they occur in approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease. Remarkable clinical activity has recently been reported with highly selective RAF inhibitors in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor V600E BRAF mutations. The response rates of RAF inhibitors in patients with BRAF-mutant melanomas far exceed the activity level of any prior therapy studied in this disease. The results suggest that we have entered an era of personalized therapy for patients with metastatic melanoma in which treatment selection will be guided by BRAF mutational status. This review will discuss the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats ("SWOT") of developing RAF and MEK selective inhibitors as anti-cancer therapies, recent insights into the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired resistance to these agents, and current efforts to develop mechanism-based combination therapies.

  8. Structural analysis of Golgi alpha-mannosidase II inhibitors identified from a focused glycosidase inhibitor screen.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Douglas A; Tarling, Chris A; Withers, Stephen G; Rose, David R

    2008-09-23

    The N-glycosylation pathway is a target for pharmaceutical intervention in a number of pathological conditions including cancer. Golgi alpha-mannosidase II (GMII) is the final glycoside hydrolase in the pathway and has been the target for a number of synthetic efforts aimed at providing more selective and effective inhibitors. Drosophila GMII (dGMII) has been extensively studied due to the ease of obtaining high resolution structural data, allowing the observation of substrate distortion upon binding and after formation of a trapped covalent reaction intermediate. However, attempts to find new inhibitor leads by high-throughput screening of large commercial libraries or through in silico docking were unsuccessful. In this paper we provide a kinetic and structural analysis of five inhibitors derived from a small glycosidase-focused library. Surprisingly, four of these were known inhibitors of beta-glucosidases. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the dGMII:inhibitor complexes highlights the ability of the zinc-containing GMII active site to deform compounds, even ones designed as conformationally restricted transition-state mimics of beta-glucosidases, into binding entities that have inhibitory activity. Although these deformed conformations do not appear to be on the expected conformational itinerary of the enzyme, and are thus not transition-state mimics of GMII, they allow positioning of the three vicinal hydroxyls of the bound gluco-inhibitors into similar locations to those found with mannose-containing substrates, underlining the importance of these hydrogen bonds for binding. Further, these studies show the utility of targeting the acid-base catalyst using appropriately positioned positively charged nitrogen atoms, as well as the challenges associated with aglycon substitutions.

  9. F8 haplotype and inhibitor risk: results from the Hemophilia Inhibitor Genetics Study (HIGS) Combined Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, John; Astermark, Jan; Menius, Erika D.; Carrington, Mary; Donfield, Sharyne M.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Nelson, George W.; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pavlova, Anna; Shapiro, Amy D.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Berntorp, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Ancestral background, specifically African descent, confers higher risk for development of inhibitory antibodies to factor VIII (FVIII) in hemophilia A. It has been suggested that differences in the distribution of factor VIII gene (F8) haplotypes, and mismatch between endogenous F8 haplotypes and those comprising products used for treatment could contribute to risk. Design and Methods Data from the HIGS Combined Cohort were used to determine the association between F8 haplotype 3 (H3) vs. haplotypes 1 and 2 (H1+H2) and inhibitor risk among individuals of genetically-determined African descent. Other variables known to affect inhibitor risk including type of F8 mutation and HLA were included in the analysis. A second research question regarding risk related to mismatch in endogenous F8 haplotype and recombinant FVIII products used for treatment was addressed. Results H3 was associated with higher inhibitor risk among those genetically-identified (N=49) as of African ancestry, but the association did not remain significant after adjustment for F8 mutation type and the HLA variables. Among subjects of all racial ancestries enrolled in HIGS who reported early use of recombinant products (N=223), mismatch in endogenous haplotype and the FVIII proteins constituting the products used did not confer greater risk for inhibitor development. Conclusion H3 was not an independent predictor of inhibitor risk. Further, our findings did not support a higher risk of inhibitors in the presence of a haplotype mismatch between the FVIII molecule infused and that of the individual. PMID:22958194

  10. Design and synthesis of conformationally restricted inhibitors of active thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa).

    PubMed

    Brink, Mikael; Dahlén, Anders; Olsson, Thomas; Polla, Magnus; Svensson, Tor

    2014-04-01

    A series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-7-carboxylic acid derivatives designed as inhibitors of TAFIa has been prepared via a common hydrogenation-alkylation sequence starting from the appropriate benzimidazole and imidazopyridine system. We present a successful design strategy using a conformational restriction approach resulting in potent and selective inhibitors of TAFIa. The X-ray structure of compound 5 in complex with a H333Y/H335Q double mutant TAFI indicate that the conformational restriction is responsible for the observed potency increase. PMID:24588961

  11. Protocol for rational design of covalently interacting inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas C; Welker, Armin; Rieger, Max; Sahu, Prabhat K; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Schirmeister, Tanja; Engels, Bernd

    2014-10-20

    The inhibition potencies of covalent inhibitors mainly result from the formation of a covalent bond to the enzyme during the inhibition mechanism. This class of inhibitors has essentially been ignored in previous target-directed drug discovery projects because of concerns about possible side effects. However, their advantages, such as higher binding energies and longer drug-target residence times moved them into the focus of recent investigations. While the rational design of non-covalent inhibitors became standard the corresponding design of covalent inhibitors is still in its early stages. Potent covalent inhibitors can be retrieved from large compound libraries by covalent docking approaches but protocols are missing that can reliably predict the influence of variations in the substitution pattern on the affinity and/or reactivity of a given covalent inhibitor. Hence, the wanted property profile can only be obtained from trial-and-error proceedings. This paper presents an appropriate protocol which is able to predict improved covalent inhibitors. It uses hybrid approaches, which mix quantum mechanical (QM) and molecular mechanical (MM) methods to predict variations in the reactivity of the inhibitor. They are also used to compute the required information about the non-covalent enzyme-inhibitor complex. Docking tools are employed to improve the inhibitor with respect to the non-covalent interactions formed in the binding site. PMID:25251382

  12. Homologous inhibitors from potato tubers of serine endopeptidases and metallocarboxypeptidases.

    PubMed Central

    Hass, C M; Venkatakrishnan, R; Ryan, C A

    1976-01-01

    A potent polypeptide inhibitor of chymotrypsin has been purified from Russett Burbank potatoes. The inhibitor has no effect on bovine carboxypeptidases A or B but exhibits homology with a carboxypeptidase inhibitor that is also present in potato tubers. The chymotrypsin inhibitor has a molecular weight of approximately 5400 as estimated by gel filtration, amino acid analysis, and titration with chymotrypsin. The polypeptide chain consists of 49 amino acid residues, of which six are half-cystine, forming three disulfide bonds. Its size is similar to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor, which contains 39 amino acid residues and also has three disulfide bridges. In immunological double diffusion assays, the chymotrypsin inhibitor and the carboxypeptidase inhibitor do not crossreact; however, automatic Edman degradation of reduced and alkylated derivatives of the chymotrypsin inhibitor, yielding a partial sequence of 18 amino acid residues at the NH2-terminus, reveals a similarity in sequence to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor. Thus, inhibitors directed toward two distinct classes of proteases, the serine endopeptidases and the metallocarboxypeptidases, appear to have evolved from a common ancestor. Images PMID:1064864

  13. Inhibitor development in non-severe haemophilia across Europe.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Kathelijn; Iorio, Alfonso; Lassila, Riitta; Peyvandi, Flora; Calizzani, Gabriele; Gatt, Alex; Lambert, Thierry; Windyga, Jerzy; Gilman, Estelle A; Hollingsworth, R; Makris, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Evidence about inhibitor formation in non-severe haemophilia and the potential role for clotting factor concentrate type is scant. It was the aim of this study to report inhibitor development in non-severe haemophilia patients enrolled in the European Haemophilia Safety Surveillance (EUHASS) study. Inhibitors are reported quarterly and total treated patients annually. Incidence rates and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated according to diagnosis and concentrate used. Between 1-10-2008 and 31-12-2012, 68 centres reported on 7,969 patients with non-severe haemophilia A and 1,863 patients with non-severe haemophilia B. For haemophilia A, 37 inhibitors occurred in 8,622 treatment years, resulting in an inhibitor rate of 0.43/100 treatment years (95% CI 0.30-0.59). Inhibitors occurred at a median age of 35 years, after a median of 38 exposure days (EDs; P25-P75: 20-80); with 72% occurring within the first 50 EDs. In haemophilia B, one inhibitor was detected in 2,149 treatment years, resulting in an inhibitor rate of 0.05/100 years (95% CI 0.001-0.26). This inhibitor developed at the age of six years, after six EDs. The rate of inhibitors appeared similar across recombinant and plasma derived factor VIII (FVIII) concentrates. Rates for individual concentrates could not be calculated at this stage due to low number of events. In conclusion, inhibitors in non-severe haemophilia occur three times more frequently than in previously treated patients with severe haemophilia at a rate of 0.43/100 patient years (haemophilia A) and 0.05/100 years (haemophilia B). Although the majority of inhibitors developed in the first 50 EDs, inhibitor development continued with increasing exposure to FVIII.

  14. Structural determinants of Tau aggregation inhibitor potency.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Kelsey N; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-11-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers.

  15. Structural Determinants of Tau Aggregation Inhibitor Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J.; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers. PMID:24072703

  16. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-08

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC{sub 50}), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC{sub 50}) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1{sub IIIB} were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  17. Tools for Characterizing Bacterial Protein Synthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Skylar; Kaushal, Bindiya; Almutairi, Mashal M.; Liu, Haipeng; Ochabowicz, Anna; Quan, Selwyn; Pham, Van Cuong; Squires, Catherine L.; Murphy, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many antibiotics inhibit the growth of sensitive bacteria by interfering with ribosome function. However, discovery of new protein synthesis inhibitors is curbed by the lack of facile techniques capable of readily identifying antibiotic target sites and modes of action. Furthermore, the frequent rediscovery of known antibiotic scaffolds, especially in natural product extracts, is time-consuming and expensive and diverts resources that could be used toward the isolation of novel lead molecules. In order to avoid these pitfalls and improve the process of dereplication of chemically complex extracts, we designed a two-pronged approach for the characterization of inhibitors of protein synthesis (ChIPS) that is suitable for the rapid identification of the site and mode of action on the bacterial ribosome. First, we engineered antibiotic-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strains that contain only one rRNA operon. These strains are used for the rapid isolation of resistance mutants in which rRNA mutations identify the site of the antibiotic action. Second, we show that patterns of drug-induced ribosome stalling on mRNA, monitored by primer extension, can be used to elucidate the mode of antibiotic action. These analyses can be performed within a few days and provide a rapid and efficient approach for identifying the site and mode of action of translation inhibitors targeting the bacterial ribosome. Both techniques were validated using a bacterial strain whose culture extract, composed of unknown metabolites, exhibited protein synthesis inhibitory activity; we were able to rapidly detect the presence of the antibiotic chloramphenicol. PMID:24041905

  18. Kynurenine Aminotransferase Isozyme Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Alireza; Sun, Guanchen; Jayawickrama, Gayan S.; Church, W. Bret

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine aminotransferase isozymes (KATs 1–4) are members of the pyridoxal-5’-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme family, which catalyse the permanent conversion of l-kynurenine (l-KYN) to kynurenic acid (KYNA), a known neuroactive agent. As KATs are found in the mammalian brain and have key roles in the kynurenine pathway, involved in different categories of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, the KATs are prominent targets in the quest to treat neurodegenerative and cognitive impairment disorders. Recent studies suggest that inhibiting these enzymes would produce effects beneficial to patients with these conditions, as abnormally high levels of KYNA are observed. KAT-1 and KAT-3 share the highest sequence similarity of the isozymes in this family, and their active site pockets are also similar. Importantly, KAT-2 has the major role of kynurenic acid production (70%) in the human brain, and it is considered therefore that suitable inhibition of this isozyme would be most effective in managing major aspects of CNS diseases. Human KAT-2 inhibitors have been developed, but the most potent of them, chosen for further investigations, did not proceed in clinical studies due to the cross toxicity caused by their irreversible interaction with PLP, the required cofactor of the KAT isozymes, and any other PLP-dependent enzymes. As a consequence of the possibility of extensive undesirable adverse effects, it is also important to pursue KAT inhibitors that reversibly inhibit KATs and to include a strategy that seeks compounds likely to achieve substantial interaction with regions of the active site other than the PLP. The main purpose of this treatise is to review the recent developments with the inhibitors of KAT isozymes. This treatise also includes analyses of their crystallographic structures in complex with this enzyme family, which provides further insight for researchers in this and related studies. PMID:27314340

  19. Sifuvirtide, a potent HIV fusion inhibitor peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Rui; Yang, Liu-Meng; Wang, Yun-Hua; Pang, Wei; Tam, Siu-Cheung; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-05-01

    Enfuvirtide (ENF) is currently the only FDA approved HIV fusion inhibitor in clinical use. Searching for more drugs in this category with higher efficacy and lower toxicity seems to be a logical next step. In line with this objective, a synthetic peptide with 36 amino acid residues, called Sifuvirtide (SFT), was designed based on the crystal structure of gp41. In this study, we show that SFT is a potent anti-HIV agent with relatively low cytotoxicity. SFT was found to inhibit replication of all tested HIV strains. The effective concentrations that inhibited 50% viral replication (EC(50)), as determined in all tested strains, were either comparable or lower than benchmark values derived from well-known anti-HIV drugs like ENF or AZT, while the cytotoxic concentrations causing 50% cell death (CC(50)) were relatively high, rendering it an ideal anti-HIV agent. A GST-pull down assay was performed to confirm that SFT is a fusion inhibitor. Furthermore, the activity of SFT on other targets in the HIV life cycle was also investigated, and all assays showed negative results. To further understand the mechanism of action of HIV peptide inhibitors, resistant variants of HIV-1(IIIB) were derived by serial virus passage in the presence of increasing doses of SFT or ENF. The results showed that there was cross-resistance between SFT and ENF. In conclusion, SFT is an ideal anti-HIV agent with high potency and low cytotoxicity, but may exhibit a certain extent of cross-resistance with ENF.

  20. Nanomolar Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei RNA Triphosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul; Ho, C. Kiong; Takagi, Yuko; Djaballah, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryal taxa differ with respect to the structure and mechanism of the RNA triphosphatase (RTPase) component of the mRNA capping apparatus. Protozoa, fungi, and certain DNA viruses have a metal-dependent RTPase that belongs to the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) superfamily. Because the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms of the TTM-type RTPases differ from those of mammalian RTPases, the TTM RTPases are potential targets for antiprotozoal, antifungal, and antiviral drug discovery. Here, we employed RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown methods to show that Trypanosoma brucei RTPase Cet1 (TbCet1) is necessary for proliferation of procyclic cells in culture. We then conducted a high-throughput biochemical screen for small-molecule inhibitors of the phosphohydrolase activity of TbCet1. We identified several classes of chemicals—including chlorogenic acids, phenolic glycopyranosides, flavonoids, and other phenolics—that inhibit TbCet1 with nanomolar to low-micromolar 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s). We confirmed the activity of these compounds, and tested various analogs thereof, by direct manual assays of TbCet1 phosphohydrolase activity. The most potent nanomolar inhibitors included tetracaffeoylquinic acid, 5-galloylgalloylquinic acid, pentagalloylglucose, rosmarinic acid, and miquelianin. TbCet1 inhibitors were less active (or inactive) against the orthologous TTM-type RTPases of mimivirus, baculovirus, and budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Our results affirm that a TTM RTPase is subject to potent inhibition by small molecules, with the caveat that parallel screens against TTM RTPases from multiple different pathogens may be required to fully probe the chemical space of TTM inhibition. PMID:26908574