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Sample records for inhibitor targeting kit

  1. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspour Babaei, Maryam; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Saleem, Mohammad; Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ahmadipour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c-Kit for future cancer therapy. In addition, it has c-Kit inhibitor drug properties and their functions have been listed in tables and demonstrated in schematic pictures. This review also has collected previous studies that targeted c-Kit as a novel strategy for cancer therapy. This paper further emphasizes the advantages of this approach, as well as the limitations that must be addressed in the future. Finally, although c-Kit is an attractive target for cancer therapy, based on the outcomes of treatment of patients with c-Kit inhibitors, it is unlikely that Kit inhibitors alone can lead to cure. It seems that c-Kit mutations alone are not sufficient for tumorogenesis, but do play a crucial role in cancer occurrence. PMID:27536065

  2. Masitinib (AB1010), a Potent and Selective Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Targeting KIT

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, Patrice; Letard, Sébastien; Ciufolini, Marco; Gros, Laurent; Humbert, Martine; Castéran, Nathalie; Borge, Laurence; Hajem, Bérengère; Lermet, Anne; Sippl, Wolfgang; Voisset, Edwige; Arock, Michel; Auclair, Christian; Leventhal, Phillip S.; Mansfield, Colin D.; Moussy, Alain; Hermine, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Background The stem cell factor receptor, KIT, is a target for the treatment of cancer, mastocytosis, and inflammatory diseases. Here, we characterise the in vitro and in vivo profiles of masitinib (AB1010), a novel phenylaminothiazole-type tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets KIT. Methodology/Principal Findings In vitro, masitinib had greater activity and selectivity against KIT than imatinib, inhibiting recombinant human wild-type KIT with an half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 200±40 nM and blocking stem cell factor-induced proliferation and KIT tyrosine phosphorylation with an IC50 of 150±80 nM in Ba/F3 cells expressing human or mouse wild-type KIT. Masitinib also potently inhibited recombinant PDGFR and the intracellular kinase Lyn, and to a lesser extent, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. In contrast, masitinib demonstrated weak inhibition of ABL and c-Fms and was inactive against a variety of other tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. This highly selective nature of masitinib suggests that it will exhibit a better safety profile than other tyrosine kinase inhibitors; indeed, masitinib-induced cardiotoxicity or genotoxicity has not been observed in animal studies. Molecular modelling and kinetic analysis suggest a different mode of binding than imatinib, and masitinib more strongly inhibited degranulation, cytokine production, and bone marrow mast cell migration than imatinib. Furthermore, masitinib potently inhibited human and murine KIT with activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain. In vivo, masitinib blocked tumour growth in mice with subcutaneous grafts of Ba/F3 cells expressing a juxtamembrane KIT mutant. Conclusions Masitinib is a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting KIT that is active, orally bioavailable in vivo, and has low toxicity. PMID:19789626

  3. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Induce Down-Regulation of c-Kit by Targeting the ATP Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Descarpentries, Clotilde; Frisan, Emilie; Adam, Kevin; Verdier, Frederique; Floquet, Célia; Dubreuil, Patrice; Lacombe, Catherine; Fontenay, Michaela; Mayeux, Patrick; Kosmider, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The stem cell factor receptor (SCF) c-Kit plays a pivotal role in regulating cell proliferation and survival in many cell types. In particular, c-Kit is required for early amplification of erythroid progenitors, while it must disappear from cell surface for the cell entering the final steps of maturation in an erythropoietin-dependent manner. We initially observed that imatinib (IM), an inhibitor targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of c-Kit concomitantly down-regulated the expression of c-Kit and accelerated the Epo-driven differentiation of erythroblasts in the absence of SCF. We investigated the mechanism by which IM or related masitinib (MA) induce c-Kit down-regulation in the human UT-7/Epo cell line. We found that the down-regulation of c-Kit in the presence of IM or MA was inhibited by a pre-incubation with methyl-β-cyclodextrin suggesting that c-Kit was internalized in the absence of ligand. By contrast to SCF, the internalization induced by TKI was independent of the E3 ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl. Furthermore, c-Kit was degraded through lysosomal, but not proteasomal pathway. In pulse-chase experiments, IM did not modulate c-Kit synthesis or maturation. Analysis of phosphotyrosine peptides in UT-7/Epo cells treated or not with IM show that IM did not modify overall tyrosine phosphorylation in these cells. Furthermore, we showed that a T670I mutation preventing the full access of IM to the ATP binding pocket, did not allow the internalization process in the presence of IM. Altogether these data show that TKI-induced internalization of c-Kit is linked to a modification of the integrity of ATP binding pocket. PMID:23637779

  4. Discovery of amido-benzisoxazoles as potent c-Kit inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Roxanne K.; Rumfelt, Shannon; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Dawei; Tasker, Andrew S.; Bürli, Roland; Hungate, Randall; Yu, Violeta; Nguyen, Yen; Whittington, Douglas A.; Meagher, Kristin L.; Plant, Matthew; Tudor, Yanyan; Schrag, Michael; Xu, Yang; Ng, Gordon Y.; Hu, Essa

    2010-01-12

    Deregulation of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit is associated with an increasing number of human diseases, including certain cancers and mast cell diseases. Interference of c-Kit signaling with multi-kinase inhibitors has been shown clinically to successfully treat gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mastocytosis. Targeted therapy of c-Kit activity may provide therapeutic advantages against off-target effects for non-oncology applications. A new structural class of c-Kit inhibitors is described, including in vitro c-Kit potency, kinase selectivity, and the observed binding mode.

  5. Development and biological evaluation of potent and selective c-KIT(D816V) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soyoung; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Jinhee; Lee, Suhyun; Kim, Soo Jung; Choi, Byong-Seok; Hong, Soon-Sun; Hong, Sungwoo

    2014-08-14

    The c-KIT tyrosine kinase has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for an array of diseases. However, there exists a drug resistance that is caused by mutations in c-KIT; therefore, c-KIT remains as a clinical challenge due to limited effective treatment options for therapies. For example, the acquired activating point mutation D816V significantly impairs the efficacy of targeted cancer therapies. Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance at the molecular level will aid in designing and developing particular inhibitors with the potential to overcome these resistance mutations. We undertake a structure-based de novo design of 7-azaindole as the molecular core using the modified scoring function. This approach led to an identification of new c-KIT inhibitors over 100-fold specific for the D816V mutant relative to the wild-type c-KIT with nanomolar inhibitory activity. More importantly, these compounds potently inhibit clinically relevant D816V mutations of c-KIT in biochemical and cellular studies.

  6. Pharmacological inhibitors of c-KIT block mutant c-KIT mediated migration of melanocytes and melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Posch, Christian; Moslehi, Homayoun; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Green, Gary; Vujic, Igor; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2016-07-19

    Mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase c-KIT (KIT) are frequent oncogenic alterations in melanoma and are predominantly detected in tumors of acral, mucosal, and chronically sun-damaged skin. Research indicates that melanocytes with aberrant KIT signaling can be found in the distant periphery of the primary tumor; However, it is hitherto unknown whether KIT might confer a migratory advantage, thereby enabling genetically abnormal cells to populate a distal area. In this study, we investigated the role of mutant KIT in melanocyte- and melanoma cell migration using KIT mutant lines as well as genetically manipulated murine and primary human melanocytes. Our results revealed that melanocytes, stably transduced with mutant KIT closed a gap inflicted on cell monolayers faster than wild-type controls. Similarly, KIT mutant human melanoma lines were able to populate a larger area in a 3D in vitro skin model compared to KIT wild type and BRAF mutant lines. Genomic profiling revealed that genes associated with increased cell-dispersal of KIT mutant variants were linked to a statistically significant up-regulation of 60 migratory genes (z-score 1.334; p=0.0001). In addition, in vivo experiments harnessing a mouse xenograft model of early melanoma development demonstrated rapid lateral migration of KIT mutant cells compared to respective controls. The specific kinase inhibitors imatinib and nilotinib, could abrogate this migratory advantage in vitro and in vivo. Our work suggests that KIT inhibition might help to target migratory active, KIT mutant melanoma cells, thus representing a potential strategy to reduce spread and local recurrence.

  7. Pharmacological inhibitors of c-KIT block mutant c-KIT mediated migration of melanocytes and melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Christian; Moslehi, Homayoun; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Green, Gary; Vujic, Igor; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase c-KIT (KIT) are frequent oncogenic alterations in melanoma and are predominantly detected in tumors of acral, mucosal, and chronically sun-damaged skin. Research indicates that melanocytes with aberrant KIT signaling can be found in the distant periphery of the primary tumor; However, it is hitherto unknown whether KIT might confer a migratory advantage, thereby enabling genetically abnormal cells to populate a distal area. In this study, we investigated the role of mutant KIT in melanocyte- and melanoma cell migration using KIT mutant lines as well as genetically manipulated murine and primary human melanocytes. Our results revealed that melanocytes, stably transduced with mutant KIT closed a gap inflicted on cell monolayers faster than wild-type controls. Similarly, KIT mutant human melanoma lines were able to populate a larger area in a 3D in vitro skin model compared to KIT wild type and BRAF mutant lines. Genomic profiling revealed that genes associated with increased cell-dispersal of KIT mutant variants were linked to a statistically significant up-regulation of 60 migratory genes (z-score 1.334; p=0.0001). In addition, in vivo experiments harnessing a mouse xenograft model of early melanoma development demonstrated rapid lateral migration of KIT mutant cells compared to respective controls. The specific kinase inhibitors imatinib and nilotinib, could abrogate this migratory advantage in vitro and in vivo. Our work suggests that KIT inhibition might help to target migratory active, KIT mutant melanoma cells, thus representing a potential strategy to reduce spread and local recurrence. PMID:27322141

  8. Design and pharmacology of a highly specific dual FMS and KIT kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Ibrahim, Prabha N; Zhang, Jiazhong; Burton, Elizabeth A; Habets, Gaston; Zhang, Ying; Powell, Ben; West, Brian L; Matusow, Bernice; Tsang, Garson; Shellooe, Rafe; Carias, Heidi; Nguyen, Hoa; Marimuthu, Adhirai; Zhang, Kam Y J; Oh, Angela; Bremer, Ryan; Hurt, Clarence R; Artis, Dean R; Wu, Guoxian; Nespi, Marika; Spevak, Wayne; Lin, Paul; Nolop, Keith; Hirth, Peter; Tesch, Greg H; Bollag, Gideon

    2013-04-02

    Inflammation and cancer, two therapeutic areas historically addressed by separate drug discovery efforts, are now coupled in treatment approaches by a growing understanding of the dynamic molecular dialogues between immune and cancer cells. Agents that target specific compartments of the immune system, therefore, not only bring new disease modifying modalities to inflammatory diseases, but also offer a new avenue to cancer therapy by disrupting immune components of the microenvironment that foster tumor growth, progression, immune evasion, and treatment resistance. McDonough feline sarcoma viral (v-fms) oncogene homolog (FMS) and v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) are two hematopoietic cell surface receptors that regulate the development and function of macrophages and mast cells, respectively. We disclose a highly specific dual FMS and KIT kinase inhibitor developed from a multifaceted chemical scaffold. As expected, this inhibitor blocks the activation of macrophages, osteoclasts, and mast cells controlled by these two receptors. More importantly, the dual FMS and KIT inhibition profile has translated into a combination of benefits in preclinical disease models of inflammation and cancer.

  9. Targeted therapy in melanoma - the role of BRAF, RAS and KIT mutations.

    PubMed

    Goldinger, Simone M; Murer, Carla; Stieger, Pascale; Dummer, Reinhard

    2013-09-01

    Melanoma today is considered as a spectrum of melanocytic malignancies characterised by clinical and molecular features, including targetable mutations in several kinases such as BRAF or c-KIT. The successful development of therapies targeting these mutations has resulted in new specific treatment options. These include vemurafenib, dabrafenib, trametinib, imatinib and other kinase inhibitors that are selected when the respective mutation is present. The BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib has resulted in improved survival in patients with BRAF-mutated advanced melanoma. Dabrafenib has shown similar efficacy. The MEK inhibitor trametinib also improved overall survival. In addition, the MEK inhibitor MEK 162 was investigated in a phase II clinical trial and showed promising efficacy in terms of response rate and progression-free survival (PFS) in NRAS-mutated melanomas. After this first success in the treatment of advanced melanoma, there is expectation that combinations of kinase inhibitors will additionally improve overall survival rates and PFS in advanced melanoma.

  10. Targeting c-kit receptor in neuroblastomas and colorectal cancers using stem cell factor (SCF)-based recombinant bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Pardo, Alessa; Rosinke, Reinhard; Batra, Janendra K; Barth, Stefan; Verma, Rama S

    2016-01-01

    Autocrine activation of c-kit (KIT receptor tyrosine kinase) has been postulated to be a potent oncogenic driver in small cell lung cancer, neuroblastoma (NB), and poorly differentiated colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although targeted therapy involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as imatinib mesylate is highly effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumor carrying V560G c-kit mutation, it does not show much potential for targeting wild-type KIT (WT-KIT). Our study demonstrates the role of stem cell factor (SCF)-based toxin conjugates for targeting WT-KIT-overexpressing malignancies such as NBs and CRCs. We constructed SCF-based recombinant bacterial toxins by genetically fusing mutated form of natural ligand SCF to receptor binding deficient forms of Diphtheria toxin (DT) or Pseudomonas exotoxin A (ETA') and evaluated their efficacy in vitro. Efficient targeting was achieved in all receptor-positive neuroblastoma (IMR-32 and SHSY5Y) and colon cancer cell lines (COLO 320DM, HCT 116, and DLD-1) but not in receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7) thereby proving specificity. While dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines, COLO 320DM and HCT 116 cells, only an anti-proliferative effect was observed in DLD-1 cells. We prove that these novel targeting agents have promising potential as KIT receptor tyrosine kinase targeting system.

  11. Targeting kit activation: a potential therapeutic approach in the treatment of allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bettina M; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases is increasing worldwide. Hence, there is continued need for novel pharmacological therapies for the treatment of these disorders. As the mast cell is one of the essential cells that contributes to the inflammation associated with allergic diseases, this cell type remains an attractive target for such pharmacological intervention. Mast cells are major players in the early phase of the allergic response since they generate and release a variety of inflammatory mediators following antigen-dependent aggregation of IgE-bound FcepsilonRI (high affinity IgE-receptor) on the cell surface. These mediators also contribute to the late and chronic stages of allergic inflammation. Thus, the IgE/antigen response has been a major focus in the development of new drugs targeting mast cells. The essential role that stem cell factor (SCF) and its receptor, Kit, play in mast cell biology, however, may provide us with an alternative or adjunct therapy. SCF is necessary for mast cell development, proliferation and survival, but it is also known to play a role in homing and adhesion of mast cells. Furthermore, there is an increasing amount of literature demonstrating that SCF is necessary for optimal IgE/antigen-induced mast cell degranulation and cytokine production. Several drug candidates targeting SCF and/or Kit have been studied for their anti-allergic properties. These include anti-SCF antibodies, antisense oligonucleotides, Kit inhibitors, and inhibitors of downstream signaling molecules. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of SCF and Kit in mast cell activation and discuss potential drug candidates for targeting this response.

  12. PCR inhibitor removal using the NucleoSpin® DNA Clean-Up XS kit.

    PubMed

    Faber, Korie L; Person, Eric C; Hudlow, William R

    2013-01-01

    Forensic evidence samples are collected from an unlimited variety of substrates, which may contain compounds known to inhibit the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These PCR inhibitors are co-extracted with the DNA sample and can negatively affect the DNA typing results, which can range from partial to complete inhibition of the short tandem repeat (STR) PCR. One potential solution is to remove the PCR inhibitors from the extracts prior to the STR PCR with the NucleoSpin(®) DNA Clean-Up XS kit. The kit contains a NucleoSpin(®) XS silica column that has a special funnel design of thrust rings along with a very small silica membrane, which allows for sample elution in a small volume that is appropriate for use with current STR typing kits. The NucleoSpin(®) DNA Clean-Up XS kit was optimized for the best possible DNA recovery and then evaluated for its ability to remove eight commonly encountered PCR inhibitors including: bile salt, collagen, hematin, humic acid, indigo, melanin, tannic acid and urea. Each of these PCR inhibitors was effectively removed by the NucleoSpin(®) DNA Clean-Up XS kit as demonstrated by generating more complete STR profiles from the cleaned up inhibitor samples than from the raw inhibitor samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of di-aryl urea derivatives as c-Kit inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ravez, Séverine; Arsenlis, Stéphane; Barczyk, Amélie; Dupont, Anthony; Frédérick, Raphaël; Hesse, Stéphanie; Kirsch, Gilbert; Depreux, Patrick; Goossens, Laurence

    2015-11-15

    Inhibition of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) continued to be a successful approach for the treatment of many types of human cancers and many potent small molecules kinase inhibitors have been discovered the last decade. In the present study, we describe the synthesis of thienopyrimidine derivatives and their pharmacological evaluation against nine kinases (EGFR, PDGFR-ß, c-Kit, c-Met, Src, Raf, VEGFR-1, -2 and -3). Most of the synthesized compounds showed from moderate to potent activities against c-Kit with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Among them, 4-anilino(urea)thienopyrimidine analogs showed selectivity and potent c-Kit inhibition with IC50 values less than 6 nM. Docking simulation was performed for the most promising compound 9 into the c-Kit active site to determine the potential binding mode. This study reveal that the 4-anilino(urea)thienopyrimidine is an interesting scaffold to design novel potent and selective c-Kit inhibitors which may make promising candidates for cancers where c-Kit receptors are overexpressed.

  14. Anti-KIT Monoclonal Antibody Treatment Enhances the Anti-Tumor Activity of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors by Reversing Tumor-Induced Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Garton, Andrew J; Seibel, Scott; Lopresti-Morrow, Lori; Crew, Linda; Janson, Neal; Mandiyan, Sreekala; Trombetta, E Sergio; Pankratz, Shannon; LaVallee, Theresa M; Gedrich, Richard

    2017-01-30

    The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is an established oncogenic driver of tumor growth in certain tumor types including gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), in which constitutively active mutant forms of KIT represent an actionable target for small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. There is also considerable potential for KIT to influence tumor growth indirectly based on its expression and function in cell types of the innate immune system, most notably mast cells. We have evaluated syngeneic mouse tumor models for anti-tumor effects of an inhibitory KIT monoclonal antibody (mAb), dosed either alone or in combination with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Anti-KIT mAb treatment enhanced the anti-tumor activity of anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 mAbs, and promoted immune responses by selectively reducing the immunosuppressive monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cell (M-MDSC) population and restoring CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell populations to levels observed in naïve mice. These data provide a rationale for clinical investigation of the human KIT-specific mAb KTN0158 in novel immuno-oncology combinations with immune checkpoint inhibitors and other immunotherapeutic agents across a range of tumor types.

  15. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor in A431 squamous cell carcinoma xenografts is mediated by c-Kit pathway transduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixia; Yang, Xiaokun; Zhao, Bei; Cai, Zhen

    2015-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor inhibitors (EGFRIs), the first targeted cancer therapy, are currently an essential treatment for many advance-stage epithelial cancers. These agents have the superior ability to target cancers cells and better safety profile compared to conventional chemotherapies. However, all responding patients eventually developed acquired resistance to EGFRIs and the mechanisms of acquired resistance invariably develops. In the current study, we reported the tumor xenografts of the human A431 squamous cell carcinoma, after 25-week consecutive therapy with EGFR inhibitor (gefitinib) that developed resistance as a result of c-Kit overexpression. Moreover, combined therapeutic inhibition of EGFR and c-Kit may abrogate this acquired mechanism of drug resistance due to an enhanced apoptotic effect in gefitinib-resistant xenograft model. Taken together, the results suggest that at least in the A431 xenograft model displaying acquired resistance to gefitinib can emerge in vivo, at least in part, by mechanisms involving the c-Kit overexpression.

  16. Heat shock protein 90 inhibition results in altered downstream signaling of mutant KIT and exerts synergistic effects on Kasumi-1 cells when combining with histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianxiang; Jin, Jie; Qian, Wenbin; Qian, Jiejing; Cheng, Yizhi; Wang, Lei

    2011-09-01

    KIT mutations may be associated with a poor prognosis in t(8;21) AML. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone frequently used by cancer cells to stabilize mutant oncoproteins. Inhibition of Hsp90 by 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) disrupted downstream signaling pathways of mutant KIT in Kasumi-1 cells. AML1-ETO fusion gene and mutated KIT act as "two-hit" factors in Kasumi-1 cells. Histone deacetylation (HDAC) inhibitors sodium phenylbutyrate (PB) and valproic acid (VPA) block AML1-ETO. Co-treatment with 17-AAG and PB or 17-AAG and VPA resulted in a synergistic effect in Kasumi-1 cells. Our results confirmed that Hsp90 and mutated KIT were valid molecular targets in the therapy of AML. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeting telomerase with radiolabeled inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Waghorn, Philip A; Jackson, Mark R; Gouverneur, Veronique; Vallis, Katherine A

    2017-01-05

    The expression of telomerase in approximately 85% of cancers and its absence in the majority of normal cells makes it an attractive target for cancer therapy. However the lag period between initiation of telomerase inhibition and growth arrest makes direct inhibition alone an insufficient method of treatment. However, telomerase inhibition has been shown to enhance cancer cell radiosensitivity. To investigate the strategy of simultaneously inhibiting telomerase while delivering targeted radionuclide therapy to cancer cells, (123)I-radiolabeled inhibitors of telomerase were synthesized and their effects on cancer cell survival studied. An (123)I-labeled analogue of the telomerase inhibitor MST-312 inhibited telomerase with an IC50 of 1.58 μM (MST-312 IC50: 0.23 μM). Clonogenic assays showed a dose dependant effect of (123)I-MST-312 on cell survival in a telomerase positive cell line, MDA-MB-435. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  18. The effects of metal ion PCR inhibitors on results obtained with the Quantifiler(®) Human DNA Quantification Kit.

    PubMed

    Combs, Laura Gaydosh; Warren, Joseph E; Huynh, Vivian; Castaneda, Joanna; Golden, Teresa D; Roby, Rhonda K

    2015-11-01

    targets human DNA in the Quantifiler(®) kit. Evidence of inhibition was observed for the human-specific assay at a lower metal concentration than detected by the IPC, for all metals examined except calcium. These results strongly suggest that determination of a "true negative" sample should not be based solely on the failure of the IPC to indicate the presence of a PCR inhibitor and indicate that amplification of all samples should be attempted, regardless of the quantification results.

  19. The novel HSP90 inhibitor STA-9090 exhibits activity against Kit-dependent and -independent malignant mast cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Bear, Misty; Du, Zhenjian; Foley, Kevin P.; Ying, Weiwen; Barsoum, James; London, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mutations of the receptor tyrosine kinase Kit occur in several human and canine cancers. While Kit inhibitors have activity in the clinical setting, they possess variable efficacy against particular forms of mutant Kit and drug resistance often develops over time. Inhibitors of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), a chaperone for which Kit is a client protein, have demonstrated activity against human cancers and evidence suggests they downregulate several mutated and imatinib-resistant forms of Kit. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel HSP90 inhibitor, STA-9090, against wild-type (WT) and mutant Kit in canine bone marrow–derived cultured mast cells (BMCMCs), malignant mast cell lines, and fresh malignant mast cells. Materials and Methods BMCMCs, cell lines, and fresh malignant mast cells were treated with STA-9090, 17-AAG, and SU11654 and evaluated for loss in cell viability, cell death, alterations in HSP90 and Kit expression/signaling, and Kit mutation. STA-9090 activity was tested in a canine mastocytoma xenograft model. Results Treatment of BMCMCs, cell lines, and fresh malignant cells with STA-9090 induced growth inhibition, apoptosis that was caspase-3/7–dependent, and downregulation of phospho/total Kit and Akt, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K). Loss of Kit cell-surface expression was also observed. Furthermore, STA-9090 exhibited superior activity to 17-AAG and SU11654, and was effective against malignant mast cells expressing either WT or mutant Kit. Lastly, STA-9090 inhibited tumor growth in a canine mastocytoma mouse xenograft model. Conclusions STA-9090 exhibits broad activity against mast cells expressing WT or mutant Kit, suggesting it may be an effective agent in the clinical setting against mast cell malignancies. PMID:18657349

  20. Intranasal sirna targeting c-kit reduces airway inflammation in experimental allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Chen, Hui; Li, Ya-Ming; Wang, Sheng-Yu; Diao, Xin; Liu, Kai-Ge

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by airway inflammation caused by infiltration and activation of inflammatory cells that produce cytokines. Many studies have revealed that c-kit, a proto-oncogene, and its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), play an important role in the development of asthmatic inflammation. Intranasal small interference RNA (siRNA) nanoparticles targeting specific viral gene could inhibit airway inflammation. In this study, we assessed whether silencing of c-kit with intranasal small interference RNA could reduce inflammation in allergic asthma. A mouse model of experimental asthma was treated with intranasal administration of anti-c-kit siRNA to inhibit the expression of the c-kit gene. We assessed the inflammatory response in both anti-c-kit siRNA-treated and control mice. Local administration of siRNA effectively inhibited the expression of the c-kit gene and reduced airway mucus secretion and the infiltration of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, c-kit siRNA reduced the production of SCF, interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-5, but had no effect on interferon-γ (IFN-γ) generation. These results show that intranasal siRNA nanoparticles targeting c-kit can decrease the inflammatory response in experimental allergic asthma.

  1. Assessing the Utility of Soil DNA Extraction Kits for Increasing DNA Yields and Eliminating PCR Inhibitors from Buried Skeletal Remains.

    PubMed

    Hebda, Lisa M; Foran, David R

    2015-09-01

    DNA identification of human remains is often necessary when decedents are skeletonized; however, poor DNA recovery and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibition are frequently encountered, a situation exacerbated by burial. In this research, the utility of integrating soil DNA isolation kits into buried skeletal DNA analysis was evaluated and compared to a standard human DNA extraction kit and organic extraction. The soil kits successfully extracted skeletal DNA at quantities similar to standard methods, although the two kits tested, which differ mechanistically, were not equivalent. Further, the PCR inhibitors calcium and humic acid were effectively removed using the soil kits, whereas collagen was less so. Finally, concordant control region sequences were obtained from human skeletal remains using all four methods. Based on these comparisons, soil DNA isolation kits, which quickened the extraction process, proved to be a viable extraction technique for skeletal remains that resulted in positive identification of a decedent.

  2. Discovery of Dual Inhibitors for Wild Type and D816V Mutant of c-KIT Kinase through Virtual and Biochemical Screening of Natural Products.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwangseo; Lee, Soyoung; Hong, Sungwoo

    2016-02-26

    Although stem cell factor receptor (c-KIT) kinase is responsible for various malignant human cancers, the presence of constitutively active gain-of-function mutants has made it difficult to discover new anticancer agents using c-KIT as the target protein. To identify the common inhibitors of wild-type c-KIT and the most abundant gain-of-function mutant (D816V), the virtual screening of natural products was performed for the two target proteins in parallel with the scoring function improved by implementing a sophisticated solvation free energy term. As a result, four common inhibitors of natural origin are found with biochemical potencies ranging from low micromolar to submicromolar levels. The results of extensive docking simulations show that although the natural-product inhibitors establish weaker hydrophobic interactions with the D816V mutant than with the wild type, they exhibit a little higher inhibitory activity for the former than the latter by strengthening the hydrogen-bond interactions to a sufficient extent. Of the four natural-product inhibitors, (Z)-6-hydroxy-2-(4-methoxybenzylidene)benzofuran-3(2H)-one (3) is anticipated to serve as a new molecular core for the structure-activity relationship studies to optimize the biochemical potencies because it exhibits good inhibitory activity against both the wild type and D816V mutant despite its low molecular weight (268.3 amu).

  3. OSI-930: a novel selective inhibitor of Kit and kinase insert domain receptor tyrosine kinases with antitumor activity in mouse xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Garton, Andrew J; Crew, Andrew P A; Franklin, Maryland; Cooke, Andrew R; Wynne, Graham M; Castaldo, Linda; Kahler, Jennifer; Winski, Shannon L; Franks, April; Brown, Eric N; Bittner, Mark A; Keily, John F; Briner, Paul; Hidden, Chris; Srebernak, Mary C; Pirrit, Carrie; O'Connor, Matthew; Chan, Anna; Vulevic, Bojana; Henninger, Dwight; Hart, Karen; Sennello, Regina; Li, An-Hu; Zhang, Tao; Richardson, Frank; Emerson, David L; Castelhano, Arlindo L; Arnold, Lee D; Gibson, Neil W

    2006-01-15

    OSI-930 is a novel inhibitor of the receptor tyrosine kinases Kit and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), which is currently being evaluated in clinical studies. OSI-930 selectively inhibits Kit and KDR with similar potency in intact cells and also inhibits these targets in vivo following oral dosing. We have investigated the relationships between the potency observed in cell-based assays in vitro, the plasma exposure levels achieved following oral dosing, the time course of target inhibition in vivo, and antitumor activity of OSI-930 in tumor xenograft models. In the mutant Kit-expressing HMC-1 xenograft model, prolonged inhibition of Kit was achieved at oral doses between 10 and 50 mg/kg and this dose range was associated with antitumor activity. Similarly, prolonged inhibition of wild-type Kit in the NCI-H526 xenograft model was observed at oral doses of 100 to 200 mg/kg, which was the dose level associated with significant antitumor activity in this model as well as in the majority of other xenograft models tested. The data suggest that antitumor activity of OSI-930 in mouse xenograft models is observed at dose levels that maintain a significant level of inhibition of the molecular targets of OSI-930 for a prolonged period. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic evaluation of the plasma exposure levels of OSI-930 at these effective dose levels provides an estimate of the target plasma concentrations that may be required to achieve prolonged inhibition of Kit and KDR in humans and which would therefore be expected to yield a therapeutic benefit in future clinical evaluations of OSI-930.

  4. Structure-based de novo design and identification of D816V mutant-selective c-KIT inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwangseo; Lee, Soyoung; Lee, Suhyun; Hong, Sungwoo

    2014-07-14

    To identify potent and selective inhibitors of D816V, the most common gain-of-function c-KIT mutant, we carried out structure-based de novo design using 7-azaindole as the core and the scoring function improved by implementing an accurate solvation free energy term. This approach led to the identification of new c-KIT inhibitors specific for the D816V mutant. The 3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-7-azaindole scaffold was optimized and represents a lead structure for the design of the potent and specific inhibitors of the D816V mutant. The results of molecular dynamics simulations indicate that hydrogen bonding interactions between the 7-azadindole moiety and the backbone groups of Cys673 are the most significant determinant for the potency and selectivity of c-KIT inhibitors.

  5. Discovery of Aryl Aminoquinazoline Pyridones as Potent, Selective, and Orally Efficacious Inhibitors of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase c-Kit

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Essa; Tasker, Andrew; White, Ryan D.; Kunz, Roxanne K.; Human, Jason; Chen, Ning; Bürli, Roland; Hungate, Randall; Novak, Perry; Itano, Andrea; Zhang, Xuxia; Yu, Violeta; Nguyen, Yen; Tudor, Yanyan; Plant, Matthew; Flynn, Shaun; Xu, Yang; Meagher, Kristin L.; Whittington, Douglas A.; Ng, Gordon Y.

    2008-12-09

    Inhibition of c-Kit has the potential to treat mast cell associated fibrotic diseases. We report the discovery of several aminoquinazoline pyridones that are potent inhibitors of c-Kit with greater than 200-fold selectivity against KDR, p38, Lck, and Src. In vivo efficacy of pyridone 16 by dose-dependent inhibition of histamine release was demonstrated in a rodent pharmacodynamic model of mast cell activation.

  6. Inhibitors targeting two-component signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Okada, Ario; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2008-01-01

    A two-component signal transduction system (TCS) is an attractive target for antibacterial agents. In this chapter, we review the TCS inhibitors developed during the past decade and introduce novel drug discovery systems to isolate the inhibitors of the YycG/YycF system, an essential TCS for bacterial growth, in an effort to develop a new class of antibacterial agents.

  7. Temporal quantitation of mutant Kit tyrosine kinase signaling attenuated by a novel thiophene kinase inhibitor OSI-930.

    PubMed

    Petti, Filippo; Thelemann, April; Kahler, Jen; McCormack, Siobhan; Castaldo, Linda; Hunt, Tony; Nuwaysir, Lydia; Zeiske, Lynn; Haack, Herbert; Sullivan, Laura; Garton, Andrew; Haley, John D

    2005-08-01

    OSI-930, a potent thiophene inhibitor of the Kit, KDR, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, was used to selectively inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of juxtamembrane mutant Kit in the mast cell leukemia line HMC-1. Inhibition of Kit kinase activity resulted in a rapid dephosphorylation of Kit and inhibition of the downstream signaling pathways. Attenuation of Ras-Raf-Erk (phospho-Erk, phospho-p38), phosphatidyl inositol-3' kinase (phospho-p85, phospho-Akt, phospho-S6), and signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling pathways (phospho-STAT3/5/6) were measured by affinity liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, by immunoblot, and by tissue microarrays of fixed cell pellets. To more globally define additional components of Kit signaling temporally altered by kinase inhibition, a novel multiplex quantitative isobaric peptide labeling approach was used. This approach allowed clustering of proteins by temporal expression patterns. Kit kinase, which dephosphorylates rapidly upon kinase inhibition, was shown to regulate both Shp-1 and BDP-1 tyrosine phosphatases and the phosphatase-interacting protein PSTPIP2. Interactions with SH2 domain adapters [growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2), Cbl, Slp-76] and SH3 domain adapters (HS1, cortactin, CD2BP3) were attenuated by inhibition of Kit kinase activity. Functional crosstalk between Kit and the non-receptor tyrosine kinases Fes/Fps, Fer, Btk, and Syk was observed. Inhibition of Kit modulated phosphorylation-dependent interactions with pathways controlling focal adhesion (paxillin, leupaxin, p130CAS, FAK1, the Src family kinase Lyn, Wasp, Fhl-3, G25K, Ack-1, Nap1, SH3P12/ponsin) and septin-actin complexes (NEDD5, cdc11, actin). The combined use of isobaric protein quantitation and expression clustering, immunoblot, and tissue microarray strategies allowed temporal measurement signaling pathways modulated by mutant Kit inhibition in a model of mast cell

  8. Structural basis for KIT receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition by antibodies targeting the D4 membrane-proximal region.

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, Andrey V; Nelson, Bryce; Shi, Xiarong; Boggon, Titus J; Pavlenco, Alevtina; Mandel-Bausch, Elizabeth M; Tome, Francisco; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2013-10-29

    Somatic oncogenic mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT function as major drivers of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and a subset of acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other cancers. Although treatment of these cancers with tyrosine kinase inhibitors shows dramatic responses and durable disease control, drug resistance followed by clinical progression of disease eventually occurs in virtually all patients. In this report, we describe inhibitory KIT antibodies that bind to the membrane-proximal Ig-like D4 of KIT with significant overlap with an epitope in D4 that mediates homotypic interactions essential for KIT activation. Crystal structures of the anti-KIT antibody in complex with KIT D4 and D5 allowed design of affinity-matured libraries that were used to isolate variants with increased affinity and efficacy. Isolated antibodies showed KIT inhibition together with suppression of cell proliferation driven by ligand-stimulated WT or constitutively activated oncogenic KIT mutant. These antibodies represent a unique therapeutic approach and a step toward the development of "naked" or toxin-conjugated KIT antibodies for the treatment of KIT-driven cancers.

  9. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treated canine mast cell tumour cells identifies potentially kit signaling-dependent genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Canine mast cell tumour proliferation depends to a large extent on the activity of KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Inhibitors of the KIT tyrosine kinase have recently been introduced and successfully applied as a therapeutic agent for this tumour type. However, little is known on the downstream target genes of this signaling pathway and molecular changes after inhibition. Results Transcriptome analysis of the canine mast cell tumour cell line C2 treated for up to 72 hours with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor masitinib identified significant changes in the expression levels of approximately 3500 genes or 16% of the canine genome. Approximately 40% of these genes had increased mRNA expression levels including genes associated with the pro-proliferative pathways of B- and T-cell receptors, chemokine receptors, steroid hormone receptors and EPO-, RAS and MAP kinase signaling. Proteome analysis of C2 cells treated for 72 hours identified 24 proteins with changed expression levels, most of which being involved in gene transcription, e.g. EIA3, EIA4, TARDBP, protein folding, e.g. HSP90, UCHL3, PDIA3 and protection from oxidative stress, GSTT3, SELENBP1. Conclusions Transcriptome and proteome analysis of neoplastic canine mast cells treated with masitinib confirmed the strong important and complex role of KIT in these cells. Approximately 16% of the total canine genome and thus the majority of the active genes were significantly transcriptionally regulated. Most of these changes were associated with reduced proliferation and metabolism of treated cells. Interestingly, several pro-proliferative pathways were up-regulated, which may represent attempts of masitinib treated cells to activate alternative pro-proliferative pathways. These pathways may contain hypothetical targets for a combination therapy with masitinib to further improve its therapeutic effect. PMID:22747577

  10. An anticancer C-Kit kinase inhibitor is reengineered to make it more active and less cardiotoxic

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ariel; Sanguino, Angela; Peng, Zhenghong; Ozturk, Eylem; Chen, Jianping; Crespo, Alejandro; Wulf, Sarah; Shavrin, Aleksander; Qin, Chaoping; Ma, Jianpeng; Trent, Jonathan; Lin, Yvonne; Han, Hee-Dong; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri; Samarel, Allen; Bornmann, William; Sood, Anil K.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2007-01-01

    Targeting kinases is central to drug-based cancer therapy but remains challenging because the drugs often lack specificity, which may cause toxic side effects. Modulating side effects is difficult because kinases are evolutionarily and hence structurally related. The lack of specificity of the anticancer drug imatinib enables it to be used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia, where its target is the Bcr-Abl kinase, as well as a proportion of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), where its target is the C-Kit kinase. However, imatinib also has cardiotoxic effects traceable to its impact on the C-Abl kinase. Motivated by this finding, we made a modification to imatinib that hampers Bcr-Abl inhibition; refocuses the impact on the C-Kit kinase; and promotes inhibition of an additional target, JNK, a change that is required to reinforce prevention of cardiotoxicity. We established the molecular blueprint for target discrimination in vitro using spectrophotometric and colorimetric assays and through a phage-displayed kinase screening library. We demonstrated controlled inhibitory impact on C-Kit kinase in human cell lines and established the therapeutic impact of the engineered compound in a novel GIST mouse model, revealing a marked reduction of cardiotoxicity. These findings identify the reengineered imatinib as an agent to treat GISTs with curbed side effects and reveal a bottom-up approach to control drug specificity. PMID:18060038

  11. In silico exploration of c-KIT inhibitors by pharmaco-informatics methodology: pharmacophore modeling, 3D QSAR, docking studies, and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Prashant; Bari, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    c-KIT is a component of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor family, classified as type-III receptor tyrosine kinase. c-KIT has been reported to be involved in, small cell lung cancer, other malignant human cancers, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases associated with mast cells. Available c-KIT inhibitors suffer from tribulations of growing resistance or cardiac toxicity. A combined in silico pharmacophore and structure-based virtual screening was performed to identify novel potential c-KIT inhibitors. In the present study, five molecules from the ZINC database were retrieved as new potential c-KIT inhibitors, using Schrödinger's Maestro 9.0 molecular modeling suite. An atom-featured 3D QSAR model was built using previously reported c-KIT inhibitors containing the indolin-2-one scaffold. The developed 3D QSAR model ADHRR.24 was found to be significant (R2 = 0.9378, Q2 = 0.7832) and instituted to be sufficiently robust with good predictive accuracy, as confirmed through external validation approaches, Y-randomization and GH approach [GH score 0.84 and Enrichment factor (E) 4.964]. The present QSAR model was further validated for the OECD principle 3, in that the applicability domain was calculated using a "standardization approach." Molecular docking of the QSAR dataset molecules and final ZINC hits were performed on the c-KIT receptor (PDB ID: 3G0E). Docking interactions were in agreement with the developed 3D QSAR model. Model ADHRR.24 was explored for ligand-based virtual screening followed by in silico ADME prediction studies. Five molecules from the ZINC database were obtained as potential c-KIT inhibitors with high in -silico predicted activity and strong key binding interactions with the c-KIT receptor.

  12. Selecting patients for KIT inhibition in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Richard D; Hamid, Omid; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2014-01-01

    For many years, melanoma has been regarded as a single disease in terms of therapeutic considerations. The more recent identification of multiple molecular mechanisms underlying the development, progression, and prognosis of melanoma has led to a new paradigm for the management of this disease, has created new therapeutic opportunities, and has led to improved clinical outcomes. Such advances, however, are dependent upon methods that can reproducibly identify key molecular alterations within an individual tumor, define clinically relevant genetic subgroups of disease, and permit improved patient selection for targeted therapies.Melanomas harboring genetic alterations of KIT have been demonstrated to constitute one such molecular subgroup of disease. In this chapter, we will discuss the biology of KIT in melanoma, review the rationale for and clinical data regarding KIT inhibition in melanomas harboring activating alterations of KIT, propose guidelines for the selection of patients for KIT inhibitor therapy, and, finally, present laboratory methods for KIT assessment in melanoma.

  13. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  14. Development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, K; Asyifah, M R; Shao, F; Zhang, D

    2014-06-01

    The HIV-1 envelope protein glycoprotein 41 (gp41) is crucial in the HIV-1 infection process, therefore gp41 has emerged as an attractive target for drug design against AIDS. During the past few decades, tremendous efforts have been made on developing inhibitors that can prevent the HIV-1 entry process via suppressing functional gp41. In this review, the development of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41 including peptide inhibitors, small molecule inhibitors, vaccines and neutralized antibodies will be discussed.

  15. Targeting tumor angiogenesis with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Leigh; Hammers, Hans; Pili, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Solid tumor malignancies including breast, lung and prostate carcinomas are considered to be angiogenesis dependent. Tumor angiogenesis is often mediated by hypoxia secondary to tumor growth or by increased oncogenic signaling. Both mechanisms result in increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) signaling and its transcriptional target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Critical to HIF-1α signaling are post translational modifications including acetylation mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATS) and deacetylation by histone deacetylases (HDACs). More recently, HDACs were shown to be up-regulated in response to hypoxia mediating increased HIF-1α signaling. HDAC inhibitors represent a new class of anti-cancer therapeutics which show great promise at inhibiting angiogenesis in pre-clinical animal models and early phase clinical trials. This review will discuss the role of HIF-1α and VEGF influence on tumor angiogenesis and how HDACs play a critical role in HIF-1α transcriptional activity. Furthermore it will also be discussed how targeting HDACs via their inhibition create new avenues in treating solid malignancies by increasing the activity of established and novel therapeutic applications. PMID:19111391

  16. Global target profile of the kinase inhibitor bosutinib in primary chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Remsing Rix, L L; Rix, U; Colinge, J; Hantschel, O; Bennett, K L; Stranzl, T; Müller, A; Baumgartner, C; Valent, P; Augustin, M; Till, J H; Superti-Furga, G

    2009-03-01

    The detailed molecular mechanism of action of second-generation BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including perturbed targets and pathways, should contribute to rationalized therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) or in other affected diseases. Here, we characterized the target profile of the dual SRC/ABL inhibitor bosutinib employing a two-tiered approach using chemical proteomics to identify natural binders in whole cell lysates of primary CML and K562 cells in parallel to in vitro kinase assays against a large recombinant kinase panel. The combined strategy resulted in a global survey of bosutinib targets comprised of over 45 novel tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. We have found clear differences in the target patterns of bosutinib in primary CML cells versus the K562 cell line. A comparison of bosutinib with dasatinib across the whole kinase panel revealed overlapping, but distinct, inhibition profiles. Common among those were the SRC, ABL and TEC family kinases. Bosutinib did not inhibit KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor, but prominently targeted the apoptosis-linked STE20 kinases. Although in vivo bosutinib is inactive against ABL T315I, we found this clinically important mutant to be enzymatically inhibited in the mid-nanomolar range. Finally, bosutinib is the first kinase inhibitor shown to target CAMK2G, recently implicated in myeloid leukemia cell proliferation.

  17. Molecular alterations of KIT oncogene in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana L; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Lopes, José M; Martinho, Olga; Lambros, Maryou B K; Martins, Albino; Schmitt, Fernando; Pardal, Fernando; Reis, Rui M

    2007-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite therapeutic advances, the majority of gliomas do not respond either to chemo or radiotherapy. KIT, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is frequently involved in tumourigenic processes. Currently, KIT constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. In the present study we assessed the frequency of KIT overexpression in gliomas and investigated the genetic mechanisms underlying KIT overexpression. KIT (CD117) immunohistochemistry was performed in a series of 179 gliomas of various grades. KIT activating gene mutations (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17) and gene amplification analysis, as defined by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) were performed in CD117 positive cases. Tumour cell immunopositivity was detected in 15.6% (28/179) of cases, namely in 25% (1/4) of pilocytic astrocytomas, 25% (5/20) of diffuse astrocytomas, 20% (1/5) of anaplastic astrocytomas, 19.5% (15/77) of glioblastomas and one third (3/9) of anaplastic oligoastrocytomas. Only 5.7% (2/35) of anaplastic oligodendrogliomas showed CD117 immunoreactivity. No association was found between tumour CD117 overexpression and patient survival. In addition, we also observed CD117 overexpression in endothelial cells, which varied from 0-22.2% of cases, being more frequent in high-grade lesions. No KIT activating mutations were identified. Interestingly, CISH and/or qRT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of KIT gene amplification in 6 glioblastomas and 2 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, corresponding to 33% (8/24) of CD117 positive cases. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that KIT gene amplification rather than gene mutation is a common genetic mechanism underlying KIT expression in subset of malignant gliomas. Further studies are warranted to determine whether glioma patients exhibiting KIT overexpression and KIT gene amplification may benefit from therapy with anti-KIT RTK inhibitors.

  18. Radotinib induces high cytotoxicity in c-KIT positive acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Sook-Kyoung; Noh, Eui-Kyu; Kim, Jeong Yi; Jo, Jae-Cheol; Choi, Yunsuk; Koh, SuJin; Baek, Jin Ho; Min, Young Joo; Kim, Hawk

    2017-03-18

    Previously, we reported that radotinib, a BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, induced cytotoxicity in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. However, the effects of radotinib in the subpopulation of c-KIT-positive AML cells were unclear. We observed that low-concentration radotinib had more potent cytotoxicity in c-KIT-positive cells than c-KIT-negative cells from AML patients. To address this issue, cell lines with high c-KIT expression, HEL92.1.7, and moderate c-KIT expression, H209, were selected. HEL92.1.7 cells were grouped into intermediate and high c-KIT expression populations. The cytotoxicity of radotinib against the HEL92.1.7 cell population with intermediate c-KIT expression was not different from that of the population with high c-KIT expression. When H209 cells were grouped into c-KIT expression-negative and c-KIT expression-positive populations, radotinib induced cytotoxicity in the c-KIT-positive population, but not the c-KIT-negative population. Thus, radotinib induces cytotoxicity in c-KIT-positive cells, regardless of the c-KIT expression intensity. Therefore, radotinib induces significant cytotoxicity in c-KIT-positive AML cells, suggesting that radotinib is a potential target agent for the treatment of c-KIT-positive malignancies including AML.

  19. Development and performance of a targeted whole exome sequencing enrichment kit for the dog (Canis Familiaris Build 3.1)

    PubMed Central

    Broeckx, Bart J. G.; Coopman, Frank; Verhoeven, Geert E. C.; Bavegems, Valérie; De Keulenaer, Sarah; De Meester, Ellen; Van Niewerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing is a technique that aims to selectively sequence all exons of protein-coding genes. A canine whole exome sequencing enrichment kit was designed based on the latest canine reference genome (build 3.1.72). Its performance was tested by sequencing 2 exome captures, each consisting of 4 pre-capture pooled, barcoded Illumina libraries on an Illumina HiSeq 2500. At an average sequencing depth of 102x, 83 to 86% of the target regions were completely sequenced with a minimum coverage of five and 90% of the reads mapped on the target regions. Additionally, it is shown that the reproducibility within and between captures is high and that pooling four samples per capture is a valid option. Overall, we have demonstrated the strong performance of this WES enrichment kit and are confident it will be a valuable tool in future disease association studies. PMID:24998260

  20. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamide-17-demethoxygeldanamycin induces apoptosis and differentiation of Kasumi-1 harboring the Asn822Lys KIT mutation and down-regulates KIT protein level.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenjuan; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Tian, Zheng; Lin, Dong; Liu, Xiangrong; Wang, Jianxiang

    2006-05-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) serves as a chaperone for a number of cell signaling proteins, including many tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases, which are involved in proliferation and/or survival. The benzoquinone ansamycin geldanamycin has been shown to bind to Hsp90 and to specifically inhibit this chaperone's function, resulting in client protein destabilization. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a chemical derivative of geldanamycin. KIT is the receptor for stem cell factor (SCF) and required for normal hematopoiesis. Mutations in c-Kit result in ligand-independent tyrosine kinase activity and uncontrolled cell proliferation. Kasumi-1 is t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line harboring mutated KIT with Asn822Lys substitution. Our present studies demonstrate that 17-AAG inhibits Kasumi-1 cells proliferation and exerts apoptosis- and differentiation-inducing effects in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The growth-inhibitory IC50 value for 17-AAG treatment is 0.62mumol/L. Characteristic apoptotic features were confirmed by morphology, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and annexin V staining. 17-AAG also causes the G0/G1 block of Kasumi-1 cells. Significantly, 17-AAG-induced apoptosis of Kasumi-1 cells is associated with a decline in KIT protein level. Our findings strongly suggest that 17-AAG might be an effective therapeutic agent targeting AML cells harboring mutated KIT.

  1. Targeting myeloproliferative neoplasms with JAK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pardanani, Animesh; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of JAK2V617F and other JAK-STAT-activating mutations in BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has led to the development of small-molecule ATP-mimetics that inhibit wild-type and mutant JAK. Here, we review the current experience with JAK inhibitors used for the treatment of myelofibrosis and polycythemia vera/essential thrombocythemia. Consistent with the clonal complexity of MPN, JAK inhibitors have not thus far shown disease-modifying activity; treatment with these agents has however shown clinically meaningful benefits, particularly decreased splenomegaly and improvement in constitutional symptoms, in myelofibrosis patients. Although these benefits accrue with both JAK-2 (TG101348) and JAK-1/2 (INCB018424, CYT387) inhibitors, the mode of action (predominant anticlonal versus anticytokine activity) may be different between the two groups. It is possible that an optimal balance between JAK-1-inhibitory and JAK-2-inhibitory activities may broaden the therapeutic activity (i.e. anemia improvement), as has been preliminarily seen (CYT387). Although JAK inhibitors have important benefits in myelofibrosis therapy, their role in polycythemia vera/essential thrombocythemia treatment is still being defined. The optimal dosing strategy and feasibility for combination with other therapeutic agents remains to be established. Another challenge is the identification of robust primary end-points that will support labeling claims for JAK inhibitors for the aforementioned indications.

  2. SGLT inhibitors: a novel target for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kanwal, Abhinav; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2013-01-01

    Inhibiting sodium-glucose co-transporters (SGLT1/SGLT2), which have a key role in the absorption of glucose in the kidney and/or GI tract has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetes. Thus, screening and patenting of chemical compounds for SGLT1/SGLT2 gets more importance in the development of new drugs in diabetes. Several companies are developing SGLT inhibitors, some of which are now in various stages of clinical development. Some molecules in the pipeline, including dapagliflozin, canagliflozin, ASP1941, BI10773, LX4211, RG7201 and TS071, are at various stages of drug development. This patent review presents the overall progress carried out in the development of SGLT inhibitors over the last decade with the active participation of various pharmaceutical companies. This class of drug is anticipated to have a large impact on diabetes field and predicting to attain a blockbuster status.

  3. [Demethylation effect of inhibitor As2O3 on expression of SHP-1 and C-kit genes in leukemia HL-60 cells].

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Wang, Dong-Mei; Li, Ying-Hua; Liu, Xiao; Guo, Su-Qing; Luo, Jian-Min

    2013-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression level of SHP-1 and C-kit genes in acute leukemia HL-60 cells and effect of inhibitor As2O3 demethylation on SHP-1 and C-kit genes expression. RT-PCR was used to detect the expression level of SHP-1 and C-kit mRNA in drug-treated cell group and control group. The methylation specific PCR (MSP) was applied to measure the methylation status of SHP-1 gene in HL-60 cells. The results showed that after being treated with As2O3 the recovery of SHP-1 gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells in which SHP-1 mRNA originally did not expressed, meanwhile the expression level of C-kit mRNA in HL-60 cells with high expression decreased. When HL-60 cells were treated with As2O3 of 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 µmol/L, the demethylation effects was enhanced, the expression of SHP-1 mRNA displayed an ascending tendency, and expression of C-kit mRNA showed an descending tendency in dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the absence of SHP-1 mRNA expression in HL-60 cells and recovery of expression after treatment with As2O3 suggest the hypermethylation of SHP-1 gene related with pathogenesis of leukemia, and the abnormal increase of C-kit mRNA expression maybe exist in formation of leukemia. The effect of As2O3 on expression of SHP-1 and C-kit shows dose-dependency, the higher the As2O3 concentration, the higher the SHP-1 expression and the lower the C-kit expression, moreover, the effect of As2O3 shows time-dependency in specific concentration. The SHP-1 mRNA expression negatively relates with C-kit mRNA expression, suggesting that the decrease or absence of SHP-1 expression in leukemia cells weakens the negative regulation on C-kit signaling pathway, thus plays a role in the formation of leukemia.

  4. Adnectin-targeted inhibitors: rationale and results.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Esha; Gong, Jun; Rimel, Bobbie; Mita, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Adnectins are a family of binding proteins derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin (10Fn3), which is part of the immunoglobulin superfamily and normally binds integrin. The 10Fn3 has the potential for broad therapeutic applications given its structural stability, ability to be manipulated, and its abundance in the human body. The most commonly studied adnectin is CT-322, which is an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. A bispecific adnectin, El-Tandem, has also been developed and binds to epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor simultaneously. Pre-clinical studies have shown promising results in relation to reducing tumor growth, decreasing microvessel density, and promoting normalization of tumor architecture. The phase I trial with CT-322 demonstrates relatively low toxicities. However, the phase II study done with CT-322 in recurrent glioblastoma does not reveal as promising results.

  5. Functional deregulation of KIT: link to mast cell proliferative diseases and other neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Metcalfe, Dean D; Olivera, Ana

    2014-05-01

    In this review, the authors discuss common gain-of-function mutations in the stem cell factor receptor KIT found in mast cell proliferation disorders and summarize the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which these transforming mutations may affect KIT structure and function leading to altered downstream signaling and cellular transformation. Drugs targeting KIT have shown mixed success in the treatment of mastocytosis and other hyperproliferative diseases. A brief overview of the most common KIT inhibitors currently used, the reasons for the varied clinical results of such inhibitors and a discussion of potential new strategies are provided.

  6. Molecular targeted approaches for advanced BRAF V600, N-RAS, c-KIT, and GNAQ melanomas.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Giovanni, Ponti; Pellacani, Giovanni; Giovanni, Pellacani; Tomasi, Aldo; Aldo, Tomasi; Loschi, Pietro; Pietro, Loschi; Luppi, Gabriele; Gabriele, Luppi; Gelsomino, Fabio; Fabio, Gelsomino; Longo, Caterina; Caterina, Longo

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of a newly developed target therapy for metastatic melanomas poses the challenge to have a good molecular stratification of those patients who may benefit from this therapeutic option. Practically, BRAF mutation status (V600E) is commonly screened although other non-V600E mutations (i.e., K-R-M-D) could be found in some patients who respond to therapy equally to the patients harboring V600E mutations. Furthermore, other mutations, namely, N-RAS, KIT, and GNAQ, should be sequenced according to distinct melanoma specific subtypes and clinical aspects. In our report, a practical flow chart is described along with our experience in this field.

  7. Multilevel therapeutic targeting by topoisomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P. J.; Souès, S.

    1994-01-01

    The successful use of cytotoxic agents in the clinical management of LCH depends upon the selective targeting of cells participating in the disease process. The topoisomerase 'poisons', currently used extensively in the treatment of aggressive malignancies, represent an intriguing class of cytotoxic agents exerting their cytostatic and cytotoxic effects at multiple levels according to cell type. The non-DNA intercalating topoisomerase II poison, etoposide (VP-16), is the "drug of first choice" in the treatment of LCH by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This major anticancer agent traps the nuclear enzyme DNA topoisomerase II on DNA in a sequence-specific manner, the processing of trapped complexes giving rise to a plethora of cellular effects not least the potential activation of pathways leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This short review describes the principles of topoisomerase inhibition, the multiplicity of cellular effects and the concept of cellular targeting in LCH. The successful treatment of LCH by cytotoxic chemotherapy will depend on both the identity of the target tissues and a clear view of therapeutic intent, given the potential for induction of haematological neoplasia. PMID:8075006

  8. Survival Kit - Food Kit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-10-01

    S62-08742 (1962) --- Food kit used by Mercury astronauts. Some is dehydrated and needs water, other packets are ready to eat. Size is measured relative to a ruler. Included are packets of mushroom soup, orange-grapefruit juice, cocoa beverage, pineapple juice, chicken with gravy, pears, strawberries, beef and vegetables and other assorted food containers. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Survival Kit - Food Kit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-10-01

    S62-08743 (1962) --- Food kit used by Mercury astronauts. Some is dehydrated and needs water, other packets are ready to eat. Size is measured relative to a ruler. Included are packets of mushroom soup, orange-grapefruit juice, cocoa beverage, pineapple juice, chicken with gravy, pears, strawberries, beef and vegetables and other assorted food containers. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Targeting cancer with small-molecular-weight kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Doriano; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Möbitz, Henrik; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Protein and lipid kinases fulfill essential roles in many signaling pathways that regulate normal cell functions. Deregulation of these kinase activities lead to a variety of pathologies ranging from cancer to inflammatory diseases, diabetes, infectious diseases, cardiovascular disorders, cell growth and survival. 518 protein kinases and about 20 lipid-modifying kinases are encoded by the human genome, and a much larger proportion of additional kinases are present in parasite, bacterial, fungal, and viral genomes that are susceptible to exploitation as drug targets. Since many human diseases result from overactivation of protein and lipid kinases due to mutations and/or overexpression, this enzyme class represents an important target for the pharmaceutical industry. Approximately one third of all protein targets under investigation in the pharmaceutical industry are protein or lipid kinases.The kinase inhibitors that have been launched, thus far, are mainly in oncology indications and are directed against a handful of protein and lipid kinases. With one exception, all of these registered kinase inhibitors are directed toward the ATP-site and display different selectivities, potencies, and pharmacokinetic properties. At present, about 150 kinase-targeted drugs are in clinical development and many more in various stages of preclinical development. Kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical trials target all stages of signal transduction from the receptor protein tyrosine kinases that initiate intracellular signaling, through second-messenger-dependent lipid and protein kinases, and protein kinases that regulate the cell cycle.This review provides an insight into protein and lipid kinase drug discovery with respect to achievements, binding modes of inhibitors, and novel avenues for the generation of second-generation kinase inhibitors to treat cancers.

  11. A human monoclonal antibody targeting the stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) blocks tumor cell signaling and inhibits tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Lebron, Maria B; Brennan, Laura; Damoci, Christopher B; Prewett, Marie C; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Duignan, Inga J; Credille, Kelly M; DeLigio, James T; Starodubtseva, Marina; Amatulli, Michael; Zhang, Yiwei; Schwartz, Kaben D; Burtrum, Douglas; Balderes, Paul; Persaud, Kris; Surguladze, David; Loizos, Nick; Paz, Keren; Kotanides, Helen

    2014-09-01

    Stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) exerts multiple biological effects on target cells upon binding its ligand stem cell factor (SCF). Aberrant activation of c-Kit results in dysregulated signaling and is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. The development of more specific and effective c-Kit therapies is warranted given its essential role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we describe the biological properties of CK6, a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the extracellular region of human c-Kit. CK6 specifically binds c-Kit receptor with high affinity (EC 50 = 0.06 nM) and strongly blocks its interaction with SCF (IC 50 = 0.41 nM) in solid phase assays. Flow cytometry shows CK6 binding to c-Kit on the cell surface of human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), melanoma, and leukemia tumor cell lines. Furthermore, exposure to CK6 inhibits SCF stimulation of c-Kit tyrosine kinase activity and downstream signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (AKT), in addition to reducing tumor cell line growth in vitro. CK6 treatment significantly decreases human xenograft tumor growth in NCI-H526 SCLC (T/C% = 57) and Malme-3M melanoma (T/C% = 58) models in vivo. The combination of CK6 with standard of care chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and etoposide for SCLC or dacarbazine for melanoma, more potently reduces tumor growth (SCLC T/C% = 24, melanoma T/C% = 38) compared with CK6 or chemotherapy alone. In summary, our results demonstrate that CK6 is a c-Kit antagonist antibody with tumor growth neutralizing properties and are highly suggestive of potential therapeutic application in treating human malignancies harboring c-Kit receptor.

  12. A human monoclonal antibody targeting the stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) blocks tumor cell signaling and inhibits tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Lebron, Maria B; Brennan, Laura; Damoci, Christopher B; Prewett, Marie C; O’Mahony, Marguerita; Duignan, Inga J; Credille, Kelly M; DeLigio, James T; Starodubtseva, Marina; Amatulli, Michael; Zhang, Yiwei; Schwartz, Kaben D; Burtrum, Douglas; Balderes, Paul; Persaud, Kris; Surguladze, David; Loizos, Nick; Paz, Keren; Kotanides, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell factor receptor (c-Kit) exerts multiple biological effects on target cells upon binding its ligand stem cell factor (SCF). Aberrant activation of c-Kit results in dysregulated signaling and is implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous cancers. The development of more specific and effective c-Kit therapies is warranted given its essential role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we describe the biological properties of CK6, a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the extracellular region of human c-Kit. CK6 specifically binds c-Kit receptor with high affinity (EC50 = 0.06 nM) and strongly blocks its interaction with SCF (IC50 = 0.41 nM) in solid phase assays. Flow cytometry shows CK6 binding to c-Kit on the cell surface of human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), melanoma, and leukemia tumor cell lines. Furthermore, exposure to CK6 inhibits SCF stimulation of c-Kit tyrosine kinase activity and downstream signaling pathways such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (AKT), in addition to reducing tumor cell line growth in vitro. CK6 treatment significantly decreases human xenograft tumor growth in NCI-H526 SCLC (T/C% = 57) and Malme-3M melanoma (T/C% = 58) models in vivo. The combination of CK6 with standard of care chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and etoposide for SCLC or dacarbazine for melanoma, more potently reduces tumor growth (SCLC T/C% = 24, melanoma T/C% = 38) compared with CK6 or chemotherapy alone. In summary, our results demonstrate that CK6 is a c-Kit antagonist antibody with tumor growth neutralizing properties and are highly suggestive of potential therapeutic application in treating human malignancies harboring c-Kit receptor. PMID:24921944

  13. TAK1 and IKK2, novel mediators of SCF-induced signaling and potential targets for c-Kit-driven diseases.

    PubMed

    Drube, Sebastian; Weber, Franziska; Göpfert, Christiane; Loschinski, Romy; Rothe, Mandy; Boelke, Franziska; Diamanti, Michaela A; Löhn, Tobias; Ruth, Julia; Schütz, Dagmar; Häfner, Norman; Greten, Florian R; Stumm, Ralf; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H; Dudeck, Anne; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-10-06

    NF-κB activation depends on the IKK complex consisting of the catalytically active IKK1 and 2 subunits and the scaffold protein NEMO. Hitherto, IKK2 activation has always been associated with IκBα degradation, NF-κB activation, and cytokine production. In contrast, we found that in SCF-stimulated primary bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), IKK2 is alternatively activated. Mechanistically, activated TAK1 mediates the association between c-Kit and IKK2 and therefore facilitates the Lyn-dependent IKK2 activation which suffices to mediate mitogenic signaling but, surprisingly, does not result in NF-κB activation. Moreover, the c-Kit-mediated and Lyn-dependent IKK2 activation is targeted by MyD88-dependent pathways leading to enhanced IKK2 activation and therefore to potentiated effector functions. In neoplastic cells, expressing constitutively active c-Kit mutants, activated TAK1 and IKKs do also not induce NF-κB activation but mediate uncontrolled proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and enables IL-33 to mediate c-Kit-dependent signaling. Together, we identified the formation of the c-Kit-Lyn-TAK1 signalosome which mediates IKK2 activation. Unexpectedly, this IKK activation is uncoupled from the NF-κB-machinery but is critical to modulate functional cell responses in primary-, and mediates uncontrolled proliferation and survival of tumor-mast cells. Therefore, targeting TAK1 and IKKs might be a novel approach to treat c-Kit-driven diseases.

  14. Novel bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, William C; Metcalf, Chester A; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Keenan, Terence; Weigele, Manfred; Bohacek, Regine S; Dalgarno, David C; Sawyer, Tomi K

    2003-09-01

    Bone-targeted Src tyrosine kinase (STK) inhibitors have recently been developed for the treatment of osteoporosis and cancer-related bone diseases. The concept of bone targeting derives from bisphosphonates, and from the evolution of such molecules in terms of therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of bone disorders. Interestingly, some of the earliest bisphosphonates were recognized for their ability to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation (scaling) by virtue of their affinity to chelate calcium. This chelating property was subsequently exploited in the development of bisphosphonate analogs as inhibitors of the bone-resorbing cells known as osteoclasts, giving rise to breakthrough medicines, such as Fosamax (for the treatment of osteoporosis) and Zometa (for the treatment of osteoporosis and bone metastases). Relative to these milestone achievements, there is a tremendous opportunity to explore beyond the limited chemical space (functional group diversity) of such bisphosphonates to design novel bone-targeting moieties, which may be used to develop other classes of promising small-molecule drugs affecting different biological pathways. Here, we review studies focused on bone-targeted inhibitors of STK, a key enzyme in osteoclast-dependent bone resorption. Two strategies are described relative to bone-targeted STK inhibitor drug discovery: (i) the development of novel Src homology (SH)-2 inhibitors incorporating non-hydrolyzable phosphotyrosine mimics and exhibiting molecular recognition and bone-targeting properties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-22408; and (ii) the development of novel ATP-based Src kinase inhibitors incorporating bone-targeting moieties, leading to the in vivo-effective lead compound AP-23236. In summary, AP-22408 and AP-23236, which differ mechanistically by virtue of blocking Src-dependent non-catalytic or catalytic activities in osteoclasts, exemplify ARIAD Pharmaceuticals' structure-based design of novel bone-targeted

  15. PLK-1 Targeted Inhibitors and Their Potential against Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shiv; Kim, Jaebong

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic kinases are the key components of the cell cycle machinery and play vital roles in cell cycle progression. PLK-1 (Polo-like kinase-1) is a crucial mitotic protein kinase that plays an essential role in both the onset of G2/M transition and cytokinesis. The overexpression of PLK-1 is strongly correlated with a wide spectrum of human cancers and poor prognosis. The (si)RNA-mediated depletion of PLK-1 arrests tumor growth and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells without affecting normal cells. Therefore, PLK-1 has been selected as an attractive anticancer therapeutic drug target. Some small molecules have been discovered to target the catalytic and noncatalytic domains of PLK-1. These domains regulate the catalytic activation and subcellular localization of PLK-1. However, while PLK-1 inhibitors block tumor growth, they have been shown to cause severe adverse complications, such as toxicity, neutropenia, and bone marrow suppression during clinical trials, due to a lack of selectivity and specificity within the human kinome. To minimize these toxicities, inhibitors should be tested against all protein kinases in vivo and in vitro to enhance selectivity and specificity against targets. Here, we discuss the potency and selectivity of PLK-1-targeted inhibitors and their molecular interactions with PLK-1 domains. PMID:26557691

  16. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  17. Small molecule inhibitors targeting activator protein 1 (AP-1).

    PubMed

    Ye, Na; Ding, Ye; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-08-28

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases.

  18. New Targets and Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism§

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress made in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:23808874

  19. Targeting Angiogenesis in Colorectal Cancer: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Sheetal Mehta; Nimeiri, Halla S; Benson, Al B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly diagnosed throughout the world, and treatment options have greatly expanded over the last 2 decades. Targeting angiogenesis has been a major focus of study in a variety of malignancy types. Targeting angiogenesis has been achieved by several mechanisms in colorectal cancer, including use of antiangiogenic small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). There have been many attempts and failures to prove efficacy of TKIs in the treatment of colorectal cancer including sorafenib, sunitinib, vatalanib, and tivozanib. Regorafenib was the first TKI to demonstrate efficacy and is an orally active inhibitor of angiogenic (including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3), stromal, and oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases. There are ongoing investigations of both regorafenib and ninetanib; however, there remains a critical need to better understand novel combinations with TKIs that could prove more efficacious than available options.

  20. Development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting adipose triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Nicole; Schweiger, Martina; Romauch, Matthias; Grabner, Gernot F; Eichmann, Thomas O; Fuchs, Elisabeth; Ivkovic, Jakov; Heier, Christoph; Mrak, Irina; Lass, Achim; Höfler, Gerald; Fledelius, Christian; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Breinbauer, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is rate limiting in the mobilization of fatty acids from cellular triglyceride stores. This central role in lipolysis marks ATGL as an interesting pharmacological target as deregulated fatty acid metabolism is closely linked to dyslipidemic and metabolic disorders. Here we report on the development and characterization of a small-molecule inhibitor of ATGL. Atglistatin is selective for ATGL and reduces fatty acid mobilization in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Network Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Describes interconnection methods, speed, and comparative equipment costs of networking starter kits. These kits supply network-connection devices that plug into or connect to each computer that is part of a network; they may also provide interconnection cables and installation software needed to set up a network. Reviews 20 kits that use a…

  2. Targeting DNA Repair in Cancer: Beyond PARP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jessica S; O'Carrigan, Brent; Jackson, Stephen P; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-01-01

    Germline aberrations in critical DNA-repair and DNA damage-response (DDR) genes cause cancer predisposition, whereas various tumors harbor somatic mutations causing defective DDR/DNA repair. The concept of synthetic lethality can be exploited in such malignancies, as exemplified by approval of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors for treating BRCA1/2-mutated ovarian cancers. Herein, we detail how cellular DDR processes engage various proteins that sense DNA damage, initiate signaling pathways to promote cell-cycle checkpoint activation, trigger apoptosis, and coordinate DNA repair. We focus on novel therapeutic strategies targeting promising DDR targets and discuss challenges of patient selection and the development of rational drug combinations.

  3. Targeting DNA Repair in Cancer: Beyond PARP Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica S.; O’Carrigan, Brent; Jackson, Stephen P.; Yap, Timothy A.

    2017-01-01

    Germline aberrations in critical DNA repair and DNA-damage response (DDR) genes cause cancer predisposition, while various tumors harbor somatic mutations causing defective DDR/DNA repair. The concept of synthetic lethality can be exploited in such malignancies, as exemplified by approval of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors for treating BRCA1/2 mutated ovarian cancers. Herein, we detail how cellular DDR processes engage various proteins that sense DNA damage, initiate signaling pathways to promote cell cycle checkpoint activation, trigger apoptosis and coordinate DNA repair. We focus on novel therapeutic strategies targeting promising DDR targets and discuss challenges of patient selection and the development of rational drug combinations. PMID:28003236

  4. Discovery of host-targeted covalent inhibitors of dengue virus.

    PubMed

    de Wispelaere, Mélissanne; Carocci, Margot; Liang, Yanke; Liu, Qingsong; Sun, Eileen; Vetter, Michael L; Wang, Jinhua; Gray, Nathanael S; Yang, Priscilla L

    2017-03-01

    We report here on an approach targeting the host reactive cysteinome to identify inhibitors of host factors required for the infectious cycle of Flaviviruses and other viruses. We used two parallel cellular phenotypic screens to identify a series of covalent inhibitors, exemplified by QL-XII-47, that are active against dengue virus. We show that the compounds effectively block viral protein expression and that this inhibition is associated with repression of downstream processes of the infectious cycle, and thus significantly contributes to the potent antiviral activity of these compounds. We demonstrate that QL-XII-47's antiviral activity requires selective, covalent modification of a host target by showing that the compound's antiviral activity is recapitulated when cells are preincubated with QL-XII-47 and then washed prior to viral infection and by showing that QL-XII-47R, a non-reactive analog, lacks antiviral activity at concentrations more than 20-fold higher than QL-XII-47's IC90. QL-XII-47's inhibition of Zika virus, West Nile virus, hepatitis C virus, and poliovirus further suggests that it acts via a target mediating inhibition of these other medically relevant viruses. These results demonstrate the utility of screens targeting the host reactive cysteinome for rapid identification of compounds with potent antiviral activity.

  5. Molecular drug targets in myeloproliferative neoplasms: mutant ABL1, JAK2, MPL, KIT, PDGFRA, PDGFRB and FGFR1

    PubMed Central

    Tefferi, Ayalew

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Therapeutically validated oncoproteins in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) include BCR-ABL1 and rearranged PDGFR proteins. The latter are products of intra- (e.g. FIP1L1-PDGFRA) or inter-chromosomal (e.g.ETV6-PDGFRB) gene fusions. BCR-ABL1 is associated with chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) and mutant PDGFR with an MPN phenotype characterized by eosinophilia and in addition, in case of FIP1L1-PDGFRA, bone marrow mastocytosis. These genotype-phenotype associations have been effectively exploited in the development of highly accurate diagnostic assays and molecular targeted therapy. It is hoped that the same will happen in other MPN with specific genetic alterations: polycythemia vera (JAK2V617F and other JAK2 mutations), essential thrombocythemia (JAK2V617F and MPL515 mutations), primary myelofibrosis (JAK2V617F and MPL515 mutations), systemic mastocytosis (KITD816V and other KIT mutations) and stem cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ZNF198-FGFR1 and other FGFR1 fusion genes). The current review discusses the above-listed mutant molecules in the context of their value as drug targets. PMID:19175693

  6. TAK1 and IKK2, novel mediators of SCF-induced signaling and potential targets for c-Kit-driven diseases

    PubMed Central

    Göpfert, Christiane; Loschinski, Romy; Rothe, Mandy; Boelke, Franziska; Diamanti, Michaela A.; Löhn, Tobias; Ruth, Julia; Schütz, Dagmar; Häfner, Norman; Greten, Florian R.; Stumm, Ralf; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H.; Dudeck, Anne; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    NF-κB activation depends on the IKK complex consisting of the catalytically active IKK1 and 2 subunits and the scaffold protein NEMO. Hitherto, IKK2 activation has always been associated with IκBα degradation, NF-κB activation, and cytokine production. In contrast, we found that in SCF-stimulated primary bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), IKK2 is alternatively activated. Mechanistically, activated TAK1 mediates the association between c-Kit and IKK2 and therefore facilitates the Lyn-dependent IKK2 activation which suffices to mediate mitogenic signaling but, surprisingly, does not result in NF-κB activation. Moreover, the c-Kit-mediated and Lyn-dependent IKK2 activation is targeted by MyD88-dependent pathways leading to enhanced IKK2 activation and therefore to potentiated effector functions. In neoplastic cells, expressing constitutively active c-Kit mutants, activated TAK1 and IKKs do also not induce NF-κB activation but mediate uncontrolled proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and enables IL-33 to mediate c-Kit-dependent signaling. Together, we identified the formation of the c-Kit-Lyn-TAK1 signalosome which mediates IKK2 activation. Unexpectedly, this IKK activation is uncoupled from the NF-κB-machinery but is critical to modulate functional cell responses in primary-, and mediates uncontrolled proliferation and survival of tumor-mast cells. Therefore, targeting TAK1 and IKKs might be a novel approach to treat c-Kit-driven diseases. PMID:26353931

  7. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Goda, Jayant S; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  8. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Jayant S.; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies. PMID:27121513

  9. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T.; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Avadhani, Narayan G.; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B.; Altieri, Dario C.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  10. Targeting MYC Dependence by Metabolic Inhibitors in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sabnis, Himalee S; Somasagara, Ranganatha R; Bunting, Kevin D

    2017-03-31

    Abstract:MYC is a critical growth regulatory gene that is commonly overexpressed in a wide range of cancers. Therapeutic targeting of MYC transcriptional activity has long been a goal, but it has been difficult to achieve with drugs that directly block its DNA-binding ability. Additional approaches that exploit oncogene addiction are promising strategies against MYC-driven cancers. Also, drugs that target metabolic regulatory pathways and enzymes have potential for indirectly reducing MYC levels. Glucose metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation, which can be targeted by multiple agents, promote cell growth and MYC expression. Likewise, modulation of the signaling pathways and protein synthesis regulated by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) can also be an effective route for suppressing MYC translation. Furthermore, recent data suggest that metabolism of nucleotides, fatty acids and glutamine are exploited to alter MYC levels. Combination therapies offer potential new approaches to overcome metabolic plasticity caused by single agents. Although potential toxicities must be carefully controlled, new inhibitors currently being tested in clinical trials offer significant promise. Therefore, as both a downstream target of metabolism and an upstream regulator, MYC is a prominent central regulator of cancer metabolism. Exploiting metabolic vulnerabilities of MYC-driven cancers is an emerging research area with translational potential.

  11. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  12. Inhibiting the Inhibitors: Evaluating Agents Targeting Cancer Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Immunotherapy of cancer has not improved disease-free or overall patient survival. The lack of concordance between immunologic and clinical responses in cancer immunotherapy trials is thought to result from the pervasive presence of tumor-driven immune suppression that allows tumor to escape and that has not been adequately targeted by current therapies. Areas covered in this review Because multiple mechanisms of tumor induced suppression have now been identified and shown to contribute to tumor escape, the opportunity arises to interfere with these mechanisms. A range of known tumor-derived inhibitors (enzymes, receptors, ligands, microvesicles and soluble factors) can now be blocked or neutralized by biologic or metabolic agents. Used alone or in combination with each other or with conventional cancer therapies, these agents offer novel therapeutic strategies for the control of tumor escape. What the reader will gain This review deals with currently available inhibitors for counteracting tumor immune escape. The restoration of effective anti-tumor immunity in patients with cancer will require new approaches aiming at: (a) protection of immune cells from adverse effects of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), regulatory T cells (Treg) or inhibitory factors thus enhancing effector functions, and (b) prolong survival of central memory T cells thus ensuring long-term protection. Take home message Inhibitors of mechanisms responsible for tumor escape could restore anti-tumor immune responses in patients with cancer. PMID:20415597

  13. Profiling targets of the irreversible palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate

    PubMed Central

    Davda, Dahvid; El Azzouny, Mahmoud A.; Tom, Christopher T.M.B.; Hernandez, Jeannie L.; Majmudar, Jaimeen D.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Martin, Brent R.

    2013-01-01

    2-bromohexadecanoic acid, or 2-bromopalmitate, was introduced nearly 50 years ago as a non-selective inhibitor of lipid metabolism. More recently, 2-bromopalmitate re-emerged as a general inhibitor of protein S-palmitoylation. Here, we investigate the cellular targets of 2-bromopalmitate through the synthesis and application of click-enabled analogues. In cells, 2-bromopalmitate is converted to 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA, although less efficiently than free palmitate. Once conjugated to CoA, probe reactivity is dramatically enhanced. Importantly, both 2-bromopalmitate and 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA label DHHC palmitoyl acyl transferases (PATs), the enzymes that catalyze protein S-palmitoylation. Mass spectrometry analysis of enriched 2-bromopalmitate targets identified PAT enzymes, transporters, and many palmitoylated proteins, with no observed preference for CoA-dependent enzymes. These data question whether 2-bromopalmitate (or 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA) blocks S-palmitoylation by inhibiting protein acyl transferases, or by blocking palmitate incorporation by direct covalent competition. Overall, these findings highlight the promiscuous reactivity of 2BP, and validate clickable 2BP analogues as activity-based probes of diverse membrane associated enzymes. PMID:23844586

  14. Profiling targets of the irreversible palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate.

    PubMed

    Davda, Dahvid; El Azzouny, Mahmoud A; Tom, Christopher T M B; Hernandez, Jeannie L; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Kennedy, Robert T; Martin, Brent R

    2013-09-20

    2-Bromohexadecanoic acid, or 2-bromopalmitate, was introduced nearly 50 years ago as a nonselective inhibitor of lipid metabolism. More recently, 2-bromopalmitate re-emerged as a general inhibitor of protein S-palmitoylation. Here, we investigate the cellular targets of 2-bromopalmitate through the synthesis and application of click-enabled analogues. In cells, 2-bromopalmitate is converted to 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA, although less efficiently than free palmitate. Once conjugated to CoA, probe reactivity is dramatically enhanced. Importantly, both 2-bromopalmitate and 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA label DHHC palmitoyl acyl transferases (PATs), the enzymes that catalyze protein S-palmitoylation. Mass spectrometry analysis of enriched 2-bromopalmitate targets identified PAT enzymes, transporters, and many palmitoylated proteins, with no observed preference for CoA-dependent enzymes. These data question whether 2-bromopalmitate (or 2-bromopalmitoyl-CoA) blocks S-palmitoylation by inhibiting protein acyl transferases, or by blocking palmitate incorporation by direct covalent competition. Overall, these findings highlight the promiscuous reactivity of 2BP and validate clickable 2BP analogues as activity-based probes of diverse membrane associated enzymes.

  15. Brainstorming: weighted voting prediction of inhibitors for protein targets.

    PubMed

    Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    The "Brainstorming" approach presented in this paper is a weighted voting method that can improve the quality of predictions generated by several machine learning (ML) methods. First, an ensemble of heterogeneous ML algorithms is trained on available experimental data, then all solutions are gathered and a consensus is built between them. The final prediction is performed using a voting procedure, whereby the vote of each method is weighted according to a quality coefficient calculated using multivariable linear regression (MLR). The MLR optimization procedure is very fast, therefore no additional computational cost is introduced by using this jury approach. Here, brainstorming is applied to selecting actives from large collections of compounds relating to five diverse biological targets of medicinal interest, namely HIV-reverse transcriptase, cyclooxygenase-2, dihydrofolate reductase, estrogen receptor, and thrombin. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) database was used for selecting known inhibitors for these protein targets, and experimental data was then used to train a set of machine learning methods. The benchmark dataset (available at http://bio.icm.edu.pl/∼darman/chemoinfo/benchmark.tar.gz ) can be used for further testing of various clustering and machine learning methods when predicting the biological activity of compounds. Depending on the protein target, the overall recall value is raised by at least 20% in comparison to any single machine learning method (including ensemble methods like random forest) and unweighted simple majority voting procedures.

  16. Pyrazolopyrimidines: Potent Inhibitors Targeting the Capsid of Rhino- and Enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Vadim A; Braun, Heike; Richter, Martina; Riabova, Olga B; Kirchmair, Johannes; Kazakova, Elena S; Seidel, Nora; Wutzler, Peter; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    There are currently no drugs available for the treatment of enterovirus (EV)-induced acute and chronic diseases such as the common cold, meningitis, encephalitis, pneumonia, and myocarditis with or without consecutive dilated cardiomyopathy. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of pyrazolopyrimidines, a well-tolerated and potent class of novel EV inhibitors. The compounds inhibit the replication of a broad spectrum of EV in vitro with IC50 values between 0.04 and 0.64 μM for viruses resistant to pleconaril, a known capsid-binding inhibitor, without affecting cytochrome P450 enzyme activity. Using virological and genetics methods, the viral capsid was identified as the target of the most promising, orally bioavailable compound 3-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)amino-6-phenylpyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-4-amine (OBR-5-340). Its prophylactic as well as therapeutic application was proved for coxsackievirus B3-induced chronic myocarditis in mice. The favorable pharmacokinetic, toxicological, and pharmacodynamics profile in mice renders OBR-5-340 a highly promising drug candidate, and the regulatory nonclinical program is ongoing. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.

  17. Targeted ultradeep next-generation sequencing as a method for KIT D816V mutation analysis in mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Thomas; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Vestergaard, Hanne; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Møller, Michael Boe

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is becoming increasingly used for diagnostic mutation analysis in myeloid neoplasms and may also represent a feasible technique in mastocytosis. However, detection of the KIT D816V mutation requires a highly sensitive method in most patients due to the typically low mutation levels. In this study, we established an NGS-based KIT mutation analysis and analyzed the sensitivity of D816V detection using the Ion Torrent platform. Eighty-two individual NGS analyses were included in the study. All samples were also analyzed using highly sensitive KIT D816V mutation-specific qPCR. Measurements of the background level in D816V-negative samples supported a cutoff for positivity of 0.2% in three different NGS panels. Clinical samples from patients with SM that tested positive using qPCR with a D816V allele burden >0.2% also tested positive using NGS. Samples that tested positive using qPCR with an allele burden <0.2% tested negative using NGS. We thereby demonstrate that caution should be taken when using the potentially very sensitive NGS technique for KIT D816V mutation analysis in mastocytosis, as many patients with SM have D816V mutation levels below the detection limit of NGS. A dedicated and highly sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis therefore remains important in mastocytosis diagnostics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The adaptor 3BP2 is required for KIT receptor expression and human mast cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ainsua-Enrich, Erola; Serrano-Candelas, Eva; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Picado, César; Sayós, Joan; Rivera, Juan; Martín, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    3BP2 is a cytoplasmic adaptor protein that acts as a positive regulator in mast cell FcεRI-dependent signaling. The KIT receptor whose ligand is the stem cell factor (SCF) is necessary for mast cell development, proliferation and survival as well as for optimal IgE-dependent signal. Activating mutations in KIT have been associated with several diseases including mastocytosis. In the present work, we found that 3BP2 silencing impairs KIT signaling pathways, thus affecting PI3K and MAP kinase pathways in human mast cells from HMC-1, LAD2 (human mast cell lines) and CD34+-derived mast cells. Unexpectedly, silencing of 3BP2 reduces KIT expression in normal human mast cells as well as in HMC-1 cells where KIT is mutated, thus increasing cellular apoptosis and caspase 3/7 activity. 3BP2 silencing reduces KIT transcription expression levels. Interestingly, 3BP2 silencing decreased MITF expression, a transcription factor involved in KIT expression. Reconstitution of 3BP2 in knockdown cells leads to reversal of KIT expression as well as survival phenotype. Accordingly MITF reconstitution enhances KIT expression levels in 3BP2 silenced cells. Moreover, downregulation of KIT expression by miRNA221 overexpression or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib also reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression. Furthermore, KIT tyrosine activity inhibition reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression, demonstrating again a tight and reciprocal relationship between these molecules. Taken together, our results show that 3BP2 regulates human mast cell survival and participates in KIT-mediated signal transduction by directly controlling KIT receptor expression, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target in mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and deregulated KIT disorders. PMID:25810396

  19. Targeting cancer using KAT inhibitors to mimic lethal knockouts

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James A.L.; Bourke, Emer; Eriksson, Leif A.; Kerin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Two opposing enzyme classes regulate fundamental elements of genome maintenance, gene regulation and metabolism, either through addition of an acetyl moiety by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) or its removal by histone de-acetyltransferases (HDAC), and are exciting targets for drug development. Importantly, dysfunctional acetylation has been implicated in numerous diseases, including cancer. Within the HAT superfamily the MYST family holds particular interest, as its members are directly involved in the DNA damage response and repair pathways and crucially, several members have been shown to be down-regulated in common cancers (such as breast and prostate). In the present study we focus on the development of lysine (K) acetyltransferase inhibitors (KATi) targeting the MYST family member Tip60 (Kat5), an essential protein, designed or discovered through screening libraries. Importantly, Tip60 has been demonstrated to be significantly down-regulated in many cancers which urgently require new treatment options. We highlight current and future efforts employing these KATi as cancer treatments and their ability to synergize and enhance current cancer treatments. We investigate the different methods of KATi production or discovery, their mechanisms and their validation models. Importantly, the utility of KATi is based on a key concept: using KATi to abrogate the activity of an already down-regulated essential protein (effectively creating a lethal knockout) provides another innovative mechanism for targeting cancer cells, while significantly minimizing any off-target effects to normal cells. This approach, combined with the rapidly developing interest in KATi, suggests that KATi have a bright future for providing truly personalized therapies. PMID:27528742

  20. CYP17 inhibitors--abiraterone, C17,20-lyase inhibitors and multi-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lina; Hu, Qingzhong

    2014-01-01

    As the first in class steroid 17α-hydroxylase/C17,20-lyase (CYP17) inhibitor, abiraterone acetate (of which the active metabolite is abiraterone) has been shown to improve overall survival in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)--in those who are chemotherapy-naive and those previously treated with docetaxel. Furthermore, the clinical success of abiraterone demonstrated that CRPC, which has previously been regarded as an androgen-independent disease, is still driven, at least in part, by androgens. More importantly, abiraterone is a 'promiscuous' drug that interacts with a number of targets, which dictate its clinical benefits and adverse effects profile. Besides CYP17 inhibition, abiraterone acts as an antagonist to the androgen receptor and inhibits 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase--two effects that potentially contribute to its antitumour effects. However, the inhibition of the 17α-hydroxylase activity of CYP17, CYP11B1 and a panel of hepatic CYP enzymes leads to adverse effects and toxicities that include secondary mineralocorticoid excess. Abiraterone is also associated with increased incidence of cardiac disorders. Under such circumstances, development of new CYP17 inhibitors as an additional line of defence is urgently needed. To achieve enhanced clinical benefits, new strategies are being explored that include selective inhibition of the C17,20-lyase activity of CYP17 and multi-targeting strategies that affect androgen synthesis and signalling at different points. Some of these strategies-including the drugs orteronel, VT-464 and galeterone--are supported by preclinical data and are being explored in the clinic.

  1. Molecular defects in mastocytosis: KIT and beyond KIT.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Siham; Langenfeld, Florent; Jeanningros, Sylvie; Brenet, Fabienne; Soucie, Erinn; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi; Dubreuil, Patrice; Arock, Michel

    2014-05-01

    In all variants of mastocytosis, activating KIT mutations are frequently found. In adults, neoplastic mast cells (MCs) cells show the KIT mutation D816V, whereas in children, MCs invading the skin are frequently positive for non-KIT D816V mutations. The clinical course and prognosis of the disease vary among patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). Additional KIT-independent molecular defects might cause progression. Additional oncogenic lesions have recently been identified in advanced SM. In advanced SM the presence of additional genetic lesions or altered signaling worsening the prognosis might lead to the use of alternative therapies such as combined antisignaling targeted treatments or stem cell transplantation.

  2. Systematic Review on Role of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors as an Alternative to Calcineurin Inhibitors in Renal Transplant: Challenges and Window to Excel.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jayant; Bridson, Julie M; Sharma, Ajay; Halawa, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    This review focuses on the current limited evidence of graft function and graft survival in various immunosuppressive regimens involving mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors with or without calcineurin inhibitors. We evaluated the current literature for describing the role of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors as an alternative to calcineurin inhibitors by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, Crossref, and Scopus databases using medical subject heading terms. Our detailed analyses of all relevant literature showed use of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-based de novo regimens, early calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal with subsequent introduction of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-based regimens, and late conversion from a calcineurin inhibitor-based regimen to mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-based regimens. Notably, early calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal with subsequent introduction of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-based regimen seemed to be a more practical and realistic approach toward immunosuppressive treatment of renal transplant recipients. However, in view of the high rejection rate observed in these studies, it is advisable not to offer these regimens to patients with moderate to high immunologic risk. The present evidences suggest that treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors allows early and substantial calcineurin inhibitor minimization. The mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors everolimus and sirolimus are preferred due to their complementary mechanisms of action and favorable nephrotoxicity profile, which have opened the way for calcineurin inhibitor reduction/withdrawal in the early posttransplant period.

  3. Glucose metabolism as a target of histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wardell, Suzanne E; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Wieman, Heather L; Frigo, Daniel E; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; Newgard, Christopher B; McDonnell, Donald P

    2009-03-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) is generally attributed to their ability to alter gene expression secondary to their effects on the acetylation status of transcription factors and histones. However, because HDACIs exhibit similar transcriptional effects in most cells, the molecular basis for their therapeutic selectivity toward malignant cells is largely unknown. In this study, we report that HDACI, of distinct chemotypes, quantitatively inhibit glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1)-mediated glucose transport into multiple myeloma cells through both down-regulation of GLUT1 and inhibition of hexokinase 1 (HXK1) enzymatic activity. Unexpectedly, however, this inhibition of glucose utilization is accompanied by an increase in amino acid catabolism with no increase in fatty acid oxidation. Our findings suggest that an HDACI-induced change in carbon source preference could contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs by creating a pattern of fuel utilization that is incompatible with rapid tumor growth and survival. Furthermore, these results, which implicate glucose metabolism as a target of HDACI, suggest that caution should be exercised in attributing effects of this class of drug to primary alterations in gene transcription.

  4. Centrin: Another target of monastrol, an inhibitor of mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Tong-Qing; Bian, Wei; Liu, Wen; Sun, Yue; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Monastrol, a cell-permeable inhibitor, considered to specifically inhibit kinesin Eg5, can cause mitotic arrest and monopolar spindle formation, thus exhibiting antitumor properties. Centrin, a ubiquitous protein associated with centrosome, plays a critical role in centrosome duplication. Moreover, a correlation between centrosome amplification and cancer has been reported. In this study, it is proposed for the first time that centrin may be another target of the anticancer drug monastrol since monastrol can effectively inhibit not only the growth of the transformed Escherichia coli cells in vivo, but also the Lu3+-dependent self-assembly of EoCen in vitro. The two closely related compounds (Compounds 1 and 2) could not take the same effect. Fluorescence titration experiments suggest that four monastrols per protein is the optimum binding pattern, and the binding constants at different temperatures were obtained. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicates that hydrophobic force is the main acting force between monastrol and centrin, and the extent of monastrol inhibition of centrin self-assembly is highly dependent upon the hydrophobic region of the protein, which is largely exposed by the binding of metal ions.

  5. Immunohistochemical and mutational analysis of PDGF and PDGFR in desmoid tumours: is there a role for tyrosine kinase inhibitors in c-kit-negative desmoid tumours?

    PubMed

    Liegl, B; Leithner, A; Bauernhofer, T; Windhager, R; Guelly, C; Regauer, S; Beham, A

    2006-12-01

    To determine the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) alpha and beta status of desmoid tumours. Desmoid tumours are rare monoclonal neoplasms that appear to have no metastatic potential. Surgical resection and radiotherapy in the event of a positive surgical margin is the first-line treatment. Recurrences are frequent. Treatment results using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, anti-oestrogen compounds and other agents such as Imatinib mesylate have been published. Therapy with Imatinib has been proposed as a therapeutic option, although in most reports desmoid tumours are reported to be c-kit-. We performed immunohistochemical analysis on 124 archived samples (85 patients) of desmoid tumours using antibodies to PDGFalpha, PDGFbeta, PDGFRalpha and PDGFRbeta. All desmoid tumours showed immunoreactivity with antibodies to PDGFalpha and PDGFRalpha, whereas with antibodies to PDGFbeta and PDGFRbeta no specific reaction could be detected. Mutational analysis of PDGFRalpha (exons 11, 12, 17 and 18) and PDGFRbeta (exon 12) on frozen material from 14 patients was performed, but no mutations leading to amino acid changes in the mature protein were identified. The absence of an activating mutation in a protooncogene does not exclude the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors through other possible mechanisms, and these might be a therapeutic option for patients with desmoid tumours in whom established local and systemic approaches fail to control the disease.

  6. Heme Aggregation inhibitors: antimalarial drugs targeting an essential biomineralization process.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, J; Linck, R; Wright, D W

    2001-02-01

    polymerization inhibitor design and the loci of drug resistance is also detailed. As the biochemistry of the complicated interactions between host, parasite, and vector become better understood, the rationale for new antimalarial drug treatments will continue to improve. Clearly, the homeostasis of metal ions is a complicated biochemical process and is not completely understood. For the immediate future, it does, however, provide a clear target for the development of new and improved treatments for malaria.

  7. Next generation sequencing analysis of platinum refractory advanced germ cell tumor sensitive to Sunitinib (Sutent®) a VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor in a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Mills, Gordon B; Shaw, Kenna R Mills; Bailey, Ann Marie; Rao, Priya; Ward, John F; Pagliaro, Lance C

    2014-08-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common solid tumors in adolescent and young adult males (age 15 and 35 years) and remain one of the most curable of all solid malignancies. However a subset of patients will have tumors that are refractory to standard chemotherapy agents. The management of this refractory population remains challenging and approximately 400 patients continue to die every year of this refractory disease in the United States. Given the preclinical evidence implicating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in the biology of germ cell tumors, we hypothesized that the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) inhibitor sunitinib (Sutent) may possess important clinical activity in the treatment of this refractory disease. We proposed a Phase II efficacy study of sunitinib in seminomatous and non-seminomatous metastatic GCT's refractory to first line chemotherapy treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00912912). Next generation targeted exome sequencing using HiSeq 2000 (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) was performed on the tumor sample of the unusual responder. Five patients are enrolled into this Phase II study. Among them we report here the clinical course of a patient (Patient # 5) who had an exceptional response to sunitinib. Next generation sequencing to understand this patient's response to sunitinib revealed RET amplification, EGFR and KRAS amplification as relevant aberrations. Oncoscan MIP array were employed to validate the copy number analysis that confirmed RET gene amplification. Sunitinib conferred clinical benefit to this heavily pre-treated patient. Next generation sequencing of this 'exceptional responder' identified the first reported case of a RET amplification as a potential basis of sensitivity to sunitinib (VEGFR2/PDGFRβ/c-kit/ FLT3/RET/CSF1R inhibitor) in a patient with refractory germ cell tumor. Further characterization of GCT patients using biomarkers for clinical response and patient

  8. Discovery – Targeted Treatments and mTOR Inhibitors

    Cancer.gov

    Thanks to discovering the anticancer effects of mTOR inhibitors, cancer treatment for pNet, a rare type of pancreatic cancer, were revolutionized. Through clinical trials, NCI continues to investigate the life-saving potential of mTOR inhibitors.

  9. Calpains: attractive targets for the development of synthetic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Markus; Chua, Krystle C H; Abell, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    The physiological roles of calpains are discussed, as are the associated pathological disorders that result from their over-activation. We also present practical information for establishing functional inhibition assays and an overview of X-ray crystal structures of calpain-inhibitor complexes to aid inhibitor design. These structures reveal the expected extended beta-strand conformation for the inhibitor backbone, a geometry that has been engineered into inhibitors with the introduction of either an N-terminal heterocycle or a macrocycle that links the P(1) and P(3) residues. The structure and function of all the main classes of inhibitors are reviewed, with most examples being classified according to the nature of the C-terminal reactive warhead group that reacts with the active site cysteine of calpains. These inhibitor classes include epoxysuccinate derivatives, aldehydes, aldehyde prodrugs (hemiacetals) and alpha-keto carbonyl compounds. Inhibitors derived from the endogenous inhibitor calpastatin and examples lacking a warhead, are now known and these are also discussed.

  10. Stopping cancer in its tracks: using small molecular inhibitors to target glioblastoma migrating cells.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Austin K; Li, Jing; Adamson, David C

    2012-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents one of the most common aggressive types of primary brain tumors. Despite advances in surgical resection, novel neuroimaging procedures, and the most recent adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival after diagnosis is about 12-14 months. Targeting migrating GBM cells is a key research strategy in the fight against this devastating cancer. Though the vast majority of the primary tumor focus can be surgically resected, these migrating cells are responsible for its universal recurrence. Numerous strategies and technologies are being explored to target migrating glioma cells, with small molecular inhibitors as one of the most commonly studied. Small molecule inhibitors, such as protein kinase inhibitors, phosphorylation site inhibitors, protease inhibitors, and antisense oligonucleotides show promise in slowing the progression of this disease. A better understanding of these small molecule inhibitors and how they target various extra- and intracellular signaling pathways may eventually lead to a cure for GBM.

  11. Feasibility of using molecular docking-based virtual screening for searching dual target kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shunye; Li, Youyong; Hou, Tingjun

    2013-04-22

    Multitarget agents have been extensively explored for solving limited efficacies, poor safety, and resistant profiles of an individual target. Theoretical approaches for searching and designing multitarget agents are critically useful. Here, the performance of molecular docking to search dual-target inhibitors for four kinase pairs (CDK2-GSK3B, EGFR-Src, Lck-Src, and Lck-VEGFR2) was assessed. First, the representative structures for each kinase target were chosen by structural clustering of available crystal structures. Next, the performance of molecular docking to distinguish inhibitors from noninhibitors for each individual kinase target was evaluated. The results show that molecular docking-based virtual screening illustrates good capability to find known inhibitors for individual targets, but the prediction accuracy is structurally dependent. Finally, the performance of molecular docking to identify the dual-target kinase inhibitors for four kinase pairs was evaluated. The analyses show that molecular docking successfully filters out most noninhibitors and achieves promising performance for identifying dual-kinase inhibitors for CDK2-GSK3B and Lck-VEGFR2. But a high false-positive rate leads to low enrichment of true dual-target inhibitors in the final list. This study suggests that molecular docking serves as a useful tool in searching inhibitors against dual or even multiple kinase targets, but integration with other virtual screening tools is necessary for achieving better predictions.

  12. A chemoproteomic method for identifying cellular targets of covalent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are attractive drug targets for numerous human diseases including cancers, diabetes and neurodegeneration. A number of kinase inhibitors that covalently target a cysteine residue in their target kinases have recently entered use in the cancer clinic. Despite the advantages of covalent kinases inhibitors, their inherent reactivity can lead to non-specific binding to other cellular proteins and cause off- target effects in cells. It is thus essential to determine the identity of these off targets in order to fully account for the phenotype and to improve the selectivity and efficacy of covalent inhibitors. Herein we present a detailed protocol for a chemoproteomic method to enrich and identify cellular targets of covalent kinase inhibitors. PMID:27551330

  13. Imatinib Spares cKit-Expressing Prostate Neuroendocrine Tumors, whereas Kills Seminal Vesicle Epithelial-Stromal Tumors by Targeting PDGFR-β.

    PubMed

    Jachetti, Elena; Rigoni, Alice; Bongiovanni, Lucia; Arioli, Ivano; Botti, Laura; Parenza, Mariella; Cancila, Valeria; Chiodoni, Claudia; Festinese, Fabrizio; Bellone, Matteo; Tardanico, Regina; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in males worldwide. Indeed, advanced and metastatic disease characterized by androgen resistance and often associated with neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation remains incurable. Using the spontaneous prostate cancer TRAMP model, we have shown that mast cells (MCs) support in vivo the growth of prostate adenocarcinoma, whereas their genetic or pharmacologic targeting favors prostate NE cancer arousal. Aiming at simultaneously targeting prostate NE tumor cells and MCs, both expressing the cKit tyrosine kinase receptor, we have tested the therapeutic effect of imatinib in TRAMP mice. Imatinib-treated TRAMP mice experience a partial benefit against prostate adenocarcinoma, because of inhibition of supportive MCs. However, they show an unexpected outgrowth of prostate NE tumors, likely because of defective signaling pathway downstream of cKit receptor. Also unexpected but very effective was the inhibition of epithelial-stromal tumors of the seminal vesicles achieved by imatinib treatment. These tumors normally arise in the seminal vesicles of TRAMP mice, independently of the degree of prostatic glandular lesions, and resemble phyllodes tumors found in human prostate and seminal vesicles, and in breast. In both mice and in patients, these tumors are negative for cKit but express PDGFR-β, another tyrosine kinase receptor specifically inhibited by imatinib. Our results imply a possible detrimental effect of imatinib in prostate cancer patients but suggest a promising therapeutic application of imatinib in the treatment of recurrent or metastatic phyllodes tumors. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 365-75. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. CS2164, a novel multi-target inhibitor against tumor angiogenesis, mitosis and chronic inflammation with anti-tumor potency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, You; Shan, Song; Li, Zhi-Bin; Xin, Li-Jun; Pan, De-Si; Yang, Qian-Jiao; Liu, Ying-Ping; Yue, Xu-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Rong; Gao, Ji-Zhou; Zhang, Jin-Wen; Ning, Zhi-Qiang; Lu, Xian-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Although inhibitors targeting tumor angiogenic pathway have provided improvement for clinical treatment in patients with various solid tumors, the still very limited anti-cancer efficacy and acquired drug resistance demand new agents that may offer better clinical benefits. In the effort to find a small molecule potentially targeting several key pathways for tumor development, we designed, discovered and evaluated a novel multi-kinase inhibitor, CS2164. CS2164 inhibited the angiogenesis-related kinases (VEGFR2, VEGFR1, VEGFR3, PDGFRα and c-Kit), mitosis-related kinase Aurora B and chronic inflammation-related kinase CSF-1R in a high potency manner with the IC50 at a single-digit nanomolar range. Consequently, CS2164 displayed anti-angiogenic activities through suppression of VEGFR/PDGFR phosphorylation, inhibition of ligand-dependent cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, and prevention of vasculature formation in tumor tissues. CS2164 also showed induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and suppression of cell proliferation in tumor tissues through the inhibition of Aurora B-mediated H3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, CS2164 demonstrated the inhibitory effect on CSF-1R phosphorylation that led to the suppression of ligand-stimulated monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and reduced CSF-1R(+) cells in tumor tissues. The in vivo animal efficacy studies revealed that CS2164 induced remarkable regression or complete inhibition of tumor growth at well-tolerated oral doses in several human tumor xenograft models. Collectively, these results indicate that CS2164 is a highly selective multi-kinase inhibitor with potent anti-tumor activities against tumor angiogenesis, mitosis and chronic inflammation, which may provide the rationale for further clinical assessment of CS2164 as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of cancer. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Finding off-targets, biological pathways, and target diseases for chymase inhibitors via structure-based systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Arooj, Mahreen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Cao, Guang Ping; Kim, Songmi; Arulalapperumal, Venkatesh; Lee, Keun Woo

    2015-07-01

    Off-target binding connotes the binding of a small molecule of therapeutic significance to a protein target in addition to the primary target for which it was proposed. Progressively such off-targeting is emerging to be regular practice to reveal side effects. Chymase is an enzyme of hydrolase class that catalyzes hydrolysis of peptide bonds. A link between heart failure and chymase is ascribed, and a chymase inhibitor is in clinical phase II for treatment of heart failure. However, the underlying mechanisms of the off-target effects of human chymase inhibitors are still unclear. Here, we develop a robust computational strategy that is applicable to any enzyme system and that allows the prediction of drug effects on biological processes. Putative off-targets for chymase inhibitors were identified through various structural and functional similarity analyses along with molecular docking studies. Finally, literature survey was performed to incorporate these off-targets into biological pathways and to establish links between pathways and particular adverse effects. Off-targets of chymase inhibitors are linked to various biological pathways such as classical and lectin pathways of complement system, intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation cascade, and fibrinolytic system. Tissue kallikreins, granzyme M, neutrophil elastase, and mesotrypsin are also identified as off-targets. These off-targets and their associated pathways are elucidated for the effects of inflammation, cancer, hemorrhage, thrombosis, and central nervous system diseases (Alzheimer's disease). Prospectively, our approach is helpful not only to better understand the mechanisms of chymase inhibitors but also for drug repurposing exercises to find novel uses for these inhibitors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Proposal of Dual Inhibitor Targeting ATPase Domains of Topoisomerase II and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kyu-Yeon; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2016-01-01

    There is a conserved ATPase domain in topoisomerase II (topo II) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) which belong to the GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, and MutL) family. The inhibitors that target each of topo II and Hsp90 are intensively studied as anti-cancer drugs since they play very important roles in cell proliferation and survival. Therefore the development of dual targeting anti-cancer drugs for topo II and Hsp90 is suggested to be a promising area. The topo II and Hsp90 inhibitors, known to bind to their ATP binding site, were searched. All the inhibitors investigated were docked to both topo II and Hsp90. Four candidate compounds as possible dual inhibitors were selected by analyzing the molecular docking study. The pharmacophore model of dual inhibitors for topo II and Hsp90 were generated and the design of novel dual inhibitor was proposed. PMID:27582553

  17. Compound Selectivity and Target Residence Time of Kinase Inhibitors Studied with Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Willemsen-Seegers, Nicole; Uitdehaag, Joost C M; Prinsen, Martine B W; de Vetter, Judith R F; de Man, Jos; Sawa, Masaaki; Kawase, Yusuke; Buijsman, Rogier C; Zaman, Guido J R

    2017-02-17

    Target residence time (τ) has been suggested to be a better predictor of the biological activity of kinase inhibitors than inhibitory potency (IC50) in enzyme assays. Surface plasmon resonance binding assays for 46 human protein and lipid kinases were developed. The association and dissociation constants of 80 kinase inhibitor interactions were determined. τ and equilibrium affinity constants (KD) were calculated to determine kinetic selectivity. Comparison of τ and KD or IC50 values revealed a strikingly different view on the selectivity of several kinase inhibitors, including the multi-kinase inhibitor ponatinib, which was tested on 10 different kinases. In addition, known pan-Aurora inhibitors resided much longer on Aurora B than on Aurora A, despite having comparable affinity for Aurora A and B. Furthermore, the γ/δ-selective PI3K inhibitor duvelisib and the δ-selective drug idelalisib had similar 20-fold selectivity for δ- over γ-isoform but duvelisib resided much longer on both targets.

  18. KIT mutations confer a distinct gene expression signature in core binding factor leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Lück, Sonja C; Russ, Annika C; Du, Juan; Gaidzik, Verena; Schlenk, Richard F; Pollack, Jonathan R; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Bullinger, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Core binding factor (CBF) leukaemias, characterized by either inv(16)(p13.1q22) or t(8;21)(q22;q22), constitute acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) subgroups with favourable prognosis. However, 40-50% of patients relapse, emphasizing the need for risk-adapted treatment approaches. In this regard, studying secondary genetic aberrations, such as mutations of the KIT gene, is of great interest, particularly as they can be targeted by receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). However, so far little is known about the biology underlying KIT-mutated CBF leukaemias. We analysed gene expression profiles of 83 CBF AML cases with known KIT mutation status in order to gain novel insights in KIT-mutated CBF pathogenesis. KIT-mutated cases were characterized by deregulation of genes belonging to the NFkB signalling complex suggesting impaired control of apoptosis. Notably, a subgroup of KIT wildtype cases was also characterized by the KIT mutation signature due to yet unknown aberrations. Our data suggest that this CBF leukaemia subgroup might profit from TKI therapy, however, the relevance of the KIT mutation-associated signature remains to be validated prior to clinical implementation. Nevertheless, the existence of such a signature supports the notion of relevant biological differences in CBF leukaemia and might serve as diagnostic tool in the future.

  19. Comparative performance of AmpFLSTR® Identifiler® Plus PCR amplification kit and QIAGEN® Investigator® IDplex Plus kit.

    PubMed

    Mattayat, Dalad; Kitpipit, Thitika; Phetpeng, Sukanya; Asawutmangkul, Watee; Thanakiatkrai, Phuvadol

    2016-12-01

    Many forensic STR kits are currently available in the market. The AmpFLSTR® Identifiler® Plus kit, which targets 15 STRs, is commonly used worldwide. The Thai forensic DNA community is built around it in terms of instrument, databases, and interpretation. QIAGEN's IDplex Plus kit targets the same loci, but the PCR cycling time is shorter by about 90min. A direct comparison that assesses forensic parameters and applicability to casework between the two kits has never been carried out. In this study, we performed a direct comparison between the two kits using serial dilutions of two control DNA samples and 60 randomly selected casework samples, including samples taken from improvised explosive devices and terrorist raids. We statistically compared the performance of the two kits in terms of peak height, number of allele detected (allelic drop-out), intra-locus balance, inter-locus balance, inhibitor tolerance, stutter ratio, concordance, and allelic drop-in. The results demonstrate that both kits are statistically similar in performance. IDplex Plus gave higher peak heights in sensitivity test and tolerated inhibitors better, but had slightly worse inter-locus balances and stutter ratios. However, these differences were not practically significant, as seen by the resulting profiles of the casework samples (p=0.601). The performance on low-template samples also was not different. In conclusion, laboratories looking to replace the aging Identifiler® Plus might consider the IDplex Plus as a faster, more robust alternative that fits right into their existing structure without further investment in instrument and DNA database. Having more kits available worldwide by different companies could help bring the technology to different forensic laboratories and the justice system as a whole.

  20. Targeting SHP2 for EGFR inhibitor resistant non-small cell lung carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jie; Zeng, Li-Fan; Shen, Weihua; Turchi, John J.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •SHP2 is required for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC H1975 cell proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor blocks EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and proliferation. •SHP2 inhibitor exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. •SHP2 inhibitor synergizes with PI3K inhibitor in suppressing cell growth. •Targeting SHP2 represents a novel strategy for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs. -- Abstract: Targeted therapy with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has produced a noticeable benefit to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose tumors carry activating mutations (e.g. L858R) in EGFR. Unfortunately, these patients develop drug resistance after treatment, due to acquired secondary gatekeeper mutations in EGFR (e.g. T790M). Given the critical role of SHP2 in growth factor receptor signaling, we sought to determine whether targeting SHP2 could have therapeutic value for EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC. We show that SHP2 is required for EGF-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and proliferation in EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLC cell line H1975, which harbors the EGFR T790M/L858R double-mutant. We demonstrate that treatment of H1975 cells with II-B08, a specific SHP2 inhibitor, phenocopies the observed growth inhibition and reduced ERK1/2 activation seen in cells treated with SHP2 siRNA. Importantly, we also find that II-B08 exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in H1975 xenograft mice. Finally, we observe that combined inhibition of SHP2 and PI3K impairs both the ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling axes and produces significantly greater effects on repressing H1975 cell growth than inhibition of either protein individually. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting SHP2 may represent an effective strategy for treatment of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs.

  1. HSP90 Inhibitor-SN-38 Conjugate Strategy for Targeted Delivery of Topoisomerase I Inhibitor to Tumors.

    PubMed

    Proia, David A; Smith, Donald L; Zhang, Junyi; Jimenez, John-Paul; Sang, Jim; Ogawa, Luisa Shin; Sequeira, Manuel; Acquaviva, Jaime; He, Suqin; Zhang, Chaohua; Khazak, Vladimir; Astsaturov, Igor; Inoue, Takayo; Tatsuta, Noriaki; Osman, Sami; Bates, Richard C; Chimmanamada, Dinesh; Ying, Weiwen

    2015-11-01

    The clinical benefits of chemotherapy are commonly offset by insufficient drug exposures, narrow safety margins, and/or systemic toxicities. Over recent decades, a number of conjugate-based targeting approaches designed to overcome these limitations have been explored. Here, we report on an innovative strategy that utilizes HSP90 inhibitor-drug conjugates (HDC) for directed tumor targeting of chemotherapeutic agents. STA-12-8666 is an HDC that comprises an HSP90 inhibitor fused to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. Mechanistic analyses in vitro established that high-affinity HSP90 binding conferred by the inhibitor backbone could be exploited for conjugate accumulation within tumor cells. In vivo modeling showed that the HSP90 inhibitor moiety was required for selective retention of STA-12-8666, and this enrichment promoted extended release of active SN-38 within the tumor compartment. Indeed, controlled intratumoral payload release by STA-12-8666 contributed to a broad therapeutic window, sustained biomarker activity, and remarkable degree of efficacy and durability of response in multiple cell line and patient-derived xenograft models. Overall, STA-12-8666 has been developed as a unique HDC agent that employs a distinct mechanism of targeted drug delivery to achieve potent and sustained antitumor effects. These findings identify STA-12-8666 as a promising new candidate for evaluation as novel anticancer therapeutic.

  2. A Novel SERCA Inhibitor Demonstrates Synergy with Classic SERCA Inhibitors and Targets Multidrug-Resistant AML

    PubMed Central

    Bleeker, Nicholas P.; Cornea, Razvan L.; Thomas, David D.; Xing, Chengguo

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance exists as a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer and drug molecules that retain effectiveness against resistant cancers are a high clinical priority. Ethyl 2-amino-6-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-4-(2-ethoxy-2-oxoethyl)-4H-chromene-3-carboxylate (CXL017) was recently identified as a promising lead for the treatment of multidrug-resistant leukemia, which elicits its cytotoxic effect, in part, through inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). Herein initial experiments with SERCA1a, CXL017 demonstrated no significant effect on calcium affinity, competed with ATP, and induced a dose-dependent decrease in ATPase activity. Among all CXLs tested, (−)-CXL017 exhibited the greatest SERCA inhibition with an IC50 = 13.5 ± 0.5 μM. Inhibitor combination studies were used to assess potential interactions between (−)-CXL017 and well-known SERCA inhibitors: thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, and 2, 5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone. Surprisingly, (−)-CXL017 exhibited marked synergy with each of the known SERCA inhibitors whereas all combinations of the known inhibitors yielded additive effects, indicating that (−)-CXL017 may bind at a unique allosteric site. Treatment of parental (HL60) and multidrug-resistant (HL60/MX2) acute myeloid leukemia cells with the known SERCA inhibitors revealed that all of these inhibitors demonstrate selective cytotoxicity (7.7 to 400 fold) for the resistant cell line. Within the CXL series, a positive correlation exists between SERCA inhibition and cytotoxicity in HL60/MX2 but not HL60. (−)-CXL017 was also shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of thapsigargin in HL60/MX2 cells. Given the elevated SERCA levels and ER calcium content in HL60/MX2, SERCA likely plays a significant role in the collateral sensitivity of this multidrug-resistance cell line to CXL molecules as well as known SERCA inhibitors. PMID:24079514

  3. Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are commonly dysregulated in GIST and can be pharmacologically targeted to enhance the pro-apoptotic activity of imatinib.

    PubMed

    Falkenhorst, Johanna; Grunewald, Susanne; Mühlenberg, Thomas; Marino-Enriquez, Adrian; Reis, Anna-Carina; Corless, Christopher; Heinrich, Michael; Treckmann, Jürgen; Podleska, Lars Erik; Schuler, Martin; Fletcher, Jonathan Alfred; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-07-05

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) exhibit a strong oncogenic dependency on KIT and KIT inhibitors confer long lasting disease stabilization in the majority of patients. Nonetheless, KIT inhibition alone does not cure GIST as a subset of GIST cells evade apoptosis and eventually develop resistance. Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) may confer resistance to drug-induced apoptosis. We observed that the mRNA and protein of IAPs XIAP (BIRC4) and survivin (BIRC5) were highly expressed in primary GIST tumors and cell line models. Amplification of the respective gene loci (BIRC2, BIRC3, BIRC4, BIRC5) was detected in 47% of GIST studied by SNP arrays. Whole exome analyses revealed a mutation of SMAC(DIABLO) in a heavily pretreated patient. Both, survivin (rank 62-92/11.194 tested proteins) and XIAP (rank 106-557/11.194) were found to be essential proteins for survival in a synthetic lethality screen. Expression of XIAP and survivin decreased upon KIT inhibition and may play a role in KIT-regulated pro-survival signaling. SMAC-mimetic treatment with LCL161 and TL32711 reduced cIAP1 and XIAP expression. Survivin inhibitor YM155 lead to transcriptional repression of BIRC5/survivin (YM155) and induced apoptosis. Combinational treatment with KIT inhibitors (imatinib, regorafenib) enhanced the proapoptotic effect. These findings support the combination of KIT inhibition with IAP antagonists in GIST.

  4. Deacetylase inhibitors dissociate the histone-targeting ING2 subunit from the Sin3 complex

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen T.; Martin-Brown, Skylar A.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are in clinical development for several diseases, including cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. HDACs1 and 2 are among the targets of these inhibitors and are part of multisubunit protein complexes. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) block the activity of HDACs by chelating a zinc molecule in their catalytic sites. It is not known if the inhibitors have any additional functional effects on the multisubunit HDAC complexes. Here, we find that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the recently FDA approved HDACi, causes the dissociation of the PHD-finger containing ING2 subunit from the Sin3 deacetylase complex. Loss of ING2 disrupts the in vivo binding of the Sin3 complex to the p21 promoter, an important target gene for cell growth inhibition by SAHA. Our findings reveal a new molecular mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors disrupt deacetylase function. PMID:20142042

  5. Development of Small-molecule HIV Entry Inhibitors Specifically Targeting gp120 or gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Cai, Lifeng; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41 play important roles in HIV-1 entry, thus serving as key targets for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. T20 peptide (enfuvirtide) is the first U.S. FDA-approved HIV entry inhibitor; however, its clinical application is limited by the lack of oral availability. Here, we have described the structure and function of the HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 subunits and reviewed advancements in the development of small-molecule HIV entry inhibitors specifically targeting these two Env glycoproteins. We then compared the advantages and disadvantages of different categories of HIV entry inhibitor candidates and further predicted the future trend of HIV entry inhibitor development.

  6. Development of Small-molecule HIV Entry Inhibitors Specifically Targeting gp120 or gp41

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Cai, Lifeng; Debnath, Asim K.; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41 play important roles in HIV-1 entry, thus serving as key targets for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. T20 peptide (enfuvirtide) is the first U.S. FDA-approved HIV entry inhibitor; however, its clinical application is limited by the lack of oral availability. Here, we have described the structure and function of the HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 subunits and reviewed advancements in the development of small-molecule HIV entry inhibitors specifically targeting these two Env glycoproteins. We then compared the advantages and disadvantages of different categories of HIV entry inhibitor candidates and further predicted the future trend of HIV entry inhibitor development. PMID:26324044

  7. Structure-based design of pteridine reductase inhibitors targeting African sleeping sickness and the leishmaniases.

    PubMed

    Tulloch, Lindsay B; Martini, Viviane P; Iulek, Jorge; Huggan, Judith K; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Gibson, Colin L; Smith, Terry K; Suckling, Colin J; Hunter, William N

    2010-01-14

    Pteridine reductase (PTR1) is a target for drug development against Trypanosoma and Leishmania species, parasites that cause serious tropical diseases and for which therapies are inadequate. We adopted a structure-based approach to the design of novel PTR1 inhibitors based on three molecular scaffolds. A series of compounds, most newly synthesized, were identified as inhibitors with PTR1-species specific properties explained by structural differences between the T. brucei and L. major enzymes. The most potent inhibitors target T. brucei PTR1, and two compounds displayed antiparasite activity against the bloodstream form of the parasite. PTR1 contributes to antifolate drug resistance by providing a molecular bypass of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibition. Therefore, combining PTR1 and DHFR inhibitors might improve therapeutic efficacy. We tested two new compounds with known DHFR inhibitors. A synergistic effect was observed for one particular combination highlighting the potential of such an approach for treatment of African sleeping sickness.

  8. Novel Pyridazinone Inhibitors for Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 (VAP-1): Old target – New Inhibition Mode

    PubMed Central

    Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Szatmári, István; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Smith, David J.; Lázár, László; Fülöp, Ferenc; Salminen, Tiina A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a primary amine oxidase and a drug target for inflammatory and vascular diseases. Despite extensive attempts to develop potent, specific and reversible inhibitors of its enzyme activity, the task has proven challenging. Here we report the synthesis, inhibitory activity and molecular binding mode of novel pyridazinone inhibitors, which show specificity for VAP-1 over monoamine and diamine oxidases. The crystal structures of three inhibitor-VAP-1 complexes show that these compounds bind reversibly into a unique binding site in the active site channel. Though they are good inhibitors of human VAP-1, they do not inhibit rodent VAP-1 well. To investigate this further, we used homology modeling and structural comparison to identify amino acid differences, which explain the species-specific binding properties. Our results prove the potency and specificity of these new inhibitors and the detailed characterization of their binding mode is of importance for further development of VAP-1 inhibitors. PMID:24304424

  9. JAK Inhibitors and other Novel Agents in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Are We Hitting the Target?

    PubMed

    Kucine, Nicole; Levine, Ross L

    2011-08-01

    The discovery of somatic mutations in the JAK-STAT signaling pathway was a major breakthrough in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis, and primary myelofibrosis. This finding led to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting Janus kinase (JAK) 2 and other JAK family members. Currently, there are a number of research and clinical trials ongoing with JAK inhibitors. While the appeal of inhibiting JAK2 is clear, studies to date suggest that JAK2 inhibitor monotherapy might not be sufficient to cause reductions in disease allele burden in MPN patients. There is compelling evidence that JAK inhibitors are improving symptoms and therefore quality of life for patients. It will be important to investigate the efficacy of JAK inhibitors in preclinical and clinical studies to better understand their effects, while at the same time pursuing alternative therapies which might offer benefit to MPN patients alone and in combination with JAK inhibitors.

  10. Novel pyridazinone inhibitors for vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1): old target-new inhibition mode.

    PubMed

    Bligt-Lindén, Eva; Pihlavisto, Marjo; Szatmári, István; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Smith, David J; Lázár, László; Fülöp, Ferenc; Salminen, Tiina A

    2013-12-27

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a primary amine oxidase and a drug target for inflammatory and vascular diseases. Despite extensive attempts to develop potent, specific, and reversible inhibitors of its enzyme activity, the task has proven challenging. Here we report the synthesis, inhibitory activity, and molecular binding mode of novel pyridazinone inhibitors, which show specificity for VAP-1 over monoamine and diamine oxidases. The crystal structures of three inhibitor-VAP-1 complexes show that these compounds bind reversibly into a unique binding site in the active site channel. Although they are good inhibitors of human VAP-1, they do not inhibit rodent VAP-1 well. To investigate this further, we used homology modeling and structural comparison to identify amino acid differences, which explain the species-specific binding properties. Our results prove the potency and specificity of these new inhibitors, and the detailed characterization of their binding mode is of importance for further development of VAP-1 inhibitors.

  11. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy. PMID:26713267

  12. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase: New Targets for Future Antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shintaro; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis and analogs of Δ<sup>9</sup>-tetrahydrocannabinol have been used for therapeutic purposes, but their therapeutic use remains limited because of various adverse effects. Endogenous cannabinoids have been discovered, and dysregulation of endocannabinoid signaling is implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Recently, endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) have become new therapeutic targets in the treatment of MDD. Several FAAH or MAGL inhibitors are reported to have no cannabimimetic side effects and, therefore, are new potential therapeutic options for patients with MDD who are resistant to first-line antidepressants (selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). In this review, we focus on the possible relationships between MDD and the endocannabinoid system as well as the inhibitors' therapeutic potential. MAGL inhibitors may reduce inflammatory responses through activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2. In the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, repeated FAAH inhibitor administration may be beneficial for reducing circulating glucocorticoid levels. Both FAAH and MAGL inhibitors may contribute to dopaminergic system regulation. Recently, several new inhibitors have been developed with strong potency and selectivity. FAAH inhibitor, MAGL inhibitor, or dual blocker use would be promising new treatments for MDD. Further pre-clinical studies and clinical trials using these inhibitors are warranted.

  13. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Quorum Sensing with Nonpeptidic Small Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of 3-oxo-C12-HSL, tetramic acid, and tetronic acid analogues were synthesized to gain insights into the structural requirements for quorum sensing inhibition in Staphylococcus aureus. Compounds active against agr were noncompetitive inhibitors of the autoinducing peptide (AIP) activated AgrC receptor, by altering the activation efficacy of the cognate AIP-1. They appeared to act as negative allosteric modulators and are exemplified by 3-tetradecanoyltetronic acid 17, which reduced nasal cell colonization and arthritis in a murine infection model. PMID:24592914

  14. Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor on non-target soil organisms.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Maureen; Brownbridge, Michael; Stilwell, Wendy B; Gerard, Emily M; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Barraclough, Emma I; Christeller, John T

    2007-01-01

    Effects of tobacco genetically modified to express the protease inhibitor bovine spleen trypsin inhibitor (BSTI) were examined in laboratory assays against three earthworm and one collembolan species. BSTI is a serine protease inhibitor that can bind to the digestive trypsins of insects feeding on modified plants, resulting in reduced growth and survival. Protease inhibitors are active against a broad range of insects, so may have a large impact on non-target organisms. Survival and fecundity of the collembolan Folsomia candida were unaffected by consumption of artificial diet containing BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf or powdered freeze-dried BSTI-expressing tobacco leaf that was added to soil. Similarly, mortality and growth of earthworms Aporrectodea caliginosa and Lumbricus rubellus did not differ significantly between soil augmented with BSTI-expressing tobacco leaves or unmodified control leaves. The redworm Eisenia fetida gained less weight when provided with BSTI-expressing leaves in one assay, but when the experiment was repeated, there was no significant difference between treatments. BSTI-expressing tobacco and unmodified control leaves decomposed at the same rate, indicating that the inhibitor had no effect on the overall function of the decomposer community of micro-flora and fauna in soil.

  15. Targeted Radiosensitization by the Chk1 Inhibitor SAR-020106

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; McLaughlin, Martin; Kyula, Joan N.; Neijenhuis, Sari; Khan, Aadil; Good, James; Zaidi, Shane; Powell, Ned G.; Meier, Pascal; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.; Verheij, Marcel; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To explore the activity of a potent Chk1 inhibitor (SAR-020106) in combination with radiation. Methods and Materials: Colony and mechanistic in vitro assays and a xenograft in vivo model. Results: SAR-020106 suppressed-radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and reduced clonogenic survival only in p53-deficient tumor cells. SAR-020106 promoted mitotic entry following irradiation in all cell lines, but p53-deficient cells were likely to undergo apoptosis or become aneuploid, while p53 wild-type cells underwent a postmitotic G{sub 1} arrest followed by subsequent normal cell cycle re-entry. Following combined treatment with SAR-020106 and radiation, homologous-recombination-mediated DNA damage repair was inhibited in all cell lines. A significant increase in the number of pan-γH2AX-staining apoptotic cells was observed only in p53-deficient cell lines. Efficacy was confirmed in vivo in a clinically relevant human head-and-neck cell carcinoma xenograft model. Conclusion: The Chk1 inhibitor SAR-020106 is a potent radiosensitizer in tumor cell lines defective in p53 signaling.

  16. HIV proteinase inhibitors target the Ddi1-like protein of Leishmania parasites

    PubMed Central

    White, Rhian E.; Powell, David J.; Berry, Colin

    2011-01-01

    HIV proteinase inhibitors reduce the levels of Leishmania parasites in vivo and in vitro, but their biochemical target is unknown. We have identified an ortholog of the yeast Ddi1 protein as the only member of the aspartic proteinase family in Leishmania parasites, and in this study we investigate this protein as a potential target for the drugs. To date, no enzyme assay has been developed for the Ddi1 proteins, but Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the DDI1 gene secrete high levels of protein into the medium. We developed an assay in which these knockout yeast were functionally complemented to low secretion by introduction of genes encoding Ddi1 orthologs from Leishmania major or humans. Plasmid alone controls gave no complementation. Treatment of the Ddi1 transformants with HIV proteinase inhibitors showed differential effects dependent on the origin of the Ddi1. Dose responses allowed calculation of IC50 values; e.g., for nelfinavir, of 3.4 μM (human Ddi1) and 0.44 μM (Leishmania Ddi1). IC50 values with Leishmania constructs mirror the potency of inhibitors against parasites. Our results show that Ddi1 proteins are targets of HIV proteinase inhibitors and indicates the Leishmania Ddi1 as the likely target for these drugs and a potential target for antiparasitic therapy.—White, R. E., Powell, D. J., Berry, C. HIV proteinase inhibitors target the Ddi1-Like protein of Leishmania parasites. PMID:21266539

  17. Design of a peptidic inhibitor that targets the dimer interface of a prototypic galectin.

    PubMed

    Vladoiu, Maria Claudia; Labrie, Marilyne; Létourneau, Myriam; Egesborg, Philippe; Gagné, Donald; Billard, Étienne; Grosset, Andrée-Anne; Doucet, Nicolas; Chatenet, David; St-Pierre, Yves

    2015-12-01

    Galectins are small soluble lectins that bind α-galactosides via their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Their ability to dimerize is critical for the crosslinking of glycoprotein receptors and subsequent cellular signaling. This is particularly important in their immunomodulatory role via the induction of T-cell apoptosis. Because galectins play a central role in many pathologies, including cancer, they represent valuable therapeutic targets. At present, most inhibitors have been directed towards the CRD, a challenging task in terms of specificity given the high structural homology of the CRD among galectins. Such inhibitors are not effective at targeting CRD-independent functions of galectins. Here, we report a new class of galectin inhibitors that specifically binds human galectin-7 (hGal-7), disrupts the formation of homodimers, and inhibits the pro-apoptotic activity of hGal-7 on Jurkat T cells. In addition to representing a new means to achieve specificity when targeting galectins, such inhibitors provide a promising alternative to more conventional galectin inhibitors that target the CRD with soluble glycans or other small molecular weight allosteric inhibitors.

  18. Development of novel entry inhibitors targeting emerging viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Simmons, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Emerging viral diseases pose a unique risk to public health, and thus there is a need to develop therapies. A current focus of funding agencies, and hence research, is the development of broad-spectrum antivirals, and in particular, those targeting common cellular pathways. The scope of this article is to review screening strategies and recent advances in this area, with a particular emphasis on antivirals targeting the step of viral entry for emerging lipid-enveloped viruses such as Ebola virus and SARS-coronavirus. PMID:23199399

  19. Niche anchorage and signaling through membrane-bound Kit-ligand/c-kit receptor are kinase independent and imatinib insensitive.

    PubMed

    Tabone-Eglinger, Séverine; Calderin-Sollet, Zuleika; Pinon, Perrine; Aebischer, Nicole; Wehrle-Haller, Monique; Jacquier, Marie-Claude; Boettiger, David; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    Kit ligand (KitL) and its tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit are critical for germ cells, melanocytes, mastocytes, and hematopoietic stem cells. Alternative splicing of KitL generates membrane-bound KitL (mb-KitL) or soluble KitL, providing survival or cell migration, respectively. Here we analyzed whether c-kit can function both as an adhesion and signaling receptor to mb-KitL presented by the environmental niche. At contacts between fibroblasts and MC/9 mast cells, mb-KitL, and c-kit formed ligand/receptor clusters that formed stable complexes, which resisted dissociation by c-kit blocking mAbs and provided cell anchorage under physiological shear stresses. Clusters recruited tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and induced spatially restricted F-actin polymerization. Mutational analysis of c-kit demonstrated kinase-independent mb-KitL/c-kit clustering, anchorage, F-actin polymerization, and Tyr567-dependent cluster phosphorylation. Kinase inhibition of c-kit by imatinib reduced cluster coalescence, but allowed cluster phosphorylation and F-actin polymerization, which required PI3K recruitment and a newly identified juxtamembrane residue. Synergies between integrin and c-kit-mediated spreading and adhesion of MC/9 cells were studied in vitro on immobilized-KitL/fibronectin surfaces. While c-kit blocking antibodies prevented spreading, imatinib blocked spreading induced by soluble- but not immobilized KitL. Thus, "mechanical" activation of c-kit provides signaling, niche-anchorage, and synergies with integrin-mediated adhesion, which is independent of kinase function and resistant to c-kit kinase inhibitors.-

  20. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase and Monoacylglycerol Lipase: New Targets for Future Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Shintaro; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis and analogs of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol have been used for therapeutic purposes, but their therapeutic use remains limited because of various adverse effects. Endogenous cannabinoids have been discovered, and dysregulation of endocannabinoid signaling is implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Recently, endocannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) have become new therapeutic targets in the treatment of MDD. Several FAAH or MAGL inhibitors are reported to have no cannabimimetic side effects and, therefore, are new potential therapeutic options for patients with MDD who are resistant to first-line antidepressants (selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). In this review, we focus on the possible relationships between MDD and the endocannabinoid system as well as the inhibitors’ therapeutic potential. MAGL inhibitors may reduce inflammatory responses through activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2. In the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, repeated FAAH inhibitor administration may be beneficial for reducing circulating glucocorticoid levels. Both FAAH and MAGL inhibitors may contribute to dopaminergic system regulation. Recently, several new inhibitors have been developed with strong potency and selectivity. FAAH inhibitor, MAGL inhibitor, or dual blocker use would be promising new treatments for MDD. Further pre-clinical studies and clinical trials using these inhibitors are warranted. PMID:26630956

  1. Genome-wide functional screening identifies CDC37 as a crucial HSP90-cofactor for KIT oncogenic expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Mariño-Enríquez, A; Ou, W-B; Cowley, G; Luo, B; Jonker, A H; Mayeda, M; Okamoto, M; Eilers, G; Czaplinski, J T; Sicinska, E; Wang, Y; Taguchi, T; Demetri, G D; Root, D E; Fletcher, J A

    2014-04-03

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) contain KIT or PDGFRA kinase gain-of-function mutations, and therefore respond clinically to imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapies. However, clinical progression subsequently results from selection of TKI-resistant clones, typically containing secondary mutations in the KIT kinase domain, which can be heterogeneous between and within GIST metastases in a given patient. TKI-resistant KIT oncoproteins require HSP90 chaperoning and are potently inactivated by HSP90 inhibitors, but clinical applications in GIST patients are constrained by the toxicity resulting from concomitant inactivation of various other HSP90 client proteins, beyond KIT and PDGFRA. To identify novel targets responsible for KIT oncoprotein function, we performed parallel genome-scale short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene knockdowns in KIT-mutant GIST-T1 and GIST882. GIST cells were infected with a lentiviral shRNA pooled library targeting 11 194 human genes, and allowed to proliferate for 5-7 weeks, at which point assessment of relative hairpin abundance identified the HSP90 cofactor, CDC37, as one of the top six GIST-specific essential genes. Validations in treatment-naive (GIST-T1, GIST882) vs imatinib-resistant GISTs (GIST48, GIST430) demonstrated that: (1) CDC37 interacts with oncogenic KIT; (2) CDC37 regulates expression and activation of KIT and downstream signaling intermediates in GIST; and (3) unlike direct HSP90 inhibition, CDC37 knockdown accomplishes prolonged KIT inhibition (>20 days) in GIST. These studies highlight CDC37 as a key biologic vulnerability in both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST. CDC37 targeting is expected to be selective for KIT/PDGFRA and a subset of other HSP90 clients, and thereby represents a promising strategy for inactivating the myriad KIT/PDGFRA oncoproteins in TKI-resistant GIST patients.

  2. Targeting inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) for new breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaomeng; Bai, Longchuan; Lu, Jianfeng; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Sun, Haiying

    2012-12-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of human cancer. Research in the last two decades has identified key regulators of apoptosis, including inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). These critical apoptosis regulators have been targeted for the development of new cancer therapeutics. In this article, we will discuss three members of IAP proteins, namely XIAP, cIAP1 and cIAP2, as cancer therapeutic targets and the progress made in developing new cancer therapeutic agents to target these IAP proteins.

  3. The SCF/c-KIT system in the male: Survival strategies in fertility and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Henrique J; Figueira, Marília I; Correia, Sara; Vaz, Cátia V; Socorro, Sílvia

    2014-12-01

    Maintaining the delicate balance between cell survival and death is of the utmost importance for the proper development of germ cells and subsequent fertility. On the other hand, the fine regulation of tissue homeostasis by mechanisms that control cell fate is a factor that can prevent carcinogenesis. c-KIT is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase activated by its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF). c-KIT signaling plays a crucial role in cell fate decisions, specifically controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Indeed, deregulating the SCF/c-KIT system by attenuation or overactivation of its signaling strength is linked to male infertility and cancer, and rebalancing its activity via c-KIT inhibitors has proven beneficial in treating human tumors that contain gain-of-function mutations or overexpress c-KIT. This review addresses the roles of SCF and c-KIT in the male reproductive tract, and discusses the potential application of c-KIT target therapies in disorders of the reproductive system.

  4. Small Molecule Inhibitors Target the Tissue Transglutaminase and Fibronectin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Bakhtiyor; Chen, Lan; Belkin, Alexey M.; Zhang, Sheng; Chelladurai, Bhadrani; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Matei, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) mediates protein crosslinking through generation of ε−(γ-glutamyl) lysine isopeptide bonds and promotes cell adhesion through interaction with fibronectin (FN) and integrins. Cell adhesion to the peritoneal matrix regulated by TG2 facilitates ovarian cancer dissemination. Therefore, disruption of the TG2-FN complex by small molecules may inhibit cell adhesion and metastasis. A novel high throughput screening (HTS) assay based on AlphaLISA™ technology was developed to measure the formation of a complex between His-TG2 and the biotinylated FN fragment that binds TG2 and to discover small molecules that inhibit this protein-protein interaction. Several hits were identified from 10,000 compounds screened. The top candidates selected based on >70% inhibition of the TG2/FN complex formation were confirmed by using ELISA and bioassays measuring cell adhesion, migration, invasion, and proliferation. In conclusion, the AlphaLISA bead format assay measuring the TG2-FN interaction is robust and suitable for HTS of small molecules. One compound identified from the screen (TG53) potently inhibited ovarian cancer cell adhesion to FN, cell migration, and invasion and could be further developed as a potential inhibitor for ovarian cancer dissemination. PMID:24586660

  5. New therapeutic targets in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Martí, R M; Sorolla, A; Yeramian, A

    2012-09-01

    Research into molecular targets for drug development in melanoma is starting to bear fruit. Of the drugs tested to date in patients with metastatic melanoma, those that have yielded the best results are V600E BRAF inhibitors in melanomas carrying the V600E mutation; c-kit tyrosine kinase activity inhibitors in melanomas carrying c-kit mutations; and anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) antibodies, which block the mechanisms involved in immune tolerance. Many problems have yet to be resolved in these areas, however, such as the rapid development of resistance to BRAF and c-kit inhibitors and the lack of biomarkers to predict treatment response in the case of CTLA-4 blockers. We review the results of targeted therapy with these and other drugs in metastatic melanoma and discuss what the future holds for this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  6. PI3 kinase is indispensable for oncogenic transformation by the V560D mutant of c-Kit in a kinase-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lindblad, Oscar; Kazi, Julhash U; Rönnstrand, Lars; Sun, Jianmin

    2015-11-01

    Oncogenic mutants of c-Kit are often found in mastocytosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumors and acute myeloid leukemia. The activation mechanism of the most commonly occurring mutation, D816V in exon 17 of c-Kit, has been well-studied while other mutations remain fairly uncharacterized in this respect. In this study, we show that the constitutive activity of the exon 11 mutant V560D is weaker than the D816V mutant. Phosphorylation of downstream signaling proteins induced by the ligand for c-Kit, stem cell factor, was stronger in c-Kit/V560D expressing cells than in cells expressing c-kit/D816V. Although cells expressing c-Kit/V560D showed increased ligand-independent proliferation and survival compared to wild-type c-Kit-expressing cells, these biological effects were weaker than in c-Kit/D816V-expressing cells. In contrast to cells expressing wild-type c-Kit, cells expressing c-Kit/V560D were independent of Src family kinases for downstream signaling. However, the independence of Src family kinases was not due to a Src-like kinase activity that c-Kit/D816V displayed. Point mutations that selectively block the association of PI3 kinase with c-Kit/V560D inhibited ligand-independent activation of the receptor, while inhibition of the kinase activity of PI3 kinase with pharmacological inhibitors did not affect the kinase activity of the receptor. This suggests a lipid kinase-independent key role of PI3 kinase in c-Kit/V560D-mediated oncogenic signal transduction. Thus, PI3 kinase is an attractive therapeutic target in malignancies induced by c-Kit mutations independent of its lipid kinase activity.

  7. HIV-1 Gag as an Antiviral Target: Development of Assembly and Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag is the master orchestrator of particle assembly. The central role of Gag at multiple stages of the HIV lifecycle has led to efforts to develop drugs that directly target Gag and prevent the formation and release of infectious particles. Until recently, however, only the catalytic site protease inhibitors have been available to inhibit late stages of HIV replication. This review summarizes the current state of development of antivirals that target Gag or disrupt late events in the retrovirus lifecycle such as maturation of the viral capsid. Maturation inhibitors represent an exciting new series of antiviral compounds, including those that specifically target CA-SP1 cleavage and the allosteric integrase inhibitors that inhibit maturation by a completely different mechanism. Numerous small molecules and peptides targeting CA have been studied in attempts to disrupt steps in assembly. Efforts to target CA have recently gained have considerable momentum from the development of small molecules that bind CA and alter capsid stability at the post-entry stage of the lifecycle. Efforts to develop antivirals that inhibit incorporation of genomic RNA or to inhibit late budding events remain in preliminary stages of development. Overall, the development of novel antivirals targeting Gag and the late stages in HIV replication appears much closer to success than ever, with the new maturation inhibitors leading the way. PMID:26329615

  8. [Controlling arachidonic acid metabolic network: from single- to multi-target inhibitors of key enzymes].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Shang, Er-chang; Yang, Kun; Wei, Deng-guo; Zhou, Lu; Jiang, Xiao-lu; He, Chong; Lai, Lu-hua

    2009-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases are common medical conditions seen in disorders of human immune system. There is a great demand for anti-inflammatory drugs. There are major inflammatory mediators in arachidonic acid metabolic network. Several enzymes in this network have been used as key targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs. However, specific single-target inhibitors can not sufficiently control the network balance and may cause side effects at the same time. Most inflammation induced diseases come from the complicated coupling of inflammatory cascades involving multiple targets. In order to treat these complicated diseases, drugs that can intervene multi-targets at the same time attracted much attention. The goal of this review is mainly focused on the key enzymes in arachidonic acid metabolic network, such as phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase, 5-lipoxygenase and eukotriene A4 hydrolase. Advance in single target and multi-targe inhibitors is summarized.

  9. Opposing roles of KIT and ABL1 in the therapeutic response of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) cells to imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Jessica L; Boichuk, Sergei; Ali, Areej A; Patil, Sneha S; Liu, Lijun; Lee, Donna M; Brown, Matthew F; Makielski, Kathleen R; Liu, Ying; Taguchi, Takahiro; Kuan, Shih-Fan; Duensing, Anette

    2017-01-17

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by activating mutations of the KIT receptor tyrosine kinase. The small molecule inhibitor imatinib mesylate was initially developed to target the ABL1 kinase, which is constitutively activated through chromosomal translocation in BCR-ABL1-positive chronic myeloid leukemia. Because of cross-reactivity of imatinib against the KIT kinase, the drug is also successfully used for the treatment of GIST. Although inhibition of KIT clearly has a major role in the therapeutic response of GIST to imatinib, the contribution of concomitant inhibition of ABL in this context has never been explored. We show here that ABL1 is expressed in the majority of GISTs, including human GIST cell lines. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown, we demonstrate that depletion of KIT in conjunction with ABL1 - hence mimicking imatinib treatment - leads to reduced apoptosis induction and attenuated inhibition of cellular proliferation when compared to depletion of KIT alone. These results are explained by an increased activity of the AKT survival kinase, which is mediated by the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2, likely through direct phosphorylation. Our results highlight that distinct inhibitory properties of targeted agents can impede antitumor effects and hence provide insights for rational drug development. Novel KIT-targeted agents to treat GIST should therefore comprise an increased specificity for KIT while at the same time displaying a reduced ability to inhibit ABL1.

  10. Benefits of targeting both pericytes and endothelial cells in the tumor vasculature with kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bergers, Gabriele; Song, Steven; Meyer-Morse, Nicole; Bergsland, Emily; Hanahan, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Functions of receptor tyrosine kinases implicated in angiogenesis were pharmacologically impaired in a mouse model of pancreatic islet cancer. An inhibitor targeting VEGFRs in endothelial cells (SU5416) is effective against early-stage angiogenic lesions, but not large, well-vascularized tumors. In contrast, a kinase inhibitor incorporating selectivity for PDGFRs (SU6668) is shown to block further growth of end-stage tumors, eliciting detachment of pericytes and disruption of tumor vascularity. Importantly, PDGFRs were expressed only in perivascular cells of this tumor type, suggesting that PDGFR+ pericytes in tumors present a complimentary target to endothelial cells for efficacious antiangiogenic therapy. Therapeutic regimes combining the two kinase inhibitors (SU5416 and SU6668) were more efficacious against all stages of islet carcinogenesis than either single agent. Combination of the VEGFR inhibitor with another distinctive kinase inhibitor targeting PDGFR activity (Gleevec) was also able to regress late-stage tumors. Thus, combinatorial targeting of receptor tyrosine kinases shows promise for treating multiple stages in tumorigenesis, most notably the often-intractable late-stage solid tumor. PMID:12727920

  11. C-Kit non-mutated metastatic melanoma showing positive response to Nilotinib.

    PubMed

    Alkeraye, S; Dadban, A; Lok, C; Arnault, J P; Chaby, G

    2016-01-15

    Melanoma is an aggressive tumor with advanced disease characterized by widespread metastatic lesions and the tumor has traditionally been resistant to most forms of treatment. Indeed, metastatic melanoma has a very poor prognosis with a median survival time of 8-9 months and an estimated 3-year survival rate of less than 15%. Recent advances in our understanding of the genetic profile of melanoma cells and the molecular factors that drive malignant transformation have resulted in the identification of numerous new therapeutic targets. KIT is an established therapeutic target in cancers with activating mutations of KIT, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), and considerable efficacy has been achieved with various small molecule inhibitors of KIT including imatinib mesylate. Nilotinib is an inhibitor of ligand-induced PDGFRα and PDFGRβ kinase activity and autophosphorylation of constitutively activated KIT harboring exon 13 or exon 11 mutations (IC50 values of 0.2 and 0.027 μmol/L, respectively), with efficacy comparable to that of imatinib. We report a case of non-kit mutated metastatic vaginal melanoma showing impressive response to nilotinib.

  12. A possible usage of a CDK4 inhibitor for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jae Ho; Park, Ga-Young; Chun, Sung Hak; Han, Jeong Yun; Kim, Sung Dae; Lee, Janet; Lee, Chang-Woo; Yang, Kwangmo; Lee, Chang Geun

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► A CDK4 inhibitor may be used for breast cancer stem cell-targeted therapy. ► The CDK4 inhibitor differentiated the cancer stem cell population (CD24{sup −}/CD44{sup +}) of MDA-MB-231. ► The differentiation of the cancer stem cells by the CDK4 inhibitor radiosensitized MDA-MB-231. -- Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are one of the main reasons behind cancer recurrence due to their resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapies. Thus, many efforts are being devoted to developing CSC-targeted therapies to overcome the resistance of CSCs to conventional anti-cancer therapies and decrease cancer recurrence. Differentiation therapy is one potential approach to achieve CSC-targeted therapies. This method involves inducing immature cancer cells with stem cell characteristics into more mature or differentiated cancer cells. In this study, we found that a CDK4 inhibitor sensitized MDA-MB-231 cells but not MCF7 cells to irradiation. This difference appeared to be associated with the relative percentage of CSC-population between the two breast cancer cells. The CDK4 inhibitor induced differentiation and reduced the cancer stem cell activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, which are shown by multiple marker or phenotypes of CSCs. Thus, these results suggest that radiosensitization effects may be caused by reducing the CSC-population of MDA-MB-231 through the use of the CDK4 inhibitor. Thus, further investigations into the possible application of the CDK4 inhibitor for CSC-targeted therapy should be performed to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy for breast cancer.

  13. Using natural product inhibitors to validate Hsp90 as a molecular target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Neckers, Len

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone whose association is required for stability and function of multiple mutated, chimeric, and over-expressed signaling proteins that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 client proteins include telomerase, mutated p53, Bcr-Abl, Raf-1, Akt, HER2/Neu (ErbB2), mutated B-Raf, mutated EGF receptor, and HIF-1alpha. Hsp90 inhibitors, by interacting specifically with a single molecular target, cause inactivation, destabilization and eventual degradation of Hsp90 client proteins, and they have shown promising anti-tumor activity in various preclinical tumor models. One Hsp90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, is currently in Phase II clinical trial and other inhibitors will shortly be entering the clinic. Hsp90 inhibitors are unique in that, although they are directed towards a specific molecular target, they simultaneously inhibit multiple signaling pathways on which cancer cells depend for growth and survival. Identification of benzoquinone ansamycins as the first Hsp90 inhibitors allowed investigators to determine the biologic effects, at first in vitro and then in vivo, of pharmacologic inhibition of Hsp90. These studies rapidly enhanced our understanding of Hsp90 function and led to the identification of radicicol as a structurally distinct Hsp90 inhibitor. Additional target-based screening uncovered novobiocin as a third structurally distinct small molecule with Hsp90 inhibitory properties. Use of novobiocin, in turn, led to identification of a previously uncharacterized C-terminal ATP binding site in the chaperone. Small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 have been very useful in understanding Hsp90 biology and in validating this protein as a molecular target for anti-cancer drug development.

  14. Investigating Mammalian Tyrosine Phosphatase Inhibitors as Potential ‘Piggyback’ Leads to Target Trypanosoma brucei Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ruberto, Irene; Szoor, Balazs; Clark, Rachel; Matthews, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease affecting humans and animals across 36 sub-Saharan African countries. We have investigated the potential to exploit a ‘piggyback’ approach to inhibit Trypanosoma brucei transmission by targeting the key developmental regulator of transmission, T. brucei protein tyrosine phosphatase 1. This strategy took advantage of the extensive investment in inhibitors for human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, a key target for pharmaceutical companies for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. Structural predictions for human and trypanosome tyrosine phosphatases revealed the overall conservation of important functional motifs, validating the potential for exploiting cross specific compounds. Thereafter, nineteen inhibitors were evaluated; seventeen from a protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-targeted inhibitor library and two from literature analysis – oleanolic acid and suramin, the latter of which is a front line drug against African trypanosomiasis. The compounds tested displayed similar inhibitory activities against the human and trypanosome enzymes, mostly behaving as noncompetitive inhibitors. However, their activity against T. brucei in culture was low, necessitating further chemical modification to improve their efficacy and specificity. Nonetheless, the results validate the potential to explore a ‘piggyback’ strategy targeting T. brucei protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 through exploiting the large pharmacological investment in therapies for obesity targeting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. PMID:23066974

  15. Investigating mammalian tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors as potential 'piggyback' leads to target Trypanosoma brucei transmission.

    PubMed

    Ruberto, Irene; Szoor, Balazs; Clark, Rachel; Matthews, Keith R

    2013-02-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease affecting humans and animals across 36 sub-Saharan African countries. We have investigated the potential to exploit a 'piggyback' approach to inhibit Trypanosoma brucei transmission by targeting the key developmental regulator of transmission, T. brucei protein tyrosine phosphatase 1. This strategy took advantage of the extensive investment in inhibitors for human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, a key target for pharmaceutical companies for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. Structural predictions for human and trypanosome tyrosine phosphatases revealed the overall conservation of important functional motifs, validating the potential for exploiting cross specific compounds. Thereafter, nineteen inhibitors were evaluated; seventeen from a protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-targeted inhibitor library and two from literature analysis - oleanolic acid and suramin, the latter of which is a front line drug against African trypanosomiasis. The compounds tested displayed similar inhibitory activities against the human and trypanosome enzymes, mostly behaving as noncompetitive inhibitors. However, their activity against T. brucei in culture was low, necessitating further chemical modification to improve their efficacy and specificity. Nonetheless, the results validate the potential to explore a 'piggyback' strategy targeting T. brucei protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 through exploiting the large pharmacological investment in therapies for obesity targeting protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Small-molecule inhibitors of the receptor tyrosine kinases: promising tools for targeted cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad

    2014-08-08

    Chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In spite of the improvements in the life quality of patients, their effectiveness is compromised by several disadvantages. This represents a demand for developing new effective strategies with focusing on tumor cells and minimum side effects. Targeted cancer therapies and personalized medicine have been defined as a new type of emerging treatments. Small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) are among the most effective drugs for targeted cancer therapy. The growing number of approved SMIs of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the clinical oncology imply the increasing attention and application of these therapeutic tools. Most of the current approved RTK-TKIs in preclinical and clinical settings are multi-targeted inhibitors with several side effects. Only a few specific/selective RTK-TKIs have been developed for the treatment of cancer patients. Specific/selective RTK-TKIs have shown less deleterious effects compared to multi-targeted inhibitors. This review intends to highlight the importance of specific/selective TKIs for future development with less side effects and more manageable agents. This article provides an overview of: (1) the characteristics and function of RTKs and TKIs; (2) the recent advances in the improvement of specific/selective RTK-TKIs in preclinical or clinical settings; and (3) emerging RTKs for targeted cancer therapies by TKIs.

  17. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Promising Tools for Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic and cytotoxic drugs are widely used in the treatment of cancer. In spite of the improvements in the life quality of patients, their effectiveness is compromised by several disadvantages. This represents a demand for developing new effective strategies with focusing on tumor cells and minimum side effects. Targeted cancer therapies and personalized medicine have been defined as a new type of emerging treatments. Small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) are among the most effective drugs for targeted cancer therapy. The growing number of approved SMIs of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) i.e., tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in the clinical oncology imply the increasing attention and application of these therapeutic tools. Most of the current approved RTK–TKIs in preclinical and clinical settings are multi-targeted inhibitors with several side effects. Only a few specific/selective RTK–TKIs have been developed for the treatment of cancer patients. Specific/selective RTK–TKIs have shown less deleterious effects compared to multi-targeted inhibitors. This review intends to highlight the importance of specific/selective TKIs for future development with less side effects and more manageable agents. This article provides an overview of: (1) the characteristics and function of RTKs and TKIs; (2) the recent advances in the improvement of specific/selective RTK–TKIs in preclinical or clinical settings; and (3) emerging RTKs for targeted cancer therapies by TKIs. PMID:25110867

  18. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I by Small-Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K.; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules. PMID:25534741

  19. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules.

  20. Role of ELA region in auto-activation of mutant KIT receptor: a molecular dynamics simulation insight.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    KIT receptor is the prime target in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GISTs) therapy. Second generation inhibitor, Sunitinib, binds to an inactivated conformation of KIT receptor and stabilizes it in order to prevent tumor formation. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of wild type and mutant D816H KIT receptor, and emphasized the extended A-loop (EAL) region (805-850) by conducting molecular dynamics simulation (∼100 ns). We analyzed different properties such as root mean square cutoff or deviation, root mean square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, hydrogen bonding network analysis, and essential dynamics. Apart from this, clustering and cross-correlation matrix approach was used to explore the conformational space of the wild type and mutant EAL region of KIT receptor. Molecular dynamics analysis indicated that mutation (D816H) was able to alter intramolecular hydrogen bonding pattern and affected the structural flexibility of EAL region. Moreover, flexible secondary elements, specially, coil and turns were dominated in EAL region of mutant KIT receptor during simulation. This phenomenon increased the movement of EAL region which in turn helped in shifting the equilibrium towards the active kinase conformation. Our atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of Sunitinib resistance mechanism of KIT receptor and would help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy.

  1. Selective Targeting of Extracellular Insulin-Degrading Enzyme by Quasi-Irreversible Thiol-Modifying Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Bannister, Thomas D; Wang, Hui; Cameron, Michael D; Caulfield, Thomas R; Masson, Amandine; Bertrand, Juliette; Howard, Erin A; McGuire, Michael P; Crisafulli, Umberto; Rosenberry, Terrone R; Topper, Caitlyn L; Thompson, Caroline R; Schürer, Stephan C; Madoux, Franck; Hodder, Peter; Leissring, Malcolm A

    2015-12-18

    Many therapeutically important enzymes are present in multiple cellular compartments, where they can carry out markedly different functions; thus, there is a need for pharmacological strategies to selectively manipulate distinct pools of target enzymes. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a thiol-sensitive zinc-metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes diverse peptide substrates in both the cytosol and the extracellular space, but current genetic and pharmacological approaches are incapable of selectively inhibiting the protease in specific subcellular compartments. Here, we describe the discovery, characterization, and kinetics-based optimization of potent benzoisothiazolone-based inhibitors that, by virtue of a unique quasi-irreversible mode of inhibition, exclusively inhibit extracellular IDE. The mechanism of inhibition involves nucleophilic attack by a specific active-site thiol of the enzyme on the inhibitors, which bear an isothiazolone ring that undergoes irreversible ring opening with the formation of a disulfide bond. Notably, binding of the inhibitors is reversible under reducing conditions, thus restricting inhibition to IDE present in the extracellular space. The identified inhibitors are highly potent (IC50(app) = 63 nM), nontoxic at concentrations up to 100 μM, and appear to preferentially target a specific cysteine residue within IDE. These novel inhibitors represent powerful new tools for clarifying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this poorly understood protease, and their unusual mechanism of action should be applicable to other therapeutic targets.

  2. An Irreversible Inhibitor of HSP72 that Unexpectedly Targets Lysine-56.

    PubMed

    Pettinger, Jonathan; Le Bihan, Yann-Vaï; Widya, Marcella; van Montfort, Rob L M; Jones, Keith; Cheeseman, Matthew D

    2017-02-22

    The stress-inducible molecular chaperone, HSP72, is an important therapeutic target in oncology, but inhibiting this protein with small molecules has proven particularly challenging. Validating HSP72 inhibitors in cells is difficult owing to competition with the high affinity and abundance of its endogenous nucleotide substrates. We hypothesized this could be overcome using a cysteine-targeted irreversible inhibitor. Using rational design, we adapted a validated 8-N-benzyladenosine ligand for covalent bond formation and confirmed targeted irreversible inhibition. However, no cysteine in the protein was modified; instead, we demonstrate that lysine-56 is the key nucleophilic residue. Targeting this lysine could lead to a new design paradigm for HSP72 chemical probes and drugs.

  3. L576P KIT mutation in anal melanomas correlates with KIT protein expression and is sensitive to specific kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Busam, Klaus J; Francone, Todd D; Wong, Grace C; Guo, Tianhua; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Besmer, Peter; Jungbluth, Achim; Gimbel, Mark; Chen, Chin-Tung; Veach, Darren; Clarkson, Bayard D; Paty, Philip B; Weiser, Martin R

    2007-07-15

    Activating mutations in either BRAF or NRAS are seen in a significant number of malignant melanomas, but their incidence appears to be dependent to ultraviolet light exposure. Thus, BRAF mutations have the highest incidence in non-chronic sun damaged (CSD), and are uncommon in acral, mucosal and CSD melanomas. More recently, activating KIT mutations have been described in rare cases of metastatic melanoma, without further reference to their clinical phenotypes. This finding is intriguing since KIT expression is downregulated in most melanomas progressing to more aggressive lesions. In this study, we investigated a group of anal melanomas for the presence of BRAF, NRAS, KIT and PDGFRA mutations. A heterozygous KIT exon 11 L576P substitution was identified in 3 of 20 cases tested. The 3 KIT mutation-carrying tumors were strongly immunopositive for KIT protein. No KIT mutations were identified in tumors with less than 4+ KIT immunostaining. NRAS mutation was identified in one tumor. No BRAF or PDGFRA mutations were identified in either KIT positive or negative anal melanomas. In vitro drug testing of stable transformant Ba/F3 KIT(L576P) mutant cells showed sensitivity for dasatinib (previously known as BMS-354825), a dual SRC/ABL kinase inhibitor, and imatinib. However, compared to an imatinib-sensitive KIT mutant, dasatinib was potent at lower doses than imatinib in the KIT(L576P) mutant. These results suggest that a subset of anal melanomas show activating KIT mutations, which are susceptible for therapy with specific kinase inhibitors.

  4. Structural and mechanistic basis of differentiated inhibitors of the acute pancreatitis target kynurenine-3-monooxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Jonathan P.; Rowland, Paul; Taylor, Mark R. D.; Christodoulou, Erica M.; Haslam, Carl; Hobbs, Clare I.; Holmes, Duncan S.; Homes, Paul; Liddle, John; Mole, Damian J.; Uings, Iain; Walker, Ann L.; Webster, Scott P.; Mowat, Christopher G.; Chung, Chun-Wa

    2017-06-01

    Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a key FAD-dependent enzyme of tryptophan metabolism. In animal models, KMO inhibition has shown benefit in neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's. Most recently it has been identified as a target for acute pancreatitis multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (AP-MODS); a devastating inflammatory condition with a mortality rate in excess of 20%. Here we report and dissect the molecular mechanism of action of three classes of KMO inhibitors with differentiated binding modes and kinetics. Two novel inhibitor classes trap the catalytic flavin in a previously unobserved tilting conformation. This correlates with picomolar affinities, increased residence times and an absence of the peroxide production seen with previous substrate site inhibitors. These structural and mechanistic insights culminated in GSK065(C1) and GSK366(C2), molecules suitable for preclinical evaluation. Moreover, revising the repertoire of flavin dynamics in this enzyme class offers exciting new opportunities for inhibitor design.

  5. Discovery of a Chemical Tool Inhibitor Targeting the Bromodomains of TRIM24 and BRPF.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James; Fedorov, Oleg; Tallant, Cynthia; Monteiro, Octovia; Meier, Julia; Gamble, Vicky; Savitsky, Pavel; Nunez-Alonso, Graciela A; Haendler, Bernard; Rogers, Catherine; Brennan, Paul E; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-02-25

    TRIM24 is a transcriptional regulator as well as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. It is overexpressed in diverse tumors, and high expression levels have been linked to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. TRIM24 contains a PHD/bromodomain offering the opportunity to develop protein interaction inhibitors that target this protein interaction module. Here we identified potent acetyl-lysine mimetic benzimidazolones TRIM24 bromodomain inhibitors. The best compound of this series is a selective BRPF1B/TRIM24 dual inhibitor that bound with a KD of 137 and 222 nM, respectively, but exerted good selectivity over other bromodomains. Cellular activity of the inhibitor was demonstrated using FRAP assays as well as cell viability data.

  6. Discovery of a Chemical Tool Inhibitor Targeting the Bromodomains of TRIM24 and BRPF

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    TRIM24 is a transcriptional regulator as well as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. It is overexpressed in diverse tumors, and high expression levels have been linked to poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. TRIM24 contains a PHD/bromodomain offering the opportunity to develop protein interaction inhibitors that target this protein interaction module. Here we identified potent acetyl-lysine mimetic benzimidazolones TRIM24 bromodomain inhibitors. The best compound of this series is a selective BRPF1B/TRIM24 dual inhibitor that bound with a KD of 137 and 222 nM, respectively, but exerted good selectivity over other bromodomains. Cellular activity of the inhibitor was demonstrated using FRAP assays as well as cell viability data. PMID:25974391

  7. Using combination therapy to override stromal-mediated chemoresistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML: Synergism between FLT3 inhibitors, dasatinib/multi-targeted inhibitors, and JAK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, Ellen; Liu, Qingsong; Nelson, Erik; Kung, Andrew L.; Christie, Amanda L.; Bronson, Rod; Sattler, Martin; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Hur, Wooyoung; Mitsiades, Constantine; Smith, Robert; Daley, John F.; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Griffin, James D.; Gray, Nathanael

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) progenitors are frequently characterized by activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3. Protein tyrosine kinases are integral components of signaling cascades that play a role in both FLT3-mediated transformation as well as viability pathways that are advantageous to leukemic cell survival. The bone marrow microenvironment can diminish AML sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We hypothesized that inhibition of protein kinases in addition to FLT3 may be effective in overriding drug resistance in AML. We used a cell-based model mimicking stromal protection as part of an unbiased high-throughput chemical screen to identify kinase inhibitors with the potential to override microenvironment-mediated drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML. Several related multi-targeted kinase inhibitors, including dasatinib, with the capability of reversing microenvironment-induced resistance to FLT3 inhibition were identified and validated. We validated synergy in vitro and demonstrated effective combination potential in vivo. In particular Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors were effective in overriding stromal protection and potentiating FLT3 inhibition in primary AML and cell lines. These results hint at a novel concept of using combination therapy to override drug resistance in mutant FLT3-positive AML in the bone marrow niche and suppress or eradicate residual disease. PMID:22469781

  8. Targeted therapies for cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kee, Damien; McArthur, Grant

    2014-06-01

    Melanoma is resistant to cytotoxic therapy, and treatment options for advanced disease have been limited historically. However, improved understanding of melanoma driver mutations, particularly those involving the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, has led to the development of targeted therapies that are effective in this previously treatment-refractory disease. In cutaneous melanomas with BRAF V600 mutations the selective RAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, and the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, have demonstrated survival benefits. Early signals of efficacy have also been demonstrated with MEK inhibitors in melanomas with NRAS mutations, and KIT inhibitors offer promise in melanomas driven through activation of their target receptor.

  9. Overcoming Chemical, Biological, and Computational Challenges in the Development of Inhibitors Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Luca; McKenzie, Grahame; Spring, David R.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Huggins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie the majority of biological processes, signaling, and disease. Approaches to modulate PPIs with small molecules have therefore attracted increasing interest over the past decade. However, there are a number of challenges inherent in developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors that have prevented these approaches from reaching their full potential. From target validation to small-molecule screening and lead optimization, identifying therapeutically relevant PPIs that can be successfully modulated by small molecules is not a simple task. Following the recent review by Arkin et al., which summarized the lessons learnt from prior successes, we focus in this article on the specific challenges of developing PPI inhibitors and detail the recent advances in chemistry, biology, and computation that facilitate overcoming them. We conclude by providing a perspective on the field and outlining four innovations that we see as key enabling steps for successful development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting PPIs. PMID:26091166

  10. Methods for Investigation of Targeted Kinase Inhibitor Therapy using Chemical Proteomics and Phosphorylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bin; Haura, Eric B.; Smalley, Keiran S.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Koomen, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation acts as a molecular switch for many regulatory events in signaling pathways that drive cell division, proliferation, and apoptosis. Because of the critical nature of these protein post-translational modifications in cancer, drug development programs often focus on inhibitors for kinases and phosphatases, which control protein phosphorylation. Numerous kinase inhibitors have entered clinical use, but prediction of their efficacy and a molecular basis for patient response remain uncertain. Chemical proteomics, the combination of drug affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry, identifies potential target proteins that bind to the drugs. Phosphorylation profiling can complement chemical proteomics by cataloging modifications in the target kinases and their downstream substrates using phosphopeptide enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry. These experiments shed light on the mechanism of disease development and illuminate candidate biomarkers to guide personalized therapeutic strategies. In this review, commonly applied technologies and workflows are discussed to illustrate the role of proteomics in examining tumor biology and therapeutic intervention using kinase inhibitors. PMID:20361944

  11. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is a target for selective kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Kayode K; Larson, Eric T; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Castaneda, Lisa J; DeRocher, Amy E; Inampudi, Krishna K; Kim, Jessica E; Arakaki, Tracy L; Murphy, Ryan C; Zhang, Li; Napuli, Alberto J; Maly, Dustin J; Verlinde, Christophe LMJ; Buckner, Frederick S; Parsons, Marilyn; Hol, Wim GJ; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2010-01-01

    New drugs are needed to treat toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinases (TgCDPKs) are attractive targets because they are absent in mammals. We show that TgCDPK1 is inhibited by low nanomolar levels of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs), compounds designed to be inactive against mammalian kinases. Cocrystal structures of TgCDPK1 with BKIs confirm that the structural basis for selectivity is due to the unique glycine gatekeeper residue in the ATP-binding site at residue 128. We show that BKIs interfere with an early step in T. gondii infection of human cells in culture. Furthermore, we show that TgCDPK1 is the in vivo target of BKIs because T. gondii cells expressing a glycine to methionine gatekeeper mutant enzyme show significantly decreased sensitivity to this class of selective kinase inhibitors. Thus, design of selective TgCDPK1 inhibitors with low host toxicity may be achievable. PMID:20436472

  12. Overcoming Chemical, Biological, and Computational Challenges in the Development of Inhibitors Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Laraia, Luca; McKenzie, Grahame; Spring, David R; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Huggins, David J

    2015-06-18

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie the majority of biological processes, signaling, and disease. Approaches to modulate PPIs with small molecules have therefore attracted increasing interest over the past decade. However, there are a number of challenges inherent in developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors that have prevented these approaches from reaching their full potential. From target validation to small-molecule screening and lead optimization, identifying therapeutically relevant PPIs that can be successfully modulated by small molecules is not a simple task. Following the recent review by Arkin et al., which summarized the lessons learnt from prior successes, we focus in this article on the specific challenges of developing PPI inhibitors and detail the recent advances in chemistry, biology, and computation that facilitate overcoming them. We conclude by providing a perspective on the field and outlining four innovations that we see as key enabling steps for successful development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting PPIs.

  13. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-11

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs.

  14. When Teaching Gets Tough--Professional Community Inhibitors of Teacher-Targeted Bullying and Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Bullying in school has become an international concern in recent decades. Yet, we know surprisingly little about inhibitors of teacher-targeted bullying. The study focused on exploring the interrelation between the teacher-working environment fit, bullying, experienced exhaustion and turnover intentions. Altogether 2310 comprehensive school…

  15. When Teaching Gets Tough--Professional Community Inhibitors of Teacher-Targeted Bullying and Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Bullying in school has become an international concern in recent decades. Yet, we know surprisingly little about inhibitors of teacher-targeted bullying. The study focused on exploring the interrelation between the teacher-working environment fit, bullying, experienced exhaustion and turnover intentions. Altogether 2310 comprehensive school…

  16. Efficient identification of inhibitors targeting the closed active site conformation of the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Freymann, D M; Wenck, M A; Engel, J C; Feng, J; Focia, P J; Eakin, A E; Craig, S P

    2000-12-01

    Currently, only two drugs are recommended for treatment of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. These compounds kill the trypomastigote forms of the parasite circulating in the bloodstream, but are relatively ineffective against the intracellular stage of the parasite life cycle. Neither drug is approved by the FDA for use in the US. The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) from T. cruzi is a possible new target for antiparasite chemotherapy. The crystal structure of the HPRT in a conformation approximating the transition state reveals a closed active site that provides a well-defined target for computational structure-based drug discovery. A flexible ligand docking program incorporating a desolvation correction was used to screen the Available Chemicals Directory for inhibitors targeted to the closed conformation of the trypanosomal HPRT. Of 22 potential inhibitors identified, acquired and tested, 16 yielded K(i)'s between 0.5 and 17 microM versus the substrate phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. Surprisingly, three of eight compounds tested were effective in inhibiting the growth of parasites in infected mammalian cells. This structure-based docking method provided a remarkably efficient path for the identification of inhibitors targeting the closed conformation of the trypanosomal HPRT. The inhibition constants of the lead inhibitors identified are unusually favorable, and the trypanostatic activity of three of the compounds in cell culture suggests that they may provide useful starting points for drug design for the treatment of Chagas' disease.

  17. Small-molecule auxin inhibitors that target YUCCA are powerful tools for studying auxin function.

    PubMed

    Kakei, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Chiaki; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakamura, Ayako; Sato, Akiko; Ishida, Yosuke; Kikuchi, Rie; Higashi, Shouichi; Kokudo, Yumiko; Ishii, Takahiro; Soeno, Kazuo; Shimada, Yukihisa

    2015-11-01

    Auxin is essential for plant growth and development, this makes it difficult to study the biological function of auxin using auxin-deficient mutants. Chemical genetics have the potential to overcome this difficulty by temporally reducing the auxin function using inhibitors. Recently, the indole-3-pyruvate (IPyA) pathway was suggested to be a major biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana L. for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most common member of the auxin family. In this pathway, YUCCA, a flavin-containing monooxygenase (YUC), catalyzes the last step of conversion from IPyA to IAA. In this study, we screened effective inhibitors, 4-biphenylboronic acid (BBo) and 4-phenoxyphenylboronic acid (PPBo), which target YUC. These compounds inhibited the activity of recombinant YUC in vitro, reduced endogenous IAA content, and inhibited primary root elongation and lateral root formation in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings. Co-treatment with IAA reduced the inhibitory effects. Kinetic studies of BBo and PPBo showed that they are competitive inhibitors of the substrate IPyA. Inhibition constants (Ki ) of BBo and PPBo were 67 and 56 nm, respectively. In addition, PPBo did not interfere with the auxin response of auxin-marker genes when it was co-treated with IAA, suggesting that PPBo is not an inhibitor of auxin sensing or signaling. We propose that these compounds are a class of auxin biosynthesis inhibitors that target YUC. These small molecules are powerful tools for the chemical genetic analysis of auxin function.

  18. A novel Pim-1 kinase inhibitor targeting residues that bind the substrate peptide.

    PubMed

    Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Hisami; Parker, Lorien; Yuki, Hitomi; Taruya, Shigenao; Nakagawa, Yukari; Kamei, Daisuke; Mori, Masumi; Ogawa, Naoko; Tomabechi, Yuri; Handa, Noriko; Honma, Teruki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Akiko

    2012-03-30

    A new screening method using fluorescent correlation spectroscopy was developed to select kinase inhibitors that competitively inhibit the binding of a fluorescently labeled substrate peptide. Using the method, among approximately 700 candidate compounds selected by virtual screening, we identified a novel Pim-1 kinase inhibitor targeting its peptide binding residues. X-ray crystal analysis of the complex structure of Pim-1 with the inhibitor indicated that the inhibitor actually binds to the ATP-binding site and also forms direct interactions with residues (Asp128 and Glu171) that bind the substrate peptide. These interactions, which cause small side-chain movements, seem to affect the binding ability of the fluorescently labeled substrate. The compound inhibited Pim-1 kinase in vitro, with an IC(50) value of 150 nM. Treatment of cultured leukemia cells with the compound reduced the amount of p21 and increased the amount of p27, due to Pim-1 inhibition, and then triggered apoptosis after cell-cycle arrest at the G(1)/S phase. This screening method may be widely applicable for the identification of various new Pim-1 kinase inhibitors targeting the residues that bind the substrate peptide.

  19. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  20. Structural investigation of inhibitor designs targeting 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase from the shikimate pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Marcio V.B.; Snee, William C.; Bromfield, Karen M.; Payne, Richard J.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Ciulli, Alessio; Howard, Nigel I.; Abell, Chris; Sacchettini, James C.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2011-09-06

    The shikimate pathway is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its absence from humans makes the enzymes of this pathway potential drug targets. In the present paper, we provide structural insights into ligand and inhibitor binding to 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (dehydroquinase) from M. tuberculosis (MtDHQase), the third enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its reaction product, 3-dehydroshikimate, and with six different competitive inhibitors. The inhibitor 2,3-anhydroquinate mimics the flattened enol/enolate reaction intermediate and serves as an anchor molecule for four of the inhibitors investigated. MtDHQase also forms a complex with citrazinic acid, a planar analogue of the reaction product. The structure of MtDHQase in complex with a 2,3-anhydroquinate moiety attached to a biaryl group shows that this group extends to an active-site subpocket inducing significant structural rearrangement. The flexible extensions of inhibitors designed to form {pi}-stacking interactions with the catalytic Tyr{sup 24} have been investigated. The high-resolution crystal structures of the MtDHQase complexes provide structural evidence for the role of the loop residues 19-24 in MtDHQase ligand binding and catalytic mechanism and provide a rationale for the design and efficacy of inhibitors.

  1. Suppression of microRNAs by dual-targeting and clustered Tough Decoy inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Bak, Rasmus O.; Haslund, Didde; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ubiquitous regulators of gene expression that contribute to almost any cellular process. Methods for managing of miRNA activity are attracting increasing attention in relation to diverse experimental and therapeutic applications. DNA-encoded miRNA inhibitors expressed from plasmid or virus-based vectors provide persistent miRNA suppression and options of tissue-directed micromanaging. In this report, we explore the potential of exploiting short, hairpin-shaped RNAs for simultaneous suppression of two or more miRNAs. Based on the “Tough Decoy” (TuD) design, we create dual-targeting hairpins carrying two miRNA recognition sites and demonstrate potent co-suppression of different pairs of unrelated miRNAs by a single DNA-encoded inhibitor RNA. In addition, enhanced miRNA suppression is achieved by expression of RNA polymerase II-transcribed inhibitors carrying clustered TuD hairpins with up to a total of eight miRNA recognition sites. Notably, by expressing clustered TuD inhibitors harboring a single recognition site for each of a total of six miRNAs, we document robust parallel suppression of multiple miRNAs by inhibitor RNA molecules encoded by a single expression cassette. These findings unveil a new potential of TuD-based miRNA inhibitors and pave the way for standardizing synchronized suppression of families or clusters of miRNAs. PMID:23324610

  2. Do CDK4/6 inhibitors have potential as targeted therapeutics for squamous cell cancers?

    PubMed

    Kalu, Nene N; Johnson, Faye M

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Dysregulation of cell cycle progression has an established link to neoplasia and cancer progression. Components of the cyclin D-CDK4/6-INK4-Rb pathway are frequently altered in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) by diverse mechanisms, including viral oncogene-induced degradation, mutation, deletion, and amplification. Activation of the CDK4/6 pathway may predict response to CDK4/6 inhibitors and provide clinical biomarkers. Recently, the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib showed clinical efficacy in combination with cetuximab in HNSCC patients. Areas covered This review focuses on the current research on the use of CDK4/6 inhibitors, comprising preclinical animal studies through phase II clinical trials across all SCCs. Expert opinion CDK4/6 inhibitors have a proven clinical benefit in breast cancer, but data on SCCs are sparse. Although frequent dysregulation of the cyclin D-CDK4/6-INK4-Rb pathway in SCCs suggests that targeting CDK4/6 may hold promise for improved clinical outcomes, single-agent activity has been modest in preclinical studies and absent in clinical studies. Combinations with immunotherapy or inhibitors of the PI3 K/mTOR or EGFR pathway may be effective. Given that SCCs caused by human papillomavirus have high levels of p16 and low levels of Rb, the CDK4/6 inhibitors are predicted to be ineffective in these cancers.

  3. 1,3,5-Triazine as a modular scaffold for covalent inhibitors with streamlined target identification.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ranjan; Pace, Nicholas J; Brown, Douglas R; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2013-02-20

    Small-molecule inhibitors can accelerate the functional annotation and validate the therapeutic potential of proteins implicated in disease. Phenotypic screens provide an effective platform to identify such pharmacological agents but are often hindered by challenges associated with target identification. For many protein targets, these bottlenecks can be overcome by incorporating electrophiles into small molecules to covalently trap interactions in vivo and by employing bioorthogonal handles to enrich the protein targets directly from a complex proteome. Here we present the trifunctionalized 1,3,5-triazine as an ideal modular scaffold for generating libraries of irreversible inhibitors with diverse target specificities. A divergent synthetic scheme was developed to derivatize the triazine with an electrophile for covalent modification of target proteins, an alkyne as a click-chemistry handle for target identification, and a diversity element to direct the compounds toward distinct subsets of the proteome. We specifically targeted our initial library toward cysteine-mediated protein activities through incorporation of thiol-specific electrophiles. From this initial screen we identified two compounds, RB-2-cb and RB-11-ca, which are cell permeable and highly selective covalent modifiers for Cys239 of β-tubulin (TUBB) and Cys53 of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) respectively. These compounds demonstrate in vitro and cellular potencies that are comparable to currently available modulators of tubulin polymerization and PDI activity. Our studies demonstrate the versatility of the triazine as a modular scaffold to generate potent and selective covalent modifiers of diverse protein families for chemical genetics applications.

  4. Combinatorial support vector machines approach for virtual screening of selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors from large compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z; Ma, X H; Qin, C; Jia, J; Jiang, Y Y; Tan, C Y; Chen, Y Z

    2012-02-01

    Selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance antidepressant efficacy. Their discovery can be facilitated by multiple methods, including in silico ones. In this study, we developed and tested an in silico method, combinatorial support vector machines (COMBI-SVMs), for virtual screening (VS) multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors of seven target pairs (serotonin transporter paired with noradrenaline transporter, H(3) receptor, 5-HT(1A) receptor, 5-HT(1B) receptor, 5-HT(2C) receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and neurokinin 1 receptor respectively) from large compound libraries. COMBI-SVMs trained with 917-1951 individual target inhibitors correctly identified 22-83.3% (majority >31.1%) of the 6-216 dual inhibitors collected from literature as independent testing sets. COMBI-SVMs showed moderate to good target selectivity in misclassifying as dual inhibitors 2.2-29.8% (majority <15.4%) of the individual target inhibitors of the same target pair and 0.58-7.1% of the other 6 targets outside the target pair. COMBI-SVMs showed low dual inhibitor false hit rates (0.006-0.056%, 0.042-0.21%, 0.2-4%) in screening 17 million PubChem compounds, 168,000 MDDR compounds, and 7-8181 MDDR compounds similar to the dual inhibitors. Compared with similarity searching, k-NN and PNN methods, COMBI-SVM produced comparable dual inhibitor yields, similar target selectivity, and lower false hit rate in screening 168,000 MDDR compounds. The annotated classes of many COMBI-SVMs identified MDDR virtual hits correlate with the reported effects of their predicted targets. COMBI-SVM is potentially useful for searching selective multi-target agents without explicit knowledge of these agents.

  5. [Research progress of dual inhibitors targeting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and integrase].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xin-Yong

    2013-04-01

    Both reverse transcriptase (RT) and integrase (IN) play crucial roles in the life cycle of HIV-1, which are also key targets in the area of anti-HIV drug research. Reverse transcriptase inhibitors are involved in the most employed drugs used to treat AIDS patients and HIV-infected people, while one of the integrase inhibitors has already been approved by US FDA to appear on the market. Great achievement has been made in the research on both, separately. Recently, much more attention of medicinal chemistry researchers has been attracted to the strategies of multi-target drugs. Compounds with excellent potency against both HIV RT and IN, evidently defined as dual inhibitors targeting both enzymes, have been obtained through considerable significant exploration, which can be classified into two categories according to different strategies. Combinatorial chemistry approach together with high throughput screening methods and multi-target-based virtual screening strategy have been useful tools for identifying selective anti-HIV compounds for long times; Rational drug design based on pharmacophore combination has also led to remarkable results. In this paper, latest progress of both categories in the discovery and structural modification will be covered, with a view to contribute to the career of anti-HIV research.

  6. Analysis of KIT expression and KIT exon 11 mutations in canine oral malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Mori, T; Sakai, H; Murakami, M; Yanai, T; Hoshino, Y; Maruo, K

    2011-09-01

    KIT, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is one of the specific targets for anti-cancer therapy. In humans, its expression and mutations have been identified in malignant melanomas and therapies using molecular-targeted agents have been promising in these tumours. As human malignant melanoma, canine malignant melanoma is a fatal disease with metastases and the poor response has been observed with all standard protocols. In our study, KIT expression and exon 11 mutations in dogs with histologically confirmed malignant oral melanomas were evaluated. Although 20 of 39 cases were positive for KIT protein, there was no significant difference between KIT expression and overall survival. Moreover, polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of KIT exon 11 in 17 samples did not detect any mutations and proved disappointing. For several reasons, however, KIT expression and mutations of various exons including exon 11 should be investigated in more cases.

  7. Kits in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Maureen

    1975-01-01

    Discusses three kits developed by museums in British Columbia for use in rural classrooms. The science kit on marine biology consists of modules which included specimens, books, audiovisual materials and student activities. (BR)

  8. Kits in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Maureen

    1975-01-01

    Discusses three kits developed by museums in British Columbia for use in rural classrooms. The science kit on marine biology consists of modules which included specimens, books, audiovisual materials and student activities. (BR)

  9. [Coreceptors of HIV infection and the development of HIV entry inhibitors: overview and targets].

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Hiroo

    2002-01-01

    In 1996 CXCR4 was identified as a coreceptor for HIV-1. This finding has lead to further identification of more than ten G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as coreceptors for HIV/SIV. Cell tropisms and coreceptor uses of HIV during the course of HIV infection are summarized. Promiscuous properties of correlations between chemokines and their chemokine receptor uses and also between variable amino acid sequences in the V3 region of HIV gp120 Env and HIV coreceptor uses are discussed. This promiscuous property of HIV-1 is claimed to be a possible cause of a difficulty in developing highly effective entry inhibitors and in addition to allow rapid appearance of immune escape HIV mutants. Representative agents that inhibit HIV entry with a special reference to inhibitors of coreceptor use and gp41 function are summarized. gp41 is discussed as a promising target for the development of effective entry inhibitors.

  10. Curation of inhibitor-target data: process and impact on pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Devidas, Sreenivas

    2009-01-01

    The past decade has seen a significant emergence in the availability and use of pathway analysis tools. The workflow that is supported by most of the pathway analysis tools is limited to either of the following: a. a network of genes based on the input data set, or b. the resultant network filtered down by a few criteria such as (but not limited to) i. disease association of the genes in the network; ii. targets known to be the target of one or more launched drugs; iii. targets known to be the target of one or more compounds in clinical trials; and iv. targets reasonably known to be potential candidate or clinical biomarkers. Almost all the tools in use today are biased towards the biological side and contain little, if any, information on the chemical inhibitors associated with the components of a given biological network. The limitation resides as follows: The fact that the number of inhibitors that have been published or patented is probably several fold (probably greater than 10-fold) more than the number of published protein-protein interactions. Curation of such data is both expensive and time consuming and could impact ROI significantly. The non-standardization associated with protein and gene names makes mapping reasonably non-straightforward. The number of patented and published inhibitors across target classes increases by over a million per year. Therefore, keeping the databases current becomes a monumental problem. Modifications required in the product architectures to accommodate chemistry-related content. GVK Bio has, over the past 7 years, curated the compound-target data that is necessary for the addition of such compound-centric workflows. This chapter focuses on identification, curation and utility of such data.

  11. Targeted delivery of antigen processing inhibitors to antigen presenting cells via mannose receptors

    PubMed Central

    Raiber, Eun-Ang; Tulone, Calogero; Zhang”, Yanjing; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Steed, Emily; Sponaas, Anna M.; Langhorne, Jean; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2014-01-01

    Improved chemical inhibitors are required to dissect the role of specific antigen processing enzymes and to complement genetic models. In this study we explore the in vitro and in vivo properties of a novel class of targeted inhibitor of aspartic proteinases, in which pepstatin is coupled to mannosylated albumin (MPC6), creating an inhibitor with improved solubility and the potential for selective cell tropism. Using these compounds, we have demonstrated that MPC6 is taken up via mannose receptor facilitated endocytosis, leading to a slow but continuous accumulation of inhibitor within large endocytic vesicles within dendritic cells, and a parallel inhibition of intracellular aspartic proteinase activity. Inhibition of intracellular proteinase activity is associated with reduction in antigen processing activity, but this is epitope specific, preferentially inhibiting processing of T cell epitopes buried within compact proteinase-resistant protein domains. Unexpectedly, we have also demonstrated, using quenched fluorescent substrates, that little or no cleavage of the disulfide linker takes place within dendritic cells, but this does not appear to affect the activity of MPC6 as an inhibitor of cathepsins D and E in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we have shown that MPC6 selectively targets dendritic cells and macrophages in spleen in vivo. Access to non-lymphoid tissues is very limited in the steady state, but is strongly enhanced at local sites of inflammation. The strategy adopted for MPC6 synthesis may therefore represent a more general way to deliver chemical inhibitors to cells of the innate immune system, especially at sites of inflammation. PMID:20349916

  12. GridKit

    SciTech Connect

    Peles, Slaven

    2016-11-06

    GridKit is a software development kit for interfacing power systems and power grid application software with high performance computing (HPC) libraries developed at National Labs and academia. It is also intended as interoperability layer between different numerical libraries. GridKit is not a standalone application, but comes with a suite of test examples illustrating possible usage.

  13. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  14. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  15. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors target cancer stem cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Solarek, Wojciech; Kornakiewicz, Anna; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to analyze the impact of multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors on the cancer stem cell subpopulation in renal cell cancer. The second objective was to evaluate the effect of tumor growth inhibition related to a tumor niche factor - oxygen deprivation - as hypoxia develops along with the anti-angiogenic activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in renal tumors. Cells were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sunitinib, sorafenib and axitinib, in 2D and 3D culture conditions. Cell proliferation along with drug toxicity were evaluated. It was shown that the proliferation rate of cancer stem cells was decreased by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The efficacy of the growth inhibition was limited by hypoxic conditions and 3D intratumoral cell-cell interactions. We conclude that understanding the complex molecular interaction feedback loops between differentiated cancer cells, cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment in 3D culture should aid the identification of novel treatment targets and to evalute the efficacy of renal cancer therapies. Cell-cell interaction may represent a critical microenvironmental factor regulating cancer stem cell self-renewal potential, enhancing the stem cell phenotype and limiting drug toxicity. At the same time the role of hypoxia in renal cancer stem cell biology is also significant.

  16. Immunosuppressive potency of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors in solid-organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José A

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin, also known as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that belongs to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, which is involved in several fundamental cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, and survival. This protein and its associated pathway have been implicated in cancer development and the regulation of immune responses, including the rejection response generated following allograft transplantation. Inhibitors of mTOR (mTORi) such as rapamycin and its derivative everolimus are potent immunosuppressive drugs that both maintain similar rates of efficacy and could optimize the renal function and diminish the side effects compared with calcineurin inhibitors. These drugs are used in solid-organ transplantationtoinduceimmunosuppression while also promoting the expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells that could favor a scenery of immunological tolerance. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which inhibitors of mTOR induce suppression by regulation of these pathways at different levels of the immune response. In addition, we particularly emphasize about the main methods that are used to assess the potency of immunosuppressive drugs, highlighting the studies carried out about immunosuppressive potency of inhibitors of mTOR. PMID:27011916

  17. Targeting InhA, the FASII Enoyl-ACP Reductase: SAR Studies on Novel Inhibitor Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Pan; Tonge, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial type II fatty acid biosynthesis (FASII) pathway is an essential but unexploited target for drug discovery. In this review we summarize SAR studies on inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl-ACP reductase from the FASII pathway in M. tuberculosis. Inhibitor scaffolds that are described include the diaryl ethers, pyrrolidine carboxamides, piperazine indoleformamides, pyrazoles, arylamides, fatty acids, and imidazopiperidines, all of which form ternary complexes with InhA and the NAD cofactor, as well as isoniazid and the diazaborines which covalently modify the cofactor. Analysis of the structural data has enabled the development of a common binding mode for the ternary complex inhibitors, which includes a hydrogen bond network, a large hydrophobic pocket and a third ‘size-limited’ binding area comprised of both polar and non-polar groups. A critical factor in InhA inhibition involves ordering of the substrate binding loop, located close to the active site, and a direct link is proposed between loop ordering and slow onset enzyme inhibition. Slow onset inhibitors have long residence times on the enzyme target, a property that is of critical importance for in vivo activity. PMID:22283812

  18. Recent advances in targeting the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway using fatty acid synthase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Angeles, Thelma S; Hudkins, Robert L

    2016-12-01

    Elevated lipogenesis has been associated with a variety of diseases including obesity, cancer and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) plays a pivotal role in de novo lipogenesis, making this multi-catalytic protein an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Recently, the first FASN inhibitor successfully advanced through the drug development process and entered clinical evaluation in oncology. Areas covered: This review discusses the biological roles of FASN in three prominent disease areas: cancer, obesity-related disorders and NAFLD. Recent advances in drug discovery strategies and design of newer FASN inhibitors are also highlighted. Expert opinion: Despite the abundance of evidence linking the lipogenic pathway to cancer, progression of FASN-targeted molecules has been rather slow and challenging and no compounds have moved past the preclinical phase. The landscape has recently changed with the recent advancement of the first FASN inhibitor into clinical evaluation for solid tumors. Needless to say, the successful translation into the clinical setting will open opportunities for expanding the therapeutic utility of FASN inhibitors not just in oncology but in other diseases associated with elevated lipogenesis such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and NAFLD.

  19. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting FLT3 in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Pan, Yihang; Guo, Yao; Zhao, Wanke; Ho, Wanting Tina; Wang, Jianlong; Xu, Mingjiang; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the myeloid lineage of blood cells. Although significant progress has been made in treating many types of cancers during recent years, AML remains a deadly disease with survival rate lagging behind other blood cancers. A combination of toxic chemotherapies has been the standard AML treatment for more than 40 years. With intensive efforts to define the pathogenesis of AML, novel therapeutic drugs targeting key molecular defects in AML are being developed. Mutated in nearly 30% of AML, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) represents one of the most attractive targets. FLT3 mutants resulted from either internal tandem duplication (ITD) or point mutations possess enhanced kinase activity and cause constitutive activation of signaling. To date, several small molecule inhibitors of FLT3 have been developed but their clinical efficacy is limited due to a lack of potency and the generation of drug resistance. Therefore, next-generation FLT3 inhibitors overcoming these limitations are urgently in need. This review focuses on the pathological role of mutant FLT3 in the development of AML, the current status of FLT3 inhibitor development, and mechanisms underlining the development of resistance to existing FLT3 inhibitors. PMID:28607922

  20. Targeting the TGF-β receptor with kinase inhibitors for scleroderma therapy.

    PubMed

    Cong, Lin; Xia, Zhi-Kuan; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2014-09-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a connective tissue disease that affects various organ systems; the treatment of scleroderma is still difficult and remains a challenge to the clinician. Recently, kinase inhibitors have shown great potential against fibrotic diseases and, specifically, the transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGF-βR) was found as a new and promising target for scleroderma therapy. In the current study, we propose that the large pool of existing kinase inhibitors could be exploited for inhibiting the TGF-βR to suppress scleroderma. In this respect, we developed a modeling protocol to systematically profile the inhibitory activities of 169 commercially available kinase inhibitors against the TGF-βR, from which five promising candidates were selected and tested using a standard kinase assay protocol. Consequently, two molecular entities, namely the PKB inhibitor MK-2206 and the mTOR C1/C2 inhibitor AZD8055, showed high potency when bound to the TGF-βR, with IC50 values of 97 and 86 nM, respectively, which are close to those of the recently developed TGF-βR selective inhibitors SB525334 and LY2157299 (IC50 = 14.3 and 56 nM, respectively). We also performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and post-molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area analyses to dissect the structural basis and energetic properties of intermolecular interactions between the TGF-βR kinase domain and these potent compounds, highlighting intensive nonbonded networks across the tightly packed interface of non-cognate TGF-βR-inhibitor complexes.

  1. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions In Small Cell Lung Cancer With a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Camilla L.; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J.; Carretero, Julian; Al-shahrour, Fatima; Zhang, Tinghu; Chipumuro, Edmond; Herter-Sprie, Grit S.; Akbay, Esra A.; Altabef, Abigail; Zhang, Jianming; Shimamura, Takeshi; Capelletti, Marzia; Reibel, Jakob B.; Cavanaugh, Jillian; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yan; Michaelsen, Signe R.; Poulsen, Hans S.; Aref, Amir R.; Barbie, David A.; Bradner, James E.; George, Rani; Gray, Nathanael S.; Young, Richard A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality. The identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library we observe that SCLC is sensitive to transcription-targeting drugs, and in particular to THZ1, a recent identified covalent inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7). We find that expression of super-enhancer associated transcription factor genes including MYC family proto-oncogenes and neuroendocrine lineage-specific factors are highly vulnerability to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy. PMID:25490451

  2. The RNA Polymerase ‘‘Switch Region’’ Is a Target for Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Das, K; Ismail, S; Koppstein, D; Jang, M; Hudson, B; Sarafianos, S; Tuske, S; Patel, J; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    The ?-pyrone antibiotic myxopyronin (Myx) inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP). Here, through a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that Myx interacts with the RNAP 'switch region'-the hinge that mediates opening and closing of the RNAP active center cleft-to prevent interaction of RNAP with promoter DNA. We define the contacts between Myx and RNAP and the effects of Myx on RNAP conformation and propose that Myx functions by interfering with opening of the RNAP active-center cleft during transcription initiation. We further show that the structurally related ?-pyrone antibiotic corallopyronin (Cor) and the structurally unrelated macrocyclic-lactone antibiotic ripostatin (Rip) function analogously to Myx. The RNAP switch region is distant from targets of previously characterized RNAP inhibitors, and, correspondingly, Myx, Cor, and Rip do not exhibit crossresistance with previously characterized RNAP inhibitors. The RNAP switch region is an attractive target for identification of new broad-spectrum antibacterial therapeutic agents.

  3. Inhibitors of emerging epigenetic targets for cancer therapy: a patent review (2010-2014).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Minoru; Roberts, Justin M; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James E

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulatory pathways comprise an emerging and active area of chemical probe discovery and investigational drug development. Emerging insights from cancer genome sequencing and chromatin biology have identified leveraged opportunities for development of chromatin-directed small molecules as cancer therapies. At present, only six agents in two epigenetic target classes have been approved by the US FDA, limited to treatment of hematological malignancies. Recently, new classes of epigenetic inhibitors have appeared in literatures. First-in-class compounds have successfully transitioned to clinical investigation, importantly also in solid tumors and pediatric malignancies. This review considers patent applications for small-molecule inhibitors of selected epigenetic targets from 2010 to 2014. Included are exemplary classes of chromatin-associated epigenomic writers (DOT1L and EZH2), erasers (LSD1) and readers (BRD4).

  4. Characterization of a Serine Hydrolase Targeted by Acyl-protein Thioesterase Inhibitors in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Louise E.; Rusch, Marion; Adibekian, Alexander; Bullen, Hayley E.; Graindorge, Arnault; Freymond, Céline; Rottmann, Matthias; Braun-Breton, Catherine; Baumeister, Stefan; Porfetye, Arthur T.; Vetter, Ingrid R.; Hedberg, Christian; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, cysteine palmitoylation is an important reversible modification that impacts protein targeting, folding, stability, and interactions with partners. Evidence suggests that protein palmitoylation contributes to key biological processes in Apicomplexa with the recent palmitome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum reporting over 400 substrates that are modified with palmitate by a broad range of protein S-acyl transferases. Dynamic palmitoylation cycles require the action of an acyl-protein thioesterase (APT) that cleaves palmitate from substrates and conveys reversibility to this posttranslational modification. In this work, we identified candidates for APT activity in Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of parasites with low micromolar concentrations of β-lactone- or triazole urea-based inhibitors that target human APT1 showed varied detrimental effects at multiple steps of the parasite lytic cycle. The use of an activity-based probe in combination with these inhibitors revealed the existence of several serine hydrolases that are targeted by APT1 inhibitors. The active serine hydrolase, TgASH1, identified as the homologue closest to human APT1 and APT2, was characterized further. Biochemical analysis of TgASH1 indicated that this enzyme cleaves substrates with a specificity similar to APTs, and homology modeling points toward an APT-like enzyme. TgASH1 is dispensable for parasite survival, which indicates that the severe effects observed with the β-lactone inhibitors are caused by the inhibition of non-TgASH1 targets. Other ASH candidates for APT activity were functionally characterized, and one of them was found to be resistant to gene disruption due to the potential essential nature of the protein. PMID:23913689

  5. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fernando L; Stokes, Kevin D; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Stabel, Judith R

    2013-01-01

    Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) from feces has been considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis for many years. However, direct fecal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is becoming more widely used, demonstrating similar sensitivity and specificity to culture. To ensure efficient and reproducible PCR results from a difficult sample matrix such as feces, there are many obstacles that a DNA extraction method must overcome, including the presence of inhibitors and the thick waxy cell wall of MAP. In the current study, 6 commercial DNA extraction kits were evaluated using fecal samples from naturally infected cattle shedding various amounts of MAP. Upon extraction, DNA purity and yield were measured, and real-time PCR was performed for detection of the insertion sequence (IS)900 and ISMAP02 targets. The kits evaluated showed significant differences in the purity and yield of DNA obtained. The best results were observed with kits E and A, having identified 94% (16/17) and 76% (13/17) of the positive samples by IS900 PCR, respectively. Both of these kits utilized bead beating in a lysis solution for cell disruption, followed by spin column technology (kit E) or magnetic bead-based technology (kit A) for nucleic acid isolation and purification. Two kits (A and F) demonstrated improved performance when used in conjunction with the respective manufacturer's PCR test. The present study demonstrates the importance of choosing the correct methodology for the most accurate diagnosis of paratuberculosis through fecal PCR.

  6. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Mariano G; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Abbott, Joshua; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands.

  7. Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) allosteric inhibitors that target the dimerization site.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Ozge; Ozkirimli, Elif; Ulgen, Kutlu

    2017-08-01

    The sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling pathway is a crucial target for numerous human diseases from cancer to cardiovascular diseases. However, available SK1 inhibitors that target the active site suffer from poor potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties. The selectivity issue of the kinases, which share a highly-conserved ATP-pocket, can be overcome by targeting the less-conserved allosteric sites. SK1 is known to function minimally as a dimer; however, the crystal structure of the SK1 dimer has not been determined. In this study, a template-based algorithm implemented in PRISM was used to predict the SK1 dimer structure and then the possible allosteric sites at the dimer interface were determined via SiteMap. These sites were used in a virtual screening campaign that includes an integrated workflow of structure-based pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, molecular docking, re-screening of common scaffolds to propose a series of compounds with different scaffolds as potential allosteric SK1 inhibitors. Finally, the stability of the SK1-ligand complexes was analyzed by molecular dynamics simulations. As a final outcome, ligand 7 having a 4,9-dihydro-1H-purine scaffold and ligand 12 having a 2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-β-carboline scaffold were found to be potential selective inhibitors for SK1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Aurora kinase inhibitor nanoparticles target tumors with favorable therapeutic index in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Susan; Song, Young Ho; Nolan, Jim; Cadogan, Elaine; Murray, Jim; Odedra, Rajesh; Foster, John; Hall, Peter A; Low, Susan; Taylor, Paula; Ellston, Rebecca; Polanska, Urszula M; Wilson, Joanne; Howes, Colin; Smith, Aaron; Goodwin, Richard J A; Swales, John G; Strittmatter, Nicole; Takáts, Zoltán; Nilsson, Anna; Andren, Per; Trueman, Dawn; Walker, Mike; Reimer, Corinne L; Troiano, Greg; Parsons, Donald; De Witt, David; Ashford, Marianne; Hrkach, Jeff; Zale, Stephen; Jewsbury, Philip J; Barry, Simon T

    2016-02-10

    Efforts to apply nanotechnology in cancer have focused almost exclusively on the delivery of cytotoxic drugs to improve therapeutic index. There has been little consideration of molecularly targeted agents, in particular kinase inhibitors, which can also present considerable therapeutic index limitations. We describe the development of Accurin polymeric nanoparticles that encapsulate the clinical candidate AZD2811, an Aurora B kinase inhibitor, using an ion pairing approach. Accurins increase biodistribution to tumor sites and provide extended release of encapsulated drug payloads. AZD2811 nanoparticles containing pharmaceutically acceptable organic acids as ion pairing agents displayed continuous drug release for more than 1 week in vitro and a corresponding extended pharmacodynamic reduction of tumor phosphorylated histone H3 levels in vivo for up to 96 hours after a single administration. A specific AZD2811 nanoparticle formulation profile showed accumulation and retention in tumors with minimal impact on bone marrow pathology, and resulted in lower toxicity and increased efficacy in multiple tumor models at half the dose intensity of AZD1152, a water-soluble prodrug of AZD2811. These studies demonstrate that AZD2811 can be formulated in nanoparticles using ion pairing agents to give improved efficacy and tolerability in preclinical models with less frequent dosing. Accurins specifically, and nanotechnology in general, can increase the therapeutic index of molecularly targeted agents, including kinase inhibitors targeting cell cycle and oncogenic signal transduction pathways, which have to date proved toxic in humans.

  9. Identification of Specific Inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi Malic Enzyme Isoforms by Target-Based HTS.

    PubMed

    Ranzani, Americo T; Nowicki, Cristina; Wilkinson, Shane R; Cordeiro, Artur T

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The lack of an efficient and safe treatment supports the research into novel metabolic targets, with the malic enzyme (ME) representing one such potential candidate. T. cruzi expresses a cytosolic (TcMEc) and a mitochondrial (TcMEm) ME isoform, with these activities functioning to generate NADPH, a key source of reducing equivalents that drives a range of anabolic and protective processes. To identify specific inhibitors that target TcMEs, two independent high-throughput screening strategies using a diversity library containing 30,000 compounds were employed. IC50 values of 262 molecules were determined for both TcMEs, as well as for three human ME isoforms, with the inhibitors clustered into six groups according to their chemical similarity. The most potent hits belonged to a sulfonamide group that specifically target TcMEc. Moreover, several selected inhibitors of both TcMEs showed a trypanocidal effect against the replicative forms of T. cruzi. The chemical diversity observed among those compounds that inhibit TcMEs activity emphasizes the druggability of these enzymes, with a sulfonamide-based subset of compounds readily able to block TcMEc function at a low nanomolar range.

  10. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, Mariano G.; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R.; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L.; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P.; Elemento, Olivier; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Melnick, Ari M.

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands. PMID:27482887

  11. Identification of alsterpaullone as a novel small molecule inhibitor to target group 3 medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Faria, Claudia C; Agnihotri, Sameer; Mack, Stephen C; Golbourn, Brian J; Diaz, Roberto J; Olsen, Samantha; Bryant, Melissa; Bebenek, Matthew; Wang, Xin; Bertrand, Kelsey C; Kushida, Michelle; Head, Renee; Clark, Ian; Dirks, Peter; Smith, Christian A; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T

    2015-08-28

    Advances in the molecular biology of medulloblastoma revealed four genetically and clinically distinct subgroups. Group 3 medulloblastomas are characterized by frequent amplifications of the oncogene MYC, a high incidence of metastasis, and poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. We investigated several potential small molecule inhibitors to target Group 3 medulloblastomas based on gene expression data using an in silico drug screen. The Connectivity Map (C-MAP) analysis identified piperlongumine as the top candidate drug for non-WNT medulloblastomas and the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor alsterpaullone as the compound predicted to have specific antitumor activity against Group 3 medulloblastomas. To validate our findings we used these inhibitors against established Group 3 medulloblastoma cell lines. The C-MAP predicted drugs reduced cell proliferation in vitro and increased survival in Group 3 medulloblastoma xenografts. Alsterpaullone had the highest efficacy in Group 3 medulloblastoma cells. Genomic profiling of Group 3 medulloblastoma cells treated with alsterpaullone confirmed inhibition of cell cycle-related genes, and down-regulation of MYC. Our results demonstrate the preclinical efficacy of using a targeted therapy approach for Group 3 medulloblastomas. Specifically, we provide rationale for advancing alsterpaullone as a targeted therapy in Group 3 medulloblastoma.

  12. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-07-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency.

  13. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  14. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  15. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rimkus, Tadas K; Carpenter, Richard L; Qasem, Shadi; Chan, Michael; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-02-15

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO) and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI) family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib) have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  16. Gyrase B Inhibitor Impairs HIV-1 Replication by Targeting Hsp90 and the Capsid Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Vozzolo, Luciano; Loh, Belinda; Gane, Paul J.; Tribak, Maryame; Zhou, Lihong; Anderson, Ian; Nyakatura, Elisabeth; Jenner, Richard G.; Selwood, David; Fassati, Ariberto

    2010-01-01

    Chemical genetics is an emerging approach to investigate the biology of host-pathogen interactions. We screened several inhibitors of ATP-dependent DNA motors and detected the gyrase B inhibitor coumermycin A1 (C-A1) as a potent antiretroviral. C-A1 inhibited HIV-1 integration and gene expression from acutely infected cell, but the two activities mapped to distinct targets. Target discovery identified Hsp90 as the C-A1 target affecting viral gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that Hsp90 associates with the viral promoter and may directly regulate gene expression. Molecular docking suggested that C-A1 binds to two novel pockets at the C terminal domain of Hsp90. C-A1 inhibited Hsp90 dimer formation, suggesting that it impairs viral gene expression by preventing Hsp90 dimerization at the C terminus. The inhibition of HIV-1 integration imposed by C-A1 was independent of Hsp90 and mapped to the capsid protein, and a point mutation at residue 105 made the virus resistant to this block. HIV-1 susceptibility to the integration block mediated by C-A1 was influenced by cyclophilin A. Our chemical genetic approach revealed an unexpected function of capsid in HIV-1 integration and provided evidence for a role of Hsp90 in regulating gene expression in mammalian cells. Both activities were amenable to inhibition by small molecules and represent novel antiretroviral drug targets. PMID:20937817

  17. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rimkus, Tadas K.; Carpenter, Richard L.; Qasem, Shadi; Chan, Michael; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO) and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI) family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib) have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials. PMID:26891329

  18. Computer-assisted identification of novel small molecule inhibitors targeting GLUT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Zhining; Li, Xin; Sun, Rong; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Li, Xinru; Rong, Li; Shi, Zheng; Bao, Jinku

    2015-12-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) are the main carriers of glucose that facilitate the diffusion of glucose in mammalian cells, especially GLUT1. Notably, GLUT1 is a rate-limiting transporter for glucose uptake, and its overexpression is a common characteristic in most cancers. Thus, the inhibition of GLUT1 by novel small compounds to lower glucose levels for cancer cells has become an emerging strategy. Herein, we employed high-throughput screening approaches to identify potential inhibitors against the sugar-binding site of GLUT1. Firstly, molecular docking screening was launched against the specs products, and three molecules (ZINC19909927, ZINC19908826, and ZINC19815451) were selected as candidate GLUT1 inhibitors for further analysis. Then, taking the initial ligand β-NG as a reference, molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area (MM/GBSA) method were applied to evaluate the binding stability and affinity of the three candidates towards GLUT1. Finally, we found that ZINC19909927 might have the highest affinity to occupy the binding site of GLUT1. Meanwhile, energy decomposition analysis identified several residues located in substrate-binding site that might provide clues for future inhibitor discovery towards GLUT1. Taken together, these results in our study may provide valuable information for identifying new inhibitors targeting GLUT1-mediated glucose transport and metabolism for cancer therapeutics.

  19. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans Protein Farnesyltransferase Reveal Strategies for Developing Inhibitors That Target Fungal Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Michael A.; Nichols, Connie B.; Armstrong, Stephanie M.; Kelly, Shannon M.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Alspaugh, J. Andrew; Beese, Lorena S.

    2012-09-17

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  20. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase to target serine biosynthesis in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mullarky, Edouard; Lucki, Natasha C.; Beheshti Zavareh, Reza; Anglin, Justin L.; Gomes, Ana P.; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Wong, Jenny C. Y.; Christen, Stefan; Takahashi, Hidenori; Singh, Pradeep K.; Blenis, John; Fendt, Sarah-Maria; Asara, John M.; DeNicola, Gina M.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Lairson, Luke L.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to promote growth and proliferation. The genetic evidence pointing to the importance of the amino acid serine in tumorigenesis is striking. The gene encoding the enzyme 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), which catalyzes the first committed step of serine biosynthesis, is overexpressed in tumors and cancer cell lines via focal amplification and nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated up-regulation. PHGDH-overexpressing cells are exquisitely sensitive to genetic ablation of the pathway. Here, we report the discovery of a selective small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH, CBR-5884, identified by screening a library of 800,000 drug-like compounds. CBR-5884 inhibited de novo serine synthesis in cancer cells and was selectively toxic to cancer cell lines with high serine biosynthetic activity. Biochemical characterization of the inhibitor revealed that it was a noncompetitive inhibitor that showed a time-dependent onset of inhibition and disrupted the oligomerization state of PHGDH. The identification of a small molecule inhibitor of PHGDH not only enables thorough preclinical evaluation of PHGDH as a target in cancers, but also provides a tool with which to study serine metabolism. PMID:26831078

  1. Design of Targeted Inhibitors of Polo-like Kinase 1 (Plk1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    2011-03-01

    Computational design of small molecule inhibitors of Polo-like Kinase 1 (Plk1) is presented. Plk1, which regulates cell cycle, is often overexpressed in cancers. Its downregulation was shown to inhibit cancer progression. Most inhibitors of kinases' interact with the highly conserved ATP binding site. This makes the development of Plk1-specific inhibitors challenging, since different kinases have similar ATP sites. However, Plk1 also contains the polo-box domain (PBD), which is absent from other kinases. In this study, the PBD site was used as a target for designed Plk1 inhibitors. Common structural features of experimentally known Plk1 ligands were first identified. The information was used to design putative small molecules that specifically bonded Plk1. Druglikeness and possible toxicities of the designed molecules were determined. Molecules with no implied toxicities and optimal druglikeness were used for docking studies. The docking studies identified several molecules that made stable complexes with the Plk1 PBD site. Possible utilization of the designed molecules in drugs against cancers with overexpressed Plk1 is discussed.

  2. Structures of Cryptococcus neoformans protein farnesyltransferase reveal strategies for developing inhibitors that target fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hast, Michael A; Nichols, Connie B; Armstrong, Stephanie M; Kelly, Shannon M; Hellinga, Homme W; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Beese, Lorena S

    2011-10-07

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals, including AIDS patients and transplant recipients. Few antifungals can treat C. neoformans infections, and drug resistance is increasing. Protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) catalyzes post-translational lipidation of key signal transduction proteins and is essential in C. neoformans. We present a multidisciplinary study validating C. neoformans FTase (CnFTase) as a drug target, showing that several anticancer FTase inhibitors with disparate scaffolds can inhibit C. neoformans and suggesting structure-based strategies for further optimization of these leads. Structural studies are an essential element for species-specific inhibitor development strategies by revealing similarities and differences between pathogen and host orthologs that can be exploited. We, therefore, present eight crystal structures of CnFTase that define the enzymatic reaction cycle, basis of ligand selection, and structurally divergent regions of the active site. Crystal structures of clinically important anticancer FTase inhibitors in complex with CnFTase reveal opportunities for optimization of selectivity for the fungal enzyme by modifying functional groups that interact with structurally diverse regions. A substrate-induced conformational change in CnFTase is observed as part of the reaction cycle, a feature that is mechanistically distinct from human FTase. Our combined structural and functional studies provide a framework for developing FTase inhibitors to treat invasive fungal infections.

  3. PARP inhibitors: review of mechanisms of action and BRCA1/2 mutation targeting

    PubMed Central

    Gąsiorowska, Emilia; Nowak-Markwitz, Ewa; Jankowska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases have shown true promise in early clinical studies due to reported activity in BRCA-associated cancers. PARP inhibitors may represent a potentially important new class of chemotherapeutic agents directed at targeting cancers with defective DNA-damage repair. In order to widen the prospective patient population that would benefit from PARP inhibitors, predictive biomarkers based on a clear understanding of the mechanism of action are required. In addition, a more sophisticated understanding of the toxicity profile is required if PARP inhibitors are to be employed in the curative, rather than the palliative, setting. PARP inhibitors have successfully moved into clinical practice in the past few years, with approval granted from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) within the past two years. The United States FDA approval of olaparib applies to fourth-line treatment in germline BRCA-mutant ovarian cancer, and European EMA approval of olaparib for maintenance therapy in both germline and somatic BRCA-mutant platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. This review covers the current understanding of PARP, its inhibition, and the basis of the excitement surrounding these new agents. It also evaluates future approaches and directions required to achieve full understanding of the intricate interplay of these agents at the cellular level. PMID:28250726

  4. Targeting Notch enhances the efficacy of ERK inhibitors in BRAF-V600E melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Krepler, Clemens; Xiao, Min; Samanta, Minu; Vultur, Adina; Chen, Hsin-Yi; Brafford, Patricia; Reyes-Uribe, Patricia I.; Halloran, Molly; Chen, Thomas; He, Xu; Hristova, Denitsa; Liu, Qin; Samatar, Ahmed A.; Davies, Michael A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Herlyn, Meenhard; Villanueva, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of activating BRAF mutations in approximately 50% of melanomas has led to the development of MAPK pathway inhibitors, which have transformed melanoma therapy. However, not all BRAF-V600E melanomas respond to MAPK inhibition. Therefore, it is important to understand why tumors with the same oncogenic driver have variable responses to MAPK inhibitors. Here, we show that concurrent loss of PTEN and activation of the Notch pathway is associated with poor response to the ERK inhibitor SCH772984, and that co-inhibition of Notch and ERK decreased viability in BRAF-V600E melanomas. Additionally, patients with low PTEN and Notch activation had significantly shorter progression free survival when treated with BRAF inhibitors. Our studies provide a rationale to further develop combination strategies with Notch antagonists to maximize the efficacy of MAPK inhibition in melanoma. Our findings should prompt the evaluation of combinations co-targeting MAPK/ERK and Notch as a strategy to improve current therapies and warrant further evaluation of co-occurrence of aberrant PTEN and Notch activation as predictive markers of response to therapy. PMID:27655717

  5. Targeting JAK/STAT signalling in inflammatory skin diseases with small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Katharina; Holstein, Julia; Laurence, Arian; Ghoreschi, Kamran

    2017-07-01

    For most inflammatory skin diseases topical glucocorticosteroids and traditional oral immunosuppressive drugs remain the principle treatment choices, but this has started to change. A deeper understanding in individual disease pathogenesis, basic immune mechanisms and molecular signalling pathways, together with advances in pharmaceutical drug development, allow us to interfere more precisely with disease-related factors. Some examples of inflammation-controlling interventions include antibodies neutralizing disease-associated cytokines, and small molecules targeting intracellular pathways relevant to cytokine production or cytokine signalling. So far, this is best established for psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease dominated by Th17 cytokines. In this review, we focus on chronic inflammatory skin diseases where cytokines using type I/II cytokine receptors play a dominant role in disease pathogenesis and where novel treatments with inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathway are already under clinical investigation. To better understand the rationale of using JAK/STAT inhibitors in the discussed skin diseases, we give an overview of important genetic and immunological associations with the JAK/STAT pathway and summarize the stage of clinical development of small molecular inhibitors. JAK/STAT inhibitors will presumably find wide application in dermatology, since they can be applied not only systematically but also topically for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Selective JAK3 Inhibitors with a Covalent Reversible Binding Mode Targeting a New Induced Fit Binding Pocket.

    PubMed

    Forster, Michael; Chaikuad, Apirat; Bauer, Silke M; Holstein, Julia; Robers, Matthew B; Corona, Cesear R; Gehringer, Matthias; Pfaffenrot, Ellen; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Knapp, Stefan; Laufer, Stefan A

    2016-11-17

    Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of cytoplasmatic tyrosine kinases that are attractive targets for the development of anti-inflammatory drugs given their roles in cytokine signaling. One question regarding JAKs and their inhibitors that remains under intensive debate is whether JAK inhibitors should be isoform selective. Since JAK3 functions are restricted to immune cells, an isoform-selective inhibitor for JAK3 could be especially valuable to achieve clinically more useful and precise effects. However, the high degree of structural conservation makes isoform-selective targeting a challenging task. Here, we present picomolar inhibitors with unprecedented kinome-wide selectivity for JAK3. Selectivity was achieved by concurrent covalent reversible targeting of a JAK3-specific cysteine residue and a ligand-induced binding pocket. We confirmed that in vitro activity and selectivity translate well into the cellular environment and suggest that our inhibitors are powerful tools to elucidate JAK3-specific functions.

  7. Parallel chemical genetic and genome-wide RNAi screens identify cytokinesis inhibitors and targets.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Ulrike S; Kiger, Amy A; Richter, Constance; Perlman, Zachary E; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Timothy J; Field, Christine M

    2004-12-01

    Cytokinesis involves temporally and spatially coordinated action of the cell cycle and cytoskeletal and membrane systems to achieve separation of daughter cells. To dissect cytokinesis mechanisms it would be useful to have a complete catalog of the proteins involved, and small molecule tools for specifically inhibiting them with tight temporal control. Finding active small molecules by cell-based screening entails the difficult step of identifying their targets. We performed parallel chemical genetic and genome-wide RNA interference screens in Drosophila cells, identifying 50 small molecule inhibitors of cytokinesis and 214 genes important for cytokinesis, including a new protein in the Aurora B pathway (Borr). By comparing small molecule and RNAi phenotypes, we identified a small molecule that inhibits the Aurora B kinase pathway. Our protein list provides a starting point for systematic dissection of cytokinesis, a direction that will be greatly facilitated by also having diverse small molecule inhibitors, which we have identified. Dissection of the Aurora B pathway, where we found a new gene and a specific small molecule inhibitor, should benefit particularly. Our study shows that parallel RNA interference and small molecule screening is a generally useful approach to identifying active small molecules and their target pathways.

  8. Parallel Chemical Genetic and Genome-Wide RNAi Screens Identify Cytokinesis Inhibitors and Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kiger, Amy A; Richter, Constance; Perlman, Zachary E; Perrimon, Norbert; Mitchison, Timothy J; Field, Christine M

    2004-01-01

    Cytokinesis involves temporally and spatially coordinated action of the cell cycle and cytoskeletal and membrane systems to achieve separation of daughter cells. To dissect cytokinesis mechanisms it would be useful to have a complete catalog of the proteins involved, and small molecule tools for specifically inhibiting them with tight temporal control. Finding active small molecules by cell-based screening entails the difficult step of identifying their targets. We performed parallel chemical genetic and genome-wide RNA interference screens in Drosophila cells, identifying 50 small molecule inhibitors of cytokinesis and 214 genes important for cytokinesis, including a new protein in the Aurora B pathway (Borr). By comparing small molecule and RNAi phenotypes, we identified a small molecule that inhibits the Aurora B kinase pathway. Our protein list provides a starting point for systematic dissection of cytokinesis, a direction that will be greatly facilitated by also having diverse small molecule inhibitors, which we have identified. Dissection of the Aurora B pathway, where we found a new gene and a specific small molecule inhibitor, should benefit particularly. Our study shows that parallel RNA interference and small molecule screening is a generally useful approach to identifying active small molecules and their target pathways. PMID:15547975

  9. The fatty acid synthase inhibitor triclosan: repurposing an anti-microbial agent for targeting prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Martin C; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Gunter, Jennifer H; Lubik, Amy A; Quinn, Ronald J; Nelson, Colleen C

    2014-10-15

    Inhibition of FASN has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, and numerous inhibitors have been investigated. However, severe pharmacological limitations have challenged their clinical testing. The synthetic FASN inhibitor triclosan, which was initially developed as a topical antibacterial agent, is merely affected by these pharmacological limitations. Yet, little is known about its mechanism in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Here we compared the cellular and molecular effects of triclosan in a panel of eight malignant and non-malignant prostate cell lines to the well-known FASN inhibitors C75 and orlistat, which target different partial catalytic activities of FASN. Triclosan displayed a superior cytotoxic profile with a several-fold lower IC50 than C75 or orlistat. Structure-function analysis revealed that alcohol functionality of the parent phenol is critical for inhibitory action. Rescue experiments confirmed that end product starvation was a major cause of cytotoxicity. Importantly, triclosan, C75 and orlistat induced distinct changes to morphology, cell cycle, lipid content and the expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism, demonstrating that inhibition of different partial catalytic activities of FASN activates different metabolic pathways. These finding combined with its well-documented pharmacological safety profile make triclosan a promising drug candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  10. Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Topoisomerase I as Novel Antituberculosis Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sandhaus, Shayna; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Welmaker, Greg; Houghten, Richard A.; Paz, Carlos; Garcia, Pamela K.; Andres, Angelo; Narula, Gagandeep; Rodrigues Felix, Carolina; Geden, Sandra; Netherton, Mandy; Gupta, Rashmi; Rohde, Kyle H.; Giulianotti, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial topoisomerase functions are required for regulation of DNA supercoiling and overcoming the DNA topological barriers that are encountered during many vital cellular processes. DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV of the type IIA bacterial topoisomerase family are important clinical targets for antibacterial therapy. Topoisomerase I, belonging to the type IA topoisomerase family, has recently been validated as a potential antitubercular target. The topoisomerase I activity has been shown to be essential for bacterial viability and infection in a murine model of tuberculosis. Mixture-based combinatorial libraries were screened in this study to identify novel bacterial topoisomerase I inhibitors. Using positional-scanning deconvolution, selective small-molecule inhibitors of bacterial topoisomerase I were identified starting from a polyamine scaffold. Antibacterial assays demonstrated that four of these small-molecule inhibitors of bacterial topoisomerase I are bactericidal against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The MICs for growth inhibition of M. smegmatis increased with overexpression of recombinant M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I, consistent with inhibition of intracellular topoisomerase I activity being involved in the antimycobacterial mode of action. PMID:27114277

  11. Managing stomatitis in patients treated with Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pilotte, Amy Potter; Hohos, Melissa Beth; Polson, Kathleen M O; Huftalen, Tarsha Marie; Treister, Nathaniel

    2011-10-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are a class of targeted cancer therapeutic agents with clinical benefit for multiple tumor types. Oral ulcerations are a common side effect of mTOR inhibitors; however, the clinical findings resemble aphthous stomatitis rather than the mucositis seen with chemotherapy. Consequently, the appearance of aphthous-like oral ulcerations has been referred to as mTOR inhibitor-associated stomatitis (mIAS). The severity of mIAS can be minimized by following common preventive steps and initiating treatment at the first sign of mouth discomfort, thereby reducing the likelihood of treatment discontinuation. mIAS can be managed through prophylactic measures, such as patient education in oral hygiene and avoidance of triggers. Patients who develop mIAS may be treated topically using rinses or other local therapies, including corticosteroids. In severe cases, dose modifications may be required. Oncology nurses have an important role in the management of patients with cancer and are well positioned to offer strategies for minimizing the occurrence and impact of mIAS.

  12. The fatty acid synthase inhibitor triclosan: repurposing an anti-microbial agent for targeting prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Martin C.; Pouwer, Rebecca H.; Gunter, Jennifer H.; Lubik, Amy A.; Quinn, Ronald J.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of FASN has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, and numerous inhibitors have been investigated. However, severe pharmacological limitations have challenged their clinical testing. The synthetic FASN inhibitor triclosan, which was initially developed as a topical antibacterial agent, is merely affected by these pharmacological limitations. Yet, little is known about its mechanism in inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. Here we compared the cellular and molecular effects of triclosan in a panel of eight malignant and non-malignant prostate cell lines to the well-known FASN inhibitors C75 and orlistat, which target different partial catalytic activities of FASN. Triclosan displayed a superior cytotoxic profile with a several-fold lower IC50 than C75 or orlistat. Structure-function analysis revealed that alcohol functionality of the parent phenol is critical for inhibitory action. Rescue experiments confirmed that end product starvation was a major cause of cytotoxicity. Importantly, triclosan, C75 and orlistat induced distinct changes to morphology, cell cycle, lipid content and the expression of key enzymes of lipid metabolism, demonstrating that inhibition of different partial catalytic activities of FASN activates different metabolic pathways. These finding combined with its well-documented pharmacological safety profile make triclosan a promising drug candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:25313139

  13. Structure-guided Development of Specific Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the ATP-binding Pocket*

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Shih-Chia; Qi, Xiangbing; Gui, Wen-Jun; Wu, Cheng-Yang; Chuang, Jacinta L.; Wernstedt-Asterholm, Ingrid; Morlock, Lorraine K.; Owens, Kyle R.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Williams, Noelle S.; Tambar, Uttam K.; Wynn, R. Max; Chuang, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDKs 1–4) negatively regulate activity of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by reversible phosphorylation. PDK isoforms are up-regulated in obesity, diabetes, heart failure, and cancer and are potential therapeutic targets for these important human diseases. Here, we employed a structure-guided design to convert a known Hsp90 inhibitor to a series of highly specific PDK inhibitors, based on structural conservation in the ATP-binding pocket. The key step involved the substitution of a carbonyl group in the parent compound with a sulfonyl in the PDK inhibitors. The final compound of this series, 2-[(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]isoindoline-4,6-diol, designated PS10, inhibits all four PDK isoforms with IC50 = 0.8 μm for PDK2. The administration of PS10 (70 mg/kg) to diet-induced obese mice significantly augments pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity with reduced phosphorylation in different tissues. Prolonged PS10 treatments result in improved glucose tolerance and notably lessened hepatic steatosis in the mouse model. The results support the pharmacological approach of targeting PDK to control both glucose and fat levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24356970

  14. Discovery of two aminoglycoside antibiotics as inhibitors targeting the menin-mixed lineage leukaemia interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Lianchun; Zhou, Ran; Geng, Heji; Yue, Liyan; Ye, Fei; Xie, Yiqian; Liu, Jingqiu; Kong, Xiangqian; Jiang, Hualiang; Huang, Jiandong; Luo, Cheng

    2014-05-01

    Menin functions as an oncogenic cofactor of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) fusion proteins in leukaemogenesis. The menin-MLL interface is a potential therapeutic target in acute leukaemia cases. In this study, approximately 900 clinical compounds were evaluated and ranked using pharmacophore-based virtual screening, the top 29 hits were further evaluated by biochemical analysis to discover the inhibitors that target the menin-MLL interface. Two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and tobramycin, were identified as menin-MLL inhibitors with binding affinities of 18.8 and 59.9 μM, respectively. The results of thermal shift assay validated the direct interactions between the two antibiotics and menin. The results of isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the equilibrium dissociation constant between menin and neomycin was approximately 15.6 μM. We also predicted the binding modes of inhibitors at the menin-MLL interface through molecular docking analysis. The results indicated that neomycin and tobramycin competitively occupy the binding site of MLL. This study has shed light on the development of powerful probes and new therapies for MLL-mediated leukaemogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Activating c-KIT mutations confer oncogenic cooperativity and rescue RUNX1/ETO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in human primary CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, C; Quagliano-Lo Coco, I; Yildiz, Ö; Chen-Wichmann, L; Weber, H; Syzonenko, T; Döring, C; Brendel, C; Ponnusamy, K; Kinner, A; Brandts, C; Henschler, R; Grez, M

    2015-02-01

    The RUNX1/ETO (RE) fusion protein, which originates from the t(8;21) chromosomal rearrangement, is one of the most frequent translocation products found in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In RE leukemias, activated forms of the c-KIT tyrosine kinase receptor are frequently found, thereby suggesting oncogenic cooperativity between these oncoproteins in the development and maintenance of t(8;21) malignancies. In this report, we show that activated c-KIT cooperates with a C-terminal truncated variant of RE, REtr, to expand human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo. CD34+ cells expressing both oncogenes resemble the AML-M2 myeloblastic cell phenotype, in contrast to REtr-expressing cells which largely undergo granulocytic differentiation. Oncogenic c-KIT amplifies REtr-depended clonogenic growth and protects cells from exhaustion. Activated c-KIT reverts REtr-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. In the presence of activated c-KIT, REtr-downregulated DNA-repair genes are re-expressed leading to an enhancement of DNA-repair efficiency via homologous recombination. Together, our results provide new mechanistic insight into REtr and c-KIT oncogenic cooperativity and suggest that augmented DNA repair accounts for the increased chemoresistance observed in t(8;21)-positive AML patients with activated c-KIT mutations. This cell-protective mechanism might represent a new therapeutic target, as REtr cells with activated c-KIT are highly sensitive to pharmacological inhibitors of DNA repair.

  16. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-01-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”). PMID:27374023

  17. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-07-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”).

  18. Development of chemical inhibitors of the SARS coronavirus: viral helicase as a potential target.

    PubMed

    Keum, Young-Sam; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2012-11-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was the first pandemic in the 21st century to claim more than 700 lives worldwide. However, effective anti-SARS vaccines or medications are currently unavailable despite being desperately needed to adequately prepare for a possible SARS outbreak. SARS is caused by a novel coronavirus, and one of its components, a viral helicase, is emerging as a promising target for the development of chemical SARS inhibitors. In the following review, we describe the characterization, family classification, and kinetic movement mechanisms of the SARS coronavirus (SCV) helicase-nsP13. We also discuss the recent progress in the identification of novel chemical inhibitors of nsP13 in the context of our recent discovery of the strong inhibition of the SARS helicase by natural flavonoids, myricetin and scutellarein. These compounds will serve as important resources for the future development of anti-SARS medications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. HDAC Inhibitors Target Replication Forks to Take a Stab at Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The stability and function of many proteins within the cell can be altered with the addition or removal of certain chemical groups, including acetyl groups. Therefore, the enzymes that regulate these modifications have an important impact on the cell. One class of such enzymes—histone deacetylases, or HDACs—has been implicated in cancer and has become a target for cancer therapy. One HDAC inhibitor, called SAHA, has been approved for use against cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and more than 60 ongoing clinical trials are continuing to test this class of drugs in various forms of cancer. However, the mechanisms by which SAHA and other HDAC inhibitors undermine the viability of tumor cells are not completely understood.

  20. Fragment-based discovery of DNA gyrase inhibitors targeting the ATPase subunit of GyrB.

    PubMed

    Mesleh, Michael F; Cross, Jason B; Zhang, Jing; Kahmann, Jan; Andersen, Ole A; Barker, John; Cheng, Robert K; Felicetti, Brunella; Wood, Michael; Hadfield, Andrea T; Scheich, Christoph; Moy, Terence I; Yang, Qingyi; Shotwell, Joseph; Nguyen, Kien; Lippa, Blaise; Dolle, Roland; Ryan, M Dominic

    2016-02-15

    Inhibitors of the ATPase function of bacterial DNA gyrase, located in the GyrB subunit and its related ParE subunit in topoisomerase IV, have demonstrated antibacterial activity. In this study we describe an NMR fragment-based screening effort targeting Staphylococcus aureus GyrB that identified several attractive and novel starting points with good ligand efficiency. Fragment hits were further characterized using NMR binding studies against full-length S. aureus GyrB and Escherichia coli ParE. X-ray co-crystal structures of select fragment hits confirmed binding and suggested a path for medicinal chemistry optimization. The identification, characterization, and elaboration of one of these fragment series to a 0.265 μM inhibitor is described herein.

  1. Novel Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the PH Domain of AKT for Preventing and Treating Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Medical Oncology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing and co-development collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel kinase inhibitors targeting the PH domain of AKT.

  2. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant chronic myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Lisa A.; Robert, Carine; Rapoport, Aaron P.; Gojo, Ivana; Baer, Maria R.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Rassool, Feyruz V.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to imatinib (IM) and other BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI)s is an increasing problem in leukemias caused by expression of BCR-ABL1. Since chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 utilize an alternative non-homologous end-joining pathway (ALT NHEJ) to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s, we asked whether this repair pathway is a novel therapeutic target in TKI-resistant disease. Notably, the steady state levels of two ALT NHEJ proteins, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and DNA ligase IIIα were increased in the BCR-ABL1-positive CML cell line K562 and, to a greater extent, in its imatinib resistant (IMR) derivative. Incubation of these cell lines with a combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors inhibited ALT NHEJ and selectively decreased survival with the effect being greater in the IMR derivative. Similar results were obtained with TKI-resistant derivatives of two hematopoietic cell lines that had been engineered to stably express BCR-ABL1. Together our results show that the sensitivity of cell lines expressing BCR-ABL1 to the combination of DNA ligase and PARP inhibitors correlates with the steady state levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα, and ALT NHEJ activity. Importantly, analysis of clinical samples from CML patients confirmed that the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα correlated with sensitivity to the DNA repair inhibitor combination. Thus, the expression levels of PARP1 and DNA ligase IIIα serve as biomarkers to identify a subgroup of CML patients who may be candidates for therapies that target the ALT NHEJ pathway when treatment with TKIs has failed. PMID:22641215

  3. Targeting c-MYC by antagonizing PP2A inhibitors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Janghorban, Mahnaz; Farrell, Amy S; Allen-Petersen, Brittany L; Pelz, Carl; Daniel, Colin J; Oddo, Jessica; Langer, Ellen M; Christensen, Dale J; Sears, Rosalie C

    2014-06-24

    The transcription factor c-MYC is stabilized and activated by phosphorylation at serine 62 (S62) in breast cancer. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a critical negative regulator of c-MYC through its ability to dephosphorylate S62. By inactivating c-MYC and other key signaling pathways, PP2A plays an important tumor suppressor function. Two endogenous inhibitors of PP2A, I2PP2A, Inhibitor-2 of PP2A (SET oncoprotein) and cancerous inhibitor of PP2A (CIP2A), inactivate PP2A and are overexpressed in several tumor types. Here we show that SET is overexpressed in about 50-60% and CIP2A in about 90% of breast cancers. Knockdown of SET or CIP2A reduces the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of breast cancer cells in vitro or in vivo with OP449, a novel SET antagonist, also decreases the tumorigenic potential of breast cancer cells and induces apoptosis. We show that this is, at least in part, due to decreased S62 phosphorylation of c-MYC and reduced c-MYC activity and target gene expression. Because of the ubiquitous expression and tumor suppressor activity of PP2A in cells, as well as the critical role of c-MYC in human cancer, we propose that activation of PP2A (here accomplished through antagonizing endogenous inhibitors) could be a novel antitumor strategy to posttranslationally target c-MYC in breast cancer.

  4. TP53 Alterations Correlate with Response to VEGF/VEGFR Inhibitors: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wheler, Jennifer J; Janku, Filip; Naing, Aung; Li, Yali; Stephen, Bettzy; Zinner, Ralph; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Karp, Daniel; Falchook, Gerald S; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Anderson, Roosevelt; Ke, Danxia; Miller, Vincent; Yelensky, Roman; Lee, J Jack; Hong, David; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-10-01

    TP53 tumor-suppressor gene mutations are among the most frequent abnormalities in cancer, affecting approximately 40% of patients. Yet, there is no accepted way to target these alterations in the clinic. At the same time, antagonists of VEGFR or its ligand are best-selling oncology drugs, with multiple, expensive compounds approved. Although only a subset of patients benefit from these antiangiogenesis agents, no relevant biomarker has been identified. Interestingly, TP53 mutations upregulate VEGF-A and VEGFR2. We prospectively enrolled 500 patients, to be interrogated by comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) (next-generation sequencing, 236 genes), and to be matched, whenever possible, with targeted agents. Herein, we analyze outcomes based on VEGF/VEGFR inhibitor treatment and presence of TP53 mutations. Of the 500 patients, 188 (37.6%; with ≥1 alteration) were treated; 106 (56% of 188) had tumors that harbored TP53 mutations. VEGF/VEGFR inhibitor therapy was independently associated with improvement in all outcome parameters [rate of stable disease (SD) ≥6 months/partial and complete remission (PR/CR); (31% versus 7%; TP53-mutant patients (who received no other molecular-matched agents) treated with versus without VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors), time-to-treatment failure, and overall survival (multivariate analysis: all P ≤ 0.01)] for the patients harboring TP53-mutant cancers, but improvement was not seen in any of these parameters for patients with TP53 wild-type neoplasms. We conclude that TP53 mutations predict sensitivity to VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors in the clinic. TP53 alterations may therefore be a ready biomarker for treatment with antiangiogenesis agents, a finding of seminal importance across the cancer field. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(10); 2475-85. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies: a focus on the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gabardi, Steven

    2013-03-01

    To review the history of risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mToR) inhibitors, evaluate their required REMS elements, and delineate the reasons for them being released from their REMS requirements. Articles were identified through a literature search of MEDLINE and EMBASE (January 2007-July 2012) using the search terms: risk evaluation and mitigation strategies, REMS, everolimus, sirolimus and organ transplant (individual organs also were searched). Information from the Federal Register, the Food and Drug Administration, and the manufacturers of the mToR inhibitors was also evaluated. REMS are strategies implemented to manage known or potential risks associated with medications and to ensure ongoing pharmacovigilance throughout the life of a pharmaceutical product. The mToR inhibitors have been associated with several potential risks, including proteinuria, graft thrombosis, and wound-healing complications. The Food and Drug Administration approved REMS programs for both sirolimus and everolimus. The manufacturers of both medications complied with the components of their approved REMS, but after less than 2 years, both medications have been relieved of their REMS obligations. The only element of the sirolimus REMS was a medication guide, whereas the everolimus REMS consisted of a medication guide and a communication plan. The sirolimus REMS was implemented more than 10 years after its initial approval by the Food and Drug Administration, but was released from its REMS requirement within 7 months of its implementation. The everolimus REMS was instituted upon initial approval and was removed approximately 2 years later. Both medications' REMS were always intended to educate health care providers and patients about the potential risks associated with this transplant immunosuppressant. Transplant practitioners should be familiar with the mToR inhibitors' associated risks and properly educate patients regarding the

  6. A web server for predicting inhibitors against bacterial target GlmU protein

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of drug resistant tuberculosis poses a serious concern globally and researchers are in rigorous search for new drugs to fight against these dreadful bacteria. Recently, the bacterial GlmU protein, involved in peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide and techoic acid synthesis, has been identified as an important drug target. A unique C-terminal disordered tail, essential for survival and the absence of gene in host makes GlmU a suitable target for inhibitor design. Results This study describes the models developed for predicting inhibitory activity (IC50) of chemical compounds against GlmU protein using QSAR and docking techniques. These models were trained on 84 diverse compounds (GlmU inhibitors) taken from PubChem BioAssay (AID 1376). These inhibitors were docked in the active site of the C-terminal domain of GlmU protein (2OI6) using the AutoDock. A QSAR model was developed using docking energies as descriptors and achieved maximum correlation of 0.35/0.12 (r/r2) between actual and predicted pIC50. Secondly, QSAR models were developed using molecular descriptors calculated using various software packages and achieved maximum correlation of 0.77/0.60 (r/r2). Finally, hybrid models were developed using various types of descriptors and achieved high correlation of 0.83/0.70 (r/r2) between predicted and actual pIC50. It was observed that some molecular descriptors used in this study had high correlation with pIC50. We screened chemical libraries using models developed in this study and predicted 40 potential GlmU inhibitors. These inhibitors could be used to develop drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Conclusion These results demonstrate that docking energies can be used as descriptors for developing QSAR models. The current work suggests that docking energies based descriptors could be used along with commonly used molecular descriptors for predicting inhibitory activity (IC50) of molecules against GlmU. Based on this study an open source

  7. Chemical-biological characterization of a cruzain inhibitor reveals a second target and a mammalian off-target.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jonathan W; Bryant, Clifford; Calvet, Claudia M; Doyle, Patricia S; Gunatilleke, Shamila S; Leung, Siegfried S F; Ang, Kenny K H; Chen, Steven; Gut, Jiri; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Johnston, Jonathan B; Arkin, Michelle R; Burlingame, Alma L; Taunton, Jack; Jacobson, Matthew P; McKerrow, James M; Podust, Larissa M; Renslo, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of the Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine protease cruzain has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of Chagas' disease. Among the best-studied cruzain inhibitors to date is the vinylsulfone K777 (1), which has proven effective in animal models of Chagas' disease. Recent structure-activity studies aimed at addressing potential liabilities of 1 have now produced analogues such as N-[(2S)-1-[[(E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]amino]-3-(4-methylphenyl)-1-oxopropan-2-yl]pyridine-4-carboxamide (4), which is trypanocidal at ten-fold lower concentrations than for 1. We now find that the trypanocidal activity of 4 derives primarily from the inhibition of T. cruzi 14-α-demethylase (TcCYP51), a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in the parasite. Compound 4 also inhibits mammalian CYP isoforms but is trypanocidal at concentrations below those required to significantly inhibit mammalian CYPs in vitro. A chemical-proteomics approach employing an activity-based probe derived from 1 was used to identify mammalian cathepsin B as a potentially important off-target of 1 and 4. Computational docking studies and the evaluation of truncated analogues of 4 reveal structural determinants for TcCYP51 binding, information that will be useful in further optimization of this new class of inhibitors.

  8. Effect of SMURF2 Targeting on Susceptibility to MEK Inhibitors in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mitogen-activated protein–kinase pathway consisting of the kinases RAF, MEK, and ERK is central to cell proliferation and survival and is deregulated in more than 90% of melanomas. MEK inhibitors are currently trialled in the clinic, but despite efficient target inhibition, cytostatic rather than cytotoxic activity limits their efficacy. Methods We assessed the cytotoxicity to MEK inhibitors (PD184352 and selumetinib) in melanoma cells by toluidine-blue staining, caspase 3 cleavage, and melanoma-sphere growth. Western blotting and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were applied to determine SMAD-specific E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (SMURF2), PAX3, and MITF expression. Human melanoma samples (n = 77) from various stages were analyzed for SMURF2 and PAX3 expression. RNA interference was performed to target SMURF2 during MEK inhibition in vivo in melanoma xenografts in mice and zebrafish. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Activation of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signalling sensitized melanoma cells to the cytotoxic effects of MEK inhibition. Melanoma cells resistant to the cytotoxic effects of MEK inhibitors counteracted TGF-β signalling through overexpression of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SMURF2, which resulted in increased expression of the transcription factors PAX3 and MITF. High MITF expression protected melanoma cells against MEK inhibitor cytotoxicity. Depleting SMURF2 reduced MITF expression and substantially lowered the threshold for MEK inhibitor–induced apoptosis. Moreover, SMURF2 depletion sensitized melanoma cells to the cytotoxic effects of selumetinib, leading to cell death at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower than the concentration required to induce cell death in SMURF2-expressing cells. Mice treated with selumetinib alone at a dosage of 10mg/kg body weight once daily produced no response, but in combination with SMURF2 depletion, selumetinib suppressed tumor growth by 97.9% (95

  9. ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Design and Synthesis of Highly Potent and Selective Pyrazolopyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Zask, Arie; Verheijen, Jeroen C.; Curran, Kevin; Kaplan, Joshua; Richard, David J.; Nowak, Pawel; Malwitz, David J.; Brooijmans, Natasja; Bard, Joel; Svenson, Kristine; Lucas, Judy; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Hollander, Irwin; Gibbons, James J.; Abraham, Robert T.; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Mansour, Tarek S.; Yu, Ker

    2009-09-18

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central regulator of growth, survival, and metabolism, is a validated target for cancer therapy. Rapamycin and its analogues, allosteric inhibitors of mTOR, only partially inhibit one mTOR protein complex. ATP-competitive, global inhibitors of mTOR that have the potential for enhanced anticancer efficacy are described. Structural features leading to potency and selectivity were identified and refined leading to compounds with in vivo efficacy in tumor xenograft models.

  10. Targeting carbonic anhydrase IX improves the anti-cancer efficacy of mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Faes, Seraina; Planche, Anne; Uldry, Emilie; Santoro, Tania; Pythoud, Catherine; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Horlbeck, Janine; Letovanec, Igor; Riggi, Nicolo; Datta, Dipak; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) by chemical inhibitors, such as rapamycin, has demonstrated anti-cancer activity in preclinical and clinical trials. Their efficacy is, however, limited and tumors eventually relapse through resistance formation. In this study, using two different cancer mouse models, we identify tumor hypoxia as a novel mechanism of resistance of cancer cells against mTORC1 inhibitors. Indeed, we show that the activity of mTORC1 is mainly restricted to the non-hypoxic tumor compartment, as evidenced by a mutually exclusive staining pattern of the mTORC1 activity marker pS6 and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. Consequently, whereas rapamycin reduces cancer cell proliferation in non-hypoxic regions, it has no effect in hypoxic areas, suggesting that cancer cells proliferate independently of mTORC1 under hypoxia. Targeting the hypoxic tumor compartment by knockdown of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) using short hairpin RNA or by chemical inhibition of CAIX with acetazolamide potentiates the anti-cancer activity of rapamycin. Taken together, these data emphasize that hypoxia impairs the anti-cancer efficacy of rapalogs. Therapeutic strategies targeting the hypoxic tumor compartment, such as the inhibition of CAIX, potentiate the efficacy of rapamycin and warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:27153561

  11. 6-Oxooxazolidine-quinazolines as noncovalent inhibitors with the potential to target mutant forms of EGFR.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiaan; Chen, En; Shu, Ke; Chen, Wenteng; Zhang, Guolin; Yu, Yongping

    2016-08-15

    Despite the remarkable benefits of gefitinib, the clinical efficacy is eventually diminished due to the acquired point mutations in the EGFR (T790M). To address this unmet medical need, we demonstrated a strategy to prepare a hybrid analogue consisting of the oxooxazolidine ring and the quinazoline scaffold and provided alternative noncovalent inhibitors targeting mutant forms of EGFR. Most of the derivatives displayed moderate to good anti-proliferative activity against gefitinib-resistant NCI-H1975. Some of them exhibited potent EGFR kinase inhibitory activities, especially on EGFR(T790M) and EGFR(L858R) kinases. SAR studies led to the identification of a hit 9a that can target both of the most common EGFR mutants: L858R and T790M. Also, 9a displayed weaker inhibitory against cancer cell lines with low level of EGFR expression and good chemical stability under different pH conditions. The work presented herein showed the potential for developing noncovalent inhibitors targeting EGFR mutants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Targeting zebrafish and murine pituitary corticotroph tumors with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning-Ai; Jiang, Hong; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Fan, Xue-Mo; Lin, Shuo; Melmed, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    Cushing disease caused by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas leads to hypercortisolemia predisposing to diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis, central obesity, cardiovascular morbidity, and increased mortality. There is no effective pituitary targeted pharmacotherapy for Cushing disease. Here, we generated germline transgenic zebrafish with overexpression of pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG/securin) targeted to the adenohypophyseal proopiomelanocortin (POMC) lineage, which recapitulated early features pathognomonic of corticotroph adenomas, including corticotroph expansion and partial glucocorticoid resistance. Adult Tg:Pomc-Pttg fish develop neoplastic coticotrophs and pituitary cyclin E up-regulation, as well as metabolic disturbances mimicking hypercortisolism caused by Cushing disease. Early development of corticotroph pathologies in Tg:Pomc-Pttg embryos facilitated drug testing in vivo. We identified a pharmacologic CDK2/cyclin E inhibitor, R-roscovitine (seliciclib; CYC202), which specifically reversed corticotroph expansion in live Tg:Pomc-Pttg embryos. We further validated that orally administered R-roscovitine suppresses ACTH and corticosterone levels, and also restrained tumor growth in a mouse model of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Molecular analyses in vitro and in vivo showed that R-roscovitine suppresses ACTH expression, induces corticotroph tumor cell senescence and cell cycle exit by up-regulating p27, p21 and p57, and downregulates cyclin E expression. The results suggest that use of selective CDK inhibitors could effectively target corticotroph tumor growth and hormone secretion. PMID:21536883

  13. C-KIT signaling in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Stankov, Karmen; Popovic, Stevan; Mikov, Momir

    2014-01-01

    Tumor progression is strongly associated with the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and their intracellular signal transduction pathways, which regulate several cell functions including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, adhesion and angiogenesis. Detailed structural and functional studies of RTKs, including the stem cell factor receptor c-KIT, revealed the complexity of these receptor systems and contributed to development of targeted clinical approaches with relevance in both prognosis and therapy. C-KIT signaling network has been the subject of intense research and pharmaceutical strategies to identify novel target-based approaches for cancer treatment. Evidence that c-KIT signaling promotes cell proliferation and survival, along with the frequency in which this pathway is aberrantly activated in cancer, support the current efforts to identify approaches for its efficient inhibition. C-KIT mutations are associatied with several human malignancies, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, acute myeloid leukemia, mast cell leukemia, and melanoma. Novel therapies are developed that target some of the identified genetic defects. It is therefore anticipated that newly-identified genetic markers will acquire a predictive value, that is, the ability to predict differential efficacy of a therapy. This review describes the evolving understanding of c-KIT/SCF axis and their downstream signaling in cancer, and the strategies for c-KIT-directed targeted cancer therapy.

  14. Creation of learning kits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stow, D. A.; Estes, J. E.; Mertz, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    A learning kit is an essential part of any remote sensing workshop, course, or in-house training program to provide the "hands-on" experience of working with remotely sensed imagery. This is the objective of laboratory and field exercises as well as the reason behind the production of imagery/map kits. The way in which these learning kits (containing conventional remotely sensed and collateral data products) are put together is described and some concerns that influence the creation of learning kits are discussed. These include budgetary constraints, number of imagery types, and number of collateral data types.

  15. Creation of learning kits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stow, D. A.; Estes, J. E.; Mertz, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    A learning kit is an essential part of any remote sensing workshop, course, or in-house training program to provide the "hands-on" experience of working with remotely sensed imagery. This is the objective of laboratory and field exercises as well as the reason behind the production of imagery/map kits. The way in which these learning kits (containing conventional remotely sensed and collateral data products) are put together is described and some concerns that influence the creation of learning kits are discussed. These include budgetary constraints, number of imagery types, and number of collateral data types.

  16. Nivolumab as Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) Inhibitor for Targeted Immunotherapy in Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liting; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Baoan

    2017-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapy has become the most promising approach for tumor patients. Programmed death-1 (PD-1), an inhibitory receptor expressed on activated T cells, can reverse immune suppression and release T cell activation. Nivolumab, a fully human immunoglobulin G4 PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor antibody, blocks PD-1 and promotes antitumor immunity, and it is effective for treating non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), melanoma, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other cancers. The present review summarizes the efficacy and current status of clinical trials of nivolumab and that enabled nivolumab to be investigated in patients. PMID:28261342

  17. Targeting tumor-stroma crosstalk: the example of the NT157 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rampias, T; Favicchio, R; Stebbing, J; Giamas, G

    2016-05-19

    Recent clinical research has provided evidence that cancer progression and therapy resistance is driven not only by tumor's genetic profile but also by complex paracrine interactions within the tumor microenvironment (TME). The role of TME in modulating tumor drug sensitivity is increasingly recognized and targeting TME has been the focus of novel therapeutic approaches. Two recent reports show that a new anti-cancer drug, the inhibitor NT157 has the potential to inhibit IGF-1R and STAT3 signaling pathways in cancer cells and stroma cells of TME leading to a decrease in cancer cell survival.

  18. X-ray structures of checkpoint kinase 2 in complex with inhibitors that target its gatekeeper-dependent hydrophobic pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Jobson, Andrew G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Self, Christopher R.; Zhang, Guangtao; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-09-17

    The serine/threonine checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) is an attractive molecular target for the development of small molecule inhibitors to treat cancer. Here, we report the rational design of Chk2 inhibitors that target the gatekeeper-dependent hydrophobic pocket located behind the adenine-binding region of the ATP-binding site. These compounds exhibit IC{sub 50} values in the low nanomolar range and are highly selective for Chk2 over Chk1. X-ray crystallography was used to determine the structures of the inhibitors in complex with the catalytic kinase domain of Chk2 to verify their modes of binding.

  19. KSHV Targeted Therapy: An Update on Inhibitors of Viral Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Natacha; Duraffour, Sophie; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. Since the discovery of KSHV 20 years ago, there is still no standard treatment and the management of virus-associated malignancies remains toxic and incompletely efficacious. As the majority of tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV, currently marketed antivirals that target the virus lytic cycle have shown inconsistent results in clinic. Nevertheless, lytic replication plays a major role in disease progression and virus dissemination. Case reports and retrospective studies have pointed out the benefit of antiviral therapy in the treatment and prevention of KSHV-associated diseases. As a consequence, potent and selective antivirals are needed. This review focuses on the anti-KSHV activity, mode of action and current status of antiviral drugs targeting KSHV lytic cycle. Among these drugs, different subclasses of viral DNA polymerase inhibitors and compounds that do not target the viral DNA polymerase are being discussed. We also cover molecules that target cellular kinases, as well as the potential of new drug targets and animal models for antiviral testing. PMID:25421895

  20. Bulgecin A: The Key to a Broad-Spectrum Inhibitor That Targets Lytic Transglycosylases

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Allison H.; Wheeler, Richard; Thiriau, Constance; Haouz, Ahmed; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Boneca, Ivo G.

    2017-01-01

    Lytic transglycosylases (Lts) are involved in recycling, cell division, and metabolism of the peptidoglycan. They have been understudied for their usefulness as potential antibacterial targets due to their high redundancy in Gram-negative bacteria. Bulgecin A is an O-sulphonated glycopeptide that targets primarily soluble lytic tranglycosylases (Slt). It has been shown that bulgecin A increases the efficacy of β-lactams that target penicillin bindings proteins (PBPs). Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of LtgA from Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58, a membrane bound homolog of Escherichia coli Slt, in complex with bulgecin A. The LtgA-bulgecin A complex reveals the mechanism of inhibition by bulgecin A at near atomic resolution. We further demonstrate that bulgecin A is not only a potent inhibitor of LtgA, but most importantly, it restores the efficacy of β-lactam antibiotics in strains of N. meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae that have reduced susceptibility to β-lactams. This is particularly relevant for N. gonorrhoeae where no vaccines are available. This work illustrates how best to target dangerous pathogens using a multiple drug target approach, a new and alternative approach to fighting antibiotic resistance. PMID:28241458

  1. Dasatinib inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in the KASUMI-1 cell line bearing the t(8;21)(q22;q22) and the N822K c-kit mutation.

    PubMed

    Mpakou, Vassiliki E; Kontsioti, Frieda; Papageorgiou, Sotiris; Spathis, Aris; Kottaridi, Christine; Girkas, Kostas; Karakitsos, Petros; Dimitriadis, George; Dervenoulas, Ioannis; Pappa, Vasiliki

    2013-02-01

    Activating mutations of the c-kit gene are frequently found in CBF (core binding factor) leukemias. We evaluated the effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib in leukemic cell lines bearing or not c-kit mutations. Our data demonstrate that in the AML Kasumi-1 cell line, bearing the N822K c-kit mutation, dasatinib is a potent suppressor of c-kit and Src kinase activity and inhibits the phosphorylation of their downstream target AKT, possibly through the Src-mediated VEGF/VEGFR receptor type 2 pathway. Dasatinib also effectively blocks proliferation and induces apoptosis through caspase-3 activation in Kasumi-1 cells. These data further encourage the integration of dasatinib in the treatment of CBF AML with c-kit mutations in the context of clinical trials, which are eagerly anticipated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening of kinase inhibitors targeting BRAF for regulating autophagy based on kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingmei; Xue, Dongbo; Wang, Xiaochun; Lu, Ming; Gao, Bo; Qiao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify agents that regulate autophagy. A total of 544 differentially expressed genes were screened from the intersection set of GSE2435 and GSE31040, which was obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database and 19 differentially expressed kinases were selected according to a 'protein kinase database'. Gene ontology‑biological process (GO-BP) enrichment analysis revealed that the 19 kinases were mainly associated with phosphorylation. The protein-protein interaction network exhibited 30 differentially expressed genes that interacted with BRAF, and GO-BP enrichment analysis showed the function of these genes were mainly involved in cell death and apoptosis. The kinase-kinase inhibitor regulatory network identified16 kinase inhibitors that specifically inhibited BRAF. Previous studies indicated that sorafenib is capable of regulating autophagy and regorafenib has also been reported; however, there have been no studies regarding the regulation of autophagy by afatinib, selumetinib, PD318088, axitinib, TAK-733, GDC-0980, GSK2126458, PLX-4720, AS703026, trametinib, GDC-0941 and PF-04217903. Thus, these kinase inhibitors are potential targets for further study on the regulation of autophagy in the future.

  3. Mutant HRAS as novel target for MEK and mTOR inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.; Curioni-Fontecedro, Alessandra; Samaras, Panagiotis; Atrott, Kirstin; Cosin-Roger, Jesus; Lang, Silvia; Scharl, Michael; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    HRAS is a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer. However, mutant HRAS as drug target has not been investigated so far. Here, we show that mutant HRAS hyperactivates the RAS and the mTOR pathway in various cancer cell lines including lung, bladder and esophageal cancer. HRAS mutation sensitized toward growth inhibition by the MEK inhibitors AZD6244, MEK162 and PD0325901. Further, we found that MEK inhibitors induce apoptosis in mutant HRAS cell lines but not in cell lines lacking RAS mutations. In addition, knockdown of HRAS by siRNA blocked cell growth in mutant HRAS cell lines. Inhibition of the PI3K pathway alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors did not alter signaling nor had an impact on viability. However, inhibition of mTOR or combined inhibition of MEK and mTOR reduced cell growth in a synergistic manner. Finally, Ba/F3 cells transformed with mutant HRAS isoforms Q61L, Q61R and G12V demonstrated equal sensitivity towards MEK and mTOR inhibition. Our results show that HRAS mutations in cancer activate the RAS and mTOR pathways which might serve as a therapeutic option for patients with HRAS mutant tumors. PMID:26544513

  4. New Targeted Agents in Gynecologic Cancers: Synthetic Lethality, Homologous Recombination Deficiency, and PARP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fong W; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) have emerged as a new class of anti-cancer drugs, specifically for malignancies bearing aberrations of the homologous recombination pathway, like those with mutations in the BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genes. Olaparib, a potent PARP1 and PARP2 inhibitor, has been shown to significantly increase progression-free survival (PFS) in women with recurrent ovarian cancer related to a germline BRCA mutation and is currently approved fourth-line treatment in these patients. PARP inhibitors (PARPi) target the genetic phenomenon known as synthetic lethality to exploit faulty DNA repair mechanisms. While ovarian cancer is enriched with a population of tumors with known homologous recombination defects, investigations are underway to help identify pathways in other gynecologic cancers that may demonstrate susceptibility to PARPi through synthetically lethal mechanisms. The ARIEL2 trial prospectively determined a predictive assay to identify patients with HRD. The future of cancer therapeutics will likely incorporate these HRD assays to determine the best treatment plan for patients. While the role of PARPi is less clear in non-ovarian gynecologic cancers, the discovery of a predictive assay for HRD may open the door for clinical trials in these other gynecologic cancers enriched with patients with HRD. Identification of patients with tumors deficient in homologous repair or have HRD-like behavior moves cancer treatment towards individualized therapies in order to maximize treatment effect and quality of life for women living with gynecologic cancers.

  5. Identification of a new JNK inhibitor targeting the JNK-JIP interaction site.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, John L; De, Surya K; Machleidt, Thomas; Becattini, Barbara; Vazquez, Jesus; Kuntzen, Christian; Chen, Li-Hsing; Cellitti, Jason F; Riel-Mehan, Megan; Emdadi, Aras; Solinas, Giovanni; Karin, Michael; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2008-10-28

    JNK is a stress-activated protein kinase that modulates pathways implicated in a variety of disease states. JNK-interacting protein-1 (JIP1) is a scaffolding protein that enhances JNK signaling by creating a proximity effect between JNK and upstream kinases. A minimal peptide region derived from JIP1 is able to inhibit JNK activity both in vitro and in cell. We report here a series of small molecules JIP1 mimics that function as substrate competitive inhibitors of JNK. One such compound, BI-78D3, dose-dependently inhibits the phosphorylation of JNK substrates both in vitro and in cell. In animal studies, BI-78D3 not only blocks JNK dependent Con A-induced liver damage but also restores insulin sensitivity in mouse models of type 2 diabetes. Our findings open the way for the development of protein kinase inhibitors targeting substrate specific docking sites, rather than the highly conserved ATP binding sites. In view of its favorable inhibition profile, selectivity, and ability to function in the cellular milieu and in vivo, BI-78D3 represents not only a JNK inhibitor, but also a promising stepping stone toward the development of an innovative class of therapeutics.

  6. Targeting Inhibitors of the Tumor Suppressor PP2A for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Amy S.; Allen-Petersen, Brittany; Daniel, Colin J.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhiping; Rodriguez, Sarah; Impey, Soren; Oddo, Jessica; Vitek, Michael P.; Lopez, Charles; Christensen, Dale J.; Sheppard, Brett; Sears, Rosalie C.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease that is usually diagnosed in the advanced stages when few effective therapies are available. Given the aggressive clinical course of this disease and lack of good treatment options, the development of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of pancreatic cancer is of the upmost importance. Several pathways shown to contribute to pancreatic cancer progression are negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Here, the endogenous inhibitors of PP2A, SET (also known as I2PP2A) and Cancerous Inhibitor of PP2A (CIP2A), were shown to be overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer, contributing to decreased PP2A activity, and overexpression and stabilization of the oncoprotein c-Myc, a key PP2A target. Knockdown of SET or CIP2A increases PP2A activity, increases c-Myc degradation, and decreases the tumorigenic potential of pancreatic cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, treatment with a novel SET inhibitor, OP449, pharmacologically recapitulates the phenotypes and significantly reduces proliferation and tumorigenic potential of several pancreatic cancer cell lines, with an accompanying attenuation of cell growth and survival signaling. Furthermore, primary cells from pancreatic cancer patients were sensitive to OP449 treatment, indicating that PP2A regulated pathways are highly relevant to this deadly disease. PMID:24667985

  7. Recent discovery of non-nucleobase thymidine phosphorylase inhibitors targeting cancer.

    PubMed

    Bera, Hriday; Chigurupati, Sridevi

    2016-11-29

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP, EC 2.4.2.4), an enzyme involved in pyrimidine salvage pathway, is identical to platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) and gliostatin. It is extremely upregulated in a variety of solid tumours. The TP amplification is associated with concomitant overexpression of many angiogenic factors such as matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), interleukins (ILs), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) etc., resulting in promotion of angiogenesis and cancer metastasis. In addition, overshooting TP level protects tumour cells from apoptosis and helps cell survival. Thus, TP is identified as a prime target for developing novel anticancer therapies. Pioneering research activities investigated a large number of TP inhibitors, most of which are pyrimidine or purine analogues. Recently, an array of structurally diverse non-nucleobase derivatives was designed, synthesized and established as promising TP inhibitors. This review, following an outline on the TP structure and functions, gives an overview of the recent advancement of various non-nucleobase TP inhibitors as novel anti-cancer agents.

  8. HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Still Remains a New Drug Target: Structure, Function, Classical Inhibitors, and New Inhibitors with Innovative Mechanisms of Actions

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Francesca; Corona, Angela; Tramontano, Enzo

    2012-01-01

    During the retrotranscription process, characteristic of all retroviruses, the viral ssRNA genome is converted into integration-competent dsDNA. This process is accomplished by the virus-coded reverse transcriptase (RT) protein, which is a primary target in the current treatments for HIV-1 infection. In particular, in the approved therapeutic regimens two classes of drugs target RT, namely, nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs). Both classes inhibit the RT-associated polymerase activity: the NRTIs compete with the natural dNTP substrate and act as chain terminators, while the NNRTIs bind to an allosteric pocket and inhibit polymerization noncompetitively. In addition to these two classes, other RT inhibitors (RTIs) that target RT by distinct mechanisms have been identified and are currently under development. These include translocation-defective RTIs, delayed chain terminators RTIs, lethal mutagenesis RTIs, dinucleotide tetraphosphates, nucleotide-competing RTIs, pyrophosphate analogs, RT-associated RNase H function inhibitors, and dual activities inhibitors. This paper describes the HIV-1 RT function and molecular structure, illustrates the currently approved RTIs, and focuses on the mechanisms of action of the newer classes of RTIs. PMID:22778958

  9. The Replication Focus Targeting Sequence (RFTS) Domain Is a DNA-competitive Inhibitor of Dnmt1

    SciTech Connect

    Syeda, Farisa; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Wean, Matthew; Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Brenner, Charles

    2015-11-30

    Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) is the principal enzyme responsible for maintenance of cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome. The N-terminal replication focus targeting sequence (RFTS) domain of Dnmt1 has been implicated in subcellular localization, protein association, and catalytic function. However, progress in understanding its function has been limited by the lack of assays for and a structure of this domain. Here, we show that the naked DNA- and polynucleosome-binding activities of Dnmt1 are inhibited by the RFTS domain, which functions by virtue of binding the catalytic domain to the exclusion of DNA. Kinetic analysis with a fluorogenic DNA substrate established the RFTS domain as a 600-fold inhibitor of Dnmt1 enzymatic activity. The crystal structure of the RFTS domain reveals a novel fold and supports a mechanism in which an RFTS-targeted Dnmt1-binding protein, such as Uhrf1, may activate Dnmt1 for DNA binding.

  10. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoid-associated protein HU with structure-based inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Tuhin; Ghosh, Soumitra; Dixit, Karuna; Ganesan, Varsha; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Dey, Debayan; Sarma, Siddhartha P.; Ramakumar, Suryanarayanarao; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-06-01

    The nucleoid-associated protein HU plays an important role in maintenance of chromosomal architecture and in global regulation of DNA transactions in bacteria. Although HU is essential for growth in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), there have been no reported attempts to perturb HU function with small molecules. Here we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of HU from Mtb. We identify a core region within the HU-DNA interface that can be targeted using stilbene derivatives. These small molecules specifically inhibit HU-DNA binding, disrupt nucleoid architecture and reduce Mtb growth. The stilbene inhibitors induce gene expression changes in Mtb that resemble those induced by HU deficiency. Our results indicate that HU is a potential target for the development of therapies against tuberculosis.

  11. Biochemical and Structural Analysis of Inhibitors Targeting the ADC-7 Cephalosporinase of Acinetobacter baumannii

    DOE PAGES

    Powers, Rachel A.; Swanson, Hollister C.; Taracila, Magdalena A.; ...

    2014-11-07

    β-Lactam resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii presents one of the greatest challenges to contemporary antimicrobial chemotherapy. Much of this resistance to cephalosporins derives from the expression of the class C β-lactamase enzymes, known as Acinetobacter-derived cephalosporinases (ADCs). Currently, β-lactamase inhibitors are structurally similar to β-lactam substrates and are not effective inactivators of this class C cephalosporinase. Herein, two boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs S02030 and SM23) that are chemically distinct from β-lactams were designed and tested for inhibition of ADC enzymes. BATSIs SM23 and S02030 bind with high affinity to ADC-7, a chromosomal cephalosporinase from Acinetobacter baumannii (Ki = 21.1more » ± 1.9 nM and 44.5 ± 2.2 nM, respectively). The X-ray crystal structures of ADC-7 were determined in both the apo form (1.73 Å resolution) and in complex with S02030 (2.0 Å resolution). In the complex, S02030 makes several canonical interactions: the O1 oxygen of S02030 is bound in the oxyanion hole, and the R1 amide group makes key interactions with conserved residues Asn152 and Gln120. In addition, the carboxylate group of the inhibitor is meant to mimic the C3/C4 carboxylate found in β-lactams. The C3/C4 carboxylate recognition site in class C enzymes is comprised of Asn346 and Arg349 (AmpC numbering), and these residues are conserved in ADC-7. Interestingly, in the ADC-7/S02030 complex, the inhibitor carboxylate group is observed to interact with Arg340, a residue that distinguishes ADC-7 from the related class C enzyme AmpC. A thermodynamic analysis suggests that ΔH driven compounds may be optimized to generate new lead agents. In conclusion, the ADC-7/BATSI complex provides insight into recognition of non-β-lactam inhibitors by ADC enzymes and offers a starting point for the structure-based optimization of this class of novel β-lactamase inhibitors against a key resistance target.« less

  12. Angiographic and volumetric effects of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors on angiomyolipomas in tuberous sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Rahul A; Feldman, Adam S; Paul, Elahna; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Walker, T Gregory

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the angiographic and volumetric effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors on angiomyolipomas (AMLs) in a case series of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. METHODS: All patients who underwent catheter angiography prior to and following mTOR inhibitor therapy (n = 3) were evaluated. All cross-sectional imaging studies were analyzed with three-dimensional volumetrics, and tumor volume curves for all three tissue compartments (soft tissue, vascular, and fat) were generated. Segmentation analysis tools were used to automatically create a region of interest (ROI) circumscribing the AML. On magnetic resonance images, the “fat only” map calculated from the in- and opposed-phase gradient recalled echo sequences was used to quantify fat volume within tumors. Tumor vascularity was measured by applying a thresholding tool within the ROI on post-contrast subtraction images. On computed tomography images, volume histogram analysis of Hounsfield unit was performed to quantify tumor tissue composition. The angiography procedures were also reviewed, and tumor vascularity based on pre-embolization angiography was characterized in a semi-quantitative manner. RESULTS: Patient 1 presented at the age of 15 with a 6.8 cm right lower pole AML and a 4.0 cm right upper pole AML. Embolization was performed of both tumors, and after a few years of size control, the tumors began to grow, and the patient was initiated on mTOR inhibitor therapy. There was an immediate reduction in the size of both lesions. The patient then underwent repeat embolization and discontinuation of mTOR inhibition, after which point there was a substantial regrowth in both tumors across all tissue compartments. Patient 2 presented at the age of 18 with a right renal AML. Following a brief period of tumor reduction after embolization, she was initiated on mTOR inhibitor therapy, with successful reduction in tumor size across all tissue compartments. As with patient 1

  13. Chemical Inhibitors of Non-Homologous End Joining Increase Targeted Construct Integration in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Arras, Samantha D. M.; Fraser, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biolistic transformation protocol for Cryptococcus neoformans over 25 years ago ushered in a new era of molecular characterization of virulence in this previously intractable fungal pathogen. However, due to the low rate of homologous recombination in this species, the process of creating targeted gene deletions using biolistic transformation remains inefficient. To overcome the corresponding difficulty achieving molecular genetic modifications, members of the Cryptococcus community have investigated the use of specific genetic backgrounds or construct design strategies aimed at reducing ectopic construct integration via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). One such approach involves deletion of components of the NHEJ-associated Ku heterodimer. While this strategy increases homologous recombination to nearly 100%, it also restricts strain generation to a ku80Δ genetic background and requires subsequent complex mating procedures to reestablish wild-type DNA repair. In this study, we have investigated the ability of known inhibitors of mammalian NHEJ to transiently phenocopy the C. neoformans Ku deletion strains. Testing of eight candidate inhibitors revealed a range of efficacies in C. neoformans, with the most promising compound (W7) routinely increasing the rate of gene deletion to over 50%. We have successfully employed multiple inhibitors to reproducibly enhance the deletion rate at multiple loci, demonstrating a new, easily applied methodology to expedite acquisition of precise genetic alterations in C. neoformans. Based on this success, we anticipate that the use of these inhibitors will not only become widespread in the Cryptococcus community, but may also find use in other fungal species as well. PMID:27643854

  14. Selective Inhibition of STAT3 Phosphorylation Using a Nuclear-Targeted Kinase Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bartolowits, Matthew D; Brown, Wells; Ali, Remah; Pedley, Anthony M; Chen, Qingshou; Harvey, Kyle E; Wendt, Michael K; Davisson, Vincent Jo

    2017-09-15

    The discovery of compounds that selectively modulate signaling and effector proteins downstream of EGFR could have important implications for understanding specific roles for pathway activation. A complicating factor for receptor tyrosine kinases is their capacity to be translocated to the nucleus upon ligand engagement. Once localized in subcellular compartments like the nucleus, the roles for EGFR take on additional features, many of which are still being revealed. Additionally, nuclear localization of EGFR has been implicated in downstream events that have significance for therapy resistance and disease progression. The challenges to addressing the differential roles for EGFR in the nucleus motivated experimental approaches that can selectively modulate its subcellular function. By adding modifications to the established EGFR kinase inhibitor gefitinib, an approach to small molecule conjugates with a unique nuclear-targeting peptoid sequence was tested in both human and murine breast tumor cell models for their capacity to inhibit EGF-stimulated activation of ERK1/2 and STAT3. While gefitinib alone inhibits both of these downstream effectors, data acquired here indicate that compartmentalization of the gefitinib conjugates allows for pathway specific inhibition of STAT3 while not affecting ERK1/2 signaling. The inhibitor conjugates offered a more direct route to evaluate the role of EGF-stimulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in these breast cancer cell models. These conjugates revealed that STAT3 activation is not involved in EGF-induced EMT, and instead utilization of the cytoplasmic MAP kinase signaling pathway is critical to this process. This is the first example of a conjugate kinase inhibitor capable of partitioning to the nucleus and offers a new approach to enhancing kinase inhibitor specificity.

  15. Pharmacological Targeting of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Decreases Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Neointima Formation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan; Weng, Zhen; Fish, Philip; Goyal, Neha; Luo, Mao; Myears, Samantha P; Strawn, Tammy L; Chandrasekar, Bysani; Wu, Jianbo; Fay, William P

    2016-11-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor that promotes and inhibits cell migration, plays a complex and important role in adverse vascular remodeling. Little is known about the effects of pharmacological PAI-1 inhibitors, an emerging drug class, on migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs), crucial mediators of vascular remodeling. We investigated the effects of PAI-039 (tiplaxtinin), a specific PAI-1 inhibitor, on SMC and EC migration in vitro and vascular remodeling in vivo. PAI-039 inhibited SMC migration through collagen gels, including those supplemented with vitronectin and other extracellular matrix proteins, but did not inhibit migration of PAI-1-deficient SMCs, suggesting that its antimigratory effects were PAI-1-specific and physiologically relevant. However, PAI-039 did not inhibit EC migration. PAI-039 inhibited phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 in SMCs, but had no discernable effect on signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 signaling in ECs. Expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, a motogenic PAI-1 receptor that activates Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription-1 signaling, was markedly lower in ECs than in SMCs. Notably, PAI-039 significantly inhibited intimal hyperplasia and inflammation in murine models of adverse vascular remodeling, but did not adversely affect re-endothelialization after endothelium-denuding mechanical vascular injury. PAI-039 inhibits SMC migration and intimal hyperplasia, while having no inhibitory effect on ECs, which seems to be because of differences in PAI-1-dependent low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1/Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 signaling between SMCs and ECs. These findings suggest that PAI-1 may be an important therapeutic target in obstructive vascular diseases characterized by

  16. Targeting inhibitors of the tumor suppressor PP2A for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Amy S; Allen-Petersen, Brittany; Daniel, Colin J; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhiping; Rodriguez, Sarah; Impey, Soren; Oddo, Jessica; Vitek, Michael P; Lopez, Charles; Christensen, Dale J; Sheppard, Brett; Sears, Rosalie C

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease that is usually diagnosed in the advanced stages when few effective therapies are available. Given the aggressive clinical course of this disease and lack of good treatment options, the development of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of pancreatic cancer is of the upmost importance. Several pathways that have shown to contribute to pancreatic cancer progression are negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Here, the endogenous inhibitors of PP2A, SET (also known as I2PP2A) and cancerous inhibitor of PP2A (CIP2A), were shown to be overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer, contributing to decreased PP2A activity and overexpression and stabilization of the oncoprotein c-Myc, a key PP2A target. Knockdown of SET or CIP2A increases PP2A activity, increases c-Myc degradation, and decreases the tumorigenic potential of pancreatic cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, treatment with a novel SET inhibitor, OP449, pharmacologically recapitulates the phenotypes and significantly reduces proliferation and tumorigenic potential of several pancreatic cancer cell lines, with an accompanying attenuation of cell growth and survival signaling. Furthermore, primary cells from patients with pancreatic cancer were sensitive to OP449 treatment, indicating that PP2A-regulated pathways are highly relevant to this deadly disease. The PP2A inhibitors SET and CIP2A are overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer and are important for pancreatic cancer cell growth and transformation; thus, antagonizing SET and/or CIP2A may be an innovative approach for the treatment of human pancreatic cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Chemical Inhibitors of Non-Homologous End Joining Increase Targeted Construct Integration in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Arras, Samantha D M; Fraser, James A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a biolistic transformation protocol for Cryptococcus neoformans over 25 years ago ushered in a new era of molecular characterization of virulence in this previously intractable fungal pathogen. However, due to the low rate of homologous recombination in this species, the process of creating targeted gene deletions using biolistic transformation remains inefficient. To overcome the corresponding difficulty achieving molecular genetic modifications, members of the Cryptococcus community have investigated the use of specific genetic backgrounds or construct design strategies aimed at reducing ectopic construct integration via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). One such approach involves deletion of components of the NHEJ-associated Ku heterodimer. While this strategy increases homologous recombination to nearly 100%, it also restricts strain generation to a ku80Δ genetic background and requires subsequent complex mating procedures to reestablish wild-type DNA repair. In this study, we have investigated the ability of known inhibitors of mammalian NHEJ to transiently phenocopy the C. neoformans Ku deletion strains. Testing of eight candidate inhibitors revealed a range of efficacies in C. neoformans, with the most promising compound (W7) routinely increasing the rate of gene deletion to over 50%. We have successfully employed multiple inhibitors to reproducibly enhance the deletion rate at multiple loci, demonstrating a new, easily applied methodology to expedite acquisition of precise genetic alterations in C. neoformans. Based on this success, we anticipate that the use of these inhibitors will not only become widespread in the Cryptococcus community, but may also find use in other fungal species as well.

  18. Community Consultation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulder Area Growth Study Commission, CO.

    This kit, designed for leaders and participants, provides a model for organizing and taking part in Community Consultation Groups. The kit was designed to be used in connection with community concerns about growth in Boulder, Colorado. These groups build upon a previous survey to assist the Commission in determining specific growth concerns in the…

  19. Identification of Polyketide Inhibitors Targeting 3-Dehydroquinate Dehydratase in the Shikimate Pathway of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Go, Maybelle Kho; Tung, Alvin; Aguda, Adeleke H.; Robinson, Robert C.; Yew, Wen Shan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the emergence of resistance toward current antibiotics, there is a pressing need to develop the next generation of antibiotics as therapeutics against infectious and opportunistic diseases of microbial origins. The shikimate pathway is exclusive to microbes, plants and fungi, and hence is an attractive and logical target for development of antimicrobial therapeutics. The Gram-positive commensal microbe, Enterococcus faecalis, is a major human pathogen associated with nosocomial infections and resistance to vancomycin, the “drug of last resort”. Here, we report the identification of several polyketide-based inhibitors against the E. faecalis shikimate pathway enzyme, 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (DHQase). In particular, marein, a flavonoid polyketide, both inhibited DHQase and retarded the growth of Enterococcus faecalis. The purification, crystallization and structural resolution of recombinant DHQase from E. faecalis (at 2.2 Å resolution) are also reported. This study provides a route in the development of polyketide-based antimicrobial inhibitors targeting the shikimate pathway of the human pathogen E. faecalis. PMID:25072253

  20. Targeting inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A as a therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Archana; Tabanor, Kayann; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Aldrich, Jane V

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A (I2PP2A), a biological inhibitor of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A, is associated with numerous cellular processes that often lead to the formation and progression of cancer. In this study we hypothesized that targeting the inhibition of I2PP2A’s multiple functions in prostate cancer cells might prevent cancer progression. We have investigated the effect of the small chain C6-ceramide, known to be a bioactive tumor suppressor lipid, on I2PP2A function, thereby affecting c-Myc signaling and histone acetylation in cells. Our data indicated that C6-ceramide treatment of prostate cancer cells induces cell death in PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells. C6-ceramide was able to disrupt the association between PP2A and I2PP2A. C6-ceramide inhibits I2PP2A’s upregulation of c-Myc and downregulation of histone acetylation in prostate cancer cells. Our data indicated that targeting cancer related signaling pathways through I2PP2A using ceramide as an anti-I2PP2A agent could have beneficial effects as a therapeutic approach to prevent prostate cancer. PMID:24025258

  1. Covalent targeting of remote cysteine residues to develop CDK12 and 13 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tinghu; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Olson, Calla M; Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E; Abraham, Brian J; Greifenberg, Ann K; Ficarro, Scott B; Elkins, Jonathan M; Liang, Yanke; Hannett, Nancy M; Manz, Theresa; Hao, Mingfeng; Bartkowiak, Bartlomiej; Greenleaf, Arno L; Marto, Jarrod A; Geyer, Matthias; Bullock, Alex N; Young, Richard A; Gray, Nathanael S

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases 12 and 13 (CDK12 and 13) play critical roles in the regulation of gene transcription. However, the absence of CDK12 and 13 inhibitors has hindered the ability to investigate the consequences of their inhibition in healthy cells and cancer cells. Here we describe the rational design of a first-in-class CDK12 and 13 covalent inhibitor, THZ531. Co-crystallization with CDK12-cyclin K indicates that THZ531 irreversibly targets a cysteine located outside the kinase domain. THZ531 causes a loss of gene expression with concurrent loss of elongating and hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II. In particular, THZ531 substantially decreases the expression of DNA damage response genes and key super–enhancer–associated transcription factor genes. Coincident with transcriptional perturbation, THZ531 dramatically induced apoptotic cell death. Small molecules capable of specifically targeting CDK12 and 13 may thus help identify cancer subtypes that are particularly dependent on their kinase activities. PMID:27571479

  2. Selective Covalent Targeting of Anti-Apoptotic BFL-1 by Cysteine-Reactive Stapled Peptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Huhn, Annissa J; Guerra, Rachel M; Harvey, Edward P; Bird, Gregory H; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-09-22

    Anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins block cell death by trapping the critical α-helical BH3 domains of pro-apoptotic members in a surface groove. Cancer cells hijack this survival mechanism by overexpressing a spectrum of anti-apoptotic members, mounting formidable apoptotic blockades that resist chemotherapeutic treatment. Drugging the BH3-binding pockets of anti-apoptotic proteins has become a highest-priority goal, fueled by the clinical success of ABT-199, a selective BCL-2 inhibitor, in reactivating apoptosis in BCL-2-dependent cancers. BFL-1 is a BCL-2 homolog implicated in melanoma, lymphoma, and other cancers, and remains undrugged. A natural juxtaposition of two unique cysteines at the binding interface of the NOXA BH3 helix and BFL-1 pocket informed the development of stapled BH3 peptides bearing acrylamide warheads to irreversibly inhibit BFL-1 by covalent targeting. Given the frequent proximity of native cysteines to regulatory binding surfaces, covalent stapled peptide inhibitors provide a new therapeutic strategy for targeting pathologic protein interactions.

  3. MmpL3 Inhibitors: Diverse Chemical Scaffolds Inhibit the Same Target.

    PubMed

    Poce, Giovanna; Consalvi, Sara; Biava, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    MmpL3 belongs to the Resistance, Nodulation and Division (RND) superfamily whose role in mycobacteria is the formation of the outer membrane. Indeed, it has been shown that MmpL3 is associated with the export of mycolic acids in the form of trehalose monomycolates (TMM) to the periplasmic space or the outer membrane. In the last few years several whole cell-based screenings of compound libraries brought by a number of diverse chemical scaffolds active against M. tuberculosis (Mtb) that surprisingly share MmpL3 as target. The diverse identified pharmacophores owe important differences among each other, in fact while some of them display inhibitory activity against pathogens that are devoid of mycolic acids and are active against non-replicating Mtb bacilli, some others specifically target mycobacteria and do not kill non-replicating bacilli. The scope of this review is to provide the recent advances in MmpL3 inhibitor discovery with a special focus on structure activity relationship (SAR) studies in order to provide information that could help in developing novel membrane-active anti- TB agents. Moreover, this review will provide the most recent insights into the modes of action of the MmpL3 inhibitors.

  4. γ-secretase inhibitor I inhibits neuroblastoma cells, with NOTCH and the proteasome among its targets

    PubMed Central

    Dorneburg, Carmen; Goß, Annika V.; Fischer, Matthias; Roels, Frederik; Barth, Thomas F.E.; Berthold, Frank; Kappler, Roland; Oswald, Franz; Siveke, Jens T.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    As high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) has a poor prognosis, new therapeutic modalities are needed. We therefore investigated the susceptibility of NB cells to γ-secretase inhibitor I (GSI-I). NOTCH signaling activity, the cellular effects of GSI-I and its mechanisms of cytotoxicity were evaluated in NB cells in vitro and in vivo. The results show that NOTCH signaling is relevant for human NB cells. Of the GSIs screened in vitro GSI-I was the most effective inhibitor of NB cells. Both MYCN-amplified and non-amplified NB cells were susceptible to GSI-I. Among the targets of GSI-I in NB cells were NOTCH and the proteasome. GSI-I caused G2/M arrest that was enhanced by acute activation of MYCN and led to mitotic dysfunction. GSI-I also induced proapoptotic NOXA. Survival of mice bearing an MYCN non-amplified orthotopic patient-derived NB xenograft was significantly prolonged by systemic GSI-I, associated with mitotic catastrophe and reduced angiogenesis, and without evidence of intestinal toxicity. In conclusion, the activity of GSI-I on multiple targets in NB cells and the lack of gastrointestinal toxicity in mice are advantageous and merit further investigations of GSI-I in NB. PMID:27588497

  5. Multiplexed metagenome mining using short DNA sequence tags facilitates targeted discovery of epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jeremy G; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Smith, Alexandra G; Ternei, Melinda A; Calle, Paula Y; Reddy, Boojala Vijay B; Montiel, Daniel; Brady, Sean F

    2015-04-07

    In molecular evolutionary analyses, short DNA sequences are used to infer phylogenetic relationships among species. Here we apply this principle to the study of bacterial biosynthesis, enabling the targeted isolation of previously unidentified natural products directly from complex metagenomes. Our approach uses short natural product sequence tags derived from conserved biosynthetic motifs to profile biosynthetic diversity in the environment and then guide the recovery of gene clusters from metagenomic libraries. The methodology is conceptually simple, requires only a small investment in sequencing, and is not computationally demanding. To demonstrate the power of this approach to natural product discovery we conducted a computational search for epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors within 185 globally distributed soil metagenomes. This led to the identification of 99 unique epoxyketone sequence tags, falling into 6 phylogenetically distinct clades. Complete gene clusters associated with nine unique tags were recovered from four saturating soil metagenomic libraries. Using heterologous expression methodologies, seven potent epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors (clarepoxcins A-E and landepoxcins A and B) were produced from these pathways, including compounds with different warhead structures and a naturally occurring halohydrin prodrug. This study provides a template for the targeted expansion of bacterially derived natural products using the global metagenome.

  6. Targeting the disordered C-terminus of PTP1B with an allosteric inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Navasona; Koveal, Dorothy; Miller, Daniel H.; Xue, Bin; Akshinthala, Sai Dipikaa; Kragelj, Jaka; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Gauss, Carla-Maria; Page, Rebecca; Blackledge, Martin; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.; Peti, Wolfgang; Tonks, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    PTP1B, a validated therapeutic target for diabetes and obesity, plays a critical positive role in HER2 signaling in breast tumorigenesis. Efforts to develop therapeutic inhibitors of PTP1B have been frustrated by the chemical properties of the active site. We defined a novel mechanism of allosteric inhibition that targets the C-terminal, non-catalytic segment of PTP1B. We present the first ensemble structure of PTP1B containing this intrinsically disordered segment, within which we identified a binding site for the small molecule inhibitor, MSI-1436. We demonstrate binding to a second site close to the catalytic domain, with cooperative effects between the two sites locking PTP1B in an inactive state. MSI-1436 antagonized HER2 signaling, inhibited tumorigenesis in xenografts and abrogated metastasis in the NDL2 mouse model of breast cancer, validating inhibition of PTP1B as a therapeutic strategy in breast cancer. This new approach to inhibition of PTP1B emphasizes the potential of disordered segments of proteins as specific binding sites for therapeutic small molecules. PMID:24845231

  7. Characterizing the Covalent Targets of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of the Lysine Acetyltransferase P300

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    C646 inhibits the lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) p300 and CBP and represents the most potent and selective small molecule KAT inhibitor identified to date. To gain insights into the cellular activity of this epigenetic probe, we applied chemoproteomics to identify covalent targets of the C646 chemotype. Modeling and synthetic derivatization was used to develop a clickable analogue (C646-yne) that inhibits p300 similarly to the parent compound and enables enrichment of bound proteins. LC–MS/MS identified the major covalent targets of C646-yne as highly abundant cysteine-containing proteins, and follow-up studies found that C646 can inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro. Finally, we provide evidence that thiol reactivity of C646 may limit its ability to antagonize acetylation in cells. These findings should enable a more precise interpretation of studies utilizing C646 as a chemical probe of KAT activity and suggest that an underappreciated liability of electrophile-containing inhibitors is a reduction in their cellular potency due to consumption by abundant protein and metabolite thiol sinks. PMID:26985290

  8. Inhibitor designing, virtual screening, and docking studies for methyltransferase: A potential target against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagbir; Kumar, Mahesh; Mansuri, Rani; Sahoo, Ganesh Chandra; Deep, Aakash

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aim of this work was to design and identify some S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) analogs as inhibitors of S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferase (MTase) protein using computational approaches. Introduction: According to the current scenario the dengue has been a global burden. The people are being killed by dengue virus in an abundant number. Despite of lot of research being going on dengue worldwide, there is no single drug which can kill its virus. This creates an urge for new drug target identification and designing. MTase has been reported as an effective target against dengue virus as it catalyzes an essential step in methylation and capping of viral RNA for viral replication. Materials and Methods: The crystal structure of MTase in complex with SAH was used for designing new analogs of SAH. SAH analogs designed were analyzed on the basis of docking, ADMET, and toxicity analysis done using Discovery Studio 3.5. Results: Seventeen analogs found noncarcinogenic, nonmutagenic, as well as good ADMET properties and good drug-like profile. Conclusion: These SAH analogs, inhibitors of MTase may act as drugs against dengue virus. Further synthesis and biological testing against dengue virus is under observation. PMID:27413346

  9. Targeting inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A as a therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Archana; Tabanor, Kayann; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Aldrich, Jane V

    2013-10-01

    Inhibitor 2 of protein phosphatase 2A (I2PP2A), a biological inhibitor of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP2A, is associated with numerous cellular processes that often lead to the formation and progression of cancer. In this study we hypothesized that targeting the inhibition of I2PP2A's multiple functions in prostate cancer cells might prevent cancer progression. We have investigated the effect of the small chain C6-ceramide, known to be a bioactive tumor suppressor lipid, on I2PP2A function, thereby affecting c-Myc signaling and histone acetylation in cells. Our data indicated that C6-ceramide treatment of prostate cancer cells induces cell death in PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells, but not normal prostate epithelial cells. C6-ceramide was able to disrupt the association between PP2A and I2PP2A. C6-ceramide inhibits I2PP2A's upregulation of c-Myc and downregulation of histone acetylation in prostate cancer cells. Our data indicated that targeting cancer related signaling pathways through I2PP2A using ceramide as an anti-I2PP2A agent could have beneficial effects as a therapeutic approach to prevent prostate cancer.

  10. The Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors in breast cancer: current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Paola; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; Fabi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a crucial mediator of tumor progression and may be a promising target in a significant proportion of patients with breast cancer. More specifically, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mTOR pathway plays a critical role in multiple cellular functions including metabolism, proliferation, growth and survival. This pathway is higly active in many types of cancer and is linked to resistance to many types of therapy. Direct blockade of the mTOR pathway is a new area in breast cancer therapy, with the potential to modulate growth factor- and estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent pathways, which contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of tumors. Thus, inhibitors of mTOR are of interest as potential therapeutic agents for patients with breast cancer, everolimus and temsirolimus being the main representatives of this category. This review of the literature analyzes the available data emerging from trials and evaluates the efficacy and safety of mTOR inhibitors in all subtypes of breast cancer.

  11. Discovery of Fungal Denitrification Inhibitors by Targeting Copper Nitrite Reductase from Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Masaki; Kumar, Ashutosh; Muddassar, Muhammad; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Yoshida, Minoru; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2017-02-27

    The efficient application of nitrogenous fertilizers is urgently required, as their excessive and inefficient use is causing substantial economic loss and environmental pollution. A significant amount of applied nitrogen in agricultural soils is lost as nitrous oxide (N2O) in the environment due to the microbial denitrification process. The widely distributed fungus Fusarium oxysporum is a major denitrifier in agricultural soils and its denitrification activity could be targeted to reduce nitrogen loss in the form of N2O from agricultural soils. Here, we report the discovery of first small molecule inhibitors of copper nitrite reductase (NirK) from F. oxysporum, which is a key enzyme in the fungal denitrification process. The inhibitors were discovered by a hierarchical in silico screening approach consisting of pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking. In vitro evaluation of F. oxysporum NirK activity revealed several pyrimidone and triazinone based compounds with potency in the low micromolar range. Some of these compounds suppressed the fungal denitrification in vivo as well. The compounds reported here could be used as starting points for the development of nitrogenous fertilizer supplements and coatings as a means to prevent nitrogen loss by targeting fungal denitrification.

  12. Assessment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pantothenate Kinase Vulnerability through Target Knockdown and Mechanistically Diverse Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, B. K. Kishore; Landge, Sudhir; Ravishankar, Sudha; Patil, Vikas; Shinde, Vikas; Tantry, Subramanyam; Kale, Manoj; Raichurkar, Anandkumar; Menasinakai, Sreenivasaiah; Mudugal, Naina Vinay; Ambady, Anisha; Ghosh, Anirban; Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Kaur, Parvinder; Singh, Ragini; Kumar, Naveen; Bharath, Sowmya; Sundaram, Aishwarya; Bhat, Jyothi; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.; Björkelid, Christofer; Jones, T. Alwyn; Das, Kaveri; Bandodkar, Balachandra; Malolanarasimhan, Krishnan; Mukherjee, Kakoli

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of pantothenate, the first committed and rate-limiting step toward coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. In our earlier reports, we had established that the type I isoform encoded by the coaA gene is an essential pantothenate kinase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this vital information was then exploited to screen large libraries for identification of mechanistically different classes of PanK inhibitors. The present report summarizes the synthesis and expansion efforts to understand the structure-activity relationships leading to the optimization of enzyme inhibition along with antimycobacterial activity. Additionally, we report the progression of two distinct classes of inhibitors, the triazoles, which are ATP competitors, and the biaryl acetic acids, with a mixed mode of inhibition. Cocrystallization studies provided evidence of these inhibitors binding to the enzyme. This was further substantiated with the biaryl acids having MIC against the wild-type M. tuberculosis strain and the subsequent establishment of a target link with an upshift in MIC in a strain overexpressing PanK. On the other hand, the ATP competitors had cellular activity only in a M. tuberculosis knockdown strain with reduced PanK expression levels. Additionally, in vitro and in vivo survival kinetic studies performed with a M. tuberculosis PanK (MtPanK) knockdown strain indicated that the target levels have to be significantly reduced to bring in growth inhibition. The dual approaches employed here thus established the poor vulnerability of PanK in M. tuberculosis. PMID:24687493

  13. The Indonesia Kit. A Study Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briere, Elaine; Gage, Susan

    This document is designed for Canadians interested in the South Pacific island chain nation of Indonesia. The kit includes information, photographs, and illustrations concerning Indonesia, West Papua (Irian Jaya), and East Timor. There are discussions of Indonesia's environment, its transmigration program, development refugees, and ties with…

  14. A botulinum toxin–derived targeted secretion inhibitor downregulates the GH/IGF1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Somm, Emmanuel; Bonnet, Nicolas; Martinez, Alberto; Marks, Philip M.H.; Cadd, Verity A.; Elliott, Mark; Toulotte, Audrey; Ferrari, Serge L.; Rizzoli, René; Hüppi, Petra S.; Harper, Elaine; Melmed, Shlomo; Jones, Richard; Aubert, Michel L.

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are zinc endopeptidases that block release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in neuromuscular synapses through cleavage of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion (NSF) attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins, which promote fusion of synaptic vesicles to the plasma membrane. We designed and tested a BoNT-derived targeted secretion inhibitor (TSI) targeting pituitary somatotroph cells to suppress growth hormone (GH) secretion and treat acromegaly. This recombinant protein, called SXN101742, contains a modified GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) domain and the endopeptidase domain of botulinum toxin serotype D (GHRH-LHN/D, where HN/D indicates endopeptidase and translocation domain type D). In vitro, SXN101742 targeted the GHRH receptor and depleted a SNARE protein involved in GH exocytosis, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2). In vivo, administering SXN101742 to growing rats produced a dose-dependent inhibition of GH synthesis, storage, and secretion. Consequently, hepatic IGF1 production and resultant circulating IGF1 levels were reduced. Accordingly, body weight, body length, organ weight, and bone mass acquisition were all decreased, reflecting the biological impact of SXN101742 on the GH/IGF1 axis. An inactivating 2–amino acid substitution within the zinc coordination site of the endopeptidase domain completely abolished SXN101742 inhibitory actions on GH and IGF1. Thus, genetically reengineered BoNTs can be targeted to nonneural cells to selectively inhibit hormone secretion, representing a new approach to treating hormonal excess. PMID:22850878

  15. Rational design of urea-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors as versatile tools for specific drug targeting and delivery.

    PubMed

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Bařinková, Jitka; Pachl, Petr; Poštová-Slavětínská, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII), also known as prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is an established prostate cancer marker and is considered a promising target for specific anticancer drug delivery. Low-molecular-weight inhibitors of GCPII are advantageous specific ligands for this purpose. However, they must be modified with a linker to enable connection of the ligand with an imaging molecule, anticancer drug, and/or nanocarrier. Here, we describe a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of GCPII inhibitors with linkers suitable for imaging and drug delivery. Structure-assisted inhibitor design and targeting of a specific GCPII exosite resulted in a 7-fold improvement in Ki value compared to the parent structure. X-ray structural analysis of the inhibitor series led to the identification of several inhibitor binding modes. We also optimized the length of the inhibitor linker for effective attachment to a biotin-binding molecule and showed that the optimized inhibitor could be used to target nanoparticles to cells expressing GCPII.

  16. A Miniaturized Chemical Proteomic Approach for Target Profiling of Clinical Kinase Inhibitors in Tumor Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Chamrád, Ivo; Rix, Uwe; Stukalov, Alexey; Gridling, Manuela; Parapatics, Katja; Müller, André C.; Altiok, Soner; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Haura, Eric B.; Bennett, Keiryn L.

    2014-01-01

    While targeted therapy based on the idea of attenuating the activity of a preselected, therapeutically relevant protein has become one of the major trends in modern cancer therapy, no truly specific targeted drug has been developed and most clinical agents have displayed a degree of polypharmacology. Therefore, the specificity of anticancer therapeutics has emerged as a highly important but severely underestimated issue. Chemical proteomics is a powerful technique combining postgenomic drug-affinity chromatography with high-end mass spectrometry analysis and bioinformatic data processing to assemble a target profile of a desired therapeutic molecule. Due to high demands on the starting material, however, chemical proteomic studies have been mostly limited to cancer cell lines. Herein, we report a down-scaling of the technique to enable the analysis of very low abundance samples, as those obtained from needle biopsies. By a systematic investigation of several important parameters in pull-downs with the multikinase inhibitor bosutinib, the standard experimental protocol was optimized to 100 µg protein input. At this level, more than 30 well-known targets were detected per single pull-down replicate with high reproducibility. Moreover, as presented by the comprehensive target profile obtained from miniaturized pull-downs with another clinical drug, dasatinib, the optimized protocol seems to be extendable to other drugs of interest. Sixty distinct human and murine targets were finally identified for bosutinib and dasatinib in chemical proteomic experiments utilizing core needle biopsy samples from xenotransplants derived from patient tumor tissue. Altogether, the developed methodology proves robust and generic and holds many promises for the field of personalized health care. PMID:23901793

  17. A Phenotypic Based Target Screening Approach Delivers New Antitubercular CTP Synthetase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Marta; Szadocka, Sára; Degiacomi, Giulia; Orena, Beatrice S; Mori, Giorgia; Piano, Valentina; Boldrin, Francesca; Zemanová, Júlia; Huszár, Stanislav; Barros, David; Ekins, Sean; Lelièvre, Joel; Manganelli, Riccardo; Mattevi, Andrea; Pasca, Maria Rosalia; Riccardi, Giovanna; Ballell, Lluis; Mikušová, Katarína; Chiarelli, Laurent R

    2017-06-09

    Despite its great potential, the target-based approach has been mostly unsuccessful in tuberculosis drug discovery, while whole cell phenotypic screening has delivered several active compounds. However, for many of these hits, the cellular target has not yet been identified, thus preventing further target-based optimization of the compounds. In this context, the newly validated drug target CTP synthetase PyrG was exploited to assess a target-based approach of already known, but untargeted, antimycobacterial compounds. To this purpose the publically available GlaxoSmithKline antimycobacterial compound set was assayed, uncovering a series of 4-(pyridin-2-yl)thiazole derivatives which efficiently inhibit the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PyrG enzyme activity, one of them showing low activity against the human CTP synthetase. The three best compounds were ATP binding site competitive inhibitors, with Ki values ranging from 3 to 20 μM, but did not show any activity against a small panel of different prokaryotic and eukaryotic kinases, thus demonstrating specificity for the CTP synthetases. Metabolic labeling experiments demonstrated that the compounds directly interfere not only with CTP biosynthesis, but also with other CTP dependent biochemical pathways, such as lipid biosynthesis. Moreover, using a M. tuberculosis pyrG conditional knock-down strain, it was shown that the activity of two compounds is dependent on the intracellular concentration of the CTP synthetase. All these results strongly suggest a role of PyrG as a target of these compounds, thus strengthening the value of this kind of approach for the identification of new scaffolds for drug development.

  18. Insight on Mutation-Induced Resistance from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Native and Mutated CSF-1R and KIT

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Chauvot De Beauchêne, Isaure; Panel, Nicolas; Lopez, Sophie; De Sepulveda, Paulo; Geraldo Pascutti, Pedro; Solary, Eric; Tchertanov, Luba

    2016-01-01

    The receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for the colony stimulating factor-1, CSF-1R, and for the stem cell factor, SCFR or KIT, are important mediators of signal transduction. The abnormal function of these receptors, promoted by gain-of-function mutations, leads to their constitutive activation, associated with cancer or other proliferative diseases. A secondary effect of the mutations is the alteration of receptors’ sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compromising effectiveness of these molecules in clinical treatment. In particular, the mutation V560G in KIT increases its sensitivity to Imatinib, while the D816V in KIT, and D802V in CSF-1R, triggers resistance to the drug. We analyzed the Imatinib binding affinity to the native and mutated KIT (mutations V560G, S628N and D816V) and CSF-1R (mutation D802V) by using molecular dynamics simulations and energy calculations of Imatinib•target complexes. Further, we evaluated the sensitivity of the studied KIT receptors to Imatinib by measuring the inhibition of KIT phosphorylation. Our study showed that (i) the binding free energy of Imatinib to the targets is highly correlated with their experimentally measured sensitivity; (ii) the electrostatic interactions are a decisive factor affecting the binding energy; (iii) the most deleterious impact to the Imatinib sensitivity is promoted by D802V (CSF-1R) and D816V (KIT) mutations; (iv) the role of the juxtamembrane region, JMR, in the imatinib binding is accessory. These findings contribute to a better description of the mutation-induced effects alternating the targets sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:27467080

  19. Compstatin: a C3-targeted complement inhibitor reaching its prime for bedside intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Yancopoulou, Despina; Kokkinos, Petros; Huber-Lang, Markus; Hajishengallis, George; Biglarnia, Ali Reza; Lupu, Florea; Nilsson, Bo; Risitano, Antonio M.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing awareness that complement plays an integral role in human physiology and disease, transcending its traditional perception as an accessory system for pathogen clearance and opsonic cell killing. As the list of pathologies linked to dysregulated complement activation grows longer, it has become clear that targeted modulation of this innate immune system opens new windows of therapeutic opportunity for anti-inflammatory drug design. Indeed, the introduction of the first complement-targeting drugs has reignited a vibrant interest in the clinical translation of complement-based inhibitors. Compstatin was discovered as a cyclic peptide that inhibits complement activation by binding C3 and interfering with convertase formation and C3 cleavage. As the convergence point of all activation pathways and a molecular hub for crosstalk with multiple pathogenic pathways, C3 represents an attractive target for therapeutic modulation of the complement cascade. A multidisciplinary drug optimization effort encompassing rational “wet” and in silico synthetic approaches and an array of biophysical, structural, and analytical tools has culminated in an impressive structure-function refinement of compstatin, yielding a series of analogs that show promise for a wide spectrum of clinical applications. These new derivatives have improved inhibitory potency and pharmacokinetic profiles and show efficacy in clinically relevant primate models of disease. This review provides an up-to-date survey of the drug design effort placed on the compstatin family of C3 inhibitors, highlighting the most promising drug candidates. It also discusses translational challenges in complement drug discovery and peptide drug development and reviews concerns related to systemic C3 interception. PMID:25678219

  20. Novel Inhibitors of AKT: Assessment of a Different Approach Targeting the Pleckstrin Homology Domain

    PubMed Central

    Meuillet, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase B/AKT plays a central role in cancer. The serine/threonine kinase is overexpressed or constitutively active in many cancers and has been validated as a therapeutic target for cancer treatment. However, targeting the kinase activity has revealed itself to be a challenge due to non-selectivity of the compounds towards other kinases. This review summarizes other approaches scientists have developed to inhibit the activity and function of AKT. They consist of targeting the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of AKT. Indeed, upon the generation of 3-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PI3Ps) by PI3-kinase (PI3K), AKT translocates from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and binds to the PI3Ps via its PH domain. Thus, several analogs of PI3Ps (PI Analogs or PIAs), alkylphospholipids (APLs), such as edelfosine or inositol phosphates (IPs) have been described to inhibit the binding of the PH domain to PI3Ps. Recent allostetic inhibitors and small molecules that do not bind the kinase domain but affect the kinase activity of AKT, presumably by interacting with the PH domain, have been also identified. Finally, several drug screening studies spawned novel chemical scaffolds that bind the PH domain of AKT. Together, these approaches have been more or less sucessful in vitro and to some extent translated in preclinical studies. Several of these new AKT PH domain inhibitors exhibit promising anti-tumor activity in mouse models and some of them show synergy with ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. Early clinical trials have started and results will attest to the validity and efficacy of such approaches in the near future. PMID:21649580

  1. Chalcone-based small-molecule inhibitors attenuate malignant phenotype via targeting deubiquitinating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Issaenko, Olga A; Amerik, Alexander Yu

    2012-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is usurped by many if not all cancers to regulate their survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Bioflavonoids curcumin and chalcones exhibit anti-neoplastic selectivity through inhibition of the 26S proteasome-activity within the UPS. Here, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of action of chalcone-based derivatives AM146, RA-9 and RA-14, which exert anticancer activity by targeting deubiquitinating enzymes (DUB) without affecting 20S proteasome catalytic-core activity. The presence of the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group susceptible to nucleophilic attack from the sulfhydryl of cysteines in the active sites of DUB determines the capacity of novel small-molecules to act as cell-permeable, partly selective DUB inhibitors and induce rapid accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and deplete the pool of free ubiquitin. These chalcone-derivatives directly suppress activity of DUB UCH-L1, UCH-L3, USP2, USP5 and USP8, which are known to regulate the turnover and stability of key regulators of cell survival and proliferation. Inhibition of DUB-activity mediated by these compounds downregulates cell-cycle promoters, e.g., cyclin D1 and upregulates tumor suppressors p53, p27(Kip1) and p16(Ink4A). These changes are associated with arrest in S-G 2/M, abrogated anchorage-dependent growth and onset of apoptosis in breast, ovarian and cervical cancer cells without noticeable alterations in primary human cells. Altogether, this work provides evidence of antitumor activity of novel chalcone-based derivatives mediated by their DUB-targeting capacity; supports the development of pharmaceuticals to directly target DUB as a most efficient strategy compared with proteasome inhibition and also provides a clear rationale for the clinical evaluation of these novel small-molecule DUB inhibitors.

  2. Compstatin: a C3-targeted complement inhibitor reaching its prime for bedside intervention.

    PubMed

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Yancopoulou, Despina; Kokkinos, Petros; Huber-Lang, Markus; Hajishengallis, George; Biglarnia, Ali R; Lupu, Florea; Nilsson, Bo; Risitano, Antonio M; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing awareness that complement plays an integral role in human physiology and disease, transcending its traditional perception as an accessory system for pathogen clearance and opsonic cell killing. As the list of pathologies linked to dysregulated complement activation grows longer, it has become clear that targeted modulation of this innate immune system opens new windows of therapeutic opportunity for anti-inflammatory drug design. Indeed, the introduction of the first complement-targeting drugs has reignited a vibrant interest in the clinical translation of complement-based inhibitors. Compstatin was discovered as a cyclic peptide that inhibits complement activation by binding C3 and interfering with convertase formation and C3 cleavage. As the convergence point of all activation pathways and a molecular hub for crosstalk with multiple pathogenic pathways, C3 represents an attractive target for therapeutic modulation of the complement cascade. A multidisciplinary drug optimization effort encompassing rational 'wet' and in silico synthetic approaches and an array of biophysical, structural and analytical tools has culminated in an impressive structure-function refinement of compstatin, yielding a series of analogues that show promise for a wide spectrum of clinical applications. These new derivatives have improved inhibitory potency and pharmacokinetic profiles and show efficacy in clinically relevant primate models of disease. This review provides an up-to-date survey of the drug design effort placed on the compstatin family of C3 inhibitors, highlighting the most promising drug candidates. It also discusses translational challenges in complement drug discovery and peptide drug development and reviews concerns related to systemic C3 interception.

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  4. A potent and selective inhibitor targeting human and murine 12/15-LOX.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle M; Freedman, Cody J; Jung, Joo Eun; Zheng, Yi; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J; van Leyen, Klaus; Jadhav, Ajit; Holman, Theodore R

    2016-03-15

    Human reticulocyte 12/15-lipoxygenase (h12/15-LOX) is a lipid-oxidizing enzyme that can directly oxidize lipid membranes in the absence of a phospholipase, leading to a direct attack on organelles, such as the mitochondria. This cytotoxic activity of h12/15-LOX is up-regulated in neurons and endothelial cells after a stroke and thought to contribute to both neuronal cell death and blood-brain barrier leakage. The discovery of inhibitors that selectively target recombinant h12/15-LOX in vitro, as well as possessing activity against the murine ortholog ex vivo, could potentially support a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of stroke. Herein, we report a new family of inhibitors discovered in a High Throughput Screen (HTS) that are selective and potent against recombinant h12/15-LOX and cellular mouse 12/15-LOX (m12/15-LOX). MLS000099089 (compound 99089), the parent molecule, exhibits an IC50 potency of 3.4±0.5 μM against h12/15-LOX in vitro and an ex vivo IC50 potency of approximately 10 μM in a mouse neuronal cell line, HT-22. Compound 99089 displays greater than 30-fold selectivity versus h5-LOX and COX-2, 15-fold versus h15-LOX-2 and 10-fold versus h12-LOX, when tested at 20 μM inhibitor concentration. Steady-state inhibition kinetics reveals that the mode of inhibition of 99089 against h12/15-LOX is that of a mixed inhibitor with a Kic of 1.0±0.08 μM and a Kiu of 6.0±3.3 μM. These data indicate that 99089 and related derivatives may serve as a starting point for the development of anti-stroke therapeutics due to their ability to selectively target h12/15-LOX in vitro and m12/15-LOX ex vivo.

  5. Distinct cellular properties of oncogenic KIT receptor tyrosine kinase mutants enable alternative courses of cancer cell inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiarong; Sousa, Leiliane P.; Mandel-Bausch, Elizabeth M.; Tome, Francisco; Reshetnyak, Andrey V.; Hadari, Yaron; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lax, Irit

    2016-01-01

    Large genomic sequencing analysis as part of precision medicine efforts revealed numerous activating mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases, including KIT. Unfortunately, a single approach is not effective for inhibiting cancer cells or treating cancers driven by all known oncogenic KIT mutants. Here, we show that each of the six major KIT oncogenic mutants exhibits different enzymatic, cellular, and dynamic properties and responds distinctly to different KIT inhibitors. One class of KIT mutants responded well to anti-KIT antibody treatment alone or in combination with a low dose of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). A second class of KIT mutants, including a mutant resistant to imatinib treatment, responded well to a combination of TKI with anti-KIT antibodies or to anti-KIT toxin conjugates, respectively. We conclude that the preferred choice of precision medicine treatments for cancers driven by activated KIT and other RTKs may rely on clear understanding of the dynamic properties of oncogenic mutants. PMID:27482095

  6. Oncogenic Kit signaling and therapeutic intervention in a mouse model of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ferdinand; Ehlers, Imke; Agosti, Valter; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Sommer, Gunhild; Yozgat, Yasemin; Manova, Katia; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Besmer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Kit receptor-activating mutations are critical in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). We investigated mechanisms of oncogenic Kit signaling and the consequences of therapeutic intervention in a mouse model of human GIST. Treatment of GIST mice with imatinib decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the tumor. Analysis of tumor tissue from imatinib-treated mice showed diminished phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling suggesting that oncogenic Kit signaling critically contributes to the translational response in GIST. Treatment with RAD001 (everolimus), an mTOR inhibitor, diminished the translational response and cell proliferation in tumor lesions, pointing to mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic approach for imatinib-resistant GIST. Analysis of RNA expression profiles in GIST lesions with and without imatinib treatment showed changes in expression of IFN-inducible genes and cell cycle regulators. These results convincingly show that KitV558Δ/+ mice represent a unique faithful mouse model of human familial GIST, and they demonstrate the utility of these mice for preclinical investigations and to elucidate oncogenic signaling mechanisms by using genetic approaches and targeted pharmacological intervention. PMID:16908864

  7. Estrogen-induced transcription factor EGR1 regulates c-Kit transcription in the mouse uterus to maintain uterine receptivity for embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Park, Mira; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Yeon Sun; Yang, Seung Chel; Yoon, Jung Ah; Lyu, Sang Woo; Lim, Hyunjung Jade; Hong, Seok-Ho; Song, Haengseok

    2017-09-28

    Early growth response 1 (Egr1) is a key transcription factor that mediates the action of estrogen (E2) to establish uterine receptivity for embryo implantation. However, few direct target genes of EGR1 have been identified in the uterus. Here, we demonstrated that E2 induced EGR1-regulated transcription of c-Kit, which plays a crucial role in cell fate decisions. Spatiotemporal expression of c-Kit followed that of EGR1 in uteri of ovariectomized mice at various time points after E2 treatment. E2 activated ERK1/2 and p38 to induce EGR1, which then activated c-Kit expression in the uterus. EGR1 transfection produced rapid and transient induction of c-KIT in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, luciferase assays to measure c-Kit promoter activity confirmed that a functional EGR1 binding site(s) (EBS) was located within -1 kb of the c-Kit promoter. Site-directed mutagenesis and chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR for three putative EBS within -1 kb demonstrated that the EBS at -818/-805 was critical for EGR1-dependent c-Kit transcription. c-Kit expression was significantly increased in the uterus on day 4 and administration of Masitinib, a c-Kit inhibitor, effectively interfered with embryo implantation. Collectively, our results showed that estrogen induces transcription factor EGR1 to regulate c-Kit transcription for uterine receptivity for embryo implantation in the mouse uterus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic aberrations in primary esophageal melanomas: molecular analysis of c-KIT, PDGFR, KRAS, NRAS and BRAF in a series of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Langer, Rupert; Becker, Karen; Feith, Marcus; Friess, Helmut; Höfler, Heinz; Keller, Gisela

    2011-04-01

    We present a series of 10 primary esophageal melanomas of Caucasian patients characterized clinicopathologically and on the molecular level. Mutation analysis for c-Kit (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17), PDGFR (exons 12, 14 and 18), NRAS and KRAS were determined using PCR and direct sequencing. Analysis of the V600E mutation of BRAF was performed using mutation-specific PCR. Expression of c-Kit and PDGFR-A was additionally determined using immunohistochemistry. One tumor harbored a missense mutation in the c-Kit (p.F504L) and in the KRAS gene (p.G12S). A different c-Kit mutation (c.1507_1508 ins TTGCCT) was detected in another case. A third case had a V600E BRAF mutation. Using immunohistochemistry, c-Kit expression could be detected in all cases. The two cases with c-Kit mutations showed high c-Kit expression. None of the tumors showed a PDGFR mutation or expression or a NRAS mutation. We conclude that molecular analysis can identify targets for a specific therapy such as tyrosin kinase inhibitors as additional treatment option in these highly malignant tumors.

  9. NK314, a Topoisomerase II Inhibitor That Specifically Targets the α Isoform*

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Eriko; Kagaya, Shigehide; Cowell, Ian G.; Kurosawa, Aya; Kamoshita, Keiichi; Nishikawa, Kiyohiro; Iiizumi, Susumu; Koyama, Hideki; Austin, Caroline A.; Adachi, Noritaka

    2008-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (Top2) is a ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that relieves torsional stress in chromosomal DNA during various cellular processes. Agents that target Top2, involving etoposide, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone, are among the most effective anticancer drugs used in the clinic. Mammalian cells possess two genetically distinct Top2 isoforms, both of which are the target of these agents. Top2α is essential for cell proliferation and is highly expressed in vigorously growing cells, whereas Top2β is nonessential for growth and has recently been implicated in treatment-associated secondary malignancies, highlighting the validity of a Top2α-specific drug for future cancer treatment; however, no such agent has been hitherto reported. Here we show that NK314, a novel synthetic benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid, targets Top2α and not Top2β in vivo. Unlike other Top2 inhibitors, NK314 induces Top2-DNA complexes and double-strand breaks (DSBs) in an α isoform-specific manner. Heterozygous disruption of the human TOP2α gene confers increased NK314 resistance, whereas TOP2β homozygous knock-out cells display increased NK314 sensitivity, indicating that the α isoform is the cellular target. We further show that the absence of Top2β does not alleviate NK314 hypersensitivity of cells deficient in non-homologous end-joining, a critical pathway for repairing Top2-mediated DSBs. Our results indicate that NK314 acts as a Top2α-specific poison in mammalian cells, with excellent potential as an efficacious and safe chemotherapeutic agent. We also suggest that a series of human knock-out cell lines are useful in assessing DNA damage and repair induced by potential topoisomerase-targeting agents. PMID:18596031

  10. Synthetic inhibitors of bacterial cell division targeting the GTP-binding site of FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Avila, Laura B; Huecas, Sonia; Artola, Marta; Vergoñós, Albert; Ramírez-Aportela, Erney; Cercenado, Emilia; Barasoain, Isabel; Vázquez-Villa, Henar; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Chacón, Pablo; López-Rodríguez, María L; Andreu, José M

    2013-09-20

    Cell division protein FtsZ is the organizer of the cytokinetic Z-ring in most bacteria and a target for new antibiotics. FtsZ assembles with GTP into filaments that hydrolyze the nucleotide at the association interface between monomers and then disassemble. We have replaced FtsZ's GTP with non-nucleotide synthetic inhibitors of bacterial division. We searched for these small molecules among compounds from the literature, from virtual screening (VS), and from our in-house synthetic library (UCM), employing a fluorescence anisotropy primary assay. From these screens we have identified the polyhydroxy aromatic compound UCM05 and its simplified analogue UCM44 that specifically bind to Bacillus subtilis FtsZ monomers with micromolar affinities and perturb normal assembly, as examined with light scattering, polymer sedimentation, and negative stain electron microscopy. On the other hand, these ligands induce the cooperative assembly of nucleotide-devoid archaeal FtsZ into distinct well-ordered polymers, different from GTP-induced filaments. These FtsZ inhibitors impair localization of FtsZ into the Z-ring and inhibit bacterial cell division. The chlorinated analogue UCM53 inhibits the growth of clinical isolates of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. We suggest that these interfacial inhibitors recapitulate binding and some assembly-inducing effects of GTP but impair the correct structural dynamics of FtsZ filaments and thus inhibit bacterial division, possibly by binding to a small fraction of the FtsZ molecules in a bacterial cell, which opens a new approach to FtsZ-based antibacterial drug discovery.

  11. Design of composite inhibitors targeting glutamate carboxypeptidase II: the importance of effector functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Zora; Cerny, Jiri; Choy, Cindy J.; Nedrow, Jessie; Choi, Joeseph K.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Berkman, Clifford E.; Barinka, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors targeting human glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) typically consist of a P1’ glutamate-derived binding module, which warrants the high-affinity and specificity, linked to an effector function that is positioned within the entrance funnel of the enzyme. Here we present a comprehensive structural and computational study aimed at dissecting the importance of the effector function for GCPII binding and affinity. To this end we determined crystal structures of human GCPII in complex with a series of phosphoramidate-based inhibitors harboring effector functions of diverse physicochemical characteristics. Our data shows that higher binding affinities of phosphoramidates, when compared to matching phosphonates, are linked to the presence of additional hydrogen bonds between Glu424 and Gly518 of the enzyme and the amide group of the phosphoramidate. While the positioning of the P1’ glutamate-derived module within the S1’ pocket of GCPII is invariant, interaction interfaces between effector functions and residues lining the entrance funnel are highly varied, with the positively charged arginine patch defined by Arg463, Arg534, Arg536, being the only ‘hot-spot’ common to several studied complexes. This variability stems in part from the fact that the effector/GCPII interfaces generally encompass isolated areas of non-polar residues within the entrance funnel and resulting van der Waals contacts lack the directionality typical for hydrogen-bonding interactions. Presented data unravel a complexity of binding modes of inhibitors within non-prime site(s) of GCPII and can be exploited for the design of novel GCPII-specific compounds. PMID:26460595

  12. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase That Target Chemoresistant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Claudia R; Markert, Tahireh; Ross, Larry J; White, E Lucile; Rasmussen, Lynn; Zhang, Wei; Everts, Maaike; Moellering, Douglas R; Bailey, Shannon M; Suto, Mark J; Griguer, Corinne E

    2016-11-11

    The enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) or complex IV (EC 1.9.3.1) is a large transmembrane protein complex that serves as the last enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain of eukaryotic mitochondria. CcO promotes the switch from glycolytic to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) metabolism and has been associated with increased self-renewal characteristics in gliomas. Increased CcO activity in tumors has been associated with tumor progression after chemotherapy failure, and patients with primary glioblastoma multiforme and high tumor CcO activity have worse clinical outcomes than those with low tumor CcO activity. Therefore, CcO is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We report here the characterization of a CcO inhibitor (ADDA 5) that was identified using a high throughput screening paradigm. ADDA 5 demonstrated specificity for CcO, with no inhibition of other mitochondrial complexes or other relevant enzymes, and biochemical characterization showed that this compound is a non-competitive inhibitor of cytochrome c When tested in cellular assays, ADDA 5 dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of chemosensitive and chemoresistant glioma cells but did not display toxicity against non-cancer cells. Furthermore, treatment with ADDA 5 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in flank xenograft mouse models. Importantly, ADDA 5 inhibited CcO activity and blocked cell proliferation and neurosphere formation in cultures of glioma stem cells, the cells implicated in tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy in patients with glioblastoma. In summary, we have identified ADDA 5 as a lead CcO inhibitor for further optimization as a novel approach for the treatment of glioblastoma and related cancers.

  13. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  14. Identification of novel targets for PGC-1{alpha} and histone deacetylase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Rita M. Talati, Pratik; Blake, Kathryn R.; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; Russell, James W.

    2009-02-06

    Recent evidence suggests that the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) is involved in the pathology of Huntington's Disease (HD). While animals lacking PGC-1{alpha} express lower levels of genes involved in antioxidant defense and oxidative phosphorylation in the brain, little is known about other targets for PGC-1{alpha} in neuronal cells and whether there are ways to pharmacologically target PGC-1{alpha} in neurons. Here, PGC-1{alpha} overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells upregulated expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function, glucose transport, fatty acid metabolism, and synaptic function. Overexpression also decreased vulnerability to hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and caspase 3 activation. Treatment of cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) trichostatin A and valproic acid upregulated PGC-1{alpha} and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). These results suggest that PGC-1{alpha} regulates multiple pathways in neurons and that HDACi's may be good candidates to target PGC-1{alpha} and GLUT4 in HD and other neurological disorders.

  15. Phytochemicals as multi-target inhibitors of the inflammatory pathway- A modeling and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nisha S; Ramanan, Meera; Paragi-Vedanthi, Padmapriya; Doble, Mukesh

    2017-03-11

    The arachidonic acid pathway consists of several enzymes and targeting them is favored for developing anti-inflammatory drugs. However, till date the current drugs are generally active against a single target, leading to undesirable side-effects. Phytochemicals are known to inhibit multiple targets simultaneously and hence, an attempt is made here to investigate their suitability. A pharmacophore based study is performed with three sets of reported phytochemicals namely, dual 5-LOX/mPGES1, alkaloids and FLAP inhibitors. The analysis indicated that phenylpropanoids (including ferulic acid) and benzoic acids derivatives, and berberine mapped onto these pharmacophores with three hydrophobic centroids and an acceptor feature. 2,4,5-trimethoxy (7) and 3,4-dimethoxy cinnamic acids (8) mapped onto all the three pharmacophores. Experimental studies indicated that berberine inhibited 5-LOX (100 μM) and PGE2 (50 μM) production by 72.2 and 72.0% and ferulic acid by 74.3 and 54.4% respectively. This approach offers a promising theoretical combined with experimental strategy for designing novel molecules against inflammatory enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Chemical Rescue Screen Identifies a Plasmodium falciparum Apicoplast Inhibitor Targeting MEP Isoprenoid Precursor Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wesley; Herrera, Zachary; Ebert, Danny; Baska, Katie; Cho, Seok H.

    2014-01-01

    The apicoplast is an essential plastid organelle found in Plasmodium parasites which contains several clinically validated antimalarial-drug targets. A chemical rescue screen identified MMV-08138 from the “Malaria Box” library of growth-inhibitory antimalarial compounds as having specific activity against the apicoplast. MMV-08138 inhibition of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum growth is stereospecific and potent, with the most active diastereomer demonstrating a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 110 nM. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 drug-resistant parasite populations from two independent selections revealed E688Q and L244I mutations in P. falciparum IspD, an enzyme in the MEP (methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate) isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast. The active diastereomer of MMV-08138 directly inhibited PfIspD activity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.0 nM. MMV-08138 is the first PfIspD inhibitor to be identified and, together with heterologously expressed PfIspD, provides the foundation for further development of this promising antimalarial drug candidate lead. Furthermore, this report validates the use of the apicoplast chemical rescue screen coupled with target elucidation as a discovery tool to identify specific apicoplast-targeting compounds with new mechanisms of action. PMID:25367906

  17. Target-based identification of whole-cell active inhibitors of biotin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sae Woong; Casalena, Dominick E; Wilson, Daniel J; Dai, Ran; Nag, Partha P; Liu, Feng; Boyce, Jim P; Bittker, Joshua A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Finzel, Barry C; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-22

    Biotin biosynthesis is essential for survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vivo. The aminotransferase BioA, which catalyzes the antepenultimate step in the biotin pathway, has been established as a promising target due to its vulnerability to chemical inhibition. We performed high-throughput screening (HTS) employing a fluorescence displacement assay and identified a diverse set of potent inhibitors including many diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) scaffolds. To efficiently select only hits targeting biotin biosynthesis, we then deployed a whole-cell counterscreen in biotin-free and biotin-containing medium against wild-type Mtb and in parallel with isogenic bioA Mtb strains that possess differential levels of BioA expression. This counterscreen proved crucial to filter out compounds whose whole-cell activity was off target as well as identify hits with weak, but measurable whole-cell activity in BioA-depleted strains. Several of the most promising hits were cocrystallized with BioA to provide a framework for future structure-based drug design efforts.

  18. Anticoagulation beyond direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors: indications for targeting the intrinsic pathway?

    PubMed

    van Montfoort, Maurits L; Meijers, Joost C M

    2013-08-01

    Antithrombotic drugs like vitamin K antagonists and heparin have been the gold standard for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disease for many years. Unfortunately, there are several disadvantages of these antithrombotic drugs: they are accompanied by serious bleeding problems, it is necessary to monitor the therapeutic window, and there are various interactions with food and other drugs. This has led to the development of new oral anticoagulants, specifically inhibiting either thrombin or factor Xa. In terms of effectiveness, these drugs are comparable to the currently available anticoagulants; however, they are still associated with issues such as bleeding, reversal of the drug and complicated laboratory monitoring. Vitamin K antagonists, heparin, direct thrombin and factor Xa inhibitors have in common that they target key proteins of the haemostatic system. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties we investigated whether the intrinsic coagulation factors (VIII, IX, XI, XII, prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen) are superior targets for anticoagulation. We analysed epidemiological data concerning thrombosis and bleeding in patients deficient in one of the intrinsic pathway proteins. Furthermore, we discuss several thrombotic models in intrinsic coagulation factor-deficient animals. The combined results suggest that intrinsic coagulation factors could be suitable targets for anticoagulant drugs.

  19. The nodal inhibitor Coco is a critical target of leftward flow in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Axel; Vick, Philipp; Getwan, Maike; Weber, Thomas; Schneider, Isabelle; Eberhardt, Melanie; Beyer, Tina; Pachur, Anke; Blum, Martin

    2010-04-27

    Vertebrate laterality, which is manifested by asymmetrically placed organs [1], depends on asymmetric activation of the Nodal signaling cascade in the left lateral plate mesoderm [2]. In fish, amphibians, and mammals, a cilia-driven leftward flow of extracellular fluid acts upstream of the Nodal cascade [3-6]. The direct target of flow has remained elusive. In Xenopus, flow occurs at the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP) in the dorsal midline of the embryo [4, 7]. The GRP is bordered by a second, bilaterally symmetrical Nodal expression domain [8]. Here we identify the Nodal inhibitor Coco as a critical target of flow. Coco and Xenopus Nodal-related 1 (Xnr1) are coexpressed in the lateralmost ciliated GRP cells. Coco becomes downregulated on the left side of the GRP as a direct readout of flow. Ablation of flow prevented Coco repression, whereas Xnr1 expression was independent of flow. Loss of flow-induced laterality defects were rescued by knockdown of Coco on the left side. Parallel knockdown of Coco and Xnr1 in GRP cells restored laterality defects in flow-impaired embryos, demonstrating that Coco acted through GRP-expressed Xnr1. Coco thus acts as a critical target of flow, suggesting that symmetry is broken by flow-mediated left-asymmetric release of Nodal repression at the midline.

  20. Target-Based Identification of Whole-Cell Active Inhibitors of Biotin Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sae Woong; Casalena, Dominick; Wilson, Daniel; Dai, Ran; Nag, Partha; Liu, Feng; Boyce, Jim P.; Bittker, Joshua; Schreiber, Stuart; Finzel, Barry C.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Biotin biosynthesis is essential for survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vivo. The aminotransferase BioA, which catalyzes the antepenultimate step in the biotin pathway, has been established as a promising target due to its vulnerability to chemical inhibition. We performed high-throughput screening (HTS) employing a fluorescence displacement assay and identified a diverse set of potent inhibitors including many diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) scaffolds. To efficiently select only hits targeting biotin biosynthesis, we then deployed a whole-cell counter-screen in either biotin-free and biotin-containing medium against wild-type Mtb and in parallel with isogenic bioA Mtb strains that possess differential levels of BioA expression. This counter-screen proved crucial to filter out compounds whose whole-cell activity was off-target as well as identify hits with weak, but measurable whole-cell activity in BioA-depleted strains. Several of the most promising hits were co-crystallized with BioA to provide a framework for future structure-based drug design efforts. PMID:25556942

  1. High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening of Kinase Inhibitors to Identify Drug Targets for Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Tijmen H.; Bange, Hester; Leonhard, Wouter N.; Yan, Kuan; Fokkelman, Michiel; Kunnen, Steven J.; Dauwerse, Johannes G.; Qin, Yu; van de Water, Bob; van Westen, Gerard J. P.; Peters, Dorien J. M.; Price, Leo S.

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a prevalent disorder characterized by renal cysts that lead to kidney failure. Various signaling pathways have been targeted to stop disease progression, but most interventions still focus on alleviating PKD-associated symptoms. The mechanistic complexity of the disease, as well as the lack of functional in vitro assays for compound testing, has made drug discovery for PKD challenging. To identify modulators of PKD, Pkd1–/– kidney tubule epithelial cells were applied to a scalable and automated 3D cyst culture model for compound screening, followed by phenotypic profiling to determine compound efficacy. We used this screening platform to screen a library of 273 kinase inhibitors to probe various signaling pathways involved in cyst growth. We show that inhibition of several targets, including aurora kinase, CDK, Chk, IGF-1R, Syk, and mTOR, but, surprisingly, not PI3K, prevented forskolin-induced cyst swelling. Additionally, we show that multiparametric phenotypic classification discriminated potentially undesirable (i.e., cytotoxic) compounds from molecules inducing the desired phenotypic change, greatly facilitating hit selection and validation. Our findings show that a pathophysiologically relevant 3D cyst culture model of PKD coupled to phenotypic profiling can be used to identify potentially therapeutic compounds and predict and validate molecular targets for PKD. PMID:28644734

  2. A survival Kit for pancreatic beta cells: stem cell factor and c-Kit receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhi-Chao; Riopel, Matthew; Popell, Alex; Wang, Rennian

    2015-04-01

    The interactions between c-Kit and its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), play an important role in haematopoiesis, pigmentation and gametogenesis. c-Kit is also found in the pancreas, and recent studies have revealed that c-Kit marks a subpopulation of highly proliferative pancreatic endocrine cells that may harbour islet precursors. c-Kit governs and maintains pancreatic endocrine cell maturation and function via multiple signalling pathways. In this review we address the importance of c-Kit signalling within the pancreas, including its profound role in islet morphogenesis, islet vascularisation, and beta cell survival and function. We also discuss the impact of c-Kit signalling in pancreatic disease and the use of c-Kit as a potential target for the development of cell-based and novel drug therapies in the treatment of diabetes.

  3. Developmental validation of the Quantifiler(®) HP and Trio Kits for human DNA quantification in forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Holt, Allison; Wootton, Sharon Chao; Mulero, Julio J; Brzoska, Pius M; Langit, Emanuel; Green, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    The quantification of human genomic DNA is a necessary first step in the DNA casework sample analysis workflow. DNA quantification determines optimal sample input amounts for subsequent STR (short tandem repeat) genotyping procedures, as well as being a useful screening tool to identify samples most likely to provide probative genotypic evidence. To better mesh with the capabilities of newest-generation STR analysis assays, the Quantifiler(®) HP and Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA Quantification Kits were designed for greater detection sensitivity and more robust performance with samples that contain PCR inhibitors or degraded DNA. The new DNA quantification kits use multiplex TaqMan(®) assay-based fluorescent probe technology to simultaneously quantify up to three human genomic targets, allowing samples to be assessed for total human DNA, male contributor (i.e., Y-chromosome) DNA, as well as a determination of DNA degradation state. The Quantifiler HP and Trio Kits use multiple-copy loci to allow for significantly improved sensitivity compared to earlier-generation kits that employ single-copy target loci. The kits' improved performance provides better predictive ability for results with downstream, newest-generation STR assays, and their shortened time-to-result allows more efficient integration into the forensic casework analysis workflow.

  4. PFI-1, a highly selective protein interaction inhibitor, targeting BET Bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Sarah; Da Costa, David; Thanasopoulou, Angeliki; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Fish, Paul V; Philpott, Martin; Fedorov, Oleg; Brennan, Paul; Bunnage, Mark E; Owen, Dafydd R; Bradner, James E; Taniere, Philippe; O'Sullivan, Brendan; Müller, Susanne; Schwaller, Juerg; Stankovic, Tatjana; Knapp, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4, and BRDT) are transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of several growth promoting and antiapoptotic genes as well as for cell-cycle progression. BET proteins are recruited on transcriptionally active chromatin via their two N-terminal bromodomains (BRD), a protein interaction module that specifically recognizes acetylated lysine residues in histones H3 and H4. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction results in transcriptional downregulation of a number of oncogenes, providing a novel pharmacologic strategy for the treatment of cancer. Here, we present a potent and highly selective dihydroquinazoline-2-one inhibitor, PFI-1, which efficiently blocks the interaction of BET BRDs with acetylated histone tails. Cocrystal structures showed that PFI-1 acts as an acetyl-lysine (Kac) mimetic inhibitor efficiently occupying the Kac binding site in BRD4 and BRD2. PFI-1 has antiproliferative effects on leukemic cell lines and efficiently abrogates their clonogenic growth. Exposure of sensitive cell lines with PFI-1 results in G1 cell-cycle arrest, downregulation of MYC expression, as well as induction of apoptosis and induces differentiation of primary leukemic blasts. Intriguingly, cells exposed to PFI-1 showed significant downregulation of Aurora B kinase, thus attenuating phosphorylation of the Aurora substrate H3S10, providing an alternative strategy for the specific inhibition of this well-established oncology target.

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase enzymes and their naturally derived inhibitors: novel targets in photocarcinoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anshita; Kaur, Chanchal Deep; Jangdey, Manmohan; Saraf, Swarnlata

    2014-01-01

    The continuous exposure of skin to ultraviolet radiations generates reactive oxygen species leading to photoaging in which degradation of dermal collagen and degeneration of elastic fibers occurs. Matrix metalloproteinase [MMP] enzymes are the proteolytic enzymes which have significant potentiality of cleaving extracellular matrix [ECM] against Ultraviolet [UV] radiation. The important MMPs are MMP1, MMP2 and MMP7 which promote skin cancer when irradiated by UV rays. In lieu of this, the investigation of MMPs and their inhibitors are constantly being studied for successive results. Recent researches have focused on some traditionally used bioactive moieties as natural matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors (MMPIs) and emphasized on the need of more extensive and specific studies on MMPIs, so that a good combination of natural or synthetic MMPIs with the conventional drugs can be evolved for cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we discuss the current view on the feasibility of MMPs as targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. This review also summarizes the role of small molecular weight natural MMPIs and a clinical update of those natural MMPIs that are under clinical trial stage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Design, synthesis and activity evaluation of novel peptide fusion inhibitors targeting HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianjun; Su, Min; Zeng, Yi; Wang, Cunxin

    2016-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), causes about 2 million people to death every year. Fusion inhibitors targeted the envelope protein (gp41) represent a novel and alternative approach for anti-AIDS therapy, which terminates the HIV-1 life cycle at an early stage. Using CP621-652 as a template, a series of peptides were designed, synthesized and evaluated in vitro assays. An interesting phenomenon was found that the substitution of hydrophobic residues at solvent accessible sites could increase the anti-HIV activity when the C-terminal sequence was extended with an enough numbers of amino acids. After the active peptides was synthesized and evaluated, peptide 8 showed the best anti-HIV-1 IIIB whole cell activity (MAGI IC50=53.02 nM). Further study indicated that peptide 8 bound with the gp41 NHR helix, and then blocked the conformation of 6-helix, thus inhibited virus-cell membrane fusion. The results would be helpful for the design of peptide fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 infection.

  7. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Delivery using Nanoparticles with Intrinsic Passive Tumor Targeting Properties for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    el Bahhaj, Fatima; Denis, Iza; Pichavant, Loic; Delatouche, Régis; Collette, Floraine; Linot, Camille; Pouliquen, Daniel; Grégoire, Marc; Héroguez, Valérie; Blanquart, Christophe; Bertrand, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Fast clearance, metabolism and systemic toxicity are major limits for the clinical use of anti-cancer drugs. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) present these defects despite displaying promising anti-tumor properties on tumor cells in vitro and in in vivo model of cancers. Specific delivery of anti-cancer drugs into the tumor should improve their clinical benefit by limiting systemic toxicity and by increasing the anti-tumor effect. In this work, we describe a simple and flexible polymeric nanoparticle platform highly targeting the tumor in vivo and triggering impressive tumor weight reduction when functionalized with HDACi. Our nanoparticles were produced by Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization of azido-polyethylene oxide-norbornene macromonomers and functionalized using click chemistry. Using an orthotopic model of peritoneal invasive cancer, a highly selective accumulation of the particles in the tumor was obtained. A combination of epigenetic drugs involving a pH-responsive histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) polymer conjugated to these particles gave 80% reduction of tumor weight without toxicity whereas the free HDACi has no effect. Our work demonstrates that the use of a nanovector with theranostic properties leads to an optimized delivery of potent HDACi in tumor and then, to an improvement of their anti-tumor properties in vivo. PMID:27162550

  8. Targeting BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells with RAD52 small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Goyal, Nadish; Sullivan, Katherine; Hanamshet, Kritika; Patel, Mikir; Mazina, Olga M.; Wang, Charles X.; An, W. Frank; Spoonamore, James; Metkar, Shailesh; Emmitte, Kyle A.; Cocklin, Simon; Skorski, Tomasz; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    RAD52 is a member of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway that is important for maintenance of genome integrity. While single RAD52 mutations show no significant phenotype in mammals, their combination with mutations in genes that cause hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer like BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51C are lethal. Consequently, RAD52 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. In vitro, RAD52 has ssDNA annealing and DNA strand exchange activities. Here, to identify small molecule inhibitors of RAD52 we screened a 372,903-compound library using a fluorescence-quenching assay for ssDNA annealing activity of RAD52. The obtained 70 putative inhibitors were further characterized using biochemical and cell-based assays. As a result, we identified compounds that specifically inhibit the biochemical activities of RAD52, suppress growth of BRCA1- and BRCA2-deficient cells and inhibit RAD52-dependent single-strand annealing (SSA) in human cells. We will use these compounds for development of novel cancer therapy and as a probe to study mechanisms of DNA repair. PMID:26873923

  9. Targeting radioresistant breast cancer cells by single agent CHK1 inhibitor via enhancing replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhanwen; Gao, Jinnan; Yang, Shuming; Gorityala, Shashank; Xiong, Xiahui; Deng, Ou; Ma, Zhefu; Yan, Chunhong; Susana, Gonzalo; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Junran

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) remains a standard therapeutic modality for breast cancer patients. However, intrinsic or acquired resistance limits the efficacy of RT. Here, we demonstrate that CHK1 inhibitor AZD7762 alone significantly inhibited the growth of radioresistant breast cancer cells (RBCC). Given the critical role of ATR/CHK1 signaling in suppressing oncogene-induced replication stress (RS), we hypothesize that CHK1 inhibition leads to the specific killing for RBCC due to its abrogation in the suppression of RS induced by oncogenes. In agreement, the expression of oncogenes c-Myc/CDC25A/c-Src/H-ras/E2F1 and DNA damage response (DDR) proteins ATR/CHK1/BRCA1/CtIP were elevated in RBCC. AZD7762 exposure led to significantly higher levels of RS in RBCC, compared to the parental cells. The mechanisms by which CHK1 inhibition led to specific increase of RS in RBCC were related to the interruptions in the replication fork dynamics and the homologous recombination (HR). In summary, RBCC activate oncogenic pathways and thus depend upon mechanisms controlled by CHK1 signaling to maintain RS under control for survival. Our study provided the first example where upregulating RS by CHK1 inhibitor contributes to the specific killing of RBCC, and highlight the importance of the CHK1 as a potential target for treatment of radioresistant cancer cells. PMID:27167194

  10. A tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced myocardial degeneration in rats through off-target phosphodiesterase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenyue; Hirakawa, Brad; Jessen, Bart; Lee, Michelle; Aguirre, Shirley

    2012-12-01

    PF-04254644 is a selective kinase inhibitor of mesenchymal epithelial transition factor/hepatocyte growth factor receptor with known off-target inhibitory activity against the phosphodiesterase (PDE) family. Rats given repeated oral doses of PF-04254644 developed a mild to moderate myocardial degeneration accompanied by sustained increase in heart rate and contractility. Investigative studies were conducted to delineate the mechanisms of toxicity. Microarray analysis of Sprague-Dawley rat hearts in a 6 day repeat dose study with PF-04254644 or milrinone, a selective PDE3 inhibitor, revealed similar perturbation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP) pathway. PDE inhibition and activation of c-AMP were further substantiated using PDE3B immunofluorescence staining and through a c-AMP response element reporter gene assay. The intracellular calcium and oxidative stress signaling pathways were more perturbed by treatment with PF-04254644 than milrinone. The rat cardiomyocytes calcium assay found a dose-dependent increase in intracellular calcium with PF-04254644 treatment. These data suggest that cardiotoxicity of PF-04254644 was probably due to activation of c-AMP signaling, and possibly subsequent disruption of intracellular calcium and oxidative stress signaling pathways. The greater response with PF-04254644 as compared with milrinone in gene expression and micro- and ultrastructural changes is probably due to the broader panel of PDEs inhibition. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A covalent PIN1 inhibitor selectively targets cancer cells by a dual mechanism of action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campaner, Elena; Rustighi, Alessandra; Zannini, Alessandro; Cristiani, Alberto; Piazza, Silvano; Ciani, Yari; Kalid, Ori; Golan, Gali; Baloglu, Erkan; Shacham, Sharon; Valsasina, Barbara; Cucchi, Ulisse; Pippione, Agnese Chiara; Lolli, Marco Lucio; Giabbai, Barbara; Storici, Paola; Carloni, Paolo; Rossetti, Giulia; Benvenuti, Federica; Bello, Ezia; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Cappuzzello, Elisa; Rosato, Antonio; Del Sal, Giannino

    2017-06-01

    The prolyl isomerase PIN1, a critical modifier of multiple signalling pathways, is overexpressed in the majority of cancers and its activity strongly contributes to tumour initiation and progression. Inactivation of PIN1 function conversely curbs tumour growth and cancer stem cell expansion, restores chemosensitivity and blocks metastatic spread, thus providing the rationale for a therapeutic strategy based on PIN1 inhibition. Notwithstanding, potent PIN1 inhibitors are still missing from the arsenal of anti-cancer drugs. By a mechanism-based screening, we have identified a novel covalent PIN1 inhibitor, KPT-6566, able to selectively inhibit PIN1 and target it for degradation. We demonstrate that KPT-6566 covalently binds to the catalytic site of PIN1. This interaction results in the release of a quinone-mimicking drug that generates reactive oxygen species and DNA damage, inducing cell death specifically in cancer cells. Accordingly, KPT-6566 treatment impairs PIN1-dependent cancer phenotypes in vitro and growth of lung metastasis in vivo.

  12. Vitexicarpin Acts as a Novel Angiogenesis Inhibitor and Its Target Network

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Lu; Zhao, Shiwen; Wang, Xu; Liu, Liyang; Li, Shao

    2013-01-01

    Vitexicarpin (VIT) isolated from the fruits of Vitex rotundifolia has shown antitumor, anti-inflammatory, and immunoregulatory properties. This work is designed to evaluate the antiangiogenic effects of VIT and address the underlying action mechanism of VIT by a network pharmacology approach. The results validated that VIT can act as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor. Firstly, VIT can exert good antiangiogenic effects by inhibiting vascular-endothelial-growth-factor- (VEGF-) induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and capillary-like tube formation on matrigel in a dose-dependent manner. Secondly, VIT was also shown to have an antiangiogenic mechanism through inhibition of cell cycle progression and induction of apoptosis. Thirdly, VIT inhibited chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis as well as tumor angiogenesis in an allograft mouse tumor model. We further addressed VIT's molecular mechanism of antiangiogenic actions using one of our network pharmacology methods named drugCIPHER. Then, we tested some key molecules in the VEGF pathway targeted by VIT and verified the inhibition effects of VIT on AKT and SRC phosphorylation. Taken together, this work not only identifies VIT as a novel potent angiogenesis inhibitor, but also demonstrates that network pharmacology methods can be an effective and promising approach to make discovery and understand the action mechanism of herbal ingredients. PMID:23476684

  13. Glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose simultaneously targets cancer and endothelial cells to suppress neuroblastoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Cheng; Wang, Shuo-Yu; Lin, Li-Ling; Wang, Pei-Wen; Chen, Ting-Ya; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2015-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and associated with poor prognosis when there is amplification of MYCN oncogene or high expression of Myc oncoproteins. In a previous in vitro study, we found that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) could suppress the growth of neuroblastoma cells, particularly in those with MYCN amplification. In this study, we established a mouse model of neuroblastoma xenografts with SK-N-DZ and SK-N-AS cells treated with 2DG by intraperitoneal injection twice a week for 3 weeks at 100 or 500 mg/kg body weight. We found that 2DG was effective in suppressing the growth of both MYCN-amplified SK-N-DZ and MYCN-non-amplified SK-N-AS neuroblastoma xenografts, which was associated with downregulation of HIF-1α, PDK1 and c-Myc, and a reduction in the number of tumor blood vessels. In vitro study showed that 2DG can suppress proliferation, cause apoptosis and reduce migration of murine endothelial cells, with inhibition of the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia and disorganization of F-actin filaments. The results suggest that 2DG might simultaneously target cancer cells and endothelial cells in the neuroblastoma xenografts in mice regardless of the status of MYCN amplification, providing a potential therapeutic opportunity to use 2DG or other glycolytic inhibitors for the treatment of patients with refractory neuroblastoma.

  14. Glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose simultaneously targets cancer and endothelial cells to suppress neuroblastoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao-Cheng; Wang, Shuo-Yu; Lin, Li-Ling; Wang, Pei-Wen; Chen, Ting-Ya; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neuroblastoma is characterized by a wide range of clinical manifestations and associated with poor prognosis when there is amplification of MYCN oncogene or high expression of Myc oncoproteins. In a previous in vitro study, we found that the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) could suppress the growth of neuroblastoma cells, particularly in those with MYCN amplification. In this study, we established a mouse model of neuroblastoma xenografts with SK-N-DZ and SK-N-AS cells treated with 2DG by intraperitoneal injection twice a week for 3 weeks at 100 or 500 mg/kg body weight. We found that 2DG was effective in suppressing the growth of both MYCN-amplified SK-N-DZ and MYCN-non-amplified SK-N-AS neuroblastoma xenografts, which was associated with downregulation of HIF-1α, PDK1 and c-Myc, and a reduction in the number of tumor blood vessels. In vitro study showed that 2DG can suppress proliferation, cause apoptosis and reduce migration of murine endothelial cells, with inhibition of the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia and disorganization of F-actin filaments. The results suggest that 2DG might simultaneously target cancer cells and endothelial cells in the neuroblastoma xenografts in mice regardless of the status of MYCN amplification, providing a potential therapeutic opportunity to use 2DG or other glycolytic inhibitors for the treatment of patients with refractory neuroblastoma. PMID:26398947

  15. PFI-1 – A highly Selective Protein Interaction Inhibitor Targeting BET Bromodomains

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Costa, David Da; Thanasopoulou, Angeliki; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Fish, Paul V.; Philpott, Martin; Fedorov, Oleg; Brennan, Paul; Bunnage, Mark E.; Owen, Dafydd R.; Bradner, James E.; Taniere, Philippe; O’Sullivan, Brendan; Müller, Susanne; Schwaller, Juerg; Stankovic, Tatjana; Knapp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bromo and extra terminal (BET) proteins (BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and BRDT) are transcriptional regulators required for efficient expression of several growth promoting and anti-apoptotic genes as well as for cell cycle progression. BET proteins are recruited to transcriptionally active chromatin via their two N-terminal bromodomains (BRDs), a protein interaction module that specifically recognizes acetylated lysine residues in histones H3 and H4. Inhibition of the BET-histone interaction results in transcriptional down-regulation of a number of oncogenes providing a novel pharmacological strategy for the treatment of cancer. Here we present a potent and highly selective dihydroquinazoline-2-one inhibitor, PFI-1 that efficiently blocks the interaction of BET BRDs with acetylated histone tails. Co-crystal structures showed that PFI-1 acts as an acetyl-lysine (Kac) mimetic inhibitor efficiently occupying the Kac binding site in BRD4 and BRD2. PFI-1 has antiproliferative effects on leukaemic cell lines and efficiently abrogates their clonogenic growth. Exposure of sensitive cell lines with PFI-1 results in G1 cell cycle arrest, down-regulation of MYC expression as well as induction of apoptosis and induces differentiation of primary leukaemic blasts. Intriguingly, cells exposed to PFI-1 showed significant down-regulation of Aurora B kinase, thus attenuating phosphorylation of the Aurora substrate H3S10 providing an alternative strategy for the specific inhibition of this well established oncology target. PMID:23576556

  16. Design and synthesis of benzylpiperidine inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL1 interface.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing; Xu, Wei; Tang, Le; Su, Minbo; Chen, Danqi; Chen, Yue-Lei; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Shen, Jingkang; Zhou, Yubo; Xiong, Bing

    2016-09-15

    Menin is an essential oncogenic cofactor for mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-mediated leukemogenesis, functioning through its direct interaction with MLL1 protein. Therefore, targeting the menin-MLL1 protein-protein interface represents a promising strategy to block MLL-mediated leukemogenesis. On the basis of co-crystal structure analysis, starting from thienopyrimidine chemotype, we have investigated the detailed structure-activity relationship of the piperazinyl-dihydrothiazole moiety. Several compounds were found with potent inhibitory activity against menin and better activities in cell-based experiments than MI-2-2. Molecular docking analysis revealed a less explored subpocket, which could be used for the design of new menin-MLL1 inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthetic lethal targeting of DNA double strand break repair deficient cells by human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Rebeka; McNeill, Daniel R.; Abbotts, Rachel; Mohammed, Mohammed Z.; Zdzienicka, Małgorzata Z.; Qutob, Haitham; Seedhouse, Claire; Laughton, Charles A.; Fischer, Peter M.; Patel, Poulam M.; Wilson, David M.; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    An apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is an obligatory cytotoxic intermediate in DNA Base Excision Repair (BER) that is processed by human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 is essential for BER and an emerging drug target in cancer. We have isolated novel small molecule inhibitors of APE1. In the current study we have investigated the ability of APE1 inhibitors to induce synthetic lethality in a panel of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair deficient and proficient cells; a) Chinese hamster (CH) cells: BRCA2 deficient (V-C8), ATM deficient (V-E5), wild type (V79) and BRCA2 revertant (V-C8(Rev1)). b) Human cancer cells: BRCA1 deficient (MDA-MB-436), BRCA1 proficient (MCF-7), BRCA2 deficient (CAPAN-1 and HeLa SilenciX cells), BRCA2 proficient (PANC1 and control SilenciX cells). We also tested synthetic lethality (SL) in CH ovary cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 (E8 cells) using ATM inhibitors and DNA-PKcs inhibitors (DSB inhibitors). APE1 inhibitors are synthetically lethal in BRCA and ATM deficient cells. APE1 inhibition resulted in accumulation of DNA DSBs and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Synthetic lethality was also demonstrated in CH cells expressing a dominant–negative form of APE1 treated with ATM or DNA-PKcs inhibitors. We conclude that APE1 is a promising synthetic lethality target in cancer. PMID:22377908

  18. Genomic and Genetic Characterization of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Therapeutic Targets for Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jesper B.; Spee, Bart; Blechacz, Boris R.; Avital, Itzhak; Komuta, Mina; Barbour, Andrew; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Gillen, Matthew C.; Roskams, Tania; Roberts, Lewis R.; Factor, Valentina M.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Cholangiocarcinoma is a heterogeneous disease with a poor outcome that accounts for 5%–10% of primary liver cancers. We characterized its genomic and genetic features and associated these with patient responses to therapy. METHODS We profiled the transcriptomes from 104 surgically resected cholangiocarcinoma samples collected from patients in Australia, Europe, and the United States; epithelial and stromal compartments from 23 tumors were laser capture microdissected. We analyzed mutations in KRAS, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and BRAF in samples from 69 tumors. Changes in gene expression were validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry; integrative genomics combined data from the patients with data from 7 human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines, which were then exposed to trastuzumab and lapatinib. RESULTS Patients were classified into 2 subclasses, based on 5-year survival rate (72% vs 30%; χ2 = 11.61; P < .0007), time to recurrence (13.7 vs 22.7 months; P < .001), and the absence or presence of KRAS mutations (24.6%), respectively. Class comparison identified 4 survival subgroups (SGI–IV; χ2 = 8.34; P < .03); SGIII was characterized by genes associated with proteasomal activity and the worst prognosis. The tumor epithelium was defined by deregulation of the HER2 network and frequent overexpression of EGFR, the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), pRPS6, and Ki67, whereas stroma was enriched in inflammatory cytokines. Lapatinib, an inhibitor of HER2 and EGFR, was more effective in inhibiting growth of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines than trastuzumab. CONCLUSIONS We provide insight into the pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma and identify previously unrecognized subclasses of patients, based on KRAS mutations and increased levels of EGFR and HER2 signaling, who might benefit from dual-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The group of patients with the worst prognosis was characterized by transcriptional enrichment of genes

  19. Peptide Inhibitors Targeting the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Pivotal Anaerobic Respiration Factor AniA.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Aleksandra E; Mills, Robert H; Weber, Jacob V; Hamza, Adel; Passow, Bryan W; Romaine, Andrew; Williamson, Zachary A; Reed, Robert W; Zielke, Ryszard A; Korotkov, Konstantin V

    2017-08-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, which is highly prevalent worldwide and has a major impact on reproductive and neonatal health. The superbug status of N. gonorrhoeae necessitates the development of drugs with different mechanisms of action. Here, we focused on targeting the nitrite reductase AniA, which is a pivotal component of N. gonorrhoeae anaerobic respiration and biofilm formation. Our studies showed that gonococci expressing AniA containing the altered catalytic residues D137A and H280A failed to grow under anaerobic conditions, demonstrating that the nitrite reductase function is essential. To facilitate the pharmacological targeting of AniA, new crystal structures of AniA were refined to 1.90-Å and 2.35-Å resolutions, and a phage display approach with libraries expressing randomized linear dodecameric peptides or heptameric peptides flanked by a pair of cysteine residues was utilized. Biopanning experiments led to the identification of 29 unique peptides, with 1 of them, C7-3, being identified multiple times. Evaluation of their ability to interact with AniA using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and computational docking studies revealed that C7-3 was the most promising inhibitor, binding near the type 2 copper site of the enzyme, which is responsible for interaction with nitrite. Subsequent enzymatic assays and biolayer interferometry with a synthetic C7-3 and its derivatives, C7-3m1 and C7-3m2, demonstrated potent inhibition of AniA. Finally, the MIC50 value of C7-3 and C7-3m2 against anaerobically grown N. gonorrhoeae was 0.6 mM. We present the first peptide inhibitors of AniA, an enzyme that should be further exploited for antigonococcal drug development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Multivalent Benzoboroxole Functionalized Polymers as gp120 Glycan Targeted Microbicide Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Julie I.; Lai, Bonnie E.; Myszka, David G.; Mahalingam, Alamelu; Langheinrich, Kris; Katz, David F.; Kiser, Patrick F.

    2009-01-01

    Microbicides are women-controlled prophylactics for sexually transmitted infections. The most important class of microbicides target HIV-1 and contain antiviral agents formulated for topical vaginal delivery. Identification of new viral entry inhibitors that target the HIV-1 envelope is important because they can inactivate HIV-1 in the vaginal lumen before virions can come in contact with CD4+ cells in the vaginal mucosa. Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs) demonstrate the ability to act as entry inhibitors due to their ability to bind to glycans and prevent gp120 binding to CD4+ cells. However, as proteins they present significant challenges in regards to economical production and formulation for resource poor environments. We have synthesized water soluble polymer CBAs that contain multiple benzoboroxole moieties. A benzoboroxole-functionalized-monomer was synthesized and incorporated into linear oligomers with 2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMAm) at different feed ratios using free radical polymerization. The benzoboroxole small molecule analog demonstrated weak affinity for HIV-1BaL gp120 by SPR; however, the 25 mol% functionalized benzoboroxole oligomer demonstrated a ten-fold decrease in the KD for gp120 suggesting an increased avidity for the multivalent polymer construct. High molecular weight polymers functionalized with 25, 50 and 75 mol% benzoboroxole were synthesized and tested for their ability to neutralize HIV-1 entry for two HIV-1 clades and both R5 and X4 co-receptor tropism. All three polymers demonstrated activity against all viral strains tested with EC50's that decrease from 15000 nM (1500 μg mL-1 ) for the 25 mol% functionalized polymers to 11 nM (1 μg mL-1) for the 75 mol% benzoboroxole-functionalized-polymers. These polymers exhibited minimal cytotoxicity after 24 hr exposure to a human vaginal cell line. PMID:20014858

  1. Burn Wise Awareness Kit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Health and safety outreach materials in the form of an awareness kit. Designed specifically for state, local, and tribal air agencies working to reduce wood smoke pollution, it includes best burn tips, social media m

  2. Small Molecule MYC Inhibitor Conjugated to Integrin-Targeted Nanoparticles Extends Survival in a Mouse Model of Disseminated Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Grace; Senpan, Angana; Yang, Xiaoxia; Lu, Lan; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.; Prochownik, Edward V.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Tomasson, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma pathogenesis is driven by the MYC oncoprotein, its dimerization with MAX, and the binding of this heterodimer to E-Boxes in the vicinity of target genes. The systemic utility of potent small molecule inhibitors of MYC-MAX dimerization was limited by poor bioavailability, rapid metabolism, and inadequate target site penetration. We hypothesized that new lipid-based MYC-MAX dimerization inhibitor prodrugs delivered via integrin-targeted nanoparticles (NP) would overcome prior shortcomings of MYC inhibitor approaches and prolong survival in a mouse model of cancer. An Sn 2 lipase-labile prodrug inhibitor of MYC-MAX dimerization (MI1-PD) was developed which decreased cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in cultured multiple myeloma cell lines alone (P < 0.05) and when incorporated into integrin-targeted lipid-encapsulated NPs (P < 0.05). Binding and efficacy of NPs closely correlated with integrin expression of the target multiple myeloma cells. Using a KaLwRij metastatic multiple myeloma mouse model, VLA-4–targeted NPs (20 nm and 200 nm) incorporating MI1-PD (D) NPs conferred significant survival benefits compared with respective NP controls, targeted (T) no-drug (ND), and untargeted (NT) control NPs (T/D 200: 46 days vs. NT/ND: 28 days, P < 0.05 and T/D 20: 52 days vs. NT/ND: 29 days, P = 0.001). The smaller particles performed better of the two sizes. Neither MI1 nor MI1-PD provided survival benefit when administered systemically as free compounds. These results demonstrate for the first time that a small molecule inhibitor of the MYC transcription factor can be an effective anticancer agent when delivered using a targeted nanotherapy approach. PMID:25824336

  3. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    PubMed

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets.

  4. Bortezomib enhances the therapeutic efficacy of dasatinib by promoting c-KIT internalization-induced apoptosis in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Liang, Chao; Zhang, Bo; Ma, Jianjuan; He, Xuexin; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Xianning; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-28

    Dasatinib-based therapy is often used as a second-line therapeutic strategy for imatinib-resistance gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs); however, acquired aberrant activation of dasatinib target proteins, such as c-KIT and PDGFRβ, attenuates the therapeutic efficiency of dasatinib. Combination therapy which inhibits the activation of dasatinib target proteins may enhance the cytotoxicity of dasatinib in GISTs. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, significantly inhibited cell viability and promoted apoptosis of dasatinib-treated GIST-T1 cells, whereas GIST-T1 cells showed little dasatinib cytotoxicity when treated with dasatinib alone, as the upregulation of c-KIT caused by dasatinib itself interfered with the inhibition of c-KIT and PDGFRβ phosphorylation by dasatinib. Bortezomib induced internalization and degradation of c-KIT by binding c-KIT to Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, and the subsequent release of Apaf-1, which was originally bound to the c-KIT-Hsp90β-Apaf-1 complex, induced primary apoptosis in GIST-T1 cells. Combined treatment with bortezomib plus dasatinib caused cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase through inactivation of PDGFRβ and promoted bortezomib-induced apoptosis in GIST-T1 cells. Our data suggest that combination therapy exerts better efficiency for eradicating GIST cells and may be a promising strategy for the future treatment of GISTs.

  5. Irreversible inhibitors of c-Src kinase that target a non-conserved cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Kwarcinski, Frank E.; Fox, Christel C.; Steffey, Michael E.; Soellner, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed the first irreversible inhibitors of wild-type c-Src kinase. We demonstrate that our irreversible inhibitors display improved potency and selectivity relative to their reversible counterparts. Our strategy involves modifying a promiscuous kinase inhibitor with an electrophile to generate covalent inhibitors of c-Src. We applied this methodology to two inhibitor scaffolds that exhibit increased cellular efficacy when rendered irreversible. In addition, we have demonstrated the utility of irreversible inhibitors in studying the conformation of an important loop in kinases that can control inhibitor selectivity and cause drug resistance. Together, we have developed a general and robust framework for generating selective irreversible inhibitors from reversible, promiscuous inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:22928736

  6. WNT5A enhances resistance of melanoma cells to targeted BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Anastas, Jamie N.; Kulikauskas, Rima M.; Tamir, Tigist; Rizos, Helen; Long, Georgina V.; von Euw, Erika M.; Yang, Pei-Tzu; Chen, Hsiao-Wang; Haydu, Lauren; Toroni, Rachel A.; Lucero, Olivia M.; Chien, Andy J.; Moon, Randall T.

    2014-01-01

    About half of all melanomas harbor a mutation that results in a constitutively active BRAF kinase mutant (BRAFV600E/K) that can be selectively inhibited by targeted BRAF inhibitors (BRAFis). While patients treated with BRAFis initially exhibit measurable clinical improvement, the majority of patients eventually develop drug resistance and relapse. Here, we observed marked elevation of WNT5A in a subset of tumors from patients exhibiting disease progression on BRAFi therapy. WNT5A transcript and protein were also elevated in BRAFi-resistant melanoma cell lines generated by long-term in vitro treatment with BRAFi. RNAi-mediated reduction of endogenous WNT5A in melanoma decreased cell growth, increased apoptosis in response to BRAFi challenge, and decreased the activity of prosurvival AKT signaling. Conversely, overexpression of WNT5A promoted melanoma growth, tumorigenesis, and activation of AKT signaling. Similarly to WNT5A knockdown, knockdown of the WNT receptors FZD7 and RYK inhibited growth, sensitized melanoma cells to BRAFi, and reduced AKT activation. Together, these findings suggest that chronic BRAF inhibition elevates WNT5A expression, which promotes AKT signaling through FZD7 and RYK, leading to increased growth and therapeutic resistance. Furthermore, increased WNT5A expression in BRAFi-resistant melanomas correlates with a specific transcriptional signature, which identifies potential therapeutic targets to reduce clinical BRAFi resistance. PMID:24865425

  7. Targeted Inhibition of Complement Using Complement Receptor 2-Conjugated Inhibitors Attenuates EAE

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases. PMID:23079547

  8. Targeted inhibition of complement using complement receptor 2-conjugated inhibitors attenuates EAE.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xianzhen; Tomlinson, Stephen; Barnum, Scott R

    2012-11-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease, affecting millions of individuals worldwide. In the last two decades, many therapeutic options for the treatment of MS have become available, however they are limited in terms of effectiveness and some remain plagued by safety issues. The currently available treatment options target relapsing remitting forms of MS and are not effective against the more progressive forms of the disease. These limitations highlight a significant unmet treatment need for MS. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) studies from our laboratory, we have previously shown, using a number of complement mutant and transgenic mice, that inhibition of the alternative complement pathway and the C3 convertase confers significant protection from disease. We report here that targeted inhibition of complement activation using complement receptor 2 (CR2)-conjugated inhibitors significantly attenuates EAE. Administration of CR2-Crry (blocks all complement pathways at C3 activation) and CR2-fH (specifically blocks the alternative pathway) just prior to and during the onset of EAE blocks progression of both acute and chronic disease. These data indicate that inhibition of complement may offer an effective therapeutic approach to treating both acute and chronic forms of demyelinating disease through blocking the alternative pathway or complement convertases.

  9. Targeting prostate cancer with compounds possessing dual activity as androgen receptor antagonists and HDAC6 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jadhavar, Pradeep S; Ramachandran, Sreekanth A; Riquelme, Eduardo; Gupta, Ashu; Quinn, Kevin P; Shivakumar, Devleena; Ray, Soumya; Zende, Dnyaneshwar; Nayak, Anjan K; Miglani, Sandeep K; Sathe, Balaji D; Raja, Mohd; Farias, Olivia; Alfaro, Ivan; Belmar, Sebastián; Guerrero, Javier; Bernales, Sebastián; Chakravarty, Sarvajit; Hung, David T; Lindquist, Jeffrey N; Rai, Roopa

    2016-11-01

    While enzalutamide and abiraterone are approved for treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), approximately 20-40% of patients have no response to these agents. It has been stipulated that the lack of response and the development of secondary resistance to these drugs may be due to the presence of AR splice variants. HDAC6 has a role in regulating the androgen receptor (AR) by modulating heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) acetylation, which controls the nuclear localization and activation of the AR in androgen-dependent and independent scenarios. With dual-acting AR-HDAC6 inhibitors it should be possible to target patients who don't respond to enzalutamide. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of dual-acting compounds which target AR and are also specific towards HDAC6. Our efforts led to compound 10 which was found to have potent dual activity (HDAC6 IC50=0.0356μM and AR binding IC50=<0.03μM). Compound 10 was further evaluated for antagonist and other cell-based activities, in vitro stability and pharmacokinetics.

  10. Small Molecules, Inhibitors of DNA-PK, Targeting DNA Repair, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, David; Amrein, Lilian; Panasci, Lawrence; Aloyz, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining a major mechanism for the repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA-PK. Computer based drug

  11. Target prices for mass production of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for global cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Andrew; Gotham, Dzintars; Fortunak, Joseph; Meldrum, Jonathan; Erbacher, Isabelle; Martin, Manuel; Shoman, Haitham; Levi, Jacob; Powderly, William G; Bower, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective To calculate sustainable generic prices for 4 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Background TKIs have proven survival benefits in the treatment of several cancers, including chronic myeloid leukaemia, breast, liver, renal and lung cancer. However, current high prices are a barrier to treatment. Mass production of low-cost generic antiretrovirals has led to over 13 million people being on HIV/AIDS treatment worldwide. This analysis estimates target prices for generic TKIs, assuming similar methods of mass production. Methods Four TKIs with patent expiry dates in the next 5 years were selected for analysis: imatinib, erlotinib, lapatinib and sorafenib. Chemistry, dosing, published data on per-kilogram pricing for commercial transactions of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and quotes from manufacturers were used to estimate costs of production. Analysis included costs of excipients, formulation, packaging, shipping and a 50% profit margin. Target prices were compared with current prices. Global numbers of patients eligible for treatment with each TKI were estimated. Results API costs per kg were $347–$746 for imatinib, $2470 for erlotinib, $4671 for lapatinib, and $3000 for sorafenib. Basing on annual dose requirements, costs of formulation/packaging and a 50% profit margin, target generic prices per person-year were $128–$216 for imatinib, $240 for erlotinib, $1450 for sorafenib, and $4020 for lapatinib. Over 1 million people would be newly eligible to start treatment with these TKIs annually. Conclusions Mass generic production of several TKIs could achieve treatment prices in the range of $128–$4020 per person-year, versus current US prices of $75161–$139 138. Generic TKIs could allow significant savings and scaling-up of treatment globally, for over 1 million eligible patients. PMID:26817636

  12. MCM5 as a target of BET inhibitors in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mio, Catia; Lavarone, Elisa; Conzatti, Ketty; Baldan, Federica; Toffoletto, Barbara; Puppin, Cinzia; Filetti, Sebastiano; Durante, Cosimo; Russo, Diego; Orlacchio, Arturo; Di Cristofano, Antonio; Di Loreto, Carla; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is an extremely aggressive thyroid cancer subtype, refractory to the current medical treatment. Among various epigenetic anticancer drugs, bromodomain and extra-terminal inhibitors (BETis) are considered to be an appealing novel class of compounds. BETi target the bromodomain and extra-terminal of BET proteins that act as regulators of gene transcription, interacting with histone acetyl groups. The goal of this study is to delineate which pathway underlies the biological effects derived from BET inhibition, in order to find new potential therapeutic targets in ATC. We investigated the effects of BET inhibition on two human anaplastic thyroid cancer-derived cell lines (FRO and SW1736). The treatment with two BETis, JQ1 and I-BET762, decreased cell viability, reduced cell cycle S-phase, and determined cell death. In order to find BETi effectors, FRO and SW1736 were subjected to a global transcriptome analysis after JQ1 treatment. A significant portion of deregulated genes belongs to cell cycle regulators. Among them, MCM5 was decreased at both mRNA and protein levels in both tested cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments indicate that MCM5 is directly bound by the BET protein BRD4. MCM5 silencing reduced cell proliferation, thus underlining its involvement in the block of proliferation induced by BETis. Furthermore, MCM5 immunohistochemical evaluation in human thyroid tumor tissues demonstrated its overexpression in several papillary thyroid carcinomas and in all ATCs. MCM5 was also overexpressed in a murine model of ATC, and JQ1 treatment reduced Mcm5 mRNA expression in two murine ATC cell lines. Thus, MCM5 could represent a new target in the therapeutic approach against ATC. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. FGF signaling inhibitor, SPRY4, is evolutionarily conserved target of WNT signaling pathway in progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-03-01

    WNT, FGF and Hedgehog signaling pathways network together during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. FGF16, FGF18, and FGF20 genes are targets of WNT-mediated TCF/LEF-beta-catenin-BCL9/BCL9L-PYGO transcriptional complex. SPROUTY (SPRY) and SPRED family genes encode inhibitors for receptor tyrosine kinase signaling cascades, such as those of FGF receptor family members and EGF receptor family members. Here, transcriptional regulation of SPRY1, SPRY2, SPRY3, SPRY4, SPRED1, SPRED2, and SPRED3 genes by WNT/beta-catenin signaling cascade was investigated by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (humint). Because double TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human SPRY4 gene, comparative genomics analyses on SPRY4 orthologs were further performed. SPRY4-FGF1 locus at human chromosome 5q31.3 and FGF2-NUDT6-SPATA5-SPRY1 locus at human chromosome 4q27-q28.1 were paralogous regions within the human genome. Chimpanzee SPRY4 gene was identified within NW_107083.1 genome sequence. Human, chimpanzee, rat and mouse SPRY4 orthologs, consisting of three exons, were well conserved. SPRY4 gene was identified as the evolutionarily conserved target of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway based on the conservation of double TCF/LEF-binding sites within 5'-promoter region of mammalian SPRY4 orthologs. Human SPRY4 mRNA was expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, brain, pancreatic islet, colon cancer, head and neck tumor, melanoma, and pancreatic cancer. WNT signaling activation in progenitor cells leads to the growth regulation of progenitor cells themselves through SPRY4 induction, and also to the growth stimulation of proliferating cells through FGF secretion. Epigenetic silencing and loss-of-function mutations of SPRY4 gene in progenitor cells could lead to carcinogenesis. SPRY4 is the pharmacogenomics target in the fields of oncology and regenerative medicine.

  14. Target prices for mass production of tyrosine kinase inhibitors for global cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Hill, Andrew; Gotham, Dzintars; Fortunak, Joseph; Meldrum, Jonathan; Erbacher, Isabelle; Martin, Manuel; Shoman, Haitham; Levi, Jacob; Powderly, William G; Bower, Mark

    2016-01-27

    To calculate sustainable generic prices for 4 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). TKIs have proven survival benefits in the treatment of several cancers, including chronic myeloid leukaemia, breast, liver, renal and lung cancer. However, current high prices are a barrier to treatment. Mass production of low-cost generic antiretrovirals has led to over 13 million people being on HIV/AIDS treatment worldwide. This analysis estimates target prices for generic TKIs, assuming similar methods of mass production. Four TKIs with patent expiry dates in the next 5 years were selected for analysis: imatinib, erlotinib, lapatinib and sorafenib. Chemistry, dosing, published data on per-kilogram pricing for commercial transactions of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and quotes from manufacturers were used to estimate costs of production. Analysis included costs of excipients, formulation, packaging, shipping and a 50% profit margin. Target prices were compared with current prices. Global numbers of patients eligible for treatment with each TKI were estimated. API costs per kg were $347-$746 for imatinib, $2470 for erlotinib, $4671 for lapatinib, and $3000 for sorafenib. Basing on annual dose requirements, costs of formulation/packaging and a 50% profit margin, target generic prices per person-year were $128-$216 for imatinib, $240 for erlotinib, $1450 for sorafenib, and $4020 for lapatinib. Over 1 million people would be newly eligible to start treatment with these TKIs annually. Mass generic production of several TKIs could achieve treatment prices in the range of $128-$4020 per person-year, versus current US prices of $75161-$139,138. Generic TKIs could allow significant savings and scaling-up of treatment globally, for over 1 million eligible patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Non-target-site resistance to ALS inhibitors in waterhemp (Amaranthus tuberculatus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A waterhemp population (MCR) previously characterized as resistant to 4-hyroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) and photosystem II (PSII) inhibitors was found to have two different resistance responses to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors. Plants from the MCR population exhibiting high resistan...

  16. Dual targeting DNA gyrase B (GyrB) and topoisomerse IV (ParE) inhibitors: A review.

    PubMed

    Azam, Mohammed Afzal; Thathan, Janarthanan; Jubie, Selvaraj

    2015-10-01

    GyrB and ParE are type IIA topoisomerases and found in most bacteria. Its function is vital for DNA replication, repair and decatenation. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA GyrB and ParE are structurally related and have been recognized as prime candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting ATPase catalytic domain of both GyrB and ParE enzymes have succeeded in the clinic. Moreover, no inhibitors of these enzymes with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-negative pathogens have been reported. Availability of high resolution crystal structures of GyrB and ParE made it possible for the design of many different classes of inhibitors with dual mechanism of action. Among them benzimidazoles, benzothiazoles, thiazolopyridines, imidiazopyridazoles, pyridines, indazoles, pyrazoles, imidazopyridines, triazolopyridines, pyrrolopyrimidines, pyrimidoindoles as well as related structures are disclosed in literatures. Unfortunately most of these inhibitors are found to be active against Gram-positive pathogens. In the present review we discuss about studies on novel dual targeting ATPase inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel assay for screening inhibitors targeting HIV-1 integrase dimerization based on Ni-NTA magnetic agarose beads

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; He, Hongqiu; Liu, Mengmeng; Meng, Zhixia; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN), which mediates integration of viral cDNA into the cellular chromosome, is a validated antiviral drug target. Three IN inhibitors, raltegravir, elvitegravir and dolutegravir, have been clinically approved since 2008. However, drug resistance have emerged in infected patients receiving treatment using these drugs which share the same mechanism of action and have a low genetic barrier for resistance. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop drugs with novel mechanism. IN requires a precise and dynamic equilibrium between several oligomeric species for its activities. The modulation of the process which is termed as IN oligomerization, presents an interesting allosteric target for drug development. In this research, we developed a magnetic beads based approach to assay the IN dimerization. Then, using the assay we screened a library of 1000 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs for IN dimerization inhibitors and identified dexlansoprazole as a potential IN dimerization inhibitor. In conclusion, the assay presented here has been proven to be sensitive and specific for the detection of IN dimerization as well as for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting IN dimerization. Moreover, a FDA-approved proton-pump inhibitors, dexlansoprazole, was identified as a potential inhibitor for IN dimerization. PMID:27137477

  18. The anticancer multi-kinase inhibitor dovitinib also targets topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Hasinoff, Brian B; Wu, Xing; Nitiss, John L; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Yalowich, Jack C

    2012-12-15

    Dovitinib (TKI258/CHIR258) is a multi-kinase inhibitor in phase III development for the treatment of several cancers. Dovitinib is a benzimidazole-quinolinone compound that structurally resembles the bisbenzimidazole minor groove binding dye Hoechst 33258. Dovitinib bound to DNA as shown by its ability to increase the DNA melting temperature and by increases in its fluorescence spectrum that occurred upon the addition of DNA. Molecular modeling studies of the docking of dovitinib into an X-ray structure of a Hoechst 33258-DNA complex showed that dovitinib could reasonably be accommodated in the DNA minor groove. Because DNA binders are often topoisomerase I (EC 5.99.1.2) and topoisomerase II (EC 5.99.1.3) inhibitors, the ability of dovitinib to inhibit these DNA processing enzymes was also investigated. Dovitinib inhibited the catalytic decatenation activity of topoisomerase IIα. It also inhibited the DNA-independent ATPase activity of yeast topoisomerase II which suggested that it interacted with the ATP binding site. Using isolated human topoisomerase IIα, dovitinib stabilized the enzyme-cleavage complex and acted as a topoisomerase IIα poison. Dovitinib was also found to be a cellular topoisomerase II poison in human leukemia K562 cells and induced double-strand DNA breaks in K562 cells as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of H2AX. Finally, dovitinib inhibited the topoisomerase I-catalyzed relaxation of plasmid DNA and acted as a cellular topoisomerase I poison. In conclusion, the cell growth inhibitory activity and the anticancer activity of dovitinib may result not only from its ability to inhibit multiple kinases, but also, in part, from its ability to target topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II.

  19. FGFR gene alterations in lung squamous cell carcinoma are potential targets for the multikinase inhibitor nintedanib.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Masaaki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Tanizaki, Junko; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Terashima, Masato; De Velasco, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Banno, Eri; Nakamura, Yu; Takeda, Masayuki; Ito, Akihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto

    2016-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) gene alterations are relatively frequent in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and are a potential targets for therapy with FGFR inhibitors. However, little is known regarding the clinicopathologic features associated with FGFR alterations. The angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib has shown promising activity in clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer. We have now applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize FGFR alterations in LSCC patients as well as examined the antitumor activity of nintedanib in LSCC cell lines positive for FGFR1 copy number gain (CNG). The effects of nintedanib on the proliferation of and FGFR signaling in LSCC cell lines were examined in vitro, and its effects on tumor formation were examined in vivo. A total of 75 clinical LSCC specimens were screened for FGFR alterations by NGS. Nintedanib inhibited the proliferation of FGFR1 CNG-positive LSCC cell lines in association with attenuation of the FGFR1-ERK signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. FGFR1 CNG (10.7%), FGFR1 mutation (2.7%), FGFR2 mutation (2.7%), FGFR4 mutation (5.3%), and FGFR3 fusion (1.3%) were detected in LSCC specimens by NGS. Clinicopathologic features did not differ between LSCC patients positive or negative for FGFR alterations. However, among the 36 patients with disease recurrence after surgery, prognosis was significantly worse for those harboring FGFR alterations. Screening for FGFR alterations by NGS warrants further study as a means to identify patients with LSCC recurrence after surgery who might benefit from nintedanib therapy.

  20. Inhibition of c-Kit, VEGFR-2 (KDR), and ABCG2 by analogues of OSI-930.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay P; Kuang, Ye-Hong; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Korlipara, Vijaya L

    2011-11-01

    The quinoline domain of OSI-930, a dual inhibitor of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) c-Kit and KDR, was modified in an effort to further understand the SAR of OSI-930, and the binding site characteristics of c-Kit and KDR. A series of 16 compounds with heteroatom substituted pyridyl and phenyl ring systems was synthesized and evaluated against a panel of kinases including c-Kit and KDR. Aminopyridyl derivative 6 was found to be the most active member of the series with 91% and 57% inhibition of c-Kit at 10μM and 1μM, respectively and 88% and 50% inhibition of KDR at 10μM and 1μM, respectively. The target compounds were also tested for their ability to inhibit efflux of mitoxantrone through inhibition of ATP dependent ABCG2 pump. Nitropyridyl derivative 5 and o-nitrophenyl derivative 7 exhibited complete inhibition of the ABCG2 pump with IC(50) values of 13.67μM and 16.67μM, respectively.

  1. Fragment-based discovery of inhibitor scaffolds targeting the metallo-β-lactamases NDM-1 and VIM-2.

    PubMed

    Christopeit, Tony; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S

    2016-04-15

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) render bacteria resistant to β-lactam antibiotics and are interesting drug targets to prevent the hydrolysis of β-lactam antibiotics. So far, there are no MBL inhibitors in clinical use and particularly the design of broad spectrum inhibitors targeting several MBLs has been difficult. In this study, we report four fragments inhibiting the clinically relevant New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) and Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase 2 (VIM-2). The fragments were identified from a library using an orthogonal screening strategy combining a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based assay and an enzyme inhibition assay. The identified fragments showed dissociation constants (KD) ranging from 181 to 2100 μM. The binding mode of the fragments was explored using QM-polarized ligand docking. All four fragments represent interesting scaffolds for the design of broad-spectrum MBL inhibitors.

  2. Chemoproteomic profiling reveals that cathepsin D off-target activity drives ocular toxicity of β-secretase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zuhl, Andrea M.; Nolan, Charles E.; Brodney, Michael A.; Niessen, Sherry; Atchison, Kevin; Houle, Christopher; Karanian, David A.; Ambroise, Claude; Brulet, Jeffrey W.; Beck, Elizabeth M.; Doran, Shawn D.; O'Neill, Brian T.; am Ende, Christopher W.; Chang, Cheng; Geoghegan, Kieran F.; West, Graham M.; Judkins, Joshua C.; Hou, Xinjun; Riddell, David R.; Johnson, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of β-secretase BACE1 is considered one of the most promising approaches for treating Alzheimer's disease. Several structurally distinct BACE1 inhibitors have been withdrawn from development after inducing ocular toxicity in animal models, but the target mediating this toxicity has not been identified. Here we use a clickable photoaffinity probe to identify cathepsin D (CatD) as a principal off-target of BACE1 inhibitors in human cells. We find that several BACE1 inhibitors blocked CatD activity in cells with much greater potency than that displayed in cell-free assays with purified protein. Through a series of exploratory toxicology studies, we show that quantifying CatD target engagement in cells with the probe is predictive of ocular toxicity in vivo. Taken together, our findings designate off-target inhibition of CatD as a principal driver of ocular toxicity for BACE1 inhibitors and more generally underscore the power of chemical proteomics for discerning mechanisms of drug action. PMID:27727204

  3. Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation Directed Rational Design of Inhibitors Targeting Drug-Resistant Mutants of Influenza A Virus M2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Ma, Chunlong; Fiorin, Giacomo; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Wang, Tuo; Hu, Fanghao; Lamb, Robert A.; Pinto, Lawrence H.; Hong, Mei; Klein, Michael L.; DeGrado, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus M2 (A/M2) forms a homotetrameric proton selective channel in the viral membrane. It has been the drug targets of antiviral drugs such as amantadine and rimantadine. However, most of the current virulent influenza A viruses carry drug resistant mutations alongside the drug binding site, such as S31N, V27A, and L26F etc., each of which might be dominant in a given flu season. Among these mutations, the V27A mutation was prevalent among transmissible viruses under drug selection pressure. Until now, V27A has not been successfully targeted by small molecule inhibitors, despite years of extensive medicinal chemistry research efforts and high throughput screening. Guided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of drug binding and the influence of drug binding on the dynamics of A/M2 from earlier experimental studies, we designed a series of potent spirane amine inhibitors targeting not only WT, but also both A/M2-27A and L26F mutants with IC50s similar to that seen for amantadine's inhibition of the WT channel. The potencies of these inhibitors were further demonstrated in experimental binding and plaque reduction assays. These results demonstrate the power of MD simulations to probe the mechanism of drug binding as well as the ability to guide design of inhibitors of targets that had previously appeared to be undruggable. PMID:21744829

  4. EPIE Educational Product Report: Early Learning Kits -- 25 Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EPIE Educational Product Report, 1975

    1975-01-01

    This report presents evaluations of 25 early learning materials kits, designed for use with young children in nursery school, kindergarten, and day care centers. Each evaluation includes: a physical description of the kit (with cost information), the target audience, content and objectives, methods of use, conditions of use, rationale, research…

  5. EPIE Educational Product Report: Early Learning Kits -- 25 Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EPIE Educational Product Report, 1975

    1975-01-01

    This report presents evaluations of 25 early learning materials kits, designed for use with young children in nursery school, kindergarten, and day care centers. Each evaluation includes: a physical description of the kit (with cost information), the target audience, content and objectives, methods of use, conditions of use, rationale, research…

  6. The NAE inhibitor pevonedistat interacts with the HDAC inhibitor belinostat to target AML cells by disrupting the DDR.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Yu; Kmieciak, Maciej; Leng, Yun; Li, Lihong; Lin, Hui; Rizzo, Kathryn A; Dumur, Catherine I; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Rahmani, Mohamed; Povirk, Lawrence; Chalasani, Sri; Berger, Allison J; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2016-05-05

    Two classes of novel agents, NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, have shown single-agent activity in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Here we examined mechanisms underlying interactions between the NAE inhibitor pevonedistat (MLN4924) and the approved HDAC inhibitor belinostat in AML/MDS cells. MLN4924/belinostat coadministration synergistically induced AML cell apoptosis with or without p53 deficiency or FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD), whereas p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown or enforced FLT3-ITD expression significantly sensitized cells to the regimen. MLN4924 blocked belinostat-induced antiapoptotic gene expression through nuclear factor-κB inactivation. Each agent upregulated Bim, and Bim knockdown significantly attenuated apoptosis. Microarrays revealed distinct DNA damage response (DDR) genetic profiles between individual vs combined MLN4924/belinostat exposure. Whereas belinostat abrogated the MLN4924-activated intra-S checkpoint through Chk1 and Wee1 inhibition/downregulation, cotreatment downregulated multiple homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining repair proteins, triggering robust double-stranded breaks, chromatin pulverization, and apoptosis. Consistently, Chk1 or Wee1 shRNA knockdown significantly sensitized AML cells to MLN4924. MLN4924/belinostat displayed activity against primary AML or MDS cells, including those carrying next-generation sequencing-defined poor-prognostic cancer hotspot mutations, and CD34(+)/CD38(-)/CD123(+) populations, but not normal CD34(+) progenitors. Finally, combined treatment markedly reduced tumor burden and significantly prolonged animal survival (P < .0001) in AML xenograft models with negligible toxicity, accompanied by pharmacodynamic effects observed in vitro. Collectively, these findings argue that MLN4924 and belinostat interact synergistically by reciprocally disabling the DDR in AML/MDS cells. This strategy

  7. Mutation scanning of BRAF, NRAS, KIT, and GNAQ/GNA11 in oral mucosal melanoma: a study of 57 cases.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Jiong; Wu, Yunteng; Li, Chaojun; Wang, Runxiang; Song, Hao; Ren, Guoxin; Guo, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in novel targeted therapies have created the need for molecular characterization of cancer to allow accurate personalized treatments. In this study, our aim was to investigate the incidence of activating mutations of oncogenes BRAF, NRAS, KIT, and GNAQ/GNA11 in oral mucosal melanoma. We analyzed a cohort of 57 oral mucosal melanoma samples, including 27 frozen samples and 30 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples. The tumors were screened for hotspot mutations of BRAF (exon 15), NRAS (exons 2 and 3), KIT (exons 9, 11, 13, and 17), and GNAQ/GNA11 (exon 5) by high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. In oral mucosal melanoma, 7.0% of tumors harbored KIT mutations and 3.5% harbored BRAF mutations, while classic BRAF V600E mutation was not detected. We found no mutations of NRAS or GNAQ/GNA11 in oral mucosal melanoma. We demonstrated that driver mutations are rare in mutational hotspots of BRAF, NRAS, KIT, and GNAQ/GNA11 in oral mucosal melanoma. The majority of patients will not benefit from KIT and BRAF inhibitors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Travel Medical Kit.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne C; Haulman, N Jean

    2016-03-01

    "The traveler's medical kit is an essential tool for both the novice and expert traveler. It is designed to treat travel-related illness and injury and to ensure preexisting medical conditions are managed appropriately. Travelers are at increased risk for common gastrointestinal issues during travel. Respiratory illnesses make up approximately 8% of the ailments present in returned international travelers. Approximately 12% of travelers experience a travel-related skin condition. First aid treatment for minor injuries is essential to all travel medical kits. The complexity ranges from a small, simple case for the urban traveler to a larger, extensive case for wilderness travel."

  9. Structure-guided creation of AcAP5-derived and platelet targeted factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Lin, Yuan; Liu, Aihua; Shui, Mengyang; Li, Ruyi; Liu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Wenhui; Wang, Yinye

    2015-06-15

    Anticoagulants and anti-platelet agents are simultaneously administrated in clinical practice (i.e. percutaneous coronary intervention), which cause significant risk of systemic bleeding. Targeted delivery of anticoagulants to the activated platelets at sites of vascular injuries may condense the site-specific anticoagulant effect and reduce the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. To this end, we prepared three ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5) variants NR1, NR2 and NR3 engineered with a platelet-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif and evaluated their anti-Factor Xa (FXa) and platelet-binding effects. These RGD-containing AcAP5 variants were capable of interacting with platelet receptor αIIbβ3 as shown in computational analysis. All variants, especially NR2 and NR3, retained entirely the anti-FXa function of parent AcAP5. Moreover, they prevented the formation of occlusive thrombi in rat carotid artery injury model, suggesting that they inhibit platelet aggregation in vivo. Further functional investigation of NR3 demonstrated that NR3 inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro and FXa activity in vivo, and prolonged the coagulation time, all in a dose-dependent manner. Through flow cytometry assay, we confirmed the binding of NR3 to αIIbβ3 receptor. In mouse model of carotid artery endothelium injury, NR3-treated mice showed less tail bleeding time than AcAP5-treated mice, and aspirin plus NR3 treatment exhibited moderate reduction of blood loss compared with aspirin plus AcAP5 treatment. These results indicate the feasibility to engineer a novel FXa inhibitor specifically targeting the activated platelets, which centralizes its anticoagulation efficacy in the injured vascular endothelium and reduces the risk of systemic bleeding. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of potential inhibitors for oncogenic target of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase using in silico approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Prabhu, Dhamodharan; Choubey, Sanjay Kumar; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2017-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) plays a major role in the rate limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway and it is pronounced as a novel target for drug development of cancer. The currently available drugs against DHODH are ineffective and bear various side effects. Three-dimensional structure of the targeted protein was constructed using molecular modeling approach followed by 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, High Throughput Virtual Screening (HTVS) was performed using various compound libraries to identify pharmacologically potential molecules. The top four identified lead molecules includes NCI_47074, HitFinder_7630, Binding_66981 and Specs_108872 with high docking score of -9.45, -8.29, -8.04 and -8.03 kcal/mol and the corresponding binding free energy were -16.25, -56.37, -26.93 and -48.04 kcal/mol respectively. Arg122, Arg185, Glu255 and Gly257 are the key residues found to be interacting with the ligands. Molecular dynamics simulations of DHODH-inhibitors complexes were performed to assess the stability of various conformations from complex structures of TtDHODH. Furthermore, stereoelectronic features of the ligands were explored to facilitate charge transfer during the protein-ligand interactions using Density Functional Theoretical approach. Based on in silico analysis, the ligand NCI_47074 ((2Z)-3-({6-[(2Z)-3-carboxylatoprop-2-enamido]pyridin-2-yl}carbamoyl)prop-2-enoate) was found to be the most potent lead molecule which was validated using energetic and electronic parameters and it could serve as a template for designing effective anticancerous drug molecule.

  11. An Integrated In Silico Approach to Design Specific Inhibitors Targeting Human Poly(A)-Specific Ribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Tsiliki, Georgia; Komiotis, Dimitri; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Balatsos, Nikolaos A. A.; Kossida, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) is an exoribonuclease/deadenylase that degrades 3′-end poly(A) tails in almost all eukaryotic organisms. Much of the biochemical and structural information on PARN comes from the human enzyme. However, the existence of PARN all along the eukaryotic evolutionary ladder requires further and thorough investigation. Although the complete structure of the full-length human PARN, as well as several aspects of the catalytic mechanism still remain elusive, many previous studies indicate that PARN can be used as potent and promising anti-cancer target. In the present study, we attempt to complement the existing structural information on PARN with in-depth bioinformatics analyses, in order to get a hologram of the molecular evolution of PARNs active site. In an effort to draw an outline, which allows specific drug design targeting PARN, an unequivocally specific platform was designed for the development of selective modulators focusing on the unique structural and catalytic features of the enzyme. Extensive phylogenetic analysis based on all the publicly available genomes indicated a broad distribution for PARN across eukaryotic species and revealed structurally important amino acids which could be assigned as potentially strong contributors to the regulation of the catalytic mechanism of PARN. Based on the above, we propose a comprehensive in silico model for the PARN’s catalytic mechanism and moreover, we developed a 3D pharmacophore model, which was subsequently used for the introduction of DNP-poly(A) amphipathic substrate analog as a potential inhibitor of PARN. Indeed, biochemical analysis revealed that DNP-poly(A) inhibits PARN competitively. Our approach provides an efficient integrated platform for the rational design of pharmacophore models as well as novel modulators of PARN with therapeutic potential. PMID:23236441

  12. An integrated in silico approach to design specific inhibitors targeting human poly(a)-specific ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Tsiliki, Georgia; Komiotis, Dimitri; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Balatsos, Nikolaos A A; Kossida, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) is an exoribonuclease/deadenylase that degrades 3'-end poly(A) tails in almost all eukaryotic organisms. Much of the biochemical and structural information on PARN comes from the human enzyme. However, the existence of PARN all along the eukaryotic evolutionary ladder requires further and thorough investigation. Although the complete structure of the full-length human PARN, as well as several aspects of the catalytic mechanism still remain elusive, many previous studies indicate that PARN can be used as potent and promising anti-cancer target. In the present study, we attempt to complement the existing structural information on PARN with in-depth bioinformatics analyses, in order to get a hologram of the molecular evolution of PARNs active site. In an effort to draw an outline, which allows specific drug design targeting PARN, an unequivocally specific platform was designed for the development of selective modulators focusing on the unique structural and catalytic features of the enzyme. Extensive phylogenetic analysis based on all the publicly available genomes indicated a broad distribution for PARN across eukaryotic species and revealed structurally important amino acids which could be assigned as potentially strong contributors to the regulation of the catalytic mechanism of PARN. Based on the above, we propose a comprehensive in silico model for the PARN's catalytic mechanism and moreover, we developed a 3D pharmacophore model, which was subsequently used for the introduction of DNP-poly(A) amphipathic substrate analog as a potential inhibitor of PARN. Indeed, biochemical analysis revealed that DNP-poly(A) inhibits PARN competitively. Our approach provides an efficient integrated platform for the rational design of pharmacophore models as well as novel modulators of PARN with therapeutic potential.

  13. Targeting tumor hypoxia: suppression of breast tumor growth and metastasis by novel carbonic anhydrase IX inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yuanmei; McDonald, Paul C; Oloumi, Arusha; Chia, Stephen; Ostlund, Christina; Ahmadi, Ardalan; Kyle, Alastair; Auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Leung, Samuel; Huntsman, David; Clarke, Blaise; Sutherland, Brent W; Waterhouse, Dawn; Bally, Marcel; Roskelley, Calvin; Overall, Christopher M; Minchinton, Andrew; Pacchiano, Fabio; Carta, Fabrizio; Scozzafava, Andrea; Touisni, Nadia; Winum, Jean-Yves; Supuran, Claudiu T; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2011-05-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a hypoxia and HIF-1-inducible protein that regulates intra- and extracellular pH under hypoxic conditions and promotes tumor cell survival and invasion in hypoxic microenvironments. Interrogation of 3,630 human breast cancers provided definitive evidence of CAIX as an independent poor prognostic biomarker for distant metastases and survival. shRNA-mediated depletion of CAIX expression in 4T1 mouse metastatic breast cancer cells capable of inducing CAIX in hypoxia resulted in regression of orthotopic mammary tumors and inhibition of spontaneous lung metastasis formation. Stable depletion of CAIX in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts also resulted in attenuation of primary tumor growth. CAIX depletion in the 4T1 cells led to caspase-independent cell death and reversal of extracellular acidosis under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Treatment of mice harboring CAIX-positive 4T1 mammary tumors with novel CAIX-specific small molecule inhibitors that mimicked the effects of CAIX depletion in vitro resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis formation in both spontaneous and experimental models of metastasis, without inhibitory effects on CAIX-negative tumors. Similar inhibitory effects on primary tumor growth were observed in mice harboring orthotopic tumors comprised of lung metatstatic MDA-MB-231 LM2-4(Luc+) cells. Our findings show that CAIX is vital for growth and metastasis of hypoxic breast tumors and is a specific, targetable biomarker for breast cancer metastasis.

  14. Signal transduction in endothelial cells by the angiogenesis inhibitor histidine-rich glycoprotein targets focal adhesions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chunsik; Dixelius, Johan; Thulin, Asa; Kawamura, Harukiyo; Claesson-Welsh, Lena; Olsson, Anna-Karin . E-mail: Anna-Karin.Olsson@genpat.uu.se

    2006-08-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) is an abundant heparin-binding plasma protein. We have shown that a fragment released from the central histidine/proline-rich (His/Pro-rich) domain of HRGP blocks endothelial cell migration in vitro and vascularization and growth of murine fibrosarcoma in vivo. The minimal active HRGP domain exerting the anti-angiogenic effect was recently narrowed down to a 35 amino acid peptide, HRGP330, derived from the His/Pro-rich domain of HRGP. By use of a signal transduction antibody array representing 400 different signal transduction molecules, we now show that HRGP and the synthetic peptide HRGP330 specifically induce tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and its downstream substrate paxillin in endothelial cells. HRGP/HRGP330 treatment of endothelial cells induced disruption of actin stress fibers, a process reversed by treatment of cells with the FAK inhibitor geldanamycin. In addition, VEGF-mediated endothelial cell tubular morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen matrix was inhibited by HRGP and HRGP330. In contrast, VEGF-induced proliferation was not affected by HRGP or HRGP330, demonstrating the central role of cell migration during tube formation. In conclusion, our data show that HRGP targets focal adhesions in endothelial cells, thereby disrupting the cytoskeletal organization and the ability of endothelial cells to assemble into vessel structures.

  15. Targeting Microglia-Mediated Neurotoxicity: The Potential of NOX2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Surace, Michael J.; Block, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are key sentinels of central nervous system health and their dysfunction has been widely implicated in the progressive nature of neurodegenerative diseases. While microglia can produce a host of factors that are toxic to neighboring neurons, NOX2 has been implicated as a common and essential mechanism of microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. Accumulating evidence indicates that activation of the NOX2 enzyme complex in microglia is neurotoxic both through the production of extracellular reactive oxygen species that damage neighboring neurons as well as the initiation of redox signaling in microglia that amplifies the pro-inflammatory response. More specifically, evidence supports that NOX2 redox signaling enhances microglial sensitivity to pro-inflammatory stimuli and amplifies the production of neurotoxic cytokines, to promote chronic and neurotoxic microglial activation. Here, we describe the evidence denoting the role of NOX2 in microglia-mediated neurotoxicity with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease, describe available inhibitors that have been tested, and detail evidence of the neuroprotective and therapeutic potential of targeting this enzyme complex to regulate microglia. PMID:22581365

  16. PMMA/polysaccharides nanofilm loaded with adenosine deaminase inhibitor for targeted anti-inflammatory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Redolfi Riva, Eugenio; Desii, Andrea; Sartini, Stefania; La Motta, Concettina; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-10-29

    A novel drug delivery vector, a free-standing polymeric ultrathin film (nanofilm) composed of PMMA and a polysaccharides multilayer, is presented. Chitosan and sodium alginate are alternatively deposited by spin-assisted LbL assembly onto a plasma-treated PMMA thin film. Hydrophobic anti-inflammatory drugs, an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (APP) and its fluorescent dansyl derivate (APP-Dns), are encapsulated inside the LbL multilayer using a simple casting deposition procedure. The resulting drug loaded nanofilm can be suspended in water upon dissolution of a PVA sacrificial layer. Morphological characterization of the nanofilm shows that PMMA/LbL nanofilms possess nanometric thickness (<200 nm) and very low surface roughness (1-2 nm for drug loaded nanofilms and <1 nm for blank nanofilm). Drug loaded films exhibit a diffusion controlled release mechanism following the Korsmayer-Peppas release model, confirmed by the fit of release data with a characteristic power law. Drug release is impaired through the PMMA layer, which acts effectively as a barrier for drug transport. This ultrathin polymer film can find application as a nanopatch for targeted inflammatory drug delivery to treat localized pathologies as inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Chlamydia Serine Protease Inhibitor, targeting HtrA, as a New Treatment for Koala Chlamydia infection

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Amba; Fraser, Tamieka; Gillett, Amber; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam; Huston, Wilhelmina M.

    2016-01-01

    The koala, an iconic marsupial native to Australia, is a threatened species in many parts of the country. One major factor in the decline is disease caused by infection with Chlamydia. Current therapeutic strategies to treat chlamydiosis in the koala are limited. This study examines the effectiveness of an inhibitor, JO146, which targets the HtrA serine protease for treatment of C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae in vitro and ex vivo with the aim of developing a novel therapeutic for koala Chlamydia infections. Clinical isolates from koalas were examined for their susceptibility to JO146. In vitro studies demonstrated that treatment with JO146 during the mid-replicative phase of C. pecorum or C. pneumoniae infections resulted in a significant loss of infectious progeny. Ex vivo primary koala tissue cultures were used to demonstrate the efficacy of JO146 and the non-toxic nature of this compound on peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary cell lines established from koala tissues collected at necropsy. Our results suggest that inhibition of the serine protease HtrA could be a novel treatment strategy for chlamydiosis in koalas. PMID:27530689

  18. BRAF inhibitors suppress apoptosis through off-target inhibition of JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vin, Harina; Ojeda, Sandra S; Ching, Grace; Leung, Marco L; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Dwyer, David W; Adelmann, Charles H; Restrepo, Monica; Richards, Kristen N; Stewart, Larissa R; Du, Lili; Ferguson, Scarlett B; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Baccarini, Manuela; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Curry, Jonathan L; Kim, Kevin B; Ciurea, Ana M; Duvic, Madeleine; Prieto, Victor G; Ullrich, Stephen E; Dalby, Kevin N; Flores, Elsa R; Tsai, Kenneth Y

    2013-01-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib selectively inhibit the v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) kinase, resulting in high response rates and increased survival in melanoma. Approximately 22% of individuals treated with vemurafenib develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) during therapy. The prevailing explanation for this is drug-induced paradoxical ERK activation, resulting in hyperproliferation. Here we show an unexpected and novel effect of vemurafenib/PLX4720 in suppressing apoptosis through the inhibition of multiple off-target kinases upstream of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), principally ZAK. JNK signaling is suppressed in multiple contexts, including in cSCC of vemurafenib-treated patients, as well as in mice. Expression of a mutant ZAK that cannot be inhibited reverses the suppression of JNK activation and apoptosis. Our results implicate suppression of JNK-dependent apoptosis as a significant, independent mechanism that cooperates with paradoxical ERK activation to induce cSCC, suggesting broad implications for understanding toxicities associated with BRAF inhibitors and for their use in combination therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00969.001 PMID:24192036

  19. Targeting the cell cycle inhibitor p57Kip2 promotes adult human β cell replication.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, Dana; Li, Changhong; Yu, Ming; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Jia; Naji, Ali; Ziaie, Seyed; Glaser, Benjamin; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2014-02-01

    Children with focal hyperinsulinism of infancy display a dramatic, non-neoplastic clonal expansion of β cells that have undergone mitotic recombination, resulting in paternal disomy of part of chromosome 11. This disomic region contains imprinted genes, including the gene encoding the cell cycle inhibitor p57Kip2 (CDKN1C), which is silenced as a consequence of the recombination event. We hypothesized that targeting p57Kip2 could stimulate adult human β cell replication. Indeed, when we suppressed CDKN1C expression in human islets obtained from deceased adult organ donors and transplanted them into hyperglycemic, immunodeficient mice, β cell replication increased more than 3-fold. The newly replicated cells retained properties of mature β cells, including the expression of β cell markers such as insulin, PDX1, and NKX6.1. Importantly, these newly replicated cells demonstrated normal glucose-induced calcium influx, further indicating β cell functionality. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the massive β cell replication that occurs in children with focal hyperinsulinism. These data also provided evidence that β cells from older humans, in which baseline replication is negligible, can be coaxed to re-enter and complete the cell cycle while maintaining mature β cell properties. Thus, controlled manipulation of this pathway holds promise for the expansion of β cells in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  20. Targeting the cell cycle inhibitor p57Kip2 promotes adult human β cell replication

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Dana; Li, Changhong; Yu, Ming; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Jia; Naji, Ali; Ziaie, Seyed; Glaser, Benjamin; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2014-01-01

    Children with focal hyperinsulinism of infancy display a dramatic, non-neoplastic clonal expansion of β cells that have undergone mitotic recombination, resulting in paternal disomy of part of chromosome 11. This disomic region contains imprinted genes, including the gene encoding the cell cycle inhibitor p57Kip2 (CDKN1C), which is silenced as a consequence of the recombination event. We hypothesized that targeting p57Kip2 could stimulate adult human β cell replication. Indeed, when we suppressed CDKN1C expression in human islets obtained from deceased adult organ donors and transplanted them into hyperglycemic, immunodeficient mice, β cell replication increased more than 3-fold. The newly replicated cells retained properties of mature β cells, including the expression of β cell markers such as insulin, PDX1, and NKX6.1. Importantly, these newly replicated cells demonstrated normal glucose-induced calcium influx, further indicating β cell functionality. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the massive β cell replication that occurs in children with focal hyperinsulinism. These data also provided evidence that β cells from older humans, in which baseline replication is negligible, can be coaxed to re-enter and complete the cell cycle while maintaining mature β cell properties. Thus, controlled manipulation of this pathway holds promise for the expansion of β cells in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24430183

  1. Amphiphilic cationic nanogels as brain-targeted carriers for activated nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Warren, G; Makarov, E; Lu, Y; Senanayake, T; Rivera, K; Gorantla, S; Poluektova, LY; Vinogradov, SV

    2015-01-01

    Progress in AIDS treatment shifted emphasis towards limiting adverse effects of antiviral drugs while improving the treatment of hard-to-reach viral reservoirs. Many therapeutic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have a limited access to the central nervous system (CNS). Increased NRTI levels induced various complications during the therapy, including neurotoxicity, due to the NRTI toxicity to mitochondria. Here, we describe an innovative design of biodegradable cationic cholesterol-ε-polylysine nanogel carriers for delivery of triphosphorylated NRTIs that demonstrated high anti-HIV activity along with low neurotoxicity, warranting minimal side effects following systemic administration. Efficient CNS targeting was achieved by nanogel modification with brain-specific peptide vectors. Novel dual and triple-drug nanoformulations, analogous to therapeutic NRTI cocktails, displayed equal or higher antiviral activity in HIV-infected macrophages compared to free drugs. Our results suggest potential alternative approach to HIV-1 treatment focused on the effective nanodrug delivery to viral reservoirs in the CNS and reduced neurotoxicity. PMID:25559020

  2. Target-site basis for resistance to acetolactate synthase inhibitor in Water chickweed (Myosoton aquaticum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Weitang; Bi, Yaling; Li, Lingxu; Yuan, Guohui; Du, Long; Wang, Jinxin

    2013-09-01

    Water chickweed is a widespread and competitive winter annual or biennial weed of wheat in China. One Water chickweed population (HN02) resistant to several acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors was found in Henan province of China. Whole-plant bioassays showed that HN02 was high resistance to tribenuron (292.05-flod). In vitro ALS assays revealed that resistance was due to reduced sensitivity of the ALS enzyme to tribenuron. The I50 value for HN02 was 85.53 times greater respectively than that of susceptible population (SD05). This altered ALS sensitivity in the resistant population was due to a mutation in the ALS gene resulting in a Pro197 to Ser substitution. Cross-resistance experiments indicated that HN02 exhibited various resistance patterns to pyrithiobac-sodium, florasulam and pyroxsulam, without resistance to imazethapyr. This is the first report of tribenuron-resistant Water chickweed in Henan province of China, target-site based resistance was established as being due to an insensitive form of ALS, resulting from a Pro to Ser substitution at amino acid position 197 in the ALS gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. DYRK1B as therapeutic target in Hedgehog/GLI-dependent cancer cells with Smoothened inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Wolfgang; Hutzinger, Martin; Elmer, Dominik Patrick; Parigger, Thomas; Sternberg, Christina; Cegielkowski, Lukasz; Zaja, Mirko; Leban, Johann; Michel, Susanne; Hamm, Svetlana; Vitt, Daniel; Aberger, Fritz

    2016-02-09

    A wide range of human malignancies displays aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH)/GLI signaling, including cancers of the skin, brain, gastrointestinal tract and hematopoietic system. Targeting oncogenic HH/GLI signaling with small molecule inhibitors of the essential pathway effector Smoothened (SMO) has shown remarkable therapeutic effects in patients with advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma. However, acquired and de novo resistance to SMO inhibitors poses severe limitations to the use of SMO antagonists and urgently calls for the identification of novel targets and compounds.Here we report on the identification of the Dual-Specificity-Tyrosine-Phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase 1B (DYRK1B) as critical positive regulator of HH/GLI signaling downstream of SMO. Genetic and chemical inhibition of DYRK1B in human and mouse cancer cells resulted in marked repression of HH signaling and GLI1 expression, respectively. Importantly, DYRK1B inhibition profoundly impaired GLI1 expression in both SMO-inhibitor sensitive and resistant settings. We further introduce a novel small molecule DYRK1B inhibitor, DYRKi, with suitable pharmacologic properties to impair SMO-dependent and SMO-independent oncogenic GLI activity. The results support the use of DYRK1B antagonists for the treatment of HH/GLI-associated cancers where SMO inhibitors fail to demonstrate therapeutic efficacy.

  4. Targeting multiple chorismate-utilizing enzymes with a single inhibitor: validation of a three-stage design.

    PubMed

    Ziebart, Kristin T; Dixon, Seth M; Avila, Belem; El-Badri, Mohamed H; Guggenheim, Kathryn G; Kurth, Mark J; Toney, Michael D

    2010-05-13

    Chorismate-utilizing enzymes are attractive antimicrobial drug targets due to their absence in humans and their central role in bacterial survival and virulence. The structural and mechanistic homology of a group of these inspired the goal of discovering inhibitors that target multiple enzymes. Previously, we discovered seven inhibitors of 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate synthase (ADCS) in an on-bead, fluorescent-based screen of a 2304-member one-bead-one-compound combinatorial library. The inhibitors comprise PAYLOAD and COMBI stages, which interact with active site and surface residues, respectively, and are linked by a SPACER stage. These seven compounds, and six derivatives thereof, also inhibit two other enzymes in this family, isochorismate synthase (IS) and anthranilate synthase (AS). The best binding compound inhibits ADCS, IS, and AS with K(i) values of 720, 56, and 80 microM, respectively. Inhibitors with varying SPACER lengths show the original choice of lysine to be optimal. Lastly, inhibition data confirm the PAYLOAD stage directs the inhibitors to the ADCS active site.

  5. Clearance Prediction of Targeted Covalent Inhibitors by In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation of Hepatic and Extrahepatic Clearance Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Yang, Xin; Strelevitz, Timothy J; Montgomery, Justin; Brown, Matthew F; Zientek, Michael A; Banfield, Christopher; Gilbert, Adam M; Thorarensen, Atli; Dowty, Martin E

    2017-01-01

    The concept of target-specific covalent enzyme inhibitors appears attractive from both an efficacy and a selectivity viewpoint considering the potential for enhanced biochemical efficiency associated with an irreversible mechanism. Aside from potential safety concerns, clearance prediction of covalent inhibitors represents a unique challenge due to the inclusion of nontraditional metabolic pathways of direct conjugation with glutathione (GSH) or via GSH S-transferase-mediated processes. In this article, a novel pharmacokinetic algorithm was developed using a series of Pfizer kinase selective acrylamide covalent inhibitors based on their in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of systemic clearance in rats. The algorithm encompasses the use of hepatocytes as an in vitro model for hepatic clearance due to oxidative metabolism and GSH conjugation, and the use of whole blood as an in vitro surrogate for GSH conjugation in extrahepatic tissues. Initial evaluations with clinical covalent inhibitors suggested that the scaling algorithm developed from rats may also be useful for human clearance prediction when species-specific parameters, such as hepatocyte and blood stability and blood binding, were considered. With careful consideration of clearance mechanisms, the described in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach may be useful to facilitate candidate optimization, selection, and prediction of human pharmacokinetic clearance during the discovery and development of targeted covalent inhibitors.

  6. DYRK1B as therapeutic target in Hedgehog/GLI-dependent cancer cells with Smoothened inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Wolfgang; Hutzinger, Martin; Elmer, Dominik Patrick; Parigger, Thomas; Sternberg, Christina; Cegielkowski, Lukasz; Zaja, Mirko; Leban, Johann; Michel, Susanne; Hamm, Svetlana; Vitt, Daniel; Aberger, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of human malignancies displays aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH)/GLI signaling, including cancers of the skin, brain, gastrointestinal tract and hematopoietic system. Targeting oncogenic HH/GLI signaling with small molecule inhibitors of the essential pathway effector Smoothened (SMO) has shown remarkable therapeutic effects in patients with advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma. However, acquired and de novo resistance to SMO inhibitors poses severe limitations to the use of SMO antagonists and urgently calls for the identification of novel targets and compounds. Here we report on the identification of the Dual-Specificity-Tyrosine-Phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase 1B (DYRK1B) as critical positive regulator of HH/GLI signaling downstream of SMO. Genetic and chemical inhibition of DYRK1B in human and mouse cancer cells resulted in marked repression of HH signaling and GLI1 expression, respectively. Importantly, DYRK1B inhibition profoundly impaired GLI1 expression in both SMO-inhibitor sensitive and resistant settings. We further introduce a novel small molecule DYRK1B inhibitor, DYRKi, with suitable pharmacologic properties to impair SMO-dependent and SMO-independent oncogenic GLI activity. The results support the use of DYRK1B antagonists for the treatment of HH/GLI-associated cancers where SMO inhibitors fail to demonstrate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26784250

  7. Validation of the proteasome as a therapeutic target in Plasmodium using an epoxyketone inhibitor with parasite-specific toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Verdoes, Martijn; Asbjornsdottir, Kristijana H.; Deu, Edgar; Edgington, Laura E.; Lee, Jeong Tae; Kirk, Christopher J.; Demo, Susan D.; Williamson, Kim C.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Summary The Plasmodium proteasome has been suggested to be a potential anti-malarial drug target, however toxicity of inhibitors has prevented validation of this enzyme in vivo. We report here a screen of a library of 670 analogs of the recently FDA approved inhibitor, carfilzomib, to identify compounds that selectively kill parasites. We identified one compound, PR3, that has significant parasite killing activity in vitro but dramatically reduced toxicity in host cells. We found that this parasite-specific toxicity is not due to selective targeting of the Plasmodium proteasome over the host proteasome, but instead is due to a lack of activity against one of the human proteasome subunits. Subsequently, we used PR3 to significantly reduce parasite load in P. berghei infected mice without host toxicity, thus validating the proteasome as a viable anti-malarial drug target. PMID:23142757

  8. A high-throughput screen for quorum-sensing inhibitors that target acyl-homoserine lactone synthases.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Quin H; Grove, Tyler L; Booker, Squire J; Greenberg, E Peter

    2013-08-20

    Many Proteobacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quorum sensing to control specific genes. Acyl-HSL synthesis requires unique enzymes that use S-adenosyl methionine as an acyl acceptor and amino acid donor. We developed and executed an enzyme-coupled high-throughput cell-free screen to discover acyl-HSL synthase inhibitors. The three strongest inhibitors were equally active against two different acyl-HSL synthases: Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 and Yersinia pestis YspI. Two of these inhibitors showed activity in whole cells. The most potent compound behaves as a noncompetitive inhibitor with a Ki of 0.7 µM and showed activity in a cell-based assay. Quorum-sensing signal synthesis inhibitors will be useful in attempts to understand acyl-HSL synthase catalysis and as a tool in studies of quorum-sensing control of gene expression. Because acyl-HSL quorum-sensing controls virulence of some bacterial pathogens, anti-quorum-sensing chemicals have been sought as potential therapeutic agents. Our screen and identification of acyl-HSL synthase inhibitors serve as a basis for efforts to target quorum-sensing signal synthesis as an antivirulence approach.

  9. Synergistic targeting of Sp1, a critical transcription factor for myeloma cell growth and survival, by panobinostat and proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bat-Erdene, Ariunzaya; Miki, Hirokazu; Oda, Asuko; Nakamura, Shingen; Teramachi, Jumpei; Amachi, Ryota; Tenshin, Hirofumi; Hiasa, Masahiro; Iwasa, Masami; Harada, Takeshi; Fujii, Shiro; Sogabe, Kimiko; Kagawa, Kumiko; Yoshida, Sumiko; Endo, Itsuro; Aihara, Kenichi; Abe, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Panobinostat, a pan-deacetylase inhibitor, synergistically elicits cytotoxic activity against myeloma (MM) cells in combination with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Because precise mechanisms for panobinostat's anti-MM action still remain elusive, we aimed to clarify the mechanisms of anti-MM effects of panobinostat and its synergism with proteasome inhibitors. Although the transcription factor Sp1 was overexpressed in MM cells, the Sp1 inhibitor terameprocol induced MM cell death in parallel with reduction of IRF4 and cMyc. Panobinostat induced activation of caspase-8, which was inversely correlated with reduction of Sp1 protein levels in MM cells. The panobinostat-mediated effects were further potentiated to effectively induce MM cell death in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib even at suboptimal concentrations as a single agent. Addition of the caspase-8 inhibitor z-IETD-FMK abolished the Sp1 reduction not only by panobinostat alone but also by its combination with bortezomib, suggesting caspase-8-mediated Sp1 degradation. The synergistic Sp1 reduction markedly suppressed Sp1-driven prosurvival factors, IRF4 and cMyc. Besides, the combinatory treatment reduced HDAC1, another Sp1 target, in MM cells, which may potentiate HDAC inhibition. Collectively, caspase-8-mediated post-translational Sp1 degradation appears to be among major mechanisms for synergistic anti-MM effects of panobinostat and proteasome inhibitors in combination. PMID:27738323

  10. 9-(Arenethenyl)purines as dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitors targeting the inactive conformation: design, synthesis, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Sheng; Zhu, Xiaotian; Wang, Yihan; Azam, Mohammad; Wen, David; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, R Mathew; Liu, Shuangying; Banda, Geetha; Lentini, Scott P; Das, Sasmita; Xu, Qihong; Keats, Jeff; Wang, Frank; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Snodgrass, Joseph T; Broudy, Marc I; Russian, Karin; Daley, George Q; Iuliucci, John; Dalgarno, David C; Clackson, Tim; Sawyer, Tomi K; Shakespeare, William C

    2009-08-13

    A novel series of potent dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitors based on a 9-(arenethenyl)purine core has been identified. Unlike traditional dual Src/Abl inhibitors targeting the active enzyme conformation, these inhibitors bind to the inactive, DFG-out conformation of both kinases. Extensive SAR studies led to the discovery of potent and orally bioavailable inhibitors, some of which demonstrated in vivo efficacy. Once-daily oral administration of inhibitor 9i (AP24226) significantly prolonged the survival of mice injected intravenously with wild type Bcr-Abl expressing Ba/F3 cells at a dose of 10 mg/kg. In a separate model, oral administration of 9i to mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of Src Y527F expressing NIH 3T3 cells elicited dose-dependent tumor shrinkage with complete tumor regression observed at the highest dose. Notably, several inhibitors (e.g., 14a, AP24163) exhibited modest cellular potency (IC50 = 300-400 nM) against the Bcr-Abl mutant T315I, a variant resistant to all currently marketed therapies for chronic myeloid leukemia.

  11. The Role of c-KIT in Tumorigenesis: Evaluation in Canine Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Joshua D; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Kaneene, John B; Miller, RoseAnn; Resau, James H; Kiupel, Matti

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The c-KIT proto-oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neoplastic diseases, including gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mastocytosis in humans, and mast cell tumors (MCTs) in canines. Cutaneous MCTs are common neoplasms in dogs and have a variable biologic behavior. The goal of this study was to define the prognostic significance of c-KIT mutations identified in canine MCTs and the associations between c-KIT mutations, KIT localization, and KIT expression levels. Microdissection and polymerase chain reaction were performed on 60 MCTs to identify c-KIT mutations. Anti-KIT antibodies were used for immunohistochemical evaluation of KIT localization. Forty-two MCTs were included in a tissue microarray, and KIT expression was quantified using immunofluorescence. Canine MCTs with c-KIT mutations were significantly associated with an increased incidence of recurrent disease and death. c-KIT mutations were also significantly associated with aberrant protein localization; however, the level of KIT expression did not correlate with either c-KIT mutations or changes in protein localization. Considering the high prevalence of canine MCTs and the central role of c-KIT in the tumorigenesis of certain tumors, canine MCTs are an excellent model for characterizing the role of c-KIT in neoplastic diseases and is a potential target for novel therapeutic agents in clinical trials. PMID:16611403

  12. The role of c-KIT in tumorigenesis: evaluation in canine cutaneous mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Webster, Joshua D; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Kaneene, John B; Miller, RoseAnn; Resau, James H; Kiupel, Matti

    2006-02-01

    The c-KIT proto-oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neoplastic diseases, including gastrointestinal stromal tumors and mastocytosis in humans, and mast cell tumors (MCTs) in canines. Cutaneous MCTs are common neoplasms in dogs and have a variable biologic behavior. The goal of this study was to define the prognostic significance of c-KIT mutations identified in canine MCTs and the associations between c-KIT mutations, KIT localization, and KIT expression levels. Microdissection and polymerase chain reaction were performed on 60 MCTs to identify c-KIT mutations. Anti-KIT antibodies were used for immunohistochemical evaluation of KIT localization. Forty-two MCTs were included in a tissue microarray, and KIT expression was quantified using immunofluorescence. Canine MCTs with c-KIT mutations were significantly associated with an increased incidence of recurrent disease and death. c-KIT mutations were also significantly associated with aberrant protein localization; however, the level of KIT expression did not correlate with either c-KIT mutations or changes in protein localization. Considering the high prevalence of canine MCTs and the central role of c-KIT in the tumorigenesis of certain tumors, canine MCTs are an excellent model for characterizing the role of c-KIT in neoplastic diseases and is a potential target for novel therapeutic agents in clinical trials.

  13. Structural insights into the pH-controlled targeting of plant cell-wall invertase by a specific inhibitor protein

    PubMed Central

    Hothorn, Michael; Van den Ende, Wim; Lammens, Willem; Rybin, Vladimir; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Invertases are highly regulated enzymes with essential functions in carbohydrate partitioning, sugar signaling, and plant development. Here we present the 2.6 Å crystal structure of Arabidopsis cell-wall invertase 1 (INV1) in complex with a protein inhibitor (CIF, or cell-wall inhibitor of β-fructosidase) from tobacco. The structure identifies a small amino acid motif in CIF that directly targets the invertase active site. The activity of INV1 and its interaction with CIF are strictly pH-dependent with a maximum at about pH 4.5. At this pH, isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that CIF tightly binds its target with nanomolar affinity. CIF competes with sucrose (Suc) for the same binding site, suggesting that both the extracellular Suc concentration and the pH changes regulate association of the complex. A conserved glutamate residue in the complex interface was previously identified as an important quantitative trait locus affecting fruit quality, which implicates the invertase–inhibitor complex as a main regulator of carbon partitioning in plants. Comparison of the CIF/INV1 structure with the complex between the structurally CIF-related pectin methylesterase inhibitor (PMEI) and pectin methylesterase indicates a common targeting mechanism in PMEI and CIF. However, CIF and PMEI use distinct surface areas to selectively inhibit very different enzymatic scaffolds. PMID:20858733

  14. Structural insights into the pH-controlled targeting of plant cell-wall invertase by a specific inhibitor protein.

    PubMed

    Hothorn, Michael; Van den Ende, Wim; Lammens, Willem; Rybin, Vladimir; Scheffzek, Klaus

    2010-10-05

    Invertases are highly regulated enzymes with essential functions in carbohydrate partitioning, sugar signaling, and plant development. Here we present the 2.6 Å crystal structure of Arabidopsis cell-wall invertase 1 (INV1) in complex with a protein inhibitor (CIF, or cell-wall inhibitor of β-fructosidase) from tobacco. The structure identifies a small amino acid motif in CIF that directly targets the invertase active site. The activity of INV1 and its interaction with CIF are strictly pH-dependent with a maximum at about pH 4.5. At this pH, isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that CIF tightly binds its target with nanomolar affinity. CIF competes with sucrose (Suc) for the same binding site, suggesting that both the extracellular Suc concentration and the pH changes regulate association of the complex. A conserved glutamate residue in the complex interface was previously identified as an important quantitative trait locus affecting fruit quality, which implicates the invertase-inhibitor complex as a main regulator of carbon partitioning in plants. Comparison of the CIF/INV1 structure with the complex between the structurally CIF-related pectin methylesterase inhibitor (PMEI) and pectin methylesterase indicates a common targeting mechanism in PMEI and CIF. However, CIF and PMEI use distinct surface areas to selectively inhibit very different enzymatic scaffolds.

  15. A novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for screening HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting HIV-1 Gp41 core structure.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei; Wang, Rui-Rui; Gao, Yue-Dong; Yang, Liu-Meng; Sun, Yi; Huang, Jing-Fei; Tien, Po; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2011-02-01

    The gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein mediates the fusion of viral and host cell membranes. As the HIV-1 enters the host cells, the 2 helical regions, HR1 and HR2, in the ectodomain of gp41 can form a 6-helix bundle, which brings the viral and target cell membranes to close proximity and serves as an attractive target for developing HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Now, there are several cell- and molecule-based assays to identify potential HIV-1 fusion inhibitors targeting gp41. However, these assays cannot be used universally because they are time-consuming, inconvenient, and expensive. In the present study, the authors expressed and purified GST-HR121 and C43-30a proteins that were derived from the HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain region. GST-HR121 has a function similar to the HR1 peptide of gp41, whereas C43-30a is an HR2-derived peptide that added 50 amino acid residues (aa) in the N-terminal of C43. Further research found they could interact with each other, and a potential HIV-1 fusion inhibitor could inhibit this interaction. On the basis of this fact, a novel, rapid, and economic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established, which can be developed for high-throughput screening of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors.

  16. Oncogenic signaling by Kit tyrosine kinase occurs selectively on the Golgi apparatus in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Obata, Y; Horikawa, K; Takahashi, T; Akieda, Y; Tsujimoto, M; Fletcher, J A; Esumi, H; Nishida, T; Abe, R

    2017-02-13

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase. Most primary GIST patients respond to the Kit inhibitor imatinib, but this drug often becomes ineffective because of secondary mutations in the Kit kinase domain. The characteristic intracellular accumulation of imatinib-sensitive and -resistant Kit protein is well documented, but its relationship to oncogenic signaling remains unknown. Here, we show that in cancer tissue from primary GIST patients as well as in cell lines, mutant Kit accumulates on the Golgi apparatus, whereas normal Kit localizes to the plasma membrane (PM). In imatinib-resistant GIST with a secondary Kit mutation, Kit localizes predominantly on the Golgi apparatus. Both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant Kit (Kit(mut)) become fully auto-phosphorylated only on the Golgi and only if in a complex-glycosylated form. Kit(mut) accumulates on the Golgi during the early secretory pathway, but not after endocytosis. The aberrant kinase activity of Kit(mut) prevents its export from the Golgi to the PM. Furthermore, Kit(mut) on the Golgi signals and activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI3K-Akt) pathway, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), and the Mek-Erk pathway. Blocking the biosynthetic transport of Kit(mut) to the Golgi from the endoplasmic reticulum inhibits oncogenic signaling. PM localization of Kit(mut) is not required for its signaling. Activation of Src-family tyrosine kinases on the Golgi is essential for oncogenic Kit signaling. These results suggest that the Golgi apparatus serves as a platform for oncogenic Kit signaling. Our study demonstrates that Kit(mut)'s pathogenicity is related to its mis-localization, and may offer a new strategy for treating imatinib-resistant GISTs.Oncogene advance online publication, 13 February 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.519.

  17. Oncogenic signaling by Kit tyrosine kinase occurs selectively on the Golgi apparatus in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Y; Horikawa, K; Takahashi, T; Akieda, Y; Tsujimoto, M; Fletcher, J A; Esumi, H; Nishida, T; Abe, R

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are caused by gain-of-function mutations in the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase. Most primary GIST patients respond to the Kit inhibitor imatinib, but this drug often becomes ineffective because of secondary mutations in the Kit kinase domain. The characteristic intracellular accumulation of imatinib-sensitive and -resistant Kit protein is well documented, but its relationship to oncogenic signaling remains unknown. Here, we show that in cancer tissue from primary GIST patients as well as in cell lines, mutant Kit accumulates on the Golgi apparatus, whereas normal Kit localizes to the plasma membrane (PM). In imatinib-resistant GIST with a secondary Kit mutation, Kit localizes predominantly on the Golgi apparatus. Both imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant Kit (Kit(mut)) become fully auto-phosphorylated only on the Golgi and only if in a complex-glycosylated form. Kit(mut) accumulates on the Golgi during the early secretory pathway, but not after endocytosis. The aberrant kinase activity of Kit(mut) prevents its export from the Golgi to the PM. Furthermore, Kit(mut) on the Golgi signals and activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Akt (PI3K–Akt) pathway, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), and the Mek–Erk pathway. Blocking the biosynthetic transport of Kit(mut) to the Golgi from the endoplasmic reticulum inhibits oncogenic signaling. PM localization of Kit(mut) is not required for its signaling. Activation of Src-family tyrosine kinases on the Golgi is essential for oncogenic Kit signaling. These results suggest that the Golgi apparatus serves as a platform for oncogenic Kit signaling. Our study demonstrates that Kit(mut)’s pathogenicity is related to its mis-localization, and may offer a new strategy for treating imatinib-resistant GISTs. PMID:28192400

  18. Isoprenoid biosynthesis as a target for antibacterial and antiparasitic drugs: phosphonohydroxamic acids as inhibitors of deoxyxylulose phosphate reducto-isomerase

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate pathway is a target against pathogenic bacteria and the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. 4-(Hydroxyamino)-4-oxobutylphosphonic acid and 4-[hydroxy(methyl)amino]-4-oxobutyl phosphonic acid, two novel inhibitors of DXR (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reducto-isomerase), the second enzyme of the pathway, have been synthesized and compared with fosmidomycin, the best known inhibitor of this enzyme. The latter phosphonohydroxamic acid showed a high inhibitory activity towards DXR, much like fosmidomycin, as well as significant antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli in tests on Petri dishes. PMID:15473867

  19. C1 inhibitor function using contact-phase proteases as target: evaluation of an innovative assay.

    PubMed

    Ghannam, A; Sellier, P; Defendi, F; Favier, B; Charignon, D; López-Lera, A; López-Trascasa, M; Ponard, D; Drouet, C

    2015-09-01

    Controlling prekallikrein activation by C1 inhibitor (C1Inh) represents the most essential mechanism for angioedema patient protection. C1Inh function in the plasma is usually measured based on the residual activity of the C1s protease not involved in the pathological process. We have hereby proposed an alternative enzymatic measurement of C1Inh function based on contact-phase activation and correlation with angioedema diagnostic requirements. The contact phase was reconstituted using the purified components, with C1Inh standard or plasma sample. The kinetics of the amidase activity were monitored using Pro-Phe-Arg-pNA, independently of alpha2-macroglobulin. We prevented any interference from a possible high plasma kininogenase activity by preincubating the samples with protease inhibitor. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were used to calculate the assay's diagnostic performance. The calibration curve was built using C1Inh standard (threshold limit 0.10 × 10(-3) U, i.e., 0.2 pmol), and C1Inh function was quantified in the sample, with a reference interval established based on healthy individuals (n = 281; men: 0.61-1.10 U/ml, median: 0.85 U/ml; women: 0.42-1.08 U/ml, median: 0.74 U/ml). The median values of female donors were lower than those of the others due to estrogen, yet C1Inh function remained within the reference interval. The ROC curve calculation provided the following optimum diagnostic cutoff values: women 0.36 U/ml (area under curve [AUC]: 0.99; sensitivity: 93.48%; specificity: 99.37%); and men 0.61 U/ml (AUC: 1; sensitivity: 100.0%; specificity: 100.0%). The performance outcome provided features suitable for angioedema diagnostic or follow-up. Established by means of the kinin formation process, this assay should be preferred over the method based on a C1s protease target. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. User Authentication. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plum, Terry, Comp.; Bleiler, Richard, Comp.

    2001-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to examine the systems research libraries use to authenticate and authorize the users of their online networked information resources. A total of 52 of 121 ARL member libraries responded to…

  1. World Disarmament Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woito, Robert, Ed.

    This kit presents a comprehensive introduction for students to arms control and disarmament issues. Included are copies of published and unpublished articles for each topic. Section I provides a self-survey to enable students to assess their own attitudes, values, and knowledge. The survey poses questions for which students select one of several…

  2. User Authentication. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plum, Terry, Comp.; Bleiler, Richard, Comp.

    2001-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to examine the systems research libraries use to authenticate and authorize the users of their online networked information resources. A total of 52 of 121 ARL member libraries responded to…

  3. Ohio EPA Teachers Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus.

    In an effort to provide teachers in Ohio with assistance in environmental education, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has produced this teachers kit. It is designed to describe what the Ohio EPA is doing to protect Ohio's air, land, and water. The background information provides an historical account of some of the events that have…

  4. Balloons and Science Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balloon Council, Washington, DC.

    This document provides background information on balloons including: (1) the history of balloons; (2) balloon manufacturing; (3) biodegradability; (4) the fate of latex balloons; and (5) the effect of balloons on the rainforest and sea mammals. Also included as part of this instructional kit are four fun experiments that allow students to…

  5. Personalized Thematic Kits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontrager, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Teaching Spanish at the K-5 level is a passion of mine, and the author would like to share some of the practical applications that she finds most rewarding and effective. She has found enthusiastic response to the creation of detailed language learning kits that are rooted in storytelling, but expanded to include home-made board games,…

  6. [Conference Time Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Public Relations Association, Washington, DC.

    This multimedia kit, for use with and by teachers from kindergarten through the upper elementary grades, consists of four components: 1) a filmstrip for teachers; 2) the 1970 edition of a handbook, "Conference Time for Teachers and Parents"; 3) a filmstrip for parents; 4) a supporting parent information leaflet "How To Confer Successfully with…

  7. Theme Kits Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslinger, Leslie Silk

    Recognizing the long-lasting impact of young childrens learning through themes as well as the amount of teacher time spent in preparing for this type of teaching, this kit is designed to help teachers avoid the shortcomings of theme-based teaching, while capitalizing on the benefits of this approach. The book is presented in two sections. The…

  8. Theme Kits Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslinger, Leslie Silk

    Recognizing the long-lasting impact of young childrens learning through themes as well as the amount of teacher time spent in preparing for this type of teaching, this kit is designed to help teachers avoid the shortcomings of theme-based teaching, while capitalizing on the benefits of this approach. The book is presented in two sections. The…

  9. Projectable Basic Electronics Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    H'ng, John; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Outlines advantages derived from constructing and using a Projectable Basic Electronics Kit and provides: (1) list of components; (2) diagrams of 10 finished components (resistor; capacitor; diode; switch; bulb; transistor; meter; variable capacitor; coil; connecting terminal); and (3) diode and transistor activities. (JN)

  10. Leisure Counseling. A Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epperson, Arlin; And Others

    This set of materials intended for use in the development of programs in leisure services and a vocational counseling contains information about a Leisure Counseling Media Kit, with directions for ordering a slide-tape program. Order forms and additional information about leisure counseling supplies are also included. A brief pamphlet describes…

  11. Projectable Basic Electronics Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    H'ng, John; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Outlines advantages derived from constructing and using a Projectable Basic Electronics Kit and provides: (1) list of components; (2) diagrams of 10 finished components (resistor; capacitor; diode; switch; bulb; transistor; meter; variable capacitor; coil; connecting terminal); and (3) diode and transistor activities. (JN)

  12. Early Childhood Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials, the bibliography covers 80 kits for developing skills at the early childhood level. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession number and include the following information:…

  13. Core Competencies. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Beth, Comp.

    2002-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to investigate the status of core competencies (i.e., the skills, knowledge, abilities, and attributes that employees across an organization are expected to have to contribute successfully…

  14. Vietnamese Culture Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Liem Thanh

    This booklet provides a brief description of the cultural background of the Vietnamese, the geography of the country of Vietnam, the history of the Vietnamese people, their language, beliefs, systems of values, religions, customs, feasts, and holidays. The kit is designed to provide American sponsors and teachers with meaningful information about…

  15. Voter Education Training Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multi-District Inst. for Political Education, Pitman, NJ.

    Guides and resources in this kit are prepared for a six week to two month secondary voter education course. The objectives are to prepare and motivate eligible students to register and vote in the presidential election, to participate in the presidential election campaigning, and to increase their overall knowledge concerning the presidential…

  16. The ESL Starter Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond. Virginia Adult Education and Literacy Resource Center.

    The kit is intended for teachers beginning to teach English as a Second Language (ESL). The first part offers some ideas for testing, registering, and placing students according to their needs and goals. A sample registration form, placement test, list of commercially-available tests, and sample needs assessments are included here. The second…

  17. Ohio EPA Teachers Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Environmental Protection Agency, Columbus.

    In an effort to provide teachers in Ohio with assistance in environmental education, the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has produced this teachers kit. It is designed to describe what the Ohio EPA is doing to protect Ohio's air, land, and water. The background information provides an historical account of some of the events that have…

  18. Chat Reference. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronan, Jana, Comp.; Turner, Carol, Comp.

    2002-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to gather data on chat reference service. A total of 66 of 124 ARL member libraries responded to the survey. A copy of the questionnaire with tabulated results is presented. Representative…

  19. Aurora kinase A and B as new treatment targets in aromatase inhibitor-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hole, Stine; Pedersen, Astrid M; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Yde, Christina W

    2015-02-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are used for treatment of estrogen receptor α (ER)-positive breast cancer; however, resistance is a major obstacle for optimal outcome. This preclinical study aimed at identifying potential new treatment targets in AI-resistant breast cancer cells. Parental MCF-7 breast cancer cells and four newly established cell lines, resistant to the AIs exemestane or letrozole, were used for a functional kinase inhibitor screen. A library comprising 195 different compounds was tested for preferential growth inhibition of AI-resistant cell lines. Selected targets were validated by analysis of cell growth, cell cycle phase distribution, protein expression, and subcellular localization. We identified 24 compounds, including several inhibitors of Aurora kinases e.g., JNJ-7706621 and barasertib. Protein expression of Aurora kinase A and B was found upregulated in AI-resistant cells compared with MCF-7, and knockdown studies showed that Aurora kinase A was essential for AI-resistant cell growth. In AI-resistant cell lines, the clinically relevant Aurora kinase inhibitors alisertib and danusertib blocked cell cycle progression at the G2/M phase, interfered with chromosome alignment and spindle pole formation, and resulted in preferential growth inhibition compared with parental MCF-7 cells. Even further growth inhibition was obtained when combining the Aurora kinase inhibitors with the antiestrogen fulvestrant. Our study is the first to demonstrate that Aurora kinase A and B may be treatment targets in AI-resistant cells, and our data suggest that therapy targeting both ER and Aurora kinases may be a potent treatment strategy for overcoming AI resistance in breast cancer.

  20. Tunicamycins: translocase-I inhibitors that target bacterial cell wall and mammalian N-glycoproteins. The potential for selective inhibitors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tunicamycins are a heterologous family of nucleoside antibiotics that target the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The mechanism of action is known, with the tunicamycin-Mg2+ complex established as a transition state analog for hexosamine-1-phosphate: prenol pho...

  1. Induced Resistance to Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors in Trypanosoma brucei Is Due to Overexpression of the Target

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Ranae M.; Gillespie, J. Robert; Shibata, Sayaka; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G. J.

    2013-01-01

    New classes of antiparasitic drugs active against Trypanosoma brucei are needed to combat human African trypanosomiasis. Inhibitors of methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) have excellent potential to be developed for this purpose (S. Shibata, J. R. Gillespie, A. M. Kelley, A. J. Napuli, Z. Zhang, K. V. Kovzun, R. M. Pefley, J. Lam, F. H. Zucker, W. C. Van Voorhis, E. A. Merritt, W. G. Hol, C. L. Verlinde, E. Fan, and F. S. Buckner, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 55:1982–1989, 2011). In order to assess the potential for resistance to develop against this new class of inhibitors, T. brucei cultures were grown in the presence of MetRS inhibitors or comparison drugs. Resistance up to ∼50 times the baseline 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was induced against a MetRS inhibitor after ∼120 days. A similar level of resistance to the clinical drug eflornithine was induced after ∼50 days and for pentamidine after ∼80 days. Thus, resistance was induced more slowly against MetRS inhibitors than against clinically used drugs. The parasites resistant to the MetRS inhibitor were shown to overexpress MetRS mRNA by a factor of 35 over the parental strain. Southern analysis indicated that the MetRS gene was amplified in the genome by nearly 8-fold. When injected into mice, the MetRS inhibitor-resistant parasites caused a reduced level of infection, indicating that the changes associated with resistance attenuated their virulence. This finding and the fact that resistance to MetRS inhibitors developed relatively slowly are encouraging for further development of this class of compounds. Published studies on other antitrypanosomal drugs have primarily shown that alterations in membrane transporters were the mechanisms responsible for resistance. This is the first published report of induced drug resistance in the African trypanosome due to overexpression of the target enzyme. PMID:23587950

  2. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis Probe Targets Plasmodium falciparum Cytochrome b Ubiquinone Reduction Site and Synergizes With Oxidation Site Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, Amanda K.; Heidebrecht, Richard W.; Mulrooney, Carol; Beaudoin, Jennifer A.; Comer, Eamon; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Fitzgerald, Mark E.; Masi, Daniela; Galinsky, Kevin; Scherer, Christina A.; Palmer, Michelle; Munoz, Benito; Foley, Michael; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wiegand, Roger C.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The emergence and spread of drug resistance to current antimalarial therapies remains a pressing concern, escalating the need for compounds that demonstrate novel modes of action. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis (DOS) libraries bridge the gap between conventional small molecule and natural product libraries, allowing the interrogation of more diverse chemical space in efforts to identify probes of novel parasite pathways. Methods. We screened and optimized a probe from a DOS library using whole-cell phenotypic assays. Resistance selection and whole-genome sequencing approaches were employed to identify the cellular target of the compounds. Results. We identified a novel macrocyclic inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum with nanomolar potency and identified the reduction site of cytochrome b as its cellular target. Combination experiments with reduction and oxidation site inhibitors showed synergistic inhibition of the parasite. Conclusions. The cytochrome b oxidation center is a validated antimalarial target. We show that the reduction site of cytochrome b is also a druggable target. Our results demonstrating a synergistic relationship between oxidation and reduction site inhibitors suggests a future strategy for new combination therapies in the treatment of malaria. PMID:25336726

  3. A novel multi-target inhibitor harboring selectivity of inhibiting EGFR T790M sparing wild-type EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaoping; Qi, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is driven by a variety of deregulated kinases and the development of multi-target inhibitor for multiple signaling pathways or multiple steps is required. Here, we reported that ZWM026, an indolocarbazoles analogue, derived from mangrove in coastal marine wetland, exhibited selectivity and reversibility against T790M mutant over wild-type EGFR in naturally occurring NSCLC cells and constructed NIH-3T3 cells. It simultaneously inhibited activities of HER2, HER3, HER4 and RET but was different from current multi-target kinase inhibitors. There was no activity in protein kinase C (PKC) family which is generally recognized as molecule target of indolocarbazoles. ZWM026 had more potent activities against gefitinib sensitizing, non-sensitizing and rare EGFR mutant NSCLC cells and constructed NIH-3T3 cells. ZWM026 induced apoptosis and exerted a synergistic effect by combining with cisplatin in NCI-H1975 cells. In summary, we identified a novel reversible multi-target inhibitor which could serve as a promising lead compound of drug development for NSCLC. PMID:28979811

  4. A novel multi-target inhibitor harboring selectivity of inhibiting EGFR T790M sparing wild-type EGFR.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoping; Qi, Xin; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Weiming; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is driven by a variety of deregulated kinases and the development of multi-target inhibitor for multiple signaling pathways or multiple steps is required. Here, we reported that ZWM026, an indolocarbazoles analogue, derived from mangrove in coastal marine wetland, exhibited selectivity and reversibility against T790M mutant over wild-type EGFR in naturally occurring NSCLC cells and constructed NIH-3T3 cells. It simultaneously inhibited activities of HER2, HER3, HER4 and RET but was different from current multi-target kinase inhibitors. There was no activity in protein kinase C (PKC) family which is generally recognized as molecule target of indolocarbazoles. ZWM026 had more potent activities against gefitinib sensitizing, non-sensitizing and rare EGFR mutant NSCLC cells and constructed NIH-3T3 cells. ZWM026 induced apoptosis and exerted a synergistic effect by combining with cisplatin in NCI-H1975 cells. In summary, we identified a novel reversible multi-target inhibitor which could serve as a promising lead compound of drug development for NSCLC.

  5. mTOR, VEGF, PDGFR, and c-kit signaling pathway activation in Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Darcy A; Busarla, Satya Vara Prasad; Gimbel, Devon C; Sohani, Aliyah R; Nazarian, Rosalynn M

    2017-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a locally progressive, intermediate-grade vascular neoplasm with no known cure, high recurrence rates, and potential for wide dissemination. Low efficacy and high toxicity limit current therapeutic options for advanced disease. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and c-kit signaling pathways has been implicated in KS pathogenesis and may suggest a role for targeted inhibitors. KS cases were retrospectively retrieved (N=274), most (90%) associated with human immunodeficiency virus. Tissue microarray slides were stained with human herpes virus-8, Friend leukemia integration 1 transcription factor, CD117 (c-kit), phospho-S6 (pS6), PDGF receptor-β, VEGF, and phospho-mTOR. Both intensity and extent of staining were scored. Multiplying these scores for each core yielded total staining H-scores. Human herpes virus-8 was positive in 87% and Friend leukemia integration 1 transcription factor in 95.7% of cases. Most were also VEGF+ (97.6%), pS6+ (95.7%), CD117+ (92.5%), and PDGFRB+ (87.4%). Approximately half (55.6%) were phospho-mTOR+. There was no significant difference in staining among patients with low (<500 cells/mm(3)) or preserved CD4 T-cell counts. Immunohistochemistry confirms upregulation of the mTOR, PDGF, VEGF, and c-kit pathways in a large cohort of KS samples. Of proteins tested, pS6, downstream of mTOR, demonstrated the highest proportion of strong positivity (67.1%). These results support the possibility of using targeted inhibitors in KS. Overexpression was independent of CD4 count, suggesting that even patients with low counts may be targeted therapy candidates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The GIST of targeted therapy for malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bello, Danielle M; Dematteo, Ronald P; Ariyan, Charlotte E

    2014-06-01

    The high response rates to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib in KIT-mutated gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) has led to a paradigm shift in cancer treatment. In a parallel fashion, the field of melanoma is shifting with the utilization of targeted therapy to treat BRAF-mutated melanoma. We reviewed published literature in PubMed on GIST and melanoma, with a focus on both past and current clinical trials. The data presented centers on imatinib, vemurafenib, and most recently dabrafenib, targeting KIT and BRAF mutations and their outcomes in GIST and melanoma. The BRAF(V600E) melanoma mutation, like the KIT exon 11 mutation in GIST, has the highest response to therapy. High response rates with inhibition of KIT in GIST have not been recapitulated in KIT-mutated melanoma. Median time to resistance to targeted agents occurs in ~7 months with BRAF inhibitors and 2 years for imatinib in GIST. In GIST, the development of secondary mutations leads to resistance; however, there have been no similar gatekeeper mutations found in melanoma. Although surgery remains an important component of the treatment of early GIST and melanoma, surgeons will need to continue to define the thresholds and timing for operation in the setting of metastatic disease with improved targeted therapies. Combination treatment strategies may result in more successful clinical outcomes in the management of melanoma in the future.

  7. SIRT inhibitors induce cell death and p53 acetylation through targeting both SIRT1 and SIRT2.

    PubMed

    Peck, Barrie; Chen, Chun-Yuan; Ho, Ka-Kei; Di Fruscia, Paolo; Myatt, Stephen S; Coombes, R Charles; Fuchter, Matthew J; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Lam, Eric W-F

    2010-04-01

    SIRT proteins play an important role in the survival and drug resistance of tumor cells, especially during chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the potency, specificity, and cellular targets of three SIRT inhibitors, Sirtinol, Salermide, and EX527. Cell proliferative and cell cycle analyses showed that Sirtinol and Salermide, but not EX527, were effective in inducing cell death at concentrations of 50 micromol/L or over in MCF-7 cells. Instead, EX527 caused cell cycle arrest at G(1) at comparable concentrations. In vitro SIRT assays using a p53 peptide substrate showed that all three compounds are potent SIRT1/2 inhibitors, with EX527 having the highest inhibitory activity for SIRT1. Computational docking analysis showed that Sirtinol and Salermide have high degrees of selectivity for SIRT1/2, whereas EX527 has high specificity for SIRT1 but not SIRT2. Consistently, Sirtinol and Salermide, but not EX527, treatment resulted in the in vivo acetylation of the SIRT1/2 target p53 and SIRT2 target tubulin in MCF-7 cells, suggesting that EX527 is ineffective in inhibiting SIRT2 and that p53 mediates the cytotoxic function of Sirtinol and Salermide. Studies using breast carcinoma cell lines and p53-deficient mouse fibroblasts confirmed that p53 is essential for the Sirtinol and Salermide-induced apoptosis. Further, we showed using small interfering RNA that silencing both SIRTs, but not SIRT1 and SIRT2 individually, can induce cell death in MCF-7 cells. Together, our results identify the specificity and cellular targets of these novel inhibitors and suggest that SIRT inhibitors require combined targeting of both SIRT1 and SIRT2 to induce p53 acetylation and cell death. Mol Cancer Ther; 9(4); 844-55. (c)2010 AACR.

  8. Is proteinuria reversible, after withdrawal of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Arnau, A; Ruiz, J C; Rodrigo, E; Quintanar, J A; Arias, M

    2011-01-01

    Conversion to mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi) is an ever more frequent practice in renal transplant recipients, even if it is not always satisfactory, needing to be suspended for various reasons in certain patients. We analyzed the evolution of proteinuria as a marker of kidney damage after withdrawal of mTORi for any reason in order to assess conversion failure risk. Among 1633 renal transplant patients with 185 converted to mTORi, we considered the 52 (28%) who withdrew as result of intolerance or a bad evolution after at least 3 months use (median: 142 days after conversion). Four groups were defined according to the evolution of proteinuria: group 1 (G1), stable after conversion; group 2 (G2), increased with complete recovery (<1 g); group 3 (G3), increased with partial recovery (>1 g); or group 4 (G4), increased without recovery. The evolution according to the groups was: G1 (57.1%), G2 (17.2%), G3 (5.7%), and G4 (20%). There were no differences between the good (G1 and G2) and the bad evolution groups (G3 and G4) in proteinuria at the time of conversion (838 ± 641 vs 532 ± 404 mg/d) or renal function (1.95 ± 0.47 vs 1.90 ± 0.4 mg/dL). Six months after withdrawal, proteinuria was stable in G1 and G2 but worse in G3 and G4 (781 ± 643 vs 4479 ± 3235 mg/d); the same observation was noted for renal failure (2.1 ± 0.71 vs 2.8 ± 1.57 mg/dL). Among about 75% of patients in whom mTORi was withdrawn, no injury remained in the medium term whereas among the other 25%, there was a residual injury.

  9. The SARS-Coronavirus-Host Interactome: Identification of Cyclophilins as Target for Pan-Coronavirus Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, Caroline C.; Müller, Marcel A.; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Stellberger, Thorsten; von Dall’Armi, Ekatarina; Herzog, Petra; Kallies, Stefan; Niemeyer, Daniela; Ditt, Vanessa; Kuri, Thomas; Züst, Roland; Pumpor, Ksenia; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Schwarz, Frank; Zimmer, Ralf; Steffen, Imke; Weber, Friedemann; Thiel, Volker; Herrler, Georg; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Schwegmann-Weßels, Christel; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Haas, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2011-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are important human and animal pathogens that induce fatal respiratory, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002/2003 has demonstrated human vulnerability to (Coronavirus) CoV epidemics. Neither vaccines nor therapeutics are available against human and animal CoVs. Knowledge of host cell proteins that take part in pivotal virus-host interactions could define broad-spectrum antiviral targets. In this study, we used a systems biology approach employing a genome-wide yeast-two hybrid interaction screen to identify immunopilins (PPIA, PPIB, PPIH, PPIG, FKBP1A, FKBP1B) as interaction partners of the CoV non-structural protein 1 (Nsp1). These molecules modulate the Calcineurin/NFAT pathway that plays an important role in immune cell activation. Overexpression of NSP1 and infection with live SARS-CoV strongly increased signalling through the Calcineurin/NFAT pathway and enhanced the induction of interleukin 2, compatible with late-stage immunopathogenicity and long-term cytokine dysregulation as observed in severe SARS cases. Conversely, inhibition of cyclophilins by cyclosporine A (CspA) blocked the replication of CoVs of all genera, including SARS-CoV, human CoV-229E and -NL-63, feline CoV, as well as avian infectious bronchitis virus. Non-immunosuppressive derivatives of CspA might serve as broad-range CoV inhibitors applicable against emerging CoVs as well as ubiquitous pathogens of humans and livestock. PMID:22046132

  10. The SARS-coronavirus-host interactome: identification of cyclophilins as target for pan-coronavirus inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pfefferle, Susanne; Schöpf, Julia; Kögl, Manfred; Friedel, Caroline C; Müller, Marcel A; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Stellberger, Thorsten; von Dall'Armi, Ekatarina; Herzog, Petra; Kallies, Stefan; Niemeyer, Daniela; Ditt, Vanessa; Kuri, Thomas; Züst, Roland; Pumpor, Ksenia; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Schwarz, Frank; Zimmer, Ralf; Steffen, Imke; Weber, Friedemann; Thiel, Volker; Herrler, Georg; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Haas, Jürgen; Drosten, Christian; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2011-10-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are important human and animal pathogens that induce fatal respiratory, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002/2003 has demonstrated human vulnerability to (Coronavirus) CoV epidemics. Neither vaccines nor therapeutics are available against human and animal CoVs. Knowledge of host cell proteins that take part in pivotal virus-host interactions could define broad-spectrum antiviral targets. In this study, we used a systems biology approach employing a genome-wide yeast-two hybrid interaction screen to identify immunopilins (PPIA, PPIB, PPIH, PPIG, FKBP1A, FKBP1B) as interaction partners of the CoV non-structural protein 1 (Nsp1). These molecules modulate the Calcineurin/NFAT pathway that plays an important role in immune cell activation. Overexpression of NSP1 and infection with live SARS-CoV strongly increased signalling through the Calcineurin/NFAT pathway and enhanced the induction of interleukin 2, compatible with late-stage immunopathogenicity and long-term cytokine dysregulation as observed in severe SARS cases. Conversely, inhibition of cyclophilins by cyclosporine A (CspA) blocked the replication of CoVs of all genera, including SARS-CoV, human CoV-229E and -NL-63, feline CoV, as well as avian infectious bronchitis virus. Non-immunosuppressive derivatives of CspA might serve as broad-range CoV inhibitors applicable against emerging CoVs as well as ubiquitous pathogens of humans and livestock.

  11. New Small Molecule Entry Inhibitors Targeting Hemagglutinin-Mediated Influenza A Virus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Wang, Minxiu; Li, Bing; Mills, Debra M.; Ames, Jessica A.; Nash, Peter J.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald T.; Prichard, Mark N.; Keith, Kathy A.; Barnard, Dale L.; Caffrey, Michael; Rong, Lijun; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses are a major public health threat worldwide, and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The influenza virus glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) plays critical roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion, making it a potential target for the development of anti-influenza drugs. Using pseudotype virus-based high-throughput screens, we have identified several new small molecules capable of inhibiting influenza virus entry. We prioritized two novel inhibitors, MBX2329 and MBX2546, with aminoalkyl phenol ether and sulfonamide scaffolds, respectively, that specifically inhibit HA-mediated viral entry. The two compounds (i) are potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 0.3 to 5.9 μM); (ii) are selective (50% cytotoxicity concentration [CC50] of >100 μM), with selectivity index (SI) values of >20 to 200 for different influenza virus strains; (iii) inhibit a wide spectrum of influenza A viruses, which includes the 2009 pandemic influenza virus A/H1N1/2009, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/H5N1, and oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 strains; (iv) exhibit large volumes of synergy with oseltamivir (36 and 331 μM2 % at 95% confidence); and (v) have chemically tractable structures. Mechanism-of-action studies suggest that both MBX2329 and MBX2546 bind to HA in a nonoverlapping manner. Additional results from HA-mediated hemolysis of chicken red blood cells (cRBCs), competition assays with monoclonal antibody (MAb) C179, and mutational analysis suggest that the compounds bind in the stem region of the HA trimer and inhibit HA-mediated fusion. Therefore, MBX2329 and MBX2546 represent new starting points for chemical optimization and have the potential to provide valuable future therapeutic options and research tools to study the HA-mediated entry process. PMID:24198411

  12. c-Kit signaling determines neointimal hyperplasia in arteriovenous fistulae.

    PubMed

    Skartsis, Nikolaos; Martinez, Laisel; Duque, Juan Camilo; Tabbara, Marwan; Velazquez, Omaida C; Asif, Arif; Andreopoulos, Fotios; Salman, Loay H; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I

    2014-11-01

    Stenosis of arteriovenous (A-V) fistulae secondary to neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) compromises dialysis delivery, which worsens patients' quality of life and increases medical costs associated with the maintenance of vascular accesses. In the present study, we evaluated the role of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit in A-V fistula neointima formation. Initially, c-Kit was found in the neointima and adventitia of human brachiobasilic fistulae, whereas it was barely detectable in control veins harvested at the time of access creation. Using the rat A-V fistula model to study venous vascular remodeling, we analyzed the spatial and temporal pattern of c-Kit expression in the fistula wall. Interestingly, c-Kit immunoreactivity increased with time after anastomosis, which concurred with the accumulation of cells in the venous intima. In addition, c-Kit expression in A-V fistulae was positively altered by chronic kidney failure conditions. Both blockade of c-Kit with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) and inhibition of stem cell factor production with a specific short hairpin RNA prevented NIH in the outflow vein of experimental fistulae. In agreement with these data, impaired c-Kit activity compromised the development of NIH in A-V fistulae created in c-KitW/Wv mutant mice. These results suggest that targeting of the c-Kit signaling pathway may be an effective approach to prevent postoperative NIH in A-V fistulae.

  13. c-Kit signaling determines neointimal hyperplasia in arteriovenous fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Skartsis, Nikolaos; Martinez, Laisel; Duque, Juan Camilo; Tabbara, Marwan; Velazquez, Omaida C.; Asif, Arif; Andreopoulos, Fotios; Salman, Loay H.

    2014-01-01

    Stenosis of arteriovenous (A-V) fistulae secondary to neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) compromises dialysis delivery, which worsens patients' quality of life and increases medical costs associated with the maintenance of vascular accesses. In the present study, we evaluated the role of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit in A-V fistula neointima formation. Initially, c-Kit was found in the neointima and adventitia of human brachiobasilic fistulae, whereas it was barely detectable in control veins harvested at the time of access creation. Using the rat A-V fistula model to study venous vascular remodeling, we analyzed the spatial and temporal pattern of c-Kit expression in the fistula wall. Interestingly, c-Kit immunoreactivity increased with time after anastomosis, which concurred with the accumulation of cells in the venous intima. In addition, c-Kit expression in A-V fistulae was positively altered by chronic kidney failure conditions. Both blockade of c-Kit with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) and inhibition of stem cell factor production with a specific short hairpin RNA prevented NIH in the outflow vein of experimental fistulae. In agreement with these data, impaired c-Kit activity compromised the development of NIH in A-V fistulae created in c-KitW/Wv mutant mice. These results suggest that targeting of the c-Kit signaling pathway may be an effective approach to prevent postoperative NIH in A-V fistulae. PMID:25186298

  14. Tumors with AKT1E17K Mutations Are Rational Targets for Single Agent or Combination Therapy with AKT Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Davies, Barry R; Guan, Nin; Logie, Armelle; Crafter, Claire; Hanson, Lyndsey; Jacobs, Vivien; James, Neil; Dudley, Philippa; Jacques, Kelly; Ladd, Brendon; D'Cruz, Celina M; Zinda, Michael; Lindemann, Justin; Kodaira, Makoto; Tamura, Kenji; Jenkins, Emma L

    2015-11-01

    AKT1(E17K) mutations occur at low frequency in a variety of solid tumors, including those of the breast and urinary bladder. Although this mutation has been shown to transform rodent cells in culture, it was found to be less oncogenic than PIK3CA mutations in breast epithelial cells. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of AKT inhibitors in human tumors with an endogenous AKT1(E17K) mutation is not known. Expression of exogenous copies of AKT1(E17K) in MCF10A breast epithelial cells increased phosphorylation of AKT and its substrates, induced colony formation in soft agar, and formation of lesions in the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. These effects were inhibited by the allosteric and catalytic AKT inhibitors MK-2206 and AZD5363, respectively. Both AKT inhibitors caused highly significant growth inhibition of breast cancer explant models with AKT1(E17K) mutation. Furthermore, in a phase I clinical study, the catalytic Akt inhibitor AZD5363 induced partial responses in patients with breast and ovarian cancer with tumors containing AKT1(E17K) mutations. In MGH-U3 bladder cancer xenografts, which contain both AKT1(E17K) and FGFR3(Y373C) mutations, AZD5363 monotherapy did not significantly reduce tumor growth, but tumor regression was observed in combination with the FGFR inhibitor AZD4547. The data show that tumors with AKT1(E17K) mutations are rational therapeutic targets for AKT inhibitors, although combinations with other targeted agents may be required where activating oncogenic mutations of other proteins are present in the same tumor. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Phase II Study of Nilotinib in Melanoma Harboring KIT Alterations Following Progression to Prior KIT Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Richard D.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Gonzalez, Rene; Lutzky, Jose; O’Day, Steven J.; Hamid, Omid; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Teitcher, Jerrold B.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Bastian, Boris C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hodi, F. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although durable responses can be achieved with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib in melanomas harboring KIT mutations, the efficacy of alternative inhibitors after progression to imatinib and the activity of these agents on brain metastases is unknown. Experimental Design We conducted a phase II study of nilotinib 400 mg BID in two cohorts of patients with melanomas harboring KIT mutations or amplification: A) those refractory or intolerant to a prior KIT inhibitor; and B) those with brain metastases. The primary endpoint was 4-month disease control rate. Secondary endpoints included response rate, time-to-progression and overall survival. A Simon two-stage and a single-stage design was planned to assess for the primary endpoint in Cohorts A and B, respectively. Results Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 treated (11-Cohort A; 8-Cohort B). Three patients on Cohort A (27%; 95% CI, 8% – 56%) and 1 on Cohort B (12.5%; 90% CI, 0.6% – 47%) achieved the primary endpoint. Two partial responses were observed in Cohort A (18.2%, 90% CI, 3% – 47%); none were observed in Cohort B. The median time-to-progression and overall survival was 3·3 (90% CI, 2.1 – 3.9 months) and 9.1 months (90% CI, 4.3 – 14.2 months), respectively, in all treated patients. Conclusion Nilotinib may achieve disease control in patients with melanoma harboring KIT alterations and whose disease progressed after imatinib therapy. The efficacy of this agent in KIT altered melanoma with brain metastasis is limited. PMID:25695690

  16. Phase II Study of Nilotinib in Melanoma Harboring KIT Alterations Following Progression to Prior KIT Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Richard D; Lawrence, Donald P; Weber, Jeffrey S; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gonzalez, Rene; Lutzky, Jose; O'Day, Steven J; Hamid, Omid; Wolchok, Jedd D; Chapman, Paul B; Sullivan, Ryan J; Teitcher, Jerrold B; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Antonescu, Cristina R; Heinrich, Michael C; Bastian, Boris C; Corless, Christopher L; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Hodi, F Stephen

    2015-05-15

    Although durable responses can be achieved with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib in melanomas harboring KIT mutations, the efficacy of alternative inhibitors after progression to imatinib and the activity of these agents on brain metastases are unknown. We conducted a phase II study of nilotinib 400 mg twice a day in two cohorts of patients with melanomas harboring KIT mutations or amplification: (A) those refractory or intolerant to a prior KIT inhibitor; and (B) those with brain metastases. The primary endpoint was 4-month disease control rate. Secondary endpoints included response rate, time-to-progression (TTP), and overall survival (OS). A Simon two-stage and a single-stage design was planned to assess for the primary endpoint in cohorts A and B, respectively. Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 treated (11 in cohort A; 8 in cohort B). Three patients on cohort A [27%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 8%-56%] and 1 on cohort B (12.5%; 90% CI, 0.6%-47%) achieved the primary endpoint. Two partial responses were observed in cohort A (18.2%; 90% CI, 3%-47%); none were observed in cohort B. The median TTP and OS was 3.3 (90% CI, 2.1-3.9 months) and 9.1 months (90% CI, 4.3-14.2 months), respectively, in all treated patients. Nilotinib may achieve disease control in patients with melanoma harboring KIT alterations and whose disease progressed after imatinib therapy. The efficacy of this agent in KIT-altered melanoma with brain metastasis is limited. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. A novel p38 MAPK docking groove-targeted compound is a potent inhibitor of inflammatory hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Willemen, Hanneke L.D.M.; Campos, Pedro M.; Lucas, Elisa; Morreale, Antonio; Gil-Redondo, Rubén; Agut, Juan; González, Florenci V.; Ramos, Paula; Heijnen, Cobi; Mayor, Federico; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Murga, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 is an important mediator of inflammation and of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We recently described that docking-groove dependent interactions are important for p38 MAPK-mediated signal transduction. Thus, virtual screening was performed to identify putative docking groove-targeted p38 MAPK inhibitors. Several compounds of the benzooxadiazol family were identified with low micromolar inhibitory activity both in a p38 MAPK activity assay, and in THP-1 human monocytes acting as inhibitors of LPS-induced TNFα secretion. Positions 2 and 5 in the phenyl ring are essential for the described inhibitory activity with a chloride in position 5 and a methyl-group in position 2 yielding the best results with an IC50 of 1.8 μM (FGA-19 compound). Notably, FGA-19 exerted a potent and long-lasting analgesic effect in vivo when tested in a mouse model of inflammatory hyperalgesia. A single intrathecal injection of FGA-19 completely resolved hyperalgesia, being ten times as potent and displaying longer lasting effects than the established p38 MAPK inhibitor SB239063. FGA-19 also reversed persistent pain in a model of post-inflammatory hyperalgesia (in LysM-GRK2+/− mice). These potent in vivo effects put forward p38 MAPK docking-site targeted inhibitors as a potential novel strategy for the treatment of inflammatory pain. PMID:24517375

  18. Discovery of Novel Oral Protein Synthesis Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis That Target Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase

    PubMed Central

    Palencia, Andrés; Li, Xianfeng; Bu, Wei; Choi, Wai; Ding, Charles Z.; Easom, Eric E.; Feng, Lisa; Hernandez, Vincent; Houston, Paul; Liu, Liang; Meewan, Maliwan; Mohan, Manisha; Rock, Fernando L.; Sexton, Holly; Zhang, Suoming; Zhou, Yasheen; Wan, Baojie; Wang, Yuehong; Franzblau, Scott G.; Woolhiser, Lisa; Gruppo, Veronica; Lenaerts, Anne J.; O'Malley, Theresa; Parish, Tanya; Cooper, Christopher B.; Waters, M. Gerard; Ma, Zhenkun; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; Rullas, Joaquín; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Mendoza, Alfonso; Barros, David; Cusack, Stephen; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    The recent development and spread of extensively drug-resistant and totally drug-resistant resistant (TDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis highlight the need for new antitubercular drugs. Protein synthesis inhibitors have played an important role in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) starting with the inclusion of streptomycin in the first combination therapies. Although parenteral aminoglycosides are a key component of therapy for multidrug-resistant TB, the oxazolidinone linezolid is the only orally available protein synthesis inhibitor that is effective against TB. Here, we show that small-molecule inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs), which are known to be excellent antibacterial protein synthesis targets, are orally bioavailable and effective against M. tuberculosis in TB mouse infection models. We applied the oxaborole tRNA-trapping (OBORT) mechanism, which was first developed to target fungal cytoplasmic leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), to M. tuberculosis LeuRS. X-ray crystallography was used to guide the design of LeuRS inhibitors that have good biochemical potency and excellent whole-cell activity against M. tuberculosis. Importantly, their good oral bioavailability translates into in vivo efficacy in both the acute and chronic mouse models of TB with potency comparable to that of the frontline drug isoniazid. PMID:27503647

  19. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Is the Anticancer Target for a Novel Series of Potent Naphthoquinone-Based Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Malachowski, William P.; DuHadaway, James B.; LaLonde, Judith M.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Jaller, Daniel; Metz, Richard; Prendergast, George C.; Muller, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is emerging as an important new therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer, chronic viral infections, and other diseases characterized by pathological immune suppression. While small molecule inhibitors of IDO exist, there remains a dearth of high-potency compounds offering in vivo efficacy and clinical translational potential. In this study, we address this gap by defining a new class of naphthoquinone-based IDO inhibitors exemplified by the natural product menadione, which is shown in mouse tumor models to have similar antitumor activity to previously characterized IDO inhibitors. Genetic validation that IDO is the critical in vivo target is demonstrated using IDO-null mice. Elaboration of menadione to a pyranonaphthoquinone has yielded low nanomolar potency inhibitors, including new compounds which are the most potent reported to date (Ki = 61–70 nM). Synthetic accessibility of this class will facilitate preclinical chemical–genetic studies as well as further optimization of pharmacological parameters for clinical translation. PMID:18318466

  20. Clinical Outcomes in Kidney Transplant Recipients Receiving Long-Term Therapy with Inhibitors of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Cortazar, F; Molnar, MZ; Isakova, T; Czira, ME; Kovesdy, CP; Roth, D; Mucsi, I; Wolf, M

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), sirolimus and everolimus, reduce the incidence of acute rejection following kidney transplantation but their impact on clinical outcomes beyond two years after transplantation is unknown. We examined risks of mortality and allograft loss in a prospective observational study of 993 prevalent kidney transplant recipients who enrolled a median of 72 months after transplantation. During a median follow-up of 37 months, 87 patients died and 102 suffered allograft loss. In the overall population, use of mTOR inhibitors at enrollment was not associated with altered risk of allograft loss, and their association with increased mortality was of borderline significance. However, history of malignancy was the strongest predictor of both mortality and therapy with an mTOR inhibitor. Among patients without a history of malignancy, use of mTOR inhibitors was associated with significantly increased risk of mortality in propensity score-adjusted (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6; 95%CI, 1.2, 5.5; P = 0.01), multivariable-adjusted (HR 3.2; 95%CI, 1.5, 6.5; P = 0.002) and one-to-one propensity score-matched analyses (HR 5.6; 95% CI 1.2, 25.7; P = 0.03). Additional studies are needed to examine the long-term safety of mTOR inhibitors in kidney transplantation, especially among recipients without a history of malignancy. PMID:22054244

  1. miR-21 Reduces Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in c-kit(+) Cardiac Stem Cells In Vitro through PTEN/PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenwen; Wang, Yan; Long, Xianping; Zhao, Ranzun; Wang, Zhenglong; Liu, Zhijiang; Cao, Song; Shi, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The low survival rate of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) in the infarcted myocardium hampers cell therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) and one of its target proteins, PTEN, contribute to the survival and proliferation of many cell types, but their prosurvival effects in c-kit(+) CSC remain unclear. Thus, we hypothesized that miR-21 reduces hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced apoptosis in c-kit(+) CSC and estimated the contribution of PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling to this oxidative circumstance. miR-21 mimics efficiently reduced H2O2-induced apoptosis in c-kit(+) CSC, as evidenced by the downregulation of the proapoptosis proteins caspase-3 and Bax and upregulation of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2. In addition, the gain of function of miR-21 in c-kit(+) CSC downregulated the protein level of PTEN although its mRNA level changed slightly; in the meantime, miR-21 overexpression also increased phospho-Akt (p-Akt). The antiapoptotic effects of miR-21 were comparable with Phen (bpV), the selective inhibitor of PTEN, while miR-21 inhibitor or PI3K's inhibitor LY294002 efficiently attenuated the antiapoptotic effect of miR-21. Taken together, these results indicate that the anti-H2O2-induced apoptosis effect of miR-21 in c-kit(+) CSC is contributed by PTEN/PI3K/Akt signaling. miR-21 could be a potential molecule to facilitate the c-kit(+) CSC therapy in ischemic myocardium.

  2. A new screening method to identify inhibitors of the Lol (localization of lipoproteins) system, a novel antibacterial target.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hideaki; Ura, Atsushi; Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Yamagishi, Jun-Ichi; Narita, Shin-Ichiro; Matsuyama, Shin-Ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    As the Lol system, which is involved in localization of lipoproteins, is essential for Escherichia coli growth and widely conserved among gram-negative bacteria, it is considered to be a promising target for the development of anti-gram-negative bacterial agents. However, no high-throughput screening method has so far been developed to screen for Lol system inhibitors. By combining three assay systems (anucleate cell blue assay, Lpp assay, and LolA-dependent release inhibition assay) and a drug susceptibility test, we have successfully developed a new screening method for identification of compounds that inhibit the Lol system. Using this new screening method, we screened 23,600 in-house chemical compounds and found 2 Lol system inhibitors. We therefore conclude that our new screening method can efficiently identify new antibacterial agents that target the Lol system.

  3. Targeted Polypharmacology: Discovery of a Highly Potent Non-Hydroxamate Dual Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-10/-13 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Senn, Nicole; Ott, Michael; Lanz, Jan; Riedl, Rainer

    2017-09-27

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a key role in many diseases like cancer, atherosclerosis or arthritis. Interest in MMP inhibition has been revitalized very recently as the knowledge on the underlying network of biological pathways is steadily growing. Based on this new insight into the relevance of MMP-10 and MMP-13 within the MMP network and the ban of hydroxamate inhibitors from clinical development, the discovery of non-hydroxamate multi-target drugs against specific MMPs is of foremost interest. Here, we disclose the discovery of a very potent and selective non-hydroxamate MMP-10/-13 inhibitor. The high potency (IC50 of 31 nM [MMP-10] and 5 nM [MMP-13]) and selectivity over MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -12 and -14 enable this compound to decipher disease causing MMP networks and to generate new treatment options through targeted polypharmacology.

  4. Recent progress in designing inhibitors that target the drug-resistant M2 proton channels from the influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Li, Fang; Ma, Chunlong

    2015-07-01

    Influenza viruses are the causative agents for seasonal influenza, which results in thousands of deaths and millions of hospitalizations each year. Moreover, sporadic transmission of avian or swan influenza viruses to humans often leads to an influenza pandemic, as there is no preimmunity in the human body to fight against such novel strains. The metastable genome of the influenza viruses, coupled with the reassortment of different strains from a wide range of host origins, leads to the continuous evolution of the influenza virus diversity. Such characteristics of influenza viruses present a grand challenge in devising therapeutic strategies to combat influenza virus infection. This review summarizes recent progress in designing small molecule inhibitors that target the drug-resistant influenza A virus M2 proton channels and highlights the contribution of mechanistic studies of proton conductance to drug discovery. The lessons learned throughout the course of M2 drug discovery might provide insights for designing inhibitors that target other therapeutically important ion channels.

  5. Congenital segmental lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis complex with associated subependymal giant cell astrocytomas treated with Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Prato, Giulia; Mancardi, Maria Margherita; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina; Janis, Sara; Vercellino, Nadia; Rossi, Andrea; Consales, Alessandro; Raso, Alessandro; Garrè, Maria Luisa

    2014-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a genetic, multisystemic disorder characterized by circumscribed benign lesions (hamartomas) in several organs, including brain. This is the result of defects in the TSC1 and/or TSC2 tumor suppressor genes, encoding the hamartin-tuberin complex that inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Specific inhibitors of this pathway have been shown to reduce the volume of subependymal giant cell astrocytomas associated with tuberous sclerosis. Congenital lymphedema is rarely seen in association with tuberous sclerosis, with only a few reported cases. Although this association can be coincidental, the dysgenetic lymphatic system can represent a hamartia as a consequence of gene mutation. We describe a child with congenital lymphedema in tuberous sclerosis and associated subependymal giant cell astrocytoma who experienced lymphangitis under treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Because our patient did not show worsening of lymphedema, congenital lymphedema does not seem to be a contraindication for this therapy. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Evolution of NADPH Oxidase Inhibitors: Selectivity and Mechanisms for Target Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Altenhöfer, Sebastian; Radermacher, Kim A.; Kleikers, Pamela W.M.; Wingler, Kirstin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress, an excess of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production versus consumption, may be involved in the pathogenesis of different diseases. The only known enzymes solely dedicated to ROS generation are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases with their catalytic subunits (NOX). After the clinical failure of most antioxidant trials, NOX inhibitors are the most promising therapeutic option for diseases associated with oxidative stress. Recent Advances: Historical NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin and diphenylene iodonium, are un-specific and not isoform selective. Novel NOX inhibitors stemming from rational drug discovery approaches, for example, GKT137831, ML171, and VAS2870, show improved specificity for NADPH oxidases and moderate NOX isoform selectivity. Along with NOX2 docking sequence (NOX2ds)-tat, a peptide-based inhibitor, the use of these novel small molecules in animal models has provided preliminary in vivo evidence for a pathophysiological role of specific NOX isoforms. Critical Issues: Here, we discuss whether novel NOX inhibitors enable reliable validation of NOX isoforms' pathological roles and whether this knowledge supports translation into pharmacological applications. Modern NOX inhibitors have increased the evidence for pathophysiological roles of NADPH oxidases. However, in comparison to knockout mouse models, NOX inhibitors have limited isoform selectivity. Thus, their use does not enable clear statements on the involvement of individual NOX isoforms in a given disease. Future Directions: The development of isoform-selective NOX inhibitors and biologicals will enable reliable validation of specific NOX isoforms in disease models other than the mouse. Finally, GKT137831, the first NOX inhibitor in clinical development, is poised to provide proof of principle for the clinical potential of NOX inhibition. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 406–427. PMID:24383718

  7. Design of HIV Protease Inhibitors Targeting Protein Backbone: An Effective Strategy for Combating Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Chapsal, Bruno D.; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-03

    The discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) and their utilization in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been a major turning point in the management of HIV/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, despite the successes in disease management and the decrease of HIV/AIDS-related mortality, several drawbacks continue to hamper first-generation protease inhibitor therapies. The rapid emergence of drug resistance has become the most urgent concern because it renders current treatments ineffective and therefore compels the scientific community to continue efforts in the design of inhibitors that can efficiently combat drug resistance.

  8. Improvement in Renal Cystic Disease of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex After Treatment with Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Siroky, Brian J; Towbin, Alexander J; Trout, Andrew T; Schäfer, Hannah; Thamann, Anna R; Agricola, Karen D; Tudor, Cynthia; Capal, Jamie; Dixon, Bradley P; Krueger, Darcy A; Franz, David N

    2017-08-01

    Renal cysts occur in approximately 50% of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, but their clinical significance and response to treatment are unknown. Abdominal imaging of 15 patients with tuberous sclerosis complex-associated renal cystic disease who had received mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor therapy for other tuberous sclerosis complex-related indications was evaluated. Reductions in cyst number, sum diameter, and volume were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In Vitro Targeted Photodynamic Therapy with a Pyropheophorbide-a Conjugated Inhibitor of Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiancheng; Wu, Lisa Y.; Choi, Joseph K.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKROUND The lack of specific delivery of photosensitizers (PSs), represents a significant limitation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer. The biomarker prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has attracted considerable attention as a target for imaging and therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. Although recent efforts have been made to conjugate inhibitors of PSMA with imaging agents, there have been no reports on photosensitizer-conjugated PSMA inhibitors for targeted PDT of prostate cancer. The present study focuses on the use of a PSMA inhibitor-conjugate of pyropheophorbide-a (Ppa-conjugate 2) for targeted PDT to achieve apoptosis in PSMA+ LNCaP cells. METHODS Confocal laser scanning microscopy with a combination of nuclear staining and immunofluorescence methods were employed to monitor the specific imaging and PDT-mediated apoptotic effects on PSMA-positive LNCaP and PSMA-negative (PC-3) cells. RESULTS Our results demonstrated that PDT-mediated effects by Ppa-conjugate 2 were specific to LNCaP cells, but not PC-3 cells. Cell permeability was detected as early as 2 h by HOE33342/PI double-staining, becoming more intense by 4 h. Evidence for the apoptotic caspase cascade being activated was based on the appearance of PARP p85 fragment. TUNEL assay detected DNA fragmentation 16 h post-PDT, confirming apoptotic events. CONCLUSIONS Cell permeability by HOE33342/PI double-staining as well as PARP p85 fragment and TUNEL assays confirm cellular apoptosis in PSMA+ cells when treated with PS-inhibitor conjugate 2 and subsequently irradiated. It is expected that the PSMA targeting small-molecule of this conjugate can serve as a delivery vehicle for PDT and other therapeutic applications for prostate cancer. PMID:19142895

  10. Assessment of three commercial DNA extraction kits and a laboratory-developed method for detecting Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora in raspberry wash, basil wash and pesto.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joan M; Joo, Jane; Kim, Richard; Murphy, Helen R

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods are often used to identify the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis in foods although little has been published regarding the efficacy of available DNA extraction methods. This study reviewed three commonly used commercial DNA extraction kits: FastDNA SPIN Kit for soil, QBiogene (FastDNA), UltraClean™ Soil DNA Isolation Kit, MO BIO Laboratories (MoBio), and QIAamp DNA Mini Stool Kit, Qiagen (QIAamp), as well as a 'homebrew' Universal Nucleic Acid Extraction (UNEX) method. Washes from raspberry and basil as well as commercial pesto samples were seeded with 5000, 500, or 50 C. parvum and C. cayetanensis oocysts. The protocols were assessed for: quantity and quality of the extracted DNA, time to completion, presence of PCR inhibitors and the percentage of samples correctly identified as positive for the two parasites. Real-time and conventional nested PCR assays were used to detect the seeded pathogens. Of the commercial kits, PCR results of samples extracted using FastDNA were statistically similar to QIAamp and both were superior to MoBio. Differences in PCR results among FastDNA, QIAamp and UNEX for detection of Cyclospora were not statistically significant although the UNEX method proved best with Cryptosporidium. Real-time PCR assays targeted the 18S rRNA and the hsp70 genes of C. cayetanensis; overall results were similar to those found using conventional nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Automatic transmission adapter kit

    SciTech Connect

    Stich, R.L.; Neal, W.D.

    1987-02-10

    This patent describes, in a four-wheel-drive vehicle apparatus having a power train including an automatic transmission and a transfer case, an automatic transmission adapter kit for installation of a replacement automatic transmission of shorter length than an original automatic transmission in the four-wheel-drive vehicle. The adapter kit comprises: an extension housing interposed between the replacement automatic transmission and the transfer case; an output shaft, having a first end which engages the replacement automatic transmission and a second end which engages the transfer case; first sealing means for sealing between the extension housing and the replacement automatic transmission; second sealing means for sealing between the extension housing and the transfer case; and fastening means for connecting the extension housing between the replacement automatic transmission and the transfer case.

  12. The class I HDAC inhibitor Romidepsin targets inflammatory breast cancer tumor emboli and synergizes with paclitaxel to inhibit metastasis.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Fredika M; Chu, Khoi; Boley, Kimberly M; Ye, Zaiming; Liu, Hui; Wright, Moishia C; Moraes, Ricardo; Zhang, Xuejun; Green, Tessa L; Barsky, Sanford H; Heise, Carla; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most metastatic variant of locally advanced breast cancer. IBC has distinctive characteristics including invasion of tumor emboli into the skin and rapid disease progression. Given our previous studies suggesting that HDAC inhibitors have promise in targeting IBC, the present study revealed that the class I HDAC inhibitor Romidepsin (FK-288, Istodax; Celgene Corporation, Summit, NJ) potently induced destruction of IBC tumor emboli and lymphatic vascular architecture. associated with inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha, (HIF1alpha) proteins in the Mary-X pre-clinical model of IBC. Romidepsin treatment induced clinically relevant biomarkers in including induction of acetylated Histone 3 (Ac-H3) proteins, apoptosis, and increased p21WAF1/CIP1. Romidepsin, alone and synergistically when combined with Paclitaxel, effectively eliminated both primary tumors and metastatic lesions at multiple sites formed by the SUM149 IBC cell line. This is the first report of the ability of an HDAC inhibitor to eradicate IBC tumor emboli, to destroy the integrity of lymphatic vessel architecture and to target metastasis. Furthermore, Romidepsin, in combination with a taxane, warrants evaluation as a therapeutic strategy that may effectively target the skin involvement and rapid metastasis that are hallmarks of IBC.

  13. Novel multi-targeted ErbB family inhibitor afatinib blocks EGF-induced signaling and induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinfang; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Guan, Shan; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A.; Tao, Ling; Pang, Jonathan C.; Lu, Jiaxiong; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Fuchun; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. The ErbB family of proteins is a group of receptor tyrosine kinases that promote the progression of various malignant cancers including neuroblastoma. Thus, targeting them with small molecule inhibitors is a promising strategy for neuroblastoma therapy. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of afatinib, an irreversible inhibitor of members of the ErbB family, on neuroblastoma. We found that afatinib suppressed the proliferation and colony formation ability of neuroblastoma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Afatinib also induced apoptosis and blocked EGF-induced activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in all neuroblastoma cell lines tested. In addition, afatinib enhanced doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells, including the chemoresistant LA-N-6 cell line. Finally, afatinib exhibited antitumor efficacy in vivo by inducing apoptosis in an orthotopic xenograft neuroblastoma mouse model. Taken together, these results show that afatinib inhibits neuroblastoma growth both in vitro and in vivo by suppressing EGFR-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Our study supports the idea that EGFR is a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. And targeting ErbB family protein kinases with small molecule inhibitors like afatinib alone or in combination with doxorubicin is a viable option for treating neuroblastoma. PMID:27902463

  14. Targeting Low-Druggability Bromodomains: Fragment Based Screening and Inhibitor Design against the BAZ2B Bromodomain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bromodomains are epigenetic reader domains that have recently become popular targets. In contrast to BET bromodomains, which have proven druggable, bromodomains from other regions of the phylogenetic tree have shallower pockets. We describe successful targeting of the challenging BAZ2B bromodomain using biophysical fragment screening and structure-based optimization of high ligand-efficiency fragments into a novel series of low-micromolar inhibitors. Our results provide attractive leads for development of BAZ2B chemical probes and indicate the whole family may be tractable. PMID:24304323

  15. Targeting low-druggability bromodomains: fragment based screening and inhibitor design against the BAZ2B bromodomain.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Fleur M; Fedorov, Oleg; Chaikuad, Apirat; Philpott, Martin; Muniz, Joao R C; Felletar, Ildiko; von Delft, Frank; Heightman, Tom; Knapp, Stefan; Abell, Chris; Ciulli, Alessio

    2013-12-27

    Bromodomains are epigenetic reader domains that have recently become popular targets. In contrast to BET bromodomains, which have proven druggable, bromodomains from other regions of the phylogenetic tree have shallower pockets. We describe successful targeting of the challenging BAZ2B bromodomain using biophysical fragment screening and structure-based optimization of high ligand-efficiency fragments into a novel series of low-micromolar inhibitors. Our results provide attractive leads for development of BAZ2B chemical probes and indicate the whole family may be tractable.

  16. Selective Targeting of Tumor and Stromal Cells By a Nanocarrier System Displaying Lipidated Cathepsin B Inhibitor**

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylov, G; Klimpel, D; Schaschke, N; Mikac, U; Vizovisek, M; Fonovic, M; Turk, V; Turk, Boris; Vasiljeva, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Cathepsin B (CtsB) is a lysosomal cysteine proteinase that is specifically translocated to the extracellular milieu during cancer progression. The development of a lipidated CtsB inhibitor incorporated into the envelope of a liposomal nanocarrier (LNC-NS-629) is described. Ex vivo and in vivo studies confirmed selective targeting and internalization of LNC-NS-629 by tumor and stromal cells, thus validating CtsB targeting as a highly promising approach to cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24975267

  17. C-kit as a prognostic and therapeutic marker in canine cutaneous mast cell tumours: From laboratory to clinic.

    PubMed

    Gil da Costa, Rui M

    2015-07-01

    Cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCTs) are some of the most common canine neoplasms and their variable and often aggressive biological behaviour makes them particularly challenging for the veterinary practitioner. Over the years, scientists have accumulated a wealth of knowledge on these tumours and developed better prognostic markers and targeted therapies, mostly focused on inhibiting c-kit, a protein that plays a major role in the biopathology of MCTs. Masitinib and toceranib, targeted inhibitors of c-kit and other receptor tyrosine-kinases (RTKs), offer the promise of improving the outcome of patients with aggressive MCTs. Much of the available knowledge on MCTs is dispersed, making it difficult for practitioners to benefit when consulting a pathologist or making therapeutic decisions. This article seeks to bring together current knowledge on the biopathology of MCTs, reviewing prognostic markers and their applications, and the development of c-kit inhibitors in the context of the basic cellular, molecular and pathological features of MCTs. Future perspectives following recent biopathological data and experimental therapeutic approaches are also addressed.

  18. Quantitative Chemical Proteomics Identifies Novel Targets of the Anti-cancer Multi-kinase Inhibitor E-3810*

    PubMed Central

    Colzani, Mara; Noberini, Roberta; Romanenghi, Mauro; Colella, Gennaro; Pasi, Maurizio; Fancelli, Daniele; Varasi, Mario; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Novel drugs are designed against specific molecular targets, but almost unavoidably they bind non-targets, which can cause additional biological effects that may result in increased activity or, more frequently, undesired toxicity. Chemical proteomics is an ideal approach for the systematic identification of drug targets and off-targets, allowing unbiased screening of candidate interactors in their natural context (tissue or cell extracts). E-3810 is a novel multi-kinase inhibitor currently in clinical trials for its anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activity. In biochemical assays, E-3810 targets primarily vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor receptors. Interestingly, E-3810 appears to inhibit the growth of tumor cells with low to undetectable levels of these proteins in vitro, suggesting that additional relevant targets exist. We applied chemical proteomics to screen for E-3810 targets by immobilizing the drug on a resin and exploiting stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to design experiments that allowed the detection of novel interactors and the quantification of their dissociation constant (Kd imm) for the immobilized drug. In addition to the known target FGFR2 and PDGFRα, which has been described as a secondary E-3810 target based on in vitro assays, we identified six novel candidate kinase targets (DDR2, YES, LYN, CARDIAK, EPHA2, and CSBP). These kinases were validated in a biochemical assay and—in the case of the cell-surface receptor DDR2, for which activating mutations have been recently discovered in lung cancer—cellular assays. Taken together, the success of our strategy—which integrates large-scale target identification and quality-controlled target affinity measurements using quantitative mass spectrometry—in identifying novel E-3810 targets further supports the use of chemical proteomics to dissect the mechanism of action of novel drugs. PMID:24696502

  19. Targeting FASN in Breast Cancer and the Discovery of Promising Inhibitors from Natural Products Derived from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chien-shan; Wang, Zhiyu; Chen, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Molecular targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells process a fundamental change in its bioenergetic metabolism from normal cells on an altered lipid metabolism, also known as the de novo fatty acid synthesis, for sustaining their high proliferation rates. Fatty acid synthesis is now associated with clinically aggressive tumor behavior and tumor cell growth and has become a novel target pathway for chemotherapy development. Although the underlying mechanisms of the altered de novo fatty acid synthesis still remains unclear, recent progress has shown that by targeting Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of endogenous long chain fatty acid could be a critical target for drug discovery. However, relatively few FASN inhibitors have been discovered. With the long history of clinical practices and numerous histological case study reports, traditional Chinese medicine enjoys an important role in seeking bioactive anticancer natural compounds. Herein, we will give an overall picture of the current progress of molecular targeted therapy in cancer fatty acid synthesis, describe the advances in the research on natural products-derived FASN inhibitors and their potential for enhancing our understanding of fatty acids in tumor biology, and may provide new therapeutic moieties for breast cancer patient care. PMID:24778702

  20. Tricyclic covalent inhibitors selectively target Jak3 through an active site thiol.

    PubMed

    Goedken, Eric R; Argiriadi, Maria A; Banach, David L; Fiamengo, Bryan A; Foley, Sage E; Frank, Kristine E; George, Jonathan S; Harris, Christopher M; Hobson, Adrian D; Ihle, David C; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J; Michalak, Mark E; Murdock, Sara E; Tomlinson, Medha J; Voss, Jeffrey W

    2015-02-20

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases.

  1. Optimized Inhibitors of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Improve in Vitro Target Residence Time and in Vivo Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is affecting the life of millions of people. A large proportion of diabetic patients suffer from severe complications such as neuropathic pain, and current treatments for these complications have deleterious side effects. Thus, alternate therapeutic strategies are needed. Recently, the elevation of epoxy-fatty acids through inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) was shown to reduce diabetic neuropathic pain in rodents. In this report, we describe a series of newly synthesized sEH inhibitors with at least 5-fold higher potency and doubled residence time inside both the human and rodent sEH enzyme than previously reported inhibitors. These inhibitors also have better physical properties and optimized pharmacokinetic profiles. The optimized inhibitor selected from this new series displayed improved efficacy of almost 10-fold in relieving pain perception in diabetic neuropathic rats as compared to the approved drug, gabapentin, and previously published sEH inhibitors. Therefore, these new sEH inhibitors could be an attractive alternative to treat diabetic neuropathy in humans. PMID:25079952

  2. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol

    DOE PAGES

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; ...

    2014-12-31

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. In this paper, we have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). Wemore » found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nM) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. Finally, these results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases.« less

  3. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol

    SciTech Connect

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2014-12-31

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. In this paper, we have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nM) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. Finally, these results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases.

  4. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  5. Target-mediated clearance and bio-distribution of a monoclonal antibody against the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor 2 domain of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lene; Petersen, Lars Christian; Lauritzen, Brian; Clausen, Jes Thorn; Grell, Susanne Nedergaard; Agersø, Henrik; Sørensen, Brit Binow; Hilden, Ida; Almholt, Kasper

    2014-03-01

    A humanised monoclonal antibody, concizumab, that binds with high affinity to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI) 2 domain of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) is in clinical development. It promotes coagulation by neutralising the inhibitory function of TFPI and may provide a subcutaneous prophylaxis option for patients with haemophilia. We aimed to study biodistribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of concizumab. Blockage of cellular TFPI by concizumab was measured by tissue factor/Factor VIIa-mediated Factor X activation on human EA.hy926 cells. Biodistribution of concizumab was analysed in rabbits by immunohistology, and the PK was measured in rabbits and rats. Concizumab bound to cell surface TFPI on EA.hy926 cells and neutralised TFPI inhibition of Factor X activation. The antibody cross-reacted with rabbit TFPI, but not with rat TFPI, allowing for comparative PK studies. PK data in rats described a log-linear profile typical for a non-binding antibody, whereas PK data in rabbits revealed a non-linear, dose-dependent profile, consistent with a target-mediated clearance mechanism. Immunohistology in rabbits during target-saturation showed localisation of the antibody on the endothelium of the microvasculature in several organs. We observed a marked co-localisation with endogenous rabbit TFPI, but a negligible sub-endothelial build-up. Concizumab binds and neutralises the inhibitory effect of cell surface-bound TFPI. The PK profile observed in rabbits is consistent with a TFPI-mediated drug disposition. Double immunofluorescence shows co-localisation of the antibody with TFPI on the endothelium of the microvasculature and points to this TFPI as a putative target involved in the clearance mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential effects of selective inhibitors targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Badura, Susanne; Tesanovic, Tamara; Pfeifer, Heike; Wystub, Sylvia; Nijmeijer, Bart A; Liebermann, Marcus; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Ruthardt, Martin; Ottmann, Oliver G

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling has been linked to oncogenesis and therapy resistance in various malignancies including leukemias. In Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) positive leukemias, activation of PI3K by dysregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK) contributes to the pathogenesis and development of resistance to ABL-TK inhibitors (TKI). The PI3K pathway thus is an attractive therapeutic target in BCR-ABL positive leukemias, but its role in BCR-ABL negative ALL is conjectural. Moreover, the functional contribution of individual components of the PI3K pathway in ALL has not been established. We compared the activity of the ATP-competitive pan-PI3K inhibitor NVP-BKM120, the allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor RAD001, the ATP-competitive dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and NVP-BGT226 and the combined mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitors Torin 1, PP242 and KU-0063794 using long-term cultures of ALL cells (ALL-LTC) from patients with B-precursor ALL that expressed the BCR-ABL or TEL-ABL oncoproteins or were BCR-ABL negative. Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors profoundly inhibited growth and survival of ALL cells irrespective of their genetic subtype and their responsiveness to ABL-TKI. Combined suppression of PI3K, mTORC1 and mTORC2 displayed greater antileukemic activity than selective inhibitors of PI3K, mTORC1 or mTORC1 and mTORC2. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway is a promising therapeutic approach in patients with ALL. Greater antileukemic activity of dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors appears to be due to the redundant function of PI3K and mTOR. Clinical trials examining dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors in patients with B-precursor ALL are warranted, and should not be restricted to particular genetic subtypes.

  7. Differential Effects of Selective Inhibitors Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Badura, Susanne; Tesanovic, Tamara; Pfeifer, Heike; Wystub, Sylvia; Nijmeijer, Bart A.; Liebermann, Marcus; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; Ruthardt, Martin; Ottmann, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Aberrant PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling has been linked to oncogenesis and therapy resistance in various malignancies including leukemias. In Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) positive leukemias, activation of PI3K by dysregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK) contributes to the pathogenesis and development of resistance to ABL-TK inhibitors (TKI). The PI3K pathway thus is an attractive therapeutic target in BCR-ABL positive leukemias, but its role in BCR-ABL negative ALL is conjectural. Moreover, the functional contribution of individual components of the PI3K pathway in ALL has not been established. Experimental Design We compared the activity of the ATP-competitive pan-PI3K inhibitor NVP-BKM120, the allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor RAD001, the ATP-competitive dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors NVP-BEZ235 and NVP-BGT226 and the combined mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitors Torin 1, PP242 and KU-0063794 using long-term cultures of ALL cells (ALL-LTC) from patients with B-precursor ALL that expressed the BCR-ABL or TEL-ABL oncoproteins or were BCR-ABL negative. Results Dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitors profoundly inhibited growth and survival of ALL cells irrespective of their genetic subtype and their responsiveness to ABL-TKI. Combined suppression of PI3K, mTORC1 and mTORC2 displayed greater antileukemic activity than selective inhibitors of PI3K, mTORC1 or mTORC1 and mTORC2. Conclusions Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway is a promising therapeutic approach in patients with ALL. Greater antileukemic activity of dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors appears to be due to the redundant function of PI3K and mTOR. Clinical trials examining dual PI3K/mTORC1/C2 inhibitors in patients with B-precursor ALL are warranted, and should not be restricted to particular genetic subtypes. PMID:24244612

  8. The molecular target of bicyclams, potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    de Vreese, K; Kofler-Mongold, V; Leutgeb, C; Weber, V; Vermeire, K; Schacht, S; Anné, J; de Clercq, E; Datema, R; Werner, G

    1996-01-01

    Bicyclams are a novel class of antiviral compounds which act as potent and selective inhibitors of the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2. They block an early step in the viral life cycle following adsorption to the CD4 receptor and preceding reverse transcription. To identify the molecular target of these compounds, we genetically analyzed variants of the HIV-1 molecular clone NL4-3, which developed resistance against two structurally related bicyclams, JM2763 and the more potent SID791. The resistant strains were obtained after long-term passaging in MT-4 cells in the presence of progressively increasing compound concentrations. Recombinants between selected genes of the resistant strains and the parental NL4-3 provirus were generated by adapting the marker rescue technique to MT-4 cells. The bicyclam-resistant phenotype was rescued by transferring the envelope gp120 gene of bicyclam-resistant virus into the NL4-3 parental genetic background. In the gp120 genes of the resistant strains, we identified several mutations leading to amino acid substitutions in the V3 loop. Furthermore, two substitutions of highly conserved amino acids in close proximity to the disulfide bridges of the V3 and V4 loops were found in both SID791- and JM2763-resistant strains. Additional mutations in regions encoding V3, C4, V5, and C5 were present in SID791-resistant viruses. Recombination experiments with overlapping parts of the envelope gene indicated that most, if not all, of the mutations were necessary to develop the fully SID791 resistant phenotype. The mutations in the C-terminal part of gp120 downstream of the V3 loop sequence conferred partial resistance to JM2763 but did not significantly decrease susceptibility to SID791. The genetic data and the biological properties of the resistant viruses point to inhibition of entry and fusion as the mode of action of the HIV-inhibitory bicyclams. A possible mechanism of binding of bicyclams to gp120

  9. Rational combination of targeted therapies as a strategy to overcome the mechanisms of resistance to inhibitors of EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Damiano, Vincenzo; Gelardi, Teresa; Daniele, Gennaro; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2007-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been widely used as a target for novel anticancer agents, such as blocking antibodies and small molecular weight tyrosine kinase compounds. In spite of recent advances in cancer cell biology, leading to the introduction of clinically active new drugs, such as cetuximab, panitumumab and erlotinib, unfortunately disease control remains unsuccessful due to the presence of constitutive resistance to EGFR inhibitors in most patients and the development of acquired resistance in the responders. A large number of molecular abnormalities in tumor cells seem to partly contribute to their resistance to anti-EGFR therapy: increased angiogenesis, constitutive activation of downstream mediators, overexpression of other tyrosine kinase receptors. Moreover, some mutations in the EGFR receptor kinase domain seem to play a crucial role in determining the sensitivity of cancer cells to specific inhibitors by altering the conformation of the receptor and its activity. The development of rational combinations of anticancer agents and EGFR inhibitors, able to exert synergistic cytotoxic interactions, has been widely accepted and used in both preclinical and clinical studies. Although the failure of large clinical trial based on empirical combination of anti-EGFR and classic chemotherapeutic agents, several preclinical data seems to support the hypothesis that combining EGFR inhibitors and other novel agents could efficiently inhibit tumor growth and overcome intrinsic resistance to a single-agent based therapy. This review focuses on the role of complementary signalling pathways in the development of resistance to EGFR targeting agents and the rationale to combine novel inhibitors as anticancer therapy.

  10. Anticancer peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) inhibitors regulate the autophagy flux and the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuji; Li, Pingxin; Wang, Shu; Hu, Jing; Chen, Xiangyun Amy; Wu, Jianhui; Fisher, Megan; Oshaben, Kira; Zhao, Na; Gu, Ying; Wang, Dong; Chen, Gong; Wang, Yanming

    2012-07-27

    Tumor suppressor genes are frequently silenced in cancer cells by enzymes catalyzing epigenetic histone modifications. The peptidylarginine deiminase family member PAD4 (also called PADI4) is markedly overexpressed in a majority of human cancers, suggesting that PAD4 is a putative target for cancer treatment. Here, we have generated novel PAD inhibitors with low micromolar IC(50) in PAD activity and cancer cell growth inhibition. The lead compound YW3-56 alters the expression of genes controlling the cell cycle and cell death, including SESN2 that encodes an upstream inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway. Guided by the gene expression profile analyses with YW3-56, we found that PAD4 functions as a corepressor of p53 to regulate SESN2 expression by histone citrullination in cancer cells. Consistent with the mTORC1 inhibition by SESN2, the phosphorylation of its substrates including p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E-BP1 was decreased. Furthermore, macroautophagy is perturbed after YW3-56 treatment in cancer cells. In a mouse xenograft model, YW3-56 demonstrates cancer growth inhibition activity with little if any detectable adverse effect to vital organs, whereas a combination of PAD4 and histone deacetylase inhibitors further decreases tumor growth. Taken together, our work found that PAD4 regulates the mTORC1 signaling pathway and that PAD inhibitors are potential anticancer reagents that activate tumor suppressor gene expression alone or in combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  11. Ganetespib overcomes resistance to PARP inhibitors in breast cancer by targeting core proteins in the DNA repair machinery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juhong; Lu, Yuanzhi; Li, Zhi; Li, Liping; Niu, Daoli; Xu, Wenwei; Liu, Jing; Fu, Lin; Zhou, Ziqing; Gu, Yingying; Xia, Fen

    2017-06-01

    DNA damage repair plays essential roles in drug resistance, especially resistance to Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in the clinic. A subset of DNA repair proteins such as Breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1), BRCA2 and RecA homolog (RAD51) are client proteins of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Clearance of these DNA repair proteins by inhibition of Hsp90 is a promising strategy for overcoming resistance to PARP inhibitors. Here we report the pharmacological analysis of the highly potent second-generation Hsp90 inhibitor, ganetespib. Methods Nuclear BRCA1, BRCA2, and RAD51 expression in breast cancer cells were detected by subcellular fractionation and western blot analysis. Formation of nuclear RAD51 and γ-H2AX foci was analyzed by immunofluorescent staining. The cytotoxicity of ganetespib and ABT-888 in breast cancer cells were evaluated by cell proliferation, colony survival, and apoptosis assay. To investigate the efficacy of this therapy in vivo, SCID mice bearing MCF7 xenografts were treated with ganetespib and ABT-888, both as single agents and in combination. Results Ganetespib significantly destabilized nuclear BRCA1, BRCA2, and RAD51, and efficiently disrupted homologous recombination-mediated DNA double-strand break repair in breast cancer cells. The synergistic antitumor effects of ganetespib and the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888 were observed, and concurrent treatment with both inhibitors synergistically inhibited xenograft tumor growth. Importantly, the combined treatment was well tolerated, without significant loss of body weight or major histological changes in the breast cancer xenograft model. Conclusion These data provide a novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer with wild type BRCA1 using combination therapy targeting Hsp90 to overcome resistance to PARP inhibitors.

  12. TIL-type protease inhibitors may be used as targeted resistance factors to enhance silkworm defenses against invasive fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Youshan; Zhao, Ping; Liu, Huawei; Guo, Xiaomeng; He, Huawei; Zhu, Rui; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-02-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi penetrate the insect cuticle using their abundant hydrolases. These hydrolases, which include cuticle-degrading proteases and chitinases, are important virulence factors. Our recent findings suggest that many serine protease inhibitors, especially TIL-type protease inhibitors, are involved in insect resistance to pathogenic microorganisms. To clarify the molecular mechanism underlying this resistance to entomopathogenic fungi and identify novel genes to improve the silkworm antifungal capacity, we conducted an in-depth study of serine protease inhibitors. Here, we cloned and expressed a novel silkworm TIL-type protease inhibitor, BmSPI39. In activity assays, BmSPI39 potently inhibited the virulence protease CDEP-1 of Beauveria bassiana, suggesting that it might suppress the fungal penetration of the silkworm integument by inhibiting the cuticle-degrading proteases secreted by the fungus. Phenol oxidase activation studies showed that melanization is involved in the insect immune response to fungal invasion, and that fungus-induced excessive melanization is suppressed by BmSPI39 by inhibiting the fungal cuticle-degrading proteases. To better understand the mechanism involved in the inhibition of fungal virulence by protease inhibitors, their effects on the germination of B. bassiana conidia was examined. BmSPI38 and BmSPI39 significantly inhibited the germination of B. bassiana conidia. Survival assays showed that BmSPI38 and BmSPI39 markedly improved the survival rates of silkworms, and can therefore be used as targeted resistance proteins in the silkworm. These results provided new insight into the molecular mechanisms whereby insect protease inhibitors confer resistance against entomopathogenic fungi, suggesting their potential application in medicinal or agricultural fields.

  13. The lack of target specificity of small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors is correlated with their ability to damage myocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hasinoff, Brian B. Patel, Daywin

    2010-12-01

    Many new targeted small molecule anticancer kinase inhibitors are actively being developed. However, the clinical use of some kinase inhibitors has been shown to result in cardiotoxicity. In most cases the mechanisms by which they exert their cardiotoxicity are not well understood. We have used large scale profiling data on 8 FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors and 10 other kinase inhibitors to a panel of 317 kinases in order to correlate binding constants and kinase inhibitor binding selectivity scores with kinase inhibitor-induced damage to neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. The 18 kinase inhibitors that were the subject of this study were: canertinib, dasatinib, dovitinib, erlotinib, flavopiridol, gefitinib, imatinib, lapatinib, midostaurin, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, staurosporine, sunitinib, tandutinib, tozasertib, vandetanib and vatalanib. The combined tyrosine kinase and serine-threonine kinase selectivity scores were highly correlated with the myocyte-damaging effects of the kinase inhibitors. This result suggests that myocyte damage was due to a lack of target selectivity to binding of both tyrosine kinases and serine-threonine kinases, and was not due to binding to either group specifically. Finally, the strength of kinase inhibitor binding for 290 kinases was examined for correlations with myocyte damage. Kinase inhibitor binding was significantly correlated with myocyte damage for 12 kinases. Thus, myocyte damage may be multifactorial in nature with the inhibition of a number of kinases involved in producing kinase inhibitor-induced myocyte damage.

  14. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical kits and first aid kits. 173.161 Section... Class 7 § 173.161 Chemical kits and first aid kits. (a) Applicability. Chemical kits and first aid kits...) The kits may only contain hazardous materials for which packaging exceptions are provided in column...

  15. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical kits and first aid kits. 173.161 Section... Class 7 § 173.161 Chemical kits and first aid kits. (a) Applicability. Chemical kits and first aid kits...) The kits may only contain hazardous materials for which packaging exceptions are provided in column...

  16. 49 CFR 173.161 - Chemical kits and first aid kits.