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Sample records for inhibitors chemistry

  1. Discovery of an Aurora kinase inhibitor through site-specific dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cancilla, Mark T; He, Molly M; Viswanathan, Nina; Simmons, Robert L; Taylor, Meggin; Fung, Amy D; Cao, Kathy; Erlanson, Daniel A

    2008-07-15

    We demonstrate a fragment-based lead discovery method that combines site-directed ligand discovery with dynamic combinatorial chemistry. Our technique targets dynamic combinatorial screening to a specified region of a protein by using reversible disulfide chemistry. We have used this technology to rapidly identify inhibitors of the drug target Aurora A that span the purine-binding site and the adaptive pocket of the kinase. The binding mode of a noncovalent inhibitor has been further characterized through crystallography.

  2. Discovery of An Aurora Kinase Inhibitor Through Site-Specific Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Cancilla, M.T.; He, M.M.; Viswanathan, N.; Simmons, R.L.; Taylor, M.; Fung, A.D.; Cao, K.; Erlanson, D.A.

    2009-05-12

    We demonstrate a fragment-based lead discovery method that combines site-directed ligand discovery with dynamic combinatorial chemistry. Our technique targets dynamic combinatorial screening to a specified region of a protein by using reversible disulfide chemistry. We have used this technology to rapidly identify inhibitors of the drug target Aurora A that span the purine-binding site and the adaptive pocket of the kinase. The binding mode of a noncovalent inhibitor has been further characterized through crystallography.

  3. Benzotriazole a Corrosion Inhibitor for Antiques: Some Practical Surface Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure and inhibitive properties of Benzotriazole. The chemical may be employed as an inhibitor to reduce corrosion of articles during storage or display. It may be applied to copper and copper-based antiques as well as to silver and other metals. (Author/JN)

  4. Structure-based design of inhibitors of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin by exploiting dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Milon; Radeva, Nedyalka; Köster, Helene; Park, Ahyoung; Potamitis, Constantinos; Zervou, Maria; Klebe, Gerhard; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2014-03-17

    Structure-based design (SBD) can be used for the design and/or optimization of new inhibitors for a biological target. Whereas de novo SBD is rarely used, most reports on SBD are dealing with the optimization of an initial hit. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has emerged as a powerful strategy to identify bioactive ligands given that it enables the target to direct the synthesis of its strongest binder. We have designed a library of potential inhibitors (acylhydrazones) generated from five aldehydes and five hydrazides and used DCC to identify the best binder(s). After addition of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin, we characterized the protein-bound library member(s) by saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy. Cocrystallization experiments validated the predicted binding mode of the two most potent inhibitors, thus demonstrating that the combination of de novo SBD and DCC constitutes an efficient starting point for hit identification and optimization.

  5. Medicinal chemistry insights in the discovery of novel LSD1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueshun; Huang, Boshi; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Liu, Xinyong; Zhan, Peng

    2015-01-01

    LSD1 is an epigenetic modulator associated with transcriptional regulation of genes involved in a broad spectrum of key cellular processes, and its activity is often altered under pathological conditions. LSD1 inhibitors are considered to be candidates for therapy of cancer, viral diseases and neurodegeneration. Many LSD1 inhibitors with various scaffolds have been disclosed, and a few potent molecules are in different stages of clinical development. In this review, we summarize recent biological findings on the roles of LSD1 and the current understanding of the clinical significance of LSD1, and focus on the medicinal chemistry strategies used in the design and development of LSD1 inhibitors as drug-like epigenetic modulators since 2012, including a brief consideration of structure-activity relationships.

  6. Chitinase inhibitors: extraction of the active framework from natural argifin and use of in situ click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tomoyasu; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Sugawara, Akihiro; Endo, Ayako; Iguchi, Kanami; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Ui, Hideaki; Shiomi, Kazuro; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sharpless, K Barry; Omura, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    In situ click chemistry is a target-guided synthesis technique for discovering potent protein ligands by assembling azides and alkynes into triazoles inside the affinity site of a target protein. We report the rapid discovery of a new and potent inhibitor of bacterial chitinases by the use of in situ click chemistry. We observed a target-templated formation of a potent triazole inhibitor of the chitinase-catalyzed chitin hydrolysis, through in situ click chemistry between a biologically active azide-containing scaffold and structurally unrelated alkyne fragments. Chitinase inhibitors have chemotherapeutic potential as fungicides, pesticides and antiasthmatics. Argifin, which has been isolated and characterized as a cyclopentapeptide natural product by our research group, shows strong inhibitory activity against chitinases. As a result of our efforts at developing a chitinase inhibitor from an azide-bearing argifin fragment and the application of the chitinase template and a library of alkynes, we rapidly obtained a very potent and new 1,5-disubstituted triazole inhibitor against Serratia marcescens chitinase (SmChi) B. The new inhibitor expressed 300-fold increase in the inhibitory activity against SmChiB compared with that of argifin. To the best of our knowledge, our finding of an enzyme-made 1,5-disubstituted triazole, using in situ click chemistry is the second example reported in the literature.

  7. Bringing Research into a First Semester Organic Chemistry Laboratory with the Multistep Synthesis of Carbohydrate-Based HIV Inhibitor Mimics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a…

  8. Protein-Directed Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: A Guide to Protein Ligand and Inhibitor Discovery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renjie; Leung, Ivanhoe K H

    2016-07-16

    Protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry is an emerging technique for efficient discovery of novel chemical structures for binding to a target protein. Typically, this method relies on a library of small molecules that react reversibly with each other to generate a combinatorial library. The components in the combinatorial library are at equilibrium with each other under thermodynamic control. When a protein is added to the equilibrium mixture, and if the protein interacts with any components of the combinatorial library, the position of the equilibrium will shift and those components that interact with the protein will be amplified, which can then be identified by a suitable biophysical technique. Such information is useful as a starting point to guide further organic synthesis of novel protein ligands and enzyme inhibitors. This review uses literature examples to discuss the practicalities of applying this method to inhibitor discovery, in particular, the set-up of the combinatorial library, the reversible reactions that may be employed, and the choice of detection methods to screen protein ligands from a mixture of reversibly forming molecules.

  9. Efavirenz a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of first-generation: Approaches based on its medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Mônica M; Costa, Carolina C P; Bezerra, Talitha C; da Silva, Fernando de C; Boechat, Núbia

    2016-01-27

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that affects individuals on all continents. In 1987, the antiretroviral therapy began increasing survival rates and improving the quality of life for patients. Efavirenz (EFV) is a drug widely used in the treatment of HIV-AIDS since 1998. Belonging to a class of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), it directly blocks the action of the enzyme and consequently the multiplication of the virus. Although EFV has provided excellent results in reducing viral load, cases of resistance associated with adverse effects have led to the search to find new analogs of this drug. Although many researchers are involved in this quest, curiously there is still no clinical substitute for EFV. To develop a second-generation version of EFV, it is essential understand the structure-activity relationships of the derivative compounds. Thus, the aims of the present review are to compare EFV and its derivatives using medicinal chemistry and to describe the main synthetic routes. PMID:26708112

  10. Discovering Echinococcus granulosus thioredoxin glutathione reductase inhibitors through site-specific dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Cecilia; Castillo, Valerie; Fontán, Pablo; Bonilla, Mariana; Salinas, Gustavo; Rodríguez-Haralambides, Alejandra; Mahler, S Graciela

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we report a strategy using dynamic combinatorial chemistry for targeting the thioredoxin (Trx)-reductase catalytic site on Trx glutathione reductase (TGR), a pyridine nucleotide thiol-disulfide oxido-reductase. We chose Echinococcus granulosus TGR since it is a bottleneck enzyme of platyhelminth parasites and a validated pharmacological target. A dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) was constructed based on thiol-disulfide reversible exchange. We demonstrate the use of 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid (TNB) as a non-covalent anchor fragment in a DCL templated by E. granulosus TGR. The heterodimer of TNB and bisthiazolidine (2af) was identified, upon library analysis by HPLC (IC50 = 24 μM). Furthermore, 14 analogs were synthetically prepared and evaluated against TGR. This allowed the study of a structure-activity relationship and the identification of a disulfide TNB-tricyclic bisthiazolidine (2aj) as the best enzyme inhibitor in these series, with an IC50 = 24 μM. Thus, our results validate the use of DCL for targeting thiol-disulfide oxido-reductases.

  11. Efavirenz a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of first-generation: Approaches based on its medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Mônica M; Costa, Carolina C P; Bezerra, Talitha C; da Silva, Fernando de C; Boechat, Núbia

    2016-01-27

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that affects individuals on all continents. In 1987, the antiretroviral therapy began increasing survival rates and improving the quality of life for patients. Efavirenz (EFV) is a drug widely used in the treatment of HIV-AIDS since 1998. Belonging to a class of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI), it directly blocks the action of the enzyme and consequently the multiplication of the virus. Although EFV has provided excellent results in reducing viral load, cases of resistance associated with adverse effects have led to the search to find new analogs of this drug. Although many researchers are involved in this quest, curiously there is still no clinical substitute for EFV. To develop a second-generation version of EFV, it is essential understand the structure-activity relationships of the derivative compounds. Thus, the aims of the present review are to compare EFV and its derivatives using medicinal chemistry and to describe the main synthetic routes.

  12. Discovery of two new classes of potent monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors by tricky chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cagide, F; Silva, T; Reis, J; Gaspar, A; Borges, F; Gomes, L R; Low, J N

    2015-02-18

    The discovery of potent and selective monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors for the management of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases is still a challenging endeavor. Herein, we report the discovery of two new classes of potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors based on chromane-2,4-dione and chromone-3-carboxamide scaffolds.

  13. Allosteric inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase dimerization discovered via combinatorial chemistry

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Kirk; Adler, Marc; Auld, Douglas S.; Baldwin, John J.; Blasko, Eric; Browne, Leslie J.; Chelsky, Daniel; Davey, David; Dolle, Ronald E.; Eagen, Keith A.; Erickson, Shawn; Feldman, Richard I.; Glaser, Charles B.; Mallari, Cornell; Morrissey, Michael M.; Ohlmeyer, Michael H. J.; Pan, Gonghua; Parkinson, John F.; Phillips, Gary B.; Polokoff, Mark A.; Sigal, Nolan H.; Vergona, Ronald; Whitlow, Marc; Young, Tish A.; Devlin, James J.

    2000-01-01

    Potent and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (EC 1.14.13.39) were identified in an encoded combinatorial chemical library that blocked human iNOS dimerization, and thereby NO production. In a cell-based iNOS assay (A-172 astrocytoma cells) the inhibitors had low-nanomolar IC50 values and thus were >1,000-fold more potent than the substrate-based direct iNOS inhibitors 1400W and N-methyl-l-arginine. Biochemical studies confirmed that inhibitors caused accumulation of iNOS monomers in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. High affinity (Kd ≈ 3 nM) of inhibitors for isolated iNOS monomers was confirmed by using a radioligand binding assay. Inhibitors were >1,000-fold selective for iNOS versus endothelial NOS dimerization in a cell-based assay. The crystal structure of inhibitor bound to the monomeric iNOS oxygenase domain revealed inhibitor–heme coordination and substantial perturbation of the substrate binding site and the dimerization interface, indicating that this small molecule acts by allosterically disrupting protein–protein interactions at the dimer interface. These results provide a mechanism-based approach to highly selective iNOS inhibition. Inhibitors were active in vivo, with ED50 values of <2 mg/kg in a rat model of endotoxin-induced systemic iNOS induction. Thus, this class of dimerization inhibitors has broad therapeutic potential in iNOS-mediated pathologies. PMID:10677491

  14. Multiphysics modelling, quantum chemistry and risk analysis for corrosion inhibitor design and lifetime prediction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C D; Chandra, A; Vera, J; Sridhar, N

    2015-01-01

    Organic corrosion inhibitors can provide an effective means to extend the life of equipment in aggressive environments, decrease the environmental, economic, health and safety risks associated with corrosion failures and enable the use of low cost steels in place of corrosion resistant alloys. To guide the construction of advanced models for the design and optimization of the chemical composition of organic inhibitors, and to develop predictive tools for inhibitor performance as a function of alloy and environment, a multiphysics model has been constructed following Staehle's principles of "domains and microprocesses". The multiphysics framework provides a way for science-based modelling of the various phenomena that impact inhibitor efficiency, including chemical thermodynamics and speciation, oil/water partitioning, effect of the inhibitor on multiphase flow, surface adsorption and self-assembled monolayer formation, and the effect of the inhibitor on cathodic and anodic reaction pathways. The fundamental tools required to solve the resulting modelling from a first-principles perspective are also described. Quantification of uncertainty is significant to the development of lifetime prediction models, due to their application for risk management. We therefore also discuss how uncertainty analysis can be coupled with the first-principles approach laid out in this paper.

  15. Identifying tumor cell growth inhibitors by combinatorial chemistry and zebrafish assays.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jing; Yang, Hongbo; Che, Chao; Zou, Haixia; Yang, Hanshuo; Wei, Yuquan; Quan, Junmin; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Zhen; Lin, Shuo

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play important roles in regulating cell cycle progression, and altered cell cycles resulting from over-expression or abnormal activation of CDKs observed in many human cancers. As a result, CDKs have become extensive studied targets for developing chemical inhibitors for cancer therapies; however, protein kinases share a highly conserved ATP binding pocket at which most chemical inhibitors bind, therefore, a major challenge in developing kinase inhibitors is achieving target selectivity. To identify cell growth inhibitors with potential applications in cancer therapy, we used an integrated approach that combines one-pot chemical synthesis in a combinatorial manner to generate diversified small molecules with new chemical scaffolds coupled with growth inhibition assay using developing zebrafish embryos. We report the successful identification of a novel lead compound that displays selective inhibitory effects on CDK2 activity, cancer cell proliferation, and tumor progression in vivo. Our approaches should have general applications in developing cell proliferation inhibitors using an efficient combinatorial chemical genetic method and integrated biological assays. The novel cell growth inhibitor we identified should have potential as a cancer therapeutic agent.

  16. Identifying Tumor Cell Growth Inhibitors by Combinatorial Chemistry and Zebrafish Assays

    PubMed Central

    Che, Chao; Zou, Haixia; Yang, Hanshuo; Wei, Yuquan; Quan, Junmin; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Zhen; Lin, Shuo

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play important roles in regulating cell cycle progression, and altered cell cycles resulting from over-expression or abnormal activation of CDKs observed in many human cancers. As a result, CDKs have become extensive studied targets for developing chemical inhibitors for cancer therapies; however, protein kinases share a highly conserved ATP binding pocket at which most chemical inhibitors bind, therefore, a major challenge in developing kinase inhibitors is achieving target selectivity. To identify cell growth inhibitors with potential applications in cancer therapy, we used an integrated approach that combines one-pot chemical synthesis in a combinatorial manner to generate diversified small molecules with new chemical scaffolds coupled with growth inhibition assay using developing zebrafish embryos. We report the successful identification of a novel lead compound that displays selective inhibitory effects on CDK2 activity, cancer cell proliferation, and tumor progression in vivo. Our approaches should have general applications in developing cell proliferation inhibitors using an efficient combinatorial chemical genetic method and integrated biological assays. The novel cell growth inhibitor we identified should have potential as a cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:19194508

  17. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  18. A novel protocol to accelerate dynamic combinatorial chemistry via isolation of ligand-target adducts from dynamic combinatorial libraries: a case study identifying competitive inhibitors of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheng; He, Wei; Li, Xin; Li, Zhengjiang; Chen, Beining; Ouyang, Pingkai; Guo, Kai

    2013-09-15

    A novel protocol based on size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and MS was established to accelerate dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) in this study. By isolating ligand-target adducts from the dynamic combinatorial library (DCL), ligands could be identified directly by MS after denaturation. Three new inhibitors for lysozyme were discovered by this SEC-MS protocol in a case study. Km Data for these new inhibitors was also determined.

  19. Snake venom phospholipase A2 inhibitors: medicinal chemistry and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Marcussi, Silvana; Sant'Ana, Carolina D; Oliveira, Clayton Z; Rueda, Aristides Quintero; Menaldo, Danilo L; Beleboni, Rene O; Stabeli, Rodrigo G; Giglio, José R; Fontes, Marcos R M; Soares, Andreimar M

    2007-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are commonly found in snake venoms from Viperidae, Hydrophidae and Elaphidae families and have been extensively studied due to their pharmacological and physiopathological effects in living organisms. This article reports a review on natural and artificial inhibitors of enzymatic, toxic and pharmacological effects induced by snake venom PLA2s. These inhibitors act on PLA2s through different mechanisms, most of them still not completely understood, including binding to specific domains, denaturation, modification of specific amino acid residues and others. Several substances have been evaluated regarding their effects against snake venoms and isolated toxins, including plant extracts and compounds from marine animals, mammals and snakes serum plasma, in addition to poly or monoclonal antibodies and several synthetic molecules. Research involving these inhibitors may be useful to understand the mechanism of action of PLA2s and their role in envenomations caused by snake bite. Furthermore, the biotechnological potential of PLA2 inhibitors may provide therapeutic molecular models with antiophidian activity to supplement the conventional serum therapy against these multifunctional enzymes. PMID:17456038

  20. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry: a tool to facilitate the identification of inhibitors for protein targets.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Milon; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2015-04-21

    Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has emerged as a powerful strategy to identify ligands for biological targets given that it enables the target to direct the synthesis and amplification of its strongest binder(s) from the library of interconverting compounds. Since the first report of DCC applied to the discovery of binders for a protein, this elegant tool has been employed on a range of protein targets at various stages of medicinal-chemistry projects. A series of suitable, reversible reactions that are biocompatible have been established and the portfolio of analytical techniques is growing. Despite progress, in most cases, the libraries employed remain of moderate size. We present here the most recent advances in the field of DCC applied to protein targets, paying particular attention to the experimental conditions and analytical methods chosen.

  1. Identification of inhibitors for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor by using dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Fang, Zheng; He, Wei; Wang, Zhixiang; Gan, Haifeng; Tian, Qitao; Guo, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The novel analysis method consisting of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and HRMS analysis was firstly applied in the discovery of potential inhibitors towards cancer drug targets. With vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-2) as a target, dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) were prepared by reacting aldehydes with amines. Four sensitive binders targeted VEGFR-2 were directly isolated from the library. Antitumor activity test in vitro and inhibition experiments toward angiogenesis were also carried out.

  2. Elucidating the structural chemistry of glycosaminoglycan recognition by protein C inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, L A; Griffin, J H; Fisher, C L; Greengard, J S; Bouma, B N; España, F; Tainer, J A

    1990-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) including heparin accelerate the inhibition of serine proteases by serine protease inhibitors (serpins), an essential process in regulating blood coagulation. to analyze the molecular basis for GAG recognition by the plasma serpin protein C inhibitor (PCI; also known as plasminogen activator inhibitor 3), we have constructed a complete, energy-minimized, three-dimensional model of PCI by using the structure of homologous alpha 1-antitrypsin as a template. Sequence analysis, hydrogen-bonding environment, and shape complementarity suggested that the N-terminal residues of PCI, which are not homologous to those of alpha 1-antitrypsin, form an amphipathic alpha-helix, here designated A+ since it precedes the alpha 1-antitrypsin A helix. Electrostatic calculations revealed a single, highly positive surface region arising from both the A+ and H helices, suggesting that this two-helix motif is required for GAG binding by PCI. The dominant role of electrostatic interactions in PCI-heparin binding was confirmed by the strong ionic strength dependence of heparin stimulation. The involvement of the A+ helix in heparin binding was verified by demonstrating that an anti-PCI antibody that specifically binds the A+ peptide blocks heparin binding. Images PMID:2172989

  3. Medicinal Chemistry and Applications of Incretins and DPP-4 Inhibitors in the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lotfy, Mohamed; Singh, Jaipaul; Kalász, Huba; Tekes, Kornelia; Adeghate, Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major metabolic disorder currently affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Approximately 90% of all diabetic patients suffer from Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The world's economy coughs out billions of dollars annually to diagnose, treat and manage patients with diabetes. It has been shown that the naturally occurring gut hormones incretins, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) can preserve the morphology and function of pancreatic beta cell. In addition, GIP and GLP-1 act on insulin receptors to facilitate insulin-receptor binding, resulting in optimal glucose metabolism. This review examines the medicinal chemistry and roles of incretins, specifically, GLP-1 and drugs which can mimic its actions and prevent its enzymatic degradation. The review discussed GLP-1 agonists such as exenatide, liraglutide, taspoglutide and albiglutide. The paper also identified and reviewed a number of inhibitors, which can block dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), the enzyme responsible for the rapid degradation of GLP-1. These DPP-4 inhibitors include sitagliptin, saxagliptin, vildagliptin and many others which are still in the experimental phase. PMID:21966329

  4. Modeling of inhibitor-metalloenzyme interactions and selectivity using molecular mechanics grounded in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Garmer, D R; Gresh, N; Roques, B P

    1998-04-01

    We investigated the binding properties of the metalloprotease inhibitors hydroxamate, methanethiolate, and methylphosphoramidate to a model coordination site occurring in several Zn2+ metalloproteases, including thermolysin. This was carried out using both the SIBFA (sum of interactions between fragments ab initio-computed) molecular mechanics and the SCF/MP2 procedures for the purpose of evaluating SIBFA as a metalloenzyme modeling tool. The energy-minimized structures were closely similar to the X-ray crystallographic structures of related thermolysin-inhibitor complexes. We found that selectivity between alternative geometries and between inhibitors usually stemmed from multiple interaction components included in SIBFA. The binding strength sequence is hydroxamate > methanethiolate > or = methylphosphoramidate from multiple interaction components included in SIBFA. The trends in interaction energy components, rankings, and preferences for mono- or bidentate binding were consistent in both computational procedures. We also compared the Zn2+ vs. Mg2+ selectivities in several other polycoordinated sites having various "hard" and "soft" qualities. This included a hexahydrate, a model representing Mg2+/Ca2+ binding sites, a chlorophyll-like structure, and a zinc finger model. The latter three favor Zn2+ over Mg2+ by a greater degree than the hydrated state, but the selectivity varies widely according to the ligand "softness." SIBFA was able to match the ab initio binding energies by < 2%, with the SIBFA terms representing dispersion and charge-transfer contributing the most to Zn2+/Mg2+ selectivity. These results showed this procedure to be a very capable modeling tool for metalloenzyme problems, in this case giving valuable information about details and limitations of "hard" and "soft" selectivity trends.

  5. Iterative In situ Click Chemistry Assembles a Branched Capture Agent and Allosteric Inhibitor for Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Millward, Steven W.; Henning, Ryan K.; Kwong, Gabriel A.; Pitram, Suresh; Agnew, Heather D.; Deyle, Kaycie M.; Nag, Arundhati; Hein, Jason; Lee, Su Seong; Lim, Jaehong; Pfeilsticker, Jessica A.; Sharpless, K. Barry; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the use of iterative in situ click chemistry to design an Akt-specific branched peptide triligand that is a drop-in replacement for monoclonal antibodies in multiple biochemical assays. Each peptide module in the branched structure makes unique contributions to affinity and/or specificity resulting in a 200 nM affinity ligand that efficiently immunoprecipitates Akt from cancer cell lysates and labels Akt in fixed cells. Our use of a small molecule to pre-inhibit Akt prior to screening resulted in low micromolar inhibitory potency and an allosteric mode of inhibition, which is evidenced through a series of competitive enzyme kinetic assays. To demonstrate the efficiency and selectivity of the protein-templated in situ click reaction, we developed a novel QPCR-based methodology that enabled a quantitative assessment of its yield. These results point to the potential for iterative in situ click chemistry to generate potent, synthetically accessible antibody replacements with novel inhibitory properties PMID:21962254

  6. Click Chemistry in Lead Optimization of Boronic Acids as β-Lactamase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Emilia; Romagnoli, Chiara; Vahabi, Roza; Taracila, Magdalena A; Bonomo, Robert A; Prati, Fabio

    2015-07-23

    Boronic acid transition-state inhibitors (BATSIs) represent one of the most promising classes of β-lactamase inhibitors. Here we describe a new class of BATSIs, namely, 1-amido-2-triazolylethaneboronic acids, which were synthesized by combining the asymmetric homologation of boronates with copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition for the stereoselective insertion of the amido group and the regioselective formation of the 1,4-disubstituted triazole, respectively. This synthetic pathway, which avoids intermediate purifications, proved to be flexible and efficient, affording in good yields a panel of 14 BATSIs bearing three different R1 amide side chains (acetamido, benzylamido, and 2-thienylacetamido) and several R substituents on the triazole. This small library was tested against two clinically relevant class C β-lactamases from Enterobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The K(i) value of the best compound (13a) was as low as 4 nM with significant reduction of bacterial resistance to the combination of cefotaxime/13a. PMID:26102369

  7. Bringing research into a first semester organic chemistry laboratory with the multistep synthesis of carbohydrate-based HIV inhibitor mimics.

    PubMed

    Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Benefits of incorporating research experiences into laboratory courses have been well documented, yet examples of research projects designed for the first semester introductory organic chemistry lab course are extremely rare. To address this deficiency, a Carbohydrate-Based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Inhibitor project consisting of a synthetic scheme of four reactions was developed for and implemented in the first semester organic lab. Students carried out the synthetic reactions during the last 6 of 10 total labs in the course, generating carbohydrate-based dimeric target molecules modeled after published dimers with application in HIV therapy. The project was designed to provide a research experience through use of literature procedures for reactions performed, exploration of variation in linker length in the target structure, and synthesis of compounds not previously reported in the scientific literature. Project assessment revealed strong student support, indicating enhanced engagement and interest in the course as a direct result of the use of scientific literature and the applications of the synthesized carbohydrate-based molecules. Regardless of discussed challenges in designing a research project for the first semester lab course, the finding from data analysis that a project implemented in the first semester lab had significantly greater student impact than a second semester project should provide motivation for development of additional research projects for a first semester organic course.

  8. Application of structure-based drug design and parallel chemistry to identify selective, brain penetrant, in vivo active phosphodiesterase 9A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Claffey, Michelle M; Helal, Christopher J; Verhoest, Patrick R; Kang, Zhijun; Fors, Kristina S; Jung, Stanley; Zhong, Jiaying; Bundesmann, Mark W; Hou, Xinjun; Lui, Shenping; Kleiman, Robin J; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Schmidt, Anne W; Menniti, Frank; Schmidt, Christopher J; Hoffman, William E; Hajos, Mihaly; McDowell, Laura; O'Connor, Rebecca E; Macdougall-Murphy, Mary; Fonseca, Kari R; Becker, Stacey L; Nelson, Frederick R; Liras, Spiros

    2012-11-01

    Phosphodiesterase 9A inhibitors have shown activity in preclinical models of cognition with potential application as novel therapies for treating Alzheimer's disease. Our clinical candidate, PF-04447943 (2), demonstrated acceptable CNS permeability in rats with modest asymmetry between central and peripheral compartments (free brain/free plasma = 0.32; CSF/free plasma = 0.19) yet had physicochemical properties outside the range associated with traditional CNS drugs. To address the potential risk of restricted CNS penetration with 2 in human clinical trials, we sought to identify a preclinical candidate with no asymmetry in rat brain penetration and that could advance into development. Merging the medicinal chemistry strategies of structure-based design with parallel chemistry, a novel series of PDE9A inhibitors was identified that showed improved selectivity over PDE1C. Optimization afforded preclinical candidate 19 that demonstrated free brain/free plasma ≥ 1 in rat and reduced microsomal clearance along with the ability to increase cyclic guanosine monophosphosphate levels in rat CSF. PMID:23025719

  9. Fragment Linking and Optimization of Inhibitors of the Aspartic Protease Endothiapepsin: Fragment-Based Drug Design Facilitated by Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Milon; Radeva, Nedyalka; Fanlo-Virgós, Hugo; Otto, Sijbren; Klebe, Gerhard; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2016-08-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) affords active compounds for biological targets. While there are numerous reports on FBDD by fragment growing/optimization, fragment linking has rarely been reported. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has become a powerful hit-identification strategy for biological targets. We report the synergistic combination of fragment linking and DCC to identify inhibitors of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin. Based on X-ray crystal structures of endothiapepsin in complex with fragments, we designed a library of bis-acylhydrazones and used DCC to identify potent inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor exhibits an IC50 value of 54 nm, which represents a 240-fold improvement in potency compared to the parent hits. Subsequent X-ray crystallography validated the predicted binding mode, thus demonstrating the efficiency of the combination of fragment linking and DCC as a hit-identification strategy. This approach could be applied to a range of biological targets, and holds the potential to facilitate hit-to-lead optimization.

  10. Fragment Linking and Optimization of Inhibitors of the Aspartic Protease Endothiapepsin: Fragment-Based Drug Design Facilitated by Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Milon; Radeva, Nedyalka; Fanlo-Virgós, Hugo; Otto, Sijbren; Klebe, Gerhard; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2016-08-01

    Fragment-based drug design (FBDD) affords active compounds for biological targets. While there are numerous reports on FBDD by fragment growing/optimization, fragment linking has rarely been reported. Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) has become a powerful hit-identification strategy for biological targets. We report the synergistic combination of fragment linking and DCC to identify inhibitors of the aspartic protease endothiapepsin. Based on X-ray crystal structures of endothiapepsin in complex with fragments, we designed a library of bis-acylhydrazones and used DCC to identify potent inhibitors. The most potent inhibitor exhibits an IC50 value of 54 nm, which represents a 240-fold improvement in potency compared to the parent hits. Subsequent X-ray crystallography validated the predicted binding mode, thus demonstrating the efficiency of the combination of fragment linking and DCC as a hit-identification strategy. This approach could be applied to a range of biological targets, and holds the potential to facilitate hit-to-lead optimization. PMID:27400756

  11. Selective inhibitors of protozoan protein N-myristoyltransferases as starting points for tropical disease medicinal chemistry programs.

    PubMed

    Bell, Andrew S; Mills, James E; Williams, Gareth P; Brannigan, James A; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Parkinson, Tanya; Leatherbarrow, Robin J; Tate, Edward W; Holder, Anthony A; Smith, Deborah F

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of N-myristoyltransferase has been validated pre-clinically as a target for the treatment of fungal and trypanosome infections, using species-specific inhibitors. In order to identify inhibitors of protozoan NMTs, we chose to screen a diverse subset of the Pfizer corporate collection against Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania donovani NMTs. Primary screening hits against either enzyme were tested for selectivity over both human NMT isoforms (Hs1 and Hs2) and for broad-spectrum anti-protozoan activity against the NMT from Trypanosoma brucei. Analysis of the screening results has shown that structure-activity relationships (SAR) for Leishmania NMT are divergent from all other NMTs tested, a finding not predicted by sequence similarity calculations, resulting in the identification of four novel series of Leishmania-selective NMT inhibitors. We found a strong overlap between the SARs for Plasmodium NMT and both human NMTs, suggesting that achieving an appropriate selectivity profile will be more challenging. However, we did discover two novel series with selectivity for Plasmodium NMT over the other NMT orthologues in this study, and an additional two structurally distinct series with selectivity over Leishmania NMT. We believe that release of results from this study into the public domain will accelerate the discovery of NMT inhibitors to treat malaria and leishmaniasis. Our screening initiative is another example of how a tripartite partnership involving pharmaceutical industries, academic institutions and governmental/non-governmental organisations such as Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust can stimulate research for neglected diseases.

  12. Chemistry, Biology, and QSAR Studies of Substituted Biaryl Hydroxamates and Mercaptoacetamides as HDAC inhibitors - Nanomolar Potency Inhibitors of Pancreatic Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kozikowski, Alan P.; Chen, Yufeng; Gaysin, Arsen M.; Savoy, Doris N.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2009-01-01

    The histone deacetylases (HDACs) are able to regulate gene expression and inhibitors of the HDACs (HDACIs) hold promise in the treatment of cancer as well as a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate the possibility to achieve some measure of isoform selectivity in the inhibition of the HDACs, we prepared a small series of 2,4′-diaminobiphenyl ligands functionalized at the para-amino group with an appendage containing either a hydroxamate or a mercaptoacetamide group and coupled to an amino acid residue at the ortho-amino group. A smaller series of substituted phenylthiazoles was also explored. Some of these newly synthesized ligands show low nM potency in the HDAC inhibition assays and display micromolar to low nanomolar IC50 values when tested against five pancreatic cancer cell lines. The isoform selectivity of these ligands for the Class I HDACs (HDAC1-3 and 8) and Class IIb HDACs (HDAC6 and HDAC10) together with QSAR studies of their correlation with the lipophilicity are presented. Of particular interest is the HDAC6 selectivity of the mercaptoacetamides. PMID:18181121

  13. Discovery of Inhibitors of Leishmania β-1,2-Mannosyltransferases Using a Click-Chemistry-Derived Guanosine Monophosphate Library

    PubMed Central

    van der Peet, Phillip; Ralton, Julie E.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Williams, Spencer J.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania spp. are a medically important group of protozoan parasites that synthesize a novel intracellular carbohydrate reserve polymer termed mannogen. Mannogen is a soluble homopolymer of β-1,2-linked mannose residues that accumulates in the major pathogenic stages in the sandfly vector and mammalian host. While several steps in mannogen biosynthesis have been defined, none of the enzymes have been isolated or characterized. We report the development of a simple assay for the GDP-mannose–dependent β-1,2-mannosyltransferases involved in mannogen synthesis. This assay utilizes octyl α-d-mannopyranoside to prime the formation of short mannogen oligomers up to 5 mannose residues. This assay was used to screen a focussed library of 44 GMP-triazole adducts for inhibitors. Several compounds provided effective inhibition of mannogen β-1,2-mannosyltransferases in a cell-free membrane preparation. This assay and inhibitor compounds will be useful for dissecting the role of different mannosyltransferases in regulating de novo biosynthesis and elongation reactions in mannogen metabolism. PMID:22393429

  14. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  15. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 (MAPKAPK2, MK2): Medicinal Chemistry Efforts To Lead Small Molecule Inhibitors to Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Mario; Forli, Stefano; Manetti, Fabrizio

    2016-04-28

    The p38/MAPK-activated kinase 2 (MK2) pathway is involved in a series of pathological conditions (inflammation diseases and metastasis) and in the resistance mechanism to antitumor agents. None of the p38 inhibitors entered advanced clinical trials because of their unwanted systemic side effects. For this reason, MK2 was identified as an alternative target to block the pathway but avoiding the side effects of p38 inhibition. However, ATP-competitive MK2 inhibitors suffered from low solubility, poor cell permeability, and scarce kinase selectivity. Fortunately, non-ATP-competitive inhibitors of MK2 have been already discovered that allowed circumventing the selectivity issue. These compounds showed the additional advantage to be effective at lower concentrations in comparison to the ATP-competitive inhibitors. Therefore, although the significant difficulties encountered during the development of these inhibitors, MK2 is still considered as an attractive target to treat inflammation and related diseases to prevent tumor metastasis and to increase tumor sensitivity to chemotherapeutics.

  16. A development of chimeric VEGFR2 TK inhibitor based on two ligand conformers from PDB: 1Y6A complex--medicinal chemistry consequences of a TKs analysis.

    PubMed

    Lintnerová, Lucia; García-Caballero, Melissa; Gregáň, Fridrich; Melicherčík, Milan; Quesada, Ana R; Dobiaš, Juraj; Lác, Ján; Sališová, Marta; Boháč, Andrej

    2014-01-24

    VEGFR2 is an important mediator of angiogenesis and influences fate of some cancer stem cells. Here we analysed all 34 structures of VEGFR2 TK available from PDB database. From them a complex PDB: 1Y6A has an exceptional AAZ ligand bound to TK in form of two conformers (U- and S-shaped). This observation inspired us to develop three chimeric bispyridyl VEGFR2 inhibitors by combining structural features of both AAZ conformers and/or their relative ligand AAX (PDB: 1Y6B). Our most interesting inhibitor 22SYM has an enzymatic VEGFR2 TK activity (IC50: 15.1 nM) comparable or better to the active compounds from clinical drugs Nexavar and Sutent. 22SYM inhibits growth, migration and tube formation of endothelial cells (EC) and selectively induces EC apoptosis. 22SYM also inhibits in vivo angiogenesis in Zebrafish embryo assay. Additionally to the above results, we proved here that tyrosine kinases in an inactive form possessing Type I inhibitors can adopt both a closed or an opened conformation of kinase A-loop independently on their DFG-out arrangement. We proposed here that an activity of certain Type I inhibitors (e.g. 22SYM-like) in complex with DFG-out TK can be negatively influenced by collisions with a dynamically moving TK A-loop.

  17. Seamless integration of dose-response screening and flow chemistry: efficient generation of structure-activity relationship data of β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Werner, Michael; Kuratli, Christoph; Martin, Rainer E; Hochstrasser, Remo; Wechsler, David; Enderle, Thilo; Alanine, Alexander I; Vogel, Horst

    2014-02-01

    Drug discovery is a multifaceted endeavor encompassing as its core element the generation of structure-activity relationship (SAR) data by repeated chemical synthesis and biological testing of tailored molecules. Herein, we report on the development of a flow-based biochemical assay and its seamless integration into a fully automated system comprising flow chemical synthesis, purification and in-line quantification of compound concentration. This novel synthesis-screening platform enables to obtain SAR data on b-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors at an unprecedented cycle time of only 1 h instead of several days. Full integration and automation of industrial processes have always led to productivity gains and cost reductions, and this work demonstrates how applying these concepts to SAR generation may lead to a more efficient drug discovery process.

  18. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  2. Colour Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  4. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  5. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  6. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  7. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  8. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  9. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  10. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  11. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  12. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  14. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  15. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  16. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  18. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  19. Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  20. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  1. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  2. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  4. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  5. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  6. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  7. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  8. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  11. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of circumstellar chemistry are discussed for both red-giant and protostellar winds. The generalized photochemical model is able to account for the recently discovered silicon-bearing molecules in the prototypical, C-rich, AGB star IRC + 10216. The surprising occurrence of CO in protostellar winds that are largely atomic is interpreted to be the result of the high density and the rapid decrease of the temperature with distance that is expected for such winds.

  12. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  13. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  14. Provocative Opinion: Descriptive Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.; Bent, Brian E.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses many of the distinctions that chemists draw between theoretical chemistry and descriptive chemistry, along with the tendency for chemical educators to adopt the type of chemistry they feel is most important to teach. Uses examples to argue that theoretical chemistry and descriptive chemistry are, at the bottom line, the same. (TW)

  15. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  16. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  17. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  18. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  19. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  20. HDAC Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olzscha, Heidi; Bekheet, Mina E; Sheikh, Semira; La Thangue, Nicholas B

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation in proteins is one of the most abundant posttranslational modifications in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic homeostasis of lysine acetylation and deacetylation is dictated by the action of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). Important substrates for HATs and HDACs are histones, where lysine acetylation generally leads to an open and transcriptionally active chromatin conformation. Histone deacetylation forces the compaction of the chromatin with subsequent inhibition of transcription and reduced gene expression. Unbalanced HAT and HDAC activity, and therefore aberrant histone acetylation, has been shown to be involved in tumorigenesis and progression of malignancy in different types of cancer. Therefore, the development of HDAC inhibitors (HDIs) as therapeutic agents against cancer is of great interest. However, treatment with HDIs can also affect the acetylation status of many other non-histone proteins which play a role in different pathways including angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, autophagy and apoptosis. These effects have led HDIs to become anticancer agents, which can initiate apoptosis in tumor cells. Hematological malignancies in particular are responsive to HDIs, and four HDIs have already been approved as anticancer agents. There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to predict the response to HDI treatment. This chapter provides information on how to assess HDAC activity in vitro and determine the potency of HDIs on different HDACs. It also gives information on how to analyze cellular markers following HDI treatment and to analyze tissue biopsies from HDI-treated patients. Finally, a protocol is provided on how to detect HDI sensitivity determinants in human cells, based on a pRetroSuper shRNA screen upon HDI treatment. PMID:27246222

  1. Sulfoximines: a neglected opportunity in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lücking, Ulrich

    2013-09-01

    Innovation has frequently been described as the key to drug discovery. However, in the daily routine, medicinal chemists often tend to stick to the functional groups and structural elements they know and love. Blockbuster cancer drug Velcade (bortezomib), for example, was rejected by more than 50 companies, supposedly because of its unusual boronic acid function (as often repeated: "only a moron would put boron in a drug!"). Similarly, in the discovery process of the pan-CDK inhibitor BAY 1000394, the unconventional proposal to introduce a sulfoximine group into the lead series also led to sneers and raised eyebrows, since sulfoximines have seldom been used in medicinal chemistry. However, it was the introduction of the sulfoximine group that finally allowed the fundamental issues of the project to be overcome, culminating in the identification of the clinical sulfoximine pan-CDK inhibitor BAY 1000394. This Minireview provides an overview of a widely neglected opportunity in medicinal chemistry--the sulfoximine group.

  2. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  3. International symposium on oilfield chemistry: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This volume contains 66 papers presented at the symposium related to the following topics in oil field chemistry: waste treatment of produced waters; methods for enhanced recovery of petroleum (mainly surfactants, polymers, and carbon dioxide injection); cement hydration and additives; drilling fluid stability; paraffin deposition in wells and pipelines; scale control and corrosion inhibitors; displacement fluid wettability and environmental transport; fracturing fluids; formation damage; asphaltene removal; and plugging agents. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  5. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  6. The design of inhibitors for medicinally relevant metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Faith E; Lewis, Jana A; Cohen, Seth M

    2007-02-01

    A number of metalloproteins are important medicinal targets for conditions ranging from pathogenic infections to cancer. Many but not all of these metalloproteins contain a zinc(II) ion in the protein active site. Small-molecule inhibitors of these metalloproteins are designed to bind directly to the active site metal ions. In this review several metalloproteins of interest are discussed, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), histone deacetylases (HDACs), anthrax lethal factor (LF), and others. Different strategies that have been employed to design effective inhibitors against these proteins are described, with an effort to highlight the strengths and drawbacks of each approach. An emphasis is placed on examining the bioinorganic chemistry of these metal active sites and how a better understanding of the coordination chemistry in these systems may lead to improved inhibitors. It is hoped that this review will help inspire medicinal, biological, and inorganic chemists to tackle this important problem by considering all aspects of metalloprotein inhibitor design.

  7. The Rapid Crystallization Strategy for Structure-Based Inhibitor Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfors, Terese

    RAPID (Rapid Approaches to Pathogen Inhibitor Discovery) is an integrated center for structural biology, computational chemistry, and medicinal chemistry at Uppsala University, Sweden. The main target of the structural biology section is Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Key concepts in the crystallization strategy include minimal screening and buffer optimization. Examples are presented showing how these concepts have been successful in RAPID projects. Three screening methods are used: vapor-diffusion, micro-batch, and microfluidics. Our experiences may be relevant for other small, academic laboratories involved in structure-based inhibitor design.

  8. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  9. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  10. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  11. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  12. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  13. History of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servos, John W.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the development of chemistry in the United States by considering: (1) chemistry as an evolving body of ideas/techniques, and as a set of conceptual resources affecting and affected by the development of other sciences; and (2) chemistry related to the history of American social and economic institutions and practices. (JN)

  14. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  15. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  16. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  17. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  18. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  19. School Chemistry vs. Chemistry in Research: An Exploratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habraken, Clarisse L.; Buijs, Wim; Borkent, Hens; Ligeon, Willy; Wender, Harry; Meijer, Marijn

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study exploring why students are not studying chemistry. Three groups of graduating high school students and their chemistry teachers stayed at a research institute working on molecular modeling and wrote essays on school chemistry versus chemistry in research. Concludes that school chemistry does not convey today's chemistry in…

  20. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  1. Natural Products as Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    With the clinical success of several synthetic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the treatment of postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers have also been investigating also the potential of natural products as AIs. Natural products from terrestrial and marine organisms provide a chemically diverse array of compounds not always available through current synthetic chemistry techniques. Natural products that have been used traditionally for nutritional or medicinal purposes (e.g., botanical dietary supplements) may also afford AIs with reduced side effects. A thorough review of the literature regarding natural product extracts and secondary metabolites of plant, microbial, and marine origin that have been shown to exhibit aromatase inhibitory activity is presented herein. PMID:18690828

  2. Glycine Transporters and Their Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfillan, Robert; Kerr, Jennifer; Walker, Glenn; Wishart, Grant

    Glycine plays a ubiquitous role in many biological processes. In the central nervous system it serves as an important neurotransmitter acting as an agonist at strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and as an essential co-agonist with glutamate at the NMDA receptor complex. Control of glycine concentrations in the vicinity of these receptors is mediated by the specific glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Inhibition of these transporters has been postulated to be of potential benefit in several therapeutic indications including schizophrenia and pain. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of glycine transporters and focus on recent advances in the medicinal chemistry of GlyT1 and GlyT2 inhibitors.

  3. New, potent P1/P2-morpholinone-based HIV-protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kazmierski, Wieslaw M; Furfine, Eric; Spaltenstein, Andrew; Wright, Lois L

    2006-10-01

    We have developed efficient synthesis of morpholinone-based cyclic mimetics of the P1/P2 portion of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor Amprenavir. This effort led to discovery of allyl- and spiro-cyclopropyl-P2-substituted inhibitors 17 and 31, both 500 times more potent than the parent inhibitor 1. These results support morpholinones as novel mimetics of the P1/P2 portion of Amprenavir and potentially of other HIV-protease inhibitors, and thus provide a novel medicinal chemistry template for optimization toward more potent and drug-like inhibitors. PMID:16904316

  4. Allosteric Indole Amide Inhibitors of p97: Identification of a Novel Probe of the Ubiquitin Pathway.

    PubMed

    Alverez, Celeste; Bulfer, Stacie L; Chakrasali, Ramappa; Chimenti, Michael S; Deshaies, Raymond J; Green, Neal; Kelly, Mark; LaPorte, Matthew G; Lewis, Taber S; Liang, Mary; Moore, William J; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Peshkov, Vsevolod A; Walters, Michael A; Zhang, Feng; Arkin, Michelle R; Wipf, Peter; Huryn, Donna M

    2016-02-11

    A high-throughput screen to discover inhibitors of p97 ATPase activity identified an indole amide that bound to an allosteric site of the protein. Medicinal chemistry optimization led to improvements in potency and solubility. Indole amide 3 represents a novel uncompetitive inhibitor with excellent physical and pharmaceutical properties that can be used as a starting point for drug discovery efforts. PMID:26985295

  5. Stoichiometry and Physical Chemistry of Promiscuous Aggregate-Based Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coan, Kristin E. D.

    2009-01-01

    Many false positives in early drug discovery owe to nonspecific inhibition by colloid-like aggregates of organic molecules. Despite their prevalence, little is known about aggregate concentration, structure, or dynamic equilibrium; the binding mechanism, stoichiometry with, and affinity for enzymes remain uncertain. To investigate the elementary question of concentration, we counted aggregate particles using flow cytometry. For seven aggregate-forming molecules, aggregates were not observed until the concentration of monomer crossed a threshold, indicating a “critical aggregation concentration” (CAC). Above the CAC, aggregate count increased linearly with added organic material, while the particles dispersed when diluted below the CAC. The concentration of monomeric organic molecule is constant above the CAC, as is the size of the aggregate particles. For two compounds that form large aggregates, nicardipine and miconazole, we measured particle numbers directly by flow cytometry, determining that the aggregate concentration just above the CAC ranged from 5 to 30 fM. By correlating inhibition of an enzyme with aggregate count for these two drugs, we determined that the stoichiometry of binding is about 10 000 enzyme molecules per aggregate particle. Using measured volumes for nicardipine and miconazole aggregate particles (2.1 × 1011 and 4.7 × 1010 Å3, respectively), computed monomer volumes, and the observation that past the CAC all additional monomer forms aggregate particles, we find that aggregates are densely packed particles. Finally, given their size and enzyme stoichiometry, all sequestered enzyme can be comfortably accommodated on the surface of the aggregate. PMID:18588298

  6. Connecting Algebra and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Correlates high school chemistry curriculum with high school algebra curriculum and makes the case for an integrated approach to mathematics and science instruction. Focuses on process integration. (DDR)

  7. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  8. Opportunities in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    Because of the changes occurring in the chemical sciences, a new survey of chemistry and its intellectual and economic impact was clearly needed. This report presents a current assessment of the status of chemistry and of the future opportunities in the field. This analysis contains: (1) an introductory chapter (establishing the need for the…

  9. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  10. Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Fay, Michael; Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2013-01-01

    Forty chemistry faculty from American Chemical Society-approved departments were interviewed to determine their goals for undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Faculty were stratified by type of institution, departmental success with regard to National Science Foundation funding for laboratory reform, and level of laboratory course. Interview…

  11. Brushing Up on Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantow, Ashley

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed for use during National Chemistry Week 2002 with the theme "Chemistry Keeps Us Clean". Allows students to discover more about a cleaning product they use everyday. Students make their own toothpaste and compare its properties with those of commercial toothpaste. (MM)

  12. Minicourses in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lygre, D. G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes nine minicourses in chemistry designed to acquaint the non-science major with practical applications of chemistry in everyday experiences. Each course consists of daily classes for two weeks for one credit and is offered on a credit/no credit basis. (MLH)

  13. Chemistry of Moth Repellents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    An effective way to teach chemistry is to examine the substances used in daily life from a pedagogical viewpoint, from the overlap of science, technology, and society (STS). A study aims to engage students in the topic of moth repellents and to encourage them to investigate the chemistry in this familiar product using a set of questions.

  14. Chemistry and Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigston, David L.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between chemisty and biology in the science curriculum. Points out the differences in perception of the disciplines, which the physical scientists favoring reductionism. Suggests that biology departments offer a special course for chemistry students, just as the chemistry departments have done for biology students.…

  15. Chemistry from Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Jan; Donaldson, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Describes the "Chemistry from Issues" project at Chelsea College. Provides the background information, rationale, and overall structure of a proposed course about the importance of chemistry to common culture. Outlines one module about the British steel industry that has been taught at King's College. (TW)

  16. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  17. Stratospheric chemistry and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael; Garcia, Maria M.

    1990-01-01

    A Chemical Tracer Model (CTM) that can use wind field data generated by the General Circulation Model (GCM) is developed to implement chemistry in the three dimensional GCM of the middle atmosphere. Initially, chemical tracers with simple first order losses such as N2O are used. Successive models are to incorporate more complex ozone chemistry.

  18. Career Options in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloli, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a credit/no credit course which focuses on career options in chemistry. The course (consisting of 15 one-hour seminar-type sessions) includes guest speakers for several sessions and an emphasis (in introductory sessions) on graduate school in chemistry, the chemical industry, resumes, and interviews. Also briefly describes an internship…

  19. Movies in Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekdag, Bulent; Le Marechal, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews numerous studies on chemistry movies. Movies, or moving pictures, are important elements of multimedia and signify a privileged or motivating means of presenting knowledge. Studies on chemistry movies show that the first movie productions in this field were devoted to university lectures or documentaries. Shorter movies were…

  20. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  1. Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    High school teachers are often challenged to motivate students who have little or no interest in a subject and are bored with traditional instruction. This unique book is designed to help educators make chemistry classes more interesting and links art curriculum to practical applications, integrating the two subjects through scores of hands-on…

  2. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  3. EVOLVING FROM GREEN CHEMISTRY TO SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The twelve principles of green chemistry provide a foundation and pathway which allows researchers to incorporate greenness into existing reactions or when developing new technologies. Research from our laboratory has adopted many of these principles and utlizes them as a major c...

  4. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  5. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  6. Fluorine in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Swallow, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Since its first use in the steroid field in the late 1950s, the use of fluorine in medicinal chemistry has become commonplace, with the small electronegative fluorine atom being a key part of the medicinal chemist's repertoire of substitutions used to modulate all aspects of molecular properties including potency, physical chemistry and pharmacokinetics. This review will highlight the special nature of fluorine, drawing from a survey of marketed fluorinated pharmaceuticals and the medicinal chemistry literature, to illustrate key concepts exploited by medicinal chemists in their attempts to optimize drug molecules. Some of the potential pitfalls in the use of fluorine will also be highlighted.

  7. Frontiers in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, I.

    1988-12-15

    Doing more with less was the modus operandi of R. Buckminster Fuller, the late science genius, and inventor of such things as the geodesic dome. In late September, chemists described their own version of this maxim--learning more chemistry from less material and in less time--in a symposium titled Frontiers in Analytical Chemistry at the 196th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Symposium organizer Allen J. Bard of the University of Texas at Austin assembled six speakers, himself among them, to survey pretty widely different areas of analytical chemistry.

  8. Computational quantum chemistry website

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-22

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

  9. Seawater Chemistry Package

    2005-11-23

    SeaChem Seawater Chemistry package provides routines to calculate pH, carbonate chemistry, density, and other quantities for seawater, based on the latest community standards. The chemistry is adapted from fortran routines provided by the OCMIP3/NOCES project, details of which are available at http://www.ipsl.jussieu.fr/OCMIP/. The SeaChem package can generate Fortran subroutines as well as Python wrappers for those routines. Thus the same code can be used by Python or Fortran analysis packages and Fortran ocean models alike.

  10. Novel corrosion inhibitor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, P.; Fritz, P.; Pellet, R.

    1999-11-01

    A novel, patented corrosion inhibitor technology has been identified for use in heat transfer applications such as automotive and heavy-duty coolant. The new technology is based on a low-toxic, virtually depletion-free carboxylic acid corrosion inhibitor package that performs equally well in mono ethylene glycol and in less toxic propylene glycol coolants. An aqueous inhibitor concentrate is available to provide corrosion protection where freezing protection is not an issue. In the present paper, this inhibitor package is evaluated in the different base fluids: mono ethylene glycol, mono propylene glycol and water. Results are obtained in both standardized and specific corrosion tests as well as in selected field trials. These results indicate that the inhibitor package remains effective and retains the benefits previously identified in automotive engine coolant applications: excellent corrosion protection under localized conditions, general corrosion conditions as well as at high temperature.

  11. Designing Inhibitors of Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Present-day rational drug design approaches are based on exploiting unique features of the target biomolecules, small- or macromolecule drug candidates, and physical forces that govern their interactions. The 2013 Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems” once again demonstrated the importance of the tailored drug discovery that reduces the role of the trial and error approach to a minimum. The “rational drug design” term is rather comprehensive as it includes all contemporary methods of drug discovery where serendipity and screening are substituted by the information-guided search for new and existing compounds. Successful implementation of these innovative drug discovery approaches is inevitably preceded by learning the physics, chemistry, and physiology of functioning of biological structures under normal and pathological conditions. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the recent rational drug design approaches to discover inhibitors of anthrax toxin. Some of the examples include small-molecule and peptide-based post-exposure therapeutic agents as well as several polyvalent compounds. The review also directs the reader to the vast literature on the recognized advances and future possibilities in the field. Expert opinion Existing options to combat anthrax toxin lethality are limited. With the only anthrax toxin inhibiting therapy (PA-targeting with a monoclonal antibody, raxibacumab) approved to treat inhalational anthrax, in our view, the situation is still insecure. The FDA’s animal rule for drug approval, which clears compounds without validated efficacy studies on humans, creates a high level of uncertainty, especially when a well-characterized animal model does not exist. Besides, unlike PA, which is known to be unstable, LF remains active in cells and in animal tissues for days. Therefore, the effectiveness of the post-exposure treatment of the individuals

  12. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  13. Chemistry for Nonscientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Thomas A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the case of DDT which can be introduced to nonscience students in a chemistry course, including the development of DDT, problems associated with its adverse effects, and curtailment of its use in our environments. (CC)

  14. Chemistry for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Sanae; Majoros, Bela

    1988-01-01

    Reports two methods for interesting children in chemistry. Describes a method for producing large soap bubbles and films for study. Examines the use of simple stories to explain common chemical concepts with example given. Lists titles of available stories. (ML)

  15. Chemistry with a Peel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; Larsen, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce natural product chemistry into high school classrooms. In the laboratory activities, students isolate and analyze the oil in orange peels. Students also perform a steam distillation and learn about terpenes. (DDR)

  16. Chemistry Laboratory Safety Check

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patnoe, Richard L.

    1976-01-01

    An accident prevention/safety check list for chemistry laboratories is printed. Included are checks of equipment, facilities, storage and handling of chemicals, laboratory procedures, instruction procedures, and items to be excluded from chemical laboratories. (SL)

  17. Magnetism in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, R. W.; McFadyen, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the technical aspects of paramagnetism and an electrostatic model called Crystal Field Theory (CFT), very often used in the case of transition metal compounds. Suggests that this discussion be included as an option for college chemistry courses. (MLH)

  18. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  19. Chemistry and Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labianca, Dominick A.; Reeves, William J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary program consisting of two courses. The first course deals with the chemistry of drugs and poisons; the second course focuses on fictional works in which these drugs and poisons are central to the plots. (SK)

  20. Water Chemistry: Seeking Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of the available literature in water chemistry is presented. Materials surveyed include: texts, reference books, bibliographic resources, journals, American Chemical Society publications, proceedings, unpublished articles, and reports. (BT)

  1. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  2. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  3. Impact of surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized. PMID:20880833

  4. Targeting the inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein BIR3 binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jaquith, James B

    2014-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular apoptosis and cytokine signaling. IAP family members include XIAP, cIAP1, cIAP2, NAIP, survivin, Apollon/Bruce, ML-IAP/livin and TIAP. The IAPs have been targeted using both antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors. Several research teams have advanced compounds that bind the highly conserved BIR3 domains of the IAPs into clinical trials, as single agents and in combination with standard of care. This patent review highlights the medicinal chemistry strategies that have been applied to the development of clinical compounds. PMID:24998289

  5. The azaindole framework in the design of kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mérour, Jean-Yves; Buron, Frédéric; Plé, Karen; Bonnet, Pascal; Routier, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    This review article illustrates the growing use of azaindole derivatives as kinase inhibitors and their contribution to drug discovery and innovation. The different protein kinases which have served as targets and the known molecules which have emerged from medicinal chemistry and Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) programs are presented. The various synthetic routes used to access these compounds and the chemical pathways leading to their synthesis are also discussed. An analysis of their mode of binding based on X-ray crystallography data gives structural insights for the design of more potent and selective inhibitors. PMID:25460315

  6. Pathway modulators and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, John A

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitors of specific cellular pathways are useful for investigating the roles of proteins of unknown function, and for selectively inhibiting a protein in complex pathways to uncover its relationships to other proteins in this and other interacting pathways. This appendix provides links to Web sites that describe cellular processes and pathways along with the various classes of inhibitors, numerous references, downloadable diagrams, and technical tips.

  7. Update on TNF Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kerdel, Francisco A

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors dramatically improved the management of psoriasis. Some newer or investigational biologics with different mechanisms of action have demonstrated noninferiority or superiority to etanercept, the first self-injectable anti-TNF-α agent to become available in the United States. Nonetheless, TNF-α inhibitors are likely to remain a mainstay of therapy for many years.

  8. Synthetic inhibitors of elastase.

    PubMed

    Edwards, P D; Bernstein, P R

    1994-03-01

    For more than two decades investigators around the world, in both academic and industrial institutions, have been developing inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase. A number of very elegant and insightful strategies have been reported. In the case of reversible peptidic inhibitors, this has resulted in the identification of some extremely potent compounds with dissociation constants in the 10(-11) M range. This is quite an accomplishment considering that these low molecular-weight inhibitors are only tri- and tetrapeptides. In the case of the heterocyclic-based inhibitors, the challenge of balancing the heterocycle's inherent reactivity and aqueous stability with the stability of the enzyme-inhibitor adduct has been meet by either using a latent, reactive functionality which is only activated within the enzyme, or by incorporating features which selectively obstruct deacylation but have little effect on the enzyme acylation step. The underlying goal of this research has been the identification of agents to treat diseases associated with HNE. Several animal models have been developed for evaluating the in vivo activity of elastase inhibitors, and compounds have been shown to be effective in all of these models by the intravenous, intratrachael or oral routes of administration. However, only a very small percentage of compounds have possessed all the necessary properties, including lack of toxicity, for progression into the clinic. The peptidyl TFMK ICI 200,880 (25-12) has many of the desired characteristics of a drug to treat the diseases associated with HNE: chemical stability, in vitro and in vivo activity, a long duration of action, and adequate metabolic stability. Currently ICI 200,880 is the only low molecular-weight HNE inhibitor known to be undergoing clinical trials, and may be the compound which finally demonstrates the clinical utility of a synthetic HNE inhibitor. PMID:8189835

  9. Residue chemistry guidelines.

    PubMed

    Olinger, C L; Schmitt, R D; Zager, E

    1993-01-01

    Residue chemistry guidelines are designed to determine what the potential residues in food are and how much may be present as a result of pesticide application, so that a tolerance level may be established. Some requirements are established to assist in the enforcement of tolerances by the USDA, FDA, and the states. I realize I have given you a quick overview of the residue chemistry requirements. There are many documents which are available if you should require more information, such as the Subdivision O Residue Chemistry Guidelines, Standard Evaluation Procedures (which are used by reviewers when evaluating the studies), the Data Reporting Guidelines (which provide guidance on preparing final reports), and the Technical Guidance from Phase III of Reregistration. We have also released various papers on studies when additional guidance is required. Most of these documents are available from NTIS. I hope you will consider this information when auditing residue chemistry studies. As I see the efforts that you, the QA professionals, have made to educate yourselves on residue chemistry studies through programs such as this meeting, I have a little more confidence in answering the question "Do you trust them?" with a "Yes." Thank you.

  10. Technetium Chemistry in HLW

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Xia Yuanxian

    2005-06-06

    Tc contamination is found within the DOE complex at those sites whose mission involved extraction of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel or isotopic enrichment of uranium. At the Hanford Site, chemical separations and extraction processes generated large amounts of high level and transuranic wastes that are currently stored in underground tanks. The waste from these extraction processes is currently stored in underground High Level Waste (HLW) tanks. However, the chemistry of the HLW in any given tank is greatly complicated by repeated efforts to reduce volume and recover isotopes. These processes ultimately resulted in mixing of waste streams from different processes. As a result, the chemistry and the fate of Tc in HLW tanks are not well understood. This lack of understanding has been made evident in the failed efforts to leach Tc from sludge and to remove Tc from supernatants prior to immobilization. Although recent interest in Tc chemistry has shifted from pretreatment chemistry to waste residuals, both needs are served by a fundamental understanding of Tc chemistry.

  11. Collaborative Physical Chemistry Projects Involving Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisnant, David M.; Howe, Jerry J.; Lever, Lisa S.

    2000-02-01

    The physical chemistry classes from three colleges have collaborated on two computational chemistry projects using Quantum CAChe 3.0 and Gaussian 94W running on Pentium II PCs. Online communication by email and the World Wide Web was an important part of the collaboration. In the first project, students used molecular modeling to predict benzene derivatives that might be possible hair dyes. They used PM3 and ZINDO calculations to predict the electronic spectra of the molecules and tested the predicted spectra by comparing some with experimental measurements. They also did literature searches for real hair dyes and possible health effects. In the final phase of the project they proposed a synthetic pathway for one compound. In the second project the students were asked to predict which isomer of a small carbon cluster (C3, C4, or C5) was responsible for a series of IR lines observed in the spectrum of a carbon star. After preliminary PM3 calculations, they used ab initio calculations at the HF/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d) level to model the molecules and predict their vibrational frequencies and rotational constants. A comparison of the predictions with the experimental spectra suggested that the linear isomer of the C5 molecule was responsible for the lines.

  12. Atmospheric chemistry research

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Global environmental changes are occurring all around us, and the energy industry is a major player in the changes that are taking place. Wise energy policy can only be generated from a position of informed enlightenment and understanding about the environmental consequences of energy production and utilization. The atmospheric chemistry research being conducted at the University of Kentucky's Center for Applied Energy Research is geared toward providing the knowledge necessary to allow industrial and legislative officials to make responsible energy decisions in the 1990's and beyond. Three programs are described: the Kentucky Acid Deposition Program Precipitation chemistry network; modeling of regional and urban photochemistry and acid deposition; and modeling of global tropospheric chemistry.

  13. IR laser chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quack, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Recent progress in IR laser chemistry is reviewed with stress on the conceptual background and experimental advances from our research group. In particular we discuss various experimental schemes in laser chemistry as related to thermal reactions and ordinary photochemistry, and new results in time and frequency resolved kinetic IR spectroscopy at the limit defined by the uncertainty relation. The recent detection of hyperfine effects in IR laser chemistry is reviewed as well as nonlinear intensity dependence over many orders of magnitude including observations of nonlinear intensity fall-off and IR laser ionization of molecules. An outlook is presented on different time scales for intramolecular processes and the resulting future possibilities of IR laser chemical reaction control.

  14. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-01

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes.

  15. Air Composition and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimblecombe, Peter

    1996-01-01

    This book is about the atmosphere and humanity's influence on it. For this new edition, Brimblecombe has rewritten and updated much of the book. In the early chapters, he discusses the geochemical, biological and maritime sources of the trace gases. Next, he examines the chemistry of atmospheric gases, suspended particles, and rainfall. After dealing with the natural atmosphere, he examines the sources of air pollution and its effects, with all scenarios updated from the last edition. Scenarios include decline in health, damage to plants and animals, indoor pollution, and acid rain. The final chapters, also revised, are concerned with the chemistry and evolution of the atmospheres of the planets of the solar system. Students with an interest in chemistry and the environmental sciences will find this book highly valuable.

  16. Digital biology and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Witters, Daan; Sun, Bing; Begolo, Stefano; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Robles, Whitney; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2014-09-01

    This account examines developments in "digital" biology and chemistry within the context of microfluidics, from a personal perspective. Using microfluidics as a frame of reference, we identify two areas of research within digital biology and chemistry that are of special interest: (i) the study of systems that switch between discrete states in response to changes in chemical concentration of signals, and (ii) the study of single biological entities such as molecules or cells. In particular, microfluidics accelerates analysis of switching systems (i.e., those that exhibit a sharp change in output over a narrow range of input) by enabling monitoring of multiple reactions in parallel over a range of concentrations of signals. Conversely, such switching systems can be used to create new kinds of microfluidic detection systems that provide "analog-to-digital" signal conversion and logic. Microfluidic compartmentalization technologies for studying and isolating single entities can be used to reconstruct and understand cellular processes, study interactions between single biological entities, and examine the intrinsic heterogeneity of populations of molecules, cells, or organisms. Furthermore, compartmentalization of single cells or molecules in "digital" microfluidic experiments can induce switching in a range of reaction systems to enable sensitive detection of cells or biomolecules, such as with digital ELISA or digital PCR. This "digitizing" offers advantages in terms of robustness, assay design, and simplicity because quantitative information can be obtained with qualitative measurements. While digital formats have been shown to improve the robustness of existing chemistries, we anticipate that in the future they will enable new chemistries to be used for quantitative measurements, and that digital biology and chemistry will continue to provide further opportunities for measuring biomolecules, understanding natural systems more deeply, and advancing molecular and

  17. Chemistry of Transactinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratz, J. V.

    In this chapter, the chemical properties of the man-made transactinide elements rutherfordium, Rf (element 104), dubnium, Db (element 105), seaborgium, Sg (element 106), bohrium, Bh (element 107), hassium, Hs (element 108), and copernicium, Cn (element 112) are reviewed, and prospects for chemical characterizations of even heavier elements are discussed. The experimental methods to perform rapid chemical separations on the time scale of seconds are presented and comments are given on the special situation with the transactinides where chemistry has to be studied with single atoms. It follows a description of theoretical predictions and selected experimental results on the chemistry of elements 104 through 108, and element 112.

  18. Chemistry in cometary comae.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Dickens, J E; Lovell, A J; Schloerb, F P; Senay, M; Bergin, E A; Jewitt, D; Matthews, H E

    1998-01-01

    Significant gas-phase chemistry occurs in the comae of bright comets, as is demonstrated here for the case of Comet Hale-Bopp. The abundance ratio of the two isomers, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide, is shown to vary with heliocentric distance in a way that is consistent with production of HNC by ion-molecule chemistry initiated by the photoionization of water. Likewise, the first maps of emission from HCO+ show an abundance and an extended distribution that are consistent with the same chemical model.

  19. Chemistry WebBook

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 69 NIST Chemistry WebBook (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemistry WebBook contains: Thermochemical data for over 7000 organic and small inorganic compounds; thermochemistry data for over 8000 reactions; IR spectra for over 16,000 compounds; mass spectra for over 33,000 compounds; UV/Vis spectra for over 1600 compounds; electronic and vibrational spectra for over 5000 compounds; constants of diatomic molecules(spectroscopic data) for over 600 compounds; ion energetics data for over 16,000 compounds; thermophysical property data for 74 fluids.

  20. Chemistry in cometary comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Dickens, J. E.; Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Senay, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Jewitt, D.; Matthews, H. E.

    1998-01-01

    Significant gas-phase chemistry occurs in the comae of bright comets, as is demonstrated here for the case of Comet Hale-Bopp. The abundance ratio of the two isomers, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide, is shown to vary with heliocentric distance in a way that is consistent with production of HNC by ion-molecule chemistry initiated by the photoionization of water. Likewise, the first maps of emission from HCO+ show an abundance and an extended distribution that are consistent with the same chemical model.

  1. Chemistry in Second Life

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Andrew SID; Bradley, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    This review will focus on the current level on chemistry research, education, and visualization possible within the multi-user virtual environment of Second Life. We discuss how Second Life has been used as a platform for the interactive and collaborative visualization of data from molecules and proteins to spectra and experimental data. We then review how these visualizations can be scripted for immersive educational activities and real-life collaborative research. We also discuss the benefits of the social networking affordances of Second Life for both chemists and chemistry students. PMID:19852781

  2. Revitalizing chemistry laboratory instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Phil Blake

    This dissertation involves research in three major domains of chemical education as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. program in chemistry at Miami University with a major emphasis on chemical education, and concurrent study in organic chemistry. Unit I, Development and Assessment of a Column Chromatography Laboratory Activity, addresses the domain of Instructional Materials Development and Testing. This unit outlines the process of developing a publishable laboratory activity, testing and revising that activity, and subsequently sharing that activity with the chemical education community. A laboratory activity focusing on the separation of methylene blue and sodium fluorescein was developed to demonstrate the effects of both the stationary and mobile phase in conducting a separation. Unit II, Bringing Industry to the Laboratory, addresses the domain of Curriculum Development and Testing. This unit outlines the development of the Chemistry of Copper Mining module, which is intended for use in high school or undergraduate college chemistry. The module uses the learning cycle approach to present the chemistry of the industrial processes of mining copper to the students. The module includes thirteen investigations (three of which are web-based and ten which are laboratory experiments) and an accompanying interactive CD-ROM, which provides an explanation of the chemistry used in copper mining with a virtual tour of an operational copper mine. Unit III, An Alternative Method of Teaching Chemistry. Integrating Lecture and the Laboratory, is a project that addresses the domain of Research in Student Learning. Fundamental Chemistry was taught at Eastern Arizona College as an integrated lecture/laboratory course that met in two-hour blocks on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The students taking this integrated course were compared with students taking the traditional 1-hour lectures held on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, with accompanying 3-hour lab on

  3. Small-molecule caspase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenodarova, S. M.

    2010-02-01

    The review considers low-molecular weight inhibitors of caspases, cysteine proteases being key contributors to apoptosis (programmed cell death). The inhibitors with aspartic acid residues or various heterocyclic systems (both synthetic and natural) are covered. Their possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Data on inhibitor structure-activity relationship studies are systematically surveyed. The interactions of the non-peptide fragments of an inhibitor with the enzymes are examined. Examples of the use of some inhibitors for apoptosis suppression are provided.

  4. Top Down Chemistry Versus Bottom up Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Witt, Adolf N.

    2016-06-01

    The idea of interstellar top down chemistry (TDC), in which molecules are produced from decomposition of larger molecules and dust in contrast to ordinary bottom up chemistry (BUC) in which molecules are produced synthetically from smaller molecules and atoms in the ISM, has been proposed in the chemistry of PAH and carbon chain molecules both for diffusea,c and dense cloudsb,d. A simple and natural idea, it must have occurred to many people and has been in the air for sometime. The validity of this hypothesis is apparent for diffuse clouds in view of the observed low abundance of small molecules and its rapid decrease with molecular size on the one hand and the high column densities of large carbon molecules demonstrated by the many intense diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) on the other. Recent identification of C60^+ as the carrier of 5 near infrared DIBs with a high column density of 2×1013 cm-2 by Maier and others confirms the TDC. This means that the large molecules and dust produced in the high density high temperature environment of circumstellar envelopes are sufficiently stable to survive decompositions due to stellar UV radiaiton, cosmic rays, C-shocks etc. for a long time (≥ 10^7 year) of their migration to diffuse clouds and seems to disagree with the consensus in the field of interstellar grains. The stability of molecules and aggregates in the diffuse interstellar medium will be discussed. Duley, W. W. 2006, Faraday Discuss. 133, 415 Zhen,J., Castellanos, P., Paardekooper, D. M., Linnartz, H., Tielens, A. G. G. M. 2014, ApJL, 797, L30 Huang, J., Oka, T. 2015, Mol. Phys. 113, 2159 Guzmán, V. V., Pety, J., Goicoechea, J. R., Gerin, M., Roueff, E., Gratier, P., Öberg, K. I. 2015, ApJL, 800, L33 L. Ziurys has sent us many papers beginning Ziurys, L. M. 2006, PNAS 103, 12274 indicating she had long been a proponent of the idea. Campbell, E. K., Holz, M., Maier, J. P., Gerlich, D., Walker, G. A. H., Bohlender, D, 2016, ApJ, in press Draine, B. T. 2003

  5. Natural inhibitors of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Huntington, James A

    2014-04-01

    The serine protease thrombin is the effector enzyme of blood coagulation. It has many activities critical for the formation of stable clots, including cleavage of fibrinogen to fibrin, activation of platelets and conversion of procofactors to active cofactors. Thrombin carries-out its multiple functions by utilising three special features: a deep active site cleft and two anion binding exosites (exosite I and II). Similarly, thrombin inhibitors have evolved to exploit the unique features of thrombin to achieve rapid and specific inactivation of thrombin. Exogenous thrombin inhibitors come from several different protein families and are generally found in the saliva of haematophagous animals (blood suckers) as part of an anticoagulant cocktail that allows them to feed. Crystal structures of several of these inhibitors reveal how peptides and proteins can be targeted to thrombin in different and interesting ways. Thrombin activity must also be regulated by endogenous inhibitors so that thrombi do not occlude blood flow and cause thrombosis. A single protein family, the serpins, provides all four of the endogenous thrombin inhibitors found in man. The crystal structures of these serpins bound to thrombin have been solved, revealing a similar exosite-dependence on complex formation. In addition to forming the recognition complex, serpins destroy the structure of thrombin, allowing them to be released from cofactors and substrates for clearance. This review examines how the special features of thrombin have been exploited by evolution to achieve inhibition of the ultimate coagulation protease.

  6. SGLT2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dardi, I; Kouvatsos, T; Jabbour, S A

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a serious health issue and an economic burden, rising in epidemic proportions over the last few decades worldwide. Although several treatment options are available, only half of the global diabetic population achieves the recommended or individualized glycemic targets. Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of antidiabetic agents with a novel insulin-independent action. SGLT2 is a transporter found in the proximal renal tubules, responsible for the reabsorption of most of the glucose filtered by the kidney. Inhibition of SGLT2 lowers the blood glucose level by promoting the urinary excretion of excess glucose. Due to their insulin-independent action, SGLT2 inhibitors can be used with any degree of beta-cell dysfunction or insulin resistance, related to a very low risk of hypoglycemia. In addition to improving glycemic control, SGLT2 inhibitors have been associated with a reduction in weight and blood pressure when used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Treatment with SGLT2 inhibitors is usually well tolerated; however, they have been associated with an increased incidence of urinary tract and genital infections, although these infections are usually mild and easy to treat. SGLT2 inhibitors are a promising new option in the armamentarium of drugs for patients with T2DM. PMID:26362302

  7. Combined inhibitor free-energy landscape and structural analysis reports on the mannosidase conformational coordinate.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rohan J; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Stepper, Judith; Jackson, Adam; Thompson, Andrew J; Lowe, Elisabeth C; White, Jonathan M; Gilbert, Harry J; Rovira, Carme; Davies, Gideon J; Williams, Spencer J

    2014-01-20

    Mannosidases catalyze the hydrolysis of a diverse range of polysaccharides and glycoconjugates, and the various sequence-based mannosidase families have evolved ingenious strategies to overcome the stereoelectronic challenges of mannoside chemistry. Using a combination of computational chemistry, inhibitor design and synthesis, and X-ray crystallography of inhibitor/enzyme complexes, it is demonstrated that mannoimidazole-type inhibitors are energetically poised to report faithfully on mannosidase transition-state conformation, and provide direct evidence for the conformational itinerary used by diverse mannosidases, including β-mannanases from families GH26 and GH113. Isofagomine-type inhibitors are poor mimics of transition-state conformation, owing to the high energy barriers that must be crossed to attain mechanistically relevant conformations, however, these sugar-shaped heterocycles allow the acquisition of ternary complexes that span the active site, thus providing valuable insight into active-site residues involved in substrate recognition.

  8. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 1: Review of General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet is one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland. It provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire…

  9. Emphasizing Mineral Chemistry in an Analytical Chemistry Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an analytical chemistry unit in the second year of the chemistry degree course at Curtin University that was designed to reflect the numerous employment opportunities for chemistry graduates in the mineral processing industries and private analytical laboratories. Presents the lecture syllabus, the laboratory course description, and…

  10. Chemistry: Experiments, Demonstrations and Other Activities Suggested for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication is a handbook used in conjunction with the course of study in chemistry developed through the New York State Education Department and The University of the State of New York. It contains experiments, demonstrations, and other activities for a chemistry course. Areas covered include the science of chemistry, the atomic structure of…

  11. Is Chemistry Attractive for Pupils? Czech Pupils' Perception of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiatko, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is an important subject due to understanding the composition and structure of the things around us. The main aim of the study was to find out the perception of chemistry by lower secondary school pupils. The partial aims were to find out the influence of gender, year of study and favorite subject on the perception of chemistry. The…

  12. Connected Chemistry--Incorporating Interactive Simulations into the Chemistry Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Wilensky, Uri

    2003-01-01

    Describes a novel modeling and simulation package and assesses its impact on students' understanding of chemistry. Connected Chemistry was implemented inside the NetLogo modeling environment. Using Connected Chemistry, students employed problem -solving techniques characterized by stronger attempts at conceptual understanding and logical…

  13. Chemistry and Popperism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd, F. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of Karl Popper's theories to chemistry, examining scientific statements and verisimilitude (which indicates that newer theories should have a higher degree of truth content compared with older theories). Also provides examples illustrating the use of Agassi's criteria for assessing currently fashionable theories. (JN)

  14. The Lens of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalos, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry possesses a distinctive theoretical lens--a distinctive set of theoretical concerns regarding the dynamics and transformations of a perplexing variety of organic and nonorganic substances--to which it must be faithful. Even if it is true that chemical facts bear a special (reductive) relationship to physical facts, nonetheless it will…

  15. Chemistry and Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittoria Barbarulo, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Chemistry is the central science, as it touches every aspect of the society we live in and it is intertwined with many aspects of our culture; in particular, the strong link between Chemistry and Archaeology and Art History is being explored, offering a penetrating insight into an area of growing interest from an educational point of view. A series of vital and vibrant examples (i.e., ancient bronzes composition, colour changes due to natural pigment decomposition, marble degradation) has been proposed, on one hand, to improve student understanding of the relationship between cultural and scientific issues arising from the examination, the conservation, and the maintenance of cultural Heritage, on the other, to illustrate the role of the underlying Chemistry. In some case studies, a survey of the most relevant atmospheric factors, which are involved in the deterioration mechanisms, has also been presented to the students. First-hand laboratory experiences have been providing an invaluable means of discovering the full and varied world of Chemistry. Furthermore, the promotion of an interdisciplinary investigation of a famous painting or fresco, involving the study of its nature and significance, the definition of its historical context, any related literature, the chemical knowledge of the materials used, may be an excellent occasion to experiment the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). The aim of this approach is to convey the important message that everyone has the responsibility to care for and preserve Heritage for the benefit of present and future generations.

  16. Myrrh--Commiphora chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Lumír O; Rezanka, Tomás; Dembitsky, Valery M; Moussaieff, Arieh

    2005-06-01

    Myrrh and opopanax has been used throughout history in incense and as a perfume. Since Bible times it has been used for the treatment of wounds. The first attempts to identify content compounds were almost 100 years ago. In this review we discuss the present state of knowledge in the chemistry of substances of Commiphora spp. PMID:16170385

  17. The Chemistry of Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Do people realize that chemistry plays a key role in helping solve some of the most serious problems facing the world today? Chemists want to find the building blocks of the chemical universe--the molecules that form materials, living cells and whole organisms. Many chemists are medical explorers looking for new ways to maintain and improve…

  18. Chemistry in the Troposphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chameides, William L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1982-01-01

    Topics addressed in this review of chemistry in the troposphere (layer of atmosphere extending from earth's surface to altitude of 10-16km) include: solar radiation/winds; earth/atmosphere interface; kinetic studies of atmospheric reactions; tropospheric free-radical photochemistry; instruments for nitric oxide detection; sampling…

  19. Array processors in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The field of attached scientific processors (''array processors'') is surveyed, and an attempt is made to indicate their present and possible future use in computational chemistry. The current commercial products from Floating Point Systems, Inc., Datawest Corporation, and CSP, Inc. are discussed.

  20. The Chemistry of Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet, geared toward an advanced high school or early college-level audience, describes how basic chemistry and biochemistry research can spur a better understanding of human health. It reveals how networks of chemical reactions keep our bodies running smoothly. Some of the tools and technologies used to explore these reactions are…

  1. Chemistry Cook-Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    For this activity, high school chemistry students compete in a cooking contest. They must determine the chemical and physical changes that occur in the food they prepare, present their recipe as a step-by-step procedure similar to a lab procedure, identify chemicals in the food, and present all measurements in both metric and English units. The…

  2. Epoxying Isoprene Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    It seems that every few months we read about another missing aspect of atmospheric chemistry: missing products, missing reactivity, missing sources, missing understanding. Thus, it is with some relief that we read in this issue the paper of Paulot et al. The paper provides more...

  3. Chemistry of Meridiani Outcrops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A.; Gellert, R.; Knoll, A.H.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    The chemistry and mineralogy of the sulfate-rich sandstone outcrops at Meridiani Planum, Mars, have been inferred from data obtained by the Opportunity rover of the MER mission and reported in recent publications [1-6]. Here, we provide an update on more recent samples and results derived from this extensive data set.

  4. General Chemistry, 1970 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Orson W.; Franke, Douglas C.

    This publication is a syllabus for a senior high school chemistry course designed for the average ability, nonscience major. The content of the syllabus is divided into three basic core areas: Area I: Similarities and Dissimilarities of Matter (9 weeks); Area II: Preparation and Separation of Substances (10 weeks); Area III: Structure and…

  5. News: Green Chemistry & Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of 21 articles focused on different features of green chemistry in a recent issue of Chemical Reviews. Topics extended over a wide range to include the design of sustainable synthetic processes to biocatalysis. A selection of perspectives follows as part of this colu

  6. Microscale Gas Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce; Anderson, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The development of syringes having free movement while remaining gas-tight enabled methods in chemistry to be changed. Successfully containing and measuring volumes of gas without the need to trap them using liquids made it possible to work with smaller quantities. The invention of the LuerLok syringe cap also allowed the gas to be stored for a…

  7. Chemistry between the stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A unit is presented for the secondary school teacher of physics, chemistry, astronomy, or earth sciences. Included are a list of reference materials, teaching aids, and projects. Discussion questions and a glossary are also provided. Concepts developed are: the nature of interstellar space, spectroscopy, molecular signals from space and interstellar molecules and other areas of astronomy.

  8. Chemistry Between The Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammon, Richard H.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics are covered: the physical conditions in interstellar space in comparison with those of the earth, particularly in regard to gas density,…

  9. The Language of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Meinwald, Jerrold

    2002-01-01

    Describes a new curriculum called The Language of Chemistry designed to illustrate how problems of biological and/or medical importance can be understood on a molecular basis and to show that the logic, knowledge, and language needed are easily accessible. Among the case studies in the curriculum are the giant peacock moth, bacterial chemotaxis,…

  10. The Pimlico Chemistry Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Describes a chemistry "trail" (similar to a nature trail) which focuses on chemical phenomena in the environment. The trail includes 20 stops in and around a local school. Types of phenomena examined include building materials, air pollution, corrosion of metals, swimming pools, and others. Additional activities are also suggested. (DH)

  11. Get Cooking with Chemistry!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This book presents science activities investigating the chemical changes and reactions with powders that are used in baking. Activities include: (1) Mystery Powders; (2) Find the Fizz: Discover the Secret of Baking Powder; and (3) A Feast for Yeast and Cheese: Behold the Power of Chemistry. (YDS)

  12. Greener and Sustainable Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    The special issue on Greener and Sustainable Chemistry highlights various strategies that can be adopted to address the pollution preventive measures promoting the use of energy efficient reactions that utilize benign and bio-renewable raw materials in a relatively safer reaction...

  13. Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy has awarded the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA) "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy". Zewail's work has taken the study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions to the ultimate degree of detail - the time scale of bond making and bond breaking.

  14. Chemistry Curricula. Course Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Listings of suggested topics aimed at helping university and college faculties plan courses in the main areas of the chemistry curricula are provided. The suggestions were originally offered as appendices to the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Committee on Professional Training's 1983 guidelines for ACS-approved schools. The course data included…

  15. Myrrh--Commiphora chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Lumír O; Rezanka, Tomás; Dembitsky, Valery M; Moussaieff, Arieh

    2005-06-01

    Myrrh and opopanax has been used throughout history in incense and as a perfume. Since Bible times it has been used for the treatment of wounds. The first attempts to identify content compounds were almost 100 years ago. In this review we discuss the present state of knowledge in the chemistry of substances of Commiphora spp.

  16. Bringing chemistry to life

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Michael; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2011-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry allows a wide variety of biomolecules to be specifically labeled and probed in living cells and whole organisms. Here we discuss the history of bioorthogonal reactions and some of the most interesting and important advances in the field. PMID:21799498

  17. Getting Reactions to Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.

    1983-01-01

    "COMETS on Careers" describes science-related careers, introduces activities illustrating a science concept being studied, and encourages use of professional persons as activity leaders. Several COMETS chemistry activities are described. These activities, which can be performed in school or at home, focus on colloids, acid/base indicators, and…

  18. Water Chemistry Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, David; And Others

    This manual of laboratory experiments in water chemistry serves a dual function of illustrating fundamental chemical principles of dilute aqueous systems and of providing the student with some familiarity with the chemical measurements commonly used in water and wastewater analysis. Experiments are grouped in categories on the basis of similar…

  19. Online Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janowicz, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the many facets of an entirely online organic chemistry course. Online homework with structure-drawing capabilities was found to be more effective than written homework. Online lecture was found to be just as effective as in-person lecture, and students prefer an online lecture format with shorter Webcasts. Online…

  20. Chemistry in a Nutshell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupnow, John; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity that involves making peanut butter in the laboratory as a way to teach students the chemistry concepts of emulsification, solubility, and formulation. Enables students to realize that they can actually create or modify the physical and sensory characteristics of peanut butter and taste the differences in their work. (JRH)

  1. Green chemistry metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthetic chemists have always had an objective to achieve reliable and high-yielding routes to the syntheses of targeted molecules. The importance of minimal waste generation has emphasized the use of green chemistry principles and sustainable development. These directions lead ...

  2. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  3. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P.; Ahmed, K. K. Mueen

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  4. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faiyaz; Ghalib, Raza Murad; Sasikala, P; Ahmed, K K Mueen

    2013-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com) are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed. PMID:24347920

  5. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cockrill, Barbara A; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a key role in modulating vascular tone and remodeling in the pulmonary circulation. The guanylate cyclase/cyclic guanylate monophosphate-signaling pathway primarily mediates nitric oxide signaling. This pathway is critical in normal regulation of the pulmonary vasculature, and is an important target for therapy in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In the pulmonary vasculature, degradation of cGMP is primarily regulated by PDE-5, and inhibition of this enzyme has important effects on pulmonary vasculature smooth muscle tone. Large randomized placebo-controlled trials of PDE-5 inhibitors demonstrated improved exercise capacity, hemodynamics and quality of life in adult patients with PAH. This chapter will discuss the mechanisms of NO signaling in the vasculature, characteristics of the PDE5-inhibitors approved for treatment of PH, and review available data on the use of phosphodiesterase inhibitors in PH. PMID:24092343

  6. The Lighter Side of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for using photochemistry to merge descriptive chemistry and molecular orbital theory in first-year chemistry courses. Includes procedures and safety information for various activities, demonstrations, and experiments involving photochemical reactions. (DH)

  7. The Birthday of Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benfey, Otto Theodor; Kaufman, George B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how the synthesis of urea, 150 years ago, was a major factor in breaking the artificial barrier that existed between organic and inorganic chemistry, and this contributed to the rapid growth of organic chemistry. (GA)

  8. Special Report: Chemistry of Comets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A'Hearn, Michael F.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the chemistry of comets. How comets provide clues to the birth of the solar system, photolytic reactions on comets involving water, chemical modeling, nuclear chemistry, and research findings are among the areas considered. (JN)

  9. Optimisation of a novel series of potent and orally bioavailable azanaphthyridine SYK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garton, Neil S; Barker, Michael D; Davis, Rob P; Douault, Clement; Hooper-Greenhill, Edward; Jones, Emma; Lewis, Huw D; Liddle, John; Lugo, Dave; McCleary, Scott; Preston, Alex G S; Ramirez-Molina, Cesar; Neu, Margarete; Shipley, Tracy J; Somers, Don O; Watson, Robert J; Wilson, David M

    2016-10-01

    The optimisation of the azanaphthyridine series of Spleen Tyrosine Kinase inhibitors is described. The medicinal chemistry strategy was focused on optimising the human whole blood activity whilst achieving a sufficient margin over hERG activity. A good pharmacokinetic profile was achieved by modification of the pKa. Morpholine compound 32 is a potent SYK inhibitor showing moderate selectivity, good oral bioavailability and good efficacy in the rat Arthus model but demonstrated a genotoxic potential in the Ames assay. PMID:27578246

  10. Structure-based optimization of MurF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Geoffrey F; Longenecker, Kenton L; Fry, Elizabeth H; Jakob, Clarissa G; Florjancic, Alan S; Gu, Yu-Gui; Anderson, David D; Cooper, Curt S; Zhang, Tianyuan; Clark, Richard F; Cia, Yingna; Black-Schaefer, Candace L; Owen McCall, J; Lerner, Claude G; Hajduk, Philip J; Beutel, Bruce A; Stoll, Vincent S

    2006-01-01

    The D-Ala-D-Ala adding enzyme (MurF) from Streptococcus pneumoniae catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of the UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide, a critical component of the bacterial cell wall. MurF is a potential target for antibacterial design because it is unique to bacteria and performs an essential non-redundant function in the bacterial cell. The recent discovery and subsequent cocrystal structure determination of MurF in complex with a new class of inhibitors served as a catalyst to begin a medicinal chemistry program aimed at improving their potency. We report here a multidisciplinary approach to this effort that allowed for rapid generation of cocrystal structures, thereby providing the crystallographic information critical for driving the inhibitor optimization process. This effort resulted in the discovery of low-nanomolar inhibitors of this bacterial enzyme. PMID:16492149

  11. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  12. 5-Benzothiazole substituted pyrimidine derivatives as HCV replication (replicase) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arasappan, Ashok; Bennett, Frank; Girijavallabhan, Vinay; Huang, Yuhua; Huelgas, Regina; Alvarez, Carmen; Chen, Lei; Gavalas, Stephen; Kim, Seong-Heon; Kosinski, Aneta; Pinto, Patrick; Rizvi, Razia; Rossman, Randall; Shankar, Bandarpalle; Tong, Ling; Velazquez, Francisco; Venkatraman, Srikanth; Verma, Vishal A; Kozlowski, Joseph; Shih, Neng-Yang; Piwinski, John J; MacCoss, Malcolm; Kwong, Cecil D; Clark, Jeremy L; Fowler, Anita T; Geng, Feng; Kezar, Hollis S; Roychowdhury, Abhijit; Reynolds, Robert C; Maddry, Joseph A; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Secrist, John A; Li, Cheng; Chase, Robert; Curry, Stephanie; Huang, Hsueh-Cheng; Tong, Xiao; Njoroge, F George

    2012-05-01

    Based on a previously identified HCV replication (replicase) inhibitor 1, SAR efforts were conducted around the pyrimidine core to improve the potency and pharmacokinetic profile of the inhibitors. A benzothiazole moiety was found to be the optimal substituent at the pyrimidine 5-position. Due to potential reactivity concern, the 4-chloro residue was replaced by a methyl group with some loss in potency and enhanced rat in vivo profile. Extensive investigations at the C-2 position resulted in identification of compound 16 that demonstrated very good replicon potency, selectivity and rodent plasma/target organ concentration. Inhibitor 16 also demonstrated good plasma levels and oral bioavailability in dogs, while monkey exposure was rather low. Chemistry optimization towards a practical route to install the benzothiazole moiety resulted in an efficient direct C-H arylation protocol.

  13. Chemistry 200, 300 Interim Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This guide, developed for the chemistry 200, 300 program in Manitoba, is designed to articulate with previous science courses, provide concepts, processes, and skills which will enable students to continue in chemistry-related areas, and relate chemistry to practical applications in everyday life. It includes a program overview (with program goals…

  14. Six Pillars of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Joseph J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching organic chemistry, which is to have students build their knowledge of organic chemistry upon a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts of the subject. Specifically, the article focuses upon a core set of concepts that I call "the six pillars of organic chemistry": electronegativity, polar…

  15. Chemistry Sets Face Uncertain Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Stephen C.

    1979-01-01

    Chemistry sets, often a child's first contact with chemistry, are becoming less attractive to manufacturers as the market for these items decreases. There is a tendency for recently manufactured chemistry sets to be less adequate than those selling in the same price range in past years. Manuals vary in quality among manufacturers. (RE)

  16. Towards "Bildung"-Oriented Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjöström, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns "Bildung"-oriented chemistry education, based on a reflective and critical discourse of chemistry. It is contrasted with the dominant type of chemistry education, based on the mainstream discourse of chemistry. "Bildung"-oriented chemistry education includes not only content knowledge in chemistry, but also…

  17. Pectin methylesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Giovane, A; Servillo, L; Balestrieri, C; Raiola, A; D'Avino, R; Tamburrini, M; Ciardiello, M A; Camardella, L

    2004-02-12

    Pectin methylesterase (PME) is the first enzyme acting on pectin, a major component of plant cell wall. PME action produces pectin with different structural and functional properties, having an important role in plant physiology. Regulation of plant PME activity is obtained by the differential expression of several isoforms in different tissues and developmental stages and by subtle modifications of cell wall local pH. Inhibitory activities from various plant sources have also been reported. A proteinaceous inhibitor of PME (PMEI) has been purified from kiwi fruit. The kiwi PMEI is active against plant PMEs, forming a 1:1 non-covalent complex. The polypeptide chain comprises 152 amino acid residues and contains five Cys residues, four of which are connected by disulfide bridges, first to second and third to fourth. The sequence shows significant similarity with the N-terminal pro-peptides of plant PME, and with plant invertase inhibitors. In particular, the four Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges are conserved. On the basis of amino acid sequence similarity and Cys residues conservation, a large protein family including PMEI, invertase inhibitors and related proteins of unknown function has been identified. The presence of at least two sequences in the Arabidopsis genome having high similarity with kiwi PMEI suggests the ubiquitous presence of this inhibitor. PMEI has an interest in food industry as inhibitor of endogenous PME, responsible for phase separation and cloud loss in fruit juice manufacturing. Affinity chromatography on resin-bound PMEI can also be used to concentrate and detect residual PME activity in fruit and vegetable products.

  18. Chemistry of superheavy elements.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    The number of chemical elements has increased considerably in the last few decades. Most excitingly, these heaviest, man-made elements at the far-end of the Periodic Table are located in the area of the long-awaited superheavy elements. While physical techniques currently play a leading role in these discoveries, the chemistry of superheavy elements is now beginning to be developed. Advanced and very sensitive techniques allow the chemical properties of these elusive elements to be probed. Often, less than ten short-lived atoms, chemically separated one-atom-at-a-time, provide crucial information on basic chemical properties. These results place the architecture of the far-end of the Periodic Table on the test bench and probe the increasingly strong relativistic effects that influence the chemical properties there. This review is focused mainly on the experimental work on superheavy element chemistry. It contains a short contribution on relativistic theory, and some important historical and nuclear aspects.

  19. Organic Chemistry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  20. Turbine Chemistry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Many of the engine exhaust species resulting in significant environmental impact exist in trace amounts. Recent research, e.g., conducted at MIT-AM, has pointed to the intra-engine environment as a possible site for important trace chemistry activity. In addition, the key processes affecting the trace species activity occurring downstream in the air passages of the turbine and exhaust nozzle are not well understood. Most recently, an effort has been initiated at NASA Glenn Research Center under the UEET Program to evaluate and further develop CFD-based technology for modeling and simulation of intra-engine trace chemical changes relevant to atmospheric effects of pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. This presentation will describe the current effort conducted at Glenn; some preliminary results relevant to the trace species chemistry in a turbine passage will also be presented to indicate the progress to date.

  1. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed. PMID:26631024

  2. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  3. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  4. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed.

  5. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  6. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B. I.; Langlands, T. A. M.; Wearne, S. L.

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  7. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems.

    PubMed

    Henry, B I; Langlands, T A M; Wearne, S L

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  8. Positioning of aminopeptidase inhibitors in next generation cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hitzerd, Sarina M; Verbrugge, Sue Ellen; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2014-04-01

    Aminopeptidases represent a class of (zinc) metalloenzymes that catalyze the cleavage of amino acids nearby the N-terminus of polypeptides, resulting in hydrolysis of peptide bonds. Aminopeptidases operate downstream of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and are implicated in the final step of intracellular protein degradation either by trimming proteasome-generated peptides for antigen presentation or full hydrolysis into free amino acids for recycling in renewed protein synthesis. This review focuses on the function and subcellular location of five key aminopeptidases (aminopeptidase N, leucine aminopeptidase, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1/2) and their association with different diseases, in particular cancer and their current position as target for therapeutic intervention by aminopeptidase inhibitors. Historically, bestatin was the first prototypical aminopeptidase inhibitor that entered the clinic 35 years ago and is still used for the treatment of lung cancer. More recently, new generation aminopeptidase inhibitors became available, including the aminopeptidase inhibitor prodrug tosedostat, which is currently tested in phase II clinical trials for acute myeloid leukemia. Beyond bestatin and tosedostat, medicinal chemistry has emerged with additional series of potential aminopeptidases inhibitors which are still in an early phase of (pre)clinical investigations. The expanded knowledge of the unique mechanism of action of aminopeptidases has revived interest in aminopeptidase inhibitors for drug combination regimens in anti-cancer treatment. In this context, this review will discuss relevant features and mechanisms of action of aminopeptidases and will also elaborate on factors contributing to aminopeptidase inhibitor efficacy and/or loss of efficacy due to drug resistance-related phenomena. Together, a growing body of data point to aminopeptidase inhibitors as attractive tools for

  9. Atmospheric Chemistry Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This presentation poster covers data products from the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) of the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC). Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer products (TOMS) introduced in the presentation include TOMS Version 8 as well as Aura, which provides 25 years of TOMS and Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) data. The presentation lists a number of atmospheric chemistry and dynamics data sets at DAAC.

  10. Green chemistry: development trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, I. I.

    2013-07-01

    Examples of applications of green chemistry methods in heavy organic synthesis are analyzed. Compounds, which can be produced by the processing of the biomass, and the criteria for the selection of the most promising products are summarized. The current status of the ethanol production and processing is considered. The possibilities of the use of high fatty acid triglycerides, glycerol, succinic acid, and isoprene are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 67 references.

  11. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  12. Analytical Chemistry in Russia.

    PubMed

    Zolotov, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Research in Russian analytical chemistry (AC) is carried out on a significant scale, and the analytical service solves practical tasks of geological survey, environmental protection, medicine, industry, agriculture, etc. The education system trains highly skilled professionals in AC. The development and especially manufacturing of analytical instruments should be improved; in spite of this, there are several good domestic instruments and other satisfy some requirements. Russian AC has rather good historical roots.

  13. Chemistry and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Black, John H

    2006-01-01

    The simplest elements, hydrogen and helium, offer a remarkably rich chemistry, which has controlled crucial features of the early evolution of the universe. Theoretical models of the origin of structure (stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, etc.) now incorporate this chemistry in some detail. In addition to the origin of structure, cosmologists are concerned with observational tests of competing world models. Primordial chemistry may give rise to some of the earliest departures from thermodynamic equilibrium in the universe. These effects may be observable as broad-band spectroscopic distortions of the cosmic background radiation, which otherwise exhibits a nearly perfect blackbody spectrum. The chemical history of the expanding universe is followed through a detailed calculation of the evolution of the abundances of H, H+, H-, H2, H2+, H3+, and other minor species. It is shown that continuous absorption by the small concentration of H- can produce a distortion in the cosmic background spectrum with a maximum at a frequency near nu/c = 9 cm-1 (wavelength 1.1 mm). The predicted effect lies only a factor of 5 below current limits. Its detection would provide an important test of our understanding of the recombination epoch of the universe. PMID:17191439

  14. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

    2002-11-10

    The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

  15. Extensible Computational Chemistry Environment

    2012-08-09

    ECCE provides a sophisticated graphical user interface, scientific visualization tools, and the underlying data management framework enabling scientists to efficiently set up calculations and store, retrieve, and analyze the rapidly growing volumes of data produced by computational chemistry studies. ECCE was conceived as part of the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory construction to solve the problem of researchers being able to effectively utilize complex computational chemistry codes and massively parallel high performance compute resources. Bringing themore » power of these codes and resources to the desktops of researcher and thus enabling world class research without users needing a detailed understanding of the inner workings of either the theoretical codes or the supercomputers needed to run them was a grand challenge problem in the original version of the EMSL. ECCE allows collaboration among researchers using a web-based data repository where the inputs and results for all calculations done within ECCE are organized. ECCE is a first of kind end-to-end problem solving environment for all phases of computational chemistry research: setting up calculations with sophisticated GUI and direct manipulation visualization tools, submitting and monitoring calculations on remote high performance supercomputers without having to be familiar with the details of using these compute resources, and performing results visualization and analysis including creating publication quality images. ECCE is a suite of tightly integrated applications that are employed as the user moves through the modeling process.« less

  16. General chemistry students' understanding of the chemistry underlying climate science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versprille, Ashley N.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate first-semester general chemistry students' understanding of the chemistry underlying climate change. The first part of this study involves the collection of qualitative data from twenty-four first-semester general chemistry students from a large Midwestern research institution. The semi-structured interview protocol was developed based on alternative conceptions identified in the research literature and the essential principles of climate change outlined in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) document which pertain to chemistry (CCSP, 2003). The analysis and findings from the interviews indicate conceptual difficulties for students, both with basic climate literacy and underlying chemistry concepts. Students seem to confuse the greenhouse effect, global warming, and the ozone layer, and in terms of chemistry concepts, they lack a particulate level understanding of greenhouse gases and their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, causing them to not fully conceptualize the greenhouse effect and climate change. Based on the findings from these interviews, a Chemistry of Climate Science Diagnostic Instrument (CCSI) was developed for use in courses that teach chemistry with a rich context such as climate science. The CCSI is designed for professors who want to teach general chemistry, while also addressing core climate literacy principles. It will help professors examine their students' prior knowledge and alternative conceptions of the chemistry concepts associated with climate science, which could then inform their teaching and instruction.

  17. Green corrosion inhibitors: An oil company perspective

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, A.J.; Harrop, D.

    1995-10-01

    Environmental concerns are increasingly likely to influence the choice of oilfield production and drilling chemicals. The Paris Commission (PARCOM) is currently developing legislation for the North Sea. The regulations which emerge may well restrict the use of many current products. Uncertainty over the eventual details has meant that new product development has been somewhat tentative. Little genuinely new chemistry has been explored to meet the environmental challenge. Polypeptides are one of several new classes which deserve attention. Polyaspartate is the most efficient corrosion inhibitor (ca 80% max) of the polypeptides. Molecular weight (1,000--22,000) does not affect the efficiency but both high [Ca{sup 2+}] and high pH are beneficial. Performance is particularly good in batch treatment tests (> 95% efficiency).

  18. [JAK2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hernández Boluda, Juan Carlos; Gómez, Montse; Pérez, Ariadna

    2016-07-15

    Pharmacological inhibition of the kinase activity of JAK proteins can interfere with the signaling of immunomodulatory cytokines and block the constitutive activation of the JAK-STAT pathway that characterizes certain malignancies, including chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. JAK inhibitors may, therefore, be useful to treat malignancies as well as inflammatory or immune disorders. Currently, the most significant advances have been made in the treatment of myelofibrosis, where these drugs may lead to a remarkable improvement in the control of hyperproliferative manifestations. However, available data suggest that this treatment is not curative of myelofibrosis. In general, JAK2 inhibition induces cytopaenias, with this being considered a class side-effect. By contrast, the extrahaematologic toxicity profile varies significantly among the different JAK inhibitors. At present, there are several clinical trials evaluating the combination of ruxolitinib with other drugs, in order to improve its therapeutic activity as well as reducing haematologic toxicity. PMID:27033437

  19. Discovery of a novel sub-class of ROMK channel inhibitors typified by 5-(2-(4-(2-(4-(1H-Tetrazol-1-yl)phenyl)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haifeng; de Jesus, Reynald K; Walsh, Shawn P; Zhu, Yuping; Yan, Yan; Priest, Birgit T; Swensen, Andrew M; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Felix, John P; Brochu, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Pai, Lee-Yuh; Hampton, Caryn; Hernandez, Melba; Owens, Karen; Roy, Sophie; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Yang, Lihu; Garcia, Maria L; Pasternak, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    A sub-class of distinct small molecule ROMK inhibitors were developed from the original lead 1. Medicinal chemistry endeavors led to novel ROMK inhibitors with good ROMK functional potency and improved hERG selectivity. Two of the described ROMK inhibitors were characterized for the first in vivo proof-of-concept biology studies, and results from an acute rat diuresis model confirmed the hypothesis that ROMK inhibitors represent new mechanism diuretic and natriuretic agents. PMID:24075732

  20. Coagulation inhibitors in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Esmon, C T

    2005-04-01

    Coagulation is triggered by inflammatory mediators in a number of ways. However, to prevent unwanted clot formation, several natural anticoagulant mechanisms exist, such as the antithrombin-heparin mechanism, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor mechanism and the protein C anticoagulant pathway. This review examines the ways in which these pathways are down-regulated by inflammation, thus limiting clot formation and decreasing the natural anti-inflammatory mechanisms that these pathways possess. PMID:15787615

  1. N-Benzyl-indolo carboxylic acids: Design and synthesis of potent and selective adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (A-FABP) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barf, Tjeerd; Lehmann, Fredrik; Hammer, Kristin; Haile, Saba; Axen, Eva; Medina, Carmen; Uppenberg, Jonas; Svensson, Stefan; Rondahl, Lena; Lundbäck, Thomas

    2009-03-15

    Small molecule inhibitors of adipocyte fatty-acid binding protein (A-FABP) have gained renewed interest following the recent publication of pharmacologically beneficial effects of such inhibitors. Despite the potential utility of selective A-FABP inhibitors within the fields of metabolic disease, inflammation and atherosclerosis, there are few examples of useful A-FABP inhibitors in the public domain. Herein, we describe the optimization of N-benzyl-tetrahydrocarbazole derivatives through the use of co-crystal structure guided medicinal chemistry efforts. This led to the identification of a potent and selective class of A-FABP inhibitors as illustrated by N-benzyl-hexahydrocyclohepta[b]indole 30. PMID:19217286

  2. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  3. Metalloprotease Peptide Inhibitors: A Semester-Long Organic Synthetic Research Project for the Introductory Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long research project to synthesize unique compounds designed after published metalloprotease peptide inhibitors is presented. The research project encompasses a set of nine organic chemistry reactions traditionally taught in the second semester lab course, and the procedures are derived from scientific literature. The two principle…

  4. 2-Amino-7-substituted benzoxazole analogs as potent RSK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Costales, Abran; Mathur, Michelle; Ramurthy, Savithri; Lan, Jiong; Subramanian, Sharadha; Jain, Rama; Atallah, Gordana; Setti, Lina; Lindvall, Mika; Appleton, Brent A; Ornelas, Elizabeth; Feucht, Paul; Warne, Bob; Doyle, Laura; Basham, Stephen E; Aronchik, Ida; Jefferson, Anne B; Shafer, Cynthia M

    2014-03-15

    2-Amino-7-substituted benzoxazole analogs were identified by HTS as inhibitors of RSK2. Molecular modeling and medicinal chemistry techniques were employed to explore the SAR for this series with a focus of improving in vitro and target modulation potency and physicochemical properties.

  5. Tropospheric Halogen Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Glasow, R.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2003-12-01

    Halogens are very reactive chemicals that are known to play an important role in anthropogenic stratospheric ozone depletion chemistry, first recognized by Molina and Rowland (1974). However, they also affect the chemistry of the troposphere. They are of special interest because they are involved in many reaction cycles that can affect the oxidation power of the atmosphere indirectly by influencing the main oxidants O3 and its photolysis product OH and directly, e.g., by reactions of the Cl radical with hydrocarbons (e.g., CH4).Already by the middle of the nineteenth century, Marchand (1852) reported the presence of bromine and iodine in rain and other natural waters. He also mentions the benefits of iodine in drinking water through the prevention of goitres and cretinism. In a prophetic monograph "Air and Rain: The Beginnings of a Chemical Climatology," Smith (1872) describes measurements of chloride in rain water, which he states to originate partly from the oceans by a process that he compares with the bursting of "soap bubbles" which produces "small vehicles" that transfer small spray droplets of seawater to the air. From deviations of the sulfate-to-chloride ratio in coastal rain compared to seawater, Smith concluded that chemical processes occur once the particles are airborne.For almost a century thereafter, however, atmospheric halogens received little attention. One exception was the work by Cauer (1939), who reported that iodine pollution has been significant in Western and Central Europe due to the inefficient burning of seaweed, causing mean gas phase atmospheric concentrations as high as or greater than 0.5 μg m-3. In his classical textbook Air Chemistry and Radioactivity, Junge (1963) devoted less than three pages to halogen gas phase chemistry, discussing chlorine and iodine. As reviewed by Eriksson (1959a, b), the main atmospheric source of halogens is sea salt, derived from the bursting of bubbles of air which are produced by ocean waves and other

  6. Mars aqueous chemistry experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.; Mason, Larry W.

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment (MACE) is designed to conduct a variety of measurements on regolith samples, encompassing mineral phase analyses, chemical interactions with H2O, and physical properties determinations. From these data, much can be learned or inferred regarding the past weathering environment, the contemporaneous soil micro-environments, and the general chemical and physical state of the Martian regolith. By analyzing both soil and duricrust samples, the nature of the latter may become more apparent. Sites may be characterized for comparative purposes and criteria could be set for selection of high priority materials on future sample return missions. Progress for the first year MACE PIDDP is reported in two major areas of effort: (1) fluids handling concepts, definition, and breadboard fabrication and (2) aqueous chemistry ion sensing technology and test facility integration. A fluids handling breadboard was designed, fabricated, and tested at Mars ambient pressure. The breadboard allows fluid manipulation scenarios to be tested under the reduced pressure conditions expected in the Martian atmosphere in order to validate valve operations, orchestrate analysis sequences, investigate sealing integrity, and to demonstrate efficacy of the fluid handling concept. Additional fluid manipulation concepts have also been developed based on updated MESUR spacecraft definition. The Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) facility was designed as a test bed to develop a multifunction interface for measurements of chemical ion concentrations in aqueous solution. The interface allows acquisition of real time data concerning the kinetics and heats of salt dissolution, and transient response to calibration and solubility events. An array of ion selective electrodes has been interfaced and preliminary calibration studies performed.

  7. The mixed chemistry problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Gesicki, K.; Lagadec, E.; Jones, D.; Millar, T. J.; Woods, P. M.; Chuimin, R. N.

    2014-04-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) represent the last stage of evolution of intermediate mass stars (0.8 to 8M⊙) and, hence, by their very nature are fundamental to galactic evolution. The massive envelopes ejected during their earlier evolution (AGB phase) are an important source of recycled material in the form of dust and molecular gas into the interstellar medium. A small fraction of PNe show both O- and C-rich features and are therefore classified as mixed-chemistry objects. The origin of their mixed-chemistry is still uncertain. Our chemical models show that the PAHs may form in irradiated dense tori, and HST images confirm the presence of such tori in some of the objects. Using the VISIR/VLT, we spatially resolved the precise location of the PAHs. We find a dense dusty structures in all of the objects observed. The ionised [SIV] material is located inside the dusty tori, while the PAHs are present at the outer edges of these tori. This confirms that the PAHs formation is due to the photodissociation of CO. In the Galactic Disk, very few PNe have shown to harbour these mixed-chemistry phenomenon. We propose to observe the tori of a sample of bipolar PNe from the Galactic Disk that harbour a close binary system inside them. The chemical models show that the formation of long C-chain molecules is possible to occur in O-rich environments, but the formation of these C-rich molecules require a very dense region (Av˜4). To test this theory we propose to observe the very dense tori of these Galactic Disk PNe and compare these sample with the already observed sample of PNe in the Galactic Bulge (Guzman-Ramirez, et al., 2011;Guzman-Ramirez, et al., 2013, submitted).

  8. Extended Wordsearches in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, Simon

    1998-04-01

    Students can be encouraged to develop their factual knowledge by use of puzzles. One strategy described here is the extended wordsearch, where the wordsearch element generates a number of words or phrases from which the answers to a series of questions are selected. The wordsearch can be generated with the aid of computer programs, though in order to make them suitable for students with dyslexia or other learning difficulties, a simpler form is more appropriate. These problems can be employed in a variety of contexts, for example, as topic tests and classroom end-of-lesson fillers. An example is provided in the area of calcium chemistry. Sources of suitable software are listed.

  9. Dynamic foldamer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Le Bailly, Bryden A F; Clayden, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Foldamers can be made more than pieces of static, conformationally uniform molecular architecture by designing into their structure the conformational dynamism characteristic of functional molecular machines. We show that these dynamic foldamers display biomimetic properties reminiscent of allosteric proteins and receptor molecules. They can translate chemical signals into conformational changes, and hence into chemical outputs such as control of reactivity and selectivity. Future developments could see dynamic foldamers operating in the membrane phase providing artificial mechanisms for communication and control that integrate synthetic chemistry into synthetic biology. PMID:26955864

  10. Chemistry and selection.

    PubMed

    de Duve, Christian

    2007-04-01

    Life is the product of chemistry, which obeys deterministic laws, and of natural selection, which operates on variants offered to it by chance, but may, in a number of cases, have been provided with a sufficiently extensive array of variants to be optimizing. Thus, the origin and evolution of life have been largely shaped by the contingency of environmental conditions. The possibility remaining open for consideration is that certain critical conditions are sufficiently reproducible for life to arise and even to evolve into conscious, intelligent beings elsewhere in the universe.

  11. Sustainable chemistry metrics.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Flores, Francisco García

    2009-01-01

    Green chemistry has developed mathematical parameters to describe the sustainability of chemical reactions and processes, in order to quantify their environmental impact. These parameters are related to mass and energy magnitudes, and enable analyses and numerical diagnoses of chemical reactions. The environmental impact factor (E factor), atom economy, and reaction mass efficiency have been the most influential metrics, and they are interconnected by mathematical equations. The ecodesign concept must also be considered for complex industrial syntheses, as a part of the sustainability of manufacturing processes. The aim of this Concept article is to identify the main parameters for evaluating undesirable environmental consequences. PMID:19780101

  12. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Chemistry and Science Fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Jack H.

    1998-11-01

    This lively collection looks at science as filtered through literature, film, and television. It discusses classic works in science fiction and provides an in-depth look at the chemistry depicted in popular culture, particularly in Start Trek , Star Wars , and Doctor Who . It includes an examination by Nebula Award winner Connie Willis of how science fiction authors use science, and reprints two tongue-in-cheek short stories by Isaac Asimov. The book also includes suggestions for using science fiction as an educational resource.

  15. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  16. Recent Syntheses of PI3K/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the syntheses of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors that have been reported outside of the patent literature in the last 5 years but is largely centered on synthetic work reported in 2011 and 2012. While focused on syntheses of inhibitors, some information on in vitro and in vivo testing of compounds is also included. Many of these reported compounds are reversible, competitive adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding inhibitors, so given the structural similarities of many of these compounds to the adenine core, this review presents recent work on inhibitors based on where the synthetic chemistry was started, i.e. inhibitor syntheses which started with purines/pyrimidines are followed by inhibitor syntheses which began with pyridines, pyrazines, azoles, and triazines then moves to inhibitors which bear no structural resemblance to adenine: liphagal, wortmannin and quercetin analogs. The review then finishes with a short section on recent syntheses of phosphotidyl inositol (PI) analogs since competitive PI binding inhibitors represent an alternative to the competitive ATP binding inhibitors which have received the most attention. PMID:23735831

  17. Green chemistry: principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Anastas, Paul; Eghbali, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Green Chemistry is a relatively new emerging field that strives to work at the molecular level to achieve sustainability. The field has received widespread interest in the past decade due to its ability to harness chemical innovation to meet environmental and economic goals simultaneously. Green Chemistry has a framework of a cohesive set of Twelve Principles, which have been systematically surveyed in this critical review. This article covers the concepts of design and the scientific philosophy of Green Chemistry with a set of illustrative examples. Future trends in Green Chemistry are discussed with the challenge of using the Principles as a cohesive design system (93 references). PMID:20023854

  18. Cross-Connections of Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Diana S.

    2002-02-01

    We are in desperate need of qualified chemistry teachers. Are the teachers who have biology, physics, or some psychology degrees qualified to teach chemistry? Have they taken enough chemistry to be prepared to teach outside their degree field? If remediation is necessary, what courses should be required? Attracting pre-service science teachers to the study of pure chemistry is not an easy task when more attractive course offerings are available. Maybe we should concentrate on cross-training in-service teachers by providing appropriate graduate courses to encourage them and bring them into the family. Many teachers with degrees outside the traditional discipline of chemistry have adequate backgrounds in the applications of chemistry. Requiring hours of undergraduate education before they enter the hallowed halls of the chemistry building as graduate students only serves to discourage a large segment of in-service teachers who wish to broaden their perspective. The National Science Education Standards make a compelling argument for connecting and integrating science courses for practicing teachers (3). We are at the crossroads. At a time when we so desperately need qualified chemistry teachers, shouldn't we be more open in our graduate teaching programs, inviting those with degrees in other disciplines to start on a graduate degree without insisting on undergraduate or survey coursework first? Many potential chemical education graduate students have a background in chemistry--it is just known by another name.

  19. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents. PMID:25792812

  20. The application of click chemistry in the synthesis of agents with anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Bing-Xin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between alkynes and azides (click chemistry) to form 1,2,3-triazoles is the most popular reaction due to its reliability, specificity, and biocompatibility. This reaction has the potential to shorten procedures, and render more efficient lead identification and optimization procedures in medicinal chemistry, which is a powerful modular synthetic approach toward the assembly of new molecular entities and has been applied in anticancer drugs discovery increasingly. The present review focuses mainly on the applications of this reaction in the field of synthesis of agents with anticancer activity, which are divided into four groups: topoisomerase II inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and antimicrotubule agents.

  1. Clinical chemistry of thiamin.

    PubMed

    Davis, R E; Icke, G C

    1983-01-01

    This volume covers the history of thiamin, its chemistry and biochemistry, methods for the assessment of thiamin status, and the clinical chemistry of thiamin. Thiamin plays an essential role in carbohydrate metabolism, and there is some evidence it may also affect protein and lipid biosynthesis. Thiamin is composed of pyrimidine and thiazole moieties that are joined by a methylene bridge. The daily requirement of thiamin is related to energy need, especially that which is derived from carbohydrate. 0.33 mg of thiamin is required for each 4400 kJ of energy requirement; thus, a thiamin intake of 0.5 mg/4400 kJ has been recommended for adults and children of all ages. Measurement of blood levels, the excretion rate of the vitamin, the abnormal metabolic products resulting from a deficient state, or some other product dependent on the concentration of the vitamin in the body have been used to assess thiamin status. Clinical states that may be associated with a change in thiamin status include Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy, megablastic anemia, maple syrup urine disease, and beriberi. There is no evidence that oral contraceptives have an adverse effect on thiamin metabolism. There is an increased requirement for thiamin during pregnancy, which may result in a deficiency in the mother. Moreover, thiamin deficiency has been implicated as a factor in toxemia of pregnancy. The concentration of thiamin in human breast milk is related to maternal intake of the vitamin, and cow's milk contains considerably more thiamin than human milk.

  2. Current ADC Linker Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nareshkumar; Smith, Sean W; Ghone, Sanjeevani; Tomczuk, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    The list of ADCs in the clinic continues to grow, bolstered by the success of first two marketed ADCs: ADCETRIS® and Kadcyla®. Currently, there are 40 ADCs in various phases of clinical development. However, only 34 of these have published their structures. Of the 34 disclosed structures, 24 of them use a linkage to the thiol of cysteines on the monoclonal antibody. The remaining 10 candidates utilize chemistry to surface lysines of the antibody. Due to the inherent heterogeneity of conjugation to the multiple lysines or cysteines found in mAbs, significant research efforts are now being directed toward the production of discrete, homogeneous ADC products, via site-specific conjugation. These site-specific conjugations may involve genetic engineering of the mAb to introduce discrete, available cysteines or non-natural amino acids with an orthogonally-reactive functional group handle such as an aldehyde, ketone, azido, or alkynyl tag. These site-specific approaches not only increase the homogeneity of ADCs but also enable novel bio-orthogonal chemistries that utilize reactive moieties other than thiol or amine. This broadens the diversity of linkers that can be utilized which will lead to better linker design in future generations of ADCs.

  3. Complex Protostellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    Two decades ago, our understanding of the chemistry in protostars was simple-matter either fell into the central star or was trapped in planetary-scale objects. Some minor chemical changes might occur as the dust and gas fell inward, but such effects were overwhelmed by the much larger scale processes that occurred even in bodies as small as asteroids. The chemistry that did occur in the nebula was relatively easy to model because the fall from the cold molecular cloud into the growing star was a one-way trip down a well-known temperature-pressure gradient; the only free variable was time. However, just over 10 years ago it was suggested that some material could be processed in the inner nebula, flow outward, and become incorporated into comets (1, 2). This outward flow was confirmed when the Stardust mission returned crystalline mineral fragments (3) from Comet Wild 2 that must have been processed close to the Sun before they were incorporated into the comet. In this week's Science Express, Ciesla and Sandford (4) demonstrate that even the outermost regions of the solar nebula can be a chemically active environment. Their finding could have consequences for the rest of the nebula.

  4. Influencing College Chemistry Success through High School Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tai, Robert H.; Sadler, Philip M.; Loehr, John F.

    2006-01-01

    The connection between high school chemistry pedagogical experiences and introductory college chemistry performance has been a topic researched in published science education literature since the 1920s. However, analysis techniques have limited the generalizability of these results. This review discusses the findings of a large-scale,…

  5. An Exhibition on Everyday Chemistry. Communicating Chemistry to the Public.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucko, David A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses a recent addition to the Museum of Science and Industry (Chicago) known as "Everyday Chemistry." This permanent exhibit on modern chemistry incorporates demonstrations of chemical reactions in ways intended to enhance public understanding. Describes the six cases in the exhibit and the automated aspects of their demonstrations. (TW)

  6. Art in Chemistry: Chemistry in Art. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    This textbook integrates chemistry and art with hands-on activities and fascinating demonstrations that enable students to see and understand how the science of chemistry is involved in the creation of art. It investigates such topics as color integrated with electromagnetic radiation, atoms, and ions; paints integrated with classes of matter,…

  7. A New Chemistry Course for Non-Chemistry Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Magda; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A two-semester basic chemistry course for nonchemistry engineering majors is described. First semester provides introductory chemistry for freshmen while second semester is "customer-oriented," based on a departmental choice of three out of six independent modules. For example, aeronautical engineering "customers" would select kinetics, organic…

  8. A Quantum Chemistry Concept Inventory for Physical Chemistry Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Luxford, Cynthia J.; Windus, Theresa L.; Holme, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A 14-item, multiple-choice diagnostic assessment tool, the quantum chemistry concept inventory or QCCI, is presented. Items were developed based on published student misconceptions and content coverage and then piloted and used in advanced physical chemistry undergraduate courses. In addition to the instrument itself, data from both a pretest,…

  9. Introducing Chemistry Students to the "Real World" of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Michael E.; Cosser, Ronald C.; Davies-Coleman, Michael T.; Kaye, Perry T.; Klein, Rosalyn; Lamprecht, Emmanuel; Lobb, Kevin; Nyokong, Tebello; Sewry, Joyce D.; Tshentu, Zenixole R.; van der Zeyde, Tino; Watkins, Gareth M.

    2010-01-01

    A majority of chemistry graduates seek employment in a rapidly changing chemical industry. Our attempts to provide the graduates with skills in entrepreneurship and the ability to understand and communicate with their chemical engineering colleagues, in addition to their fundamental knowledge of chemistry, are described. This is done at…

  10. Protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Salaski, Edward J

    2002-05-01

    Specific mutations in the ras gene impair the guanosine triphophatase (GTPase) activity of Ras proteins, which play a fundamental role in the signaling cascade, leading to uninterrupted growth signals and to the transformation of normal cells into malignant phenotypes. It has been shown that normal cells transfected with mutant ras gene become cancerous and that unfarnesylated, cytosolic mutant Ras protein does not anchor onto cell membranes and cannot induce this transformation. Posttranslational modification and plasma membrane association of mutant Ras is necessary for this transforming activity. Since its identification, the enzyme protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) that catalyzes the first and essential step of the three Ras-processing steps has emerged as the most promising target for therapeutic intervention. FTase has been implicated as a potential target in inhibiting the prenylation of a variety of proteins, thus in controlling varied disease states (e.g. cancer, neurofibromatosis, restenosis, viral hepatitis, bone resorption, parasitic infections, corneal inflammations, and diabetes) associated with prenyl modifications of Ras and other proteins. Furthermore, it has been suggested that FTase inhibitors indirectly help in inhibiting tumors via suppression of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis. Major milestones have been achieved with small-molecule FTase inhibitors that show efficacy without toxicity in vitro, as well as in mouse models bearing ras-dependent tumors. With the determination of the crystal structure of mammalian FTase, existent leads have been fine-tuned and new potent molecules of diverse structural classes have been designed. A few of these molecules are currently in the clinic, with at least three drug candidates in Phase II studies and one in Phase III. This article will review the progress that has been reported with FTase inhibitors in drug discovery and in the clinic. PMID:12733981

  11. Green Chemistry Metrics with Special Reference to Green Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tobiszewski, Marek; Marć, Mariusz; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The concept of green chemistry is widely recognized in chemical laboratories. To properly measure an environmental impact of chemical processes, dedicated assessment tools are required. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge in the field of development of green chemistry and green analytical chemistry metrics. The diverse methods used for evaluation of the greenness of organic synthesis, such as eco-footprint, E-Factor, EATOS, and Eco-Scale are described. Both the well-established and recently developed green analytical chemistry metrics, including NEMI labeling and analytical Eco-scale, are presented. Additionally, this paper focuses on the possibility of the use of multivariate statistics in evaluation of environmental impact of analytical procedures. All the above metrics are compared and discussed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages. The current needs and future perspectives in green chemistry metrics are also discussed. PMID:26076112

  12. Green Chemistry Metrics with Special Reference to Green Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tobiszewski, Marek; Marć, Mariusz; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-06-12

    The concept of green chemistry is widely recognized in chemical laboratories. To properly measure an environmental impact of chemical processes, dedicated assessment tools are required. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge in the field of development of green chemistry and green analytical chemistry metrics. The diverse methods used for evaluation of the greenness of organic synthesis, such as eco-footprint, E-Factor, EATOS, and Eco-Scale are described. Both the well-established and recently developed green analytical chemistry metrics, including NEMI labeling and analytical Eco-scale, are presented. Additionally, this paper focuses on the possibility of the use of multivariate statistics in evaluation of environmental impact of analytical procedures. All the above metrics are compared and discussed in terms of their advantages and disadvantages. The current needs and future perspectives in green chemistry metrics are also discussed.

  13. Significant steps in the evolution of analytical chemistry--is the today's analytical chemistry only chemistry?

    PubMed

    Karayannis, Miltiades I; Efstathiou, Constantinos E

    2012-12-15

    In this review the history of chemistry and specifically the history and the significant steps of the evolution of analytical chemistry are presented. In chronological time spans, covering the ancient world, the middle ages, the period of the 19th century, and the three evolutional periods, from the verge of the 19th century to contemporary times, it is given information for the progress of chemistry and analytical chemistry. During this period, analytical chemistry moved gradually from its pure empirical nature to more rational scientific activities, transforming itself to an autonomous branch of chemistry and a separate discipline. It is also shown that analytical chemistry moved gradually from the status of exclusive serving the chemical science, towards serving, the environment, health, law, almost all areas of science and technology, and the overall society. Some recommendations are also directed to analytical chemistry educators concerning the indispensable nature of knowledge of classical analytical chemistry and the associated laboratory exercises and to analysts, in general, why it is important to use the chemical knowledge to make measurements on problems of everyday life.

  14. Chemistry laboratory safety manual available

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsbrock, R. G.

    1968-01-01

    Chemistry laboratory safety manual outlines safe practices for handling hazardous chemicals and chemistry laboratory equipment. Included are discussions of chemical hazards relating to fire, health, explosion, safety equipment and procedures for certain laboratory techniques and manipulations involving glassware, vacuum equipment, acids, bases, and volatile solvents.

  15. Organic Chemistry for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deBeer, W. H. J.

    In response to a serious shortage of chemists in South Africa, gifted secondary school students are enrolled in an enrichment program in organic chemistry and encouraged to consider chemistry or one of its related fields as a career. The introductory portion of the program involves approximately 90 hours over a 3-year period while the advanced…

  16. Chemical Principles Revisited: Petroleum Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Doris; Kolb, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an historical review of the role of petroleum in world history and information on the chemistry of petroleum. It is suggested that petroleum chemistry be discussed since within the next two decades oil and gas will provide the major portion of U.S. energy. (Author/SA)

  17. Creating a Context for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, A. Truman

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes the origin, development, content, pedagogy, evaluation, and influence of a textbook for non-science majors entitled "Chemistry in Context: Applying Chemistry to Society." Considers the text's potential implications for other disciplines and for the instruction of science majors. (Author/WRM)

  18. Contextualising Nanotechnology in Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Christine; Hayden, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    In recent years nanotechnology has become part of the content of many undergraduate chemistry and physics degree courses. This paper deals with the role of contextualisation of nanotechnology in the delivery of the content, as nanotechnology is only now being slowly integrated into many chemistry degree courses in Ireland and elsewhere. An…

  19. Crocodile Chemistry. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This high school chemistry resource is an on-screen chemistry lab. In the program, students can experiment with a huge range of chemicals, choosing the form, quantity and concentrations. Dangerous or difficult experiments can be investigated safely and easily. A vast range of equipment can be set up, and complex simulations can be put together and…

  20. A Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Carrie A.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    A Chemistry Concept Reasoning Test was created and validated providing an easy-to-use tool for measuring conceptual understanding and critical scientific thinking of general chemistry models and theories. The test is designed to measure concept understanding comparable to that found in free-response questions requiring explanations over…

  1. News from Online: Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uffelman, Erich S.

    2004-01-01

    Green chemistry closely relates to energy and environmental problems, and includes the promotion of environmental friendly products and systems within the framework of renewable resources. Various websites on green chemistry are reviewed, one of which lists the 12 commandments of this particular subject.

  2. Plasma chemistry and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozumi, K.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between discharge phenomena and plasma chemistry, as well as the equipment and mechanisms of plasma chemical reactions are described. Various areas in which plasma chemistry is applied are surveyed, such as: manufacturing of semiconductor integrated circuits; synthetic fibers; high polymer materials for medical uses; optical lenses; and membrane filters (reverse penetration films).

  3. The Great Ideas of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a list of six concepts that form the basis of modern chemistry and that should be included in introductory chemistry courses. Discusses atoms, molecules, and ions; the chemical bond; molecular shape and geometry; kinetic theory; the chemical reaction; and energy and entropy. (JRH)

  4. Fundamentals of Aqueous Microwave Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first chemical revolution changed modern life with a host of excellent amenities and services, but created serious problems related to environmental pollution. After 150 years of current chemistry principles and practices, we need a radical change to a new type of chemistry k...

  5. Remedial Mathematics for Quantum Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopman, Lodewijk; Brouwer, Natasa; Heck, Andre; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2008-01-01

    Proper mathematical skills are important for every science course and mathematics-intensive chemistry courses rely on a sound mathematical pre-knowledge. In the first-year quantum chemistry course at this university, it was noticed that many students lack basic mathematical knowledge. To tackle the mathematics problem, a remedial mathematics…

  6. Rethinking Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    A summary of fundamental changes made to the undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in the Chemistry Department at Gustavus Adolphus College (beginning in the 2013-2014 academic year) is presented. The yearlong sequence now consists of an introductory semester covering both quantum mechanics and thermodynamics/kinetics, followed by a second…

  7. [Photonic crystals for analytical chemistry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Li, Jincheng

    2009-09-01

    Photonic crystals, originally created to control the transmission of light, have found their increasing value in the field of analytical chemistry and are probable to become a hot research area soon. This review is hence composed, focusing on their analytical chemistry-oriented applications, including especially their use in chromatography, capillary- and chip-based electrophoresis.

  8. Stereochemical Control in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Rhys; Northcote, Peter T.; Harvey, Joanne E.; Dangerfield, Emma M.; Stocker, Bridget L.

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in the form of glycoconjugates, have recently been shown to control a wide range of cellular processes. Accordingly, students interested in the study of organic chemistry and biomedical sciences should be exposed to carbohydrate chemistry. To this end, we have developed a sequence of experiments that leads the student from the…

  9. Introducing Relativity into Quantum Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wai-Kee; Blinder, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    It is not often realized by chemists that the special theory of relativity is behind several aspects of quantum chemistry. The Schrdinger equation itself is based on relations between space-time and energy-momentum four vectors. Electron spin is, of course, the most obvious manifestation of relativity. The chemistry of some heavy elements is…

  10. Chemistry Teachers' Views of Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkanat, Çigdem; Gökdere, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine chemistry teachers' views of creativity. In this study, phenomenology method, one of the qualitative research patterns, was used. The participants of this study were 13 chemistry teachers working in Amasya. A semi-structured interview form was used for data collection. By using NVivo 9 qualitative…

  11. Local Evaluation of Chemistry Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Joseph R.; Hansen, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the evaluation of local usage statistics of a specific set of chemistry journals at the University of Denver in Colorado, USA. The objective of the study is to demonstrate that commercial publishers in chemistry charge considerably more for their journals than those from the non-commercial sector. There are three variables…

  12. Computational Tools To Model Halogen Bonds in Medicinal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ford, Melissa Coates; Ho, P Shing

    2016-03-10

    The use of halogens in therapeutics dates back to the earliest days of medicine when seaweed was used as a source of iodine to treat goiters. The incorporation of halogens to improve the potency of drugs is now fairly standard in medicinal chemistry. In the past decade, halogens have been recognized as direct participants in defining the affinity of inhibitors through a noncovalent interaction called the halogen bond or X-bond. Incorporating X-bonding into structure-based drug design requires computational models for the anisotropic distribution of charge and the nonspherical shape of halogens, which lead to their highly directional geometries and stabilizing energies. We review here current successes and challenges in developing computational methods to introduce X-bonding into lead compound discovery and optimization during drug development. This fast-growing field will push further development of more accurate and efficient computational tools to accelerate the exploitation of halogens in medicinal chemistry.

  13. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  14. Nanoplasmonics tuned "click chemistry".

    PubMed

    Tijunelyte, I; Guenin, E; Lidgi-Guigui, N; Colas, F; Ibrahim, J; Toury, T; Lamy de la Chapelle, M

    2016-04-01

    Nanoplasmonics is a growing field of optical condensed matter science dedicated to optical phenomena at the nanoscale level in metal systems. Extensive research on noble metallic nanoparticles (NPs) has emerged within the last two decades due to their ability to keep the optical energy concentrated in the vicinity of NPs, in particular, the ability to create optical near-field enhancement followed by heat generation. We have exploited these properties in order to induce a localised "click" reaction in the vicinity of gold nanostructures under unfavourable experimental conditions. We demonstrate that this reaction can be controlled by the plasmonic properties of the nanostructures and we propose two physical mechanisms to interpret the observed plasmonic tuning of the "click" chemistry.

  15. Prebiotic phosphorus chemistry reconsidered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, A. W.; Orgel, L. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The available evidence indicates that the origin of life on Earth certainly occurred earlier than 3.5 billion years ago and perhaps substantially earlier. The time available for the chemical evolution which must have preceded this event is more difficult to estimate. Both endogenic and exogenic contributions to chemical evolution have been considered; i.e., from chemical reactions in a primitive atmosphere, or by introduction in the interiors of comets and/or meteorites. It is argued, however, that the phosphorus chemistry of Earth's earliest hydrosphere, whether primarily exogenic or endogenic in origin, was most likely dominated by compounds less oxidized than phosphoric acid and its esters. A scenario is presented for the early production of a suite of reactive phosphonic acid derivatives, the properties of which may have foreshadowed the later appearance of biophosphates.

  16. Advances in analytical chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendale, W. F.; Congo, Richard T.; Nielsen, Bruce J.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of computer programs based on multivariate statistical algorithms makes possible obtaining reliable information from long data vectors that contain large amounts of extraneous information, for example, noise and/or analytes that we do not wish to control. Three examples are described. Each of these applications requires the use of techniques characteristic of modern analytical chemistry. The first example, using a quantitative or analytical model, describes the determination of the acid dissociation constant for 2,2'-pyridyl thiophene using archived data. The second example describes an investigation to determine the active biocidal species of iodine in aqueous solutions. The third example is taken from a research program directed toward advanced fiber-optic chemical sensors. The second and third examples require heuristic or empirical models.

  17. Atmospheric Pseudohalogen Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, David John

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide is not usually considered in atmospheric chemical models. The paper presents three reasons why hydrogen cyanide is likely to be significant for atmospheric chemistry. Firstly, HCN is a product and marker of biomass burning. Secondly, it is also likely that lightning is producing HCN, and as HCN is sparingly soluble it could be a useful long-lived "smoking gun" marker of lightning activity. Thirdly, the chemical decomposition of HCN leads to the production of small amounts of the cyanide (CN) and NCO radicals. The NCO radical can be photolyzed in the visible portion of the spectrum yielding nitrogen atoms (N). The production of nitrogen atoms is significant as it leads to the titration of total nitrogen from the atmosphere via N+N->N2, where N2 is molecular nitrogen.

  18. Automation in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Reader, John C

    2004-01-01

    The implementation of appropriate automation can make a significant improvement in productivity at each stage of the drug discovery process, if it is incorporated into an efficient overall process. Automated chemistry has evolved rapidly from the 'combinatorial' techniques implemented in many industrial laboratories in the early 1990's which focused primarily on the hit discovery phase, and were highly dependent on solid-phase techniques and instrumentation derived from peptide synthesis. Automated tools and strategies have been developed which can impact the hit discovery, hit expansion and lead optimization phases, not only in synthesis, but also in reaction optimization, work-up, and purification of compounds. This article discusses the implementation of some of these techniques, based especially on experiences at Millennium Pharmaceuticals Research and Development Ltd.

  19. Chemistry of Aviation Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knepper, Bryan; Hwang, Soon Muk; DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    2004-01-01

    Minimum ignition energies of various methanol/air mixtures were measured in a temperature controlled constant volume combustion vessel using a spark ignition method with a spark gap distance of 2 mm. The minimum ignition energies decrease rapidly as the mixture composition (equivalence ratio, Phi) changes from lean to stoichiometric, reach a minimum value, and then increase rather slowly with Phi. The minimum of the minimum ignition energy (MIE) and the corresponding mixture composition were determined to be 0.137 mJ and Phi = 1.16, a slightly rich mixture. The variation of minimum ignition energy with respect to the mixture composition is explained in terms of changes in reaction chemistry.

  20. Agricultural chemistry and bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Orts, William J; Holtman, Kevin M; Seiber, James N

    2008-06-11

    Renewed interest in converting biomass to biofuels such as ethanol, other forms of bioenergy, and bioenergy byproducts or coproducts of commercial value opens opportunities for chemists, including agricultural chemists and related disciplines. Applications include feedstock characterization and quantification of structural changes resulting from genetic modification and of the intermediates formed during enzymatic and chemical processing; development of improved processes for utilizing chemical coproducts such as lactic acid and glycerol; development of alternative biofuels such as methanol, butanol, and hydrogen; and ways to reduce greenhouse gas emission and/or use carbon dioxide beneficially. Chemists will also be heavily involved in detailing the phytochemical composition of alternative energy crops and genetically improved crops. A resurgence of demand for agricultural chemistry and related disciplines argues for increasing output through targeted programs and on-the-job training. PMID:18473470

  1. Prebiotic chemistry in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Marshall, John; Shen, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The chemical evolution hypothesis of Woese (1979), according to which prebiotic reactions occurred rapidly in droplets in giant atmospheric reflux columns was criticized by Scherer (1985). This paper proposes a mechanism for prebiotic chemistry in clouds that answers Scherer's concerns and supports Woese's hypothesis. According to this mechanism, rapid prebiotic chemical evolution was facilitated on the primordial earth by cycles of condensation and evaporation of cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and nonvolatile monomers. For example, amino acids supplied by, or synthesized during entry of meteorites, comets, and interplanetary dust, would have been scavenged by cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and would be polymerized within cloud systems during cycles of condensation, freezing, melting, and evaporation of cloud drops.

  2. Complex Autocatalysis in Simple Chemistries.

    PubMed

    Virgo, Nathaniel; Ikegami, Takashi; McGregor, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Life on Earth must originally have arisen from abiotic chemistry. Since the details of this chemistry are unknown, we wish to understand, in general, which types of chemistry can lead to complex, lifelike behavior. Here we show that even very simple chemistries in the thermodynamically reversible regime can self-organize to form complex autocatalytic cycles, with the catalytic effects emerging from the network structure. We demonstrate this with a very simple but thermodynamically reasonable artificial chemistry model. By suppressing the direct reaction from reactants to products, we obtain the simplest kind of autocatalytic cycle, resulting in exponential growth. When these simple first-order cycles are prevented from forming, the system achieves superexponential growth through more complex, higher-order autocatalytic cycles. This leads to nonlinear phenomena such as oscillations and bistability, the latter of which is of particular interest regarding the origins of life.

  3. Synthesis of Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tao; Hui, Chunngai

    2015-07-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting Lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery.

  4. High performance oilfield scale inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Duccini, Y.; Dufour, A.; Hann, W.M.; Sanders, T.W.; Weinstein, B.

    1997-08-01

    Sea water often reacts with the formation water in offshore fields to produce barium, calcium and strontium sulfate deposits that hinder oil production. Newer fields often have more difficult to control scale problems than older ones, and current technology scale inhibitors are not able to control the deposits as well as needed. In addition, ever more stringent regulations designed to minimize the impact of inhibitors on the environment are being enacted. Three new inhibitors are presented that overcome many of the problems of older technology scale inhibitors.

  5. Chemistry of Art and Color Sudoku Puzzles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle format was used to teach light science and chemistry terms to students of Chemistry of Art and Color. The puzzles were used to motivate and encourage students to learn chemistry in an easier and in friendly fashion.

  6. Discovery of potent, selective and orally bioavailable imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine derived ACK1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Meizhong; Wang, Jing; Kleinberg, Andrew; Kadalbajoo, Mridula; Siu, Kam W; Cooke, Andrew; Bittner, Mark A; Yao, Yan; Thelemann, April; Ji, Qunsheng; Bhagwat, Shripad; Mulvihill, Kristen M; Rechka, Josef A; Pachter, Jonathan A; Crew, Andrew P; Epstein, David; Mulvihill, Mark J

    2013-02-15

    This Letter describes the medicinal chemistry effort towards a series of novel imidazo[1,5-a]pyrazine derived inhibitors of ACK1. Virtual screening led to the discovery of the initial hit, and subsequent exploration of structure-activity relationships and optimization of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic properties led to the identification of potent, selective and orally bioavailable ACK1 inhibitors. PMID:23317569

  7. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jayhyuk; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has emerged as a central player in the regulation of several diverse cellular processes. Here, we describe the important components of this complex biochemical machinery as well as several important cellular substrates targeted by this pathway and examples of human diseases resulting from defects in various components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, this review covers the chemistry of synthetic and natural proteasome inhibitors, emphasizing their mode of actions toward the 20S proteasome. Given the importance of proteasome-mediated protein degradation in various intracellular processes, inhibitors of this pathway will continue to serve as both molecular probes of major cellular networks as well as potential therapeutic agents for various human diseases. PMID:11410931

  8. Magnus scale inhibitor squeeze treatments - a case history

    SciTech Connect

    Ravenscroft, P.D.; Cowie, L.G.; Smith, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Magnus oilfield lies approximately 160 km NE of the Shetland Islands in the UK sector of North Sea. Areal sweep and pressure support is achieved via sea water injection into the reservoir. Due to the layered nature of the reservoir, formation water and sea water are often co-produced and are commingled in the production wellbore. This has often resulted in downhole deposition of barium sulphate scale and an appreciable reduction in well productivity. A combination of scale inhibitor chemistry and its deployment into the reservoir using novel diverting agents has significantly reduced the problems and are described in detail in this paper.

  9. Osteocompatibility of Biofilm Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  10. Osteocompatibility of biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Monica; Haggard, Warren; Jennings, Jessica A

    2014-01-01

    The demand for infection prevention therapies has led to the discovery of several biofilm inhibitors. These inhibiting signals are released by bacteria, fungi, or marine organisms to signal biofilm dispersal or disruption in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to test the biocompatibility of five different naturally-produced biofilm chemical dispersal and inhibition signals with osteoblast-like cells: D-amino acids (D-AA), lysostaphin (LS), farnesol, cis-2-decenoic acid (C2DA), and desformyl flustrabromine (dFBr). In this preliminary study, compatibility of these anti-biofilm agents with differentiating osteoblasts was examined over a 21 days period at levels above and below concentrations active against bacterial biofilm. Anti-biofilm compounds listed above were serially diluted in osteogenic media and added to cultures of MC3T3 cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity, after exposure to each anti-biofilm agent, were measured using a DNA assay. Differentiation characteristics of osteoblasts were determined qualitatively by observing staining of mineral deposits and quantitatively with an alkaline phosphatase assay. D-AA, LS, and C2DA were all biocompatible within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration ranges and supported osteoblast differentiation. Farnesol and dFBr induced cytotoxic responses within the reported biofilm inhibitory concentration range and low doses of dFBr were found to inhibit osteoblast differentiation. At high concentrations, such as those that may be present after local delivery, many of these biofilm inhibitors can have effects on cellular viability and osteoblast function. Concentrations at which negative effects on osteoblasts occur should serve as upper limits for delivery to orthopaedic trauma sites and guide development of these potential therapeutics for orthopaedics. PMID:25505496

  11. Zinc oxide nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhobale, Sandip; Thite, Trupti; Laware, S. L.; Rode, C. V.; Koppikar, Soumya J.; Ghanekar, Ruchika-Kaul; Kale, S. N.

    2008-11-01

    Amylase inhibitors, also known as starch blockers, contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body via inhibiting breakdown of complex sugars to simpler ones. In this sense, these materials are projected as having potential applications in diabetes control. In this context, we report on zinc oxide nanoparticles as possible alpha-amylase inhibitors. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized using soft-chemistry approach and 1-thioglycerol was used as a surfactant to yield polycrystalline nanoparticles of size ˜18 nm, stabilized in wurtzite structure. Conjugation study and structural characterization have been done using x-ray diffraction technique, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity studies on human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) and skin carcinoma (A-431) cell lines as well as mouse primary fibroblast cells demonstrate that up to a dose of 20 μg/ml, ZnO nanoparticles are nontoxic to the cells. We report for the first time the alpha-amylase inhibitory activity of ZnO nanoparticles wherein an optimum dose of 20 μg/ml was sufficient to exhibit 49% glucose inhibition at neutral pH and 35 °C temperature. This inhibitory activity was similar to that obtained with acarbose (a standard alpha-amylase inhibitor), thereby projecting ZnO nanoparticles as novel alpha-amylase inhibitors.

  12. Biological abatement of cellulase inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-abatement uses a fungus to metabolize and remove fermentation inhibitors. To determine whether bio-abatement could alleviate enzyme inhibitor effects observed in biomass liquors after pretreatment, corn stover at 10% (w/v) solids was pretreated with either dilute acid or liquid hot water. The ...

  13. Anthranilamide inhibitors of factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Mendel, David; Marquart, Angela L; Joseph, Sajan; Waid, Philip; Yee, Ying K; Tebbe, Anne Louise; Ratz, Andrew M; Herron, David K; Goodson, Theodore; Masters, John J; Franciskovich, Jeffry B; Tinsley, Jennifer M; Wiley, Michael R; Weir, Leonard C; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Klimkowski, Valentine J; Smith, Gerald F; Towner, Richard D; Froelich, Larry L; Buben, John; Craft, Trelia J

    2007-09-01

    SAR about the B-ring of a series of N(2)-aroyl anthranilamide factor Xa (fXa) inhibitors is described. B-ring o-aminoalkylether and B-ring p-amine probes of the S1' and S4 sites, respectively, afforded picomolar fXa inhibitors that performed well in in vitro anticoagulation assays.

  14. Prebiotic chemistry in clouds.

    PubMed

    Oberbeck, V R; Marshall, J; Shen, T

    1991-01-01

    In the traditional concept for the origin of life as proposed by Oparin and Haldane in the 1920s, prebiotic reactants became slowly concentrated in the primordial oceans and life evolved slowly from a series of highly protracted chemical reactions during the first billion years of Earth's history. However, chemical evolution may not have occurred continuously because planetesimals and asteroids impacted the Earth many times during the first billion years, may have sterilized the Earth, and required the process to start over. A rapid process of chemical evolution may have been required in order that life appeared at or before 3.5 billion years ago. Thus, a setting favoring rapid chemical evolution may be required. A chemical evolution hypothesis set forth by Woese in 1979 accomplished prebiotic reactions rapidly in droplets in giant atmospheric reflux columns. However, in 1985 Scherer raised a number of objections to Woese's hypothesis and concluded that it was not valid. We propose a mechanism for prebiotic chemistry in clouds that satisfies Scherer's concerns regarding the Woese hypothesis and includes advantageous droplet chemistry. Prebiotic reactants were supplied to the atmosphere by comets, meteorites, and interplanetary dust or synthesized in the atmosphere from simple compounds using energy sources such as ultraviolet light, corona discharge, or lightning. These prebiotic monomers would have first encountered moisture in cloud drops and precipitation. We propose that rapid prebiotic chemical evolution was facilitated on the primordial Earth by cycles of condensation and evaporation of cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei and nonvolatile monomers. For example, amino acids supplied by , or synthesized during entry of, meteorites, comets, and interplanetary dust would have been scavenged by cloud drops containing clay condensation nuclei. Polymerization would have occurred within cloud systems during cycles of condensation, freezing, melting, and

  15. Incorporation of Medicinal Chemistry into the Organic Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Application of concepts presented in organic chemistry lecture using a virtual project involving the sythesis of medicinally important compounds is emphasized. The importance of reinforcing the concepts from lecture in lab, thus providing a powerful instructional means is discussed.

  16. Resident training in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Genzen, Jonathan R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2007-06-01

    Practicing clinical chemists responded to an anonymous, open-ended questionnaire designed to define the state of clinical chemistry education in pathology training programs in the United States. Survey respondents identified many ideas for educational improvements and offered criticism regarding aspects of clinical chemistry education that are not working particularly well. Many of these findings are generalizable to other subspecialties of clinical pathology. It is hoped that this analysis will allow readers to compare their programs with national trends and identify new ways of improving clinical chemistry training at their institutions. PMID:17556088

  17. Resident training in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Genzen, Jonathan R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2007-06-01

    Practicing clinical chemists responded to an anonymous, open-ended questionnaire designed to define the state of clinical chemistry education in pathology training programs in the United States. Survey respondents identified many ideas for educational improvements and offered criticism regarding aspects of clinical chemistry education that are not working particularly well. Many of these findings are generalizable to other subspecialties of clinical pathology. It is hoped that this analysis will allow readers to compare their programs with national trends and identify new ways of improving clinical chemistry training at their institutions.

  18. Proteinaceous alpha-amylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Birte; Fukuda, Kenji; Nielsen, Peter K; Bønsager, Birgit C

    2004-02-12

    Proteins that inhibit alpha-amylases have been isolated from plants and microorganisms. These inhibitors can have natural roles in the control of endogenous alpha-amylase activity or in defence against pathogens and pests; certain inhibitors are reported to be antinutritional factors. The alpha-amylase inhibitors belong to seven different protein structural families, most of which also contain evolutionary related proteins without inhibitory activity. Two families include bifunctional inhibitors acting both on alpha-amylases and proteases. High-resolution structures are available of target alpha-amylases in complex with inhibitors from five families. These structures indicate major diversity but also some similarity in the structural basis of alpha-amylase inhibition. Mutational analysis of the mechanism of inhibition was performed in a few cases and various protein engineering and biotechnological approaches have been outlined for exploitation of the inhibitory function. PMID:14871655

  19. Authentic HIV-1 integrase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenzhong; Marchand, Christophe; Burke, Terrence R; Pommier, Yves; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is indispensable for HIV-1 replication and has become a validated target for developing anti-AIDS agents. In two decades of development of IN inhibition-based anti-HIV therapeutics, a significant number of compounds were identified as IN inhibitors, but only some of them showed antiviral activity. This article reviews a number of patented HIV-1 IN inhibitors, especially those that possess high selectivity for the strand transfer reaction. These compounds generally have a polar coplanar moiety, which is assumed to chelate two magnesium ions in the binding site. Resistance to those compounds, when given to patients, can develop as a result of IN mutations. We refer to those compounds as authentic IN inhibitors. Continued drug development has so far delivered one authentic IN inhibitor to the market (raltegravir in 2007). Current and future attention will be focused on the development of novel authentic IN inhibitors with the goal of overcoming viral resistance. PMID:21426159

  20. Identification of quinazolinyloxy biaryl urea as a new class of SUMO activating enzyme 1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Ito, Akihiro; Hirohama, Mikako; Yoshida, Minoru; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2013-09-15

    SUMO activating enzyme 1 (SUMO E1) is the first enzyme in sumoylation pathway and an important cancer drug target. However, only a few inhibitors were reported up to now that includes three natural products, semi-synthetic protein inhibitors and one AMP mimic. Here, we report the identification of quinazolinyloxy biaryl urea as a new class of SUMO E1 inhibitors. The most active compound of this class inhibited the in vitro sumoylation with an IC50 of 13.4 μM. This compound inhibits sumoylation by blocking the formation of SUMOE1-SUMO thioester intermediate. The biological activity of the most active compound is comparable to previously reported inhibitors with properties suitable for medicinal chemistry optimization for potency and druggability.

  1. Discovery of a Potent Class I Protein Arginine Methyltransferase Fragment Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Ferreira de Freitas, Renato; Eram, Mohammad S; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Steuber, Holger; Smil, David; Wu, Hong; Li, Fengling; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dong, Aiping; Brown, Peter J; Hitchcock, Marion; Moosmayer, Dieter; Stegmann, Christian M; Egner, Ursula; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-02-11

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) are a promising target class in oncology and other disease areas. They are composed of SET domain methyltransferases and structurally unrelated Rossman-fold enzymes that include protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). In the absence of a well-defined medicinal chemistry tool-kit focused on PMTs, most current inhibitors were identified by screening large and diverse libraries of leadlike molecules. So far, no successful fragment-based approach was reported against this target class. Here, by deconstructing potent PRMT inhibitors, we find that chemical moieties occupying the substrate arginine-binding site can act as efficient fragment inhibitors. Screening a fragment library against PRMT6 produced numerous hits, including a 300 nM inhibitor (ligand efficiency of 0.56) that decreased global histone 3 arginine 2 methylation in cells, and can serve as a warhead for the development of PRMT chemical probes.

  2. Cometary MHD and chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegmann, R.; Schmidt, H. U.; Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.

    1987-01-01

    An MHD and chemical comet-coma model was developed, applying the computer program of Huebner (1985) for the detailed chemical evolution of a spherically expanding coma and the program of Schmidt and Wegman (1982) and Wegman (1987) for the MHD flow of plasma and magnetic field in a comet to the Giotto-mission data on the ion abundances measured by the HIS ion mass spectrometer. The physics and chemistry of the coma are modeled in great detail, including photoprocesses, gas-phase chemical kinetics, energy balance with a separate electron temperature, multifluid hydrodynamics with a transition to free molecular flow, fast-streaming atomic and molecular hydrogen, counter and cross streaming of the ionized species relative to the neutral species in the coma-solar wind interaction region with momentum exchange by elastic collisions, mass-loading through ion pick-up, and Lorentz forces of the advected magnetic field. The results, both inside and outside of the contact surface, are discussed and compared with the relevant HIS ion mass spectra.

  3. Chemistry of ferroelectric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Garrity, K; Kolpak, A M; Ismail-Beigi, S; Altman, E I

    2010-07-20

    It has been recognized since the 1950s that the polar and switchable nature of ferroelectric surfaces can potentially lead to polarization direction-dependent surface chemistry. Recent theoretical studies and advances in growing high quality epitaxial ferroelectric thin films have motivated a flurry of experimental studies aimed at creating surfaces with switchable adsorption and catalytic properties, as well as films whose polarization direction switches depending on the gas phase environment. This research news article briefly reviews the key findings of these studies. These include observations that the adsorption strengths, and in certain cases the activation energies for reactions, of polar molecules on the surfaces of ferroelectric materials are sensitive to the polarization direction. For bare ferroelectric surfaces, the magnitudes of these differences are not large, but are still comparable to the energy barrier required to switch the polarization of approximately 10 nm thick films. Highlights of a recent study where chemical switching of a thin film ferroelectric was demonstrated are presented. Attempts to use the ferroelectric polarization to influence the behavior of supported catalytic metals will also be described. It will be shown that the tendency of the metals to cluster into particles makes it difficult to alter the chemical properties of the metal surface, since it is separated from the ferroelectric by several layers of metal atoms. An alternate approach to increasing the reactivity of ferroelectric surfaces is suggested that involves modifying the surface with atoms that bind strongly to the surface and thus remain atomically dispersed.

  4. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.

    1993-08-01

    This is the annual progress report for the Indiana University nuclear chemistry program for the 1992/1993 year. Accomplishments include the construction, testing, and initial experimental runs of the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4{pi} charged particle detector. ISiS is designed to study energy dissipation and multifragmentation phenomena in light-ion-induced nuclear reactions at medium-to-high energies. Its second test run was to examine 3.6 GeV {sup 3}He beam reactions at Laboratoire National Saturne (LNS) in Saclay. The development and deployment of this system has occupied a great deal of the groups effort this reporting period. Additional work includes: calculations of isotopic IMF yields in the {sup 4}He + {sup 116,124}Sn reaction; cross sections for A = 6 - 30 fragments from the {sup 4}He + {sup 28}Si reaction at 117 and 198 MeV; charging effects of passivated silicon detectors; neck emission of intermediate-mass fragments in the fission of hot heavy nuclei.

  5. Organic chemistry on Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of nonequilibrium phenomena on the Saturn satellite Titan indicate the occurrence of organic chemical evolution. Greenhouse and thermal inversion models of Titan's atmosphere provide environmental constraints within which various pathways for organic chemical synthesis are assessed. Experimental results and theoretical modeling studies suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite may be dominated by two atmospheric processes: energetic-particle bombardment and photochemistry. Reactions initiated in various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic ray, Saturn wind, and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4 - N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the C2-hydrocarbons, the UV-visible-absorbing stratospheric haze, and the reddish color of the satellite. Photochemical reactions of CH4 can also account for the presence of C2-hydrocarbons. In the lower Titan atmosphere, photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. Hot H-atom reactions initiated by photo-dissociation of NH3 can couple the chemical reactions of NH3 and CH4 and produce organic matter.

  6. Marine fragrance chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hügel, Helmut M; Drevermann, Britta; Lingham, Anthony R; Marriott, Philip J

    2008-06-01

    The main marine message in perfumery is projected by Calone 1951 (7-methyl-2H-1,5-benzodioxepin-3(4H)-one). Kraft (Givaudan) and Gaudin (Firmenich) further maximized the marine fragrance molecular membership by extending the carbon chain of the 7-Me group. Our research targeted the polar group of the benzodioxepinone parent compound to investigate how this region of molecular makeup resonates with the dominant marine fragrance of the Calone 1951 structure. The olfactory evaluation of analogues prepared by chemical modification or removal of the CO group resulted in the introduction of aldehydic, sweet and floral-fruity notes with a diluted/diminished potency of the marine odor. To further analyze the olfactory properties of benzodioxepinones containing a diverse range of aromatic ring substituents, a novel synthesis route was developed. We found that a 7-alkyl group in Calone 1951 was essential for the maintenance of the significant marine odor characteristic, and our studies support the concept that the odorant structure occupying the hydrophobic binding pocket adjacent to the aromatic ring-binding site of the olfactory receptor is pivotal in the design and discovery of more potent and characteristic marine fragrances. How the structure of benzodioxepinones connects to marine sea-breeze fragrances is our continuing challenging research focus at the chemistry-biology interface.

  7. Chemistry in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Loos, Pierre-François; Ball, Caleb J; Gill, Peter M W

    2015-02-01

    We report benchmark results for one-dimensional (1D) atomic and molecular systems interacting via the Coulomb operator |x|(-1). Using various wavefunction-type approaches, such as Hartree-Fock theory, second- and third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and explicitly correlated calculations, we study the ground state of atoms with up to ten electrons as well as small diatomic and triatomic molecules containing up to two electrons. A detailed analysis of the 1D helium-like ions is given and the expression of the high-density correlation energy is reported. We report the total energies, ionization energies, electron affinities and other physical properties of the many-electron 1D atoms and, using these results, we construct the 1D analog of Mendeleev's periodic table. We find that the 1D periodic table contains only two groups: the alkali metals and the noble gases. We also calculate the dissociation curves of several 1D diatomics and study the chemical bond in H2(+), HeH(2+), He2(3+), H2, HeH(+) and He2(2+). We find that, unlike their 3D counterparts, 1D molecules are primarily bound by one-electron bonds. Finally, we study the chemistry of H3(+) and we discuss the stability of the 1D polymer resulting from an infinite chain of hydrogen atoms. PMID:25518906

  8. Mars aqueous chemistry experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Benton C.; Mason, Larry W.

    1994-01-01

    Mars Aqueous Chemistry Experiment (MACE) is designed to conduct a variety of measurements on regolith samples, encompassing mineral phase analyses, chemical interactions with H2O, and physical properties determinations. From these data, much can be learned or inferred regarding the past weathering environment, the contemporaneous soil micro-environments, and the general chemical and physical state of the Martian regolith. By analyzing both soil and duricrust samples, the nature of the latter may become more apparent. Sites may be characterized for comparative purposes and criteria could be set for selection of high priority materials on future sample return missions. The second year of the MACE project has shown significant progress in two major areas. MACE Instrument concept definition is a baseline design that has been generated for the complete MACE instrument, including definition of analysis modes, mass estimates and thermal model. The design includes multiple reagent reservoirs, 10 discrete analysis cells, sample manipulation capability, and thermal control. The MACE Measurement subsystems development progress is reported regarding measurement capabilities for aqueous ion sensing, evolved gas sensing, solution conductivity measurement, reagent addition (titration) capabilities, and optical sensing of suspended particles.

  9. Computational Chemistry and Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Members of NASA Lewis Research Center's Tribology and Surface Science Branch are applying high-level computational chemistry techniques to the development of new lubrication systems for space applications and for future advanced aircraft engines. The next generation of gas turbine engines will require a liquid lubricant to function at temperatures in excess of 350 C in oxidizing environments. Conventional hydrocarbon-based lubricants are incapable of operating in these extreme environments, but a class of compounds known as the perfluoropolyether (PFAE) liquids (see the preceding illustration) shows promise for such applications. These commercially available products are already being used as lubricants in conditions where low vapor pressure and chemical stability are crucial, such as in satellite bearings and composite disk platters. At higher temperatures, however, these compounds undergo a decomposition process that is assisted (catalyzed) by metal and metal oxide bearing surfaces. This decomposition process severely limits the applicability of PFAE's at higher temperatures. A great deal of laboratory experimentation has revealed that the extent of fluid degradation depends on the chemical properties of the bearing surface materials. Lubrication engineers would like to understand the chemical breakdown mechanism to design a less vulnerable PFAE or to develop a chemical additive to block this degradation.

  10. Elimination chemistry in asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, J.L.; Ihsiung Wang; Martinez, D.F. )

    1990-07-01

    Elimination chemistry provides important information, not only about the chemical properties of asphalt, but also the chemical modification method of asphalt. The chemical reactions which use the natural abundance of radicals are important for free-radical halogenation reaction. Spectral data demonstrates the formation of halogenated asphalt. The utility of dehydrohalogenation modified asphalt is limited. However, the resulting dehydrohalogenation modified asphalt does produce a significant unsaturated intermediate, which can incorporate elastomeric polymers (and monomers) via condensation or addition process. The second chemical modification method is the Hofmann elimination reaction, which was performed by reaction of methyl iodide with asphalt, followed by treatment of base. Spectroscopic data shows that a methyl group attached to nitrogen or sulfur in asphalt after Hofmann elimination reaction. Physical data shows that the Hofmann elimination modification improved the quality of asphalt, such as low temperature susceptibility measured by PVN. The modified asphalt also studied by HP-GPC in order to correlate their physical properties. The result shows that the molecular size distribution has changed and reduced the amount of LMS. The amount of decreasing LMS is also dependent on the content of nitrogen and sulfur in asphalts.

  11. The Dawn of Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Daniele; Palla, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Within the precise cosmological framework provided by the Λ-cold dark matter model and standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, the chemical evolution of the pregalactic gas can now be followed with accuracy limited only by the uncertainties on the reaction rates. Starting during the recombination era, the formation of the first molecules and molecular ions containing hydrogen, deuterium, helium, and lithium was severely hindered by the low density of the expanding Universe, the intensity of the cosmic radiation field, and the absence of solid catalyzers. Molecular hydrogen and deuterated hydrogen, the most abundant species formed in the gas phase prior to structure formation, played a fundamental role in the cooling of the gas clouds that gave birth to the first stellar generation, contributing to determine the scale of fragmentation. Primordial molecules also interacted with the photons of the cosmic background via resonant scattering, absorption, and emission. In this review, we examine the current status of the chemistry of the early Universe and discuss the most relevant reactions for which uncertainties still exist from theory or laboratory experiments. The prospects for detecting spectral distortions or spatial anisotropies due to the first atoms and molecules are also addressed.

  12. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  13. Chemistry behind Vegetarianism.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo

    2011-02-01

    This review summarizes the effect of a habitual vegetarian diet on clinical complications in relation to chemistry and biochemistry. Omnivores have a significantly higher cluster of cardiovascular risk factors compared with vegetarians, including increased body mass index, waist to hip ratio, blood pressure, plasma total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol and LDL-C levels, serum lipoprotein(a) concentration, plasma factor VII activity, ratios of TC/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C and TAG/HDL-C, and serum ferritin levels. Compared with omnivores, vegetarians, especially vegans, have lower serum vitamin B₁₂ concentration and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels in the tissue membrane phospholipids, which are associated with increased collagen and ADP stimulated ex vivo whole blood platelet aggregation, plasma 11-dehydrothromboxane B₂, and homocysteine levels and decreased plasma HDL-C. This may be associated with an increased thrombotic and atherosclerotic risk. It is suggested that vegetarians, especially vegans, should increase their dietary n-3 PUFA and vitamin B₁₂ intakes.

  14. Computational chemistry research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Task 41 is composed of two parts: (1) analysis and design studies related to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Extended Operating Configuration (EOC) and (2) computational chemistry. During the first half of 1987, Dr. Levin served as a member of an advanced system planning team to establish the requirements, goals, and principal technical characteristics of the NAS EOC. A paper entitled 'Scaling of Data Communications for an Advanced Supercomputer Network' is included. The high temperature transport properties (such as viscosity, thermal conductivity, etc.) of the major constituents of air (oxygen and nitrogen) were correctly determined. The results of prior ab initio computer solutions of the Schroedinger equation were combined with the best available experimental data to obtain complete interaction potentials for both neutral and ion-atom collision partners. These potentials were then used in a computer program to evaluate the collision cross-sections from which the transport properties could be determined. A paper entitled 'High Temperature Transport Properties of Air' is included.

  15. Oxidized mucus proteinase inhibitor: a fairly potent neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    1994-01-01

    N-chlorosuccinimide oxidizes one of the methionine residues of mucus proteinase inhibitor with a second-order rate constant of 1.5 M-1.s-1. Cyanogen bromide cleavage and NH2-terminal sequencing show that the modified residue is methionine-73, the P'1 component of the inhibitor's active centre. Oxidation of the inhibitor decreases its neutrophil elastase inhibitory capacity but does not fully abolish it. The kinetic parameters describing the elastase-oxidized inhibitor interaction are: association rate constant kass. = 2.6 x 10(5) M-1.s-1, dissociation rate constant kdiss. = 2.9 x 10(-3) s-1 and equilibrium dissociation constant Ki = 1.1 x 10(-8) M. Comparison with the native inhibitor indicates that oxidation decreases kass. by a factor of 18.8 and increases kdiss. by a factor of 6.4, and therefore leads to a 120-fold increase in Ki. Yet, the oxidized inhibitor may still act as a potent elastase inhibitor in the upper respiratory tract where its concentration is 500-fold higher than Ki, i.e. where the elastase inhibition is pseudo-irreversible. Experiments in vitro with fibrous human lung elastin, the most important natural substrate of elastase, support this view: 1.35 microM elastase is fully inhibited by 5-6 microM oxidized inhibitor whether the enzyme-inhibitor complex is formed in the presence or absence of elastin and whether elastase is pre-adsorbed on elastin or not. PMID:7945266

  16. Chemistry in the Justice System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazdra, James J.

    1980-01-01

    The application of chemistry to the justice system is presented. The role of the forensic chemist, historical development of forensic laboratories, and tools of the criminalists are also discussed. (HM)

  17. Plants and Medicinal Chemistry--2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, D.

    1977-01-01

    Second of a two part article on the influence of plants on medicinal chemistry. This part considers how drugs work, the attempts to develop anaesthetics safer than cocaine, and useful poisons. (Author/SL)

  18. Chemistry Education: Experiments Worth Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchhoff, Mary M.

    2007-01-01

    The Education system has decided to introduce various new experiments and a digital system for imparting chemistry education to children in schools. The new programs are expected to prepare graduate students completely for their professional lives beyond the graduate school.

  19. Organic Experiments for Introductory Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff

    1985-01-01

    Describes test-tube organic chemistry procedures (using comparatively safe reagents) for the beginning student. These procedures are used to: examine differences between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons; compare structural isomers; and compare organic and inorganic acids and bases. (DH)

  20. Beginning Chemistry Can Be Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, James F.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews ways of applying laboratory work in general and analytical chemistry to supermarket products. Describes ways water and air pollution analysis can illustrate acid-base reactions, redox reactions, precipitimetry, and colorimetry. (PR)

  1. Chemistry for the Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Judy L.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses modifications to general education or introductory chemistry courses that allow visually impaired students to participate productively. Describes a strategy for teaching about elements and density, and the construction of a conductivity tester for visually impaired students. (JRH)

  2. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  3. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures.

  4. [Pharmaceutical chemistry of general anaesthetics].

    PubMed

    Szász, György; Takácsné, Novák Krisztina

    2004-01-01

    The paper represents the first part of a planned series of reviews about pharmaceutical chemistry of drugs acting on the central nervous system. The authorial aim and editorial concepts are the same were followed in a former series of papers about pharmaceutical chemistry of agents effecting the heart, blood circulation and vegetative nervous system. Consequently, general anaesthetics are discussed in the present paper through the chapters "history, preparation; structure-properties-activity; application; analysis".

  5. Physical chemistry and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Garrett, B.C.; Kolb, C.E. Jr.; Shaw, R.W.; Choppin, G.R.; Wagner, A.F.

    1994-08-01

    From the ozone hole and the greenhouse effect to plastics recycling and hazardous waste disposal, society faces a number of issues, the solutions to which require an unprecedented understanding of the properties of molecules. We are coming to realize that the environment is a coupled set of chemical systems, its dynamics determining the welfare of the biosphere and of humans in particular. These chemical systems are governed by fundamental molecular interactions, and they present chemists with an unparalleled challenge. The application of current concepts of molecular behavior and of up-to-date experimental and computational techniques can provide us with insights into the environment that are needed to mitigate past damage, to anticipate the impact of current human activity, and to avoid future insults to the environment. Environmental chemistry encompasses a number of separate, yet interlocking, areas of research. In all of these areas progress is limited by an inadequate understanding of the underlying chemical processes involved. Participation of all chemical approaches -- experimental, theoretical and computational -- and of all disciplines of chemistry -- organic, inorganic, physical, analytical and biochemistry -- will be required to provide the necessary fundamental understanding. The Symposium on ``Physical Chemistry and the Environment`` was designed to bring the many exciting and challenging physical chemistry problems involved in environmental chemistry to the attention of a larger segment of the physical chemistry community.

  6. Effective Chemistry Communication in Informal Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Chemistry plays a critical role in daily life, impacting areas such as medicine and health, consumer products, energy production, the ecosystem, and many other areas. Communicating about chemistry in informal environments has the potential to raise public interest and understanding of chemistry around the world. However, the chemistry community…

  7. Peer Mentoring in the General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: The Pinacol Rearrangement--An Exercise in NMR and IR Spectroscopy for General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Caleb A.; Hill, Jameica B.; Radfar, Ramin; Whisnant, David M.; Bass, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a discovery experiment for general chemistry and organic chemistry labs. Although the pinacol rearrangement has been employed in undergraduate organic laboratories before, in this application organic chemistry students act as mentors to students of general chemistry. Students work together using distillation--a new technique…

  8. The Place of Macromolecules in Freshman Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wunderlich, Bernhard

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the inclusion of knowledge on macromolecules into a freshman chemistry course which emphasizes topics in organic chemistry, polymer science and biochemistry, atoms, chemical thermodynamics, and inorganic chemistry. Indicates that the program is the only way to keep chemistry education up to date. (CC)

  9. Chemistry, College Level. Annotated Bibliography of Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ. Test Collection.

    Most of the 30 tests cited in this bibliography are those of the American Chemical Society. Subjects covered include physical chemistry, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, analytical chemistry, and other specialized areas. The tests are designed only for advanced high school, and both bachelor/graduate degree levels of college students. This…

  10. 42 CFR 493.839 - Condition: Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Chemistry. 493.839 Section 493.839... These Tests § 493.839 Condition: Chemistry. The specialty of chemistry includes for the purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of routine chemistry, endocrinology, and toxicology....

  11. 42 CFR 493.839 - Condition: Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Chemistry. 493.839 Section 493.839... These Tests § 493.839 Condition: Chemistry. The specialty of chemistry includes for the purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of routine chemistry, endocrinology, and toxicology....

  12. 42 CFR 493.839 - Condition: Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Chemistry. 493.839 Section 493.839... These Tests § 493.839 Condition: Chemistry. The specialty of chemistry includes for the purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of routine chemistry, endocrinology, and toxicology....

  13. 42 CFR 493.839 - Condition: Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Chemistry. 493.839 Section 493.839... These Tests § 493.839 Condition: Chemistry. The specialty of chemistry includes for the purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of routine chemistry, endocrinology, and toxicology....

  14. 42 CFR 493.839 - Condition: Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Chemistry. 493.839 Section 493.839... These Tests § 493.839 Condition: Chemistry. The specialty of chemistry includes for the purposes of proficiency testing the subspecialties of routine chemistry, endocrinology, and toxicology....

  15. HOCO radical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Joseph S; Muckerman, James T; Yu, Hua-Gen

    2010-12-21

    Free radicals are important species in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, plasma environments, interstellar clouds, and biochemistry. Therefore, researchers would like to understand the formation mechanism, structure, stability, reactivity, spectroscopy, and dynamics of these chemical species. However, due to the presence of one or more unpaired electrons, radicals are often very reactive and have short lifetimes, which makes it difficult to conduct experiments. The HOCO radical appears in the atmosphere as well as in combustion environments and plays an important role in the conversion of CO to CO(2). Through the interplay between theoretical and experimental investigations, researchers have only recently understood the chemical role of the HOCO radical. In this Account, we systematically describe the current state of knowledge of the HOCO radical based on recent theoretical and experimental studies. This radical's two stable conformers, trans- and cis-HOCO, have been identified by high-level ab initio calculations and experimental spectroscopy. trans-HOCO is more stable by approximately 1.8 kcal/mol. The heat of formation of HOCO (298 K) was determined to be -43.0 ± 0.5 kcal/mol, giving a potential well depth of 30.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol relative to the asymptote of the reactants OH + CO. The HOCO radical is very reactive. In most reactions between the HOCO radical and atoms, the HOCO radical acts as a hydrogen donor to reaction partners. Generally, the hydrogen is transferred through the formation of an association intermediate, which then proceeds through a molecular elimination step to produce the reaction products. The reaction rates of HOCO with some small radicals fall in the range of 10(-11)-10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). These results clearly illustrate important features in the reactivity of the HOCO radical with other molecules.

  16. Chemistry of fast electrons

    PubMed Central

    Maximoff, Sergey N.; Head-Gordon, Martin P.

    2009-01-01

    A chemicurrent is a flux of fast (kinetic energy ≳ 0.5−1.3 eV) metal electrons caused by moderately exothermic (1−3 eV) chemical reactions over high work function (4−6 eV) metal surfaces. In this report, the relation between chemicurrent and surface chemistry is elucidated with a combination of top-down phenomenology and bottom-up atomic-scale modeling. Examination of catalytic CO oxidation, an example which exhibits a chemicurrent, reveals 3 constituents of this relation: The localization of some conduction electrons to the surface via a reduction reaction, 0.5 O2 + δe− → Oδ− (Red); the delocalization of some surface electrons into a conduction band in an oxidation reaction, Oδ− + CO → CO2δ− → CO2 + δe− (Ox); and relaxation without charge transfer (Rel). Juxtaposition of Red, Ox, and Rel produces a daunting variety of metal electronic excitations, but only those that originate from CO2 reactive desorption are long-range and fast enough to dominate the chemicurrent. The chemicurrent yield depends on the universality class of the desorption process and the distribution of the desorption thresholds. This analysis implies a power-law relation with exponent 2.66 between the chemicurrent and the heat of adsorption, which is consistent with experimental findings for a range of systems. This picture also applies to other oxidation-reduction reactions over high work function metal surfaces. PMID:19561296

  17. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  18. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  19. Synthetic conversion of ACAT inhibitor to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Otoguro, K; Tomoda, H; Harigaya, Y; Omura, S

    2000-06-19

    Natural product acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor pyripyropene A was synthetically converted to acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor via heterolitic cleavage of the 2-pyrone ring, followed by gamma-acylation/cyclization with several aroyl chlorides. The 4-pyridyl analogue selectively showed AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 7.9 microM) and no ACAT inhibitory activity IC50 = >1000 microM. PMID:10890154

  20. Transition-state inhibitors of purine salvage and other prospective enzyme targets in malaria.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Rodrigo G; Namanja-Magliano, Hilda A; Schramm, Vern L

    2013-07-01

    Malaria is a leading cause of human death within the tropics. The gradual generation of drug resistance imposes an urgent need for the development of new and selective antimalarial agents. Kinetic isotope effects coupled to computational chemistry have provided the relevant details on geometry and charge of enzymatic transition states to facilitate the design of transition-state analogs. These features have been reproduced into chemically stable mimics through synthetic chemistry, generating inhibitors with dissociation constants in the pico- to femto-molar range. Transition-state analogs are expected to contribute to the control of malaria.

  1. Transition-state inhibitors of purine salvage and other prospective enzyme targets in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Ducati, Rodrigo G.; Namanja-Magliano, Hilda A.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a leading cause of human death within the tropics. The gradual generation of drug resistance imposes an urgent need for the development of new and selective antimalarial agents. Kinetic isotope effects coupled to computational chemistry have provided the relevant details on geometry and charge of enzymatic transition states to facilitate the design of transition-state analogs. These features have been reproduced into chemically stable mimics through synthetic chemistry, generating inhibitors with dissociation constants in the pico- to femto-molar range. Transition-state analogs are expected to contribute to the control of malaria. PMID:23859211

  2. Nonproprietary corrosion inhibitors for solvents to clean steam generators. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Annand, R.R.; Hausler, R.H.

    1983-06-01

    The Steam Generator Owners Group, in association with EPRI, sponsored development work at Petrolite Corporation to develop a corrosion inhibitor for chemical-cleaning solvents to clean PWR nuclear steam generators. As a result of this work, a nonproprietary corrosion inhibitor, CCI-801, was selected and qualified in numerous laboratory demonstration tests. Companion projects dealing with the development of the cleaning process were carried out at The Babcock and Wilcox Company (RPS127-1); UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. (RPS150-1); and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (RPS128-1). The development of inhibitors for chemical-cleaning fluids of necessity dealt with the chemistry of the inhibitors, the solution chemistry, the corrosion mechanism, the metallurgy of the metals to be protected, the system parameters such as the nature of galvanic coupling, and the techniques to monitor corrosion. Studies concerning these subjects are described in this report. It is concluded that CCI-801 is an effective inhibitor which protects all metals tested under all process conditions envisaged, with no perceived detrimental aftereffects.

  3. Evaluation and critical assessment of putative MCL-1 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, S; Vogler, M; Butterworth, M; Dinsdale, D; Walensky, L D; Cohen, G M

    2013-01-01

    High levels of BCL-2 family proteins are implicated in a failed/ineffective apoptotic programme, often resulting in diseases, including cancer. Owing to their potential as drug targets in cancer therapy, several inhibitors of BCL-2 family proteins have been developed. These primarily target specific members of the BCL-2 family, particularly BCL-2 and BCL-XL but are ineffective against MCL-1. Major efforts have been invested in developing inhibitors of MCL-1, which is commonly amplified in human tumours and associated with tumour relapse and chemoresistance. In this report, the specificity of several BCL-2 family inhibitors (ABT-263, UCB-1350883, apogossypol and BH3I-1) was investigated and compared with putative MCL-1 inhibitors designed to exhibit improved or selective binding affinities for MCL-1 (TW-37, BI97C1, BI97C10, BI112D1, compounds 6 and 7, and MCL-1 inhibitor molecule (MIM-1)). ABT-263, BI97C1, BI112D1, MIM-1 and TW-37 exhibited specificity in inducing apoptosis in a Bax/Bak- and caspase-9-dependent manner, whereas the other agents showed no killing activity, or little or no specificity. Of these inhibitors, only ABT-263 and UCB-1350883 induced apoptosis in a BCL-2- or BCL-XL-dependent system. In cells that depend on MCL-1 for survival, ABT-263 and TW-37 induced extensive apoptosis, suggesting that at high concentrations these inhibitors have the propensity to inhibit MCL-1 in a cellular context. TW-37 induced apoptosis, assessed by chromatin condensation, caspase processing and phosphatidylserine externalisation, in a BAK-dependent manner and in cells that require MCL-1 for survival. TW-37-mediated apoptosis was also partly dependent on NOXA, suggesting that derivatives of TW-37, if engineered to exhibit better selectivity and efficacy at low nanomolar concentrations, may provide useful lead compounds for further synthetic programmes. Expanded medicinal chemistry iteration, as performed for the ABT series, may likewise improve the potency and

  4. Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibition with Benzenesulfonamides and Tetrafluorobenzenesulfonamides Obtained via Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel benzene- and 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorobenzenesulfonamide was synthesized by using a click chemistry approach starting from azido-substituted sulfonamides and alkynes, incorporating aryl, alkyl, cycloalkyl, and amino-/hydroxy-/halogenoalkyl moieties. The new compounds were medium potency inhibitors of the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) isoforms I and II and low nanomolar/subnanomolar inhibitors of the tumor-associated hCA IX and XII isoforms. The X-ray crystal structure of two such sulfonamides in adduct with hCA II allowed us to understand the factors governing inhibitory power. PMID:25147616

  5. Glycosylasparaginase inhibition studies: competitive inhibitors, transition state mimics, noncompetitive inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Risley, J M; Huang, D H; Kaylor, J J; Malik, J J; Xia, Y Q

    2001-01-01

    Glycosylasparaginase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosylic bond between asparagine and N-acetylglucosamine in the catabolism of N-linked glycoproteins. Previously only three competitive inhibitors, one noncompetitive inhibitor, and one irreversible inhibitor of glycosylasparaginase activity had been reported. Using human glycosylasparaginase from human amniotic fluid, L-aspartic acid and four of its analogues, where the alpha-amino group was substituted with a chloro, bromo, methyl or hydrogen, were competitive inhibitors having Ki values between 0.6-7.7 mM. These results provide supporting evidence for a proposed intramolecular autoproteolytic activation reaction. A proposed phosphono transition state mimic and a sulfo transition state mimic were competitive inhibitors with Ki values 0.9 mM and 1.4 mM, respectively. These results support a mechanism for the enzyme-catalyzed reaction involving formation of a tetrahedral high-energy intermediate. Three analogues of the natural substrate were noncompetitive inhibitors with Ki values between 0.56-0.75 mM, indicating the presence of a second binding site that may recognize (substituted)acetamido groups.

  6. National Chemistry Week 2000: JCE Resources in Food Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Erica K.

    2000-10-01

    November brings another National Chemistry Week, and this year's theme is food chemistry. I was asked to collect and evaluate JCE resources for use with this theme, a project that took me deep into past issues of JCE and yielded many treasures. Here we present the results of searches for food chemistry information and activities. While the selected articles are mainly at the high school and college levels, there are some excellent ones for the elementary school level and some that can be adapted for younger students. The focus of all articles is on the chemistry of food itself. Activities that only use food to demonstrate a principle other than food chemistry are not included. Articles that cover household products such as cleansers and pharmaceuticals are also not included. Each article has been characterized as a demonstration, experiment, calculation, activity, or informational item; several fit more than one classification. Also included are keywords and an evaluation as to which levels the article may serve.

  7. Reviewing Ligand-Based Rational Drug Design: The Search for an ATP Synthase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2011-01-01

    Following major advances in the field of medicinal chemistry, novel drugs can now be designed systematically, instead of relying on old trial and error approaches. Current drug design strategies can be classified as being either ligand- or structure-based depending on the design process. In this paper, by describing the search for an ATP synthase inhibitor, we review two frequently used approaches in ligand-based drug design: The pharmacophore model and the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method. Moreover, since ATP synthase ligands are potentially useful drugs in cancer therapy, pharmacophore models were constructed to pave the way for novel inhibitor designs. PMID:21954360

  8. A reporter ligand NMR screening method for 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Demetriades, Marina; Hardy, Adam P.; Lejeune, Clarisse; Smart, Tristan J.; Szöllössi, Andrea; Kawamura, Akane; Schofield, Christopher J.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The human 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent oxygenases belong to a family of structurally related enzymes that play important roles in many biological processes. We report that competition-based NMR methods, using 2OG as a reporter ligand, can be used for quantitative and site-specific screening of ligand binding to 2OG oxygenases. The method was demonstrated using hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases and histone demethylases, and KD values were determined for inhibitors that compete with 2OG at the metal centre. This technique is also useful as a screening or validation tool for inhibitor discovery, as exemplified by work with protein-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC). PMID:23234607

  9. Discovery of transition state factor Xa inhibitors as potential anticoagulant agents.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B Y; Huang, W; Su, T; Marlowe, C; Sinha, U; Hollenbach, S; Scarborough, R M

    2001-06-01

    Factor Xa is an attractive biological target in the discovery and development of either parenteral or orally active anticoagulant agents. Several strategies have been utilized at COR Therapeutics in the pursuit of tri-peptide based transition state mimetic factor Xa inhibitors with high aqueous solubility. Some of these inhibitors have displayed excellent in vitro potency in inhibiting factor Xa in the prothrombinase complex. More importantly, these compounds showed strong in vivo antithrombotic efficacy without significant bleeding complications in several animal thrombosis models. These results demonstrated that small molecule factor Xa inhibitors could be advantageous over Warfarin and LMWH. For the discovery and development of orally active anticoagulant agents, small organic molecules as reversible factor Xa inhibitors were explored. From a medicinal chemistry perspective, significant insight has been gained regarding the in vivo antithrombotic efficacy and pharmacokinetic behaviors of each class of factor Xa inhibitors. This review will focus on the design and discovery of transition state factor Xa inhibitors as potential parenteral anticoagulant agents. Several excellent comprehensive review articles on factor Xa inhibitors have appeared recently [1-4]. PMID:11899247

  10. Study on Synergistic Mechanism of Inhibitor Mixture Based on Electron Transfer Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Peng; He, Yang; Chen, Changfeng; Yu, Haobo; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong; Ma, Yue; Zheng, Yanjun

    2016-09-01

    Mixing is an important method to improve the performance of surfactants due to their synergistic effect. The changes in bonding interaction and adsorption structure of IM and OP molecules before and after co-adsorbed on Fe(001) surface is calculated by DFTB+ method. It is found that mixture enable the inhibitor molecules with higher EHOMO donate more electrons while the inhibitor molecules with lower ELUMO accept more electrons, which strengthens the bonding interaction of both inhibitor agent and inhibitor additive with metal surface. Meanwhile, water molecules in the compact layer of double electric layer are repulsed and the charge transfer resistance during the corrosion process increases. Accordingly, the correlation between the frontier orbital (EHOMO and ELUMO of inhibitor molecules and the Fermi level of metal) and inhibition efficiency is determined. Finally, we propose a frontier orbital matching principle for the synergistic effect of inhibitors, which is verified by electrochemical experiments. This frontier orbital matching principle provides an effective quantum chemistry calculation method for the optimal selection of inhibitor mixture.

  11. Study on Synergistic Mechanism of Inhibitor Mixture Based on Electron Transfer Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Han, Peng; He, Yang; Chen, Changfeng; Yu, Haobo; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong; Ma, Yue; Zheng, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    Mixing is an important method to improve the performance of surfactants due to their synergistic effect. The changes in bonding interaction and adsorption structure of IM and OP molecules before and after co-adsorbed on Fe(001) surface is calculated by DFTB+ method. It is found that mixture enable the inhibitor molecules with higher EHOMO donate more electrons while the inhibitor molecules with lower ELUMO accept more electrons, which strengthens the bonding interaction of both inhibitor agent and inhibitor additive with metal surface. Meanwhile, water molecules in the compact layer of double electric layer are repulsed and the charge transfer resistance during the corrosion process increases. Accordingly, the correlation between the frontier orbital (EHOMO and ELUMO of inhibitor molecules and the Fermi level of metal) and inhibition efficiency is determined. Finally, we propose a frontier orbital matching principle for the synergistic effect of inhibitors, which is verified by electrochemical experiments. This frontier orbital matching principle provides an effective quantum chemistry calculation method for the optimal selection of inhibitor mixture. PMID:27671332

  12. Selective Inhibitors of Protein Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that protein methyltransferases (PMTs), which catalyze methylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and human diseases. In particular, PMTs have been recognized as major players in regulating gene expression and chromatin state. PMTs are divided into two categories: protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There has been a steadily growing interest in these enzymes as potential therapeutic targets and therefore discovery of PMT inhibitors has also been pursued increasingly over the past decade. Here, we present a perspective on selective, small-molecule inhibitors of PMTs with an emphasis on their discovery, characterization, and applicability as chemical tools for deciphering the target PMTs’ physiological functions and involvement in human diseases. We highlight the current state of PMT inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for PMT inhibitor discovery. PMID:25406853

  13. Synthesis of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chunngai; Ye, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine methyltransferase which catalyze methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, play a crucial role in diverse biological processes and has emerged as a promising target for the development of various human diseases, including cancer, inflammation, and psychiatric disorders. However, inhibiting lysine methyltransferases selectively has presented many challenges to medicinal chemists. During the past decade, lysine methyltransferase inhibitors covering many different structural classes have been designed and developed. In this review, we describe the development of selective, small-molecule inhibitors of lysine methyltransferases with an emphasis on their discovery and chemical synthesis. We highlight the current state of lysine methyltransferase inhibitors and discuss future directions and opportunities for lysine methyltransferase inhibitor discovery. PMID:26258118

  14. [Pharmacology of bone resorption inhibitor].

    PubMed

    Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Currently, bone resorption inhibitor is mainly used for osteoporosis. A number of these agents have been developed. These pharmacological action are various. Bisphosphonate inhibit functions of the osteoclasts by inducing apoptosis. On the one hand, RANK-ligand inhibitor and selective estrogen receptor modulator inhibit formation of osteoclasts. It is important to understand these pharmacological action for the selection of the appropriate medicine. PMID:26529923

  15. Medicinal electrochemistry: integration of electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Almeida, M O; Maltarollo, V G; de Toledo, R A; Shim, H; Santos, M C; Honorio, K M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last centuries, there were many important discoveries in medicine that were crucial for gaining a better understanding of several physiological processes. Molecular modelling techniques are powerful tools that have been successfully used to analyse and interface medicinal chemistry studies with electrochemical experimental results. This special combination can help to comprehend medicinal chemistry problems, such as predicting biological activity and understanding drug action mechanisms. Electrochemistry has provided better comprehension of biological reactions and, as a result of many technological improvements, the combination of electrochemical techniques and biosensors has become an appealing choice for pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses. Therefore, this review will briefly outline the present scope and future advances related to the integration of electrochemical and medicinal chemistry approaches based on various applications from recent studies. PMID:24533810

  16. Medicinal electrochemistry: integration of electrochemistry, medicinal chemistry and computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Almeida, M O; Maltarollo, V G; de Toledo, R A; Shim, H; Santos, M C; Honorio, K M

    2014-01-01

    Over the last centuries, there were many important discoveries in medicine that were crucial for gaining a better understanding of several physiological processes. Molecular modelling techniques are powerful tools that have been successfully used to analyse and interface medicinal chemistry studies with electrochemical experimental results. This special combination can help to comprehend medicinal chemistry problems, such as predicting biological activity and understanding drug action mechanisms. Electrochemistry has provided better comprehension of biological reactions and, as a result of many technological improvements, the combination of electrochemical techniques and biosensors has become an appealing choice for pharmaceutical and biomedical analyses. Therefore, this review will briefly outline the present scope and future advances related to the integration of electrochemical and medicinal chemistry approaches based on various applications from recent studies.

  17. Cycloadditions in modern polymer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delaittre, Guillaume; Guimard, Nathalie K; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-05-19

    Synthetic polymer chemistry has undergone two major developments in the last two decades. About 20 years ago, reversible-deactivation radical polymerization processes started to give access to a wide range of polymeric architectures made from an almost infinite reservoir of functional building blocks. A few years later, the concept of click chemistry revolutionized the way polymer chemists approached synthetic routes. Among the few reactions that could qualify as click, the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) initially stood out. Soon, many old and new reactions, including cycloadditions, would further enrich the synthetic macromolecular chemistry toolbox. Whether click or not, cycloadditions are in any case powerful tools for designing polymeric materials in a modular fashion, with a high level of functionality and, sometimes, responsiveness. Here, we wish to describe cycloaddition methodologies that have been reported in the last 10 years in the context of macromolecular engineering, with a focus on those developed in our laboratories. The overarching structure of this Account is based on the three most commonly encountered cycloaddition subclasses in organic and macromolecular chemistry: 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions, (hetero-)Diels-Alder cycloadditions ((H)DAC), and [2+2] cycloadditions. Our goal is to briefly describe the relevant reaction conditions, the advantages and disadvantages, and the realized polymer applications. Furthermore, the orthogonality of most of these reactions is highlighted because it has proven highly beneficial for generating unique, multifunctional polymers in a one-pot reaction. The overview on 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions is mostly centered on the application of CuAAC as the most travelled route, by far. Besides illustrating the capacity of CuAAC to generate complex polymeric architectures, alternative 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions operating without the need for a catalyst are described. In the area of (H)DA cycloadditions

  18. Medicinal Chemistry Projects Requiring Imaginative Structure-Based Drug Design Methods.

    PubMed

    Moitessier, Nicolas; Pottel, Joshua; Therrien, Eric; Englebienne, Pablo; Liu, Zhaomin; Tomberg, Anna; Corbeil, Christopher R

    2016-09-20

    Computational methods for docking small molecules to proteins are prominent in drug discovery. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of documented examples-and several pertinent cases within our research program. Fifteen years ago, our first docking-guided drug design project yielded nanomolar metalloproteinase inhibitors and illustrated the potential of structure-based drug design. Subsequent applications of docking programs to the design of integrin antagonists, BACE-1 inhibitors, and aminoglycosides binding to bacterial RNA demonstrated that available docking programs needed significant improvement. At that time, docking programs primarily considered flexible ligands and rigid proteins. We demonstrated that accounting for protein flexibility, employing displaceable water molecules, and using ligand-based pharmacophores improved the docking accuracy of existing methods-enabling the design of bioactive molecules. The success prompted the development of our own program, Fitted, implementing all of these aspects. The primary motivation has always been to respond to the needs of drug design studies; the majority of the concepts behind the evolution of Fitted are rooted in medicinal chemistry projects and collaborations. Several examples follow: (1) Searching for HDAC inhibitors led us to develop methods considering drug-zinc coordination and its effect on the pKa of surrounding residues. (2) Targeting covalent prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibitors prompted an update to Fitted to identify reactive groups and form bonds with a given residue (e.g., a catalytic residue) when the geometry allows it. Fitted-the first fully automated covalent docking program-was successfully applied to the discovery of four new classes of covalent POP inhibitors. As a result, efficient stereoselective syntheses of a few screening hits were prioritized rather than synthesizing large chemical libraries-yielding nanomolar inhibitors. (3) In order to study the metabolism of POP inhibitors by

  19. Medicinal Chemistry Projects Requiring Imaginative Structure-Based Drug Design Methods.

    PubMed

    Moitessier, Nicolas; Pottel, Joshua; Therrien, Eric; Englebienne, Pablo; Liu, Zhaomin; Tomberg, Anna; Corbeil, Christopher R

    2016-09-20

    Computational methods for docking small molecules to proteins are prominent in drug discovery. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of documented examples-and several pertinent cases within our research program. Fifteen years ago, our first docking-guided drug design project yielded nanomolar metalloproteinase inhibitors and illustrated the potential of structure-based drug design. Subsequent applications of docking programs to the design of integrin antagonists, BACE-1 inhibitors, and aminoglycosides binding to bacterial RNA demonstrated that available docking programs needed significant improvement. At that time, docking programs primarily considered flexible ligands and rigid proteins. We demonstrated that accounting for protein flexibility, employing displaceable water molecules, and using ligand-based pharmacophores improved the docking accuracy of existing methods-enabling the design of bioactive molecules. The success prompted the development of our own program, Fitted, implementing all of these aspects. The primary motivation has always been to respond to the needs of drug design studies; the majority of the concepts behind the evolution of Fitted are rooted in medicinal chemistry projects and collaborations. Several examples follow: (1) Searching for HDAC inhibitors led us to develop methods considering drug-zinc coordination and its effect on the pKa of surrounding residues. (2) Targeting covalent prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibitors prompted an update to Fitted to identify reactive groups and form bonds with a given residue (e.g., a catalytic residue) when the geometry allows it. Fitted-the first fully automated covalent docking program-was successfully applied to the discovery of four new classes of covalent POP inhibitors. As a result, efficient stereoselective syntheses of a few screening hits were prioritized rather than synthesizing large chemical libraries-yielding nanomolar inhibitors. (3) In order to study the metabolism of POP inhibitors by

  20. Bioengineering and semisynthesis of an optimized cyclophilin inhibitor for treatment of chronic viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Magnus Joakim; Moss, Steven James; Bobardt, Michael; Chatterji, Udayan; Coates, Nigel; Garcia-Rivera, Jose A; Elmér, Eskil; Kendrew, Steve; Leyssen, Pieter; Neyts, Johan; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Warneck, Tony; Wilkinson, Barrie; Gallay, Philippe; Gregory, Matthew Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Inhibition of host-encoded targets, such as the cyclophilins, provides an opportunity to generate potent, high barrier to resistance antivirals for the treatment of a broad range of viral diseases. However, many host-targeted agents are natural products which can be difficult to optimize using synthetic chemistry alone. We describe the orthogonal combination of bioengineering and semisynthetic chemistry to optimize the drug-like properties of sanglifehrin A, a known cyclophilin inhibitor of mixed non-ribosomal peptide/polyketide origin in order to generate the drug candidate NVP018 (formerly BC556). NVP018 is a potent inhibitor of HBV, HCV and HIV-1 replication, shows minimal inhibition of major drug transporters and has a high barrier to generation of both HCV and HIV-1 resistance. PMID:25619934

  1. Towards Bildung-Oriented Chemistry Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöström, Jesper

    2013-07-01

    This paper concerns Bildung-oriented chemistry education, based on a reflective and critical discourse of chemistry. It is contrasted with the dominant type of chemistry education, based on the mainstream discourse of chemistry. Bildung-oriented chemistry education includes not only content knowledge in chemistry, but also knowledge about chemistry, both about the nature of chemistry and about its role in society. In 2004 Mahaffy suggested a tetrahedron model based on Johnstone's chemical triangle. The latter represents the formal aspects of chemistry teaching (macro, submicro, and symbolic) and the top of the tetrahedron represents a human element. In the present paper the following subdivision of the top is suggested (starting from the bottom): (1) applied chemistry, (2) socio-cultural context, and (3) critical-philosophic approach. The professional identity of the Bildung-oriented chemistry teacher differs from that of the chemist and is informed by research fields such as Philosophy of Chemistry, Science and Technology Studies, and Environmental Education. He/she takes a socio-critical approach to chemistry, emphasising both the benefits and risks of chemistry and its applications.

  2. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    DOE PAGES

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Marley, Nancy A.

    2003-01-01

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozonemore » and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.« less

  3. Mass spectrometry. [in organic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Shackleton, C. H. L.; Howe, I.; Chizhov, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A review of mass spectrometry in organic chemistry is given, dealing with advances in instrumentation and computer techniques, selected topics in gas-phase ion chemistry, and applications in such fields as biomedicine, natural-product studies, and environmental pollution analysis. Innovative techniques and instrumentation are discussed, along with chromatographic-mass spectrometric on-line computer techniques, mass spectral interpretation and management techniques, and such topics in gas-phase ion chemistry as electron-impact ionization and decomposition, photoionization, field ionization and desorption, high-pressure mass spectrometry, ion cyclotron resonance, and isomerization reactions of organic ions. Applications of mass spectrometry are examined with respect to bio-oligomers and their constituents, biomedically important substances, microbiology, environmental organic analysis, and organic geochemistry.

  4. The Chemistry of Nearby Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.

    2016-01-01

    The gas and dust rich disks around young stars are the formation sites of planets. Observations of molecular trace species have great potential as probes of the disk structures and volatile compositions that together regulate planet formation. The disk around young star TW Hya has become a template for disk molecular studies due to a combination of proximity, a simple face-on geometry and richness in volatiles. It is unclear, however, how typical the chemistry of the TW disk is. In this proceeding, we review lessons learnt from exploring the TW Hya disk chemistry, focusing on the CO snowline, and on deuterium fractionation chemistry. We compare these results with new ALMA observations toward more distant, younger disks. We find that while all disks have some chemical structures in common, there are also substantial differences between the disks, which may be due to different initial conditions, structural or chemical evolutionary stages, or a combination of all three.

  5. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  6. Water Chemistry in Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.

    2005-12-01

    Water chemistry is central in understanding the physics and chemistry of cometary comae. A rather advanced knowledge of water chemistry has been attained from studies of various comets via ground-based observations and in situ spacecraft measurements, especially the Giotto encounter with comet 1P/Halley. Photochemistry and the effects of photoelectrons that react via electron impact reactions, ion-molecule reactions, and the interaction with solar wind plasma are important processes that affect the overall composition and ionization state in the coma. However, initial results from the PEPE instrument onboard Deep Space 1 (DS1) concerning water-group ions around closest approach significantly differ from those expected from model results, challenging conventional notions. We have attempted to reconcile these differences in ion composition between the DS1 in situ measurements and model results with an extensive modeling investigation, unique from previous studies. This work should be relevant to past, on-going, and future spacecraft missions to comets.

  7. Atmospheric chemistry and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Jeffrey S; Marley, Nancy A

    2003-04-07

    Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.

  8. High-Throughput Screening Based Identification of Paramyxovirus Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong-Jeong; Chawla, Dhruv; Paal, Tanja; Ndungu, Maina; Du, Yuhong; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Sun, Aiming; Snyder, James P; Plemper, Richard K

    2008-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are negative strand non-segmented RNA viruses. Several members of this family constitute major human pathogens that, collectively, are responsible for major morbidity and mortality worldwide. In an effort to ultimately develop novel therapeutics against measles virus (MV), a prominent member of the paramyxovirus family, we report a high-throughput screening protocol that allows hit identification using non-recombinant primary MV strains as targets. Implementation of the assay has yielded 60 hit candidates from a 137,500-entry library. Counterscreening and generation of dose-response curves narrows this pool to 35 compounds with active concentrations ≤15.3 μM against the MV-Alaska strain and specificity indices ranging from 36 to >500. Library mining for structural analogs of several confirmed hits combined with re-testing of identified candidates reveals a low false-negative rate and, thus, a high accuracy of primary hit identification. Eleven of the confirmed hits were found to interfere with the viral entry machinery, while the remaining 24 compounds target post-entry steps of the viral life cycle. Activity testing against selected members of the paramyxovirus family reveals three patterns of activity: 1) exclusively MV-specific blockers; 2) inhibitors of MV and related viruses of the same genus; 3) broader-range inhibitors with activity against a different paramyxovirinae genus. Representatives of the last class may open avenues for the development of broad-range paramyxovirus inhibitors through hit-to-lead chemistry. PMID:18626114

  9. Identification of a novel family of BRAFV600E inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jie; Xie, Peng; Ventocilla, Christian; Zhou, Guoqiang; Vultur, Adina; Chen, Quan; Liu, Qin; Herlyn, Meenhard; Winkler, Jeffrey; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The BRAF oncoprotein is mutated in about half of malignant melanomas and other cancers, and a kinase activating single valine to glutamate substitution at residue 600 (BRAFV600E) accounts for over 90% of BRAF-mediated cancers. Several BRAFV600E inhibitors have been developed, although they harbor some liabilities, thus motivating the development of other BRAFV600E inhibitor options. We report here the use of an ELISA based high-throughput screen to identify a family of related quinolol/naphthol compounds that preferentially inhibit BRAFV600E over BRAFWT and other kinases. We also report the X-ray crystal structure of a BRAF/quinolol complex revealing the mode of inhibition, employ structure-based medicinal chemistry efforts to prepare naphthol analogs that inhibit BRAFV600E in vitro with IC50 values in the 80–200 nM under saturating ATP concentrations, and demonstrate that these compounds inhibit MAPK signaling in melanoma cells. Prospects for improving the potency and selectivity of these inhibitors are discussed. PMID:22537109

  10. Piperazine sulfonamide BACE1 inhibitors: Design, synthesis, and in vivo characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cumming, Jared; Babu, Suresh; Huang, Ying; Carrol, Carolyn; Chen, Xia; Favreau, Leonard; Greenlee, William; Guo, Tao; Kennedy, Matthew; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Le, Thuy; Li, Guoqing; McHugh, Nansie; Orth, Peter; Ozgur, Lynne; Parker, Eric; Saionz, Kurt; Stamford, Andrew; Strickland, Corey; Tadesse, Dawit; Voigta, Johannes; Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Qi

    2010-08-17

    With collaboration between chemistry, X-ray crystallography, and molecular modeling, we designed and synthesized a series of novel piperazine sulfonamide BACE1 inhibitors. Iterative exploration of the non-prime side and S2{prime} sub-pocket of the enzyme culminated in identification of an analog that potently lowers peripheral A{beta}{sub 40} in transgenic mice with a single subcutaneous dose.

  11. Structure activity relationship studies on chemically non-reactive glycine sulfonamide inhibitors of diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Chupak, Louis S; Zheng, Xiaofan; Hu, Shuanghua; Huang, Yazhong; Ding, Min; Lewis, Martin A; Westphal, Ryan S; Blat, Yuval; McClure, Andrea; Gentles, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    N-Benzylic-substituted glycine sulfonamides that reversibly inhibit diacylglycerol (DAG) lipases are reported. Detailed herein are the structure activity relationships, profiling characteristics and physico-chemical properties for the first reported series of DAG lipase (DAGL) inhibitors that function without covalent attachment to the enzyme. Highly potent examples are presented that represent valuable tool compounds for studying DAGL inhibition and constitute important leads for future medicinal chemistry efforts.

  12. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  13. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Delcul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  14. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  15. A Wet Chemistry Laboratory Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This picture of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) cell is labeled with components responsible for mixing Martian soil with water from Earth, adding chemicals and measuring the solution chemistry. WCL is part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on board the Phoenix lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  17. NMR methods in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M J; Wareing, J R

    1998-06-01

    The use of NMR spectroscopy in combinatorial chemistry has provided a versatile tool for monitoring combinatorial chemistry reactions and for assessing ligand-receptor interactions. The application of magic angle spinning NMR is widespread and has allowed structure determination to be performed on compounds attached to solid supports. A variety of two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied to enhance the usability of the magic angle spinning NMR data. New developments for solution NMR analysis include high performance liquid chromatography, NMR, mass spectroscopy and flow NMR. NMR based methods currently being investigated may prove valuable as compound screening tools.

  18. Sustainable Chemistry at Sungkyunkwan University.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-07-20

    Special Issue: Sustainable Chemistry at Sungkyunkwan University. Sustainable chemistry is key to the development of efficient renewable energies, which will become more and more important in order to combat global warming. In this Editorial, guest editor Prof. Nam-Gyu Park describes the context of this Special Issue on top-quality research towards sustainability performed at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU) in Korea. Scientists at SKKU work on, for example, photovoltaic solar cells to generate low-cost electricity, lithium batteries and capacitors to store electricity, piezoelectric nanogenerators, thermoelectric devices, hydrogen generation, and fuel cells.

  19. Perspectives on Computational Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Streitwieser, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The author reviews how his early love for theoretical organic chemistry led to experimental research and the extended search for quantitative correlations between experiment and quantum calculations. The experimental work led to ion pair acidities of alkali-organic compounds and most recently to equilibria and reactions of lithium and cesium enolates in THF. This chemistry is now being modeled by ab initio calculations. An important consideration is the treatment of solvation in which coordination of the alkali cation with the ether solvent plays a major role. PMID:19518150

  20. Fuel cell chemistry and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamrock, Steven J.; Herring, Andrew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    The annual fall symposium on Fuel Cell Chemistry and Operation was held at the 232nd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco, CA on September 11-14, 2006. Similar symposia sponsored by the Fuel Division have been held every fall since 1999. Significantly, this symposium was part of an ACS Presidential Event on Hydrogen, and was sponsored by a number of other ACS divisions including, Polymer, Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering, Petroleum, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, and the Inorganic divisions. Additional support was provided by the Petroleum Research Fund and the 3M Fuel Cell Components Group.

  1. Sustainable Chemistry at Sungkyunkwan University.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-07-20

    Special Issue: Sustainable Chemistry at Sungkyunkwan University. Sustainable chemistry is key to the development of efficient renewable energies, which will become more and more important in order to combat global warming. In this Editorial, guest editor Prof. Nam-Gyu Park describes the context of this Special Issue on top-quality research towards sustainability performed at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU) in Korea. Scientists at SKKU work on, for example, photovoltaic solar cells to generate low-cost electricity, lithium batteries and capacitors to store electricity, piezoelectric nanogenerators, thermoelectric devices, hydrogen generation, and fuel cells. PMID:26183687

  2. Doing Chemistry: A Resource for High School Chemistry Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Described is a practical resource that ties the specifics of classroom chemistry content to the specifics of teaching practice. Listed are 135 lessons found on three videodisks which have 700 pages of supporting written materials. Notes that the full gamut of the traditional high school curriculum is covered. (MVL)

  3. Integrating Computational Chemistry into the Physical Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Engel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Relatively few undergraduate physical chemistry programs integrate molecular modeling into their quantum mechanics curriculum owing to concerns about limited access to computational facilities, the cost of software, and concerns about increasing the course material. However, modeling exercises can be integrated into an undergraduate course at a…

  4. Chemistry on the Go: Review of Chemistry Apps on Smartphones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libman, Diana; Huang, Ling

    2013-01-01

    touch-controlled computers such as smartphones and iPods are seeing dramatic growth with increasing adoption rates. This review covers about 30 popular and mostly free apps that can be used to learn chemistry and to serve as reference or research tools. The target…

  5. Integrating Particulate Representations into AP Chemistry and Introductory Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prilliman, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    The College Board's recently revised curriculum for advanced placement (AP) chemistry places a strong emphasis on conceptual understanding, including representations of particle phenomena. This change in emphasis is informed by years of research showing that students could perform algorithmic calculations but not explain those calculations…

  6. Comparing Carbonyl Chemistry in Comprehensive Introductory Organic Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Donna J.; Kumar, Ravi; Ramasamy, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Learning the chemistry of compounds containing carbonyl groups is difficult for undergraduate students partly because of a convolution of multiple possible reaction sites, competitive reactions taking place at those sites, different criteria needed to discern between the mechanisms of these reactions, and no straightforward selection method…

  7. General Chemistry Students' Goals for Chemistry Laboratory Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKorver, Brittland K.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists on college students' learning goals in chemistry, let alone specifically pertaining to laboratory coursework. Because students' learning goals are linked to achievement and dependent on context, research on students' goals in the laboratory context may lead to better understanding about the efficacy of lab curricula. This…

  8. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  9. Developing an online chemistry laboratory for non-chemistry majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Jacqueline H.

    Distance education, also known as online learning, is student-centered/self-directed educational opportunities. This style of learning is expanding in scope and is increasingly being accepted throughout the academic curriculum as a result of its flexibility for the student as well as the cost-effectiveness for the institution. Nevertheless, the introduction of online science courses including chemistry and physics have lagged behind due to the challenge of re-creation of the hands-on laboratory learning experience. This dissertation looks at the effectiveness of the design of a series of chemistry laboratory experiments for possible online delivery that provide students with simulated hands-on experiences. One class of college Chemistry 101 students conducted chemistry experiments inside and outside of the physical laboratory using instructions on Blackboard and Late Nite Labs(TM). Learning outcomes measured by (a) pretests, (b) written laboratory reports, (c) posttest assessments, (d) student reactions as determined by a questionnaire, and (e) a focus group interview were utilized to compare both types of laboratory experiences. The research findings indicated learning outcomes achieved by students outside of the traditional physical laboratory were statistically greater than the equivalent face-to-face instruction in the traditional laboratory. Evidence from student reactions comparing both types of laboratory formats (online and traditional face-to-face) indicated student preference for the online laboratory format. The results are an initial contribution to the design of a complete sequence of experiments that can be performed independently by online students outside of the traditional face-to-face laboratory that will satisfy the laboratory requirement for the two-semester college Chemistry 101 laboratory course.

  10. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  11. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  12. Evolutionary families of peptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D; Tolle, Dominic P; Barrett, Alan J

    2004-01-01

    The proteins that inhibit peptidases are of great importance in medicine and biotechnology, but there has never been a comprehensive system of classification for them. Some of the terminology currently in use is potentially confusing. In the hope of facilitating the exchange, storage and retrieval of information about this important group of proteins, we now describe a system wherein the inhibitor units of the peptidase inhibitors are assigned to 48 families on the basis of similarities detectable at the level of amino acid sequence. Then, on the basis of three-dimensional structures, 31 of the families are assigned to 26 clans. A simple system of nomenclature is introduced for reference to each clan, family and inhibitor. We briefly discuss the specificities and mechanisms of the interactions of the inhibitors in the various families with their target enzymes. The system of families and clans of inhibitors described has been implemented in the MEROPS peptidase database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), and this will provide a mechanism for updating it as new information becomes available. PMID:14705960

  13. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  14. Green chemistry for chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-Jun; Trost, Barry M

    2008-09-01

    Green chemistry for chemical synthesis addresses our future challenges in working with chemical processes and products by inventing novel reactions that can maximize the desired products and minimize by-products, designing new synthetic schemes and apparati that can simplify operations in chemical productions, and seeking greener solvents that are inherently environmentally and ecologically benign. PMID:18768813

  15. Teaching Triple Science: GCSE Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ3), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) has contracted with the Learning and Skills Network to support awareness and take-up of Triple Science GCSEs through the Triple Science Support Programme. This publication provides an introduction to teaching and learning approaches for the extension topics within GCSE Chemistry. It…

  16. Visualizing Chemistry: Investigations for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Ealy, James L., Jr.

    This book contains 101 investigations for chemistry classrooms. Topics include: (1) Physical Properties; (2) Reactions of Some Elements; (3) Reactions Involving Gases; (4) Energy Changes; (5) Solutions and Solubility; (6) Transition Metals and Complex Ions; (7) Kinetics and Equilibrium; (8) Acids and Bases; (9) Oxidation-Reduction; (10)…

  17. Astronomy Matters for Chemistry Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes basic misconceptions about the origin of elements and forms of matter found in chemistry texts that need modification in light of modern observational data and interpretations given in astronomy. Notes that there are forms of matter other than elements and compounds. Confounding examples from astronomy include white dwarfs, neutron…

  18. Organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory photochemical simulations and other types of chemical simulations are discussed. The chemistry of methane, which is the major known constituent of Titan's atmosphere was examined with stress on what can be learned from photochemistry and particle irradiation. The composition of dust that comprises the haze layer was determined. Isotope fractionation in planetary atmospheres is also discussed.

  19. Plasma chemistry and organic synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezuka, M.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristic features of chemical reactions using low temperature plasmas are described and differentiated from those seen in other reaction systems. A number of examples of applications of plasma chemistry to synthetic reactions are mentioned. The production of amino acids by discharge reactions in hydrocarbon-ammonia-water systems is discussed, and its implications for the origins of life are mentioned.

  20. Chemistry Teaching: Science or Alchemy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that the development of good chemistry teaching and the pursuit of research have essentially the same structure. Similarities include the need for a clear focus, efficiency in time and effort, and a direction that is more often right than wrong. (DDR)

  1. Chemistry without borders: An overview

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As chemistry becomes more globalized, it is important for an organization to be interconnected and adaptable, and for an individual to keep up with changes and latest scientific findings and keep options open. Many of the challenges and the opportunities of globalization are in the areas of jobs, re...

  2. Chemistry--The Big Picture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassell, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry produces materials and releases energy by ionic or electronic rearrangements. Three structure types affect the ease with which a reaction occurs. In the Earth's crust, "solid crystals" change chemically only with extreme heat and pressure, unless their fixed ions touch moving fluids. On the other hand, in living things, "liquid crystals"…

  3. The Chemistry of Color Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guida, Wayne C.; Raber, Douglas J.

    1975-01-01

    Presents several topics in color photography which can serve as an introduction of scientific concepts into the classroom, such as: photochemistry (energy transport), organic chemistry (dye formation), physics (nature of light), psychology (color perception), and engineering (isolation of different chemical processes within layers of the film).…

  4. Instructor's Guide for General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The first part of this curriculum guide for a college-level general chemistry course includes: (1) a list of 28 lectures/lessons with topic titles and content divisions; (2) behavioral objectives related to specific lessons; (3) a list of laboratory activities and objectives; (4) a course overview and syllabus for spring semester 1981; and (5) a…

  5. Atmospheric chemistry over southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Levy, Robert C.; Thompson, Anne M.

    2012-03-01

    Changing Chemistry in a Changing Climate: Human and Natural Impacts Over Southern Africa (C4-SAR); Midrand, South Africa, 31 May to 3 June 2011 During the southern African dry season, regional haze from mixed industrial pollution, biomass burning aerosol and gases from domestic and grassland fires, and biogenic sources from plants and soils is worsened by a semipermanent atmospheric gyre over the subcontinent. These factors were a driver of several major international field campaigns in the 1990s and early 2000s and attracted many scientists to the region. Some researchers were interested in understanding fundamental processes governing chemistry of the atmosphere and interaction with climate change. Others found favorable conditions for evaluating satellite- derived measurements of atmospheric properties and a changing land surface. With that background in mind a workshop on atmospheric chemistry was held in South Africa. Sponsored by the International Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution (ICACGP; http://www.icacgp.org/), the workshop received generous support from Eskom, the South African power utility; and the Climatology Research Group of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

  6. General Chemistry for Waste Handlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sixtus, Michael E.

    This manual is intended for use in presenting a course which provides the content-specific general chemistry education required for the safety awareness and job enhancement of persons employed as waste handlers. The course, which was designed to be delivered to technicians at job sites in a lecture/demonstration format with several hands-on…

  7. Chemistry Perfumes Your Daily Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortineau, Anne-Dominique

    2004-01-01

    A synopsis on the history of perfumery is presented, along with the various processes accessible for obtaining natural perfume constituents, and creation of synthetic chemicals. The important contribution of organic chemists in the invention of perfumes, aspects of fragrance chemistry, and general information on the perfume industry are…

  8. A Comprehensive General Chemistry Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeder, Ryan D.; Jeffery, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of a comprehensive demonstration suitable for a high school or first-year undergraduate introductory chemistry class. The demonstration involves placing a burning candle in a container adjacent to a beaker containing a basic solution with indicator. After adding a lid, the candle will extinguish and the produced…

  9. Radiation Chemistry in Organized Assemblies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. K.; Chen, T. S.

    1981-01-01

    Expands the basic concepts regarding the radiation chemistry of simple aqueous systems to more complex, but well defined, organized assemblies. Discusses the differences in behavior in comparison to simple systems. Reviews these techniques: pulse radiolysis, laser flash, photolysis, and steady state irradiation by gamma rays or light. (CS)

  10. Green Chemistry with Microwave Energy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green chemistry utilizes a set of 12 principles that reduces or eliminates the use or generation of hazardous substances in the design, manufacture, and applications of chemical products (1). This newer chemical approach protects the environment by inventing safer and eco-friendl...

  11. Green chemistry for chemical synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao-Jun; Trost, Barry M.

    2008-01-01

    Green chemistry for chemical synthesis addresses our future challenges in working with chemical processes and products by inventing novel reactions that can maximize the desired products and minimize by-products, designing new synthetic schemes and apparati that can simplify operations in chemical productions, and seeking greener solvents that are inherently environmentally and ecologically benign. PMID:18768813

  12. News from Online: Kitchen Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    2000-10-01

    And one of the best sources for kitchen activities is the JCE Classroom Activities from the Journal of Chemical Education, edited by Nancy S. Gettys and Erica K. Jacobsen. Go to Anthocyanins: A Colorful Class of Compounds for acid-base indicators made from another item in the kitchen, purple cabbage--my favorite kitchen chemistry experiment.

  13. Text Editing in Chemistry Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Low, Renae; Sweller, John

    2002-01-01

    Describes experiments with Australian high school students that investigated differences in performance on chemistry word problems between two learning strategies: text editing, and conventional problem solving. Concluded that text editing had no advantage over problem solving in stoichiometry problems, and that the suitability of a text editing…

  14. Thirty years through vanadium chemistry.

    PubMed

    Costa Pessoa, J

    2015-06-01

    The relevance of vanadium in biological systems is known for many years and vanadium-based catalysts have important industrial applications, however, till the beginning of the 80s research on vanadium chemistry and biochemistry did not receive much attention from the scientific community. The understanding of the broad bioinorganic implications resulting from the similarities between phosphate and vanadate(V) and the discovery of vanadium dependent enzymes gave rise to an enormous increase in interest in the chemistry and biological relevance of vanadium. Thereupon the last 30years corresponded to a period of enormous research effort in these fields, as well as in medicinal applications of vanadium and in the development of catalysts for use in fine-chemical synthesis, some of these inspired by enzymatic active sites. Since the 80s my group in collaboration with others made contributions, described throughout this text, namely in the understanding of the speciation of vanadium compounds in aqueous solution and in biological fluids, and to the transport of vanadium compounds in blood plasma and their uptake by cells. Several new types of vanadium compounds were also synthesized and characterized, with applications either as prospective therapeutic drugs or as homogeneous or heterogenized catalysts for the production of fine chemicals. The developments made are described also considering the international context of the evolution of the knowledge in the chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry of vanadium compounds during the last 30years. This article was compiled based on the Vanadis Award presentation at the 9th International Vanadium Symposium.

  15. Botany, Chemistry, and Tropical Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headrick, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the role played by botany and chemistry in the development, exploitation, and later deterioration of tropical economies. Although near equals in 19th-century international trade, the development of synthetics by European scientists in the early 20th century crippled the tropical economies. Research, innovation, and investment protected…

  16. Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Sharon S.

    1988-01-01

    This review compares "Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry" with the "Kirk-Othmer Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology," two prominent encyclopedias of chemical technology and industry. Cost, quantity of information, organization, illustrations, authorship, abbreviations, online availability, and content of articles are discussed. (MES)

  17. Chromium Chemistry in the Subsurface

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromium (VI) (Cr) is carcinogenic and a threat to human and ecological health. There are adequate and acceptable methods to characterize and assess Cr contaminated sites. Cr chemistry in the environment is well understood. There are documented methods to address Cr contaminat...

  18. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  19. Microcomputer Applications in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Joseph W.

    The first part of this paper addresses the following topics: (1) the usefulness of microcomputers; (2) applications for microcomputers in analytical chemistry; (3) costs; (4) major microcomputer systems and subsystems; and (5) which microcomputer to buy. Following these brief comments, the major focus of the paper is devoted to a discussion of…

  20. Dreyfus/Wilson Chemistry Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanis, Dave

    1982-01-01

    Describes a four-week summer science program for high school chemistry teachers. The program was divided into four segments and focused on "Electrons in Motion." Specific areas addressed included instructional methodology, electron transfer processes, electrons and kinetics/chemical reactions, and background information on the tetrahederal atom…

  1. Chemistry Curriculum Guide. Bulletin 1660.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Academic Programs.

    This curriculum guide, developed to establish statewide curriculum standards for the Louisiana Competency-based Education Program, contains the minimum competencies and process skills that should be included in a chemistry course. It consists of: (1) a rationale for an effective science program; (2) a list and description of four major goals of…

  2. Analytical Chemistry and the Microchip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Robert K.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical techniques used at various points in making microchips are described. They include: Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (silicon purity); optical emission spectroscopy (quantitative thin-film composition); X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (chemical changes in thin films); wet chemistry, instrumental analysis (process chemicals);…

  3. Teaching Techniques in Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Diane

    This master's thesis presents several instructional methods and techniques developed for each of eleven topics or subject areas in clinical chemistry: carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, diagnostic enzymology, endocrinology, toxicology, quality control, electrolytes, acid base balance, hepatic function, nonprotein nitrogenous compounds, and…

  4. Synthesis: Click chemistry gets reversible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, David A.

    2016-10-01

    'Click' chemistry allows for the linking together of chemical modules, however, there are currently no methods that also allow for facile 'declicking' to unlink them. Now, a method has been developed to click together amines and thiols, and then allow a chemically triggered declick reaction to release the original molecular components.

  5. Organometallic chemistry: A new metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Elisabeth T.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2016-08-01

    Carbonyls and alkenes, two of the most common functional groups in organic chemistry, generally do not react with one another. Now, a simple Lewis acid has been shown to catalyse metathesis between alkenes and ketones in a new carbonyl olefination reaction.

  6. The Chemistry of the Planets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Introduces knowledge of planetary chemistry for possible use in teaching. Discusses the chemical composition of the planets; the atmosphere and clouds of Venus, Jupiter and its moons, and Titan. Includes diagrams of the greenhouse effects in the solar system, elemental abundances, and the chemical composition of Jupiter. (RT)

  7. Argumentation in Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Joi Phelps

    2011-01-01

    To address the need for reform in undergraduate science education a new instructional model called "Argument-Driven Inquiry" (ADI) was developed and then implemented in a undergraduate chemistry course at a community college in the southeastern United States (Sampson, Walker, & Grooms, 2009; Walker, Sampson, & Zimmerman, in press). The ADI…

  8. The Chemistry of Optical Discs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, David

    2002-01-01

    Explains the chemistry used in compact discs (CD), digital versatile discs (DVD), and magneto-optical (MO) discs focusing on the steps of initial creation of the mold, the molding of the polycarbonate, the deposition of the reflective layers, the lacquering of the CDs, and the bonding of DVDs. (Contains 15 references.) (YDS)

  9. An Introduction to Air Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Samuel S.; Charlson, Robert J.

    Designed for those with no previous experience in the field, this book synthesizes the areas of chemistry and meteorology required to bring into focus some of the complex problems associated with the atmospheric environment. Subject matter moves from a review of the relevant chemical and meteorological principles to a discussion of the general…

  10. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  11. Electrochemical studies of corrosion inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single salts, as well as multicomponent mixtures, on corrosion inhibition was studied for type 1010 steel; for 5052, 1100, and 2219-T87 aluminum alloys; and for copper. Molybdate-containing inhibitors exhibit an immediate, positive effect for steel corrosion, but an incubation period may be required for aluminum before the effect of a given inhibitor can be determined. The absence of oxygen was found to provide a positive effect (smaller corrosion rate) for steel and copper, but a negative effect for aluminum. This is attributed to the two possible mechanisms by which aluminum can oxidize. Corrosion inhibition is generally similar for oxygen-rich and oxygen-free environments. The results show that the electrochemical method is an effective means of screening inhibitors for the corrosion of single metals, with caution to be exercised in the case of aluminum.

  12. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  13. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  14. Corrosion inhibitors from expired drugs.

    PubMed

    Vaszilcsin, Nicolae; Ordodi, Valentin; Borza, Alexandra

    2012-07-15

    This paper presents a method of expired or unused drugs valorization as corrosion inhibitors for metals in various media. Cyclic voltammograms were drawn on platinum in order to assess the stability of pharmaceutically active substances from drugs at the metal-corrosive environment interface. Tafel slope method was used to determine corrosion rates of steel in the absence and presence of inhibitors. Expired Carbamazepine and Paracetamol tablets were used to obtain corrosion inhibitors. For the former, the corrosion inhibition of carbon steel in 0.1 mol L(-1) sulfuric acid solution was about 90%, whereas for the latter, the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the same material in the 0.25 mol L(-1) acetic acid-0.25 mol L(-1) sodium acetate buffer solution was about 85%.

  15. An environmentally friendly scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, J.B.; Brown, J.M.

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes a method of inhibiting the formation of scales such as barium and strontium sulfate in low pH aqueous systems, and calcium carbonate in systems containing high concentrations of dissolved iron. The solution, chemically, involves treating the aqueous system with an inhibitor designed to replace organic-phosphonates. Typical low pH aqueous systems where the inhibitor is particularly useful are oilfield produced-water, resin bed water softeners that form scale during low pH, acid regeneration operations. Downhole applications are recommended where high concentrations of dissolved iron are present in the produced water. This new approach to inhibition replaces typical organic phosphonates and polymers with a non-toxic, biodegradable scale inhibitor that performs in harsh environments.

  16. Diverse inhibitors of aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Robert A; Boston, Rebecca S; Payne, Gary A

    2008-03-01

    Pre-harvest and post-harvest contamination of maize, peanuts, cotton, and tree nuts by members of the genus Aspergillus and subsequent contamination with the mycotoxin aflatoxin pose a widespread food safety problem for which effective and inexpensive control strategies are lacking. Since the discovery of aflatoxin as a potently carcinogenic food contaminant, extensive research has been focused on identifying compounds that inhibit its biosynthesis. Numerous diverse compounds and extracts containing activity inhibitory to aflatoxin biosynthesis have been reported. Only recently, however, have tools been available to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which these inhibitors affect aflatoxin biosynthesis. Many inhibitors are plant-derived and a few may be amenable to pathway engineering for tissue-specific expression in susceptible host plants as a defense against aflatoxin contamination. Other compounds show promise as protectants during crop storage. Finally, inhibitors with different modes of action could be used in comparative transcriptional and metabolomic profiling experiments to identify regulatory networks controlling aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  17. Neglect of Solid State Chemistry Scored

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    At a recent symposium concerning the teaching of solid state chemistry in the classroom, many educators indicated that important areas of solid state chemistry were being neglected in college curricula. (RH)

  18. Environmental Chemistry in the High School Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearns, Carole

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the incorporation of environmental chemistry topics into the traditional high school chemistry curriculum. Describes and provides lesson plans for the sulfur cycle and acid rain, and radioactivity and nuclear energy. Considers possible laboratory experiments. (CW)

  19. Some Exercises Reflecting Green Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Yu-Min; Wang, Yong-Cheng; Geng, Zhi-Yuan

    2004-01-01

    Some exercises to introduce students to the concept of green chemistry are given. By doing these exercises, students develop an appreciation for the role of green chemistry on feedstock substitution, milder reaction conditions, reduced environmental exposure, and resource conservation.

  20. Outlook Bright for Computers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Rudy M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the recent decision to close down the National Resource for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC), implications of that decision, and various alternatives in the field of computational chemistry. (CS)

  1. EVALUATING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF GREEN CHEMISTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory is developing a methodology for the evaluation of reaction chemistries. This methodology, called GREENSCOPE (Gauging Reaction Effectiveness for the ENvironmental Sustainability of Chemistries with a multi-Objective Proc...

  2. Chemistry for Artists and Art Buffs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1979-01-01

    This course provides an attractive introduction to chemistry for a group of students who would normally avoid traditional chemistry courses. Topics include color, pigments, metals, ceramics, glass, paints, plastics, fibers, and dyes. (BB)

  3. Process chemistry {ampersand} statistics quality assurance plan

    SciTech Connect

    Meznarich, H.K.

    1996-08-01

    This document provides quality assurance guidelines and quality control requirements for Process Chemistry and Statistics. This document is designed on the basis of Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Plan (HASQAP) technical guidelines and is used for governing process chemistry activities.

  4. Discovery of a series of cyclohexylethylamine-containing protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors exhibiting potent cellular activity.

    PubMed

    Henry, K J; Wasicak, J; Tasker, A S; Cohen, J; Ewing, P; Mitten, M; Larsen, J J; Kalvin, D M; Swenson, R; Ng, S C; Saeed, B; Cherian, S; Sham, H; Rosenberg, S H

    1999-11-18

    Synthesis of a library of secondary benzylic amines based on the Sebti-Hamilton type peptidomimetic farnesyltransferase (FTase) inhibitor FTI-276 (1) led to the identification of 6 as a potent enzyme inhibitor (IC(50) of 8 nM) which lacked the problematic thiol residue which had been a common theme in many of the more important FTase inhibitors reported to date. It has previously been disclosed that addition of o-tolyl substitution to FTase inhibitors of the general description 2 had a salutary effect on both FTase inhibition and inhibition of Ras prenylation in whole cells. Combination of these two observations led us to synthesize 7, a potent FTase inhibitor which displayed an IC(50) of 0.16 nM for in vitro inhibition of FTase and an EC(50) of 190 nM for inhibition of whole cell Ras prenylation. Modification of 7 by classical medicinal chemistry led to the discovery of a series of potent FTase inhibitors, culminating in the identification of 25 which exhibited an IC(50) of 0.20 nM and an EC(50) of 4.4 nM. In vivo tests in a nude mouse xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer (MiaPaCa cells) showed that oral dosing of 25 gave rise to impressive attenuation of the growth of this aggressive tumor cell line.

  5. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  6. Results of Aluminosilicate Inhibitor Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    2001-06-27

    The aluminosilicate scale in the 2H Evaporator has precluded operation since late 1999. The chemistry of scale formation is known but the mechanism(s) for deposition are not well understood. Tests have been conducted to determine if chemical agents could prevent aluminosilicate formation under conditions similar to Tank 43H. Additionally, particle growth inhibition is also tested.

  7. Environmental Chemistry Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-08-01

    111 pg, leading to a body fat concentration of about 40 ppt (12). Lithium Battery AdvancesRechargeable Power SourceRecent advances in lithium ion battery technology may allow these devices to become the rechargeable power source of choice in electric cars of the future. Due to their high voltage, they can store a large amount of energy per given mass or volume of battery. In the past, however, such batteries have been somewhat impractical because they had to be hermetically sealed and required nonaqueous electrolytes due to lithium's violent reaction with water. In the newly developed battery, the electrolyte is water that already contains a high concentration of Li+ ions; elemental lithium (present as LiMn2O4 in one electrode) is unreactive in this medium unless an external connection to the other electrode is made (13). Air-Pollution Control for Power PlantsA process called SNOX, which removes both NOx and SO2 from the flue gases produced by coal-fired power plants, has been developed and demonstrated. The nitrogen oxides are first reduced to N2. The resulting gas is then heated and catalytically oxidized to sulfur trioxide, which is then hydrated to sulfuric acid. More than 90% of the NOx and SO2 were removed from the flue gases in the demonstration held at an Ohio Edison plant (14). Literature Cited Williams, D. Nature 1994, 371, 556. Emsley, J. New Scientist 1994, (Oct 1), 14. McMichael, A. J. American Journal of Epidemiology 1994, 140, 489-499. Chemical and Engineering News 1994, (Oct 10), 5. Santee, M. L. Science 1995, 267, 849-852. Chemical and Engineering News 1994, (Nov 14). Solomon, S. Journal of Geophysical Research 1994, 99, 20491-20499. Wennberg, P. O. Science 1994, 266, 398-404. Viggiano, A. A. Science 1995, 267, 82-84. Summary in Chemistry and Engineering News 1995, (Jan 9), 23. Schottler, S. P.; Eisenreich, S. J. Environmental Science and Technology 1994, 28, 2228-2232. Lang, L. Environmental Health Perspectives 1993, 101, 578-583. Chemical and

  8. Fragment-based discovery of potent inhibitors of the anti-apoptotic MCL-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Petros, Andrew M; Swann, Steven L; Song, Danying; Swinger, Kerren; Park, Chang; Zhang, Haichao; Wendt, Michael D; Kunzer, Aaron R; Souers, Andrew J; Sun, Chaohong

    2014-03-15

    Apoptosis is regulated by the BCL-2 family of proteins, which is comprised of both pro-death and pro-survival members. Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant cells. One way in which cancer cells achieve this evasion is thru overexpression of the pro-survival members of the BCL-2 family. Overexpression of MCL-1, a pro-survival protein, has been shown to be a resistance factor for Navitoclax, a potent inhibitor of BCL-2 and BCL-XL. Here we describe the use of fragment screening methods and structural biology to drive the discovery of novel MCL-1 inhibitors from two distinct structural classes. Specifically, cores derived from a biphenyl sulfonamide and salicylic acid were uncovered in an NMR-based fragment screen and elaborated using high throughput analog synthesis. This culminated in the discovery of selective and potent inhibitors of MCL-1 that may serve as promising leads for medicinal chemistry optimization efforts. PMID:24582986

  9. Overcoming Chemical, Biological, and Computational Challenges in the Development of Inhibitors Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Luca; McKenzie, Grahame; Spring, David R.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Huggins, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) underlie the majority of biological processes, signaling, and disease. Approaches to modulate PPIs with small molecules have therefore attracted increasing interest over the past decade. However, there are a number of challenges inherent in developing small-molecule PPI inhibitors that have prevented these approaches from reaching their full potential. From target validation to small-molecule screening and lead optimization, identifying therapeutically relevant PPIs that can be successfully modulated by small molecules is not a simple task. Following the recent review by Arkin et al., which summarized the lessons learnt from prior successes, we focus in this article on the specific challenges of developing PPI inhibitors and detail the recent advances in chemistry, biology, and computation that facilitate overcoming them. We conclude by providing a perspective on the field and outlining four innovations that we see as key enabling steps for successful development of small-molecule inhibitors targeting PPIs. PMID:26091166

  10. The Philosophy of Chemistry as a New Resource for Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Olimpia; Labarca, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The philosophy of chemistry has offered new tools that can guide educators in deciding how to balance descriptive and theoretical chemistry. The philosophy of chemistry has positive effects on the way that chemistry is taught and learned and it also leads educators to reach a better understanding of their own scientific discipline.

  11. The Journal of Kitchen Chemistry: A Tool for Instructing the Preparation of a Chemistry Journal Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Jonathan K.; LeBaron, Tyler W.; Collins, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Writing assignments are typically incorporated into chemistry courses in an attempt to enhance the learning of chemistry or to teach technical writing to chemistry majors. This work addresses the development of chemistry-major writing skills by focusing on the rigorous guidelines and conventions associated with the preparation of a journal…

  12. DanceChemistry: Helping Students Visualize Chemistry Concepts through Dance Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Gidget C.; Edwards, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    A visual aid teaching tool, the DanceChemistry video series, has been developed to teach fundamental chemistry concepts through dance. These educational videos portray chemical interactions at the molecular level using dancers to represent chemical species. Students reported that the DanceChemistry videos helped them visualize chemistry ideas in a…

  13. Moving Chemistry Education into 3D: A Tetrahedral Metaphor for Understanding Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahaffy, Peter

    2006-01-01

    A new conceptual metaphor is proposed to enrich the description of chemistry education and support the many existing efforts to help students make connections with the chemistry found in textbooks. A widely used metaphor for chemistry education takes the shape of a planar triangle that highlights three thinking levels in learning chemistry such as…

  14. One-world chemistry and systems thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlin, Stephen A.; Mehta, Goverdhan; Hopf, Henning; Krief, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The practice and overarching mission of chemistry need a major overhaul in order to be fit for purpose in the twenty-first century and beyond. The concept of 'one-world' chemistry takes a systems approach that brings together many factors, including ethics and sustainability, that are critical to the future role of chemistry.

  15. Activities across Nation Mark National Chemistry Week.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Ernest, Ed.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes national and local activities done during National Chemistry Week including chemistry demonstrations, shopping center exhibits, contests, and museum exhibits. Discusses the supplementary material about chemistry in selected editions of 16 newspapers, "Solution for the Future." Presents many pictures showing those activities. (YP)

  16. Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murov, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The Reaction-Map of Organic Chemistry lists all the most commonly studied reactions in organic chemistry on one page. The discussed Reaction-Map will act as another learning aide for the students, making the study of organic chemistry much easier.

  17. Supplemental Instruction in Physical Chemistry I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toby, Ellen; Scott, Timothy P.; Migl, David; Kolodzeji, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Physical chemistry I at Texas A&M University is an upper division course requiring mathematical and analytical skills. As such, this course poses a major problem for many Chemistry, Engineering, Biochemistry and Genetics majors. Comparisons between participants and non-participants in Supplemental Instruction for physical chemistry were made…

  18. Undergraduate Chemistry Education: A Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Keegan; Alper, Joe

    2014-01-01

    "Undergraduate Chemistry Education" is the summary of a workshop convened in May 2013 by the Chemical Science Roundtable of the National Research Council to explore the current state of undergraduate chemistry education. Research and innovation in undergraduate chemistry education has been done for many years, and one goal of this…

  19. A Discovery Chemistry Experiment on Buffers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulevich, Suzanne E.; Herrick, Richard S.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    The Holy Cross Chemistry Department has designed and implemented an experiment on buffers as part of our Discovery Chemistry curriculum. The pedagogical philosophy of Discovery Chemistry is to make the laboratory the focal point of learning for students in their first two years of undergraduate instruction. We first pose questions in prelaboratory…

  20. Diversity and Periodicity: An Inorganic Chemistry Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huheey, James

    This book is one in a series of Interdisciplinary Approaches to Chemistry (IAC) designed to help students discover that chemistry is a lively science and actively used to pursue solutions to the important problems of today. It is expected for students to see how chemistry takes place continuously all around and to readily understand the daily…

  1. An Approach towards Teaching Green Chemistry Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Arnum, Susan D.

    2005-01-01

    A useful metrics system for the assessment of the environmental impact of chemical processes is utilized to illustrate several of the principles of green chemistry. The use of this metrics system in conjunction with laboratory experiments in green chemistry would provide for reinforcement in both the theory and practice of green chemistry.

  2. Chemistry, A Syllabus for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is a 1971 reprint of the chemistry syllabus printed in 1966 for the state of New York. This course of study presents a modern view of chemistry suitable for pupils with a wide range of skills and abilities. The outline of topics provides the unifying principles of chemistry together with related facts. The principles included in the outline…

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY CAREERS IN GOVERNMENT AGENCIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Careers in chemistry and chemistry related fields can be very rewarding and enriching. Being an environmental chemist for a government agency requires a broad background in the field of chemistry. A knowledge of the operation of several analytical and preparatory instruments is...

  4. Forensic Chemistry--A Symposium Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a collection of articles to provide chemistry teachers with resource materials to add forensic chemistry units to their chemistry courses. Topics range from development of forensic science laboratory courses and mock-crime scenes to forensic serology and analytical techniques. (JN)

  5. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 2: Methane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  6. Greener Approaches to Undergraduate Chemistry Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchhoff, Mary, Ed.; Ryan, Mary Ann, Ed.

    This laboratory manual introduces the idea of Green Chemistry, which is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. Instructional samples are included to help teachers integrate green chemistry into the college chemistry curriculum. Each laboratory includes: (1) a…

  7. Affordances of Instrumentation in General Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Kristin Mary Daniels

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out what students in the first chemistry course at the undergraduate level (general chemistry for science majors) know about the affordances of instrumentation used in the general chemistry laboratory and how their knowledge develops over time. Overall, students see the PASCO(TM) system as a useful and accurate…

  8. Introducing Green Chemistry in Teaching and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Terrence J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes key elements for the research and teaching components of green chemistry, an environmentally friendly approach to chemistry. Presents an outline of an introductory course to green chemistry and other efforts at Carnegie Mellon University to incorporate the environment in a fertile manner into teaching. (JRH)

  9. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 17: Arenes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  10. JCE Resources for Chemistry and Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Erica K.

    2001-10-01

    This annotated bibliography shares the best "pictures" of chemistry and art from past issues of the Journal of Chemical Education--many thousands of well-crafted words and articles that tie in with National Chemistry Week's 2001 theme, Celebrating Chemistry and Art.

  11. 42 CFR 493.929 - Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemistry. 493.929 Section 493.929 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.929 Chemistry. The subspecialties under the specialty of chemistry for which a proficiency testing program may offer proficiency testing are...

  12. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  13. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  14. 42 CFR 493.929 - Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemistry. 493.929 Section 493.929 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.929 Chemistry. The subspecialties under the specialty of chemistry for which a proficiency testing program may offer proficiency testing are...

  15. 42 CFR 493.929 - Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemistry. 493.929 Section 493.929 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.929 Chemistry. The subspecialties under the specialty of chemistry for which a proficiency testing program may offer proficiency testing are...

  16. 40 CFR 158.2210 - Product chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Product chemistry. 158.2210 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Antimicrobial Pesticide Data Requirements § 158.2210 Product chemistry. The product chemistry data requirements of subpart D of this part apply to antimicrobial products covered by...

  17. 42 CFR 493.929 - Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemistry. 493.929 Section 493.929 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.929 Chemistry. The subspecialties under the specialty of chemistry for which a proficiency testing program may offer proficiency testing are...

  18. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...

  19. 42 CFR 493.929 - Chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemistry. 493.929 Section 493.929 Public Health... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.929 Chemistry. The subspecialties under the specialty of chemistry for which a proficiency testing program may offer proficiency testing are...

  20. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a...