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Sample records for inhibitory avoidance retention

  1. Glucocorticoid-cholinergic interactions in the dorsal striatum in memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance training

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Resendis, Oscar; Medina, Andrea C.; Serafín, Norma; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A.; Roozendaal, Benno; Quirarte, Gina L.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that glucocorticoid hormones act in a variety of brain regions to enhance the consolidation of memory of emotionally motivated training experiences. We previously reported that corticosterone, the major glucocorticoid in the rat, administered into the dorsal striatum immediately after inhibitory avoidance training dose-dependently enhances memory consolidation of this training. There is also abundant evidence that the intrinsic cholinergic system of the dorsal striatum is importantly involved in memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance training. However, it is presently unknown whether these two neuromodulatory systems interact within the dorsal striatum in the formation of long-term memory. To address this issue, we first investigated in male Wistar rats whether the muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine administered into the dorsal striatum immediately after inhibitory avoidance training enhances 48 h retention of the training. Subsequently, we examined whether an attenuation of glucocorticoid signaling by either a systemic administration of the corticosterone-synthesis inhibitor metyrapone or an intra-striatal infusion of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU 38486 would block the memory enhancement induced by oxotremorine. Our findings indicate that oxotremorine dose-dependently enhanced 48 h retention latencies, but that the administration of either metyrapone or RU 38486 prevented the memory-enhancing effect of oxotremorine. In the last experiment, corticosterone was infused into the dorsal striatum together with the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine immediately after inhibitory avoidance training. Scopolamine blocked the enhancing effect of corticosterone on 48 h retention performance. These findings indicate that there are mutual interactions between glucocorticoids and the striatal cholinergic system in enhancing the consolidation of memory of inhibitory avoidance training. PMID:22737110

  2. Chlorpheniramine facilitates inhibitory avoidance in teleosts submitted to telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Faganello, F R; Mattioli, R

    2008-05-01

    The present study investigated the involvement of H(1) histaminegic receptor on the acquisition of inhibitory avoidance in Carassius auratus submitted to telencephalic ablation. The fish were submitted to telencephalic ablation 5 days before the experiment. The inhibitory avoidance procedure included 1 day for habituation, 3 days for training composed of 3 trials each (1st day: T1, T2, T3; 2nd day: 2T1, 2T2, 2T3; 3rd day: 3T1, 3T2, 3T3) and 1 day for test. On training days, the fish were placed in a white compartment, after 30 s the door was opened. When the fish crossed to a black compartment, a weight was dropped (aversive stimuli). Immediately after the third trial, on training days, the fish received, intraperitoneally, one of the pharmacological treatments (saline (N = 20), 8 (N = 12) or 16 (N = 13) microg/g chlorpheniramine, CPA). On the test day, the time to cross to the black compartment was determined. The latency of the saline group increased significantly only on the 3rd trial of the 2nd training day (mean +/- SEM, T1 (50.40 +/- 11.69), 2T3 (226.05 +/- 25.01); ANOVA: P = 0.0249, Dunn test: P < 0.05). The group that received 8 microg/g CPA showed increased latencies from the 2nd training day until the test day (T1 (53.08 +/- 17.17), 2T2 (197.75 +/- 35.02), test (220.08 +/- 30.98); ANOVA: P = 0.0022, Dunn test: P < 0.05)). These results indicate that CPA had a facilitating effect on memory. We suggest that the fish submitted to telencephalic ablation were able to learn due to the local circuits of the mesencephalon and/or diencephalon and that CPA interferes in these circuits, probably due an anxiolytic-like effect.

  3. Haloperidol and chlorpheniramine interaction in inhibitory avoidance in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Faganello, F R; Medalha, C C; Mattioli, R

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible interaction between histaminergic and dopaminergic systems in learning and memory processes, in an inhibitory avoidance test in goldfish. Haloperidol, a dopaminergic antagonist, was administrated pre-training and the chlorpheniramine (CPA), a histaminergic antagonist, post-training. The inhibitory avoidance procedure was performed in 3 days, using a rectangular aquarium divided into two compartments (black and white), with a central door. On the first day, the animals were habituated for 10 min. On the second day, they were injected with 2 mg/kg of haloperidol or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) 20 min before training. Then, the animals were placed in the white compartment, the central door was opened and the time spent for crossing between compartments was recorded. After the fish crossed the line between compartments a 45 g weight was dropped. This procedure was done five times in a row. Immediately after the fifth trial, the fish were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with either saline or CPA (0.4, 1.0, 4.0, 8.0 or 16 mg/kg). On the next day (test) the time to cross was recorded again. On the training trials, the animals treated with DMSO or haloperidol presented a significant increase in the latencies indicating learning (Friedman P = 0.0062 and 0.0001). The latencies in the test day showed that groups pre-treated with haloperidol and treated with CPA presented a dose-dependent increase in latencies, and those treated with the 16 mg/kg CPA group showed a significant increase (ANOVA two-way followed by Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) P < 0.01). Thus, it can be suggested that the facilitatory action occurs due to an additive interaction between both systems, in a dose-dependent way.

  4. Auraptene consolidates memory, reverses scopolamine-disrupted memory in passive avoidance task, and ameliorates retention deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Yaghoobi, Najmeh Sadat; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Shahraki, Jafar; Rezaee, Ramin; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Auraptene (7-geranyloxycoumarin) (AUR), from Citrus species has shown anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-secretase inhibitory effects. Scopolamine is a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist which causes short-term memory impairments and is used for inducing animal model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This research aimed to investigate the effect of AUR on scopolamine-induced avoidance memory retention deficits in step-through task in mice. Materials and Methods: The effect of four-day pre-training injections of AUR (50, 75, and 100 mg/kg, subcutaneous (SC)) and scopolamine (1 mg/kg, IP), and their co-administration on avoidance memory retention in step-through passive avoidance task, was investigated by measuring the latency to enter to the dark chamber. Results: Pre-training administration of AUR caused significant increase in step-through latency in comparison with control group, 48, 96, and 168 hr after training trial. The findings of this study showed that scopolamine (1 mg/kg, IP, for four consecutive days) impaired passive avoidance memory retention compared to saline-treated animals. Step-through passive avoidance task results showed that AUR markedly reversed scopolamine-induced avoidance memory retention impairments, 24 and 168 hr after training trial in step-through task. Conclusion: Results from co-administration of AUR and scopolamine showed that AUR reversed scopolamine-induced passive avoidance memory retention impairments. PMID:26730337

  5. Nitric oxide in the nucleus accumbens is involved in retrieval of inhibitory avoidance memory by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Piri, Morteza; Nasehi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, the possible effect of nitric oxide agents injected into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the presence or absence of nicotine on morphine state-dependent memory in adult male Wistar rats was investigated. As a model of memory, a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task was used. Post-training injection of morphine (4 and 6mg/kg) dose dependently induced the impairment of memory retention. Administration of morphine (4 and 6mg/kg) before retention induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine (6mg/kg) influence. Injection of nicotine before retention (0.25 and 0.5mg/kg) alone and nicotine (0.1, 0.25 and 0.5mg/kg) plus an ineffective dose of morphine (2mg/kg) reversed the post-training morphine-induced memory impairment. The amnesia elicited by morphine (6mg/kg) was also prevented by pre-retention intra-NAc administration of a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, l-NAME (0.24μg/rat, intra-NAc). Interestingly, an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.1mg/kg) in combination with low doses of l-NAME (0.06 and 0.12μg/rat, intra-NAc) synergistically improved memory performance impaired by morphine given after training. It is important to note that intra-NAc administration of l-NAME before retention impaired memory retrieval by itself. In contrast, pre-retention administration of l-arginine, a nitric oxide (NO) precursor (0.25 and 0.5μg/rat, intra-NAc), which had no effect alone, prevented the nicotine reversal of morphine effect on memory. The results suggest a possible role for nitric oxide of nucleus accumbens in the improving effect of nicotine on the morphine-induced amnesia and morphine state-dependent memory.

  6. Role of D2 dopamine receptors of the ventral pallidum in inhibitory avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Lénárd, László; Ollmann, Tamás; László, Kristóf; Kovács, Anita; Gálosi, Rita; Kállai, Veronika; Attila, Tóth; Kertes, Erika; Zagoracz, Olga; Karádi, Zoltán; Péczely, László

    2017-03-15

    In our present experiments, the role of D2 dopamine (DA) receptors of the ventral pallidum (VP) was investigated in one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance paradigm. Animals were shocked 3 times in the conditioning trial, with 0.5mA current for 1s. Subsequently bilateral microinjection of the D2 DA receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the VP in three doses (0.1μg, 1.0μg or 5.0μg in 0.4μl saline). We also applied the D2 DA receptor antagonist sulpiride (0.4μg in 0.4μl saline) alone or 15min prior to the agonist treatment to elucidate whether the agonist effect was specific for the D2 DA receptors. Control animals received saline. In a supplementary experiment, it was also investigated whether application of the same conditioning method leads to the formation of short-term memory in the experimental animals. In the experiment with the D2 DA receptor agonist, only the 0.1μg quinpirole increased significantly the step-through latency during the test trials: retention was significant compared to the controls even 2 weeks after conditioning. The D2 DA receptor antagonist sulpiride pretreatment proved that the effect was due to the agonist induced activation of the D2 DA receptors of the VP. The supplementary experiment demonstrated that short-term memory is formed after conditioning in the experimental animals, supporting that the agonist enhanced memory consolidation in the first two experiments. Our results show that the activation of the D2 DA receptors in the VP facilitates memory consolidation as well as memory-retention in inhibitory avoidance paradigm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Memory enhancement by intrahippocampal, intraamygdala, or intraentorhinal infusion of platelet-activating factor measured in an inhibitory avoidance task.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, I; Fin, C; Schmitz, P K; Da Silva, R C; Jerusalinsky, D; Quillfeldt, J A; Ferreira, M B; Medina, J H; Bazan, N G

    1995-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is thought to be a retrograde messenger in long-term potentiation (LTP), enhances glutamate release and LTP through an action on presynaptic nerve endings. The PAF antagonist BN 52021 blocks CA1 LTP in hippocampal slices, and, when infused into rat dorsal hippocampus pre- or posttraining, blocks retention of inhibitory avoidance. Here we report that memory is affected by pre- or posttraining infusion of the PAF analog 1-O-hexadecyl-2-N-methylcarbamoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (mc-PAF) into either rat dorsal hippocampus, amygdala, or entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae in these brain regions. After recovery from surgery, the animals were trained in step-down inhibitory avoidance or in a spatial habituation task and tested for retention 24 h later. mc-PAF (1.0 microgram per side) enhanced retention test performance of the two tasks when infused into the hippocampus before training without altering training session performance. In addition, mc-PAF enhanced retention test performance of the avoidance task when infused into (i) the hippocampus 0 but not 60 min after training; (ii) the amygdala immediately after training; and (iii) the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. In confirmation of previous findings, BN 52021 (0.5 microgram per side) was found to be amnestic for the avoidance task when infused into the hippocampus or the amygdala immediately but not 30 or more minutes after training or into the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. These findings support the hypothesis that memory involves PAF-regulated events, possibly LTP, generated at the time of training in hippocampus and amygdala and 100 min later in the entorhinal cortex. PMID:7761446

  8. Intra-cerebellar microinjection of histamine enhances memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance learning in mice via H2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Canto-de-Souza, A; Mattioli, R

    2013-12-17

    Studies have demonstrated the relationship between the histaminergic system and the cerebellum, and we intend to investigate the role of the cerebellar histaminergic system on memory consolidation. This study investigated the effect of intra-cerebellar microinjection of histamine on memory retention of inhibitory avoidance in mice, and the role of H1 and H2 receptors in it. The cerebellar vermis of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of histaminergic drugs: in the experiment 1, saline (SAL) or histamine (HA 0.54, 1.36, 2.72 or 4.07 nmol); experiment 2, SAL or 1.36 nmol HA 5 min after a pretreatment with 0.16 nmol chlorpheniramine (CPA) or SAL; and experiment 3, SAL or 1.36 nmol HA 5 min after a pretreatment with 2.85 nmol ranitidine (RA) or SAL. Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. In experiment 1, animals microinjected with 1.36 nmol HA showed a higher latency to cross to the dark compartment compared to controls and to 2.72 and 4.07 nmol HA groups. In experiment 2, the combined infusions revealed difference between control (SAL+SAL) and SAL+HA and CPA+HA; while in the experiment 3 the analysis indicated differences in retention latency between mice injected with SAL+SAL and SAL+HA. The groups that received the H2 antagonist RA did not show difference compared to control. These results indicate that 1.36 nmol HA enhances memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance learning in mice and that the pretreatment with H2 antagonist RA was able to prevent this effect.

  9. Memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance requires histamine H1 receptor activation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Roberta; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Provensi, Gustavo; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Izquierdo, Ivan; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-05-10

    Retrieval represents a dynamic process that may require neuromodulatory signaling. Here, we report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for retrieval of inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory, because rats depleted of histamine through lateral ventricle injections of α-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, displayed impaired IA memory when tested 2 d after training. a-FMHis was administered 24 h after training, when IA memory trace was already formed. Infusion of histamine in hippocampal CA1 of brain histamine-depleted rats (hence, amnesic) 10 min before the retention test restored IA memory but was ineffective when given in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Intra-CA1 injections of selective H1 and H2 receptor agonists showed that histamine exerted its effect by activating the H1 receptor. Noteworthy, the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine disrupted IA memory retrieval in rats, thus strongly supporting an active involvement of endogenous histamine; 90 min after the retention test, c-Fos-positive neurons were significantly fewer in the CA1s of a-FMHis-treated rats that displayed amnesia compared with in the control group. We also found reduced levels of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1s of a-FMHis-treated animals compared with in controls. Increases in pCREB levels are associated with retrieval of associated memories. Targeting the histaminergic system may modify the retrieval of emotional memory; hence, histaminergic ligands might reduce dysfunctional aversive memories and improve the efficacy of exposure psychotherapies.

  10. Memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance requires histamine H1 receptor activation in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Roberta; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Provensi, Gustavo; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Izquierdo, Ivan; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-01-01

    Retrieval represents a dynamic process that may require neuromodulatory signaling. Here, we report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for retrieval of inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory, because rats depleted of histamine through lateral ventricle injections of α-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, displayed impaired IA memory when tested 2 d after training. a-FMHis was administered 24 h after training, when IA memory trace was already formed. Infusion of histamine in hippocampal CA1 of brain histamine-depleted rats (hence, amnesic) 10 min before the retention test restored IA memory but was ineffective when given in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Intra-CA1 injections of selective H1 and H2 receptor agonists showed that histamine exerted its effect by activating the H1 receptor. Noteworthy, the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine disrupted IA memory retrieval in rats, thus strongly supporting an active involvement of endogenous histamine; 90 min after the retention test, c-Fos–positive neurons were significantly fewer in the CA1s of a-FMHis–treated rats that displayed amnesia compared with in the control group. We also found reduced levels of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1s of a-FMHis–treated animals compared with in controls. Increases in pCREB levels are associated with retrieval of associated memories. Targeting the histaminergic system may modify the retrieval of emotional memory; hence, histaminergic ligands might reduce dysfunctional aversive memories and improve the efficacy of exposure psychotherapies. PMID:27118833

  11. Inhibitory avoidance in CD1 mice: sex matters, as does the supplier.

    PubMed

    Parra, Andrés; Rama, Encarnación; Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Monleón, Santiago

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of the present work was to study possible differences in the learning of inhibitory avoidance (also called passive avoidance) in male and female CD1 mice acquired from three different suppliers, for which a one-trial step-through version of the paradigm was employed. Ninety-six mice from Charles River (France), Janvier (France) and Harlan (The Netherlands) laboratories were divided by sex and assigned to group C, J or H, respectively (n=16). The animals were tested in the training phase (foot-shock: 0.3mA, 5s) and again for avoidance (no foot-shock delivered) one week later. Inhibitory avoidance learning (test latencies significantly higher than training latencies) was observed in every one of the six groups of animals. The variable Supplier was statistically significant, showing better to worse avoidance in C, J and H mice (in that order). A post hoc analysis showed differences between groups C and H. Females tended to exhibit avoidance learning to a greater extent than males. Our results suggest that inhibitory avoidance learning in CD1 mice varies depending on the breeding facilities from which they originate, and that females should be included in inhibitory avoidance studies.

  12. Differences in inhibitory avoidance, cortisol and brain gene expression in TL and AB zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gorissen, M; Manuel, R; Pelgrim, T N M; Mes, W; de Wolf, M J S; Zethof, J; Flik, G; van den Bos, R

    2015-06-01

    Recently, we established an inhibitory avoidance paradigm in Tupfel Long-Fin (TL) zebrafish. Here, we compared task performance of TL fish and fish from the AB strain; another widely used strain and shown to differ genetically and behaviourally from TL fish. Whole-body cortisol and telencephalic gene expression related to stress, anxiety and fear were measured before and 2 h post-task. Inhibitory avoidance was assessed in a 3-day paradigm: fish learn to avoid swimming from a white to a black compartment where a 3V-shock is given: day 1 (first shock), day 2 (second shock) and day 3 (no shock, sampling). Tupfel Long-Fin fish rapidly learned to avoid the black compartment and showed an increase in avoidance-related spatial behaviour in the white compartment across days. In contrast, AB fish showed no inhibitory avoidance learning. AB fish had higher basal cortisol levels and expression levels of stress-axis related genes than TL fish. Tupfel Long-Fin fish showed post-task learning-related changes in cortisol and gene expression levels, but these responses were not seen in AB fish. We conclude that AB fish show higher cortisol levels and no inhibitory avoidance than TL fish. The differential learning responses of these Danio strains may unmask genetically defined risks for stress-related disorders.

  13. Multiphasic retention deficits at periodic intervals after passive-avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Holloway, F A; Wansley, R

    1973-04-15

    Aftetr one-trial passive-avoidance training, indepelenet groups of rats tested promptly after training or at successive 6-hour intervals displayed a repetitive pattern of high then low retention scores. These results suggest that some physiological rhythm may interact with retention performance.

  14. Differential Arc protein expression in dorsal and ventral striatum after moderate and intense inhibitory avoidance training.

    PubMed

    González-Franco, Diego A; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A; Quirarte, Gina L

    2017-04-01

    Intense training refers to training mediated by emotionally arousing experiences, such as aversive conditioning motivated by relatively high intensities of foot-shock, which produces a strong memory that is highly resistant to extinction. Intense training protects memory consolidation against the amnestic effects of a wide variety of treatments, administered systemically or directly into brain structures. The mechanisms of this protective effect are unknown. To determine a potential neurobiological correlate of the protective effect of intense training, rats were trained in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task using different intensities of foot-shock (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0mA). Some rats from each group were sacrificed 45min after training for immunohistochemical Arc protein detection in dorsal and ventral striatum; other rats were tested for extinction during six consecutive days, starting 48h after training. The results showed that training with 1.0 and 2.0mA produced optimal retention scores, which were significantly higher than those of the 0.5 and 0.0mA groups. Also, a higher resistance to extinction was obtained with 2.0mA than with the other intensities. A high number of neurons expressed Arc in ventral, but not in dorsal striatum in both the 1.0 and 2.0mA groups, with a larger area of Arc signal in the latter group. We conclude that an increased Arc expression may be related to enhanced synaptic plasticity in the ventral striatum, suggesting that it may be one of the physiological substrates of enhanced learning.

  15. Effects of oxotremorine on inhibitory avoidance behaviour in two inbred strains of mice: interaction with 5-methoxy-NN-dimethyltriptamine.

    PubMed

    Pavone, F; Fagioli, S; Castellano, C

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the cholinergic muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine (0.005, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.04 mg/kg), the serotonergic agonist, 5-methoxy-NN-dimethyltriptamine (5-MeODMT) (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg), and their combination, were investigated in C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice using a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task, drug treatment being given immediately after the acquisition trial. Post-trial administration of oxotremorine facilitated, while post-trial administration of 5-MeODMT inhibited memory retention of both strains in a dose-dependent fashion. The DBA/2 strain was more affected by oxotremorine than the C57BL/6 mice; no strain-dependent sensitivity to serotonergic agonist administration was observed. In both strains, the combination of oxotremorine plus 5-MeODMT inhibited the performance improvement shown by the administration of the cholinergic agonist alone. The facilitatory role of cholinergic stimulation on retention performance was confirmed and an inhibitory action of the serotonergic system on memory processes was suggested. Moreover, the present results support a functional interaction between cholinergic and serotonergic systems on memory consolidation.

  16. Amnesia of Inhibitory Avoidance by Scopolamine Is Overcome by Previous Openfield Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colettis, Natalia C.; Snitcofsky, Marina; Kornisiuk, Edgar E.; Gonzalez, Emilio N.; Quillfeldt, Jorge A.; Jerusalinsky, Diana A.

    2014-01-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MAChR) blockade with scopolamine either extended or restricted to the hippocampus, before or after training in inhibitory avoidance (IA) caused anterograde or retrograde amnesia, respectively, in the rat, because there was no long-term memory (LTM) expression. Adult Wistar rats previously exposed to one or two…

  17. Amnesia of Inhibitory Avoidance by Scopolamine Is Overcome by Previous Openfield Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colettis, Natalia C.; Snitcofsky, Marina; Kornisiuk, Edgar E.; Gonzalez, Emilio N.; Quillfeldt, Jorge A.; Jerusalinsky, Diana A.

    2014-01-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MAChR) blockade with scopolamine either extended or restricted to the hippocampus, before or after training in inhibitory avoidance (IA) caused anterograde or retrograde amnesia, respectively, in the rat, because there was no long-term memory (LTM) expression. Adult Wistar rats previously exposed to one or two…

  18. Memory consolidation and reconsolidation of an inhibitory avoidance response in mice: effects of i.c.v. injections of hemicholinium-3.

    PubMed

    Boccia, M M; Acosta, G B; Blake, M G; Baratti, C M

    2004-01-01

    The immediate post-training i.c.v. administration of hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) (1 microg), a specific inhibitor of the high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) in brain cholinergic neurons, impaired retention test performance of a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance response in adult male CF-1 mice. The effect was observed in mice that received a footshock (0.8 mA, 50 Hz, 1 s) on the learning trial, and not only 48 h after training, but also 7 days after it. After the completion of the retention test at each of the training-test interval that were studied, the HACU in the hippocampus of HC-3-treated mice was not significantly different from that of saline-injected (1 microl) control groups. Mice that were over-reinforced (1.2 mA, 50 Hz, 1 s) on the learning trial, exhibited a high retention performance 48 h after training. The immediate i.c.v. injection of HC-3 (1 microg) after the retention test, that is, after memory reactivation, significantly impaired retention performance over 4 consecutive days, whereas the saline-injected control group shown a slight, but significant performance decrease only at the last retention test. Retention performance was unchanged in HC-3-treated mice not undergoing memory reactivation session. These results, taken together, indicate that HC-3, not only impaired consolidation, but also reconsolidation of an inhibitory avoidance task in mice, suggesting a critical participation of central cholinergic mechanisms in both memory processes.

  19. Modification of CO2 avoidance behaviour in Drosophila by inhibitory odorants.

    PubMed

    Turner, Stephanie Lynn; Ray, Anandasankar

    2009-09-10

    The fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster exhibits a robust and innate olfactory-based avoidance behaviour to CO(2), a component of odour emitted from stressed flies. Specialized neurons in the antenna and a dedicated neuronal circuit in the higher olfactory system mediate CO(2) detection and avoidance. However, fruitflies need to overcome this avoidance response in some environments that contain CO(2) such as ripening fruits and fermenting yeast, which are essential food sources. Very little is known about the molecular and neuronal basis of this unique, context-dependent modification of innate olfactory avoidance behaviour. Here we identify a new class of odorants present in food that directly inhibit CO(2)-sensitive neurons in the antenna. Using an in vivo expression system we establish that the odorants act on the Gr21a/Gr63a CO(2) receptor. The presence of these odorants significantly and specifically reduces CO(2)-mediated avoidance behaviour, as well as avoidance mediated by 'Drosophila stress odour'. We propose a model in which behavioural avoidance to CO(2) is directly influenced by inhibitory interactions of the novel odours with CO(2) receptors. Furthermore, we observe differences in the temporal dynamics of inhibition: the effect of one of these odorants lasts several minutes beyond the initial exposure. Notably, animals that have been briefly pre-exposed to this odorant do not respond to the CO(2) avoidance cue even after the odorant is no longer present. We also show that related odorants are effective inhibitors of the CO(2) response in Culex mosquitoes that transmit West Nile fever and filariasis. Our findings have broader implications in highlighting the important role of inhibitory odorants in olfactory coding, and in their potential to disrupt CO(2)-mediated host-seeking behaviour in disease-carrying insects like mosquitoes.

  20. Anxiolytic-like effect of chlorpheniramine in inhibitory avoidance in goldfish submitted to telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Faganello, Flávia Roberta; Mattioli, Rosana

    2007-01-30

    The aim of the present study was to verify the consequences of telencephalic ablation on the learning of inhibitory avoidance and anxiety in goldfish. The animals were submitted to telencephalic ablation or sham operations five days prior to the experimental procedure. The inhibitory avoidance procedure was performed in 3 days using a rectangular aquarium divided into two compartments (black and white) with a central door. On the first day, the animals were habituated for 10 min. On the second and third days, they were injected with saline (SAL), 16 mg/kg Chlorpheniramine (CPA), 40% Propylene glycol (PPG) or 1 mg/kg Diazepam (DZP) twenty minutes before training. Then the animals were placed in the white compartment, the central door was opened and the time spent for crossing between compartments was recorded. After the fish crossed the line between the compartments a 45-g weight was dropped. This procedure was performed three times in a row. The groups submitted or not to telencephalic ablation and treated with SAL presented a difference between training sessions; however, the groups treated with CPA, PPG or DZP did not show any differences between them. These results suggest that the treatment with CPA, PPG or DZP impaired the acquisition of inhibitory avoidance conditioning in animals regardless of telecenphalic ablation. In conclusion, telencephalic ablation does not disrupt the animals' capacity to learn the inhibitory avoidance task, and based on the fact that CPA showed similar effects to those of DZP on the animals submitted or not to telencephalic ablation, we suggest that the CPA presents an anxiolytic-like effect mediated by the diencephalon in goldfish.

  1. Inflammatory markers are associated with inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Esumi, L A; Palma, B D; Gomes, V L; Tufik, S; Hipólide, D C

    2011-08-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) causes detrimental effects to the body, such as memory impairment and weight loss. SD also changes the concentration of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, which, in turn, can affect cognitive functioning. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of these inflammatory mediators in inhibitory avoidance memory deficit in sleep-deprived rats. Male Wistar rats were deprived of sleep by the modified multiple platform method for 96 h, while their respective controls remained in their housing cages. To assess memory after SD, all animals underwent training, followed by the inhibitory avoidance task test 24h later. Also, the weight of each animal was recorded daily. In the first experiment, animals received an acute administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 or 75 μg/kg i.p.) 3h before the inhibitory avoidance training. In the experiment 2, the animals received acute or chronic administration of anti-IL-6 antibody (Ab, 2 μg/kg i.p.). The acute administration was performed 3h before the inhibitory avoidance training, while the chronic treatment administrations were performed daily during the SD period. The 75 μg/kg dose of LPS, but not the 50 μg/kg dose, caused a significant attenuation of memory impairment in the sleep-deprived animals. Although the treatments with the anti-IL-6 Ab did not produce any significant changes in cognitive performance, the Ab attenuated weight loss in sleep-deprived animals. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the modulation of memory deficit and weight loss that are observed in sleep-deprived rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Repeated administration of histamine improves memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance by lithium in mice.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Parsaei, Leila; Ahmadi, Shamseddin

    2008-01-01

    The influence of repeated administration of histamine on lithium-induced state dependency has been investigated. A single-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance task was used to assess memory in adult male NMRI mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of lithium (10 mg/kg), immediately after training (post-training), impaired inhibitory avoidance memory on the test day. Pre-test administration of lithium reversed amnesia induced by the drug given after training, with the maximum response at a dose of 10 mg/kg. Repeated intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine (20 microg/mouse) for 3 consecutive days followed by 5 days of no drug treatment improved memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance by a pre-test lower dose (5 mg/kg i.p.) of lithium. In contrast, 3 days of i.c.v. injections of both the histamine H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine (40 microg/mouse) and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (6.25 and 12.5 microg/mouse) prevented the improving effect of pre-test lithium (10 mg/kg i.p.) on memory retrieval. The results suggest that the repeated administration of histaminergic agents may induce a sensitization which affects the memory impairment induced by lithium.

  3. Dehydroepiandrosterone increases synaptosomal glutamate release and improves the performance in inhibitory avoidance task.

    PubMed

    Lhullier, F L R; Nicolaidis, R; Riera, N G; Cipriani, F; Junqueira, D; Dahm, K C S; Brusque, A M; Souza, D O

    2004-03-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) exerts multiple effects in the rodent central nervous system (CNS), mediated through its nongenomic actions on several neurotransmitter systems, increasing neuronal excitability, modulating neuronal plasticity and presenting neuroprotective properties. It has been demonstrated that DHEA is a potent modulator of GABA(A), NMDA and Sigma receptors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DHEA on (i) basal- and K(+)-stimulated l-[(3)H]glutamate release from synaptosomes (both in vitro and ex vivo), (ii) synaptosomal l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake (in vitro), and (iii) an inhibitory avoidance task (in vivo). The results indicated that DHEA in vitro increased glutamate release by 57%, and its intracerebroventricular infusion increased the basal-[(3)H]glutamate release by 15%. After 30 min of intraperitoneal administration, DHEA levels in the serum or CSF increased 33 and 21 times, respectively. Additionally, DHEA, intraperitoneally administrated 30 min before training, improved memory for inhibitory avoidance task. Concluding, DHEA could improve memory on an inhibitory avoidance task, perhaps due to its ability to physiologically strength the glutamatergic tonus by increasing glutamate release.

  4. On the participation of hippocampal p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in extinction and reacquisition of inhibitory avoidance memory.

    PubMed

    Rossato, J I; Bevilaqua, L R M; Lima, R H; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M

    2006-11-17

    Inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning relies on the formation of an association between stepping down from a platform present in a certain context (conditioned stimulus; CS) with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US; i.e. a footshock). A single CS-US pairing establishes a robust long-term memory expressed as an increase in step-down latency at testing. However, repeated retrieval of the avoidance response in the absence of the US induces extinction of IA memory. That is, recurring presentation of the CS alone results in a new learning indicating that the CS no longer predicts the US. Although the signaling pathways involved in the consolidation of IA and other fear-motivated memories have been profusely studied, little is known about the molecular requirements of fear memory extinction. Here we report that, as happens with its consolidation, extinction of IA long-term memory requires activity of the p38 subfamily of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, we found that inhibition of hippocampal p38MAPK blocked memory reacquisition after extinction without affecting either the increase in IA memory retention induced by a second training session or animal's locomotor/exploratory activity and anxiety state.

  5. Effects of histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Eidi, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem

    2003-03-28

    In the present study, the effects of the histamine and cholinergic systems on memory retention in adult male rats were investigated. Post-training intracerebroventricular injections were carried out in all the experiments. Cholinoceptor agonist, acetylcholine (1-10 microg/rat) or nicotine (1-10 microg/rat), increased, while a cholinoceptor antagonist, scopolamine (5-20 microg/rat), decreased memory retention. The response to acetylcholine was attenuated by scopolamine. Administration of histamine (5-20 microg/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (10-50 microg/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (1-50 microg/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists attenuated the response to histamine. Histamine reduced the acetylcholine- or nicotine-induced enhancement. The histamine receptor antagonists enhanced the nicotine- or acetylcholine-induced response. Histamine potentiated the inhibitory effect induced by scopolamine. It is concluded that histaminergic and cholinergic systems have opposing effects on memory retention. Also, the histaminergic system elicits an interaction with the cholinergic system in memory retention.

  6. Effects of Alcohol on Inhibitory Avoidance Learning in Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Amorim, Ricardo Rodrigues; Silva, Priscila Fernandes; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-10-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) can be used in studies addressing the effects of drugs on learning, memory, and anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the effect of different alcohol treatments (chronic and acute) on the learning and anxiety response of zebrafish in an inhibitory avoidance paradigm. Zebrafish were initially exposed to different alcohol treatments and submitted to an inhibitory avoidance protocol, where an electroshock was applied to the fish as they swam from the white to the black side of a shuttle box tank (naturally preferred environment of zebrafish). Animals from the control and 0.5% acute alcohol groups exhibited high latency to enter the black side of the tank after the first exposure to electroshock, in addition to higher freezing and a shorter distance from the bottom of the tank, suggesting acute alcohol exposure did not affect aversive learning in zebrafish. However, chronic exposure and alcohol withdrawal impaired the fish's capacity to properly respond to the aversive stimulus. Overall, our results show the harmful effects of chronic alcohol exposure, both continued intake and its cessation, but avoidance behavior persisted and anxiety increased following acute alcohol exposure.

  7. The effects of environmental enrichment and age-related differences on inhibitory avoidance in zebrafish (Danio rerio Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Gorissen, Marnix; Stokkermans, Mitchel; Zethof, Jan; Ebbesson, Lars O E; van de Vis, Hans; Flik, Gert; van den Bos, Ruud

    2015-04-01

    The inhibitory avoidance paradigm allows the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory formation in zebrafish (Danio rerio Hamilton). For zebrafish, the physiology and behavior associated with this paradigm are as yet poorly understood. We therefore assessed the effects of environmental enrichment and fish age on inhibitory avoidance learning. Fish raised in an environmentally enriched tank showed decreased anxiety-like behavior and increased exploration. Enrichment greatly reduced inhibitory avoidance in 6-month (6M)- and 12-month (12 M)-old fish. Following inhibitory avoidance, telencephalic mRNA levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna), neurogenic differentiation (neurod), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript 4 (cart4), and cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) were lower in enriched-housed fish, while the ratios of mineralocorticoid receptor (nr3c2)/glucocorticoid receptor α [nr3c1(α)] and glucocorticoid receptor β [nr3c1(β)]/glucocorticoid receptor α [nr3c1(α)] were higher. This was observed for 6M-old fish only, not for 24-month (24 M) old fish. Instead, 24 M-old fish showed delayed inhibitory avoidance, no effects of enrichment, and reduced expression of neuroplasticity genes. Overall, our data show strong differences in inhibitory avoidance behavior between zebrafish of different ages and a clear reduction in avoidance behavior following housing under environmental enrichment.

  8. Inhibitory effect of oxytocin on accelerated colonic motility induced by water-avoidance stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, M; Konagaya, T; Nogimori, T; Yoneda, M; Kasugai, K; Ohira, H; Kaneko, H

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have indicated that brain and gut activities are interrelated and exposure to several stressors, such as water-avoidance stress, stimulates the motor function of the gut through corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-signalling pathways in the brain. Central oxytocin is known to attenuate stress responses, including CRF expression in the brain. Here, we examined whether central oxytocin attenuated the acceleration of colonic motility induced by water-avoidance stress. A force transducer was attached to the distal colon of male rat, and the colonic motility and faecal pellet output were recorded while the rats were exposed to water-avoidance stress. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of oxytocin (5, 50 and 500 pmol) and the oxytocin receptor antagonist tocinoic acid (25 microg) were administered before exposure to water-avoidance stress, and the effect of oxytocin on colonic motor function was determined. Centrally administered oxytocin inhibited the accelerated colonic motility induced by water-avoidance stress. The effective dose ranged between 5 and 50 pmol on i.c.v. injection. Oxytocin also decreased the number of CRF-positive cells in the paraventricular nucleus and corticosterone release. The inhibitory effect of oxytocin on accelerated colonic motility was blocked by pretreatment with oxytocin receptor antagonist. Furthermore, centrally administered tocinoic acid enhanced the acceleration of colonic motility. These results suggested that endogenous central oxytocin may contribute to the regulation of colonic function and inhibit the brain CRF-signalling pathways targeting the gut, resulting in the inhibition of stress-induced colonic contractions.

  9. Effects of histamine and opioid systems on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Eidi, Maryam; Eidi, Akram; Oryan, Shahrbano

    2002-10-04

    The present study investigated the effect of interactions between histamine receptor agents and the opioid peptidergic system on memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats. Post-training intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections were carried out in all the experiments. Administration of histamine (20 micro g/rat) reduced, but the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, pyrilamine (20 and 50 micro g/rat), and the histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, cimetidine (10 and 50 micro g/rat), increased memory retention in rats. The histamine receptor antagonists decreased the response induced by histamine. Morphine (1-10 micro g/rat) reduced, while pentazocine (5 and 10 micro g/rat) or the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone (5 and 15 micro g/rat), increased memory retention. The combination of histamine with morphine showed potentiation. Effects of pyrilamine and cimetidine were attenuated by morphine. The responses to pentazocine and naloxone also were decreased by histamine. It is concluded that the histaminergic system has an interaction with opioidergic system that is involved in the memory retention process.

  10. Interactions of the dorsal hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens in formation of fear memory: difference in inhibitory avoidance learning and contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang-Chi; Liang, K C

    2014-07-01

    Learning active or reactive responses to fear involves different brain circuitry. This study examined how the nuclus accumbens (NAc), dorsal hippocampus (DH) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) may interact in memory processing for these two kinds of responses. Male Wistar rats with cannulae implanted in these areas were trained on a contextual fear conditioning or inhibitory avoidance task that respectively engaged a reactive or active response to fear in the test. Immediately after training, a memory modulating factor released by stress, norepinephrine (NE), was infused into one region and 4% lidocaine into another to examine if an upstream activation effect could be blocked by the downstream suppression. Retention tested 1 day later showed that in both tasks posttraining infusion of NE at different doses into either the DH or mPFC enhanced retention but the enhancement was blocked by concurrent infusion of lidocaine into the other region, suggesting reliance of the effect on functional integrity of both regions. Further, posttraining intra-NAc lidocaine infusion attenuated memory enhancement of NE infused to the DH or mPFC in the inhibitory avoidance task but did not do so in contextual fear conditioning. These results suggest that NE regulation of memory formation for the reactive and active responses to fear may rely on distinct interactions among the DH, mPFC and NAc. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanism underlying the inner membrane retention of Escherichia coli lipoproteins caused by Lol avoidance signals.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takashi; Matsuyama, Shin-ichi; Tokuda, Hajime

    2003-10-10

    Escherichia coli lipoproteins are localized to either the inner or outer membrane depending on the residue at position 2. The inner membrane retention signal, Asp at position 2 in combination with certain residues at position 3, functions as a Lol avoidance signal, i.e. the signal inhibits the recognition of lipoproteins by LolCDE that releases lipoproteins from the inner membrane. To understand the role of the residue at position 2, outer membrane-specific lipoproteins with Cys at position 2 were subjected to chemical modification followed by the release reaction in reconstituted proteoliposomes. Sulfhydryl-specific introduction of nonprotein molecules or a negative charge to Cys did not inhibit the LolCDE-dependent release. In contrast, oxidation of Cys to cysteic acid resulted in generation of the Lol avoidance signal, indicating that the Lol avoidance signal requires a critical length of negative charge at the second residue. Furthermore, not only modification of the carboxylic acid of Asp at position 2 but also that of the amine of phosphatidylethanolamine abolished the Lol avoidance function. Based on these results, the Lol avoidance mechanism is discussed.

  12. Memory reconsolidation of an inhibitory avoidance task in mice involves cytosolic ERK2 bidirectional modulation.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, M C; Blake, M G; Baratti, C M; Romano, A; Boccia, M M; Feld, M

    2015-05-21

    Reconsolidation has been defined as the process of memory stabilization after retrieval involving, among others, gene expression regulation and post-translational modifications. Many of these mechanisms are shared with memory consolidation. Here, we studied hippocampal ERK participation on memory reconsolidation of an inhibitory avoidance task in CF-1 mice. We found a retrieval-induced cytosolic ERK2 activation in the hippocampus (HIP) 15 min after memory reactivation, and an inhibition at 45 min. PD098059, a MEK1/2 (MAPK/ERK kinase) inhibitor, administered in the HIP immediately after retrieval impaired memory in a dose-dependent fashion. However, infusions of the highest dose of PD098059 performed 40 min after retrieval enhanced memory in mice trained with a weaker footshock. These results suggest for the first time that ERK2 is involved in memory reconsolidation in a biphasic fashion. Furthermore, the inhibition of ERK could either impair or enhance mice performance depending on ERK state of activation.

  13. Histamine enhances inhibitory avoidance memory consolidation through a H2 receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Weber C; Bonini, Juliana S; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2006-07-01

    Several evidences suggest that brain histamine is involved in memory consolidation but the actual contribution of the hippocampal histaminergic system to this process remains controversial. Here, we show that when infused into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus immediately after training in an inhibitory avoidance task, but not later, histamine induced a dose-dependent promnesic effect without altering locomotor activity, exploratory behavior, anxiety state or retrieval of the avoidance response. The facilitatory effect of intra-CA1 histamine was mimicked by the histamine N-methyltransferase inhibitor SKF-91844 as well as by the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit and it was blocked completely by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine. Conversely, the promnesic action of histamine was unaffected by the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine, the H3 receptor antagonist, thioperamide, and the NMDAr polyamine-binding site antagonist ifenprodil. By themselves, ranitidine, pyrilamine, thioperamide, and ifenprodil did not affect IA memory consolidation. Our data indicate that, when given into CA1, histamine enhances memory consolidation through a mechanism that involves activation of H2 receptors; however, endogenous CA1 histamine does not seem to participate in the consolidation of IA memory at least at the post-training times analyzed.

  14. EFFECTS OF ANISOMYCIN ON RETENTION OF THE PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE HABIT AS A FUNCTION OF AGE

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Hasker P.; Rosenzweig, Mark R.; Kinkade, Patrick T.; Bennett, Edward L.

    1980-09-01

    Three age groups of male Swiss albino CD-1 mice (2-3 mo, 6-7 mo, and 14-15 mo) were treated with a 120 mg/kg dose of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin or with an equal volume of saline at various times before and after training (20 min pretraining, 0, 10, 30, and 180 min posttraining) in a shock motivated passive-avoidance task. Young (2-3 mo) and intermediate-aged (6-7 mo) mice treated with anisomycin before or immediately after training demonstrated impaired retention at a 7 day test, but retention was normal for mice injected 10, 30, or 180 min posttraining. The older mice (14-15 mo) showed similar results, with one exception: Those older mice injected with anisomycin 10 min posttraining were significantly impared in retention as compared to older saline controls and to identically treated young or intermediate-aged mice. The prolonged gradient of retrograde amnesia demonstrated by older mice could not be accounted for by impaired acquisition, impaired short-term memory, altered spontaneous locomotor activity, or differential inhibition of brain protein synthesis.

  15. The role of hippocampal nitric oxide (NO) on learning and immediate, short- and long-term memory retrieval in inhibitory avoidance task in male adult rats.

    PubMed

    Harooni, Hooman Eshagh; Naghdi, Nasser; Sepehri, Hoori; Rohani, Ali Haeri

    2009-07-19

    There is impressive amount of evidence suggesting the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and consequently learning and memory. Hippocampus is a brain region which is widely implicated in several types of learning and memory formation, including inhibitory avoidance learning. Since the CA1 region of hippocampus has shown nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, inhibition of the NOS enzymes can modulate hippocampal function, hence affecting memory processes. Therefore, we conducted series of experiments to further investigate the role of NO on inhibitory avoidance short- and long-term memory in rats. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were divided into 15 groups (n=10), and bilaterally implanted with guide cannulae aimed at the CA1 region of hippocampus. Animals received pre-training, post-training and pre-retrieval injections of vehicle (saline) or different doses of L-NAME (5, 10 and 15 microg/0.5 microl/side) or l-arginine (alone or in combination with L-NAME), tested for immediate, short- and long-term memory retention in an inhibitory avoidance task. Our results indicated that step-through latency (STL) of short- and long-term memory retention test was significantly reduced in L-NAME treated rats (15 microg/0.5 microl for immediate and short-term memory; 10 microg/0.5 microl for long-term memory), as compared to that of control group. Results also revealed that, L-arginine produced no any significant effect on STL, however could reverse the effect of L-NAME on memory. Our results also showed that, blocking of NO signaling immediately after training had no effect on either short- or long-term memory, indicating that NO release only during training, and not during consolidation, plays a role in memory formation. Together, our findings suggest that NO synthase inhibition by L-NAME can induce impairments in immediate, short- and long-term memories of inhibitory avoidance task, and these impairments are dependent on the learning and

  16. Inhibitory avoidance learning in zebrafish (Danio rerio): effects of shock intensity and unraveling differences in task performance.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Gorissen, Marnix; Roca, Carme Piza; Zethof, Jan; van de Vis, Hans; Flik, Gert; van den Bos, Ruud

    2014-08-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is increasingly used as a model in neurobehavioral and neuroendocrine studies. The inhibitory avoidance paradigm has been proposed as tool to study mechanisms underlying learning and memory in zebrafish. In this paradigm subjects receive a shock after entering the black compartment of a black-white box. On the next day, latency to enter the black compartment is assessed; higher latencies are indicative of increased avoidance learning. Here, we aimed to understand the effects of different shock intensities (0, 1, 3, and 9 V) and to unravel variation in inhibitory avoidance learning in an in-house reared Tuebingen Long-Fin zebrafish (D. rerio) strain. While median latencies had increased in the 1, 3, and 9 V groups, no increase in median latency was found in the 0 V group. In addition, higher shock intensities resulted in a higher number of avoiders (latency ≥180 s) over nonavoiders (latency <60 s). Both changes are indicative of increased avoidance learning. We assessed whole-body cortisol content and the expression levels of genes relevant to stress, anxiety, fear, and learning 2 h after testing. Shock intensity was associated with whole-body cortisol content and the expression of glucocorticoid receptor alpha [nr3c1(alpha)], cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (cart4), and mineralocorticoid receptor (nr3c2), while avoidance behavior was associated with whole-body cortisol content only. The inhibitory avoidance paradigm in combination with measuring whole-body cortisol content and gene expression is suitable to unravel (genetic) mechanisms of fear avoidance learning. Our data further show differences in brain-behavior relationships underlying fear avoidance learning and memory in zebrafish. These findings serve as starting point for further unraveling differences in brain-behavior relationships underlying (fear avoidance) learning and memory in zebrafish.

  17. Histamine in the basolateral amygdala promotes inhibitory avoidance learning independently of hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Fernando; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Munari, Leonardo; Izquierdo, Ivan; Blandina, Patrizio

    2015-05-12

    Recent discoveries demonstrated that recruitment of alternative brain circuits permits compensation of memory impairments following damage to brain regions specialized in integrating and/or storing specific memories, including both dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Here, we first report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for long-term, but not for short-term memory of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Second, we found that phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive-element-binding protein, a crucial mediator in long-term memory formation, correlated anatomically and temporally with histamine-induced memory retrieval, showing the active involvement of histamine function in CA1 and BLA in different phases of memory consolidation. Third, we found that exogenous application of histamine in either hippocampal CA1 or BLA of brain histamine-depleted rats, hence amnesic, restored long-term memory; however, the time frame of memory rescue was different for the two brain structures, short lived (immediately posttraining) for BLA, long lasting (up to 6 h) for the CA1. Moreover, long-term memory was formed immediately after training restoring of histamine transmission only in the BLA. These findings reveal the essential role of histaminergic neurotransmission to provide the brain with the plasticity necessary to ensure memorization of emotionally salient events, through recruitment of alternative circuits. Hence, our findings indicate that the histaminergic system comprises parallel, coordinated pathways that provide compensatory plasticity when one brain structure is compromised.

  18. Inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by scopolamine: interaction with glutamatergic system in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Pakpour, Bahareh; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Nayer-Nouri, Touraj; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2010-12-01

    The possible involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in amnesia induced by scopolamine was investigated. An inhibitory (passive) avoidance task was used for memory assessment in male Wistar rats. The results revealed that intra-NAc administration of a nonselective muscarinic acetylcholine antagonist, scopolamine (1 and 2 g/rat) impaired memory consolidation in the animals when tested 24 h later. Post-training intra-NAc administration of NMDA (0.005 and 0.01 g/rat) also impaired memory consolidation, whereas post-training intra-NAc administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (0.5, 1 and 1.5 g/rat) did not. Intra-NAc co-administration of an ineffective dose of NMDA with ineffective doses of scopolamine (0.25 and 0.5 g/rat) after training had no significant effect on memory consolidation, but intra-NAc injections of effective doses of NMDA (0.005 and 0.01 g/rat) prevented the amnesic effect of an effective dose of scopolamine (2 g/rat). In contrast, intra-NAc co-administration of MK-801 (0.5, 1 and 1.5 g/rat) along with an effective dose of scopolamine (2 g/rat) did not prevent the effect of the latter drug. It can be concluded that NMDA receptors in the NAc are involved in the modulation of memory consolidation that was affected by scopolamine.

  19. Histamine in the basolateral amygdala promotes inhibitory avoidance learning independently of hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Benetti, Fernando; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Munari, Leonardo; Izquierdo, Ivan; Blandina, Patrizio

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries demonstrated that recruitment of alternative brain circuits permits compensation of memory impairments following damage to brain regions specialized in integrating and/or storing specific memories, including both dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Here, we first report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for long-term, but not for short-term memory of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Second, we found that phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive-element-binding protein, a crucial mediator in long-term memory formation, correlated anatomically and temporally with histamine-induced memory retrieval, showing the active involvement of histamine function in CA1 and BLA in different phases of memory consolidation. Third, we found that exogenous application of histamine in either hippocampal CA1 or BLA of brain histamine-depleted rats, hence amnesic, restored long-term memory; however, the time frame of memory rescue was different for the two brain structures, short lived (immediately posttraining) for BLA, long lasting (up to 6 h) for the CA1. Moreover, long-term memory was formed immediately after training restoring of histamine transmission only in the BLA. These findings reveal the essential role of histaminergic neurotransmission to provide the brain with the plasticity necessary to ensure memorization of emotionally salient events, through recruitment of alternative circuits. Hence, our findings indicate that the histaminergic system comprises parallel, coordinated pathways that provide compensatory plasticity when one brain structure is compromised. PMID:25918368

  20. Aerobic exercise attenuates inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Jansen; Baliego, Luiz Guilherme Zaccaro; Peixinho-Pena, Luiz Fernando; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; de Mello, Marco Tulio; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2013-09-05

    The deleterious effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (SD) on memory processes are well documented. Physical exercise improves many aspects of brain functions and induces neuroprotection. In the present study, we investigated the influence of 4 weeks of treadmill aerobic exercise on both long-term memory and the expression of synaptic proteins (GAP-43, synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95) in normal and sleep-deprived rats. Adult Wistar rats were subjected to 4 weeks of treadmill exercise training for 35 min, five times per week. Twenty-four hours after the last exercise session, the rats were sleep-deprived for 96 h using the modified multiple platform method. To assess memory after SD, all animals underwent training for the inhibitory avoidance task and were tested 24h later. The aerobic exercise attenuated the long-term memory deficit induced by 96 h of paradoxical SD. Western blot analysis of the hippocampus revealed increased levels of GAP-43 in exercised rats. However, the expression of synapsin I, synaptophysin, and PSD-95 was not modified by either exercise or SD. Our results suggest that an aerobic exercise program can attenuate the deleterious effects of SD on long-term memory and that this effect is not directly related to changes in the expression of the pre- and post-synaptic proteins analyzed in the study.

  1. Amnesia of inhibitory avoidance by scopolamine is overcome by previous open-field exposure

    PubMed Central

    Colettis, Natalia C.; Snitcofsky, Marina; Kornisiuk, Edgar E.; Gonzalez, Emilio N.; Quillfeldt, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MAChR) blockade with scopolamine either extended or restricted to the hippocampus, before or after training in inhibitory avoidance (IA) caused anterograde or retrograde amnesia, respectively, in the rat, because there was no long-term memory (LTM) expression. Adult Wistar rats previously exposed to one or two open-field (OF) sessions of 3 min each (habituated), behaved as control animals after a weak though over-threshold training in IA. However, after OF exposure, IA LTM was formed and expressed in spite of an extensive or restricted to the hippocampus MAChR blockade. It was reported that during and after OF exposure and reexposure there was an increase in both hippocampal and cortical ACh release that would contribute to “prime the substrate,” e.g., by lowering the synaptic threshold for plasticity, leading to LTM consolidation. In the frame of the “synaptic tagging and capture” hypothesis, plasticity-related proteins synthesized during/after the previous OF could facilitate synaptic plasticity for IA in the same structure. However, IA anterograde amnesia by hippocampal protein synthesis inhibition with anisomycin was also prevented by two OF exposures, strongly suggesting that there would be alternative interpretations for the role of protein synthesis in memory formation and that another structure could also be involved in this “OF effect.” PMID:25322799

  2. Amnesia of inhibitory avoidance by scopolamine is overcome by previous open-field exposure.

    PubMed

    Colettis, Natalia C; Snitcofsky, Marina; Kornisiuk, Edgar E; Gonzalez, Emilio N; Quillfeldt, Jorge A; Jerusalinsky, Diana A

    2014-11-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MAChR) blockade with scopolamine either extended or restricted to the hippocampus, before or after training in inhibitory avoidance (IA) caused anterograde or retrograde amnesia, respectively, in the rat, because there was no long-term memory (LTM) expression. Adult Wistar rats previously exposed to one or two open-field (OF) sessions of 3 min each (habituated), behaved as control animals after a weak though over-threshold training in IA. However, after OF exposure, IA LTM was formed and expressed in spite of an extensive or restricted to the hippocampus MAChR blockade. It was reported that during and after OF exposure and reexposure there was an increase in both hippocampal and cortical ACh release that would contribute to "prime the substrate," e.g., by lowering the synaptic threshold for plasticity, leading to LTM consolidation. In the frame of the "synaptic tagging and capture" hypothesis, plasticity-related proteins synthesized during/after the previous OF could facilitate synaptic plasticity for IA in the same structure. However, IA anterograde amnesia by hippocampal protein synthesis inhibition with anisomycin was also prevented by two OF exposures, strongly suggesting that there would be alternative interpretations for the role of protein synthesis in memory formation and that another structure could also be involved in this "OF effect." © 2014 Colettis et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Effects of alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on histamine-induced impairment of memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Ahmadi, Ramesh; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem; Haeri-Rohani, Ali

    2002-11-15

    The effect of alpha-adrenoceptor agents on the impairment induced by histamine was measured for memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats. Post-training intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection was carried out in all the experiments. Histamine (5, 10 and 20 microg/rat) reduced, while a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, chlorpheniramine (0.1, 1 and 10 microg/rat), increased memory retention. The histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, ranitidine (0.1, 1, 10 and 20 microg/rat), did not elicit any response in this respect. Different doses of chlorpheniramine but not ranitidine reversed the histamine-induced impairment of memory. Clonidine and prazosin decreased, but yohimbine and phenylephrine increased, memory retention. Yohimbine decreased the inhibitory response to histamine. Phenylephrine, clonidine and prazosin did not alter the histamine effect. It is concluded that a histamine-induced impairment of memory retention through histamine H(1) receptors and an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor mechanism may be involved in the histamine response.

  4. Effects of hippocampal stimulation on retention and extinction of one way active avoidance response in cats.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, K; Gralewicz, S

    1984-01-01

    We found previously that hippocampal stimulation (HiSt) at 20 cps, 100 mikroA, applied jointly with a tone (500 Hz) CS in the course of retention test, improved the performance and retarded the extinction of one way active avoidance response (AAR) in cats. During this test failures to perform the AAR were not punished in all but two trials it the beginning of each session. The first experiment of the present studies demonstrated that - (i) the AAR facilitating the effect of HiSt might be prevented by m all electrolytic lesions made around the tips of the stimulating electrodes, (ii) large lesions of the hippocampus exerted little effect on the AAR acquisition, but the response was extinguished faster during the retention test. In the second experiment two response prevention trials (non-reinforced presentations of the CS with no possibility to make the AAR) were run at the beginning of each session after the end of training. In these conditions the HiSt resulted in a faster extinction of the AAR as compared with implanted unstimulated animals. Large lesions of the hippocampus had no effect on the extinction rate. We conclude that the facilitation of retrieval from memory may be responsible for the effects of HiSt on conditioned behavior.

  5. The Role of Muscarinic and Nicotinic Cholinergic Neurotransmission in Aversive Conditioning: Comparing Pavlovian Fear Conditioning and Inhibitory Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Matthew R.; Quinn, Jennifer J.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    Aversive conditioning is an ideal model for studying cholinergic effects on the processes of learning and memory for several reasons. First, deficits produced by selective lesions of the anatomical structures shown to be critical for Pavlovian fear conditioning and inhibitory avoidance (such as the amygdala and hippocampus) resemble those deficits…

  6. The Role of Muscarinic and Nicotinic Cholinergic Neurotransmission in Aversive Conditioning: Comparing Pavlovian Fear Conditioning and Inhibitory Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Matthew R.; Quinn, Jennifer J.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    Aversive conditioning is an ideal model for studying cholinergic effects on the processes of learning and memory for several reasons. First, deficits produced by selective lesions of the anatomical structures shown to be critical for Pavlovian fear conditioning and inhibitory avoidance (such as the amygdala and hippocampus) resemble those deficits…

  7. Graft-induced Recovery of Inhibitory Avoidance Conditioning in Striatal Lesioned Rats is Related to Choline Acetyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Piña, Ana Luisa; Ormsby, Christopher Edward; Miranda, María Isabel; Jiménez, Nicolás; Tapia, Ricardo; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    1994-01-01

    Four groups of male Wistar rats showing disrupted inhibitory avoidance conditioning due to striatal lesions received either striatal or ventral mesencephalic brain grafts. Two additional non-lesioned groups were used as controls. Half of the groups was retrained in an inhibitory avoidance task at fifteen days postgraft and the other half at sixty days postgraft. Those animals receiving striatal grafts significantly improved their ability to acquire the inhibitory avoidance task at fifteen and sixty days postgraft, as opposed to those receiving mesencephalic grafts, which did not show behavioral recovery. Choline acetyltransferase and glutamate decarboxylase activities, as well as dopamine content, were measured in the grafted tissue. Striatal grafts showed levels of choline acetyltransferase activity similar to the control group. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between the choline acetyltransferase activity and the behavioral recovery. In contrast, both glutamate decarboxylase activity and dopamine levels were significantly lower in striatal and in mesencephalic grafts, as compared to the controls. These results show that striatal but not mesencephalic grafts can promote the restoration of the ability to acquire an inhibitory avoidance task even at early stages (15 days) of the development of the grafts. The results also suggest that acetylcholine plays an important role in behavioral recovery. PMID:7819369

  8. Histamine infused into basolateral amygdala enhances memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Fernando; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2013-08-01

    The role of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the consolidation of aversive memory is well established. Here we investigate the involvement of the histaminergic system in BLA on this variable. Rats were chronically implanted with bilateral cannulae in the BLA and after recovery were trained in a one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Immediately after training histaminergic compounds either alone or in combination were infused through the cannulae. Memory was assessed in test sessions carried out 24 h after the training session. Post-training histamine (1-10 nmol; 0.5 μl/side) enhanced consolidation and the histamine H₃ receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 nmol; 0.5 μl/side) impaired memory consolidation. The effect was shared by the histamine N-methyltransferase inhibitor SKF-91844 (50 nmol; 0.5 μl/side) as well as by the H₃ receptor agonist imetit (10 nmol; 0.5 μl/side). The promnesic action of histamine was unaffected by the H₁ receptor antagonist pyrilamine (50 nmol; 0.5 μl/side). The H1 receptor agonist pyridylethylamine (10 nmol; 0.5 μl/side), the H₂ agonist dimaprit (10 nmol; 0.5 μl/side) and the H₂ antagonist ranitidine (50 nmol; 0.5 μl/side) were ineffective. Histaminergic compounds infused into the BLA had no effect on open-field or elevated plus-maze behaviour. The data show that histamine induces a dose-dependent mnemonic effect in rats and indicate that this reflects a role of endogenous histamine in the BLA mediated by H₃ receptors.

  9. The anticancer estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen impairs consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory through estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Lichtenfels, Martina; Dornelles, Arethuza da Silva; Petry, Fernanda Dos Santos; Blank, Martina; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2017-09-02

    Over two-thirds of women with breast cancer have positive tumors for hormone receptors, and these patients undergo treatment with endocrine therapy, tamoxifen being the most widely used agent. Despite being very effective in breast cancer treatment, tamoxifen is associated with side effects that include cognitive impairments. However, the specific aspects and mechanisms underlying these impairments remain to be characterized. Here, we have investigated the effects of tamoxifen and interaction with estrogen receptors on formation of memory for inhibitory avoidance conditioning in female rats. In the first experiment, Wistar female rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg) or saline by gavage immediately after training and were tested for memory consolidation 24 h after training. In the second experiment, rats received a single dose of 1 mg/kg tamoxifen or saline by gavage 3 h after training and were tested 24 h after training for memory consolidation. In the third experiment, rats received a subcutaneous injection with estrogen receptor α agonist or estrogen receptor beta agonist 30 min before the training. After training, rats received a single oral dose of tamoxifen 1 mg/kg or saline and were tested 24 h after training. In the fourth experiment, rats were trained and tested 24 h later. Immediately after test, rats received a single dose of tamoxifen (1 mg/kg) or saline by gavage and were given four additional daily test trials followed by a re-instatement. Tamoxifen at 1 mg/kg impaired memory consolidation when given immediately after training and the estrogen receptor alpha agonist improved the tamoxifen-related memory impairment. Moreover, tamoxifen impairs memory consolidation of the test. These findings indicate that estrogen receptors regulate the early phase of memory consolidation and the effects of tamoxifen on memory consolidation.

  10. Drought-avoiding plants with low water use can achieve high rainfall retention without jeopardising survival on green roofs.

    PubMed

    Szota, Christopher; Farrell, Claire; Williams, Nicholas S G; Arndt, Stefan K; Fletcher, Tim D

    2017-12-15

    Green roofs are increasingly being used among the suite of tools designed to reduce the volume of surface water runoff generated by cities. Plants provide the primary mechanism for restoring the rainfall retention capacity of green roofs, but selecting plants with high water use is likely to increase drought stress. Using empirically-derived plant physiological parameters, we used a water balance model to assess the trade-off between rainfall retention and plant drought stress under a 30-year climate scenario. We compared high and low water users with either drought avoidance or drought tolerance strategies. Green roofs with low water-using, drought-avoiding species achieved high rainfall retention (66-81%) without experiencing significant drought stress. Roofs planted with other strategies showed high retention (72-90%), but they also experienced >50days of drought stress per year. However, not all species with the same strategy behaved similarly, therefore selecting plants based on water use and drought strategy alone does not guarantee survival in shallow substrates where drought stress can develop quickly. Despite this, it is more likely that green roofs will achieve high rainfall retention with minimal supplementary irrigation if planted with low water users with drought avoidance strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT-7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory. PMID:23792034

  12. Sex-specific effect of the anabolic steroid, 17α-methyltestosterone, on inhibitory avoidance learning in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Pratts, Keyla; Rosa-González, Dariana; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L; Cintrón-López, Dahima; Barreto-Estrada, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The illicit use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has gained popularity among adolescents in the last decade. However, although it is known that exposure to AAS impairs cognition in adult animal models, the cognitive effects during adolescence remain undetermined. An inhibitory avoidance task (IAT) was used to assess the effect of AAS (17α-methyltestosterone; 17α-meT--7.5 mg/kg) in male and female periadolescent rats. A single injection of 17α-meT immediately before the footshock produced significant impairment of inhibitory avoidance learning in males but not females. Generalized anxiety, locomotion, and risk assessment behaviors (RAB) were not affected. Our results show that exposure to a single pharmacological dose of 17α-meT during periadolescence exerts sex-specific cognitive effects without affecting anxiety. Thus, disruption of the hormonal milieu during this early developmental period might have negative impact on learning and memory.

  13. The integrated role of ACh, ERK and mTOR in the mechanisms of hippocampal inhibitory avoidance memory.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Maria Grazia; Lana, Daniele; Pepeu, Giancarlo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the present knowledge on the interplay among the cholinergic system, Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathways in the development of short and long term memories during the acquisition and recall of the step-down inhibitory avoidance in the hippocampus. The step-down inhibitory avoidance is a form of associative learning that is acquired in a relatively simple one-trial test through several sensorial inputs. Inhibitory avoidance depends on the integrated activity of hippocampal CA1 and other brain areas. Recall can be performed at different times after acquisition, thus allowing for the study of both short and long term memory. Among the many neurotransmitter systems involved, the cholinergic neurons that originate in the basal forebrain and project to the hippocampus are of crucial importance in inhibitory avoidance processes. Acetylcholine released from cholinergic fibers during acquisition and/or recall of behavioural tasks activates muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and brings about a long-lasting potentiation of the postsynaptic membrane followed by downstream activation of intracellular pathway (ERK, among others) that create conditions favourable for neuronal plasticity. ERK appears to be salient not only in long term memory, but also in the molecular mechanisms underlying short term memory formation in the hippocampus. Since ERK can function as a biochemical coincidence detector in response to extracellular signals in neurons, the activation of ERK-dependent downstream effectors is determined, in part, by the duration of ERK phosphorylation itself. Long term memories require protein synthesis, that in the synapto-dendritic compartment represents a direct mechanism that can produce rapid changes in protein content in response to synaptic activity. mTOR in the brain regulates protein translation in response to neuronal activity, thereby modulating

  14. Involvement of hippocampal PKCbetaI isoform in the early phase of memory formation of an inhibitory avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Paratcha, G; Furman, M; Bevilaqua, L; Cammarota, M; Vianna, M; de Stein, M L; Izquierdo, I; Medina, J H

    2000-02-14

    Several evidences demonstrate that protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and in different forms of learning, including inhibitory avoidance training in rats. Here, we evaluated the levels of conventional PKC isozymes (alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma) in synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions isolated from hippocampus of rats subjected to a one-trial inhibitory avoidance paradigm. At 0, 30 and 120 min after training, there was a significant increase in the total amount of PKCbetaI. Densitometric analysis of the immunoblots showed an increase of 142+/-11% at 0 min, 193+/-16% at 30 min and 156+/-6% at 120 min after training relative to shocked control values. No changes were found in PKCbetaI levels in SPM fractions of the shocked animals relative to naive control values. No training-specific increments in the levels of PKCalpha, betaII and gamma were observed at any time point tested. However, an increase in PKCgamma levels was found in trained and shocked animals sacrificed 120 min after each experimental procedure. In addition, bilateral microinjections of a fairly selective inhibitor of PKCbetaI isozyme into the CA1 of the dorsal hippocampus produced amnesia when given 10 min before training, or 50, 110, but not 170 min, after training. Thus, the present findings demonstrate the participation of PKCbetaI in the early synaptic events responsible for the acquisition and consolidation of an inhibitory avoidance learning, and suggest a putative role of this presynaptic isozyme on the enhanced PKC-dependent B-50/GAP-43 phosphorylation previously detected by us during this associative learning.

  15. Zinc Chloride and Lead Acetate-Induced Passive Avoidance Memory Retention Deficits Reversed by Nicotine and Bucladesine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Yazdani, Abdolmajid; Baheri, Behnam; Payandemehr, Borna; Sanati, Mehdi; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Miri, Abdolhossein; Zandkarimi, Majid; Belaran, Maryam; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    It is very important to investigate the neurotoxic effects of metals on learning and memory processes. In this study, we tried to investigate the effects and time course properties of oral administration of zinc chloride (25, 50, and 75 mg/kg, for 2 weeks), lead acetate (250, 750, 1,500, and 2,500 ppm for 4, 6 and 8 weeks), and their possible mechanisms on a model of memory function. For this matter, we examined the intra-peritoneal injections of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 1.5 mg/kg) and bucladesine (50, 100, 300, and 600 nM/mouse) for 4 days alone and in combination with mentioned metals in the step-through passive avoidance task. Control animals received saline, drinking water, saline, and DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide)/deionized water (1:9), respectively. At the end of each part of studies, animals were trained for 1 day in step-through task. The avoidance memory retention alterations were evaluated 24 and 48 h later in singular and combinational studies. Zinc chloride (75 mg/kg) oral gavage for 2 weeks decreased latency times compared to control animals. Also, lead acetate (750 ppm oral administrations for 8 weeks) caused significant lead blood levels and induced avoidance memory retention impairments. Four-days intra-peritoneal injection of nicotine (1 mg/kg) increased latency time compared to control animals. Finally, findings of this research showed that treatment with intra-peritoneal injections of nicotine (1 mg/kg) and/or bucladesine (600 nM/mouse) reversed zinc chloride- and lead acetate-induced avoidance memory retention impairments. Taken together, these results showed the probable role of cholinergic system and protein kinase A pathways in zinc chloride- and lead acetate-induced avoidance memory alterations.

  16. Multiple binge alcohol consumption during rat adolescence increases anxiety but does not impair retention in the passive avoidance task.

    PubMed

    Popović, Miroljub; Caballero-Bleda, María; Puelles, Luis; Guerri, Consuelo

    2004-03-04

    We investigated the effect of binge alcohol consumption on anxiety-related behavior and memory in adolescent male Wistar rats. Three consecutive daily sessions of ethanol administration (5 g/kg) were repeated weekly for 4 weeks. The retention of passive avoidance was measured weekly, 48 h following the treatment. Three days after the last memory test a novel object exploration test was done. There was no significant difference in step-through latency between the groups, but the ethanol-treated group displayed a significantly higher incidence of defecation, and an increased number of boluses during the passive avoidance test. The latency to explore a novel object was also higher, while the duration of exploration was significantly lower. Together, these data suggest that binge alcohol consumption in adolescent rats does not impair their memory in passive avoidance tasks, but may significantly increase their anxiety.

  17. Functional connectivity changes during consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory in rats: a manganese-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Hsin; Chen, Der-Yow; Liang, K C

    2013-10-31

    Consolidation of memory involves transfer of encoded information into a durable neural representation, but how this is transacted in the nervous system remains elusive. It has been proposed that memory consolidation is subserved by formation of a cell assembly due to coincidence of pre- and post-synaptic activity therein after learning. To capture such off-line changes, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) was used to trace brain activity during the memory consolidation period. Male Wistar rats were trained on the one-trial inhibitory avoidance task and received intraventricular infusion of manganese ion shortly after training. The MEMRI taken 1 day later showed that brain areas including the prelimbic, insular and anterior pirifrom cortices of the learning group had significantly lower memory-related MEMRI signal than those of the control group. The functional network was revealed by correlating the MEMRI signals among regions followed by graph theoretical analysis. Learning sculpted the non-discriminative connectivity among many brain regions in the controls into a network in the trained rats with selected connectivity among regions implicated in inhibitory avoidance learning. The network could be organized into three clusters presumably subserving different functions. The results suggest that the brain prunes excessive functional connectivity in a cell assembly to consolidate new memory.

  18. Catching Fish and Avoiding Sharks: Investigating Factors That Influence Developmentally Appropriate Measurement of Preschoolers' Inhibitory Control.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven J; Okely, Anthony D

    2015-09-01

    Although researchers agree that the first 5 years of life are critical for children's developing executive functions (EFs), further advances are hindered by a lack of consensus on the design and selection of developmentally appropriate EF tasks for young children. Given this debate, well-established adult measures of EF routinely have been adapted for young children. Given young children's comparatively limited cognitive capacities, however, such adaptations do not guarantee that the task's critical EF demands are retained. To investigate this possibility, the current study examined the characteristics that optimize measurement of young children's EFs-specifically, their inhibitory control-using the go/no-go (GNG) task as an exemplar. Sixty preschoolers completed six GNG tasks differing in stimulus animation, presentation time, and response location. Comparison EF tasks were administered to examine concurrent validity of GNG variants. Results indicated effects of stimulus presentation time and response location, with animation further enhancing task validity and reliability. This suggests that current GNG tasks deflate estimates of young children's ability to inhibit, with implications for future design and selection of developmentally appropriate EF tasks.

  19. Cooperative interaction between the basolateral amygdala and ventral tegmental area modulates the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance memory.

    PubMed

    Nazari-Serenjeh, Farzaneh; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2013-01-10

    The aim of the current study was to examine the existence of a cooperative interaction between the basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in inhibitory avoidance task. The BLA and the VTA regions of adult male Wistar rats were simultaneously cannulated and memory consolidation was measured in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance apparatus. Post-training microinjection of muscimol, a potent GABA-A receptor agonist (0.01-0.02 μg/rat), into the VTA impaired memory in a dose-dependent manner. Post-training intra-BLA microinjection of NMDA (0.02-0.04 μg/rat), 5 min before the intra-VTA injection of muscimol (0.02 μg/rat), attenuated muscimol-induced memory impairment. Microinjection of a NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (0.02-0.06 μg/rat) into the BLA inhibited NMDA effect on the memory impairment induced by intra-VTA microinjection of muscimol. On the other hand, post-training intra-BLA microinjection of muscimol (0.02-0.04 μg/rat) dose-dependently decreased step-through latency, indicating an impairing effect on memory. This impairing effect was however significantly attenuated by intra-VTA microinjection of NMDA (0.01-0.03 μg/rat). Intra-VTA microinjection of D-AP5 (0.02-0.08 μg/rat), 5 min prior to NMDA injection, inhibited NMDA response on the impairing effect induced by intra-BLA microinjection of muscimol. It should be considered that post-training microinjection of the same doses of NMDA or D-AP5 into the BLA or the VTA alone had no effect on memory consolidation. The data suggest that the relationship between the BLA and the VTA in mediating memory consolidation in inhibitory avoidance learning may be dependent on a cooperative interaction between the glutamatergic and GABAergic systems via NMDA and GABA-A receptors.

  20. Dorsomedial hypothalamus CRF type 1 receptors selectively modulate inhibitory avoidance responses in the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mariana S C F; Pereira, Bruno A; Céspedes, Isabel C; Nascimento, Juliana O G; Bittencourt, Jackson C; Viana, Milena B

    2014-09-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) plays a critical role in the mediation of physiological and behavioral responses to stressors. In the present study, we investigated the role played by the CRF system within the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) in the modulation of anxiety- and panic-related responses. Male Wistar rats were administered into the DMH with CRF (125 and 250 ng/0.2 μl, experiment 1) or with the CRFR1 antagonist antalarmin (25 ng/0.2 μl, experiment 2) and 10 min later tested in the elevated T-maze (ETM) for inhibitory avoidance and escape measurements. In clinical terms, these responses have been respectively related to generalized anxiety and panic disorder. To further verify if the anxiogenic effects of CRF were mediated by CRFR1 activation, we also investigated the effects of the combined treatment with CRF (250 ng/0.2 μl) and antalarmin (25 ng/0.2 μl) (experiment 3). All animals were tested in an open field, immediately after the ETM, for locomotor activity assessment. Results showed that 250 ng/0.2μl of CRF facilitated ETM avoidance, an anxiogenic response. Antalarmin significantly decreased avoidance latencies, an anxiolytic effect, and was able to counteract the anxiogenic effects of CRF. None of the compounds administered altered escape responses or locomotor activity measurements. These results suggest that CRF in the DMH exerts anxiogenic effects by activating type 1 receptors, which might be of relevance to the physiopathology of generalized anxiety disorder.

  1. Training in the step-down inhibitory avoidance task time-dependently increases cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in the entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Pereira, P; Ardenghi, P; Mello e Souza, T; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2001-06-01

    The cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling pathway has been implicated in synaptic plasticity changes and memory consolidation. Several cortical structures are involved in the consolidation of memory for inhibitory avoidance. The aim of the present work was to observe the effects of training in the inhibitory avoidance task on the levels of PKA activity in the entorhinal, parietal and posterior cingulate cortex (EC, PARIET and PC), and the medial precentral area (Fr2) of the rat, at different post-training times (0, 1.5, 3 and 6h). PKA activity, assayed using [gamma-32P]ATP and kemptide, a selective substrate, increased in the EC 3 h after training, but no changes were observed in PARIET, PC and Fr2. These results suggest that the late phase of memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance requires a functional PKA signaling pathway in the EC in a way that a 'peak' of PKA activity is observed.

  2. Memory-enhancing intra-basolateral amygdala clenbuterol infusion reduces post-burst afterhyperpolarizations in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons following inhibitory avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Lovitz, E S; Thompson, L T

    2015-03-01

    Activation of the basolateral amygdala can modulate the strength of fear memories, including those in single-trial inhibitory avoidance (IA) tasks. Memory retention, measured by the latency to re-enter a dark-compartment paired 24h earlier with a footshock, varies with intensity of this aversive stimulus. When higher intensity footshocks were used, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibited reduced afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) 24h post-trial, an effect blocked by immediate post-trial inactivation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). Similar AHP reductions in CA1 have been observed in a number of learning tasks, with time courses appropriate to support memory consolidation. When less intense footshocks were used for IA training of Sprague-Dawley rats, immediate post-trial infusion of the β-adrenergic agonist clenbuterol into BLA was required to enhance hippocampal Arc protein expression 45 min later and to enhance memory retention tested 48 h later. Here, using Long-Evans rats and low-intensity footshocks, we confirmed that bilateral immediate post-trial infusion of 15 ng/0.5 μl of the β-adrenergic agonist clenbuterol into BLA significantly enhances memory for an IA task. Next, clenbuterol was infused into one BLA immediately post-training, with vehicle infused into the contralateral BLA, then hippocampal CA1 neuron AHPs were assessed 24 h later. Only CA1 neurons from hemispheres ipsilateral to post-trial clenbuterol infusion showed learning-dependent AHP reductions. Excitability of CA1 neurons from the same trained rats, but from the vehicle-infused hemispheres, was identical to that from untrained rats receiving unilateral clenbuterol or vehicle infusions. Peak AHPs, medium and slow AHPs, and accommodation were reduced only with the combination of IA training and unilateral BLA β-receptor activation. Similar to previous observations of BLA adrenergic memory-related enhancement of Arc protein expression in hippocampus, increased CA1 neuronal

  3. Hippocampal dynamics of synaptic NF-kappa B during inhibitory avoidance long-term memory consolidation in mice.

    PubMed

    Salles, A; Boccia, M; Blake, M; Corbi, N; Passananti, C; Baratti, C M; Romano, A; Freudenthal, R

    2015-04-16

    Since the discovery that long-term memory is dependent on protein synthesis, several transcription factors have been found to participate in the transcriptional activity needed for its consolidation. Among them, NF-kappa B is a constitutive transcription factor whose nuclear activity has proven to be necessary for the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance in mice. This transcription factor has a wide distribution in the nervous system, with a well-reported presence in dendrites and synaptic terminals. Here we report changes in synaptosomal NF-kappa B localization and activity, during long-term memory consolidation. Activity comparison of synaptosomal and nuclear NF-kappa B, indicates different dynamics for both localizations. In this study we identify two pools of synaptosomal NF-kappa B, one obtained with the synaptoplasm (free fraction) and the second bound to the synaptosomal membranes. During the early steps of consolidation the first pool is activated, as the membrane associated transcription factor fraction increases and concomitantly the free fraction decreases. These results suggest that the activation of synaptic NF-kappa B and its translocation to membranes are part of the consolidation of long-term memory in mice.

  4. Chronic caffeine prevents changes in inhibitory avoidance memory and hippocampal BDNF immunocontent in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sallaberry, Cássia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Ardais, Ana Paula; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Klaudat, Bruno; Forte, Thomás; Souza, Diogo O; Elisabetsky, Elaine; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Beneficial effects of caffeine on memory processes have been observed in animal models relevant to neurodegenerative diseases and aging, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Because brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with memory formation and BDNF's actions are modulated by adenosine receptors, the molecular targets for the psychostimulant actions of caffeine, we here compare the effects of chronic caffeine (1 mg/mL drinking solution for 30 days) on short- and long term memory and on levels of hippocampal proBDNF, mature BDNF, TrkB and CREB in young (3 month old) and middle-aged (12 month old) rats. Caffeine treatment substantially reduced i) age-related impairments in the two types of memory in an inhibitory avoidance paradigm, and ii) parallel increases in hippocampal BDNF levels. In addition, chronic caffeine increased proBDNF and CREB concentrations, and decreased TrkB levels, in hippocampus regardless of age. These data provide new evidence in favor of the hypothesis that modifications in BDNF and related proteins in the hippocampus contribute to the pro-cognitive effects of caffeine on age-associated losses in memory encoding. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  5. Enhancement of Inhibitory Avoidance and Conditioned Taste Aversion Memory with Insular Cortex Infusions of 8-Br-cAMP: Involvement of the Basolateral Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Maria I.; McGaugh, James L.

    2004-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that in rats, the insular cortex (IC) and amygdala are involved in the learning and memory of aversively motivated tasks. The present experiments examined the effects of 8-Br-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, and oxotremorine, a muscarinic agonist, infused into the IC after inhibitory avoidance (IA) training and during the…

  6. Enhancement of Inhibitory Avoidance and Conditioned Taste Aversion Memory with Insular Cortex Infusions of 8-Br-cAMP: Involvement of the Basolateral Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Maria I.; McGaugh, James L.

    2004-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that in rats, the insular cortex (IC) and amygdala are involved in the learning and memory of aversively motivated tasks. The present experiments examined the effects of 8-Br-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, and oxotremorine, a muscarinic agonist, infused into the IC after inhibitory avoidance (IA) training and during the…

  7. Nitric oxide in the ventral tegmental area is involved in retrieval of inhibitory avoidance memory by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Piri, M; Zarrindast, M R

    2011-02-23

    In the present study, the possible involvement of nitric oxide systems in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in nicotine's effect on morphine-induced amnesia and morphine state-dependent memory in adult male Wistar rats was investigated. Step-through type inhibitory avoidance task was used to test memory retrieval. Post-training administration of morphine (5 and 7.5 mg/kg) induced amnesia. The response induced by post-training morphine was significantly reversed by pre-test administration of the drug. Pre-test injection of nicotine (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) alone and nicotine (0.1, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) plus an ineffective dose of morphine also significantly reversed the amnesia induced by morphine. Morphine amnesia was also prevented by pre-test administration of l-arginine (1 and 3 μg/rat, intra-VTA), a nitric oxide (NO) precursor. Interestingly, an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg s.c.) in combination with low dose of l-arginine (0.3 μg/rat, intra-VTA) synergistically improved memory performance impaired by morphine given after training. In contrast, pre-test administration of NG nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (2 μg/rat, intra-VTA) prevented the nicotine reversal of morphine effect on memory. The results suggest a possible role for nitric oxide of ventral tegmental area in the improving effect of nicotine on the morphine-induced amnesia.

  8. Contrasting effects of acute and chronic treatment with imipramine and fluoxetine on inhibitory avoidance and escape responses in mice exposed to the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Karina Santos; de Carvalho-Netto, Eduardo Ferreira; Monte, Kátia Cristina Da Silva; Acco, Bruno; Nogueira, Paulo José de Campos; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2009-03-30

    The elevated T-maze (ETM) is an animal model of anxiety-like behavior that assesses two different defensive behavioral tasks in the same animal-acquisition of inhibitory avoidance and latency to escape from an open and elevated arm. In rats, cute and chronic treatments with anxiolytic-like drugs impair avoidance acquisition while only chronic administration of panicolytic-like drugs impairs open arm withdrawal. To date, only the acute effects of anxiolytic/anxiogenic or panicolytic/panicogenic drugs have been tested in the mouse ETM and the results have partially corroborated those found in the rat ETM. This study investigated the effects of acute (a single intraperitoneal injection 30 min before testing) and chronic (daily i.p. injections for 15 consecutive days) treatment with imipramine or fluoxetine, non-selective and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, respectively, on inhibitory avoidance and escape tasks in the mouse ETM. Neither acute nor chronic treatment with imipramine (0, 1, 5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly changed the behavioral profile of mice in the two ETM tasks. Interestingly, while acute fluoxetine (0, 5, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg, i.p.) facilitated inhibitory avoidance and impaired escape latency, chronic treatment (0, 5, 20 or 40 mg/kg, i.p.) with this selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) produced an opposite effect, i.e., it impaired inhibitory avoidance acquisition and facilitated open arm withdrawal. Importantly, acute or chronic treatment with imipramine (except at the highest dose that increased locomotion when given acutely) or fluoxetine failed to alter general locomotor activity in mice as assessed in an ETM in which all arms were enclosed by lateral walls (eETM). These results suggest that inhibitory avoidance acquisition is a useful task for the evaluation of acute and chronic effects of SSRI treatment on anxiety in mice. However, as open arm latency was actually increased and reduced by acute and chronic fluoxetine

  9. Prelimbic cortex extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation is required for memory retrieval of long-term inhibitory avoidance.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fei; Zheng, Jian; Sun, Xuan; Deng, Wei-Ke; Li, Bao Ming; Liu, Fang

    2017-04-15

    Neural mechanism underlying memory retrieval has been extensively studied in the hippocampus and amygdala. However, little is known about the role of medial prefrontal cortex in long-term memory retrieval. We evaluate this issue in one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance (IA) paradigm. Our results showed that, 1) inactivation of mPFC by local infusion of GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol caused severe deficits in retrieval of 1-day and 7-day but had no effects on 2-h inhibitory avoidance memory; 2) the protein level of phosphorylated-ERK1/2 in mPFC were significantly increased following retrieval of 1-day and 7-day IA memory, so did the numbers of phosphorylated-ERK (pERK) and phosphorylated-CREB (pCREB) labeled neurons; 3) intra-mPFC infusion of ERK kinase inhibitor PD98095 significantly reduced phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels and phosphorylated-ERK1/2 and phosphorylated-CREB labeled cells, and severely impaired retrieval of 7-day IA memory when the drugs were administrated 30min prior to test. The present study provides evidence that retrieval of long-lasting memory for inhibitory avoidance requires mPFC and involves the ERK-CREB signaling cascade. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adolescent harm avoidance as a longitudinal predictor of maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation in adulthood: The mediating role of inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Izadpanah, Shahrzad; Schumacher, Maren; Arens, Elisabeth A; Stopsack, Malte; Ulrich, Ines; Hansenne, Michel; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Barnow, Sven

    2016-10-01

    The current study investigates the effect of adolescent harm avoidance (HA) on maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies (mCER) in early adulthood. The mediating role of inhibitory control and the moderating effect of gender on this link were also examined. Longitudinal data from 261 adolescents (147 female) were collected in three phases (T0, T1 and T2) over approximately 10 years. Results revealed that, after controlling for HA in adulthood (T2), female adolescents' HA (T0) significantly predicted mCER strategies after 10 years (T2), whereas male adolescents' HA only predicted catastrophizing. In addition, attentional impulsivity (T1) significantly mediated the relation between HA and mCER, though only among women. There was no significant indirect effect for emotional interference and stop-signal reaction time. Results revealed gender and measure specific associations between HA and inhibitory control and suggest that HA could induce inhibitory deficits leading to mCER. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Unpredictable chronic stress decreases inhibitory avoidance learning in Tuebingen long-fin zebrafish: stronger effects in the resting phase than in the active phase.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Gorissen, Marnix; Zethof, Jan; Ebbesson, Lars O E; van de Vis, Hans; Flik, Gert; van den Bos, Ruud

    2014-11-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio Hamilton) are increasingly used as a model to study the effects of chronic stress on brain and behaviour. In rodents, unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) has a stronger effect on physiology and behaviour during the active phase than during the resting phase. Here, we applied UCS during the daytime (active phase) for 7 and 14 days or during the night-time (resting phase) for 7 nights in an in-house-reared Tuebingen long-fin (TLF) zebrafish strain. Following UCS, inhibitory avoidance learning was assessed using a 3 day protocol where fish learn to avoid swimming from a white to a black compartment where they will receive a 3 V shock. Latencies of entering the black compartment were recorded before training (day 1; first shock) and after training on day 2 (second shock) and day 3 (no shock, tissue sampling). Fish whole-body cortisol content and expression levels of genes related to stress, fear and anxiety in the telencephalon were quantified. Following 14 days of UCS during the day, inhibitory avoidance learning decreased (lower latencies on days 2 and 3); minor effects were found following 7 days of UCS. Following 7 nights of UCS, inhibitory avoidance learning decreased (lower latency on day 3). Whole-body cortisol levels showed a steady increase compared with controls (100%) from 7 days of UCS (139%), to 14 days of UCS (174%) to 7 nights of UCS (231%), suggestive of an increasing stress load. Only in the 7 nights of UCS group did expression levels of corticoid receptor genes (mr, grα, grβ) and of bdnf increase. These changes are discussed as adaptive mechanisms to maintain neuronal integrity and prevent overload, and as being indicative of a state of high stress load. Overall, our data suggest that stressors during the resting phase have a stronger impact than during the active phase. Our data warrant further studies on the effect of UCS on stress axis-related genes, especially grβ; in mammals this receptor has been implicated in

  12. Enhancement of long-term memory retention by Colostrinin in one-day-old chicks trained on a weak passive avoidance learning paradigm.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Michael G; Banks, Duncan

    2006-07-01

    Colostrinin (CLN) is a biologically active proline-rich polypeptide which has therapeutic potential for the alleviation of memory deficits in age-related dementias in a number of human conditions, particularly Alzheimer's disease. To examine the efficacy of CLN in other species, day-old domestic chicks were used as a model system to study its effects on retention of memory for a single one-trial learning paradigm--avoidance of a bitter-tasting substance (methylanthranilate, MeA). Birds were presented with a bead coated with either a dilute (10%) solution of MeA or a bead coated with 100% MeA. Those trained on 100% MeA avoided pecking at a similar but dry bead 24 h later, thereby demonstrating long-term memory whereas chicks trained on the 10% solution pecked the bead at 24 h, indicating lack of long term memory for the task. However, when CLN was injected (i.c.) into a region known to be important in memory formation, the mesopallium intermediomediale (IMM), prior to training with 10% MeA, chicks exhibited strong memory retention at 24 h, similar to those trained on 100% MeA. Control chicks trained on 10% MeA but injected i.c. with a 10% saline solution did not show improvement in memory retention. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of CLN were as effective as the i.c. route. These data extend the known efficacy of CLN from mammals demonstrating its widespread efficacy as a cognitive enhancer.

  13. AGE-RELATED IMPAIRMENTS IN MEMORY AND IN CREB AND pCREB EXPRESSION IN HIPPOCAMPUS AND AMYGDALA FOLLOWING INHIBITORY AVOIDANCE TRAINING

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Ken A.; Gold, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment examined whether age-related changes in CREB and pCREB contribute to the rapid forgetting seen in aged animals. Young (3-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) Fischer-344 rats received inhibitory avoidance training with a low (0.2 mA, 0.4 sec) or moderate (0.5 mA, 0.5 sec) footshock; memory was measured 7 days later. Other rats were euthanized 30 minutes after training, and CREB and pCREB expression levels were examined in the hippocampus, amygdala, and piriform cortex using immunohistochemistry. CREB levels decreased with age in the hippocampus and amygdala. After training with either shock level, young rats exhibited good memory and increases in pCREB levels in the hippocampus and amygdala. Aged rats exhibited good memory for the moderate but not the low shock but did not show increases in pCREB levels after either shock intensity. These results suggest that decreases in total CREB and in pCREB activation in the hippocampus and amygdala may contribute to rapid forgetting in aged rats. After moderate footshock, the stable memory in old rats together with absence of CREB activation suggests either that CREB was phosphorylated in a spatiotemporal pattern other than analyzed here or that the stronger training conditions engaged alternate mechanisms that promote long-lasting memory. PMID:22445851

  14. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the ventral tegmental area are involved in retrieval of inhibitory avoidance memory by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Nouri, Maryam; Haeri-Rohani, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2007-10-01

    The interaction of opiate, cholinergic, glutamatergic and (possibly) dopaminergic inputs in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) influencing a learned behavior is certainly a topic of great interest. In the present study, the effect of intra-VTA administration of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agents on nicotine's effect in morphine state-dependent learning was investigated. An inhibitory avoidance (IA) task was used for memory assessment in male Wistar rats. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of morphine (5 and 7.5mg/kg) immediately after training decreased IA response on the test day, which was reinstated by pre-test administration of the same doses of the opioid; this is known as state-dependency. Moreover, pre-test administration of nicotine (0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg, s.c.) also reversed the decrease in IA response because of post-training morphine (5mg/kg). Here, we also show that when infused into the VTA before testing, NMDA (0.01 and 0.1 microg/rat) reverse the post-training morphine effect on memory. In addition, the sub-effective doses of NMDA (0.0001 and 0.001 microg/rat) in combination with a low dose of nicotine (0.1mg/kg) which had no effects by themselves, synergistically improved retrieval of IA memory on the test day. In contrast, pre-test administration of a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (0.5, 1 and 2 microg/rat) which had no effect alone prevented the nicotine reversal of morphine effect on memory. Our data indicate that NMDA receptors in the VTA are involved in the reversing effect of nicotine on morphine induced state-dependency.

  15. Use of mini-implants to avoid maxillary surgery for Class III mandibular prognathic patient: a long-term post-retention case

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hee-Yeon; Park, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    Because of the potential morbidity and complications associated with surgical procedures, limiting the extent of orthognathic surgery is a desire for many orthodontic patients. An eighteen-year-old woman had a severe Class III malocclusion and required bi-maxillary surgery. By changing the patient's maxillary occlusal plane using orthodontic mini-implants, she was able to avoid the maxillary surgery; requiring only a mandibular setback surgery. To accurately predict the post-surgery outcome, we applied a new soft tissue prediction method. We were able to follow and report the long-term result of her combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. The changes to her occlusal plane continue to appear stable over 6 years later. PMID:25473650

  16. Role of dopamine receptors subtypes, D1-like and D2-like, within the nucleus accumbens subregions, core and shell, on memory consolidation in the one-trial inhibitory avoidance task.

    PubMed

    Managò, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dopamine within the nucleus accumbens mediates consolidation of both associative and nonassociative memories. However, the specific contribution of the nucleus accumbens subregions, core and shell, and of D1 and D2 receptors subtypes has not been yet clarified. The aim of this study was, therefore, to directly compare the effect of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor blockade within the core and the shell subregions of the nucleus accumbens on memory consolidation. Using the one-trial inhibitory avoidance task in CD1 mice, we demonstrated that SCH 23390 (vehicle, 12.5, 25, 50 ng/side) administration within the core, but not the shell, impaired step-through latency 24 h after the administration if injected immediately, but not 120 min post-training. Interestingly, sulpiride (vehicle, 25, 50 ng/side) injection in both the core and the shell of the accumbens affected step-through latency 24 h later; also, in this case the impairment was time dependent. These data provide the most complete and direct demonstration to date that early consolidation of aversive memory requires D2 receptor activation in both nucleus accumbens subregions, and D1 activation selectively in the nucleus accumbens core.

  17. Shade Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Jorge J.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of neighboring vegetation modifies the light environment experienced by plants, generating signals that are perceived by phytochromes and cryptochromes. These signals cause large changes in plant body form and function, including enhanced growth of the hypocotyl and petioles, a more erect position of the leaves and early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. Collectively, these so-called shade-avoidance responses tend to reduce the degree of current or future shade by neighbors. Shade light signals increase the abundance of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PIF5 proteins, promote the synthesis and redirection of auxin, favor the degradation of DELLA proteins and increase the expression of auxin, gibberellins and brassinosteroid-promoted genes, among other events downstream the photoreceptors. Selectively disrupting these events by genetic or pharmacological approaches affects shade-avoidance responses with an intensity that depends on the developmental context and the environment. Shade-avoidance responses provide a model to investigate the signaling networks used by plants to take advantage of the cues provided by the environment to adjust to the challenges imposed by the environment itself. PMID:22582029

  18. The role of the nucleus accumbens shell in the mediation of the reinforcing properties of a safety signal in free-operant avoidance: dopamine-dependent inhibitory effects of d-amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Anushka B P; Urcelay, Gonzalo P; Mar, Adam C; Dickinson, Tony A; Robbins, Trevor W

    2014-05-01

    Safety signals (SSs) have been shown to reinforce instrumental avoidance behavior due to their ability to signal the absence of an aversive event; however, little is known of their neural mediation. This study investigated whether infusions of d-amphetamine in the nucleus accumbens (Nac), previously shown to potentiate responding for appetitive conditioned reinforcers (CRfs), also regulate avoidance responding for a SS. Rats were trained on a free-operant task in which lever-press responses avoided shock and were reinforced with an auditory SS. Rats were then cannulated in the Nac core (NacC) or shell (NacS) and infused with d-amphetamine and, in separate NacS groups, other drugs, before extinction sessions with the SS present or absent following responding. Selective effects of d-amphetamine were found in the NacS, but not in the NacC, when the SS was present in the session. A significant increase in response rate during the presentation of the SS reflected a disruption of its fear-inhibiting properties. In parallel, a decrease in avoidance response rate reflected the reduced influence of the SS as a CRf. Inactivation of the NacS reduced avoidance responding only when the SS was present in the session, whereas the D1-D2 DA receptor antagonist α-flupenthixol reduced responding both before and during the SS regardless of the presence of the SS. Atomoxetine (ATO), a selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, had no effect on responding. These results indicate a role for the NacS in the mediation of the conditioned reinforcing properties of a SS. These effects appear to be modulated by dopaminergic mechanisms but seem distinct from those previously reported with food-related CRfs.

  19. Evidence for the involvement of extinction-associated inhibitory learning in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Campus, P; Colelli, V; Orsini, C; Sarra, D; Cabib, S

    2015-02-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) remains one of the most used tools for screening antidepressants in rodent models. Nonetheless, the nature of immobility, its main behavioral measure, is still a matter of debate. The present study took advantage of our recent finding that mice of the inbred DBA/2J strain require a functioning left dorsolateral striatum (DLS) to consolidate long-term memory of FST to test whether immobility is the outcome of stress-related learning. Infusion of the GABA-A agonist muscimol in the left DLS immediately after a single experience of FST prevented and infusion in the left or the right amygdala impaired recall of the acquired levels of immobility in a probe test performed 24h later. Post-training left DLS infusion of muscimol, at a dose capable of preventing retention of FST-induced immobility, did not influence 24h retention of inhibitory avoidance training or of the escape response acquired in a water T-maze. However, this same treatment prevented 24h retention of the extinction training of the consolidated escape response. These results indicate that a left DLS-centered memory system selectively mediates memory consolidation of FST and of escape extinction and support the hypothesis that immobility is the result of extinction-like inhibitory learning involving all available escape responses due to the inescapable/unavoidable nature of FST experience.

  20. Promoting Retention

    PubMed Central

    Hall, LaToya N.; Ficker, Lisa J.; Chadiha, Letha A.; Green, Carmen R.; Jackson, James S.; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the capability of a research volunteer registry to retain community-dwelling African American older adults, and to explore demographic and health factors associated with retention. Method: A logistic regression model was used to determine the influence of demographics, health factors, and registry logic model activities on retention in a sample of 1,730 older African American adults. Results: Almost 80% of participants active in the volunteer research registry between January 2012 and June 2015 were retained. Employment, being referred to research studies, a higher number of medical conditions, and more follow-up contacts were associated with an increased likelihood of retention. Older age, more months in the registry, and more mobility problems decreased the likelihood of retention. Discussion: These results suggest the Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research logic model promotes retention through involving older African American adults in research through study referrals and intensive follow-up. The loss of participants due to age- and mobility-related issues indicate the registry may be losing its most vulnerable participants. PMID:28138501

  1. Urinary Retention

    MedlinePlus

    ... indicates the bladder does not empty completely. A health care provider performs this test during an office visit. The patient often receives ... more urodynamic tests to diagnose urinary retention. The health care provider will perform these tests during an office visit. For tests that use ...

  2. Retention Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rita, Emilio

    Designed to improve student retention at Bronx Community College (BCC), this workbook is comprised of sets checklists for use by students in evaluating their progress toward a number of academic, personal, and work-related goals. The workbook is divided into five sections, each containing a set of goals and associated checklists. Part I deals with…

  3. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  4. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  5. Retrieval Does Not Induce Reconsolidation of Inhibitory Avoidance Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Ivan; Cammarota, Martin; Bevilaqua, Lia R. M.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that retrieval during a nonreinforced test induces reconsolidation instead of extinction of the mnemonic trace. Reconsolidation would preserve the original memory from the labilization induced by its nonreinforced recall through a hitherto uncharacterized mechanism requiring protein synthesis. Given the importance that such a…

  6. Retrieval Does Not Induce Reconsolidation of Inhibitory Avoidance Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Jorge H.; Izquierdo, Ivan; Cammarota, Martin; Bevilaqua, Lia R. M.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that retrieval during a nonreinforced test induces reconsolidation instead of extinction of the mnemonic trace. Reconsolidation would preserve the original memory from the labilization induced by its nonreinforced recall through a hitherto uncharacterized mechanism requiring protein synthesis. Given the importance that such a…

  7. Taurine improves learning and retention in aged mice.

    PubMed

    El Idrissi, Abdeslem

    2008-05-02

    Aging of the brain is characterized by several neurochemical modifications involving structural proteins, neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and related receptors. Alterations of neurochemical indices of synaptic function have been considered as indicators of age-related impairment of central functions, such as locomotion, memory and sensory performances. Several studies demonstrated that GABA receptors, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65&67), and different subpopulations of GABAergic neurons are markedly decreased in experimental animal brains during aging. Thus, the age-related decline in cognitive functions could be attributable, at least in part, to decrements in GABA inhibitory neurotransmission. In this study, using a passive avoidance test, we show that chronic supplementation of taurine to aged mice significantly ameliorates the age-dependent decline in memory acquisition and retention. We have previously shown that taurine supplementation caused changes in the GABAergic system. These changes include increased levels of the neurotransmitters GABA and glutamate, increased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and the neuropeptide somatostatin and increase in the number of somatostatin-positive neurons. These specific alterations of the inhibitory system caused by taurine treatment oppose those naturally occurring in aging, and suggest a protective role of taurine against the normal aging process. Increased understanding of age-related neurochemical changes in the GABAergic system will be important in elucidating the underpinnings of the functional changes of aging. Taurine might help forestall the age-related decline in cognitive functions through alterations of the GABAergic system.

  8. Managing retention.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2007-01-01

    To build this process it is necessary to consult customers for preferences, build familiarity and knowledge to build a relationship and conduct business in a customized fashion. The process takes every opportunity to build customer satisfaction with each customer contact. It is an important process to have, since customers today are more demanding, sophisticated, educated and comfortable speaking to the company as an equal (Belk, 2003). Customers have more customized expectations so they want to be reached as individuals (Raymond and Tanner, 1994). Also, a disproportionate search for new business is costly. The cost to cultivate new customers is more than maintaining existing customers (Cathcart, 1990). Other reasons that customer retention is necessary is because many unhappy customers will never buy again from a company that dissatisfied them and they will communicate their displeasure to other people. These dissatisfied customers may not even convey their displeasure but without saying anything just stop doing business with that company, which may keep them unaware for some time that there is any problem (Cathcart, 1990).

  9. Inhibitory control of hippocampal inhibitory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chamberland, Simon; Topolnik, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Information processing within neuronal networks is determined by a dynamic partnership between principal neurons and local circuit inhibitory interneurons. The population of GABAergic interneurons is extremely heterogeneous and comprises, in many brain regions, cells with divergent morphological and physiological properties, distinct molecular expression profiles, and highly specialized functions. GABAergic interneurons have been studied extensively during the past two decades, especially in the hippocampus, which is a relatively simple cortical structure. Different types of hippocampal inhibitory interneurons control spike initiation [e.g., axo-axonic and basket cells (BCs)] and synaptic integration (e.g., bistratified and oriens–lacunosum moleculare interneurons) within pyramidal neurons and synchronize local network activity, providing a means for functional segregation of neuronal ensembles and proper routing of hippocampal information. Thus, it is thought that, at least in the hippocampus, GABAergic inhibitory interneurons represent critical regulating elements at all stages of information processing, from synaptic integration and spike generation to large-scale network activity. However, this raises an important question: if inhibitory interneurons are fundamental for network computations, what are the mechanisms that control the activity of the interneurons themselves? Given the essential role of synaptic inhibition in the regulation of neuronal activity, it would be logical to expect that specific inhibitory mechanisms have evolved to control the operation of interneurons. Here, we review the mechanisms of synaptic inhibition of interneurons and discuss their role in the operation of hippocampal inhibitory circuits. PMID:23162426

  10. Analysis of the 5-HT1A receptor involvement in passive avoidance in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Misane, Ilga; Johansson, Christina; Ove Ögren, Sven

    1998-01-01

    The effects of the 5-HT2A/2C agonist DOB, the selective 5-HT1A agonist NDO 008 (3-dipropylamino-5-hydroxychroman), and the two enantiomers of the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (R(+)-8-OH-DPAT and S(−)-8-OH-DPAT) were studied in a step-through passive avoidance (PA) test in the male rat.The 5-HT1A agonists injected prior to training (conditioning) produced a dose-dependent impairment of PA retention when examined 24 h later. R(+)-8-OH-DPAT was four times more effective than S(−)-8-OH-DPAT to cause an impairment of PA retention. Both NDO 008 and the two enantiomers of 8-OH-DPAT induced the serotonin syndrome at the dose range that produced inhibition of the PA response, thus, indicating activation of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors.Neither NDO 008 nor R(+)-8-OH-DPAT induced head-twitches, a behavioural response attributed to stimulation of postsynaptic 5-HT2A receptors. In contrast, DOB induced head-twitches at the 0.01 mg kg−1 dose while a 200 times higher dose was required to produce a significant impairment of PA retention.The impairment of PA retention induced by both NDO 008 and R(+)-8-OH-DPAT was fully blocked by the active S(+)- enantiomer of the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100135 and the mixed 5-HT1A/β-adrenoceptor antagonist L(−)-alprenolol. In contrast, the mixed 5-HT2A/2C antagonists ketanserin and pirenperone were found to be ineffective. Moreover, the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118551, the β1-antagonist metoprolol as well as the mixed β-adrenoceptor blocker D(+)-alprenolol all failed to modify the deficit of PA retention by NDO 008 and R(+)-8-OH-DPAT. None of the 5-HT1A or 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonists tested or the β-blockers altered PA retention by themselves.A 3 day pretreatment procedure (200+100+100 mg kg−1) with the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) did not alter PA retention and did not prevent the inhibitory action of the 5-HT1A agonists, indicating that their effects on PA do not

  11. Strategies for Teacher Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    Strategies for teacher retention are presented, including successful approaches and elements for operating a state system for personnel recruitment and retention in special education. Such initiatives as the Utah Mentor Teacher Academy; the Texas Teacher Recruitment, Retention and Assistance Program; and the Kansas Recruitment/Retention Project…

  12. Color-avoiding percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Sebastian M.; Danziger, Michael M.; Zlatić, Vinko

    2017-08-01

    Many real world networks have groups of similar nodes which are vulnerable to the same failure or adversary. Nodes can be colored in such a way that colors encode the shared vulnerabilities. Using multiple paths to avoid these vulnerabilities can greatly improve network robustness, if such paths exist. Color-avoiding percolation provides a theoretical framework for analyzing this scenario, focusing on the maximal set of nodes which can be connected via multiple color-avoiding paths. In this paper we extend the basic theory of color-avoiding percolation that was published in S. M. Krause et al. [Phys. Rev. X 6, 041022 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.041022. We explicitly account for the fact that the same particular link can be part of different paths avoiding different colors. This fact was previously accounted for with a heuristic approximation. Here we propose a better method for solving this problem which is substantially more accurate for many avoided colors. Further, we formulate our method with differentiated node functions, either as senders and receivers, or as transmitters. In both functions, nodes can be explicitly trusted or avoided. With only one avoided color we obtain standard percolation. Avoiding additional colors one by one, we can understand the critical behavior of color-avoiding percolation. For unequal color frequencies, we find that the colors with the largest frequencies control the critical threshold and exponent. Colors of small frequencies have only a minor influence on color-avoiding connectivity, thus allowing for approximations.

  13. Color-avoiding percolation.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sebastian M; Danziger, Michael M; Zlatić, Vinko

    2017-08-01

    Many real world networks have groups of similar nodes which are vulnerable to the same failure or adversary. Nodes can be colored in such a way that colors encode the shared vulnerabilities. Using multiple paths to avoid these vulnerabilities can greatly improve network robustness, if such paths exist. Color-avoiding percolation provides a theoretical framework for analyzing this scenario, focusing on the maximal set of nodes which can be connected via multiple color-avoiding paths. In this paper we extend the basic theory of color-avoiding percolation that was published in S. M. Krause et al. [Phys. Rev. X 6, 041022 (2016)]2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.6.041022. We explicitly account for the fact that the same particular link can be part of different paths avoiding different colors. This fact was previously accounted for with a heuristic approximation. Here we propose a better method for solving this problem which is substantially more accurate for many avoided colors. Further, we formulate our method with differentiated node functions, either as senders and receivers, or as transmitters. In both functions, nodes can be explicitly trusted or avoided. With only one avoided color we obtain standard percolation. Avoiding additional colors one by one, we can understand the critical behavior of color-avoiding percolation. For unequal color frequencies, we find that the colors with the largest frequencies control the critical threshold and exponent. Colors of small frequencies have only a minor influence on color-avoiding connectivity, thus allowing for approximations.

  14. Fuel nozzle tube retention

    DOEpatents

    Cihlar, David William; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2017-02-28

    A system for retaining a fuel nozzle premix tube includes a retention plate and a premix tube which extends downstream from an outlet of a premix passage defined along an aft side of a fuel plenum body. The premix tube includes an inlet end and a spring support feature which is disposed proximate to the inlet end. The premix tube extends through the retention plate. The spring retention feature is disposed between an aft side of the fuel plenum and the retention plate. The system further includes a spring which extends between the spring retention feature and the retention plate.

  15. Avoiding health information.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Joshua B; Rintamaki, Lance S; Ramsey, Jason A; Brashers, Dale E

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated why and how individuals avoid health information to support the development of models of uncertainty and information management and offer insights for those dealing with the information and uncertainty inherent to health and illness. Participants from student (n = 507) and community (n = 418) samples reported that they avoided health information to (a) maintain hope or deniability, (b) resist overexposure, (c) accept limits of action, (d) manage flawed information, (e) maintain boundaries, and (f) continue with life/activities. They also reported strategies for avoiding information, including removing or ignoring stimuli (e.g., avoiding people who might provide health advice) and controlling conversations (e.g., withholding information, changing the subject). Results suggest a link between previous experience with serious illness and health information avoidance. Building on uncertainty management theory, this study demonstrated that health information avoidance is situational, relatively common, not necessarily unhealthy, and may be used to accomplish multiple communication goals.

  16. Learning and extinction of a passive avoidance response in mice with high levels of predisposition to catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, N I; Zinov'ev, D R; Zinov'eva, D V; Kulikov, A V

    2009-06-01

    This report presents results obtained from comparative analysis of learning and the dynamics of extinction of a conditioned passive avoidance response in ASC mice, which were bred for a high level of predisposition to catalepsy, and in CBA and AKR mice. The following findings were obtained: 1) impairments to the extinction of the memory of fear represent an important symptom of depression in ASC mice; 2) extinction is delayed in CBA mice; and 3) new inhibitory learning occurs quickly in AKR mice. Prolonged retention of the fear memory in ASC mice appears to be related to increased anxiety on prolonged testing without a punishment. The deficit of inhibition of the fear reaction in ASC mice allows this strain to be regarded as a genetic model of depression.

  17. Avoiding Cancer Risk Information

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, Amber S.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Howell, Jennifer L.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Waters, Erika A.; Orom, Heather; Shepperd, James A.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Perceived risk for health problems such as cancer is a central construct in many models of health decision making and a target for behavior change interventions. However, some portion of the population actively avoids cancer risk information. The prevalence of, explanations for, and consequences of such avoidance are not well understood. OBJECTIVE We examined the prevalence and demographic and psychosocial correlates of cancer risk information avoidance preference in a nationally representative sample. We also examined whether avoidance of cancer risk information corresponds with avoidance of cancer screening. RESULTS Based on our representative sample, 39% of the population indicated that they agreed or strongly agreed that they would “rather not know [their] chance of getting cancer.” This preference was stronger among older participants, female participants, and participants with lower levels of education. Preferring to avoid cancer risk information was stronger among participants who agreed with the beliefs that everything causes cancer, that there’s not much one can do to prevent cancer, and that there are too many recommendations to follow. Finally, the preference to avoid cancer risk information was associated with lower levels of screening for colon cancer. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that cancer risk information avoidance is a multi-determined phenomenon that is associated with demographic characteristics and psychosocial individual differences and also relates to engagement in cancer screening. PMID:26560410

  18. Fall 1984 Retention Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    A study was conducted of the retention patterns of students enrolled in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) in fall 1984 using college reports on withdrawals and grade distributions. The study focused on successful retention (i.e., all students who received a passing grade) and on total retention (i.e., all students who received any…

  19. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  20. GABA[subscript A] Receptors Determine the Temporal Dynamics of Memory Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Gavan P.; Augustyn, Katarzyna A.; Richardson, Rick

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments studied the role of GABA[subscript A] receptors in the temporal dynamics of memory retention. Memory for an active avoidance response was a nonmonotonic function of the retention interval. When rats were tested shortly (2 min) or some time (24 h) after training, retention was excellent, but when they were tested at intermediate…

  1. Avoiding Construction Snafus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochefort, Mark; Gosch, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    Discusses risk management planning tips that help schools avoid project-delaying construction problems. Preconstruction planning topics explored include the type of construction method to use, contract selection, and the need for efficient project management. (GR)

  2. Avoidant personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    American Psychiatric Association. Avoidant personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013;672-675. Blais MA, Smallwood ...

  3. Avoiding Computer Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Joyce; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The threat of computer sabotage is a real concern to business teachers and others responsible for academic computer facilities. Teachers can minimize the possibility. Eight suggestions for avoiding computer viruses are given. (JOW)

  4. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  5. An inhibitory corticostriatal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Crystal; Zurita, Hector; Wilson, Charles; Apicella, Alfonso junior

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological studies have led to the assumption that the dorsal striatum receives exclusively excitatory afferents from the cortex. Here we test the hypothesis that the dorsal striatum receives also GABAergic projections from the cortex. We addressed this fundamental question by taking advantage of optogenetics and directly examining the functional effects of cortical GABAergic inputs to spiny projection neurons (SPNs) of the mouse auditory and motor cortex. We found that the cortex, via corticostriatal somatostatin neurons (CS-SOM), has a direct inhibitory influence on the output of the striatum SPNs. Our results describe a corticostriatal long-range inhibitory circuit (CS-SOM inhibitory projections → striatal SPNs) underlying the control of spike timing/generation in SPNs and attributes a specific function to a genetically defined type of cortical interneuron in corticostriatal communication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15890.001 PMID:27159237

  6. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  7. Cyber Workforce Retention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Retention 25 Congressional Concerns about Cyber Retention 25 Contemporary Civilian Labor Market Study Findings on Retention Best Practices 26...occupational categories in the labor markets in the United States and around the world in the coming years. This demand is increasing based on the rising...professionals collides with a world labor market already experi- encing a dramatic deficit in individuals with these skills. At the same time, the United

  8. Vigour in active avoidance.

    PubMed

    Nord, Camilla L; Prabhu, Gita; Nolte, Tobias; Fonagy, Peter; Dolan, Ray; Moutoussis, Michael

    2017-12-01

    It would be maladaptive to learn about catastrophes by trial and error alone. Investment in planning and effort are necessary. Devoting too many resources to averting disaster, however, can impair quality of life, as in anxiety and paranoia. Here, we developed a novel task to explore how people adjust effort expenditure (vigor) so as to avoid negative consequences. Our novel paradigm is immersive, enabling us to measure vigor in the context of (simulated) disaster. We found that participants (N = 118) exerted effort to avoid disaster-associated states, adjusting their effort expenditure according to the baseline probability of catastrophe, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, negative subjective emotional states were associated both with threat level and with increasing vigor in the face of disaster. We describe for the first time effort expenditure in the context of irreversible losses, with important implications for disorders marked by excessive avoidance.

  9. Collision Avoidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Ames Research Center teamed with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to study human performance factors associated with the use of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance system (TCAS II) in an operational environment. TCAS is designed to alert pilots of the presence of other aircraft in their vicinity, to identify and track those who could be a threat, and to recommend action to avoid a collision. Ames conducted three laboratory experiments. The first showed that pilots were able to use the TCAS II correctly in the allowable time. The second tested pilots' response to changes in the avoidance advisories, and the third examined pilots' reactions to alternative displays. After a 1989 congressional mandate, the FAA ruled that TCAS would be required on all passenger carrying aircraft (to be phased in completely by 1995).

  10. Psychological Treatments to Avoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Certain psychological treatments should be avoided, and a list of such treatments would provide valuable guidance for counselors, as well as potential clients. It is well established that some therapies are potentially dangerous, and some fringe therapies are highly unlikely to help clients beyond a placebo effect. This article provides an…

  11. Pitcherpot: Avoiding Honeypot Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Vinod K.; Bhatnagar, Pramod K.; Bhatnagar, Mitul

    This paper explores the various ways honeypots could be detected by the malicious attacker. This includes the different prevalent criteria and characteristics for honeypots generation & their weaknesses. Further this paper proposes a new way of implementation of a honeypot (Pitcher pots Systems) that effectively facilitate its identity avoidance and yet offers better ways to study the attacker.

  12. Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoit, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how and why college students commit plagiarism, suggesting techniques that instructors can use to help student avoid plagiarism. Instructors should define and discuss plagiarism thoroughly; discuss hypothetical cases; review the conventions of quoting and documenting material; require multiple drafts of essays; and offer responses…

  13. Avoiding the "M" Word.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Donna

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of roundtable discussions by top business officers about how higher education can capitalize on strategic alliances. Describes how, by working with one another and with corporate partners, colleges and universities can avoid closing their doors or merging with stronger institutions. (EV)

  14. Plants to Avoid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of poisonous plants is extremely important for home owners, gardeners, farmers, hunters, hikers, and the rest of the general public. Among the most important plants to avoid in the Delta Region are poison ivy, bull nettle, eastern black nightshade, Queen Ann’s lace, jimsonweed, and trumpe...

  15. Typewriting: Retention and Relearning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagman, Joseph D.

    Retention and relearning of straight-copy typewriting skill among thirty-eight administrative specialists, 71L Military Occupational Speciality, were examined after the no-practice retention interval between Advanced Individual Training (AIT) graduation and unit duty. Over this interval, average typing speed decreased and errors increased. As a…

  16. Retention, retention, retention: targeting the young in CPR skills training!

    PubMed

    Roppolo, Lynn P; Pepe, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    The usefulness of basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in school systems has been questioned, considering that young students may not have the physical or cognitive skills required to perform complex tasks correctly. In the study conducted by Fleishhackl and coworkers, students as young as 9 years were able to successfully and effectively learn basic CPR skills, including automated external defibrillator deployment, correct recovery position, and emergency calling. As in adults, physical strength may limit the depth of chest compressions and ventilation volumes given by younger individuals with low body mass index; however, skill retention is good. Training all persons across an entire community in CPR may have a logarithmic improvement in survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest because bystanders, usually family members, are more likely to know CPR and can perform it immediately, when it is physiologically most effective. Training captured audiences of trainees, such as the entire work-force of the community or the local school system, are excellent mechanisms to help achieve that goal. In addition to better retention with new half hour training kits, a multiplier effect can be achieved through school children. In addition, early training not only sets the stage for subsequent training and better retention, but it also reinforces the concept of a social obligation to help others.

  17. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone on avoidance behavior of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Yu O; Goncharov, N P; Sapronov, N S

    2004-07-01

    We studied the effect of repeated intraperitoneal treatment with dehydroepiandrosterone in doses of 0.1 and 0.7 mg/kg on conditioned-response activity and behavior of adult male rats. The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone on learning was estimated in conditioned active and passive avoidance response paradigms. Chronic administration of dehydroepiandrosterone in low and high doses had no effect on retention of conditioned passive avoidance response in adult male rats 24 h after learning. However, chronic administration of dehydroepiandrosterone in low dose impaired acquisition of the conditioned active avoidance response. It should be emphasized that chronic administration of dehydroepiandrosterone in high dose did not modulate acquisition and retention of this reaction.

  18. Avoiding revision rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Waite, Peter D

    2011-02-01

    Reoperation of the nose is challenging and sometimes emotionally difficult for the surgeon and patient. There are multiple pitfalls to be avoided and it is always best to carefully diagnose and establish a surgical treatment plan. Even among the best of plans and surgical techniques, revision may be necessary. The patient and surgeon should understand the limitations of the surgical techniques and the individual anatomy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Postoperative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Daniela M; Griebling, Tomas L; Silverstein, Jeffrey H

    2009-09-01

    Postoperative urinary retention (PUR) is a common complication of surgery and anesthesia. The risk of retention is especially high after anorectal surgery, hernia repair, and orthopedic surgery and increases with advancing age. Certain anesthetic and analgesic modalities, particularly spinal anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics and epidural analgesia, promote the development of urinary retention. Portable ultrasound provides rapid and accurate assessment of bladder volume and aids in the diagnosis and management of PUR. Catheterization is recommended when bladder volume exceeds 600 mL to prevent the negative sequelae of prolonged bladder overdistention.

  20. No Enhancement of 24-Hour Visuomotor Skill Retention by Post-Practice Caffeine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Sara J.; Cole, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed throughout the world and appears to indirectly facilitate learning and memory through effects on attention and motivation. Animal work indicates that post-training caffeine administration augments inhibitory avoidance memory, spatial memory, and object memory. In humans, post-training caffeine administration enhances the ability to discern between familiar images and new, similar images. However, the effect of post-training caffeine administration on motor memory has not been examined. Therefore, we tested two groups of low caffeine consumers (average weekly consumption ≤500 mg) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving acquisition of a continuous isometric visuomotor tracking skill. On Day 1, subjects completed 5 blocks (150 repetitions) of training on the continuous isometric visuomotor skill and subsequently ingested either 200 mg of caffeine or placebo. On day 2, subjects completed an additional 5 blocks of training. Day 1 mean performance and performance variability were both similar between groups, suggesting that both groups acquired the motor skill similarly. For mean performance on Day 2, patterns of re-learning, mean performance learning magnitudes, mean performance learning rates, and mean performance retention magnitudes were all similar between groups. For performance variability on Day 2, there was a small trend towards increased variability in the caffeine group during re-learning, but performance variability learning magnitudes and performance variability retention magnitudes did not differ between groups. Because motor skill acquisition can also be conceptualized as a reduction in performance variability, these results suggest that there may be a small negative effect of post-practice caffeine administration on memory of a newly-learned visuomotor skill. Overall, we found no evidence to suggest that post-training caffeine administration enhances 24-hour retention of a newly-learned continuous visuomotor

  1. No Enhancement of 24-Hour Visuomotor Skill Retention by Post-Practice Caffeine Administration.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sara J; Cole, Kelly J

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed throughout the world and appears to indirectly facilitate learning and memory through effects on attention and motivation. Animal work indicates that post-training caffeine administration augments inhibitory avoidance memory, spatial memory, and object memory. In humans, post-training caffeine administration enhances the ability to discern between familiar images and new, similar images. However, the effect of post-training caffeine administration on motor memory has not been examined. Therefore, we tested two groups of low caffeine consumers (average weekly consumption ≤500 mg) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving acquisition of a continuous isometric visuomotor tracking skill. On Day 1, subjects completed 5 blocks (150 repetitions) of training on the continuous isometric visuomotor skill and subsequently ingested either 200 mg of caffeine or placebo. On day 2, subjects completed an additional 5 blocks of training. Day 1 mean performance and performance variability were both similar between groups, suggesting that both groups acquired the motor skill similarly. For mean performance on Day 2, patterns of re-learning, mean performance learning magnitudes, mean performance learning rates, and mean performance retention magnitudes were all similar between groups. For performance variability on Day 2, there was a small trend towards increased variability in the caffeine group during re-learning, but performance variability learning magnitudes and performance variability retention magnitudes did not differ between groups. Because motor skill acquisition can also be conceptualized as a reduction in performance variability, these results suggest that there may be a small negative effect of post-practice caffeine administration on memory of a newly-learned visuomotor skill. Overall, we found no evidence to suggest that post-training caffeine administration enhances 24-hour retention of a newly-learned continuous visuomotor

  2. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  3. Retention in Tough Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Beverly; Jordan-Evans, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with 25 global talent leaders discuss keeping good people and the challenges and emerging practices for retaining employees. Sidebars discuss retention tips and what keeps people on the job. (JOW)

  4. Landing Hazard Avoidance Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, Michael Franklin (Inventor); Hirsh, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Landing hazard avoidance displays can provide rapidly understood visual indications of where it is safe to land a vehicle and where it is unsafe to land a vehicle. Color coded maps can indicate zones in two dimensions relative to the vehicles position where it is safe to land. The map can be simply green (safe) and red (unsafe) areas with an indication of scale or can be a color coding of another map such as a surface map. The color coding can be determined in real time based on topological measurements and safety criteria to thereby adapt to dynamic, unknown, or partially known environments.

  5. Avoiding Death by Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, A.; Ferreira, P. M.; Ivanov, I.; Santos, R.; Silva, João P.

    2013-07-01

    The two-Higgs doublet model (2HDM) can have two electroweak breaking, CP-conserving, minima. The possibility arises that the minimum which corresponds to the known elementary particle spectrum is metastable, a possibility we call the "panic vacuum". We present analytical bounds on the parameters of the softly broken Peccei-Quinn 2HDM which are necessary and sufficient conditions to avoid this possibility. We also show that, for this particular model, the current LHC data already tell us that we are necessarily in the global minimum of the theory, regardless of any cosmological considerations about the lifetime of the false vacua.

  6. Mentorship: increasing retention probabilities.

    PubMed

    Leners, Debra Woodard; Wilson, Vicki W; Connor, Peggy; Fenton, Joanne

    2006-11-01

    Retaining nurses is a significant workforce issue. Experienced nurses in particular are getting harder to retain within hospitals and the discipline at large. One solution to boost retention is to give serious attention to professional socialization activities through contemporary nurse mentorship experiences. The authors contend that contemporary mentoring programmes, targeting developmental quality of life issues of the expert nurse, would appreciably benefit retention programmes within the hospital environment.

  7. Predicting attention and avoidance: when do avoiders attend?

    PubMed

    Klein, Rupert; Knäuper, Bärbel

    2009-09-01

    Three avoidance measures, the Miller Behavioural Style Scale (MBSS), Index of Self-Regulation of Emotion (ISE) and Mainz Coping Inventory (MCI), were compared in their ability to predict attention and avoidance of threats in the emotional Stroop task. It was also examined if the avoidance mechanism of individuals who would normally avoid threat-indicating words becomes disrupted under conditions of dopamine reduction. Results show that only the ISE predicted attention/avoidance of threat-indicating words. In addition, the avoidance mechanism, as measured by the ISE and MCI, was not activated when regular smokers abstained from smoking.

  8. Collision avoidance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.; Cour-Palais, B. G.; Taylor, R. E.; Landry, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Collisions in earth orbital space between operational payloads and various forms of space debris (nonoperational payloads, nonfunctional mission-related objects and fragments resulting from collisions and explosions) are discussed and possible means of avoiding them are considered. From 10,000 to 15,000 objects are estimated to be in earth orbital space, most of which represent spacecraft fragments and debris too small to be detected and tracked by earth-based sensors, and it is considered likely that some of them will be or have already been involved in direct collisions with the ever increasing number of operational satellites and space stations. Means of protecting proposed large space structures and smaller spacecraft from significant damage by larger space objects, particularly in the 400-4000 km altitude range where most debris occurs, include structural redundancy and the double shielding of sensitive components. Other means of collision avoidance are the collection or relocation of satellites, rocket bodies and other objects by the Space Shuttle, the prevention of explosions and the disposal of spent rocket parts by reentry. Finally, a management structure would be required to administer guidelines for the prevention and elimination of space debris.

  9. Avoidable waste management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  10. Campus Retention Committee Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David P.; Alford, Veronica; Alpha-Kpetewama, Tamba; Clagett, Craig A.; Engleberg, Isa N.

    In January 1996, Prince George's Community College (PGCC) established the Campus Retention Committee to review community college retention strategies, determine PGCC's strengths and weaknesses in the area of retention, and develop a list of retention goals and an implementation schedule for the college. After reviewing findings from previous…

  11. Context specificity of inhibitory control in dogs

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Evan L.; Hare, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Across three experiments, we explored whether a dog's capacity for inhibitory control is stable or variable across decision-making contexts. In the social task, dogs were first exposed to the reputations of a stingy experimenter that never shared food and a generous experimenter who always shared food. In subsequent test trials, dogs were required to avoid approaching the stingy experimenter when this individual offered (but withheld) a higher-value reward than the generous experimenter did. In the A-not-B task, dogs were required to inhibit searching for food in a previously rewarded location after witnessing the food being moved from this location to a novel hiding place. In the cylinder task, dogs were required to resist approaching visible food directly (because it was behind a transparent barrier), in favor of a detour reaching response. Overall, dogs exhibited inhibitory control in all three tasks. However, individual scores were not correlated between tasks, suggesting that context has a large effect on dogs' behavior. This result mirrors studies of humans, which have highlighted intra-individual variation in inhibitory control as a function of the decision-making context. Lastly, we observed a correlation between a subject's age and performance on the cylinder task, corroborating previous observations of age-related decline in dogs' executive function. PMID:23584618

  12. Context specificity of inhibitory control in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bray, Emily E; MacLean, Evan L; Hare, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Across three experiments, we explored whether a dog's capacity for inhibitory control is stable or variable across decision-making contexts. In the social task, dogs were first exposed to the reputations of a stingy experimenter that never shared food and a generous experimenter who always shared food. In subsequent test trials, dogs were required to avoid approaching the stingy experimenter when this individual offered (but withheld) a higher-value reward than the generous experimenter did. In the A-not-B task, dogs were required to inhibit searching for food in a previously rewarded location after witnessing the food being moved from this location to a novel hiding place. In the cylinder task, dogs were required to resist approaching visible food directly (because it was behind a transparent barrier), in favor of a detour reaching response. Overall, dogs exhibited inhibitory control in all three tasks. However, individual scores were not correlated between tasks, suggesting that context has a large effect on dogs' behavior. This result mirrors studies of humans, which have highlighted intra-individual variation in inhibitory control as a function of the decision-making context. Lastly, we observed a correlation between a subject's age and performance on the cylinder task, corroborating previous observations of age-related decline in dogs' executive function.

  13. Avoiding dangerous climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Joachim Schellnhuber; Wolfgang Cramer; Nebojsa Nakicenovic; Tom Wigley; Gary Yohe

    2006-02-15

    In 2005 the UK Government hosted the Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change conference to take an in-depth look at the scientific issues associated with climate change. This volume presents the most recent findings from the leading international scientists that attended the conference. The topics addressed include critical thresholds and key vulnerabilities of the climate system, impacts on human and natural systems, socioeconomic costs and benefits of emissions pathways, and technological options for meeting different stabilisation levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Contents are: Foreword from Prime Minister Tony Blair; Introduction from Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the IPCC; followed by 41 papers arranged in seven sections entitled: Key Vulnerabilities of the Climate System and Critical Thresholds; General Perspectives on Dangerous Impacts; Key Vulnerabilities for Ecosystems and Biodiversity; Socio-Economic Effects; Regional Perspectives; Emission Pathways; and Technological Options. Four papers have been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.

  14. Micro UAV collision avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, John; Pope, Frank

    2007-04-01

    A range image for micro UAV (unmanned air vehicle) collision avoidance is derived by processing a sequence of conventional images from a single camera on board the UAV. The range image will warn of looming collisions immediately ahead and also provide the 3-D situational awareness over a wide field of view needed for semi-autonomous or autonomous operation of the UAV. This single-camera technique is potentially applicable for other robotic vehicles that may not be large enough for two-camera stereo. The range image is generated by tracking the motion of scene detail along optic flow lines. Performance is estimated in terms of the minimum and maximum ranges of scene detail that can be sensed as a function of its position within the field of view.

  15. Measuring Experiential Avoidance in Adults: The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Jonathan E.; Murrell, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    To date, general levels of experiential avoidance are primarily measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), but it includes items of questionable comprehensibility. The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), previously validated as a measure of experiential avoidance with children and adolescents, was…

  16. Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing Page Content Article Body What is the best way to avoid infection after ear piercing? Ears may be pierced for cosmetic reasons ...

  17. Spacecraft Collision Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussy-Virat, Charles

    The rapid increase of the number of objects in orbit around the Earth poses a serious threat to operational spacecraft and astronauts. In order to effectively avoid collisions, mission operators need to assess the risk of collision between the satellite and any other object whose orbit is likely to approach its trajectory. Several algorithms predict the probability of collision but have limitations that impair the accuracy of the prediction. An important limitation is that uncertainties in the atmospheric density are usually not taken into account in the propagation of the covariance matrix from current epoch to closest approach time. The Spacecraft Orbital Characterization Kit (SpOCK) was developed to accurately predict the positions and velocities of spacecraft. The central capability of SpOCK is a high accuracy numerical propagator of spacecraft orbits and computations of ancillary parameters. The numerical integration uses a comprehensive modeling of the dynamics of spacecraft in orbit that includes all the perturbing forces that a spacecraft is subject to in orbit. In particular, the atmospheric density is modeled by thermospheric models to allow for an accurate representation of the atmospheric drag. SpOCK predicts the probability of collision between two orbiting objects taking into account the uncertainties in the atmospheric density. Monte Carlo procedures are used to perturb the initial position and velocity of the primary and secondary spacecraft from their covariance matrices. Developed in C, SpOCK supports parallelism to quickly assess the risk of collision so it can be used operationally in real time. The upper atmosphere of the Earth is strongly driven by the solar activity. In particular, abrupt transitions from slow to fast solar wind cause important disturbances of the atmospheric density, hence of the drag acceleration that spacecraft are subject to. The Probability Distribution Function (PDF) model was developed to predict the solar wind speed

  18. CAT altitude avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for indicating the altitude of the tropopause or of an inversion layer wherein clear air turbulence (CAT) may occur, and the likely severity of any such CAT, includes directing a passive microwave radiometer on the aircraft at different angles with respect to the horizon. The microwave radiation measured at a frequency of about 55 GHz represents the temperature of the air at an ""average'' range of about 3 kilometers, so that the sine of the angle of the radiometer times 3 kilometers equals the approximate altitude of the air whose temperature is measured. A plot of altitude (with respect to the aircraft) versus temperature of the air at that altitude, can indicate when an inversion layer is present and can indicate the altitude of the tropopause or of such an inversion layer. The plot can also indicate the severity of any CAT in an inversion layer. If CAT has been detected in the general area, then the aircraft can be flown at an altitude to avoid the tropopause or inversion layer.

  19. Avoid Earth Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    In 2011, the author supposes: the dark hole will take the dark comet to impact our solar system in 20 years. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.DFD.LA.24, BAPS.2012.APR.K1.78 and BAPS.2011.APR.K1.17) Asteroid 2011 AG5 will impact on Earth in 2040. (See Donald K. Yoemans, ``Asteroid 2011 AG5 - A Reality Check,'' NASA-JPL, 2012) The dark Asteroid 2011 AG5 (as a dark comet) is made of the dark matte. Sun and its companion-dark hole are a binary system (Their systemic model- SDS for short there in after). The dark hole has a dark comet belt. The dark hole and dark comet are made of the dark matter which has a space-time (as frequence-amplitude square) center- a different systemic model from solar systemic model. Because it absorb the space-time and wave. So it is ``dark.'' When the dark hole goes near the sun every 25-27 million years, it will take its dark comet belt to go into the solar system to impact our earth. In a other hand, it can change all of our systemic model and code which are controled by the SDS, such as the orbit both of the asteroid belt and planet (such as Jupiter), our atomic structure and our genetic code. It can trigger periodic Mass Extinction. We will use the dark matter to change the SDS to avoid forthcoming extinction.

  20. MEST- avoid next extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    Asteroid 2011 AG5 will impact on Earth in 2040. (See Donald K. Yoemans, ``Asteroid 2011 AG5 - A Reality Check,'' NASA-JPL, 2012) In 2011, The author say: the dark hole will take the dark comet to impact our solar system in 20 years, and give a systemic model between the sun and its companion-dark hole to explain why were there periodicity mass extinction on earth. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.CAL.C1.7, BAPS.2011.DFD.LA.24, BAPS.2012.APR.K1.78 and BAPS.2011.APR.K1.17) The dark Asteroid 2011 AG5 (as a dark comet) is made of the dark matter which has a space-time (as frequence-amplitude square) center- a different systemic model from solar systemic model. It can asborb the space-time and wave. So it is ``dark.'' When many dark matters hit on our earth, they can break our atom structure and our genetic code to trigger the Mass Extinction. In our experiments, consciousness can change the systematic model and code by a life-informational technology. So it can change the output signals of the solar cell. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.MAR.C1.286 and BAPS.2012.MAR.P33.14) So we will develop the genetic code of lives to evolution and sublimation, will use the dark matter to change the systemic model between dark hole and sun and will avoid next extinction.

  1. Collision avoidance sensor skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to totally eliminate the possibility of a robot (or any mechanism for that matter) inducing a collision in space operations. We were particularly concerned that human beings were safe under all circumstances. This was apparently accomplished, and it is shown that GSFC has a system that is ready for space qualification and flight. However, it soon became apparent that much more could be accomplished with this technology. Payloads could be made invulnerable to collision avoidance and the blind spots behind them eliminated. This could be accomplished by a simple, non-imaging set of 'Capaciflector' sensors on each payload. It also is evident that this system could be used to align and dock the system with a wide margin of safety. Throughout, lighting problems could be ignored, and unexpected events and modeling errors taken in stride. At the same time, computational requirements would be reduced. This can be done in a simple, rugged, reliable manner that will not disturb the form factor of space systems. It will be practical for space applications. The lab experiments indicate we are well on the way to accomplishing this. Still, the research trail goes deeper. It now appears that the sensors can be extended to end effectors to provide precontact information and make robot docking (or any docking connection) very smooth, with minimal loads impacted back into the mating structures. This type of ability would be a major step forward in basic control techniques in space. There are, however, baseline and restructuring issues to be tackled. The payloads must get power and signals to them from the robot or from the astronaut servicing tool. This requires a standard electromechanical interface. Any of several could be used. The GSFC prototype shown in this presentation is a good one. Sensors with their attendant electronics must be added to the payloads, end effectors, and robot arms and integrated into the system.

  2. Financial Literacy and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruth L.

    2006-01-01

    Higher education administrators know it is more cost-effective to keep students than to recruit them. Understanding financial literacy--and how it impacts student retention and persistence on the campuses--is an important concept for administrators to comprehend. Most students are not financially literate when they enter the world of higher…

  3. Data Show Retention Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee J.; Robelen, Erik W.; Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    New nationwide data collected by the U.S. Department of Education's civil rights office reveal stark racial and ethnic disparities in student retentions, with black and Hispanic students far more likely than white students to repeat a grade, especially in elementary and middle school. The contrast is especially strong for African-Americans. In the…

  4. Retention and Persistence Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Timothy R.

    Two studies are combined with an introductory section: one is "Persistence to Graduation for Freshmen Entering the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1967-75," by Timothy Sanford, and the second is "Freshman, Transfer, Professional, Masters, and Doctoral Student Retention at the University of North Carolina at Chapel…

  5. Data Show Retention Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee J.; Robelen, Erik W.; Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    New nationwide data collected by the U.S. Department of Education's civil rights office reveal stark racial and ethnic disparities in student retentions, with black and Hispanic students far more likely than white students to repeat a grade, especially in elementary and middle school. The contrast is especially strong for African-Americans. In the…

  6. Financial Literacy and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruth L.

    2006-01-01

    Higher education administrators know it is more cost-effective to keep students than to recruit them. Understanding financial literacy--and how it impacts student retention and persistence on the campuses--is an important concept for administrators to comprehend. Most students are not financially literate when they enter the world of higher…

  7. Tritium retention in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the materials physics related to D-T operation in TFTR. Research activities are described pertaining to basic studies of hydrogenic retention in graphite, hydrogen recycling phenomena, first-wall and limiter conditioning, surface analysis of TFTR first-wall components, and estimates of the tritium inventory.

  8. Secrets of Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliniak, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Recruiting students is one thing, but keeping them in a chorus, orchestra, or band is another. Although a music director has no control over some variables, there is much that can be done to help students to stay. Several experts share their advice on retention. One expert said a teacher's own attitude and classroom strategies may be two of the…

  9. Principals Retention. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Many districts are struggling with the problem of administrator retention. Hoffman (2004) identifies some of the reasons for this: (1) Increased accountability expectations; (2) Diminished or static levels of resources to support reform efforts; (3) Greater administrator vulnerability to sanctions; (4) The complex demands of government and the…

  10. Secondary Retention Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Nancy R.; Hopkins, Patricia

    Two alternatives to retention in grade for secondary school students were evaluated in Austin (Texas). Both were designed to allow students who are potential retainees (PRs) to receive remediation in one semester. The Transitional Academic Program (TAP) allows PRs to enroll in ninth-grade courses while repeating eighth-grade courses they had…

  11. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF).

    PubMed

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF)

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Nicos A; Babon, Jeffrey J

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is the most pleiotropic member of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. It utilises a receptor that consists of the LIF receptor β and gp130 and this receptor complex is also used by ciliary neurotrophic growth factor (CNTF), oncostatin M, cardiotrophin1 (CT1) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC). Despite common signal transduction mechanisms (JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K) LIF can have paradoxically opposite effects in different cell types including stimulating or inhibiting each of cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. While LIF can act on a wide range of cell types, LIF knockout mice have revealed that many of these actions are not apparent during ordinary development and that they may be the result of induced LIF expression during tissue damage or injury. Nevertheless LIF does appear to have non-redundant actions in maternal receptivity to blastocyst implantation, placental formation and in the development of the nervous system. LIF has also found practical use in the maintenance of self-renewal and totipotency of embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26187859

  13. Soil Water Retention Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. E.; Kim, J.; Cifelli, R.; Chandra, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Potential water retention, S, is one of parameters commonly used in hydrologic modeling for soil moisture accounting. Physically, S indicates total amount of water which can be stored in soil and is expressed in units of depth. S can be represented as a change of soil moisture content and in this context is commonly used to estimate direct runoff, especially in the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number (CN) method. Generally, the lumped and the distributed hydrologic models can easily use the SCS-CN method to estimate direct runoff. Changes in potential water retention have been used in previous SCS-CN studies; however, these studies have focused on long-term hydrologic simulations where S is allowed to vary at the daily time scale. While useful for hydrologic events that span multiple days, the resolution is too coarse for short-term applications such as flash flood events where S may not recover its full potential. In this study, a new method for estimating a time-variable potential water retention at hourly time-scales is presented. The methodology is applied for the Napa River basin, California. The streamflow gage at St Helena, located in the upper reaches of the basin, is used as the control gage site to evaluate the model performance as it is has minimal influences by reservoirs and diversions. Rainfall events from 2011 to 2012 are used for estimating the event-based SCS CN to transfer to S. As a result, we have derived the potential water retention curve and it is classified into three sections depending on the relative change in S. The first is a negative slope section arising from the difference in the rate of moving water through the soil column, the second is a zero change section representing the initial recovery the potential water retention, and the third is a positive change section representing the full recovery of the potential water retention. Also, we found that the soil water moving has traffic jam within 24 hours after finished first

  14. Mobile Learning and Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fozdar, Bharat Inder; Kumar, Lalita S.

    2007-01-01

    Student retention in open and distance learning (ODL) is comparatively poor to traditional education and, in some contexts, embarrassingly low. Literature on the subject of student retention in ODL indicates that even when interventions are designed and undertaken to improve student retention, they tend to fall short. Moreover, this area has not…

  15. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    PubMed

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  16. Inhibitory functioning in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Amieva, Hélène; Phillips, Louise H; Della Sala, Sergio; Henry, Julie D

    2004-05-01

    We present a comprehensive review of studies assessing inhibitory functioning in Alzheimer's disease. The objectives of this review are: (i) to establish whether Alzheimer's disease affects all inhibitory mechanisms equally, and (ii) where possible, to assess whether any effects of Alzheimer's disease on inhibition tasks might be caused by other cognitive deficits, such as slowed processing. We review inhibitory mechanisms considered to play a crucial role in various domains of cognition, such as inhibition involved in working memory, selective attention and shifting abilities, and the inhibition of motor and verbal responses. It was found that whilst most inhibitory mechanisms are affected by the disorder, some are relatively preserved, suggesting that inhibitory deficits in Alzheimer's disease may not be the result of a general inhibitory breakdown. In particular, the experimental results reviewed showed that Alzheimer's disease has a strong effect on tasks requiring controlled inhibition processes, such as the Stroop task. However, the presence of the disease appears to have relatively little effect on tasks requiring more automatic inhibition, such as the inhibition of return task. Thus, the distinction between automatic, reflexive inhibitory mechanisms and controlled inhibitory mechanisms may be critical when predicting the integrity of inhibitory mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease. Substantial effects of Alzheimer's disease on tasks such as negative priming, which are not cognitively complex but do require some degree of controlled inhibition, support this hypothesis. A meta-analytic review of seven studies on the Stroop paradigm revealed substantially larger effects of Alzheimer's disease on the inhibition condition relative to the baseline condition, suggesting that these deficits do not simply reflect general slowing.

  17. Psychogenic urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Bird, J R

    1980-01-01

    The literature on psychogenic urinary retention is reviewed. 2 cases treated by analytical psychotherapy are reported, in which significant demand for physical punishment was revealed and seen as linked to unacceptable, unconscious sadistic and aggressive feelings. Some psychodynamic aspects of what is considered to be "a disturbance of internal body space' are discussed. Psychogenic urinary retention has received little attention in the literature. It may represent the uneasy position this disorder of bodily function occupies in clinical practice, with clear physical symptoms and associated psychological factors. The condition is more frequent in females, usually young adults. Case histories regularly record the placid, passive presentation of these patients, childhood enuresis and disturbed backgrounds. The diagnosis, "hysteric', is frequent and most psychodynamic evaluations suggest the symptom represents a displacement of unacceptable sexual wishes and impulse. 2 patients treated by analytical psychotherapy are reported who, whilst fulfilling many of the criteria already noted, additionally revealed an intense desire for physical punishment. This punitive demand had less to do with unacceptable sexual wishes, than guilt at repressed aggressive drives of considerable magnitude. The role of aggression in the genesis of psychogenic urinary retention has so far been little studied.

  18. Social inhibitory control in five lemur species.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Rachna B; MacLean, Evan L; Sandel, Aaron A; Hare, Brian

    2015-07-01

    We tested five lemur species-ring-tailed lemurs, ruffed lemurs, mongoose lemurs, black lemurs, and Coquerel's sifakas-(N = 52) in an experiment that evaluated skills for inhibitory control in a social context. First, two human experimenters presented identical food rewards; the "generous" experimenter allowed the subject to eat from her hand, whereas the "competitive" experimenter always withheld the reward. Lemurs quickly learned to approach the generous experimenter and avoid the competitive one. In the inhibition test phase, we endowed the competitive experimenter with a more valuable food reward but the competitive experimenter continued to withhold food from the subject. Thus, lemurs were required to inhibit approaching the more desirable reward in favor of the lesser but obtainable reward presented by the generous experimenter. In test trials, lemurs' tendency to approach the competitive experimenter increased from the reputation phase, demonstrating sensitivity to the experimental manipulation. However, subjects approached the larger reward less frequently in test trials compared with pretest food-preference trials, evidencing some capacity for inhibitory control in this context. Despite differences in sociality and ecology, the five lemur species did not differ in this ability. Although the study did not uncover species differences, this experimental task may provide a useful measure of social inhibition in broader comparative studies.

  19. Chemical avoidance responses of fishes.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Keith B

    2016-05-01

    The hydrosphere is a repository for all of our waste and mistakes, be they sewage, garbage, process-affected waters, runoff, and gases. For fish living in environments receiving undesirable inputs, moving away seems an obvious way to avoid harm. While this should occur, there are numerous examples where it will not. The inability to avoid harmful environments may lead to sensory impairments that in turn limit the ability to avoid other dangers or locate benefits. For avoidance to occur, the danger must first be perceived, which may not happen if the fish is 'blinded' in some capacity. Second, the danger must be recognized for what it is, which may also not happen if the fish is cognitively confused or impaired. Third, it is possible that the fish may not be able to leave the area, or worse, learns to prefer a toxic environment. Concerning generating regulations around avoidance, there are two possibilities: that an avoidance threshold be used to set guidelines for effluent release with the intention of driving fishes away; the second is to set a contaminant concentration that would not affect the avoidance or attraction responses to other cues. With the complexities of the modern world in which we release diverse pollutants, from light to municipal effluents full of 1000s of chemicals, to the diversity present in ecosystems, it is impossible to have avoidance data on every stimulus-species combination. Nevertheless, we may be able to use existing avoidance response data to predict the likelihood of avoidance of untested stimuli. Where we cannot, this review includes a framework that can be used to direct new research. This review is intended to collate existing avoidance response data, provide a framework for making decisions in the absence of data, and suggest studies that would facilitate the prediction of risk to fish health in environments receiving intentional and unintentional human-based chemical inputs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Conflict Avoidance and University Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tagliacozzo, Daisy M.

    The conditions that intensify conflict avoidance by the central administration in making strategic decisions, and the consequences of such avoidance for the management of college affairs, are discussed. The implication of an emerging decision-making style for adapting the organization to changing environments is also considered. Some of the…

  1. Cigarette tax avoidance and evasion.

    PubMed

    Stehr, Mark

    2005-03-01

    Variation in state cigarette taxes provides incentives for tax avoidance through smuggling, legal border crossing to low tax jurisdictions, or Internet purchasing. When taxes rise, tax paid sales of cigarettes will decline both because consumption will decrease and because tax avoidance will increase. The key innovation of this paper is to compare cigarette sales data to cigarette consumption data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). I show that after subtracting percent changes in consumption, residual percent changes in sales are associated with state cigarette tax changes implying the existence of tax avoidance. I estimate that the tax avoidance response to tax changes is at least twice the consumption response and that tax avoidance accounted for up to 9.6% of sales between 1985 and 2001. Because of the increase in tax avoidance, tax paid sales data understate the level of smoking and overstate the drop in smoking. I also find that the level of legal border crossing was very low relative to other forms of tax avoidance. If states have strong preferences for smoking control, they must pair high cigarette taxes with effective policies to curb smuggling and other forms of tax avoidance or employ alternative policies such as counter-advertising and smoking restrictions.

  2. Differences in Active Avoidance Conditioning in Male and Female Rats with Experimental Anxiety-Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Khlebnikova, N N; Krupina, N A; Kushnareva, E Yu; Orlova, I N

    2015-07-01

    Using rat model of experimental anxiety-depressive disorder caused by postnatal administration of methionyl-2(S)-cyanopyrrolidine, an inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase IV, we compared conditioned active avoidance response and memory retention in males and females. In experimental males and females, conditioning was impaired in comparison with the control. In experimental groups, females were worse learners than males, while in control groups, females were better learners than males. Memory retention in experimental animals did not differ from that in controls 24 h after learning. Two months after learning, control females demonstrated better retention than control males.

  3. Ground Collision Avoidance System (Igcas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, Mark A (Inventor); Prosser, Kevin (Inventor); Hook, Loyd (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for aircraft ground collision avoidance (iGCAS) comprising a modular array of software, including a sense own state module configured to gather data to compute trajectory, a sense terrain module including a digital terrain map (DTM) and map manger routine to store and retrieve terrain elevations, a predict collision threat module configured to generate an elevation profile corresponding to the terrain under the trajectory computed by said sense own state module, a predict avoidance trajectory module configured to simulate avoidance maneuvers ahead of the aircraft, a determine need to avoid module configured to determine which avoidance maneuver should be used, when it should be initiated, and when it should be terminated, a notify Module configured to display each maneuver's viability to the pilot by a colored GUI, a pilot controls module configured to turn the system on and off, and an avoid module configured to define how an aircraft will perform avoidance maneuvers through 3-dimensional space.

  4. Postcopulatory inbreeding avoidance in guppies.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J L; Evans, J P

    2014-12-01

    In many species, the negative fitness effects of inbreeding have facilitated the evolution of a wide range of inbreeding avoidance mechanisms. Although avoidance mechanisms operating prior to mating are well documented, evidence for postcopulatory mechanisms of inbreeding avoidance remain scarce. Here, we examine the potential for paternity biases to favour unrelated males when their sperm compete for fertilizations though postcopulatory inbreeding avoidance mechanisms in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata. To test this possibility, we used a series of artificial inseminations to deliver an equal number of sperm from a related (either full sibling or half sibling) and unrelated male to a female while statistically controlling for differences in sperm quality between rival ejaculates. In this way, we were able to focus exclusively on postcopulatory mechanisms of inbreeding avoidance and account for differences in sperm competitiveness between rival males. Under these carefully controlled conditions, we report a significant bias in paternity towards unrelated males, although this effect was only apparent when the related male was a full sibling. We also show that sperm competition generally favours males with highly viable sperm and thus that some variance in sperm competitiveness can be attributed to difference in sperm quality. Our findings for postcopulatory inbreeding avoidance are consistent with prior work on guppies, revealing that sperm competition success declines linearly with the level of relatedness, but also that such effects are only apparent at relatedness levels of full siblings or higher. These findings reveal that postcopulatory processes alone can facilitate inbreeding avoidance.

  5. Selenide retention by mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Finck, N; Dardenne, K; Bosbach, D; Geckeis, H

    2012-09-18

    The isotope (79)Se may be of great concern with regard to the safe disposal of nuclear wastes in deep geological repositories due to its long half-life and potential mobility in the geosphere. The Se mobility is controlled by the oxidation state: the oxidized species (Se(IV)) and (Se(VI)) are highly mobile, whereas the reduced species (Se(0) and Se(-II)) form low soluble solids. The mobility of this trace pollutant can be greatly reduced by interacting with the various barriers of the repository. Numerous studies report on the oxidized species retention by mineral phases, but only very scarce studies report on the selenide (Se(-II)) retention. In the present study, the selenide retention by coprecipitation with and by adsorption on mackinawite (FeS) was investigated. XRD and SEM analyses of the samples reveal no significant influence of Se on the mackinawite precipitate morphology and structure. Samples from coprecipitation and from adsorption are characterized at the molecular scale by a multi-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigation. In the coprecipitation experiment, all elements (S, Fe, and Se) are in a low ionic oxidation state and the EXAFS data strongly point to selenium located in a mackinawite-like sulfide environment. By contacting selenide ions with FeS in suspension, part of Se is located in an environment similar to that found in the coprecipitation experiment. The explanation is a dynamical dissolution-recrystallization mechanism of the highly reactive mackinawite. This is the first experimental study to report on selenide incorporation in iron monosulfide by a multi-edge XAS approach.

  6. Floating nut retention system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, J. F.; Theakston, H. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A floating nut retention system includes a nut with a central aperture. An inner retainer plate has an opening which is fixedly aligned with the nut aperture. An outer retainer member is formed of a base plate having an opening and a surface adjacent to a surface of the inner retainer plate. The outer retainer member includes a securing mechanism for retaining the inner retainer plate adjacent to the outer retainer member. The securing mechanism enables the inner retainer plate to float with respect to the outer retainer number, while simultaneously forming a bearing surface for inner retainer plate.

  7. Vertical jumping and signaled avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cándido, Antonio; Maldonado, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment intended to demonstrate that the vertical jumping response can be learned using a signaled-avoidance technique. A photoelectric cell system was used to record the response. Twenty female rats, divided equally into two groups, were exposed to intertrial intervals of either 15 or 40 s. Subjects had to achieve three successive criteria of acquisition: 3, 5, and 10 consecutive avoidance responses. Results showed that both groups learned the avoidance response, requiring increasingly larger numbers of trials as the acquisition criteria increased. No significant effect of intertrial interval was observed. PMID:16812559

  8. Self-avoiding magnetic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, C. H.; Liu, B. X.; Li, H. D.

    1991-10-01

    We report a first experimental evidence for the self-avoiding walks in Fe-Cu thin films. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the observed self-avoiding chains result from aggregation of the magnetic Fe particles. Scaling analysis demonstrated that these chains were indeed self-similar structures with fractal dimensions ranging from 1.13 to 1.29. It was found that as the annealing temperature elevated, the fractal dimension of the chains with nearly the same width increased. Rich microstructures pertinent to the self-avoiding magnetic chains are described in detail, and a theoretical attempt based on magnetic interaction is proposed to account for the temperature effect.

  9. Design, synthesis and aromatase inhibitory activities of novel indole-imidazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Shi, Hong-Fan; Zhao, Jing-Feng; He, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2013-03-15

    A series of novel indole-imidazole derivatives have been prepared and evaluated in vitro on the aromatase inhibitory activities. The results suggested that proton or a small electron-withdrawing group at para-position of the phenyl ring would enhance the inhibitory activities and any bulky group should be avoided in order to keep a relative small volume for this kind of molecules.

  10. Inhibitory effect of cyanide on wastewater nitrification ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The effect of CN- (CN-) on nitrification was examined with samples from nitrifying wastewater enrichments using two different approaches: by measuring substrate (ammonia) specific oxygen uptake rates (SOUR), and by using RT-qPCR to quantify the transcripts of functional genes involved in nitrification. The nitrifying bioreactor was operated as a continuous reactor with a 24 h hydraulic retention time. The samples were exposed in batch vessels to cyanide for a period of 12 h. The concentrations of CN- used in the batch assays were 0.03, 0.06, 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L. There was considerable decrease in SOUR with increasing dosages of CN-. A decrease of more than 50% in nitrification activity was observed at 0.1 mg/L CN-. Based on the RT-qPCR data, there was notable reduction in the transcript levels of amoA and hao for increasing CN- dosage, which corresponded well with the ammonia oxidation activity measured via SOUR. The inhibitory effect of cyanide may be attributed to the affinity of cyanide to bind ferric heme proteins, which disrupt protein structure and function. The correspondence between the relative expression of functional genes and SOUR shown in this study demonstrates the efficacy of RNA based function-specific assays for better understanding of the effect of toxic compounds on nitrification activity in wastewater. Nitrification is the first step of nitrogen removal is wastewater, and it is susceptible to inhibition by many industrial chemical. We looked at

  11. Robot Avoids Collisions With Obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Edward; Rosinski, Doug; Wegerif, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Developmental robot equipped with infrared sensors and control system acting in concert to enable manipulator arm to move around obstacles. Robot avoids collisions with other objects, even when moving in unpredictable ways. Control system requires no prior knowledge of environment.

  12. How to avoid exercise injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000859.htm How to avoid exercise injuries To use the sharing features on this ... injury and stay safe during exercise. What Causes Exercise Injuries? Some of the most common causes of ...

  13. Tritium retention in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Mueller, D.; Walters, R. T.; TFTR Team; Causey, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Hirooka, J.

    1996-11-01

    The large tritium inventories projected for ITER pose an important constraint in the design of plasma facing components and the selection of first wall materials. Three years of deuterium-tritium operation in TFTR has provided a special opportunity to address the issues of tritium retention in a tokamak environment. More than 18 kCi of tritium has been injected into the torus via neutral beam injection and gas puffs and approximately half of this amount was retained in the vacuum vessel.(C.H. Skinner et al.), PPPL 3172 (Jan 1995). Tritium has been successfully removed by glow discharges, exposure to room air and other techniques and it is not a constraint on continued operations. A vacuum opening is scheduled for September 1996 and we plan to extract samples of tritiated carbon dust and flakes from the limiter and vacuum vessel for elemental and chemical analysis. We will present the TFTR experience in tritium recycling, retention and removal and its implications for ITER.

  14. Vision-based obstacle avoidance

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, John

    2006-07-18

    A method for allowing a robot to avoid objects along a programmed path: first, a field of view for an electronic imager of the robot is established along a path where the electronic imager obtains the object location information within the field of view; second, a population coded control signal is then derived from the object location information and is transmitted to the robot; finally, the robot then responds to the control signal and avoids the detected object.

  15. Predator Avoidance in Extremophile Fish

    PubMed Central

    Bierbach, David; Schulte, Matthias; Herrmann, Nina; Zimmer, Claudia; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeane Rimber; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Extreme habitats are often characterized by reduced predation pressures, thus representing refuges for the inhabiting species. The present study was designed to investigate predator avoidance of extremophile populations of Poecilia mexicana and P. sulphuraria that either live in hydrogen sulfide-rich (sulfidic) springs or cave habitats, both of which are known to have impoverished piscine predator regimes. Focal fishes that inhabited sulfidic springs showed slightly weaker avoidance reactions when presented with several naturally occurring predatory cichlids, but strongest differences to populations from non-sulfidic habitats were found in a decreased shoaling tendency with non-predatory swordtail (Xiphophorus hellerii) females. When comparing avoidance reactions between P. mexicana from a sulfidic cave (Cueva del Azufre) and the adjacent sulfidic surface creek (El Azufre), we found only slight differences in predator avoidance, but surface fish reacted much more strongly to the non-predatory cichlid Vieja bifasciata. Our third experiment was designed to disentangle learned from innate effects of predator recognition. We compared laboratory-reared (i.e., predator-naïve) and wild-caught (i.e., predator-experienced) individuals of P. mexicana from a non-sulfidic river and found no differences in their reaction towards the presented predators. Overall, our results indicate (1) that predator avoidance is still functional in extremophile Poecilia spp. and (2) that predator recognition and avoidance reactions have a strong genetic basis. PMID:25371337

  16. Boulder Valley Kindergarten Study: Retention Practices and Retention Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie A.; Smith, Mary Lee

    Having implemented a policy that allowed schools to retain children in kindergarten an extra year, the Boulder Valley Public School District in Colorado conducted a study to determine the cognitive and emotional benefits of retention in kindergarten and the characteristics that led to decisions about retention. The study involved a research review…

  17. Retention Issues in Legal Education: The Roles of Undergraduate Educators and of Academic Support in the Law School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Reviews legal education and student retention, particularly of minority students, from three perspectives: current trends in law school admissions, the role of undergraduate institutions in avoiding retention problems by preparing candidates for successful legal education, and the increased role of law school academic support programs in student…

  18. Fixed prosthodontics: avoiding pulp death.

    PubMed

    1995-11-01

    Fixed prostheses & crowns have become a major part of dental services due to aging population & increase in retention of natural teeth. In some practices, alarming numbers of endodontic procedures are necessary because of pulp damage after prosthesis cementation. Third party payment companies show many teeth receiving crowns require endodontic therapy within 5 years. Following report describes: (1) 14 potential causes of endodontic need related to fixed prosthodontics; & (2) state-of-art concepts to prevent pulp damage.

  19. Addressing employee turnover and retention: keeping your valued performers.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee turnover and employee retention are inextricably linked; to control turnover is to enhance retention. Turnover is a relatively simple concept; however, considerable confusion often results when addressing turnover because of differences in how it is defined; that is, what is counted, how it is counted, and how the turnover rates are expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to its cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some that can be corrected and some that cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role; every improvement in turnover is a direct improvement in retention, with eventual positive effects on the bottom line.

  20. Inhibitory Control Predicts Grammatical Ability

    PubMed Central

    Ibbotson, Paul; Kearvell-White, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that individual variation in grammatical ability can be predicted by individual variation in inhibitory control. We tested 81 5-year-olds using two classic tests from linguistics and psychology (Past Tense and the Stroop). Inhibitory control was a better predicator of grammatical ability than either vocabulary or age. Our explanation is that giving the correct response in both tests requires using a common cognitive capacity to inhibit unwanted competition. The implications are that understanding the developmental trajectory of language acquisition can benefit from integrating the developmental trajectory of non-linguistic faculties, such as executive control. PMID:26659926

  1. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user. Based on anecdotal evidence, most people “party” during extended time away from the work environment. Therefore, the following scenarios were envisioned: (1) a person uses an illicit drug at a party on Saturday night (infrequent user); (2) a person uses a drug one time on Friday night and once again on Saturday night (infrequent user); and (3) a person uses a drug on Friday night, uses a drug twice on Saturday night, and once again on Sunday (frequent user).

  2. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  3. Stability and Retention.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    Stability of tooth position in the broader sense considers all the forces that may act on the tooth. Reitan reported that significant forces remained in the periodontium after tooth movement, and he carried out research that demonstrated residual stretching of the crestal periodontal fibers more than 7 months after tooth movement. Brain demonstrated that severing the fibers reduced the relapse in tooth position in dogs. Edwards published a series of papers exploring the effects of surgical transection of the gingival fibers on tooth stability, recommending that circumferential fiberotomy be performed in order to increase posttreatment tooth stability. Other researchers have suggested ways to increase the stability of the incisors, which are typically most prone to relapse. Peck and Peck recommended that interproximal reduction be done to broaden the contact point. Boese also recommended interproximal reduction as part of a four-pronged approach to retention.

  4. Retention through redemption.

    PubMed

    Abrashoff, D M

    2001-02-01

    Corporate America and the U.S. Navy share one big problem: employee retention. Today's knowledge workers hop from start-up to start-up. And 40% of the navy's new recruits leave the service before their four-year tours of duty are up. D. Michael Abrashoff came face to face with the navy's retention problem when he took command of the USS Benfold. Before he became captain, sailors couldn't get away from the ship fast enough. Today the vessel is the pride of the Pacific fleet, and sailors from other ships are clamoring to join its crew. In this firsthand account, Abrashoff explains how he got the ship and its crew back on course by breaking bad habits--personal and professional ones--and jettisoning old attitudes. During his 21 months aboard the Benfold, Abrashoff came to realize that in today's technology-intensive U.S. Navy, the traditional command-and-control style wouldn't work. And it hadn't--the Benfold's 310 sailors had cheered derisively when Abrashoff's predecessor had left the ship. So he defied 225 years of navy tradition in his quest to engage the sailors in their work, increase their performance, and keep them around for their entire tours of duty. He retained his crew by redeeming them--showing them how to be not just better sailors but better people, too. That meant breaking them down when they were at their worst and then building them up to reach their best. It also meant personal redemption for Abrashoff; he resolved to really listen to what his sailors were saying. The result? Cost-saving ideas for the entire navy and surging confidence and commitment among crew members.

  5. Approach/avoidance in dreams.

    PubMed

    Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Koopowitz, Sheri; Pantelis, Eleni; Solms, Mark

    2012-03-01

    The influential threat simulation theory (TST) asserts that dreaming yields adaptive advantage by providing a virtual environment in which threat-avoidance may be safely rehearsed. We have previously found the incidence of biologically threatening dreams to be around 20%, with successful threat avoidance occurring in approximately one-fifth of such dreams. TST asserts that threat avoidance is over-represented relative to other possible dream contents. To begin assessing this issue, we contrasted the incidence of 'avoidance' dreams with that of their opposite: 'approach' dreams. Because TST states that the threat-avoidance function is only fully activated in ecologically valid (biologically threatening) contexts, we also performed this contrast for populations living in both high- and low-threat environments. We find that 'approach' dreams are significantly more prevalent across both contexts. We suggest these results are more consistent with the view that dreaming is generated by reward-seeking systems than by fear-conditioning systems, although reward-seeking is clearly not the only factor determining the content of dreams.

  6. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  7. Harm Avoidance and Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert S.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Levine, Steven R.; Yu, Lei; Hoganson, George M.; Buchman, Aron S.; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Harm avoidance, a trait indicative of behavioral inhibition, is associated with disability and dementia in old age, but the basis of these associations is uncertain. We test the hypothesis that higher level of harm avoidance is associated with increased likelihood of cerebral infarction. Methods Older persons without dementia completed a standard measure of harm avoidance. During a mean of 3.5 years of follow-up, 257 (of 1,082) individuals died of whom 206 (80%) underwent brain autopsy. Number of chronic cerebral infarcts (microscopic plus gross; expressed as 0,1, or >1) was assessed on neuropathologic examination, completed in 192 individuals at the time of analyses. Results On postmortem examination, chronic cerebral infarcts were found in 89 (42 with 1, 47 with >1). Higher harm avoidance was associated with higher likelihood of infarcts (odds ratio = 1.083, 95% confidence interval 1.040–1.128). A moderately high level of the trait (score=17, 75th percentile) was associated with a 2.4-fold increase in the likelihood of infarction compared to a moderately low level of the trait (score = 6, 25th percentile). These associations persisted in models that controlled for other cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion Higher level of the harm avoidance trait may be a risk factor for cerebral infarction. PMID:24364391

  8. Improving retention of older employees through training and development.

    PubMed

    Tourigny, Louise; Pulich, Marcia

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the needs and interests of older employees in training and development efforts which can result in higher retention rates. Managers may be reluctant to train workers close to retirement age for various reasons. Managers also use certain practices to avoid training older employees. When training is offered, accurate performance feedback is essential for desired training outcomes to occur. Finally, areas are proposed which are more appropriate to include in training and development endeavors for older employees versus younger ones.

  9. Avoiding DEET through insect gustatory receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngseok; Kim, Sang Hoon; Montell, Craig

    2010-08-26

    DEET is the most widely used insect repellent worldwide. In Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), DEET is detected through a mechanism employing the olfactory receptor, OR83b. However, it is controversial as to whether ORNs respond directly to DEET or whether DEET blocks the response to attractive odors. Here, we showed that DEET suppressed feeding behavior in Drosophila, and this effect was mediated by gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs). DEET was potent in suppressing feeding as <0.1% DEET elicited aversive behavior. Inhibition of feeding required multiple gustatory receptors (GRs) expressed in inhibitory GRNs. DEET stimulated action potentials in GRNs that respond to aversive compounds, and this response was lost in the Gr32a, Gr33a, and Gr66a mutants. Since 0.02% DEET elicited action potentials, we conclude that DEET directly activates of GRNs. We suggest that the effectiveness of DEET in pest control owes to its dual action in inducing avoidance simultaneously via GRNs and ORNs. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Toward a Record Retention Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jason

    2007-01-01

    An academic library working group was charged in 2005 to create a records retention schedule and policy applicable to records containing personally identifiable information of library patrons. This group conducted a survey and extensive research, culminating in an adopted library records retention schedule and policy implemented in 2006.

  11. Retention of Motor Skills: Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, J. D.; And Others

    A summary of an extensive literature survey deals with the variables known or suspected to affect the retention of learned motor behaviors over lengthy no-practice intervals. Emphasis was given to research conducted by or for the military. The variables that may affect the retention of motor skills were dichotomized into task variables and…

  12. Toward a Record Retention Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jason

    2007-01-01

    An academic library working group was charged in 2005 to create a records retention schedule and policy applicable to records containing personally identifiable information of library patrons. This group conducted a survey and extensive research, culminating in an adopted library records retention schedule and policy implemented in 2006.

  13. Motive to Avoid Success, Locus of Control, and Reinforcement Avoidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katovsky, Walter

    Subjects were four groups of 12 college women, high or low in motive to avoid success (MAS) and locus of control (LC), were reinforced for response A on a fixed partial reinforcement schedule on three concept learning tasks, one task consisting of combined reward and punishment, another of reward only, and one of punishment only. Response B was…

  14. Food Avoidance Diets for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeffrey F; Hammond, Margaret I; Nedorost, Susan T

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is relatively common in both children and adults, and its prevalence is increasing. Early exposure of food allergens onto skin with an impaired epidermal barrier predisposes to sensitization and prevents the development of oral tolerance. While immediate-type food allergies are well described, less is known about delayed-type food allergies manifesting as dermatitis. This is due, in part, to limitations with current diagnostic testing for delayed-type food allergy, including atopy patch testing. We conducted a systematic review of food avoidance diets in delayed-type food allergies manifesting as dermatitis. While beneficial in some clinical circumstances, avoidance diets should be used with caution in infants and children, as growth impairment and developmental delay may result. Ultimately, dermatitis is highly multifactorial and avoidance diets may not improve symptoms of delayed-type food allergy until combined with other targeted therapies, including restoring balance in the skin microbiome and re-establishing proper skin barrier function.

  15. A problem of collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Cliff, E. M.; Grantham, W. J.; Peng, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Collision avoidance between two vehicles of constant speed with limited turning radii, moving in a horizontal plane is investigated. Collision avoidance is viewed as a game by assuming that the operator of one vehicle has perfect knowledge of the state of the other, whereas the operator of the second vehicle is unaware of any impending danger. The situation envisioned is that of an encounter between a commercial aircraft and a small light aircraft. This worse case situation is examined to determine the conditions under which the commercial aircraft should execute a collision avoidance maneuver. Three different zones of vulnerability are defined and the boundaries, or barriers, between these zones are determined for a typical aircraft encounter. A discussion of the methods used to obtain the results as well as some of the salient features associated with the resultant barriers is included.

  16. Diverse Ensembles of Inhibitory Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Shane R; Connors, Barry W

    2016-04-06

    In this issue of Neuron, Karnani et al. (2016) show that ensembles of specific types of inhibitory interneurons generate coordinated activity in mouse visual cortex. They also describe chemical and electrical synaptic mechanisms that may enable diverse interneuron ensembles to function as distinct operational units. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibitory Control in Childhood Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, Kurt; De Nil, Luc F.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in inhibitory control (IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of IC using a computer task. Method: Participants were 30 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 7;05 years) and 30…

  18. Inhibitory Control in Childhood Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, Kurt; De Nil, Luc F.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in inhibitory control (IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of IC using a computer task. Method: Participants were 30 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 7;05 years) and 30…

  19. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  20. Catching Fish and Avoiding Sharks: Investigating Factors That Influence Developmentally Appropriate Measurement of Preschoolers' Inhibitory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Steven J.; Okely, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Although researchers agree that the first 5 years of life are critical for children's developing executive functions (EFs), further advances are hindered by a lack of consensus on the design and selection of developmentally appropriate EF tasks for young children. Given this debate, well-established adult measures of EF routinely have been adapted…

  1. Intra-Amygdala Injections of CREB Antisense Impair Inhibitory Avoidance Memory: Role of Norepinephrine and Acetylcholine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Infusions of CREB antisense into the amygdala prior to training impair memory for aversive tasks, suggesting that the antisense may interfere with CRE-mediated gene transcription and protein synthesis important for the formation of new memories within the amygdala. However, the amygdala also appears to modulate memory formation in distributed…

  2. Catching Fish and Avoiding Sharks: Investigating Factors That Influence Developmentally Appropriate Measurement of Preschoolers' Inhibitory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Steven J.; Okely, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Although researchers agree that the first 5 years of life are critical for children's developing executive functions (EFs), further advances are hindered by a lack of consensus on the design and selection of developmentally appropriate EF tasks for young children. Given this debate, well-established adult measures of EF routinely have been adapted…

  3. Production of biopesticides in an in situ cell retention bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Gunjan; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2008-12-01

    The seeds of Azadirachta indica contain azadirachtin and other limonoids, which can be used as a biopesticide for crop protection. Significant variability and availability of seed only in arid zones has triggered biotechnological production of biopesticides to cope up with its huge requirement. Batch cultivation of A. indica suspension culture was carried out in statistically optimized media (25.0 g/l glucose, 5.7 g/l nitrate, 0.094 g/l phosphate and 5 g/l inoculum) in 3 l stirred tank bioreactor. This resulted in 15.5 g/l biomass and 0.05 g/l azadirachtin production in 10 days leading to productivity of 5 mg l(-1) day(-1). Possible inhibition by the limiting substrates (C, N, P) were also studied and maximum inhibitory concentrations identified. The batch kinetic/inhibitory data were then used to develop and identify an unstructured mathematical model. The batch model was extrapolated to simulate continuous cultivation with and without cell retention in the bioreactor. Several offline computer simulations were done to identify right nutrient feeding strategies (with respect to key limiting substrates; carbon, nitrate and phosphate) to maintain non-limiting and non-inhibitory substrate concentrations in bioreactor. One such continuous culture (with cell retention) simulation was experimentally implemented. In this cultivation, the cells were propagated batch-wise for 8 days. It was then converted to continuous cultivation by feeding MS salts with glucose (75 g/l), nitrate (10 g/l), and phosphate (0.5 g/l) at a feed rate of 500 ml/day and withdrawing the spent medium at the same rate. The above continuous cultivation (with cell retention) demonstrated an improvement in cell growth to 95.8 g/l and intracellular accumulation of 0.38 g/l azadirachtin in 40 days leading to an overall productivity of 9.5 mg l(-1) day(-1).

  4. Managing and Preventing Acute Urinary Retention

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Acute urinary retention (AUR), an uncomfortable and potentially dangerous condition, often occurs in men who have benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although the reported incidence of AUR varies in the literature, there are a number of events that are known to precipitate episodes of AUR, including ingestion of certain agents, infection, general anesthesia, and performance of various diagnostic genitourinary procedures. Because it is preferable to avoid the need for catheterization (and the associated risks) in men at high risk for AUR, certain measures have been studied as means to prevent AUR episodes. Specifically, α-blockers and 5-α-reductase inhibitors have been shown to reduce the incidence of initial and subsequent AUR episodes in certain at-risk men. PMID:16985887

  5. Rethinking Student Retention in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Linda; Ebbers, Larry

    2002-01-01

    States that student retention is significant for measuring institutional effectiveness in the prevailing environment of accountability and budgetary constraints. Presents recommendations for increasing retention, including training staff on retention issues, reviewing admission and advising strategies affecting minority populations, and piloting…

  6. Orthodontic retention: why when and how?

    PubMed

    McNally, M; Mullin, M; Dhopatkar, A; Rock, W P

    2003-10-01

    Retention is normally required after active orthodontic tooth movement to hold the teeth in their new positions. This article reviews the principles of orthodontic retention and describes common retention regimes and appliances.

  7. Avoiding plagiarism in academic writing.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Irene

    Plagiarism means taking the work of another and presenting it as one's own, resulting in potential upset for the original author and disrepute for the professions involved. This article aims to explore the issue of plagiarism and some mechanisms for detection and avoidance.

  8. Avoiding unfavourable outcomes in liposuction.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Atul; Filobbos, George

    2013-05-01

    The origin of liposuction can be traced to an adverse event by Dujarrier in 1921 when he used a uterine curette to remove fat from the knees of a ballerina ending in an amputation secondary to damage of the femoral artery. The history of liposuction since then has been one of avoiding complications and optimising outcome. After this adverse event, liposuction was abandoned until the 1960's when Schrudde revived the practice using small stab incisions and sharp curettage with the secondary suction to aspirate the freed tissue. This technique was associated with a high incidence of complications especially seroma and skin necrosis. Illouz then replaced the curette with a blunt cannula connected to vacuum pump thus avoiding the complications of a sharp curette. Despite the presence of various techniques for liposuction, suction assisted liposuction (SAL) is still the standard technique of liposuction. This article aims to discuss literature regarding the various aspects of liposuction (SAL) and to highlight the salient points in the literature and in the senior author's experience in order to avoid unfavourable outcomes in liposuction. A literature review on avoiding complication is in liposuction including some of the seminal papers on liposuction. Liposuction is generally a safe procedure with reproducible outcome. Just like any surgical procedure it should be treated with the utmost care. Illouz published 10 commandments for liposuction in 1989 and we review these commandments to demonstrate how liposuction has evolved.

  9. Structured interviewing: avoiding selection problems.

    PubMed

    Pursell, E D; Campion, M A; Gaylord, S R

    1980-11-01

    In place of the old-fashioned, casual interview, which is unreliable and occasionally invalid in the context of EEO and affirmative action developments, the authors propose the adoption of structured interviewing for job selection. They contend that objective testing--oral, written and physical--would be more reliable, avoid the labyrinth of EEO, and ultimately yield better candidates for the jobs offered.

  10. Biochar aging reduces earthworm avoidance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biochar, a black carbon substance produced by the pyrolysis of organic feedstocks, has been used in many soil improvement strategies ranging from nutrient addition to sequestration of C. Simple toxicity studies and laboratory preference/avoidance assays are recommended but results rarely reported. ...

  11. Avoiding unfavourable outcomes in liposuction

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Atul; Filobbos, George

    2013-01-01

    The origin of liposuction can be traced to an adverse event by Dujarrier in 1921 when he used a uterine curette to remove fat from the knees of a ballerina ending in an amputation secondary to damage of the femoral artery. The history of liposuction since then has been one of avoiding complications and optimising outcome. After this adverse event, liposuction was abandoned until the 1960's when Schrudde revived the practice using small stab incisions and sharp curettage with the secondary suction to aspirate the freed tissue. This technique was associated with a high incidence of complications especially seroma and skin necrosis. Illouz then replaced the curette with a blunt cannula connected to vacuum pump thus avoiding the complications of a sharp curette. Despite the presence of various techniques for liposuction, suction assisted liposuction (SAL) is still the standard technique of liposuction. This article aims to discuss literature regarding the various aspects of liposuction (SAL) and to highlight the salient points in the literature and in the senior author's experience in order to avoid unfavourable outcomes in liposuction. A literature review on avoiding complication is in liposuction including some of the seminal papers on liposuction. Liposuction is generally a safe procedure with reproducible outcome. Just like any surgical procedure it should be treated with the utmost care. Illouz published 10 commandments for liposuction in 1989 and we review these commandments to demonstrate how liposuction has evolved. PMID:24501475

  12. Molecular signalling pathways in the cerebral cortex are required for retrieval of one-trial avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Barros, D M; Izquierdo, L A; Mello e Souza, T; Ardenghi, P G; Pereira, P; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2000-09-01

    Rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus, the entorhinal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior parietal cortex, or the basolateral complex of the amygdala. The animals were trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance and tested 24 h later. Prior (10 min) to the retention test, through the cannulae, they received 0.5 microl infusions of a vehicle (2% dimethylsulfoxide in saline), or of the following drugs dissolved in the vehicle: the glutamate NMDA receptor blocker, aminophosphonopentanoic acid (AP5, 2.0 or 5.0 microg), the AMPA receptor blocker, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3 (1H,4H)dione (DNQX, 0.4 or 1.0 microg), the metabotropic receptor antagonist, methylcarboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 0.5 or 2.5 microg), the inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), Rp-cAMPs (0.1 or 0.5 microg), the PKA stimulant, Sp-cAMPs (0.5 microg), or the inhibitor of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), PD098059 (10 or 50 microM). All these drugs, at the same doses, had been previously found to alter long-term memory formation of this task. Here, retrieval test performance was blocked by DNQX, MCPG, Rp-cAMPs and PD098059 and enhanced by Sp-cAMPs infused into CA1 or the entorhinal cortex. The drugs had similar effects when infused into the parietal or anterior cingulate cortex, except that in these two areas AP5 also blocked retrieval, and in the cingulate cortex DNQX had no effect. Infusions into the basolateral amygdala were ineffective except for DNQX, which hindered retrieval. None of the treatments that affected retrieval had any influence on performance in an open field or in a plus maze; therefore, their effect on retention testing can not be attributed to an influence on locomotion, exploration or anxiety. The results indicate that the four cortical regions studied participate actively in, and are necessary for, retrieval of the one-trial avoidance task. They require metabotropic and/or NMDA glutamate

  13. Job embeddedness and nurse retention.

    PubMed

    Reitz, O Ed; Anderson, Mary Ann; Hill, Pamela D

    2010-01-01

    Nurse retention is a different way of conceptualizing the employer-employee relationship when compared with turnover. Job embeddedness (JE), a construct based on retention, represents the sum of reasons why employees remain at their jobs. However, JE has not been investigated in relation to locale (urban or rural) or exclusively with a sample of registered nurses (RNs). The purpose of this study was to determine what factors (JE, age, gender, locale, and income) help predict nurse retention. A cross-sectional mailed survey design was used with RNs in different locales (urban or rural). Job embeddedness was measured by the score on the composite, standardized instrument. Nurse retention was measured by self-report items concerning intent to stay. A response rate of 49.3% was obtained. The typical respondent was female (96.1%), white, non-Hispanic (87.4%), and married (74.9%). Age and JE were predictive of nurse retention and accounted for 26% of the explained variance in intent to stay. Although age was a significant predictor of intent to stay, it accounted for only 1.4% of the variance while JE accounted for 24.6% of the variance of nurse retention (as measured by intent to stay). Older, more "embedded" nurses are more likely to remain employed in their current organization. Based on these findings, JE may form the basis for the development of an effective nurse retention program.

  14. Intra-Amygdala ZIP Injections Impair the Memory of Learned Active Avoidance Responses and Attenuate Conditioned Taste-Aversion Acquisition in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of protein kinase Mzeta (PKM[zeta]) inhibition in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) upon the retention of a nonspatial learned active avoidance response and conditioned taste-aversion (CTA) acquisition in rats. ZIP (10 nmol/[mu]L) injected into the BLA 24 h after training impaired retention of a learned…

  15. Intra-Amygdala ZIP Injections Impair the Memory of Learned Active Avoidance Responses and Attenuate Conditioned Taste-Aversion Acquisition in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamiz, Fernando; Gallo, Milagros

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of protein kinase Mzeta (PKM[zeta]) inhibition in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) upon the retention of a nonspatial learned active avoidance response and conditioned taste-aversion (CTA) acquisition in rats. ZIP (10 nmol/[mu]L) injected into the BLA 24 h after training impaired retention of a learned…

  16. Retention in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C D; Littlewood, S J

    2015-02-16

    Retention is necessary following orthodontic treatment to prevent relapse of the final occlusal outcome. Relapse can occur as a result of forces from the periodontal fibres around the teeth which tend to pull the teeth back towards their pre-treatment positions, and also from deflecting occlusal contacts if the final occlusion is less than ideal. Age changes, in the form of ongoing dentofacial growth, as well as changes in the surrounding soft tissues, can also affect the stability of the orthodontic outcome. It is therefore essential that orthodontists, patients and their general dental practitioners understand the importance of wearing retainers after orthodontic treatment. This article will update the reader on the different types of removable and fixed retainers, including their indications, duration of wear, and how they should be managed in order to minimise any unwanted effects on oral health and orthodontic outcomes. The key roles that the general dental practitioner can play in supporting their patients wearing orthodontic retainers are also emphasised.

  17. Data Retention and Anonymity Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthold, Stefan; Böhme, Rainer; Köpsell, Stefan

    The recently introduced legislation on data retention to aid prosecuting cyber-related crime in Europe also affects the achievable security of systems for anonymous communication on the Internet. We argue that data retention requires a review of existing security evaluations against a new class of realistic adversary models. In particular, we present theoretical results and first empirical evidence for intersection attacks by law enforcement authorities. The reference architecture for our study is the anonymity service AN.ON, from which we also collect empirical data. Our adversary model reflects an interpretation of the current implementation of the EC Directive on Data Retention in Germany.

  18. Human avoidance and approach learning: evidence for overlapping neural systems and experiential avoidance modulation of avoidance neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Michael W; Magee, Sandy; Hudgins, Caleb D

    2011-12-01

    Adaptive functioning is thought to reflect a balance between approach and avoidance neural systems with imbalances often producing pathological forms of avoidance. Yet little evidence is available in healthy adults demonstrating a balance between approach and avoidance neural systems and modulation in avoidance neurocircuitry by vulnerability factors for avoidance. Consequently, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare changes in brain activation associated with human avoidance and approach learning and modulation of avoidance neurocircuitry by experiential avoidance. fMRI tracked trial-by-trial increases in activation while adults learned through trial and error an avoidance response that prevented money loss and an approach response that produced money gain. Avoidance and approach cues elicited similar experience-dependent increases in activation in a fronto-limbic-striatal network. Positive and negative reinforcing outcomes (i.e., money gain and avoidance of loss) also elicited similar increases in activation in frontal and striatal regions. Finally, increased experiential avoidance and self-punishment coping was associated with decreased activation in medial/superior frontal regions, anterior cingulate, amygdala and hippocampus. These findings suggest avoidance and approach learning recruit a similar fronto-limbic-striatal network in healthy adults. Increased experiential avoidance also appears to be associated with reduced frontal and limbic reactivity in avoidance, establishing an important link between maladaptive avoidance coping and altered responses in avoidance neurocircuitry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adrenoceptors and colocolonic inhibitory reflex.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S F; Scott, S M; Pilot, M A; Williams, N S

    1999-12-01

    The colocolonic inhibitory reflex is characterized by inhibition of proximal colonic motility induced by distal colonic distension. The aim of this study was to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of this reflex, in vivo, using an isolated loop of canine colon. In five beagle dogs, motility was recorded from an exteriorized colonic loop via a serosal strain gauge connected to a digital data logger and chart recorder. Inflation of a balloon in the distal colon resulted in inhibition of motility in the isolated loop. Inhibition of motor activity persisted following injection of propranolol (100 microg/kg intravenously), a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, but was abolished following administration of the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (200 microg/kg intravenously). This study confirms that the colocolonic inhibitory reflex is mediated via the extrinsic nerves to the colon. As the reflex was abolished by alpha2-, but not beta-adrenoceptor blockade, this indicates that the reflex pathway involves alpha2-adrenoceptors.

  20. Cortical neurodynamics of inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kai; Ghuman, Avniel S; Manoach, Dara S; Jones, Stephanie R; Luna, Beatriz

    2014-07-16

    The ability to inhibit prepotent responses is critical for successful goal-directed behaviors. To investigate the neural basis of inhibitory control, we conducted a magnetoencephalography study where human participants performed the antisaccade task. Results indicated that neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) showed significant task modulations in preparation to suppress saccades. Before successfully inhibiting a saccade, beta-band power (18-38 Hz) in the lateral PFC and alpha-band power (10-18 Hz) in the frontal eye field (FEF) increased. Trial-by-trial prestimulus FEF alpha-band power predicted successful saccadic inhibition. Further, inhibitory control enhanced cross-frequency amplitude coupling between PFC beta-band (18-38 Hz) activity and FEF alpha-band activity, and the coupling appeared to be initiated by the PFC. Our results suggest a generalized mechanism for top-down inhibitory control: prefrontal beta-band activity initiates alpha-band activity for functional inhibition of the effector and/or sensory system.

  1. Cortical Neurodynamics of Inhibitory Control

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Avniel S.; Manoach, Dara S.; Jones, Stephanie R.; Luna, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The ability to inhibit prepotent responses is critical for successful goal-directed behaviors. To investigate the neural basis of inhibitory control, we conducted a magnetoencephalography study where human participants performed the antisaccade task. Results indicated that neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) showed significant task modulations in preparation to suppress saccades. Before successfully inhibiting a saccade, beta-band power (18–38 Hz) in the lateral PFC and alpha-band power (10–18 Hz) in the frontal eye field (FEF) increased. Trial-by-trial prestimulus FEF alpha-band power predicted successful saccadic inhibition. Further, inhibitory control enhanced cross-frequency amplitude coupling between PFC beta-band (18–38 Hz) activity and FEF alpha-band activity, and the coupling appeared to be initiated by the PFC. Our results suggest a generalized mechanism for top-down inhibitory control: prefrontal beta-band activity initiates alpha-band activity for functional inhibition of the effector and/or sensory system. PMID:25031398

  2. Estimating avoidable causes of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, D L; Muir, C

    1995-01-01

    Evidence that much cancer is preventable derives from observations of time trends and geographic patterns of cancer, birth cohort changes, high risks in groups with well-defined exposures, and experimental studies. In an effort to identify additional opportunities for reducing the impact of cancer on society, this conference assessed avoidable causes of cancer. The magnitude and extent of preventable causes of cancer are subjects of intense debate, with discrepancies often related to the use of different time frames and different weights for epidemiologic and toxicologic evidence. There is much agreement, however, about the exposures that increase risk, notably tobacco, alcohol, diet, radiation, medications, occupational exposures, general environmental exposures, and infectious agents. Interactions between carcinogenic exposures and genetic susceptibility are also important. Concerted efforts are needed to identify avoidable causes of cancer and to apply knowledge already obtained to reduce the cancer burden. PMID:8741803

  3. Post-operative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Steggall, Martin; Treacy, Colm; Jones, Mark

    Urinary retention is a common complication of surgery and anaesthesia. The risk of post-operative urinary retention is increased following certain surgical procedures and anaesthetic modalities, and with patients' advancing age. Patients at increased risk of post-operative urinary retention should be identified before surgery or the condition should be identified and treated in a timely manner following surgery. If conservative measures do not help the patient to pass urine, the bladder will need to be drained using either an intermittent catheter or an indwelling urethral catheter, which can result in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This article provides an overview of normal bladder function, risk factors for developing post-operative urinary retention, and treatment options. Guidance drawn from the literature aims to assist nurses in identifying at-risk patients and inform patient care.

  4. EA Shuttle Document Retention Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effort of code EA at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to identify and acquire databases and documents from the space shuttle program that are adjudged important for retention after the retirement of the space shuttle.

  5. Pulmonary retention of coal dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, P.E.; Gibb, F.R.; Beiter, H.; Amato, F.; Yuile, C.; Kilpper, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The principal objectives of this study were: to determine, quantitatively, coal dust retention times in the dog lung; to test the appropriateness of a pulmonary retention model which incorporates first order rate coefficients obtained from in vitro and in vivo experiments on neutron-activated coal; to acquire a temporal description of the pulmonary disposition of the retained coal dust, and to compare the behavior of two different Pennsylvania coals in the foregoing regards. The principal findings include: retention half-times for both coals of approximately 2 years following single, hour-long exposures; a vivid association of the retained coal dust with the pulmonic lymphatics; and a general validation of the retention model.

  6. Diversity and Retention in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cinda-Sue G.; Finelli, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe three initiatives designed to increase the academic achievement and retention of historically underrepresented students (including females and underrepresented students of color) in engineering. (Contains 2 tables.)

  7. Avoiding congestion in recommender systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaolong; Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Runran; Zhang, Jianlin

    2014-06-01

    Recommender systems use the historical activities and personal profiles of users to uncover their preferences and recommend objects. Most of the previous methods are based on objects’ (and/or users’) similarity rather than on their difference. Such approaches are subject to a high risk of increasingly exposing users to a narrowing band of popular objects. As a result, a few objects may be recommended to an enormous number of users, resulting in the problem of recommendation congestion, which is to be avoided, especially when the recommended objects are limited resources. In order to quantitatively measure a recommendation algorithm's ability to avoid congestion, we proposed a new metric inspired by the Gini index, which is used to measure the inequality of the individual wealth distribution in an economy. Besides this, a new recommendation method called directed weighted conduction (DWC) was developed by considering the heat conduction process on a user-object bipartite network with different thermal conductivities. Experimental results obtained for three benchmark data sets showed that the DWC algorithm can effectively avoid system congestion, and greatly improve the novelty and diversity, while retaining relatively high accuracy, in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods.

  8. Rapid jamming avoidance in biosonar.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Erin H; Ulanovsky, Nachum; McCracken, Gary F

    2007-03-07

    The sonar systems of bats and dolphins are in many ways superior to man-made sonar and radar systems, and considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the signal-processing strategies underlying these capabilities. A major feature determining the efficiency of sonar systems is the sensitivity to noise and jamming signals. Previous studies indicated that echolocating bats may adjust their signal structure to avoid jamming ('jamming avoidance response'; JAR). However, these studies relied on behavioural correlations and not controlled experiments. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence for JAR in bats. We presented bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) with 'playback stimuli' consisting of recorded echolocation calls at one of six frequencies. The bats exhibited a JAR by shifting their call frequency away from the presented playback frequency. When the approaching bats were challenged by an abrupt change in the playback stimulus, they responded by shifting their call frequencies upwards, away from the playback. Interestingly, even bats initially calling below the playback's frequency shifted their frequencies upwards, 'jumping' over the playback frequency. These spectral shifts in the bats' calls occurred often within less than 200 ms, in the first echolocation call emitted after the stimulus switch-suggesting that rapid jamming avoidance is important for the bat.

  9. Rapid jamming avoidance in biosonar

    PubMed Central

    Gillam, Erin H; Ulanovsky, Nachum; McCracken, Gary F

    2006-01-01

    The sonar systems of bats and dolphins are in many ways superior to man-made sonar and radar systems, and considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the signal-processing strategies underlying these capabilities. A major feature determining the efficiency of sonar systems is the sensitivity to noise and jamming signals. Previous studies indicated that echolocating bats may adjust their signal structure to avoid jamming (‘jamming avoidance response’; JAR). However, these studies relied on behavioural correlations and not controlled experiments. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence for JAR in bats. We presented bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) with ‘playback stimuli’ consisting of recorded echolocation calls at one of six frequencies. The bats exhibited a JAR by shifting their call frequency away from the presented playback frequency. When the approaching bats were challenged by an abrupt change in the playback stimulus, they responded by shifting their call frequencies upwards, away from the playback. Interestingly, even bats initially calling below the playback's frequency shifted their frequencies upwards, ‘jumping’ over the playback frequency. These spectral shifts in the bats' calls occurred often within less than 200 ms, in the first echolocation call emitted after the stimulus switch—suggesting that rapid jamming avoidance is important for the bat. PMID:17254989

  10. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982).

  11. phosphorus retention data and metadata

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    phosphorus retention in wetlands data and metadataThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Lane , C., and B. Autrey. Phosphorus retention of forested and emergent marsh depressional wetlands in differing land uses in Florida, USA. Wetlands Ecology and Management. Springer Science and Business Media B.V;Formerly Kluwer Academic Publishers B.V., GERMANY, 24(1): 45-60, (2016).

  12. Admission avoidance hospital at home.

    PubMed

    Shepperd, Sasha; Iliffe, Steve; Doll, Helen A; Clarke, Mike J; Kalra, Lalit; Wilson, Andrew D; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C

    2016-09-01

    Admission avoidance hospital at home provides active treatment by healthcare professionals in the patient's home for a condition that otherwise would require acute hospital inpatient care, and always for a limited time period. This is the third update of the original review. To determine the effectiveness and cost of managing patients with admission avoidance hospital at home compared with inpatient hospital care. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, two other databases, and two trials registers on 2 March 2016. We checked the reference lists of eligible articles. We sought unpublished studies by contacting providers and researchers who were known to be involved in the field. Randomised controlled trials recruiting participants aged 18 years and over. Studies comparing admission avoidance hospital at home with acute hospital inpatient care. We followed the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane and the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group. We performed meta-analysis for trials that compared similar interventions and reported comparable outcomes with sufficient data, requested individual patient data from trialists, and relied on published data when this was not available. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of the body of evidence for the most important outcomes. We included 16 randomised controlled trials with a total of 1814 participants; three trials recruited participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two trials recruited participants recovering from a stroke, six trials recruited participants with an acute medical condition who were mainly elderly, and the remaining trials recruited participants with a mix of conditions. We assessed the majority of the included studies as at low risk of selection, detection, and attrition bias, and unclear for selective reporting and performance bias. Admission avoidance hospital at home probably makes little

  13. Retention Rate by Ethnicity. Information Capsule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Anne

    This document discusses retention rate based on ethnicity for Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC) for December 2002. The study found that the 2001 Fall-Spring retention rates increased among all ethnic groups. The total college retention rate rose by 2.7 percentage points to 75.2%. Among individual groups, the highest retention rate of 76.9% was…

  14. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Paula M; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a "kick start effect" over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the

  15. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Paula M.; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a “kick start effect” over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the

  16. Home care aide retention: building team spirit to avoid employee walkouts.

    PubMed

    Walter, B M

    1996-08-01

    While home care agencies work to increase productivity and decrease costs, it is easy to lose sight of the value of employees. Because home care aides are seldom in the office, their value to the organization may get overlooked. In this article, one home care agency shares ways to build team spirit among the home care aides and empower them to be better employees. The result has been increased productivity, improved morale, and a more stable workforce.

  17. Adaptive avoidance of reef noise.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N; Tickle, Edward J; Meekan, Mark G; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2011-02-04

    Auditory information is widely used throughout the animal kingdom in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some marine species are dependent on reefs for adult survival and reproduction, and are known to use reef noise to guide orientation towards suitable habitat. Many others that forage in food-rich inshore waters would, however, benefit from avoiding the high density of predators resident on reefs, but nothing is known about whether acoustic cues are used in this context. By analysing a sample of nearly 700,000 crustaceans, caught during experimental playbacks in light traps in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon, we demonstrate an auditory capability in a broad suite of previously neglected taxa, and provide the first evidence in any marine organisms that reef noise can act as a deterrent. In contrast to the larvae of species that require reef habitat for future success, which showed an attraction to broadcasted reef noise, taxa with a pelagic or nocturnally emergent lifestyle actively avoided it. Our results suggest that a far greater range of invertebrate taxa than previously thought can respond to acoustic cues, emphasising yet further the potential negative impact of globally increasing levels of underwater anthropogenic noise.

  18. Adaptive Avoidance of Reef Noise

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Stephen D.; Radford, Andrew N.; Tickle, Edward J.; Meekan, Mark G.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Auditory information is widely used throughout the animal kingdom in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some marine species are dependent on reefs for adult survival and reproduction, and are known to use reef noise to guide orientation towards suitable habitat. Many others that forage in food-rich inshore waters would, however, benefit from avoiding the high density of predators resident on reefs, but nothing is known about whether acoustic cues are used in this context. By analysing a sample of nearly 700,000 crustaceans, caught during experimental playbacks in light traps in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon, we demonstrate an auditory capability in a broad suite of previously neglected taxa, and provide the first evidence in any marine organisms that reef noise can act as a deterrent. In contrast to the larvae of species that require reef habitat for future success, which showed an attraction to broadcasted reef noise, taxa with a pelagic or nocturnally emergent lifestyle actively avoided it. Our results suggest that a far greater range of invertebrate taxa than previously thought can respond to acoustic cues, emphasising yet further the potential negative impact of globally increasing levels of underwater anthropogenic noise. PMID:21326604

  19. Obstacle-avoiding navigation system

    DOEpatents

    Borenstein, Johann; Koren, Yoram; Levine, Simon P.

    1991-01-01

    A system for guiding an autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicle through a field of operation having obstacles thereon to be avoided employs a memory for containing data which defines an array of grid cells which correspond to respective subfields in the field of operation of the vehicle. Each grid cell in the memory contains a value which is indicative of the likelihood, or probability, that an obstacle is present in the respectively associated subfield. The values in the grid cells are incremented individually in response to each scan of the subfields, and precomputation and use of a look-up table avoids complex trigonometric functions. A further array of grid cells is fixed with respect to the vehicle form a conceptual active window which overlies the incremented grid cells. Thus, when the cells in the active window overly grid cell having values which are indicative of the presence of obstacles, the value therein is used as a multiplier of the precomputed vectorial values. The resulting plurality of vectorial values are summed vectorially in one embodiment of the invention to produce a virtual composite repulsive vector which is then summed vectorially with a target-directed vector for producing a resultant vector for guiding the vehicle. In an alternative embodiment, a plurality of vectors surrounding the vehicle are computed, each having a value corresponding to obstacle density. In such an embodiment, target location information is used to select between alternative directions of travel having low associated obstacle densities.

  20. Threshold-avoiding proteomics pipeline.

    PubMed

    Suits, Frank; Hoekman, Berend; Rosenling, Therese; Bischoff, Rainer; Horvatovich, Peter

    2011-10-15

    We present a new proteomics analysis pipeline focused on maximizing the dynamic range of detected molecules in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data and accurately quantifying low-abundance peaks to identify those with biological relevance. Although there has been much work to improve the quality of data derived from LC-MS instruments, the goal of this study was to extend the dynamic range of analyzed compounds by making full use of the information available within each data set and across multiple related chromatograms in an experiment. Our aim was to distinguish low-abundance signal peaks from noise by noting their coherent behavior across multiple data sets, and central to this is the need to delay the culling of noise peaks until the final peak-matching stage of the pipeline, when peaks from a single sample appear in the context of all others. The application of thresholds that might discard signal peaks early is thereby avoided, hence the name TAPP: threshold-avoiding proteomics pipeline. TAPP focuses on quantitative low-level processing of raw LC-MS data and includes novel preprocessing, peak detection, time alignment, and cluster-based matching. We demonstrate the performance of TAPP on biologically relevant sample data consisting of porcine cerebrospinal fluid spiked over a wide range of concentrations with horse heart cytochrome c.

  1. The flavonoid apigenin delays forgetting of passive avoidance conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Popović, Miroljub; Caballero-Bleda, María; Benavente-García, Obdulio; Castillo, Julián

    2014-05-01

    The present experiments were performed to study the effect of the flavonoid apigenin (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.), 1 h before acquisition), on 24 h retention performance and forgetting of a step-through passive avoidance task, in young male Wistar rats. There were no differences between saline- and apigenin-treated groups in the 24 h retention trial. Furthermore, apigenin did not prevent the amnesia induced by scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p., 30 min before the acquisition). The saline- and apigenin-treated rats that did not step through into the dark compartment during the cut-off time (540 s) were retested weekly for up to eight weeks. In the saline treated group, the first significant decline in passive avoidance response was observed at four weeks, and complete memory loss was found five weeks after the acquisition of the passive avoidance task. At the end of the experimental period, 60% of the animals treated with apigenin still did not step through. These data suggest that 1) apigenin delays the long-term forgetting but did not modulate the 24 h retention of fear memory and 2) the obtained beneficial effect of apigenin on the passive avoidance conditioning is mediated by mechanisms that do not implicate its action on the muscarinic cholinergic system.

  2. Altered activity of the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala during acquisition and extinction of an active avoidance task

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xilu; Beck, Kevin D.; Myers, Catherine E.; Servatius, Richard J.; Pang, Kevin C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Altered medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and amygdala function is associated with anxiety-related disorders. While the mPFC-amygdala pathway has a clear role in fear conditioning, these structures are also involved in active avoidance. Given that avoidance perseveration represents a core symptom of anxiety disorders, the neural substrate of avoidance, especially its extinction, requires better understanding. The present study was designed to investigate the activity, particularly, inhibitory neuronal activity in mPFC and amygdala during acquisition and extinction of lever-press avoidance in rats. Neural activity was examined in the mPFC, intercalated cell clusters (ITCs) lateral (LA), basal (BA) and central (CeA) amygdala, at various time points during acquisition and extinction, using induction of the immediate early gene product, c-Fos. Neural activity was greater in the mPFC, LA, BA, and ITC during the extinction phase as compared to the acquisition phase. In contrast, the CeA was the only region that was more activated during acquisition than during extinction. Our results indicate inhibitory neurons are more activated during late phase of acquisition and extinction in the mPFC and LA, suggesting the dynamic involvement of inhibitory circuits in the development and extinction of avoidance response. Together, these data start to identify the key brain regions important in active avoidance behavior, areas that could be associated with avoidance perseveration in anxiety disorders. PMID:26441578

  3. Inhibitory Receptors of the Immune System: Functions and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Xiang; Liu, Wentao; Demirci, Gulcin; Li, Xian C

    2009-01-01

    The immune system has a remarkable ability to respond to seemingly endless antigens. In essence, a productive immune response takes place along a well defined but treacherous line, that is to effectively eradicate pathogens, and at the same time avoid causing damage to self organs. This type of response is fine-tuned, at least in part, by a complex array of pathways that either promote or inhibit the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells. Much effort has been focused on pathways that can support immune activation. In this article, we review specifically pathways that can inhibit immune responses and maintain immune homeostasis, highlighting our recent understanding on the role of inhibitory receptors that selectively engage the self MHC class I molecules and the B7 superfamily members, we also discuss the inhibitory Fc receptors and inhibitory cytokines and how such pathways, either individually or collectively, regulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Finally, we summarize new emerging approaches on how such negative pathways can be therapeutically modulated in various disease settings. PMID:20003816

  4. CHLORIDE RETENTION IN EXPERIMENTAL HYDRONEPHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Norman M.; Pulford, D. Schuyler

    1923-01-01

    1. In acute experimental hydronephrosis chloride retention occurs as well as retention of water, urea, and phenolsulfonephthalein. 2. If both water and chlorides are retained there may be no appreciable rise in the plasma chloride content. 3. When chlorides are retained, but not water, the chloride content of the plasma rises strikingly. 4. After the removal of the ureteral obstruction in acute hydronephrosis all renal functions, water, urea, and chloride excretion, may be rapidly restored in equal degree, or the chlorides may be retained temporarily while there is free excretion of water and urea. 5. In chronic hydronephrosis adequate daily excretion of urea and chlorides may be maintained by a compensatory polyuria. 6. Chloride retention or an abnormal chloride excretion may occur in certain renal lesions when there is no change in the urea, phenolsulfonephthalein, or water excretion. PMID:19868720

  5. Fuel retention studies on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast Team Huang, J.; Lisgo, S.; Maddison, G.

    2011-08-01

    Fuel retention has been studied on MAST using gas-balance analysis. With 8-15 min of inter-shot helium glow-discharge cleaning (4He-GDC), the wall retention fraction stays very high (>90%) during the flat-top of the plasma current, indicating this component is dominant during the discharge. Recovery of wall conditioning with 4He-GDC suggests the retention process is dominated by direct implantation of particles in shallow surface layers. The effect of 4He-GDC duration on the particle balance has also been investigated. It is shown that when there was no preceding 4He-GDC, the wall pumping capacity was reduced, causing higher plasma density and tank pressure for the next shot.

  6. Lake retention of manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Koelmans, A A; Quik, J T K; Velzeboer, I

    2015-01-01

    For twenty-five world lakes and three engineered nanoparticles (ENP), lake retention was calculated using a uniformly mixed lake mass balance model. This follows similar approaches traditionally used in water quality management. Lakes were selected such that lake residence times, depths and areal hydraulic loadings covered the widest possible range among existing lakes. Sedimentation accounted for natural colloid as well as suspended solid settling regimes. An ENP-specific mixed sedimentation regime is proposed. This regime combines ENP sedimentation through slow settling with natural colloids from the water column, with faster settling with suspended solids from a selected part of the water column. Although sedimentation data and hydrodynamic concepts as such were not new, their first time combination or application to ENPs shows in which cases lake retention is important for these particles. In combination with ENP emission data, lake retention translates directly into potential risks of ENPs for lake benthic communities.

  7. Retention of hydrogen in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1986-10-01

    The retention of hydrogen in POCO AXF-5Q graphite has been measured at room temperature as a function of fluence and flux for H/sub 2//sup +/ ions at energies from 250 to 500 eV provided by a glow discharge. More than 2 x 10/sup 18/ H/cm/sup 2/ has been retained, and no indication of saturation has been observed to a fluence of 5 x 10/sup 19/ H/cm/sup 2/. In this experiment, retention was found to increase linearly with fluence for constant flux. A flux dependence was observed; that is, the retention rate was observed to decrease monotonically as the flux increased. A change-over experiment, deuterium to hydrogen, was conducted; the results show that significant change-over occurs (i.e., about 30% change-over for a fluence of 5 x 10/sup 17/ D/cm/sup 2/).

  8. Developing Sediment Retention Model for the Ecoservice Model InVEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghebremichael, L.; Ziv, G.; Ghile, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Integrated Valuation of Environmental Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) model has been gaining popularity internationally as a tool to evaluate and value services provided by nature. The sediment retention sub-model is one of the key components of the InVEST model that assesses potentials of landscape and landcover to retain sediments preventing them from reaching the waterways and reservoirs. Based on the outputs of the sediment retention sub-model, InVEST estimates landcover's economic values of avoiding water quality pollution and reservoir sedimentation. The current version of the sediment retention sub-model uses retention-coefficient approach based solely on landcover type in estimating the quantities of sediment retained and transported downstream. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a sediment-delivery-ratio approach that integrates more catchment characteristics, including slope and flow length, in addition to the landcover characteristics. This approach was tested in Midwestern U.S. using distributed sediment data. Results show that the sediment-delivery-ratio approach has improved performance in identifying sediment transport and retention processes. Incorporating this approach into the InVEST tool will enhance the model's capability in more accurately estimating the economic values of avoiding water quality pollution and reservoir sedimentation. Keywords: ecosystem service, modeling, sediment delivery ratio, sediment retention

  9. Autonomous hazard detection and avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Homer

    1992-01-01

    During GFY 91, Draper Laboratory was awarded a task by NASA-JSC under contract number NAS9-18426 to study and evaluate the potential for achieving safe autonomous landings on Mars using an on-board autonomous hazard detection and avoidance (AHDA) system. This report describes the results of that study. The AHDA task had four objectives: to demonstrate, via a closed-loop simulation, the ability to autonomously select safe landing sites and the ability to maneuver to the selected site; to identify key issues in the development of AHDA systems; to produce strawman designs for AHDA sensors and algorithms; and to perform initial trade studies leading to better understanding of the effect of sensor/terrain/viewing parameters on AHDA algorithm performance. This report summarizes the progress made during the first year, with primary emphasis on describing the tools developed for simulating a closed-loop AHDA landing. Some cursory performance evaluation results are also presented.

  10. Bone tumor mimics: avoiding misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gould, C Frank; Ly, Justin Q; Lattin, Grant E; Beall, Douglas P; Sutcliffe, Joseph B

    2007-01-01

    Whether discovered incidentally or as part of a focused diagnostic evaluation, the finding of a benign osseous lesion that has radiologic features resembling a bone tumor is not uncommon. Some of the more common benign and nonneoplastic entities that can sometimes be confused with tumors are the following: cortical desmoid, Brodie abscess, synovial herniation pit, pseudocyst, enostosis, intraosseous ganglion cyst, fibrous dysplasia, stress fracture, avulsion fracture (healing stage), bone infarct, myositis ossificans, brown tumor, and subchondral cyst. Accurate diagnosis and management of these lesions require a basic understanding of their epidemiology, clinical presentations, anatomic distributions, imaging features, differential considerations, and therapeutic options. This in-depth review of 13 potential bone tumor mimics will assist the radiologist in correctly identifying these benign lesions and in avoiding misdiagnosis and related morbidity. This review will also aid the radiologist in making appropriate recommendations to the referring physician for management or further imaging.

  11. The avoidable costs of population.

    PubMed

    Sadie, J L

    1987-07-01

    The social and economic consequences of current demographic trends in South Africa are analyzed using the concept of avoidable costs. The author presents projections of the population up to the year 2000 organized under four major categories: executive and managerial; professional; semi-skilled; and the unskilled, peasants, underemployed, and very poor. Comparisons are made with projections for the same four categories for Canada to show the problems faced by South Africa, in that relatively small growth in the first two classes is contrasted to massive growth in the other, and particularly the least privileged, classes. Consideration is given to the implications for the provision of schools and for the labor force. The author concludes that "if a problem is to be tackled at its roots it is to the control of human numbers that our attention is to be directed."

  12. Reading, Writing, and Retention: A Primer on Grade Retention Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Kaufman, Amber M.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that research shows that neither grade retention nor social promotion improves educational success. Suggests that familiarity with this research is essential when seeking intervention strategies. Considers how it is possible to strengthen the connection between research and practice by recognizing that educational professionals who know…

  13. Why People with Autism Avoid Eye Contact

    MedlinePlus

    ... 166988.html Why People With Autism Avoid Eye Contact Direct gaze stresses part of the brain tied ... Hospital's Center for Biomedical Imaging. While avoiding eye contact is often regarded as a sign of social ...

  14. ACAT Ground Collision Avoidance Flight Tests Over

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has concluded flight tests of an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) under the joint U.S. Air Force/NASA F-16D Automatic Collision Avoidance...

  15. See and Avoid/Cockpit Visibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    potential for significant reduction of collision risk. See and Avoid prevents the majority of collisions which would occur without it, particularly at...the failure to see. Column 5 in table 1 gives estimates of the effectiveness of See and Avoid (See and Avoid Effectiveness) in preventing encounters...to see (in daytime). 2. See and Avoid prevents the majority of collisions which would occur without it, particularly at low closing speeds. 3. At high

  16. Course Retention Analysis. Focus Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    A study was conducted at Mount San Antonio College (MSAC), California, to analyze patterns in credit course retention between fall 1986 and spring 1989. The study investigated the development of course prerequisites based on faculty perceptions of the skills necessary for success and minimal skill levels associated with success; student assessment…

  17. Institutionalization of a Retention Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. J.; Campbell, A.

    2006-05-01

    Bowie State University and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have, for the past 10 years, worked diligently together to enhance the science, mathematics, engineering and technology (SMET) domain. Efforts made, because of a Model Institutions for Excellence (MIE) Award, have changed the landscape of the SMET domain by increasing the retention and graduation rates, the number of students entering graduate and professional schools, and the number of students entering SMET related careers for minorities and women. Several initiatives a Scholarship Program, PRISEM Tutoring Center, Safety-net Program, Research emphasis, Focused Mentoring, a Summer Academy for accepted incoming students, a Bridge Program for students needing assistance being admitted to the University, the RISE Program and the Bowie State Satellite Operations and Control Center (BSOCC) provide the nurturing, mentoring, and opportunities for our students. As a result of efforts made, the retention rate has increase to approximately 80%, the graduation rate has increased 40%, and 85% of the SMET students are now interested or entering graduate and professional schools. Successes that have been documented by various assessment activities have led to the institutionalization of the Retention Model of the MIE Initiative. It is anticipated that University-wide application of the retention model will prove the incentives necessary to obtain similar results as the MIE Initiative.

  18. Academic Advising for Retention Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazazes, Barbara A.

    An effective academic advising system can assist in the retention of two-year college students; however, the institution and its faculty must be committed to providing such a system. Establishing a successful advising system would require the following: (1) a clear distinction must be made between academic advising and course scheduling; (2)…

  19. Implicit Memory: Retention without Remembering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Henry L., III

    1990-01-01

    Reviews recent research on retention that is demonstrated without conscious recollection, such as the ability to tie shoelaces or drive a car. Suggests that future research in this field may have implications for such educational issues as the transfer of training and the carryover of abstract classroom learning to problems in other contexts. (EVL)

  20. Course Retention Analysis. Focus Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    A study was conducted at Mount San Antonio College (MSAC), California, to analyze patterns in credit course retention between fall 1986 and spring 1989. The study investigated the development of course prerequisites based on faculty perceptions of the skills necessary for success and minimal skill levels associated with success; student assessment…

  1. Meeting Individual Needs Fosters Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artman, Johanne I.; Gore, Robert C.

    A 1991 study of non-returning students at Del Mar College (DMC), in Corpus Christi, Texas, revealed that only 37.9% of these students were actual dropouts (i.e., had failed to accomplish their educational goals, and had no plans to take up further study). Retention studies conducted in Texas between 1985 and 1989 have shown that DMC has…

  2. Strategies for improving employee retention.

    PubMed

    Verlander, Edward G; Evans, Martin R

    2007-03-28

    This article proposes a solution to the perennial problem of talent retention in the clinical laboratory. It includes the presentation of 12 strategies that may be used to significantly improve institutional identity formation and establishment of the psychological contract that employees form with laboratory management. Identity formation and psychological contracting are deemed as essential in helping reduce employee turnover and increase retention. The 12 conversational strategies may be used as a set of best practices for all employees, but most importantly for new employees, and should be implemented at the critical moment when employees first join the laboratory. This time is referred to as "retention on-boarding"--the period of induction and laboratory orientation. Retention on-boarding involves a dialogue between employees and management that is focused on the psychological, practical, cultural, and political dimensions of the laboratory. It is placed in the context of the modern clinical laboratory, which is faced with employing and managing Generation X knowledge workers. Specific topics and broad content areas of those conversations are outlined.

  3. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  4. Exploring General Education Development Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Sharon D.

    2013-01-01

    According to the instructors and administrators at a local adult education (AE) program in Houston, Texas, retaining and graduating general education development (GED) students has been a constant challenge. Locating GED attendance barriers could enable AE programs to develop techniques that increase student retention and graduation rates. The…

  5. Classroom Management for Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rita, Emilio

    This guidebook recommends methods for teachers to use to improve teacher-student interaction in the classroom, as a means of increasing student retention. Chapter I introduces eight major systems of classroom management which teachers may use as their values and the classroom situation dictate: "Behavior Modification,""Reality Therapy,""Discipline…

  6. A Research Study in Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knibbe, Marie Vannozzi; Dusewicz, Russell A.

    A study of the Center for Literacy's (CFL) program was conducted to provide information on retention and attrition in an urban, open-entry/open-exit, individualized, goal-based literacy program. An exploratory analysis that used student and tutor records from 1985 through 1989 provided a summary of demographics and attendance patterns. This…

  7. Teacher Retention: An Appreciative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesavento-Conway, Jennifer Jean

    2010-01-01

    Nationally, the problem of teacher retention compounds the unstable nature of the educational situation, especially in urban, high-needs schools. Much of the instability of urban schools is due to teacher movement, the migration of teachers from school to another school within or between school districts, particularly from high-needs schools.…

  8. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  9. Three Recruitment and Retention Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronx Community Coll., NY.

    This three-part report summarizes methodology and findings of three recruitment and retention studies conducted by the Bronx Community College (BCC) during 1979-1980. Part I examines a survey of enrolled students conducted to determine student attitudes toward BCC, the services that were most in demand, the reasons for attending BCC, and student…

  10. 49 CFR 260.49 - Avoiding defaults.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Avoiding defaults. 260.49 Section 260.49... Avoiding defaults. Borrowers are encouraged to contact the Administrator prior to the occurrence of an event of default to explore possible avenues for avoiding such an occurrence. ...

  11. Differential effects of bupropion on acquisition and performance of an active avoidance task in male mice.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M C; Redolat, R; Carrasco, M C

    2016-03-01

    Bupropion is an antidepressant drug that is known to aid smoking cessation, although little experimental evidence exists about its actions on active avoidance learning tasks. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of this drug on two-way active avoidance conditioning. In this study, NMRI mice received bupropion (10, 20 and 40mg/kg) or saline before a daily training session (learning phase, days 1-4) in the active avoidance task. Performance was evaluated on the fifth day (retention phase): in each bupropion-treated group half of the mice continued with the same dose of bupropion, and the other half received saline. Among the vehicle-treated mice, different sub-groups were challenged with different doses of bupropion. Results indicated that mice treated with 10 and 20mg/kg bupropion exhibited more number of avoidances during acquisition. The response latency confirmed this learning improvement, since this parameter decreased after bupropion administration. No differences between groups were observed in the retention phase. In conclusion, our data show that bupropion influences the learning process during active avoidance conditioning, suggesting that this drug can improve the control of emotional responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An economic assessment of local farm multi-purpose surface water retention systems in a Canadian Prairie setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Pamela; Yassin, Fuad; Belcher, Kenneth; Lindenschmidt, Karl-Erich

    2017-07-01

    There is a need to explore more sustainable approaches to water management on the Canadian Prairies. Retention pond installation schemes designed to capture surface water may be a viable option that would reduce water stress during drought periods by providing water for irrigation. The retention systems would serve to capture excess spring runoff and extreme rainfall events, reducing flood potential downstream. Additionally, retention ponds may be used for biomass production and nutrient retention. The purpose of this research was to investigate the economic viability of adopting local farm surface water retention systems as a strategic water management strategy. A retention pond was analyzed using a dynamic simulation model to predict its storage capacity, installation and upkeep cost, and economic advantage to farmers when used for irrigation. While irrigation application increased crop revenue, the cost of irrigation and reservoir infrastructure and installation costs were too high for the farmer to experience a positive net revenue. Farmers who harvest cattails from retention systems for biomass and available carbon offset credits can gain 642.70/hectare of harvestable cattail/year. Cattail harvest also removes phosphorus and nitrogen, providing a monetized impact of 7014/hectare of harvestable cattail/year. The removal of phosphorus, nitrogen, carbon, and avoided flooding damages of the retention basin itself provide an additional 17,730-18,470/hectare of retention system/year. The recommended use of retention systems is for avoided flood damages, nutrient retention, and biomass production. The revenue gained from these functions can support farmers wanting to invest in irrigation while providing economic and environmental benefits to the region.

  13. 5-HT1A and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors jointly regulate passive avoidance behavior.

    PubMed

    Riekkinen, P

    1994-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of combined stimulation of 5-HT1A or 5-HT2 receptors and blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on passive avoidance behavior. Administration of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, and 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI), a 5-HT2 receptor agonist, impaired passive avoidance acquisition (pre-training injections) and consolidation (post-training injections) performance. Ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, blocked the performance-impairing effect of DOI on passive avoidance consolidation. Interestingly, 5-HT receptor agonists may affect passive avoidance consolidation only during the immediate post-training period, as passive avoidance testing performance was not modulated by 8-OH-DPAT or DOI injected 30 min after the training trial. Furthermore, passive avoidance retention (pre-testing injections) performance was impaired only by the highest dose of 8-OH-DPAT, and DOI had no effect on passive avoidance retention. Next, the effects of combined 5-HT and acetylcholine receptor manipulations on passive avoidance behavior were studied. The effects on passive avoidance behavior of a combination of subthreshold doses of scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, and 8-OH-DPAT were compared to those of a single high dose of scopolamine. A combination of small doses of scopolamine and 8-OH-DPAT impaired acquisition and consolidation of passive avoidance performance, but a single high dose of scopolamine impaired only acquisition performance. The small dose of 8-OH-DPAT also aggravated medial septal lesion-induced passive avoidance acquisition and consolidation failure. The combination of small doses of scopolamine and DOI had no effect on passive avoidance behavior. Peripherally acting scopolamine methylbromide alone or in combination with 8-OH-DPAT had no effect on passive avoidance performance. Motor activity in a swimming pool

  14. Termites eavesdrop to avoid competitors

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Theodore A.; Inta, Ra; Lai, Joseph C. S.; Prueger, Stefan; Foo, Nyuk Wei; Fu, Eugene Wei'en; Lenz, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Competition exclusion, when a single species dominates resources due to superior competitiveness, is seldom observed in nature. Termites compete for resources with deadly consequences, yet more than one species can be found feeding in the same wooden resource. This is especially surprising when drywood species, with colonies of a few hundred, are found cohabiting with subterranean species, with colonies of millions. Termites communicate vibro-acoustically and, as these signals can travel over long distances, they are vulnerable to eavesdropping. We investigated whether drywood termites could eavesdrop on vibration cues from subterranean species. We show, using choice experiments and recordings, that the drywood termite Cryptotermes secundus can distinguish its own species from the dominant competitor in the environment, the subterranean termite Coptotermes acinaciformis. The drywood termite was attracted to its own vibration cues, but was repelled by those of the subterranean species. This response increased with decreasing wood size, corresponding with both increased risk and strength of the cue. The drywood termites appear to avoid confrontation by eavesdropping on the subterranean termites; these results provide further evidence that vibro-acoustic cues are important for termite sensory perception and communication. PMID:19710058

  15. Obstacle avoidance sonar for submarines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Albert C.; Webman, Kenneth M.

    2002-05-01

    The Advanced Mine Detection Sonar (AMDS) system was designed to operate in poor environments with high biological and/or shallow-water boundary conditions. It provides increased capability for active detection of volume, close-tethered, and bottom mines, as well as submarine and surface target active/passive detection for ASW and collision avoidance. It also provides bottom topography mapping capability for precise submarine navigation in uncharted littoral waters. It accomplishes this by using advanced processing techniques with extremely narrow beamwidths. The receive array consists of 36 modules arranged in a 15-ft-diameter semicircle at the bottom of the submarine sonar dome to form a chin-mounted array. Each module consists of 40 piezoelectric rubber elements. The modules provide the necessary signal conditioning to the element data prior to signal transmission (uplink) through the hull. The elements are amplified, filtered, converted to digital signals by an A/D converter, and multiplexed prior to uplink to the inboard receiver. Each module also has a downlink over which it receives synchronization and mode/gain control. Uplink and downlink transmission is done using fiberoptic telemetry. AMDS was installed on the USS Asheville. The high-frequency chin array for Virginia class submarines is based on the Asheville design.

  16. Allergen Avoidance in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Francesca; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2017-01-01

    Allergic asthma is the most frequent disease among the chronic respiratory disorders in pediatric age with an important social impact. In the last years, many efforts have been made to identify effective preventive approaches to get a better control of symptoms and to obtain the best future outcomes for the patients. In patients with allergic asthma triggered by the exposure to indoor allergens, the avoidance is the first intervention to prevent the appearance or the worsening of bronchial symptoms. This review article summarized the most recent evidence from literature about the efficacy of specific control interventions for the most important allergens. Even if a wide spectrum of interventions has been suggested and may help to reduce exposure to trigger allergy for sensitized patients suffering from respiratory allergy, evidence supporting the efficacy of these approaches is still weak and subject of controversy. However, the exposure control to specific airborne allergens is still widely recommended and may be effective as part of a holistic approach to reduce the severity of allergic respiratory symptoms in sensitized individuals. PMID:28540285

  17. 27 CFR 26.276 - Retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Records and Reports of Liquors From the Virgin Islands Filing and Retention of Records and Reports § 26.276 Retention...

  18. 27 CFR 26.276 - Retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Records and Reports of Liquors From the Virgin Islands Filing and Retention of Records and Reports § 26.276 Retention...

  19. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were ... too much at one time. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid retention) Weigh yourself. l Weigh yourself ...

  20. Population Ration, Intermarriage and Mother Tongue Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Eddie C. Y.

    1978-01-01

    An explanatory model of the relationship between mother tongue retention, population ratio, and intermarriage is presented. In general, data collected on mother tongue retention in Singapore, a multilingual and multiethnic society, support the proposed model. (DS)

  1. Extinction and recovery of an avoidance memory impaired by scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Navarro, N M; Krawczyk, M C; Boccia, M M; Blake, M G

    2017-03-15

    Pre-training administration of scopolamine (SCP) resembles situations of cholinergic dysfunction, leading to memory impairment of mice trained in an inhibitory avoidance task. We suggest here that SCP does not impair memory formation, but acquisition is affected in a way that reduces the strength of the stored memory, thus making this memory less able to control behavior when tested. Hence, a memory trace is stored, but is poorly expressed during the test. Although weakly expressed, this memory shows extinction during successive tests, and can be strengthened by using a reminder. Our results indicate that memories stored under cholinergic dysfunction conditions seem absent or lost, but are in fact present and experience common memory processes, such as extinction, and could be even recovered by using appropriate protocols.

  2. Adolescent subgenual anterior cingulate activity is related to harm avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tony T.; Simmons, Alan N.; Matthews, Scott C.; Tapert, Susan F.; Frank, Guido K.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Lansing, Amy E.; Wu, Jing; Paulus, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    Recent adult studies suggest that the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) is involved in fundamental mental operations such as affective processing and inhibitory control. However, little is known about inhibition-associated sgACC function in adolescents, and there are no published data regarding whether personality characteristics are related to inhibition-associated sgACC brain activity in adolescents. This study examined the relationship between personality and inhibition-associated sgACC response in healthy adolescents. Seventeen adolescents of 13–17 years of age underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a parametric stop-signal task. Greater harm avoidance levels were significantly associated with increased inhibition-related sgACC activity. These results establish, for the first time, a link between personality and differential sgACC activation in adolescents. PMID:19034055

  3. Effects of histamine and some related compounds on conditioned avoidance response in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tasaka, K.; Kamei, C.; Akahori, H.; Kitazumi, K.

    1985-11-25

    When histamine (Hi) and other agonists were applied intraventricularly, Hi caused a dose-dependent inhibition of the avoidance response in rats; its ED50 was 3.60 ..mu..g. l-methylHi, l-methylimidazole acetic acid and imidazole acetic acid which are major metabolites of Hi produced no inhibitory effect even at 50 ..mu..g. H/sub 1/-agonists (2-methylHi and 2-thiazolylethylamine) also depressed the avoidance response; their dose-response lines run parallel to that of Hi. The depressant effects of H/sub 2/-agonists (4-methylHi and dimaprit) were relatively weak; their dose-response lines were not parallel to that of Hi. When antagonists were pretreated intravenously, Hi action was clearly antagonized by diphehydramine and pyrilamine, but not by cimetidine or ranitidine. Intraventricular injection of Hi mixed with cimetidine or ranitidine did not change the effect induced by Hi alone. The avoidance response was not affected by noradrenaline, dopamine or 5-hydroxytryptamine. Although acetylcholine (ACh) suppressed the avoidance response dose-dependently, its effect was much weaker than that of Hi. Pretreatment with cholinergic blocking drugs (atropine and scopolamine) antagonized ACh action but not Hi action. From these results, it is assumed that the inhibitory effect of Hi on the avoidance response is preferentially linked to the H/sub 1/-receptor. After intraventricular application of /sup 3/H-Hi, the highest radioactivity was determined in the hypothalamus. 21 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Transient inhibitory seizures mimicking crescendo TIAs.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Lerner, A

    1990-01-01

    Somatic inhibitory seizures are thought to occur rarely. We describe a patient with somatic inhibitory seizures who initially presented with a clinical picture of crescendo transient ischemic attacks. He did not improve with anticoagulation, but the episodes ceased promptly after the administration of an anticonvulsant.

  5. The Diversity of Cortical Inhibitory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Karube, Fuyuki; Nomura, Masaki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The most typical and well known inhibitory action in the cortical microcircuit is a strong inhibition on the target neuron by axo-somatic synapses. However, it has become clear that synaptic inhibition in the cortex is much more diverse and complicated. Firstly, at least ten or more inhibitory non-pyramidal cell subtypes engage in diverse inhibitory functions to produce the elaborate activity characteristic of the different cortical states. Each distinct non-pyramidal cell subtype has its own independent inhibitory function. Secondly, the inhibitory synapses innervate different neuronal domains, such as axons, spines, dendrites and soma, and their inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) size is not uniform. Thus, cortical inhibition is highly complex, with a wide variety of anatomical and physiological modes. Moreover, the functional significance of the various inhibitory synapse innervation styles and their unique structural dynamic behaviors differ from those of excitatory synapses. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the inhibitory mechanisms of the cortical microcircuit. PMID:27199670

  6. Avoidance of aluminum by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Exley, C.

    2000-04-01

    Aluminum is the principal toxicant in fish in acid waters. The ability to avoid Al, particularly at low concentrations, would confer a considerable ecological advantage, but previous research into avoidance of Al has produced mixed results. The author used a cylindrical perspex tank, 150 cm in length, to study avoidance of Al by rainbow trout fry. The fish avoided Al, and their response was dependent on pH. Avoidance that was demonstrated at pHs of 5.00, 5.50, 5.50, and 5.75 was abolished at a pH of 6.00. Fry avoided very low Al concentrations being sensitive to [Al] > 1.00 {micro}mol L{sup {minus}1} at a pH of 5.00. This unequivocal demonstration of avoidance by rainbow trout fry of Al may have important implications for the ecology of indigenous fish populations in surface waters impacted by acidic deposition.

  7. Designing Online Courses to Promote Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz-Uhler, Beth; Fisher, Amy; Han, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Although the issue of student retention is a campus-wide one, it is of special interest in online distance learning courses, where retention rates are reported to be lower than in face-to-face classes. Among the explanations and theories of retention rates in online courses, one that struck us as most useful is a structural one, namely, course…

  8. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This snapshot report provides information on student persistence and retention rates for Spring 2014. Data is presented in tabular format on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Starting Enrollment Intensity (all institutional sectors); (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Age at College Entry (all…

  9. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Snapshot Report offers information on student persistence and retention rates for 2009-2013. It offers data on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year Private Nonprofit Institutions; (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year…

  10. Designing Online Courses to Promote Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz-Uhler, Beth; Fisher, Amy; Han, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Although the issue of student retention is a campus-wide one, it is of special interest in online distance learning courses, where retention rates are reported to be lower than in face-to-face classes. Among the explanations and theories of retention rates in online courses, one that struck us as most useful is a structural one, namely, course…

  11. Reframing Retention Strategy: A Focus on Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spittle, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Few words have dominated the vocabulary of college retention as has the word "persistence." Many institutions still struggle to engage faculty and administrators in building campuswide retention efforts, to find the organizational levers that translate the abstractions and complexities of retention theory into scalable and durable initiatives, and…

  12. Reframing Retention Strategy: A Focus on Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.; Zucker, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Over 35 years of retention theory and literature have acknowledged the importance of institutional and student profiles in accounting for cross-sectional differences in retention and completion rates between types of colleges and universities. The first "P" within a 4 Ps framework of student retention--"profile"--recognizes that an institution's…

  13. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  14. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  15. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  16. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  17. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  18. 12 CFR 202.12 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Record retention. 202.12 Section 202.12 Banks... OPPORTUNITY ACT (REGULATION B) § 202.12 Record retention. (a) Retention of prohibited information. A creditor...) Applications. For 25 months (12 months for business credit, except as provided in paragraph (b)(5) of...

  19. Reframing Retention Strategy: A Focus on Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.; Zucker, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Over 35 years of retention theory and literature have acknowledged the importance of institutional and student profiles in accounting for cross-sectional differences in retention and completion rates between types of colleges and universities. The first "P" within a 4 Ps framework of student retention--"profile"--recognizes that an institution's…

  20. Developmental broadening of inhibitory sensory maps.

    PubMed

    Quast, Kathleen B; Ung, Kevin; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Isabella; Addison, Angela P; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Cordiner, Keith; Saggau, Peter; Tolias, Andreas S; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2017-02-01

    Sensory maps are created by networks of neuronal responses that vary with their anatomical position, such that representations of the external world are systematically and topographically organized in the brain. Current understanding from studying excitatory maps is that maps are sculpted and refined throughout development and/or through sensory experience. Investigating the mouse olfactory bulb, where ongoing neurogenesis continually supplies new inhibitory granule cells into existing circuitry, we isolated the development of sensory maps formed by inhibitory networks. Using in vivo calcium imaging of odor responses, we compared functional responses of both maturing and established granule cells. We found that, in contrast to the refinement observed for excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps became broader with maturation. However, like excitatory maps, inhibitory sensory maps are sensitive to experience. These data describe the development of an inhibitory sensory map as a network, highlighting the differences from previously described excitatory maps.

  1. Do We Have a Retention Problem ... Or Do We Have a Problem "about" Retention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the "problem" of student retention in higher education. But unlike most, this paper focuses not on the problem of retention "per se" but rather on how institutional leaders think about student retention, completion, and success--how the way they frame their concerns about retention can give rise to a different sort of…

  2. Do We Have a Retention Problem ... Or Do We Have a Problem "about" Retention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the "problem" of student retention in higher education. But unlike most, this paper focuses not on the problem of retention "per se" but rather on how institutional leaders think about student retention, completion, and success--how the way they frame their concerns about retention can give rise to a different sort of…

  3. Retention in the Canadian Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-14

    the reasons that contribute to their personnel and retention problems . The research will then focus on the implemented solutions that the ADF has... one place Desire to live in own home 4 Low morale in work environment Desire to stay in one place Better career prospects in civilian life To... on my career management Low morale in my work environment and impact of job demands on family/personal life A desire for more challenging work

  4. Air Force Pilot Retention-1988.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    ACCESSION NO I I TITLE (include Security Classification) *AIR FORCE PILOT RETENTION - 1988 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Fisk, Robert B. III; Green, James W...FIGURE 13--Geographic Stability ...... ................ 20 FIGURE 14-- Personal Growth/Development .............. 20 - FIGURE 15--Overall Job...40 F ’j3;PE I - Creer Decisions Based on Fami Iy Considerat:on:; .. 40 [ r ,. oa the Air ’cr.e a Career ... . . .......... ~v; EXECUTIVE

  5. Retention of Motor Skills. Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    c) degree to which the learner can organize or impose order upon the elements that define the task; (d) struc- ture of the training environment...term retention of motor skill include (a) degree of proficiency attained by the learner during initial training; (b) amount and kind of refresher...Time to retrain individuals to original performance levels is generally rapid, consistently less than half the original training time. 6. Learners

  6. Acute urinary retention among astronauts.

    PubMed

    Stepaniak, Philip C; Ramchandani, Suneil R; Jones, Jeffrey A

    2007-04-01

    Although acute urinary retention (AUR) is not commonly thought of as a life-threatening condition, its presentation in orbit can lead to a number of medical complications that could compromise a space mission. We report on a middle-aged astronaut who developed urinary retention during two spaceflights. On the first mission of note, the astronaut initially took standard doses of promethazine and scopolamine before launch, and developed AUR immediately after entering orbit. For the first 3 d, the astronaut underwent intermittent catheterizations with a single balloon-tipped catheter. Due to the lack of iodine solution on board and the need for the astronaut to complete certain duties without interruption, the catheter was left in place for a total of 4 d. Although the ability to void returned after day 7, a bout of AUR reemerged on day 10, 1 d before landing. On return to Earth, a cystometrogram was unremarkable. During the astronaut's next mission, AUR again recurred for the first 24 h of microgravity exposure, and the astronaut was subsequently able to void spontaneously while in space. This report details the presentation of this astronaut, the precautions that were taken for space travel subsequent to the initial episode of AUR, and the possible reasons why space travel can predispose astronauts to urinary retention while in orbit. The four major causes of AUR--obstructive, pharmacologic, psychogenic, and neurogenic-are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may have played a role in this case.

  7. Increasing Pain Sensation Eliminates the Inhibitory Effect of Depression on Evoked Pain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Li, Sheng-Guang; Lin, Xiao-Xiao; Su, Yuan-Lin; Qi, Wei-Jing; Wang, Jin-Yan; Luo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have suggested that depression may be associated with inhibition of evoked pain but facilitation of spontaneous pain, the mechanisms underlying these relationships are unclear. The present study investigated whether the difference between evoked and spontaneous pain on sensory (descending inhibition) and affective (avoidance motivation) components contributes to the divergent effects of depression on them. Depressive-like behavior was produced in male Wistar rats by unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS). Tone-laser conditioning and formalin-induced conditioned place avoidance (F-CPA) were used to explore avoidance motivation in evoked and spontaneous pain, respectively. Behavioral pharmacology experiments were conducted to examine descending inhibition of both evoked (thermal stimulation) and spontaneous pain behavior (formalin pain). The results revealed that the inhibitory effect of depression on evoked pain was eliminated following repeated thermal stimuli. Avoidance behavior in the tone-laser conditioning task was reduced in UCMS rats, relative to controls. However, avoidance motivation for formalin pain in the UCMS group was similar to controls. 5-HT1A receptor antagonism interfered with inhibition of pain responses over time. The present study demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of depression on evoked pain dissipates with increased nociception and that the sensory-discriminative and affective-motivational components of pain are jointly involved in the divergent effects of depression on pain. PMID:27733820

  8. Nursing practice environment: a strategy for mental health nurse retention?

    PubMed

    Redknap, Robina; Twigg, Di; Rock, Daniel; Towell, Amanda

    2015-06-01

    Historically, mental health services have faced challenges in their ability to attract and retain a competent nursing workforce in the context of an overall nursing shortage. The current economic downturn has provided some respite; however, this is likely to be a temporary reprieve, with significant nursing shortages predicted for the future. Mental health services need to develop strategies to become more competitive if they are to attract and retain skilled nurses and avoid future shortages. Research demonstrates that creating and maintaining a positive nursing practice environment is one such strategy and an important area to consider when addressing nurse retention. This paper examines the impact the nursing practice environment has on nurse retention within the general and mental health settings. Findings indicate, that while there is a wealth of evidence to support the importance of a positive practice environment on nurse retention in the broader health system, there is little evidence specific to mental health. Further research of the mental health practice environment is required.

  9. Detection And Avoidance Of Obstacles By Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Sridhar, Banavar

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses problems relevant to control subsystems enabling helicopters on nap-of-the-Earth flight paths to detect and avoid obstacles automatically. Indicates similarities between this and obstacle-avoidance problem of industrial mobile robots. Two approaches extend two-dimensional obstacle-avoidance concept to three dimensions. First involves direct search of three-dimensional range-map data for indications of openings between obstacles. Second involves compression of data into two-dimensional map for path search.

  10. Generalization of socially transmitted and instructed avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Gemma; Schlund, Michael W.; Dymond, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Excessive avoidance behavior, in which an instrumental action prevents an upcoming aversive event, is a defining feature of anxiety disorders. Left unchecked, both fear and avoidance of potentially threatening stimuli may generalize to perceptually related stimuli and situations. The behavioral consequences of generalization mean that aversive learning experiences with specific threats may lead to the inference that classes of related stimuli are threatening, potentially dangerous, and need to be avoided, despite differences in physical form. Little is known however about avoidance generalization in humans and the learning pathways by which it may be transmitted. In the present study, we compared two pathways to avoidance—instructions and social observation—on subsequent generalization of avoidance behavior, fear expectancy and physiological arousal. Participants first learned that one cue was a danger cue (conditioned stimulus, CS+) and another was a safety cue (CS−). Groups were then either instructed that a simple avoidance response in the presence of the CS+ cancelled upcoming shock (instructed-learning group) or observed a short movie showing a demonstrator performing the avoidance response to prevent shock (observational-learning group). During generalization testing, danger and safety cues were presented along with generalization stimuli that parametrically varied in perceptual similarity to the CS+. Reinstatement of fear and avoidance was also tested. Findings demonstrate, for the first time, generalization of socially transmitted and instructed avoidance: both groups showed comparable generalization gradients in fear expectancy, avoidance behavior and arousal. Return of fear was evident, suggesting that generalized avoidance remains persistent following extinction testing. The utility of the present paradigm for research on avoidance generalization is discussed. PMID:26150773

  11. Excitatory and inhibitory learning with absent stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Daniel S; Sherwood, Andrew; Holland, Peter C

    2008-04-01

    Three experiments showed that 2 associatively activated stimulus representations may engage in excitatory or inhibitory learning, depending on their temporal relationship. Experiment 1a suggested that simultaneously activated stimulus representations show evidence of inhibitory learning in an acquisition test. Experiment 1b showed similar evidence of inhibition in a summation test. Experiment 2 found that activation of 2 stimulus representations in a serial compound resulted in excitatory learning between the antecedent and the subsequent (forward) and inhibitory learning between the subsequent and the antecedent (backward). The results show the dynamic influence of temporal contiguity on mediated learning.

  12. Integration of Weather Avoidance and Traffic Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Wilson, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic convective weather avoidance concept that compensates for weather motion uncertainties; the integration of this weather avoidance concept into a prototype 4-D trajectory-based Airborne Separation Assurance System (ASAS) application; and test results from a batch (non-piloted) simulation of the integrated application with high traffic densities and a dynamic convective weather model. The weather model can simulate a number of pseudo-random hazardous weather patterns, such as slow- or fast-moving cells and opening or closing weather gaps, and also allows for modeling of onboard weather radar limitations in range and azimuth. The weather avoidance concept employs nested "core" and "avoid" polygons around convective weather cells, and the simulations assess the effectiveness of various avoid polygon sizes in the presence of different weather patterns, using traffic scenarios representing approximately two times the current traffic density in en-route airspace. Results from the simulation experiment show that the weather avoidance concept is effective over a wide range of weather patterns and cell speeds. Avoid polygons that are only 2-3 miles larger than their core polygons are sufficient to account for weather uncertainties in almost all cases, and traffic separation performance does not appear to degrade with the addition of weather polygon avoidance. Additional "lessons learned" from the batch simulation study are discussed in the paper, along with insights for improving the weather avoidance concept. Introduction

  13. Flight Tests Validate Collision-Avoidance System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Flights tests of a smartphone-assisted automatic ground collision avoidance system at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center consistently commanded evasive maneuvers when it sensed that the unmanned ...

  14. Emerging approaches to estimate retention factors in high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Saldaña, José María; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Villanueva-Camañas, Rosa María; Medina-Hernández, María José; Sagrado, Salvador

    2005-11-11

    The retention factor is one of the most universally used parameters in chromatography. The errors associated with the conventional ways to determine the retention factor of compounds in liquid chromatography are studied and compared with those corresponding to new approaches. The later avoid the use of extra-column time and hold-up time values, which have proven to be tedious and ambiguous. Simulations and real data, used to examine the accuracy of four different approaches (two classic and two new), suggest that the new approaches could be considered more satisfactory than the classic ones.

  15. Participation of muscarinic receptors in memory consolidation in passive avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Dobryakova, Yulia V; Gurskaya, Olga; Markevich, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that the cholinergic system and the muscarinic cholinergic receptors are associated with cognitive functions. Here we examined whether a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine affects learning performance and/or synaptic plasticity during the memory consolidation period. Adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were injected with scopolamine (2 mg/kg) or saline immediately after training in a "passive avoidance" task. Memory retention test was conducted 24 h after training. The changes in the latency of the first entry into a dark compartment of a test chamber was chosen as a criterion of learning. The efficacy of synaptic transmission was estimated by the changes in the basal level of focal potentials (fEPSP amplitude and slope ratio) before training (baseline), 90 min after the training (consolidation period), and 24 hour after the training (retention period). We found that foot-shock presentation by itself had no effect on fEPSP within the first 90 min after training, but in 24 hour fEPSPs were decreased. In untrained rats administration of scopolamine had no effect on the fEPSP amplitude within the first 90 min after the injection, but in 24 h we observed an increase in the fEPSP amplitude. In trained animals, scopolamine decreased the fEPSP amplitude in the hippocampal CA1 area during first 1.5 h after the injection. However, the drug had no effect on the memory retention in the passive avoidance task. Taken together our data suggest that scopolamine modifies the synaptic placticity of the hippocampal network but does not induce significant changes in the retention of the passive avoidance skill.

  16. Vatless manufacturing of low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese from highly concentrated skim milk microfiltration retentates.

    PubMed

    Ardisson-Korat, A V; Rizvi, S S H

    2004-11-01

    Low-moisture, part-skim (LMPS) Mozzarella cheeses were made from concentration factor (CF) 6, 7, 8, and 9, pH 6.0 skim milk microfiltration (MF) retentates using a vatless cheese-making process. The compositional and proteolytic effects of cheese made from 4 CF retentates were evaluated as well as their functional properties (meltability and stretchability). Pasteurized skim milk was microfiltered using a 0.1-microm ceramic membrane at 50 degrees C to a retentate CF of 6, 7, 8, and 9. An appropriate amount of cream was added to achieve a constant casein:fat ratio in the 4 cheesemilks. The ratio of rennet to casein was also kept constant in the 4 cheesemilks. The compositional characteristics of the cheeses made from MF retentates did not vary with retentate CF and were within the legal range for LMPS Mozzarella cheese. The observed reduction in whey drained was greater than 90% in the cheese making from the 4 CF retentates studied. The development of proteolytic and functional characteristics was slower in the MF cheeses than in the commercial samples that were used for comparison due to the absence of starter culture, the lower level of rennet used, and the inhibition of cheese proteolysis due to the inhibitory effect of residual whey proteins retained in the MF retentates, particularly high molecular weight fractions.

  17. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  18. Cognitive involvement by negative modulation of histamine H2 receptors in passive avoidance task in mice.

    PubMed

    Onodera, K; Miyazaki, S; Imaizumi, M

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the intracerebroventricular administration of 4-methylhistamine (3 and 10 micrograms/head), a histamine H2 receptor agonist, shortened the step-through latency in the retention trial using a step-through passive avoidance task in mice. This deteriorating effect of 4-methylhistamine (3 micrograms/head) was clearly antagonized by pretreatment with zolantidine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), a histamine H2 receptor antagonist, 20 min before an acquisition trial. Zolantidine alone at the dose tested had no effect. Thus, it is likely that activation of histamine H2 receptors has a deteriorating effect on avoidance learning in mice. The present results indicate the cognitive involvement by negative modulation of histamine H2 receptors in passive avoidance task in mice.

  19. Effects of Nepeta menthoides aqueous extract on retention and retrieval of memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Sarahroodi, S; Jafari-Najafi, R; Nasri, S; Rohampour, K; Maleki-Jamshid, A; Esmaeili, S

    2012-11-15

    There are several evidences that plants and vegetables with antioxidant activity can reduce oxidative damages in brain and improve cognitive functions. The aim of this study was evaluation of Nepeta menthoides aqueous extract on memory retention and retrieval of mice by using passive avoidance apparatus. For this purpose, mice were classified, coded, weighted and grouped (n = 8) as follow as: control group (Only electric shock), blank group (electric shock plus normal saline) and test groups (electric shock plus Nepeta menthoides extract by doses: 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg kg(-1), i.p.). Delay time of leaving the platform was measured for retention and retrieval test of memory in all mentioned groups. In retention test, plant extract was administered immediately after receiving electric shock while it was administered 24 h after receiving electric shock in retrieval. The results revealed that Nepeta menthoides aqueous extract significantly (p<0.05) increased memory retention and retrieval. The best response for memory retention and retrieval was achieved with 800 mg kg(-1) of Nepeta extract. In conclusion, enhancement of memory retention and retrieval by Nepeta menthoides could be cause of antioxidant activity of its components such as rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid and phenolic acids.

  20. Retention period after treatment of posterior crossbite with maxillary expansion: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Julia Garcia; Galindo, Thaís Magalhães; Mattos, Claudia Trindade; Cury-Saramago, Adriana de Alcantara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the duration of the retention period in growing patients undergoing maxillary expansion and its relation with posterior crossbite stability. METHODS: Search strategies were executed for electronic databases Cochrane Library, Web of Science, PubMed and Scopus, which were completed on January 15, 2016. The inclusion criteria included randomized, prospective or retrospective controlled trials in growing subjects with posterior crossbite; treated with maxillary expanders; retention phase after expansion; post-retention phase of at least 6 months. The exclusion criteria were anterior crossbite, craniofacial anomalies, surgery or another orthodontic intervention; case reports; author’s opinions articles, thesis, literature reviews and systematic reviews. The risk of bias of selected articles was assessed with Cochrane risk of bias tool for RCTs and Downs and Black checklist for non-RCTs. RESULTS: A total of 156 titles/abstracts was retrieved, 44 full-texts were examined, and 6 articles were selected and assessed for their methodological quality. The retention period after maxillary expansion ranged between 4 weeks and 16 months. Fixed (acrylic plate, Haas, Hyrax and quad-helix) or removable (Hawley and Hawley expander) appliances were used for retention. CONCLUSIONS: Six months of retention with either fixed or removable appliances seem to be enough to avoid relapse or to guarantee minimal changes in a short-term follow-up. PMID:28658354

  1. Human Hippocampus Arbitrates Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Packard, Pau A.; Miró, Júlia; Falip, Mercè; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Animal models of human anxiety often invoke a conflict between approach and avoidance [1, 2]. In these, a key behavioral assay comprises passive avoidance of potential threat and inhibition, both thought to be controlled by ventral hippocampus [2–6]. Efforts to translate these approaches to clinical contexts [7, 8] are hampered by the fact that it is not known whether humans manifest analogous approach-avoidance dispositions and, if so, whether they share a homologous neurobiological substrate [9]. Here, we developed a paradigm to investigate the role of human hippocampus in arbitrating an approach-avoidance conflict under varying levels of potential threat. Across four experiments, subjects showed analogous behavior by adapting both passive avoidance behavior and behavioral inhibition to threat level. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we observe that threat level engages the anterior hippocampus, the human homolog of rodent ventral hippocampus [10]. Testing patients with selective hippocampal lesions, we demonstrate a causal role for the hippocampus with patients showing reduced passive avoidance behavior and inhibition across all threat levels. Our data provide the first human assay for approach-avoidance conflict akin to that of animal anxiety models. The findings bridge rodent and human research on passive avoidance and behavioral inhibition and furnish a framework for addressing the neuronal underpinnings of human anxiety disorders, where our data indicate a major role for the hippocampus. PMID:24560572

  2. Human hippocampus arbitrates approach-avoidance conflict.

    PubMed

    Bach, Dominik R; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Packard, Pau A; Miró, Júlia; Falip, Mercè; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Dolan, Raymond J

    2014-03-03

    Animal models of human anxiety often invoke a conflict between approach and avoidance. In these, a key behavioral assay comprises passive avoidance of potential threat and inhibition, both thought to be controlled by ventral hippocampus. Efforts to translate these approaches to clinical contexts are hampered by the fact that it is not known whether humans manifest analogous approach-avoidance dispositions and, if so, whether they share a homologous neurobiological substrate. Here, we developed a paradigm to investigate the role of human hippocampus in arbitrating an approach-avoidance conflict under varying levels of potential threat. Across four experiments, subjects showed analogous behavior by adapting both passive avoidance behavior and behavioral inhibition to threat level. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we observe that threat level engages the anterior hippocampus, the human homolog of rodent ventral hippocampus. Testing patients with selective hippocampal lesions, we demonstrate a causal role for the hippocampus with patients showing reduced passive avoidance behavior and inhibition across all threat levels. Our data provide the first human assay for approach-avoidance conflict akin to that of animal anxiety models. The findings bridge rodent and human research on passive avoidance and behavioral inhibition and furnish a framework for addressing the neuronal underpinnings of human anxiety disorders, where our data indicate a major role for the hippocampus. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 47 CFR 74.604 - Interference avoidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference avoidance. 74.604 Section 74.604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... Stations § 74.604 Interference avoidance. (a) (b) Where two or more licensees are assigned a common...

  4. Information Seeking and Avoiding in Health Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashers, Dale E.; Goldsmith, Daena J.; Hsieh, Elaine

    2002-01-01

    Suggests a research agenda that would provide a basis for proposing normative recommendations for information management in health contexts. Overviews information seeking and avoiding processes. Describes challenges and dilemmas faced by those who seek, avoid, and provide information. Offers research questions derived from a normative agenda for…

  5. How Do Speakers Avoid Ambiguous Linguistic Expressions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, V.S.; Slevc, L.R.; Rogers, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments assessed how speakers avoid linguistically and nonlinguistically ambiguous expressions. Speakers described target objects (a flying mammal, bat) in contexts including foil objects that caused linguistic (a baseball bat) and nonlinguistic (a larger flying mammal) ambiguity. Speakers sometimes avoided linguistic-ambiguity, and they…

  6. Recommendations for Sense and Avoid Policy Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Since unmanned aircraft do not have a human on board, they need to have a sense and avoid capability that provides an "equivalent level of safety" (ELOS) to manned aircraft. The question then becomes - is sense and avoid ELOS for unmanned aircraft adequate to satisfy the requirements of 14 CFR 91.113? Access 5 has proposed a definition of sense and avoid, but the question remains as to whether any sense and avoid system can comply with 14 CFR 91.113 as currently written. The Access 5 definition of sense and avoid ELOS allows for the development of a sense and avoid system for unmanned aircraft that would comply with 14 CFR 91.113. Compliance is based on sensing and avoiding other traffic at an equivalent level of safety for collision avoidance, as manned aircraft. No changes to Part 91 are necessary, with the possible exception of changing "see" to "sense," or obtaining an interpretation from the FAA General Counsel that "sense" is equivalent to "see."

  7. How Do Speakers Avoid Ambiguous Linguistic Expressions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, V.S.; Slevc, L.R.; Rogers, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments assessed how speakers avoid linguistically and nonlinguistically ambiguous expressions. Speakers described target objects (a flying mammal, bat) in contexts including foil objects that caused linguistic (a baseball bat) and nonlinguistic (a larger flying mammal) ambiguity. Speakers sometimes avoided linguistic-ambiguity, and they…

  8. Retention at Departments of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Rafael; Rosa, Luis

    2013-03-01

    A thriving physics department is the end result of many actions, taken over time, that results in the development of a sense of community between the faculty and the students. As part of this sense of community, gifted students must receive special attention and innovative ideas must be incorporated to successfully accommodate the needs of these students. We have found that the best retention strategy for gifted undergraduates is the total involvement of them in undergraduate research projects and also the development of leadership in extracurricular activities within the department. A careful employment strategy is needed to secure a faculty committed to the goals of the community.

  9. Population properties affect inbreeding avoidance in moose.

    PubMed

    Herfindal, Ivar; Haanes, Hallvard; Røed, Knut H; Solberg, Erling J; Markussen, Stine S; Heim, Morten; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms reducing inbreeding are thought to have evolved owing to fitness costs of breeding with close relatives. In small and isolated populations, or populations with skewed age- or sex distributions, mate choice becomes limited, and inbreeding avoidance mechanisms ineffective. We used a unique individual-based dataset on moose from a small island in Norway to assess whether inbreeding avoidance was related to population structure and size, expecting inbreeding avoidance to be greater in years with larger populations and even adult sex ratios. The probability that a potential mating event was realized was negatively related to the inbreeding coefficient of the potential offspring, with a stronger relationship in years with a higher proportion or number of males in the population. Thus, adult sex ratio and population size affect the degree of inbreeding avoidance. Consequently, conservation managers should aim for sex ratios that facilitate inbreeding avoidance, especially in small and isolated populations.

  10. Living with food allergy: allergen avoidance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jennifer S; Sicherer, Scott H

    2011-04-01

    The primary treatment of food allergy is to avoid the culprit foods. This is a complex undertaking that requires education about reading the labels of manufactured products, understanding how to avoid cross-contact with allergens during food preparation, and communicating effectively with persons who are providing allergen-safe meals including relatives and restaurant personnel. Successful avoidance also requires a knowledge of nuances such as appropriate cleaning practices, an understanding of the risks of ingestion compared to skin contact or inhalation, that exposure could occur through unanticipated means such as through sharing utensils or passionate kissing, and that food may be a component of substances that are not ingested such as cosmetics, bath products, vaccines and medications. The authors review the necessary tools of avoidance that physicians and medical practitioners can use to guide their patients through the complexities of food avoidance.

  11. Combined effects of cognitive bias for food cues and poor inhibitory control on unhealthy food intake.

    PubMed

    Kakoschke, Naomi; Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the combined effects of cognitive bias (attentional and approach biases) and inhibitory control on unhealthy snack food intake. Cognitive biases reflect automatic processing, while inhibitory control is an important component of controlled processing. Participants were 146 undergraduate women who completed a dot probe task to assess attentional bias and an approach-avoidance task to assess approach bias. Inhibitory control was measured with a food-specific go/no-go task. Unhealthy snack food intake was measured using a so-called "taste test". There was a significant interaction between approach bias and inhibitory control on unhealthy snack food intake. Specifically, participants who showed a strong approach bias combined with low inhibitory control consumed the most snack food. Theoretically, the results support contemporary dual-process models which propose that behaviour is guided by both automatic and controlled processing systems. At a practical level, the results offer potential scope for an intervention that combines re-training of both automatic and controlled processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Higher threat avoidance costs reduce avoidance behaviour which in turn promotes fear extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    Rattel, Julina A; Miedl, Stephan F; Blechert, Jens; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2016-12-15

    Theoretical models specifying the underlying mechanisms of the development and maintenance of anxiety and related disorders state that fear responses acquired through classical Pavlovian conditioning are maintained by repeated avoidance behaviour; thus, it is assumed that avoidance prevents fear extinction. The present study investigated behavioural avoidance decisions as a function of avoidance costs in a naturalistic fear conditioning paradigm. Ecologically valid avoidance costs - manipulated between participant groups - were represented via time-delays during a detour in a gamified computer task. After differential acquisitions of shock-expectancy to a predictive conditioned stimulus (CS+), participants underwent extinction where they could either take a risky shortcut, while anticipating shock signaled by the CS+, or choose a costly avoidance option (lengthy detour); thus, they were faced with an approach-avoidance conflict. Groups with higher avoidance costs (longer detours) showed lower proportions of avoiders. Avoiders gave heightened shock-expectancy ratings post-extinction, demonstrating 'protecting from extinction', i.e. failure to extinguish. Moreover, there was an indirect effect of avoidance costs on protection from extinction through avoidance behaviour. No moderating role of trait-anxiety was found. Theoretical implications of avoidance behaviour are discussed, considering the involvement of instrumental learning in the maintenance of fear responses.

  13. CB1 Receptor Autoradiographic Characterization of the Individual Differences in Approach and Avoidance Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Petrosini, Laura; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Typically, approach behaviour is displayed in the context of moving towards a desired goal, while avoidance behaviour is displayed in the context of moving away from threatening or novel stimuli. In the current research, we detected three sub-populations of C57BL/6J mice that spontaneously responded with avoiding, balancing or approaching behaviours in the presence of the same conflicting stimuli. While the balancing animals reacted with balanced responses between approach and avoidance, the avoiding or approaching animals exhibited inhibitory or advance responses towards one of the conflicting inputs, respectively. Individual differences in approach and avoidance motivation might be modulated by the normal variance in the level of functioning of different systems, such as endocannabinoid system (ECS). The present research was aimed at analysing the ECS involvement on approach and avoidance behavioural processes. To this aim, in the three selected sub-populations of mice that exhibited avoiding or balancing or approaching responses in an approach/avoidance Y-maze we analysed density and functionality of CB1 receptors as well as enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase activity in different brain regions, including the networks functionally responsible for emotional and motivational control. The main finding of the present study demonstrates that in both approaching and avoiding animals higher CB1 receptor density in the amygdaloidal centro-medial nuclei and in the hypothalamic ventro-medial nucleus was found when compared with the CB1 receptor density exhibited by the balancing animals. The characterization of the individual differences to respond in a motivationally based manner is relevant to clarify how the individual differences in ECS activity are associated with differences in motivational and affective functioning. PMID:22848724

  14. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  15. Retention Problems and the USAF Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) should implement initiatives to improve organizational climate and thereby improve low retention. Today’s low...and USAF studies that point to various aspects of organizational climate as sources of dissatisfaction among their respective members, the USAF...apparently has not attempted to improve organizational climate in an effort to improve retention. The USAF should implement initiatives to improve retention

  16. The Retention of Female Unrestricted Line Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    PS y• s’TANTIA PER SCIENTIAM NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS THE RETENTION OF FEMALE UNRESTRICTED LINE OFFICERS by Elena G...Title (Mix case letters) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS The Retention of Female Unrestricted Line Officers 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This thesis analyzes the retention of female Naval officers, focusing on the

  17. Fission-product retention in HTGR fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, F.J.; Kania, M.J.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    Retention data for gaseous and metallic fission products are presented for both Triso-coated and Biso-coated HTGR fuel particles. Performance trends are established that relate fission product retention to operating parameters, such as temperature, burnup, and neutron exposure. It is concluded that Biso-coated particles are not adequately retentive of fission gas or metallic cesium, and Triso-coated particles which retain cesium still lose silver. Design implications related to these performance trends are identified and discussed.

  18. Disease-avoidant behaviour and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Kouznetsova, Daria; Stevenson, Richard J; Oaten, Megan J; Case, Trevor I

    2012-01-01

    Medical conditions that are non-contagious, but that appear contagious, seem to result in the sufferer being avoided. Error management theory (EMT), suggests that such false alarms occur because the cost of infection poses a greater threat to ones fitness than avoidance. Study 1 attempted to demonstrate a disease-related false alarm effect by asking participants, to evaluate a series of vignettes, featuring people with infectious diseases, non-infectious diseases that looked infectious and non-infectious diseases that did not. Judgements of contracting infection under varying levels of contact, and desire to avoid were obtained. Consistent with EMT, a false alarm effect was evident. Study 2 examined the importance of the face as a key indicator of real and apparent infection, by determining whether facial symptoms result in a greater desire to avoid people with infectious and non-infectious diseases. Consistent with expectation, participants reported a greater desire to avoid people with facially displayed symptoms. Together, these results support the idea that humans have evolved a general tendency to avoid individuals with disease signs, especially if displayed upon the face. One consequence is that where a facially displayed disease sign persists, even if known to be benign, its bearer will experience chronic avoidance.

  19. Moving Obstacle Avoidance for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yucong

    There has been a vast increase in applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in civilian domains. To operate in the civilian airspace, a UAV must be able to sense and avoid both static and moving obstacles for flight safety. While indoor and low-altitude environments are mainly occupied by static obstacles, risks in space of higher altitude primarily come from moving obstacles such as other aircraft or flying vehicles in the airspace. Therefore, the ability to avoid moving obstacles becomes a necessity for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Towards enabling a UAV to autonomously sense and avoid moving obstacles, this thesis makes the following contributions. Initially, an image-based reactive motion planner is developed for a quadrotor to avoid a fast approaching obstacle. Furthermore, A Dubin's curve based geometry method is developed as a global path planner for a fixed-wing UAV to avoid collisions with aircraft. The image-based method is unable to produce an optimal path and the geometry method uses a simplified UAV model. To compensate these two disadvantages, a series of algorithms built upon the Closed-Loop Rapid Exploratory Random Tree are developed as global path planners to generate collision avoidance paths in real time. The algorithms are validated in Software-In-the-Loop (SITL) and Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulations using a fixed-wing UAV model and in real flight experiments using quadrotors. It is observed that the algorithm enables a UAV to avoid moving obstacles approaching to it with different directions and speeds.

  20. When Is Topic Avoidance Unsatisfying? Examining Moderators of the Association between Avoidance and Dissatisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caughlin, John P.; Afifi, Tamara D.

    2004-01-01

    Despite theoretical arguments that avoiding certain topics can be functional, there is consistent evidence that avoiding topics tends to be associated with dissatisfying relationships. This disparity between theory and empirical findings suggests a need to understand better the connection between topic avoidance and relational dissatisfaction. The…

  1. Automatic attitudes and health information avoidance.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jennifer L; Ratliff, Kate A; Shepperd, James A

    2016-08-01

    Early detection of disease is often crucially important for positive health outcomes, yet people sometimes decline opportunities for early detection (e.g., opting not to screen). Although some health-information avoidance reflects a deliberative decision, we propose that information avoidance can also reflect an automatic, nondeliberative reaction. In the present research, we investigated whether people's automatic attitude toward learning health information predicted their avoidance of risk feedback. In 3 studies, we gave adults the opportunity to learn their risk for a fictitious disease (Study 1), melanoma skin cancer (Study 2), or heart disease (Study 3), and examined whether they opted to learn their risk. The primary predictors were participants' attitudes about learning health information measured using a traditional (controlled) self-report instrument and using speeded (automatic) self-report measure. In addition, we prompted participants in Study 3 to contemplate their motives for seeking or avoiding information prior to making their decision. Across the 3 studies, self-reported (controlled) and implicitly measured (automatic) attitudes about learning health information independently predicted avoidance of the risk feedback, suggesting that automatic attitudes explain unique variance in the decision to avoid health information. In Study 3, prompting participants to contemplate their reasons for seeking versus avoiding health information reduced information avoidance. Surprisingly, it did so by inducing reliance on automatic, rather than controlled, attitudes. The data suggests that automatic processes play an important role in predicting health information avoidance and suggest that interventionists aiming to increase information seeking might fruitfully target automatic processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. The temperature and ion energy dependence of deuterium retention in lithium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Koel, Bruce E.; Skinner, Charles H.

    2016-10-01

    Lithium conditioning of plasma facing components in magnetic fusion devices has improved plasma performance and lowered hydrogen recycling. For applications of lithium in future high heat flux and long pulse duration machines it is important to understand and parameterize deuterium retention in lithium. This work presents surface science studies of deuterium retention in lithium films as a function of surface temperature, incident deuterium ion energy and flux. Initial experiments are performed on thin (3-30 ML) lithium films deposited on a single crystal molybdenum substrate to avoid effects due to grain boundaries, intrinsic defects and impurities. A monoenergetic and mass-filtered deuterium ion beam was generated in a differentially pumped Colutron ion gun. Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the elemental composition and temperature programmed desorption was used to measure the deuterium retention under the different conditions. Support was provided through DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Dissociation of the genotoxic and growth inhibitory effects of selenium.

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Jiang, C; Kaeck, M; Ganther, H; Vadhanavikit, S; Ip, C; Thompson, H

    1995-07-17

    The effects of forms of selenium compounds that enter the cellular selenium metabolic pathway at different points were investigated in a mouse mammary carcinoma cell line. The goal of these experiments was to determine if the genotoxicity of selenium, defined as its ability to induce DNA single-strand breaks, could be dissociated from activities proposed to account for its cancer inhibitory activity. The results demonstrated that growth inhibition, measured as inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of cell death, was induced by all the forms of selenium evaluated. However, sodium selenite and sodium selenide, which are metabolized predominantly to hydrogen selenide, caused the rapid induction of DNA single-strand breaks as an early event that preceded growth inhibition. Interestingly methylselenocyanate and Se-methylselenocysteine, which are initially metabolized predominantly to methylselenol, induced growth inhibition in the absence of DNA single-strand breakage. Differences in the time course of selenium retention, in the occurrence of membrane damage, and in the induction of morphological changes by selenite versus methylselenocyanate were noted. Collectively, these data indicate that different pathways affecting cell proliferation and cell death are induced depending on whether selenium undergoes metabolism predominantly to hydrogen selenide or to methylselenol.

  4. Intolerance of uncertainty as a contributor to fear and avoidance symptoms of panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Fetzner, Mathew G; Hackl, Jennifer L; McEvoy, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Panic disorder symptoms are persistent for 50-80% of cases even after treatment, resulting in experiences of disability and dissatisfaction in life. Previous research has focused on anxiety sensitivity (AS) and its dimensions as contributing to symptoms of panic disorder; however, recent research has suggested that intolerance of uncertainty (IU)-the tendency for a person to consider the possibility of a negative event occurring as threatening, irrespective of the actual probability of its occurrence-may also play a critical role. The current study was designed to assess the specific relationships between dimensions of IU (i.e. prospective IU and inhibitory IU) and the fear and avoidance symptoms associated with panic disorder. Participants included 122 community members (81% women) with a history of at least one panic attack who participated in a larger study on fear. Participants completed measures of AS, IU, and panic disorder symptoms. Correlation and regression analyses supported a significant and substantial relationship between AS, inhibitory IU, and panic disorder symptoms. Inhibitory IU accounted for relatively more variance in avoidance symptoms related to panic disorder than did the fears of physical sensations dimension of AS. As such, further investigation of the role of IU in panic disorder symptoms appears warranted. Comprehensive results, implications, and directions for future research are discussed.

  5. Elementary Grade Retention Policies and Teachers' Perceptions on Retention Practices and Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrasco-Tolentino, Sheril

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the retention policies, practices, and interventions in school districts in 4 counties in Southern California. It was based on a study conducted by Olds (2008). A content analysis of retention policies and practices in 9 elementary (K-6) districts found that districts used the state's Pupil Promotion and Retention regulations…

  6. 6 Tips to Avoid Medication Mistakes

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates 6 Tips to Avoid Medication Mistakes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... dietary supplements you use. back to top Computerized Medication Box FDA has cleared for marketing the Electronic ...

  7. Physicians’ Religious Topic Avoidance during Clinical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Villagran, Melinda M.; MacArthur, Brenda L.; Lee, Lauren E.; Ledford, Christy J. W.; Canzona, Mollie R.

    2017-01-01

    Religious and spiritual (R/S) conversations at the end-of-life function to help patients and their families find comfort in difficult circumstances. Physicians who feel uncertain about how to discuss topics related to religious beliefs may seek to avoid R/S conversations with their patients. This study utilized a two-group objective structured clinical examination with a standardized patient to explore differences in physicians’ use of R/S topic avoidance tactics during a clinical interaction. Results indicated that physicians used more topic avoidance tactics in response to patients’ R/S inquiries than patients’ R/S disclosures; however, the use of topic avoidance tactics did not eliminate the need to engage in patient-initiated R/S interactions. PMID:28481290

  8. The challenges for scientists in avoiding plagiarism.

    PubMed

    Fisher, E R; Partin, K M

    2014-01-01

    Although it might seem to be a simple task for scientists to avoid plagiarism and thereby an allegation of research misconduct, assessment of trainees in the Responsible Conduct of Research and recent findings from the National Science Foundation Office of Inspector General regarding plagiarism suggests otherwise. Our experiences at a land-grant academic institution in assisting researchers in avoiding plagiarism are described. We provide evidence from a university-wide multi-disciplinary course that understanding how to avoid plagiarism in scientific writing is more difficult than it might appear, and that a failure to learn the rules of appropriate citation may cause dire consequences. We suggest that new strategies to provide training in avoiding plagiarism are required.

  9. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Present day robotic missions to other planets require precise, a priori knowledge of the terrain to pre-determine a landing spot that is safe. Landing sites can be miles from the mission objective, or, mission objectives may be tailored to suit landing sites. Future robotic exploration missions should be capable of autonomously identifying a safe landing target within a specified target area selected by mission requirements. Such autonomous landing sites must (1) 'see' the surface, (2) identify a target, and (3) land the vehicle. Recent advances in radar technology have resulted in small, lightweight, low power radars that are used for collision avoidance and cruise control systems in automobiles. Such radar systems can be adapted for use as active hazard avoidance systems for planetary landers. The focus of this CIF proposal is to leverage earlier work on collision avoidance systems for MSFC's Mighty Eagle lander and evaluate the use of automotive radar systems for collision avoidance in planetary landers.

  10. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  11. How work environment impacts retention.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Kate

    2008-01-01

    Work environment is a major aspect of the day-to-day grind that drives the retention (or turnover) of RNs. When opportunities abound, it is easy to jump ship, and when turnover begins, it is usually the best and brightest who are first to depart. Recent research reported a whopping 27.1% average voluntary turnover rate among new graduate nurses during their first year of employment. Aging of the nurse workforce may be the largest factor impacting health care work environments, as employers struggle to diminish the physical effect of lifting thousands of pounds and walking several miles during each shift. Every influence on the work environment (management, peer behavior, patient acuity, equipment availability, the physical plant) should be assessed for impact on the workforce. While we cannot hope to create paradise in each work setting, we can promote an environment that is healing both to patient and to caregiver.

  12. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  13. The vigilance-avoidance model of avoidant recognition: An ERP study under threat priming.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jing; Chen, Xu; Ma, Jianling; Yang, Qingqing; Liu, Ying

    2016-12-30

    Our study examined attachment-related electrophysiological differences in recognition using event-related potentials (ERPs) measured during a study-test paradigm after threat priming. We identified ERP correlates of recognition by comparing the ERPs of attachment-related positive and negative images between avoidant and secure attachment orientations. Our results revealed that the distribution of early old/new effects was broader in avoidant individuals than in secure individuals, and an early parietal old/new effect was observed in avoidant individuals, which reflected their implicit memory. The late old/new effect was found only in secure individuals when evoked by negative pictures, and was not observed in avoidant individuals. The results suggest that avoidant individuals adopt the "vigilance-avoidance" dual-process model to recognize both positive and negative attachment-related stimuli and carry out preferential familiarity matching at the automatic level and avoidant retrieval at the controlled-processing level.

  14. Singularity avoidance and time in quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kreienbuehl, Andreas

    2009-06-15

    We consider the quantization of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We derive a reduced square root Hamiltonian by choosing the scale factor as time variable and quantize the theory using Pauli matrices a la Dirac. From the resulting spinor equation we show that there is no semiclassical wave packet that avoids the big bang singularity. Our work raises the question concerning the relationship between the choice of time and singularity avoidance.

  15. Pathological demand avoidance: exploring the behavioural profile.

    PubMed

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    'Pathological Demand Avoidance' is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to 'socially manipulative' behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand avoidance is thought to share aspects of social impairment with autism spectrum disorders, but autism spectrum disorder-appropriate strategies, such as routine and repetition, are described as unhelpful. Outrageous acts and lack of concern for their effects draw parallels with conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits. However, reward-based techniques, effective with conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits, seem not to work in pathological demand avoidance. Despite increasing interest and controversy over the pathological demand avoidance label, there is only one published study to date. We present the first systematic comparison of the behavioural profile of children receiving the term pathological demand avoidance (N = 25) to children with autism spectrum disorders (N = 39) or conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits (N = 28), using parent-report indices of psychopathology. The pathological demand avoidance group displayed comparable levels of autistic traits and peer problems to the autism spectrum disorders group and anti-social traits approaching those seen in the conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits group. Emotional symptoms in pathological demand avoidance exceeded both comparison groups. Findings highlight the extreme behavioural impairment associated with pathological demand avoidance and the need to explore whether behavioural overlap reflects a similar neurocognitive basis to existing groups. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. [Management of total placental retention with oxytocin injected into the umbilical vein].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, W H

    1991-01-01

    Oxytocin was injected into the umbilical vein in 8 patients whose third stage of labor was complicated by retention of the placenta. The placenta was delivered in all patients within 3 min after the injection, avoiding thus the need for manual removal. This method seems to be effective, quick and safe in the management of retained placenta, and decreases the risks associated with the use of anesthesia and puerperal complications such as infection or trauma to the uterus.

  17. Do approach-avoidance actions create attitudes?

    PubMed

    Centerbar, David B; Clore, Gerald L

    2006-01-01

    Do approach-avoidance actions create attitudes? Prior influential studies suggested that rudimentary attitudes could be established by simply pairing novel stimuli (Chinese ideographs) with arm flexion (approach) or arm extension (avoidance). In three experiments, we found that approach-avoidance actions alone were insufficient to account for such effects. Instead, we found that these affective influences resulted from the interaction of these actions with a priori differences in stimulus valence. Thus, with negative stimuli, the effect of extension on attitude was more positive than the effect of flexion. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the affect from motivationally compatible or incompatible action can also influence task evaluations. A final experiment, using Chinese ideographs from the original studies, confirmed these findings. Both approach and avoidance actions led to more positive evaluations of the ideographs when the actions were motivationally compatible with the prior valence of the ideographs. The attitudinal impact of approach-avoidance action thus reflects its situated meaning, which depends on the valence of stimuli being approached or avoided.

  18. Novel thiourea-based sirtuin inhibitory warheads.

    PubMed

    Zang, Wenwen; Hao, Yujun; Wang, Zhenghe; Zheng, Weiping

    2015-08-15

    N(ε)-Thiocarbamoyl-lysine was recently demonstrated by our laboratory to be a potent catalytic mechanism-based SIRT1/2/3 inhibitory warhead, in the current study, among the prepared analogs of N(ε)-thiocarbamoyl-lysine with its terminal NH2 mono-substituted with alkyl and aryl groups, we found that N(ε)-methyl-thiocarbamoyl-lysine and N(ε)-carboxyethyl-thiocarbamoyl-lysine, respectively, also behaved as strong inhibitory warheads against SIRT1/2/3 and SIRT5, typical deacetylases and deacylase in the human sirtuin family, respectively. Moreover, N(ε)-methyl-thiocarbamoyl-lysine was found in the study to be a ∼ 2.5-18.4-fold stronger SIRT1/2/3 inhibitory warhead than its lead warhead N(ε)-thiocarbamoyl-lysine.

  19. Using Enrollment Data to Predict Retention Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Melissa A.; Solverson, Natalie Walleser

    2016-01-01

    First- to second-year retention rates are one metric reported by colleges and universities to convey institutional success to a variety of external constituents. But how much of a retention rate is institutional inputs, and how much can be understood by examining student inputs? The authors utilize multi-year, multi-institutional data to examine…

  20. Retention of New Teachers in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah; Rueben, Kim S.; Barbour, Elisa

    2006-01-01

    In the continuing effort to raise the academic performance of public schools, improving teacher retention could be an important strategy for California. Keeping new teachers in the classroom could improve academic performance, because experienced teachers are, on average, more effective at raising student test scores. Better retention of teachers…

  1. The "Classroom Ticket" to Concept Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Divoll, Kent; Browning, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Classroom assessment techniques have been advocated for use in the college classroom for over 20 years. The authors of this paper formed a new teaching technique, "the ticket to retention" ("TtR"), one that changes classroom assessment techniques so that the emphasis is on student retention of concepts. This technique combines…

  2. 12 CFR 226.25 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Record retention. 226.25 Section 226.25 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 226.25 Record retention. (a) General rule. A...

  3. 12 CFR 213.8 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Record retention. 213.8 Section 213.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CONSUMER LEASING (REGULATION M) § 213.8 Record retention. A lessor shall retain evidence of compliance with the requirements...

  4. 12 CFR 226.25 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Record retention. 226.25 Section 226.25 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 226.25 Record retention. (a) General rule. A creditor shall...

  5. 12 CFR 213.8 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Record retention. 213.8 Section 213.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CONSUMER LEASING (REGULATION M) § 213.8 Record retention. A lessor shall retain evidence of compliance with the requirements...

  6. African Retentions in Blues and Jazz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, Eddie S.

    1979-01-01

    The perseverance of African musical characteristics among American Blacks is an historic reality. African retentions have been recorded in Black music of the antebellum period. Various African scales and rhythms permeate Black American music today as evidenced in the retentions found in blues and jazz. (RLV)

  7. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate, accessible...

  8. Minority Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney-Gissendaner, Janet E.

    2010-01-01

    The tools and resources in this book help school leaders seamlessly incorporate minority teacher recruitment and retention programs into current human-resources activities. With details about exemplary minority teacher recruitment and retention programs, this book also showcases strategies for how to replicate such programs in your own school or…

  9. Novel Word Retention in Sequential Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Pui Fong

    2014-01-01

    Children's ability to learn and retain new words is fundamental to their vocabulary development. This study examined word retention in children learning a home language (L1) from birth and a second language (L2) in preschool settings. Participants were presented with sixteen novel words in L1 and in L2 and were tested for retention after…

  10. 9 CFR 354.73 - Retention labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Retention labels. 354.73 Section 354.73 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 354.73 Retention labels. An inspector may use such labels, devices, and methods as may be approved...

  11. 9 CFR 354.73 - Retention labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Retention labels. 354.73 Section 354.73 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 354.73 Retention labels. An inspector may use such labels, devices, and methods as may be approved...

  12. 7 CFR 400.412 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Record retention. 400.412 Section 400.412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Social Security Account Numbers and Employer Identification Numbers § 400.412 Record retention. (a) FCIC...

  13. Emotional Intelligence and Nursing Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Victoria Jane

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the constructs of a Multi-Intelligence Model of Retention with four constructs: cognitive and emotional-social intelligence, student characteristics, and environmental factors. Data were obtained from sophomore students entering two diploma, nine associate, and five baccalaureate nursing programs. One year later, retention and…

  14. 12 CFR 226.25 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Record retention. 226.25 Section 226.25 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Miscellaneous § 226.25 Record retention. (a) General rule. A creditor shall...

  15. Faculty Personality: A Factor of Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Cassandra S.; Wu, Xiaodong; Irwin, Kathleen C.; Patrizi, L. A. Chad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between student retention and faculty personality as it was hypothesized that faculty personality has an effect on student retention. The methodology adopted for this study was quantitative and in two parts 1) using linear regression models to examine the impact or causality of faculty…

  16. Emotional Intelligence and Nursing Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Victoria Jane

    2013-01-01

    The study examined the constructs of a Multi-Intelligence Model of Retention with four constructs: cognitive and emotional-social intelligence, student characteristics, and environmental factors. Data were obtained from sophomore students entering two diploma, nine associate, and five baccalaureate nursing programs. One year later, retention and…

  17. Faculty Personality: A Factor of Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Cassandra S.; Wu, Xiaodong; Irwin, Kathleen C.; Patrizi, L. A. Chad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between student retention and faculty personality as it was hypothesized that faculty personality has an effect on student retention. The methodology adopted for this study was quantitative and in two parts 1) using linear regression models to examine the impact or causality of faculty…

  18. A Model for Freshman Engineering Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenstra, Cindy P.; Dey, Eric L.; Herrin, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    With the current concern over the growing need for more engineers, there is an immediate need to improve freshman engineering retention. A working model for freshman engineering retention is needed. This paper proposes such a model based on Tinto's Interactionalist Theory. Emphasis in this model is placed on pre-college characteristics as…

  19. Managing human resources to improve employee retention.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    Managers face increased challenges as the demand for health care services increases while the supply of employees with the requisite skills continues to lag. Employee retention will become more important in the effort to service health care needs. Appropriate human resource management strategies and policies implemented effectively can significantly assist managers in dealing with the employee retention challenges ahead.

  20. 76 FR 24089 - Credit Risk Retention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Department of Housing and Urban Development 24 CFR Part 267 Credit Risk Retention; Proposed Rule #0;#0... Part 246 RIN 3235-AK96 DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 267 RIN 2501-AD53 Credit..., and HUD (the Agencies) are proposing rules to implement the credit risk retention requirements...

  1. The Grade Retention/Social Promotion Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John

    1985-01-01

    This publication focuses on the retention/promotion debate regarding failing and low-achieving students. An introductory essay describes the inherent limitation in the research done on this issue--the impossibility of obtaining an appropriate control group--and suggests that the retention/promotion quandary can best be resolved by accommodating…

  2. 5 CFR 353.302 - Retention protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retention protections. 353.302 Section... TO DUTY FROM UNIFORMED SERVICE OR COMPENSABLE INJURY Compensable Injury § 353.302 Retention protections. An injured employee enjoys no special protection in a reduction in force. Separation by reduction...

  3. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate,...

  4. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate,...

  5. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate,...

  6. 12 CFR 609.945 - Records retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records retention. 609.945 Section 609.945 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM ELECTRONIC COMMERCE Standards for Boards and Management § 609.945 Records retention. Records stored electronically must be accurate,...

  7. Novel Word Retention in Sequential Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Pui Fong

    2014-01-01

    Children's ability to learn and retain new words is fundamental to their vocabulary development. This study examined word retention in children learning a home language (L1) from birth and a second language (L2) in preschool settings. Participants were presented with sixteen novel words in L1 and in L2 and were tested for retention after…

  8. Measuring Up: Benchmarking Graduate Retention. IES Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyers, C.; Perryman, S.; Barber, L.

    Retention of college graduates by employers across the United Kingdom was examined. Data were collected through a survey of 362 organizations and interviews with 36 employers and their graduate employees. Most employers were unworried by their levels of graduate retention; two-thirds expected to keep new recruits for the foreseeable future. Rates…

  9. 10 CFR 37.103 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Record retention. 37.103 Section 37.103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF CATEGORY 1 AND CATEGORY 2 QUANTITIES OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Records § 37.103 Record retention. Licensees shall maintain the records that are required by...

  10. Effective Teacher Retention Bonuses: Evidence From Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.; Swain, Walker A.; Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    We report findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of the recently implemented US$5,000 retention bonus program for effective teachers in Tennessee's Priority Schools. We estimate the impact of the program on teacher retention using a fuzzy regression discontinuity design by exploiting a discontinuity in the probability of treatment…

  11. Profile in Action: Linking Admission and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    A profile-oriented retention strategy embraces the admission process as a powerful lever in improving retention and completion rates and recognizes that the student profile can be shaped by changes in admission policies or priorities--even within the current market position of the institution. In addition, the student body can be oriented toward…

  12. Positive Youth Development and Undergraduate Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demetriou, Cynthia; Powell, Candice

    2014-01-01

    The primary theoretical tradition in the study of college retention has been sociological. A review and synthesis of common themes of development among traditional-age, college students suggests that a developmental perspective on the retention of youth in college may have more to offer than the dominant sociological paradigm. This article argues…

  13. Black Student Retention in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Marvel, Ed.; Ford, Clinita A., Ed.

    This collection focuses on problems in the recruitment, enrollment and retention of Blacks in higher education in America. The following chapters are provided: "The Black Student Retention Problem in Higher Education: Some Introductory Perspectives" (Marvel Lang); "Early Acceptance and Institutional Linkages in a Model Program of Recruitment,…

  14. Effective Teacher Retention Bonuses: Evidence From Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.; Swain, Walker A.; Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    We report findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of the recently implemented US$5,000 retention bonus program for effective teachers in Tennessee's Priority Schools. We estimate the impact of the program on teacher retention using a fuzzy regression discontinuity design by exploiting a discontinuity in the probability of treatment…

  15. Using Enrollment Data to Predict Retention Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Melissa A.; Solverson, Natalie Walleser

    2016-01-01

    First- to second-year retention rates are one metric reported by colleges and universities to convey institutional success to a variety of external constituents. But how much of a retention rate is institutional inputs, and how much can be understood by examining student inputs? The authors utilize multi-year, multi-institutional data to examine…

  16. Minority Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney-Gissendaner, Janet E.

    2010-01-01

    The tools and resources in this book help school leaders seamlessly incorporate minority teacher recruitment and retention programs into current human-resources activities. With details about exemplary minority teacher recruitment and retention programs, this book also showcases strategies for how to replicate such programs in your own school or…

  17. 7 CFR 4280.136 - Minimum retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum retention. 4280.136 Section 4280.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Efficiency Improvements Program Section B. Guaranteed Loans § 4280.136 Minimum retention. Minimum...

  18. Effect of paradoxical sleep deprivation and stress on passive avoidance behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian Hong; van den Buuse, Maarten; Tian, Shao Wen; Ma, Yuan Ye

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that several types of stress can induce memory impairment. However, the memory effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD), a stressor in itself, are unclear. We therefore compared passive avoidance behavior of rats undergoing PSD and PSD stress yoked-control (PSC) using the "reversed flowerpot method." When rats were kept isolated on a PSC platform for 24 h immediately after criterion training, retention trials showed impaired aversive memory storage. When delayed for 24 h after criterion training, PSC stress did not disrupt retention performance. In rats subjected to PSD, either immediately or 24 h after criterion training, there was no disruption of aversive memory consolidation. These results suggest that, during stress, paradoxical sleep plays a role in erasing aversive memory traces, in line with the theory that we "dream in order to forget."

  19. [The involvement of thalamic nuclei in the formation of conditional avoidance reflexes in rats. I. Lesions in the anterior part of the nucleus ventralis lateralis].

    PubMed

    Hohrein, D; Klingberg, F

    1978-01-01

    Hooded rats (Long-Evans-strain) were not able to elaborate conditioned avoidance responses in a simple runway respectively in a jumping test after bilateral lesions of the anterior part of the nucleus ventralis lateralis thalami. When the number of the CS-US-combinations was increased from 10 to 25 per session, then during the last ten combinations the punishing electrical foot shocks were correctly avoided, but the animals showed no retention in their long-term memory.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Chinese nutritional herbs in isogenic breast carcinoma cells with modulated estrogen receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Telang, Nitin; Li, Guo; Katdare, Meena; Sepkovic, Daniel; Bradlow, Leon; Wong, George

    2016-01-01

    In estrogen receptor (ER)+ MCF-7 cells, ER represents a ligand-activated transcription factor, and 17β-estradiol (E2) represents its physiological ligand. Maintenance of the human breast carcinoma-derived MCF-7 cells with 0.7% serum selected a proliferative sub-population of E2-responsive cells with transiently non-functional ER due to limited availability of E2. Culture of MCF-7 cells in the presence of either 0.7% serum, <1 nM E2 or 0.7% serum + 20 nM E2 selected isogenic cells with either non-functional ER (ER-NF) or functional ER (ER-F) phenotype. The two phenotypes responded to the growth-promoting effects of E2 and to the growth-inhibitory effects of the selective ER modulator tamoxifen, indicating retention of E2 responsiveness. Comparative dose-response experiments with Chinese nutritional herbs on ER-NF and ER-F cells identified the inhibitory concentration (IC)50 values for these herbs, while the IC50 ratios for the ER-NF:ER-F phenotypes facilitated their rank ordering in terms of efficacy. Out of the 11 efficacious herbs tested, five herbs exhibited ER-F > ER-NF inhibitory activity, four exhibited ER-F = ER-NF inhibitory activity and two exhibited ER-NF > ER-F inhibitory activity. Extracts from representative herbs, Lycium barbarum bark, Epimedium grandiflorum and Cornus officinalis, from each of the three groups inhibited anchorage-independent growth, induced G1 or G2/M arrest and/or apoptosis, and generated anti-proliferative E2 metabolites. The differential growth inhibition in ER-NF and ER-F phenotypes, together with the mechanistic efficacy of representative herbs, identified potential leads for their efficacy on ER+ and/or ER- breast cancer. PMID:27895755

  1. Inhibitory effects of Chinese nutritional herbs in isogenic breast carcinoma cells with modulated estrogen receptor function.

    PubMed

    Telang, Nitin; Li, Guo; Katdare, Meena; Sepkovic, Daniel; Bradlow, Leon; Wong, George

    2016-11-01

    In estrogen receptor (ER)+ MCF-7 cells, ER represents a ligand-activated transcription factor, and 17β-estradiol (E2) represents its physiological ligand. Maintenance of the human breast carcinoma-derived MCF-7 cells with 0.7% serum selected a proliferative sub-population of E2-responsive cells with transiently non-functional ER due to limited availability of E2. Culture of MCF-7 cells in the presence of either 0.7% serum, <1 nM E2 or 0.7% serum + 20 nM E2 selected isogenic cells with either non-functional ER (ER-NF) or functional ER (ER-F) phenotype. The two phenotypes responded to the growth-promoting effects of E2 and to the growth-inhibitory effects of the selective ER modulator tamoxifen, indicating retention of E2 responsiveness. Comparative dose-response experiments with Chinese nutritional herbs on ER-NF and ER-F cells identified the inhibitory concentration (IC)50 values for these herbs, while the IC50 ratios for the ER-NF:ER-F phenotypes facilitated their rank ordering in terms of efficacy. Out of the 11 efficacious herbs tested, five herbs exhibited ER-F > ER-NF inhibitory activity, four exhibited ER-F = ER-NF inhibitory activity and two exhibited ER-NF > ER-F inhibitory activity. Extracts from representative herbs, Lycium barbarum bark, Epimedium grandiflorum and Cornus officinalis, from each of the three groups inhibited anchorage-independent growth, induced G1 or G2/M arrest and/or apoptosis, and generated anti-proliferative E2 metabolites. The differential growth inhibition in ER-NF and ER-F phenotypes, together with the mechanistic efficacy of representative herbs, identified potential leads for their efficacy on ER(+) and/or ER- breast cancer.

  2. Staff nurse retention: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Lassiter, S S

    1989-04-01

    At the same time the demand for nurses is on the rise, the supply is dwindling. Recruitment and retention are the two main factors which can be adjusted to affect supply. Recruitment has become increasingly difficult in the past two or three years due to decreasing enrollment in nursing education programs and increased demand for nurses in alternative delivery systems. Therefore staff nurse retention has become an issue of major importance. This article will begin by briefly delineating need and expectancy theories which in part explain job satisfaction and, hence, retention. Secondly, findings from the Magnet Hospital Study are summarized. Creative retention strategies will then be explored, concluding with a framework for developing a strategic plan for successful staff nurse retention.

  3. Effects of daily administration of methamphetamine on multiple active/passive avoidance performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, T; Hishida, S; Hatake, K; Taniguchi, T; Ouchi, H

    1993-02-26

    The effects of daily methamphetamine (M-Amp) treatment with (2 mg/kg/day, i.p.) were examined on multiple active/passive avoidance performance (MAP) in rats. After avoidance training, the animals were given M-Amp every day; on the days of learning sessions, which were on alternate days, the drug was administered at 15 min before the session. Daily administration of M-Amp produced enhancement of the number of respondings (running) as an excitatory dimension of behavior, disruption of immobilities as an inhibitory dimension, and impairment of successes as a discriminatory dimension, when compared with saline-treated rats. Following M-Amp withdrawal, recovery from these damages of learned behavior was observed, except the deterioration in the discriminative dimension. In conclusion, the MAP paradigm is good for assessing the behavioral effects of M-Amp treatment, making it easy to distinct the behavioral effects of M-Amp into excitatory-inhibitory and discriminative dimensions. It is important to distinguish the behavioral components induced by M-Amp, since the damage of learned avoidance performance consists of different dimensions in the M-Amp-treated rats. Impairment of discriminative behavior appears to demonstrate an attentional deficit, which may explain the behavioral disorderliness in M-Amp abusers who display no disturbance of apparent consciousness. These results are discussed with association of brain monoamine alterations.

  4. Forced exercise improves passive avoidance memory in morphine-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Saadipour, K; Sarkaki, A; Alaei, H; Badavi, M; Rahim, F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term forced exercise protocol on passive avoidance retention in morphine-exposed rats. Effects of morphine on acquisition and retrieval of retention have been proven in the avoidance paradigms. Twenty four male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into four groups including: (1) non-morphine-exposed without exercise (nA.nE) (2) non-morphine-exposed with exercise (nA.E) (3) morphine-exposed without exercise (A.nE) and (4) morphine-exposed with exercise (A.E). Rats ran as forced exercise on the motorized treadmill 1 h daily for ten days. Morphine-exposed animals received intraperitoneal morphine during first 5 days of the exercise period and their dependence to morphine was confirmed by naloxane admistration (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and withdrawal test. After 10 days of forced exercise, step down latency was tested and Inflexion Ratio (IR) was evaluated in each rat. Baseline step down latencies before any morphine exposing or exercise have shown no significant alteration in all groups. Inflexion Ratio (IR) ofnA.E group has increased significantly (p<0.001) at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after receiving shock (learning) compared to nA.nE and A.E groups. Our data showed that short-term forced exercise on treadmill improved retention in both morphine-exposed and non morphine-exposed rats at least up to 7 days and more than 14 days, respectively. Alteration in retention between exercised groups may attribute the release of adrenal stress hormones such as epinephrine and corticosterone because of the emotional arousal.

  5. Retention modelling in hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Euerby, Melvin R; Hulse, Jennifer; Petersson, Patrik; Vazhentsev, Andrey; Kassam, Karim

    2015-12-01

    The retention behaviour of acidic, basic and quaternary ammonium salts and polar neutral analytes has been evaluated on acidic, basic and neutral hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) stationary phases as a function of HILIC operating parameters such as MeCN content, buffer concentration, pH and temperature. Numerous empirical HILIC retention models (existing and newly developed ones) have been assessed for their ability to describe retention as a function of the HILIC operating parameters investigated. Retention models have been incorporated into a commercially available retention modelling programme (i.e. ACD/LC simulator) and their accuracy of retention prediction assessed. The applicability of HILIC modelling using these equations has been demonstrated in the two-dimensional isocratic (i.e. buffer concentration versus MeCN content modelling) and one-dimensional gradient separations for a range of analytes of differing physico-chemical properties on the three stationary phases. The accuracy of retention and peak width prediction was observed to be comparable to that reported in reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) retention modelling. Intriguingly, our results have confirmed that the use of gradient modelling to predict HILIC isocratic conditions and vice versa is not reliable. A relative ranking of the importance of the retention and selectivity of HILIC operating parameters has been determined using statistical approaches. For retention, the order of importance was observed to be organic content > stationary phase > temperature ≈ mobile phase pH (i.e. pH 3-6 which mainly effects the ionization of the analyte) ≈ buffer concentration. For selectivity, the nature of the stationary phase > mobile phase pH > buffer concentration > temperature > organic content.

  6. “To be or not to be Retained … That’s the Question!” Retention, Self-esteem, Self-concept, Achievement Goals, and Grades

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Francisco; Monteiro, Vera; Mata, Lourdes; Sanches, Cristina; Pipa, Joana; Almeida, Leandro S.

    2016-01-01

    Keeping students back in the same grade – retention – has always been a controversial issue in Education, with some defending it as a beneficial remedial practice and others arguing against its detrimental effects. This paper undertakes an analysis of this issue, focusing on the differences in student motivation and self-related variables according to their retention related status, and the interrelationship between retention and these variables. The participants were 695 students selected from two cohorts (5th and 7th graders) of a larger group of students followed over a 3-year project. The students were assigned to four groups according to their retention-related status over time: (1) students with past and recent retention; (2) students with past but no recent retention; (3) students with no past but recent retention; (4) students with no past or recent retention. Measures of achievement goal orientations, self-concept, self-esteem, importance given to school subjects and Grade Point Average (GPA) were collected for all students. Repeated measures MANCOVA analyses were carried out showing group differences in self-esteem, academic self-concept, importance attributed to academic competencies, task and avoidance orientation and academic achievement. To attain a deeper understanding of these results and to identify profiles across variables, a cluster analysis based on achievement goals was conducted and four clusters were identified. Students who were retained at the end of the school year are mainly represented in clusters with less adaptive motivational profiles and almost absent from clusters exhibiting more adaptive ones. Findings highlight that retention leaves a significant mark that remains even when students recover academic achievement and retention is in the distant past. This is reflected in the low academic self-concept as well as in the devaluation of academic competencies and in the avoidance orientation which, taken together, can undermine

  7. "To be or not to be Retained … That's the Question!" Retention, Self-esteem, Self-concept, Achievement Goals, and Grades.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Francisco; Monteiro, Vera; Mata, Lourdes; Sanches, Cristina; Pipa, Joana; Almeida, Leandro S

    2016-01-01

    Keeping students back in the same grade - retention - has always been a controversial issue in Education, with some defending it as a beneficial remedial practice and others arguing against its detrimental effects. This paper undertakes an analysis of this issue, focusing on the differences in student motivation and self-related variables according to their retention related status, and the interrelationship between retention and these variables. The participants were 695 students selected from two cohorts (5th and 7th graders) of a larger group of students followed over a 3-year project. The students were assigned to four groups according to their retention-related status over time: (1) students with past and recent retention; (2) students with past but no recent retention; (3) students with no past but recent retention; (4) students with no past or recent retention. Measures of achievement goal orientations, self-concept, self-esteem, importance given to school subjects and Grade Point Average (GPA) were collected for all students. Repeated measures MANCOVA analyses were carried out showing group differences in self-esteem, academic self-concept, importance attributed to academic competencies, task and avoidance orientation and academic achievement. To attain a deeper understanding of these results and to identify profiles across variables, a cluster analysis based on achievement goals was conducted and four clusters were identified. Students who were retained at the end of the school year are mainly represented in clusters with less adaptive motivational profiles and almost absent from clusters exhibiting more adaptive ones. Findings highlight that retention leaves a significant mark that remains even when students recover academic achievement and retention is in the distant past. This is reflected in the low academic self-concept as well as in the devaluation of academic competencies and in the avoidance orientation which, taken together, can undermine students

  8. Beyond negligence: avoidability and medical injury compensation.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Allen B; Mello, Michelle M; Brennan, Troyen A; Studdert, David M

    2008-01-01

    Disenchantment with the tort system and negligence standard in the United States is fueling interest in alternate compensation systems for medical injury. One possibility is experimentation with administrative "health courts," through which specialized adjudicators would utilize neutral experts to render compensability determinations. Compensation would be based not on negligence, but rather on a broader avoidable medical injury (avoidability) standard. Although considerable interest in health courts exists, stakeholders frequently express uncertainty about the meaning and operation of an avoidability standard. Three nations-Sweden, Denmark, and New Zealand-have long operated administrative schemes. We conducted interviews with administrators and stakeholders in these systems. Our goal was to garner lessons on how to operate a health court, and specifically, how to develop and apply alternate compensation criteria such as avoidability. This article reports our findings on the origins and operations of the systems, the evolution of their compensation criteria, and how these criteria are actually applied. We found that all three systems had their primary genesis in ensuring compensation for the injured, as opposed to sanctioning providers. All have abandoned the negligence standard. The Nordic systems use an avoidability standard, principally defined as injury that would not occur in the hands of the best practitioner. Their experience demonstrates that this definition is feasible to apply. New Zealand's recent move to a no-fault system sheds light on the benefits and drawbacks of a variety of compensation standards. Key lessons for successfully applying an alternate standard, such as avoidability, include a strict adherence to national precedent, the use of neutral and experienced experts, and a block on routine transfer of information from compensation investigations to disciplinary authorities. Importantly, all three nations are harnessing their systems' power to

  9. Electron microscopic tomography reveals discrete transcleft elements at excitatory and inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    High, Brigit; Cole, Andy A.; Chen, Xiaobing; Reese, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy has revealed an abundance of material in the clefts of synapses in the mammalian brain, and the biochemical and functional characteristics of proteins occupying synaptic clefts are well documented. However, the detailed spatial organization of the proteins in the synaptic clefts remains unclear. Electron microscope tomography provides a way to delineate and map the proteins spanning the synaptic cleft because freeze substitution preserves molecular details with sufficient contrast to visualize individual cleft proteins. Segmentation and rendering of electron dense material connected across the cleft reveals discrete structural elements that are readily classified into five types at excitatory synapses and four types at inhibitory synapses. Some transcleft elements resemble shapes and sizes of known proteins and could represent single dimers traversing the cleft. Some of the types of cleft elements at inhibitory synapses roughly matched the structure and proportional frequency of cleft elements at excitatory synapses, but the patterns of deployments in the cleft are quite different. Transcleft elements at excitatory synapses were often evenly dispersed in clefts of uniform (18 nm) width but some types show preference for the center or edges of the cleft. Transcleft elements at inhibitory synapses typically were confined to a peripheral region of the cleft where it narrowed to only 6 nm wide. Transcleft elements in both excitatory and inhibitory synapses typically avoid places where synaptic vesicles attach to the presynaptic membrane. These results illustrate that elements spanning synaptic clefts at excitatory and inhibitory synapses consist of distinct structures arranged by type in a specific but different manner at excitatory and inhibitory synapses. PMID:26113817

  10. Retention of arsenic and selenium compounds using limestone in a coal gasification flue gas.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Somoano, Mercedes; Martinez-Tarazona, M Rosa

    2004-02-01

    Volatile arsenic and selenium compounds present in coals may cause environmental problems during coal combustion and gasification. A possible way to avoid such problems may be the use of solid sorbents capable of retaining these elements from flue gases in gas cleaning systems. Lime and limestone are materials that are extensively employed for the capture of sulfur during coal processing. Moreover, they have also proven to have good retention characteristics for arsenic and selenium during combustion. The aim of this work was to ascertain whether this sorbent is also useful for retaining arsenic and selenium species in gases produced in coal gasification. The study was carried out in a laboratory-scale reactor in which the sorbent was employed as a fixed bed, using synthetic gas mixtures. In these conditions, retention capacities for arsenic may reach 17 mg g(-1) in a gasification atmosphere free of H2S, whereas the presence of H2S implies a significant decrease in arsenic retention. In the case of selenium, H2S does not influence retention which may reach 65 mg g(-1). Post-retention sorbent characterization, thermal stability, and water solubility tests have shown that chemical reaction is one of the mechanisms responsible for the capture of arsenic and selenium, with Ca(AsO2)2 and CaSe being the main compounds formed.

  11. Safety signals from avoidance learning but not from yoked classical conditioning training pass both summation and retardation tests for inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cándido, Antonio; González, Felisa; de Brugada, Isabel

    2004-05-31

    In one experiment half of the animals were trained to avoid a signaled footshock by jumping (30 or 160 trials), whereas the rest of the animals received the same events as yoked. For all of them the termination of the warning signal and of the shock was followed by a safety signal. Several tests were conducted to assess the ability of the stimuli to suppress licking by measuring the latency in completing 25 consecutive licks in the presence of the stimuli. Fear of the warning signal and inhibitory properties of the safety signal (summation and retardation tests) were measured. The results showed that there were no differences in fear to the warning signal, and that the safety signal behaves as a conditioned inhibitor only for animals trained with a long avoidance procedure, but not in the yoked (classical conditioning) procedure. These results highlight the role played by the avoidance response and its consequences in avoidance learning.

  12. Inhibition of hyaluronan retention by 4-methylumbelliferone suppresses osteosarcoma cells in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arai, E; Nishida, Y; Wasa, J; Urakawa, H; Zhuo, L; Kimata, K; Kozawa, E; Futamura, N; Ishiguro, N

    2011-12-06

    Hyaluronan (HA) plays crucial roles in the tumourigenicity of many types of malignant tumours. 4-Methylumbelliferone (MU) is an inhibitor of HA synthesis. Several studies have shown its inhibitory effects on malignant tumours; however, none have focused on its effects on osteosarcoma. We investigated the effects of MU on HA accumulation and tumourigenicity of highly metastatic murine osteosarcoma cells (LM8) that have HA-rich cell-associated matrix, and human osteosarcoma cell lines (MG-63 and HOS). In vitro, MU inhibited HA retention, thereby reducing the formation of functional cell-associated matrices, and also inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Akt phosphorylation was suppressed by MU (1.0 mM). In vivo, although MU showed only a mild inhibitory effect on the growth of the primary tumour, it markedly inhibited (75% reduction) the development of lung metastasis. Hyaluronan retention in the periphery of the primary tumour was markedly suppressed by MU. These findings suggested that MU suppressed HA retention and cell-associated matrix formation in osteosarcoma cells, resulting in a reduction of tumourigenicity, including lung metastasis. 4-Methylumbelliferone is a promising therapeutic agent targeting both primary tumours and distant metastasis of osteosarcoma, possibly via suppression of HA retention.

  13. Inhibition of hyaluronan retention by 4-methylumbelliferone suppresses osteosarcoma cells in vitro and lung metastasis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arai, E; Nishida, Y; Wasa, J; Urakawa, H; Zhuo, L; Kimata, K; Kozawa, E; Futamura, N; Ishiguro, N

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hyaluronan (HA) plays crucial roles in the tumourigenicity of many types of malignant tumours. 4-Methylumbelliferone (MU) is an inhibitor of HA synthesis. Several studies have shown its inhibitory effects on malignant tumours; however, none have focused on its effects on osteosarcoma. Methods: We investigated the effects of MU on HA accumulation and tumourigenicity of highly metastatic murine osteosarcoma cells (LM8) that have HA-rich cell-associated matrix, and human osteosarcoma cell lines (MG-63 and HOS). Results: In vitro, MU inhibited HA retention, thereby reducing the formation of functional cell-associated matrices, and also inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Akt phosphorylation was suppressed by MU (1.0 m). In vivo, although MU showed only a mild inhibitory effect on the growth of the primary tumour, it markedly inhibited (75% reduction) the development of lung metastasis. Hyaluronan retention in the periphery of the primary tumour was markedly suppressed by MU. Conclusion: These findings suggested that MU suppressed HA retention and cell-associated matrix formation in osteosarcoma cells, resulting in a reduction of tumourigenicity, including lung metastasis. 4-Methylumbelliferone is a promising therapeutic agent targeting both primary tumours and distant metastasis of osteosarcoma, possibly via suppression of HA retention. PMID:22045192

  14. Key conclusions from AVOID Work Stream One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Rachel

    2010-05-01

    AVOID work stream (WS1)one has produced emission scenarios that simulate potential future global emission pathways for greenhouse gases during the 21st century. The study explored the influence of three key features of such pathways: (1) the year in which emissions peak globally, (2) the rate of emission reduction, and (3) the minimum level to which emissions are eventually reduced. It examined the resultant climate change, climate change impacts and economic implications using computer simulations. Avoided impacts, carbon taxes and GDP change increase throughout the 21st century in the models. AVOID-WS1 showed that in the absence of climate policy it is very likely that global mean temperatures would exceed 3 degrees and there are evens chances that the temperature would rise by 4 degrees relative to pre-industrial times. Scenarios that peak emissions in 2016 were more effective at constraining temperatures to below 3 degrees than those that peaked in 2030: one ‘2016' scenario achieved a probability of 45% of avoiding breaching of a 2 degree threshold. Scenarios peaking in 2030 were inconsistent with constraining temperatures to below 2 degrees. Correspondingly, scenarios that peak in 2030 are more effective at avoiding climate impacts than scenarios that peak in 2016, for all sectors that we studied. Hence the date at which emissions peak is more important than the rate of subsequent emissions reduction in determining the avoided impacts. Avoided impacts increase with time, being negligible in the 2030s, significant by the 2050s and large by the 2080s. Finally, the choice of GCM influences the magnitude of the avoided impacts strongly, so that the uncertainties in our estimates of avoided impacts for each scenario are larger than the difference between the scenarios. Our economic analysis is based on models which differ greatly in the assumptions that they make, but generally show that the date at which emissions peak is a stronger driver of induced GDP changes

  15. Rape avoidance behavior among Slovak women.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Pavol

    2013-05-28

    Rape has been a recurrent adaptive problem for many species, including humans. Rape is costly to women in terms of disease transmission, partner abandonment, and unwanted pregnancy (among other costs). Therefore, behavioral strategies which allow women to avoid coercive men may have been favored by selection. In line with this evolutionary reasoning, the current research documented that physically stronger women and those in a committed romantic relationship reported more rape avoidance behavior. In addition, virgin women tended to perform more rape avoidance behavior compared with their non-virgin counterparts. Women with high conception risk perceived themselves as physically stronger, which may protect them against a potential rapist. Fear of unwanted pregnancy from rape decreased as age increased, reflecting higher fertility among younger participants. However, older women reported more rape avoidance behavior, which contradicts evolutionary predictions. The results provide some support for evolutionary hypotheses of rape avoidance behavior which suggest that woman's perception of rape is influenced by parental investment and perceived physical condition.

  16. Obstacle-avoiding router for custom VLSI

    SciTech Connect

    Hamachi, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    Magic's automatic routing system combines the flexibility of hand routing with the speed and quality of automatic channel routers by allowing chip designers to prewire selected nets by hand. The router then works around this previously-placed layout, called obstacles, to automatically wire the remaining nets. This ability to partially hand route an integrated circuit gives designers complete control over critical paths, power and ground routing, and other special nets. At the same time, the router provides a fast way to make the remaining connections in the design. The system's novel features include a fast channel decomposer, an obstacle-avoiding global router, and an obstacle avoiding switchbox router. The router's channel decomposition algorithm relies on a corner stitched data structure to efficiently produce a small number of large channels. The global router considers obstacles during path generation, trading off net length and channel complexity to simplify the subsequent channel routing task. While able to cope with obstacles, Magic's switchbox router is still comparable to the best traditional (non-obstacle-avoiding) channel routers. The router's obstacle-avoidance features rely on two underlying concepts: (1) a preferred direction for crossing an obstacle, and (2) hazards or areas the routing should avoid.

  17. Avoidance of Phycomyces in a controlled environment.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, P W; Matus, I J; Berg, H C

    1987-01-01

    The sporangiophore of the fungus Phycomyces bends away from nearby objects without ever touching them. It has been thought that these objects act as aerodynamic obstacles that damp random winds, thereby generating asymmetric distributions of a growth-promoting gas emitted by the growth zone. In the interest of testing this hypothesis, we studied avoidance in an environmental chamber in which convection was suppressed by a shallow thermal gradient. We also controlled pressure, temperature, and relative humidity of the air, electrostatic charge, and ambient light. A protocol was established that yielded avoidance rates constant from sporangiophore to sporangiophore to within +/- 10%. We found that avoidance occurred at normal rates in the complete absence of random winds. The rates were smaller at 100% than at lower values of relative humidity, but not by much. Remarkably, at a distance as great as 0.5 mm, avoidance from a 30-micron diam glass fiber (aligned parallel to the sporangiophore) was about the same as that from a planar glass sheet. However, the rate for the fiber fell more rapidly with distance. The rate for the sheet remained nearly constant out to approximately 4 mm. We conclude that avoidance depends either on adsorption by the barrier of a growth-inhibiting substance or emission by the barrier of a growth-promoting substance; it cannot occur by passive reflection. Models that can explain these effects are analyzed in the Appendix. PMID:3567313

  18. Harm avoidance and disability in old age.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Buchman, Aron S; Arnold, Steven E; Shah, Raj C; Tang, Yuxiao; Bennett, David A

    2006-01-01

    The relation of personality to disability in old age is not well understood. The authors examined the relation of harm avoidance, a trait indicating a tendency to worry, fear uncertainty, be shy, and tire easily, to disability in a group of 474 older persons without dementia. Participants completed the 35-item Harm Avoidance scale. Disability was assessed with the Rosow-Breslau scale, a self-report measure of physical mobility. Performance-based tests of lower limb functions were also administered from which composite measures of gait, balance, and strength were derived. In a logistic regression model controlled for age, sex, education, and lower limb function, persons with high levels of harm avoidance were nearly three times as likely to report mobility limitations as persons with low levels, and these effects largely reflected fatigability and fear of uncertainty. The association of harm avoidance with disability was not explained or modified by frailty, physical activity, depressive symptoms, neuroticism, extraversion, or cognition. The results suggest that harm avoidance is associated with disability in old age.

  19. Avoidance of hydrolyzed casein by mice

    PubMed Central

    Field, Kristin L.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Mennella, Julie A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    When casein, a milk protein, is hydrolyzed, it renders human foods that contain it (e.g., hypoallergenic infant formula, cheeses) distasteful to many people. This rejection of hydrolyzed casein (HC)-containing foods has recently been found to also occur in a non-human species (deer, Odocoileus spp.). Identifying other animals that avoid HC would facilitate understanding how and why HC-containing food is often rejected. This study determined whether HC-containing food is avoided by Mus musculus and whether consumption patterns were sensitive to testing conditions, specifically food form (powder, pellet or dough) and food access (ad libitum or 1.5 h/day following 6 h of food deprivation). Diets were offered in two-choice tests that paired an HC-containing food with an intact casein-containing alternative at seven protein concentrations (0%–50% w/w). Five experimental groups were tested under different combinations of food form and food access. Three groups (ad lib/powder, ad lib/pellet, and 1.5 h/pellet) avoided the HC diet starting at the 30% protein level. At the 40% and 50% protein levels, all groups showed strong avoidance of HC. Although testing conditions influenced total caloric intake and body weight gain, avoidance of HC at the highest concentrations was robust to the manipulations in experimental conditions. Our study suggests that mice may be a useful model for understanding the mechanisms of HC rejection. PMID:17900635

  20. Bilingualism Influences Inhibitory Control in Auditory Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Henrike K.; Marian, Viorica

    2011-01-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to outperform monolinguals at suppressing task-irrelevant information. The present study aimed to identify how processing linguistic ambiguity during auditory comprehension may be associated with inhibitory control. Monolinguals and bilinguals listened to words in their native language (English) and identified them among…

  1. Neuraminidase inhibitory terpenes from endophytic Cochliobolus sp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gao-Fei; Guo, Zhi-Kai; Wang, Wei; Cui, Jiang-Tao; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Ge, Hui-Ming

    2011-08-01

    The chemical study of endophytic fungus of Cochliobolus led to the isolation of 10 terpenes (1-10), including one new compound named isocochlioquinone B (1). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 5-7 showed significant neuraminidase inhibitory activity with IC(50) values of 0.79-1.75 μM.

  2. Inhibitory neurosteroids and the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Seljeset, Sandra; Laverty, Duncan; Smart, Trevor G

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) are vital proteins that are engaged in regulating neural circuit activity in the central nervous system. Their effectiveness in this task is dependent on the extent of receptor modulation by naturally occurring ligands that are released in the brain. One of the foremost examples of such ligands is the neurosteroids that can either potentiate GABAAR function or cause direct inhibition. To fully understand the underlying mechanisms by which neurosteroids modulate GABAARs, it is necessary to identify their binding sites on the receptors. For potentiating neurosteroids, recent work has made substantive progress in identifying a binding site located in the transmembrane domains of GABAAR α subunits. However, for the inhibitory neurosteroids, several possibilities exist including an ion channel site as well as potential sites in the transmembrane domain. This review systematically analyzes the evidence behind possible binding sites for the inhibitory neurosteroids. We consider the chemical structure-function properties of such inhibitory neurosteroids, their physiological effects on synaptic inhibition, and whether a binding site exists in the GABA ion channel or in other areas of the transmembrane domain. Finally, we discuss how structural homology modeling and Cys-loop receptor homologues may help to locate the inhibitory neurosteroid-binding site on GABAARs.

  3. Inhibitory ability of children with developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaiying; Wu, Hanrong

    2011-02-01

    Inhibitory ability of children with developmental dyscalculia (DD) was investigated to explore the cognitive mechanism underlying DD. According to the definition of developmental dyscalculia, 19 children with DD-only and 10 children with DD&RD (DD combined with reading disability) were selected step by step, children in two control groups were matched with children in case groups by gender and age, and the match ratio was 1:1. Psychological testing software named DMDX was used to measure inhibitory ability of the subjects. The differences of reaction time in number Stroop tasks and differences of accuracy in incongruent condition of color-word Stroop tasks and object inhibition tasks between DD-only children and their controls reached significant levels (P<0.05), and the differences of reaction time in number Stroop tasks between dyscalculic and normal children did not disappear after controlling the non-executive components. The difference of accuracy in color-word incongruent tasks between children with DD&RD and normal children reached significant levels (P<0.05). Children with DD-only confronted with general inhibitory deficits, while children with DD&RD confronted with word inhibitory deficits only.

  4. Retention of long-term interim restorations with sodium fluoride enriched interim cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strash, Carolyn

    Purpose: Interim fixed dental prostheses, or "provisional restorations", are fabricated to restore teeth when definitive prostheses are made indirectly. Patients undergoing extensive prosthodontic treatment frequently require provisionalization for several months or years. The ideal interim cement would retain the restoration for as long as needed and still allow for ease of removal. It would also avoid recurrent caries by preventing demineralization of tooth structure. This study aims to determine if adding sodium fluoride varnish to interim cement may assist in the retention of interim restorations. Materials and methods: stainless steel dies representing a crown preparation were fabricated. Provisional crowns were milled for the dies using CAD/CAM technology. Crowns were provisionally cemented onto the dies using TempBond NE and NexTemp provisional cements as well as a mixture of TempBond NE and Duraphat fluoride varnish. Samples were stored for 24h then tested or thermocycled for 2500 or 5000 cycles before being tested. Retentive strength of each cement was recorded using a universal testing machine. Results: TempBond NE and NexTemp cements performed similarly when tested after 24h. The addition of Duraphat significantly decreased the retention when added to TempBond NE. NexTemp cement had high variability in retention over all tested time periods. Thermocycling for 2500 and 5000 cycles significantly decreased the retention of all cements. Conclusions: The addition of Duraphat fluoride varnish significantly decreased the retention of TempBond NE and is therefore not recommended for clinical use. Thermocycling significantly reduced the retention of TempBond NE and NexTemp. This may suggest that use of these cements for three months, as simulated in this study, is not recommended.

  5. Caffeine enhancement of saccharin but not cyclamate flavor avoidance.

    PubMed

    Mason, J R; Bean, N J

    1987-01-01

    The present experiments were designed to assess whether caffeine, a substance that potentiates human perception of some artificial sweeteners, might also enhance perception of such substances by rats. In Experiment 1, rats were given varied concentrations of saccharin, cyclamate, and caffeine in 2-choice tests. 'Indifference thresholds' for these substances were 3.9 X 10(-4) M, 1 X 10(-3) M, and 1.6 X 10(-7) M, respectively. In Experiment 2, concentrations of saccharin and cyclamate just above and below indifference were used as stimuli in a flavor avoidance learning (FAL) paradigm. 'Suprathreshold' concentrations of saccharin and cyclamate produced reliable FAL while 'subthreshold' concentrations did not. In Experiment 3, rats were exposed to a low concentration of caffeine followed by presentations of subthreshold concentrations of saccharin or cyclamate as stimuli in a FAL paradigm. Saccharin FAL was observed but cyclamate FAL was not, suggesting that caffeine preexposure selectively potentiated detection of saccharin. In Experiment 4, animals were given saccharin or cyclamate with or without prior exposure to caffeine in a FAL paradigm. During subsequent tests, animals were presented with saccharin or cyclamate following exposure to caffeine saccharin or cyclamate mixed with caffeine saccharin or cyclamate alone. Saccharin FAL was observed following caffeine preexposure, but mixing with caffeine had no effect. These findings of selective potentiation are consistent with previous studies of human sensitivity after caffeine preexposure. Moreover, the present results support the notion that inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors are involved in modulating the perceived intensity of some flavors.

  6. Fractal processes in soil water retention

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, S.W.; Wheatcraft, S.W. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors propose a physical conceptual model for soil texture and pore structure that is based on the concept of fractal geometry. The motivation for a fractal model of soil texture is that some particle size distributions in granular soils have already been shown to display self-similar scaling that is typical of fractal objects. Hence it is reasonable to expect that pore size distributions may also display fractal scaling properties. The paradigm that they used for the soil pore size distribution is the Sierpinski carpet, which is a fractal that contains self similar holes (or pores) over a wide range of scales. The authors evaluate the water retention properties of regular and random Sierpinski carpets and relate these properties directly to the Brooks and Corey (or Campbell) empirical water retention model. They relate the water retention curves directly to the fractal dimension of the Sierpinski carpet and show that the fractal dimension strongly controls the water retention properties of the Sierpinski carpet soil. Higher fractal dimensions are shown to mimic clay-type soils, with very slow dewatering characteristics and relatively low fractal dimensions are shown to mimic a sandy soil with relatively rapid dewatering characteristics. Their fractal model of soil water retention removes the empirical fitting parameters from the soil water retention models and provides paramters which are intrinsic to the nature of the fractal porous structure. The relative permeability functions of Burdine and Mualem are also shown to be fractal directly from fractal water retention results.

  7. Clay particle retention in small constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Braskerud, B C

    2003-09-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) can be used to mitigate non-point source pollution from arable fields. Previous investigations have shown that the relative soil particle retention in small CWs increases when hydraulic load increases. This paper investigates why this phenomenon occurs, even though common retention models predict the opposite, by studying clay and silt particle retention in two Norwegian CWs. Retention was measured with water flow proportional sampling systems in the inlet and outlet of the wetlands, and the texture of the suspended solids was analyzed. The surface area of the CWs was small compared to the watershed area (approximately 0.07%), giving high average hydraulic loads (1.1 and 2.0 md(-1)). One of the watersheds included only old arable land, whereas the other included areas with disturbed topsoil after artificial land leveling. Clay particle retention was 57% for the CW in the first watershed, and 22% for the CW in the disturbed watershed. The different behavior of the wetlands could be due to differences in aggregate size and stability of the particles entering the wetlands. Results showed that increased hydraulic loads did affect CW retention negatively. However, as runoff increased, soil particles/aggregates with higher sedimentation velocities entered the CWs (e.g., the clay particles behaved as silt particles). Hence, clay particle settling velocity is not constant as assumed in many prediction models. The net result was increased retention.

  8. Predictors of Calcium Retention in Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kathleen M.; Braun, Michelle; Kern, Mark; Martin, Berdine R.; Navalta, James W.; Sedlock, Darlene A.; McCabe, Linda; McCabe, George P.; Peacock, Munro; Weaver, Connie M.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The relationship between calcium (Ca) intake and Ca retention in adolescent boys was recently reported. Objective: This study evaluated the influence of Ca intake, serum hormone levels, biomarkers of bone metabolism, habitual physical activity, habitual Ca intake, and physical fitness on Ca retention in the same sample. Design: This study was a randomized, cross-over design that consisted of two 3-wk metabolic balance periods. Setting: The study took place on a university campus as a summer camp. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 31 American white boys (13–15 yr) participated in the study. Interventions: Each subject consumed a controlled diet with one of five high-low Ca intake pairs that ranged from 670-2003 mg/d, which was manipulated utilizing a fortified beverage. Main Outcome Measures: Ca retention was determined by Ca intake minus urinary and fecal Ca excretion during each balance period. Results: Ca intake explained 21.7% of the variability in Ca retention, and serum IGF-I concentration explained an additional 11.5%. Other serum hormone levels did not significantly add to the model. Biomarkers of bone metabolism, habitual physical activity, habitual Ca intake, and physical fitness were not significant predictors of Ca retention in adolescent boys. Conclusions: IGF-I, a regulator of growth during puberty, is an important predictor of Ca retention in adolescent boys. However, dietary Ca intake is an even greater predictor of Ca retention during this period of growth. PMID:18840643

  9. The Extracellular Protease Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Is Activated by Inhibitory Avoidance Learning and Required for Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Vanja; Bozdagi, Ozlem; Huntley, George W.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellularly acting proteolytic enzymes with well-recognized roles in plasticity and remodeling of synaptic circuits during brain development and following brain injury. However, it is now becoming increasingly apparent that MMPs also function in normal, nonpathological synaptic plasticity of the…

  10. The Extracellular Protease Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Is Activated by Inhibitory Avoidance Learning and Required for Long-Term Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Vanja; Bozdagi, Ozlem; Huntley, George W.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellularly acting proteolytic enzymes with well-recognized roles in plasticity and remodeling of synaptic circuits during brain development and following brain injury. However, it is now becoming increasingly apparent that MMPs also function in normal, nonpathological synaptic plasticity of the…

  11. Is Avoiding an Aversive Outcome Rewarding? Neural Substrates of Avoidance Learning in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hackjin; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2006-01-01

    Avoidance learning poses a challenge for reinforcement-based theories of instrumental conditioning, because once an aversive outcome is successfully avoided an individual may no longer experience extrinsic reinforcement for their behavior. One possible account for this is to propose that avoiding an aversive outcome is in itself a reward, and thus avoidance behavior is positively reinforced on each trial when the aversive outcome is successfully avoided. In the present study we aimed to test this possibility by determining whether avoidance of an aversive outcome recruits the same neural circuitry as that elicited by a reward itself. We scanned 16 human participants with functional MRI while they performed an instrumental choice task, in which on each trial they chose from one of two actions in order to either win money or else avoid losing money. Neural activity in a region previously implicated in encoding stimulus reward value, the medial orbitofrontal cortex, was found to increase, not only following receipt of reward, but also following successful avoidance of an aversive outcome. This neural signal may itself act as an intrinsic reward, thereby serving to reinforce actions during instrumental avoidance. PMID:16802856

  12. Is avoiding an aversive outcome rewarding? Neural substrates of avoidance learning in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hackjin; Shimojo, Shinsuke; O'Doherty, John P

    2006-07-01

    Avoidance learning poses a challenge for reinforcement-based theories of instrumental conditioning, because once an aversive outcome is successfully avoided an individual may no longer experience extrinsic reinforcement for their behavior. One possible account for this is to propose that avoiding an aversive outcome is in itself a reward, and thus avoidance behavior is positively reinforced on each trial when the aversive outcome is successfully avoided. In the present study we aimed to test this possibility by determining whether avoidance of an aversive outcome recruits the same neural circuitry as that elicited by a reward itself. We scanned 16 human participants with functional MRI while they performed an instrumental choice task, in which on each trial they chose from one of two actions in order to either win money or else avoid losing money. Neural activity in a region previously implicated in encoding stimulus reward value, the medial orbitofrontal cortex, was found to increase, not only following receipt of reward, but also following successful avoidance of an aversive outcome. This neural signal may itself act as an intrinsic reward, thereby serving to reinforce actions during instrumental avoidance.

  13. Chloroplast avoidance movement reduces photodamage in plants.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Oikawa, Kazusato; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Miyao, Mitsue; Wada, Masamitsu

    When plants are exposed to light levels higher than those required for photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are generated in the chloroplasts and cause photodamage. This can occur even under natural growth conditions. To mitigate photodamage, plants have developed several protective mechanisms. One is chloroplast avoidance movement, in which chloroplasts move from the cell surface to the side walls of cells under high light conditions, although experimental support is still awaited. Here, using different classes of mutant defective in chloroplast avoidance movement, we show that these mutants are more susceptible to damage in high light than wild-type plants. Damage of the photosynthetic apparatus and subsequent bleaching of leaf colour and necrosis occur faster under high light conditions in the mutants than in wild-type plants. We conclude that chloroplast avoidance movement actually decreases the amount of light absorption by chloroplasts, and might therefore be important to the survival of plants under natural growth conditions.

  14. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    The use of automotive radar systems are being evaluated for collision avoidance in planetary landers. Our focus is to develop a low-cost, light-weight collision avoidance system that overcomes the drawbacks identified with optical-based systems. We also seek to complement the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology system by providing mission planners an alternative system that can be used on low-cost, small robotic missions and in close approach. Our approach takes advantage of how electromagnetic radiation interacts with solids. As the wavelength increases, the sensitivity of the radiation to isolated solids of a specific particle size decreases. Thus, rocket exhaust-blown dust particles, which have major significance in visible wavelengths, have much less significance at radar wavelengths.

  15. Retention Models on Core-Shell Columns.

    PubMed

    Jandera, Pavel; Hájek, Tomáš; Růžičková, Marie

    2017-07-13

    A thin, active shell layer on core-shell columns provides high efficiency in HPLC at moderately high pressures. We revisited three models of mobile phase effects on retention for core-shell columns in mixed aqueous-organic mobile phases: linear solvent strength and Snyder-Soczewiński two-parameter models and a three-parameter model. For some compounds, two-parameter models show minor deviations from linearity due to neglect of possible minor retention in pure weak solvent, which is compensated for in the three-parameter model, which does not explicitly assume either the adsorption or the partition retention mechanism in normal- or reversed-phase systems. The model retention equation can be formulated as a function of solute retention factors of nonionic compounds in pure organic solvent and in pure water (or aqueous buffer) and of the volume fraction of an either aqueous or organic solvent component in a two-component mobile phase. With core-shell columns, the impervious solid core does not participate in the retention process. Hence, the thermodynamic retention factors, defined as the ratio of the mass of the analyte mass contained in the stationary phase to its mass in the mobile phase in the column, should not include the particle core volume. The values of the thermodynamic factors are lower than the retention factors determined using a convention including the inert core in the stationary phase. However, both conventions produce correct results if consistently used to predict the effects of changing mobile phase composition on retention. We compared three types of core-shell columns with C18-, phenyl-hexyl-, and biphenyl-bonded phases. The core-shell columns with phenyl-hexyl- and biphenyl-bonded ligands provided lower errors in two-parameter model predictions for alkylbenzenes, phenolic acids, and flavonoid compounds in comparison with C18-bonded ligands.

  16. Learning processes underlying avoidance of negative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Marta; Michelmann, Sebastian; Pauli, Paul; Hewig, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Successful avoidance of a threatening event may negatively reinforce the behavior due to activation of brain structures involved in reward processing. Here, we further investigated the learning-related properties of avoidance using feedback-related negativity (FRN). The FRN is modulated by violations of an intended outcome (prediction error, PE), that is, the bigger the difference between intended and actual outcome, the larger the FRN amplitude is. Twenty-eight participants underwent an operant conditioning paradigm, in which a behavior (button press) allowed them to avoid a painful electric shock. During two learning blocks, participants could avoid an electric shock in 80% of the trials by pressing one button (avoidance button), or by not pressing another button (punishment button). After learning, participants underwent two test blocks, which were identical to the learning ones except that no shocks were delivered. Participants pressed the avoidance button more often than the punishment button. Importantly, response frequency increased throughout the learning blocks but it did not decrease during the test blocks, indicating impaired extinction and/or habit formation. In line with a PE account, FRN amplitude to negative feedback after correct responses (i.e., unexpected punishment) was significantly larger than to positive feedback (i.e., expected omission of punishment), and it increased throughout the blocks. Highly anxious individuals showed equal FRN amplitudes to negative and positive feedback, suggesting impaired discrimination. These results confirm the role of negative reinforcement in motivating behavior and learning, and reveal important differences between high and low anxious individuals in the processing of prediction errors.

  17. Do allergic families avoid keeping furry pets?

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, R J; Carlsen, K C L; Granum, B; Carlsen, K-H; Håland, G; Devulapalli, C S; Munthe-Kaas, M C; Mowinckel, P; Løvik, M

    2010-06-01

    Studies addressing the relationship between pet keeping and development of asthma and allergies may be influenced by pet avoidance in families with a history of allergic disease. Following a cohort of 1019 children in Oslo till 10 years of age, we studied the association of pet keeping with socio-economic factors and allergic disease in the family. A family history of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis was not significantly associated with pet ownership at birth or with pet removal by 10 years. Acquiring cats and dogs was less likely if the child had allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, whereas no association was seen with asthma (in any family member). Single parenthood increased the likelihood of acquiring a cat, smoking parents more often had cats or dogs, and having older siblings was associated with keeping dogs and other furry pets. Among 319 families reporting pet avoidance, 70% never had pets, 8% had given up pets, and 22% avoided a particular type of pet only. Twenty-four per cent of the parents failed to retrospectively report pet keeping during the child's first year of life. Overall, allergic rhinitis, but not asthma was associated with actual pet avoidance, whereas the strongest predictors for keeping pets were found to be socio-economic factors. Allergic disease in a child most often does not lead to the removal of the family's furry pet. Pet avoidance is associated with allergic symptoms, but not asthma. Socio-economic factors like parental education, single parenthood and smoking affects the families' decisions on pet keeping, including the type of pets the families will avoid or acquire. The large recall error demonstrated points to the need for prospective data regarding pet keeping.

  18. Telerobotics with whole arm collision avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Strenn, S.

    1993-09-01

    The complexity of teleorbotic operations in a cluttered environment is exacerbated by the need to present collision information to the operator in an understandable fashion. In addition to preventing movements which will cause collisions, a system providing some form of virtual force reflection (VFR) is desirable. With this goal in mind, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a kinematically master/slave system and developed a whole arm collision avoidance system which interacts directly with the telerobotic controller. LLNL has also provided a structure to allow for automated upgrades of workcell models and provide collision avoidance even in a dynamically changing workcell.

  19. Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Chirold

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work towards technology that will result in an autonomous landing on the lunar surface, that will avoid the hazards of lunar landing. In October 2005, the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters assigned the development of new technologies to support the return to the moon. One of these was Autonomous Precision Landing and Hazard Detection and Avoidance Technology now known as ALHAT ALHAT is a lunar descent and landing GNC technology development project led by Johnson Space Center (JSC) with team members from Langley Research Center (LaRC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Draper Laboratories (CSDL) and the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL)

  20. Integrated Collision Avoidance System for Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Collision with ground/water/terrain and midair obstacles is one of the common causes of severe aircraft accidents. The various data from the coremicro AHRS/INS/GPS Integration Unit, terrain data base, and object detection sensors are processed to produce collision warning audio/visual messages and collision detection and avoidance of terrain and obstacles through generation of guidance commands in a closed-loop system. The vision sensors provide more information for the Integrated System, such as, terrain recognition and ranging of terrain and obstacles, which plays an important role to the improvement of the Integrated Collision Avoidance System.

  1. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas; Rourke, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Collision avoidance must be ensured during Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) operations near the space station. The design of the Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) will involve analysis of CTV failure modes during rendezvous and proximity operations as well as analysis of possible problems external to the CTV, but that would require CTV to execute a CAM. In considering the requirements and design of the CAM for the CTV, the CAM design for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a useful reference point from which some lessons can be learned and many CTV design options can be set forth.

  2. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Thomas; Rourke, Kenneth

    Collision avoidance must be ensured during Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) operations near the space station. The design of the Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) will involve analysis of CTV failure modes during rendezvous and proximity operations as well as analysis of possible problems external to the CTV, but that would require CTV to execute a CAM. In considering the requirements and design of the CAM for the CTV, the CAM design for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a useful reference point from which some lessons can be learned and many CTV design options can be set forth.

  3. A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L.; Maslakowski, J.E.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

  4. Collision Avoidance Short Course Part I: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Satellite conjunction assessment is perhaps the fastest-growing area in space situational awareness and protection, with military, civil, and commercial satellite owner operators embracing more and more sophisticated processes to avoid the avoidable namely collisions between high-value space assets and orbital debris. NASA and CNES have collaborated to offer an introductory short course on all the major aspects of the conjunction assessment problem. This half-day course will cover satellite conjunction dynamics and theory, JSpOC conjunction data products, major risk assessment parameters and plots, conjunction remediation decision support, and present and future challenges. This briefing represents the NASA portion of the course.

  5. A strategic approach to employee retention.

    PubMed

    Gering, John; Conner, John

    2002-11-01

    A sound retention strategy should incorporate a business plan, a value proposition, progress measures, and management influences. The business plan will indicate whether a healthcare organization will achieve a return on investment for its effort. A value proposition will showcase an organization's strengths and differentiate it from its competitors. Measuring progress toward meeting retention goals at regular intervals will help keep an organization on track. The best managers require accountability, rewarding employees for their successes and taking corrective action as necessary. Retention rate targets must be at a level that will achieve a competitive advantage in the served market.

  6. Prior Learning of Relevant Nonaversive Information Is a Boundary Condition for Avoidance Memory Reconsolidation in the Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Radiske, Andressa; Gonzalez, Maria Carolina; Conde-Ocazionez, Sergio A; Feitosa, Anatildes; Köhler, Cristiano A; Bevilaqua, Lia R; Cammarota, Martín

    2017-10-04

    Reactivated memories can be modified during reconsolidation, making this process a potential therapeutic target for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a mental illness characterized by the recurring avoidance of situations that evoke trauma-related fears. However, avoidance memory reconsolidation depends on a set of still loosely defined boundary conditions, limiting the translational value of basic research. In particular, the involvement of the hippocampus in fear-motivated avoidance memory reconsolidation remains controversial. Combining behavioral and electrophysiological analyses in male Wistar rats, we found that previous learning of relevant nonaversive information is essential to elicit the participation of the hippocampus in avoidance memory reconsolidation, which is associated with an increase in theta- and gamma-oscillation power and cross-frequency coupling in dorsal CA1 during reactivation of the avoidance response. Our results indicate that the hippocampus is involved in memory reconsolidation only when reactivation results in contradictory representations regarding the consequences of avoidance and suggest that robust nesting of hippocampal theta-gamma rhythms at the time of retrieval is a specific reconsolidation marker.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by maladaptive avoidance responses to stimuli or behaviors that represent or bear resemblance to some aspect of a traumatic experience. Disruption of reconsolidation, the process by which reactivated memories become susceptible to modifications, is a promising approach for treating PTSD patients. However, much of what is known about fear-motivated avoidance memory reconsolidation derives from studies based on fear conditioning instead of avoidance-learning paradigms. Using a step-down inhibitory avoidance task in rats, we found that the hippocampus is involved in memory reconsolidation only when the animals acquired the avoidance response in an

  7. Development of a Measure of Experiential Avoidance: The Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Watson, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) has been conceptualized as the tendency to avoid negative internal experiences and is an important concept in numerous conceptualizations of psychopathology as well as theories of psychotherapy. Existing measures of EA have either been narrowly defined or demonstrated unsatisfactory internal consistency and/or evidence…

  8. A collision avoidance model for two-pedestrian groups: Considering random avoidance patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuping; Cai, Yifei; Ke, Ruimin; Yang, Jiwei

    2017-06-01

    Grouping is a common phenomenon in pedestrian crowds and group modeling is still an open challenging problem. When grouping pedestrians avoid each other, different patterns can be observed. Pedestrians can keep close with group members and avoid other groups in cluster. Also, they can avoid other groups separately. Considering this randomness in avoidance patterns, we propose a collision avoidance model for two-pedestrian groups. In our model, the avoidance model is proposed based on velocity obstacle method at first. Then grouping model is established using Distance constrained line (DCL), by transforming DCL into the framework of velocity obstacle, the avoidance model and grouping model are successfully put into one unified calculation structure. Within this structure, an algorithm is developed to solve the problem when solutions of the two models conflict with each other. Two groups of bidirectional pedestrian experiments are designed to verify the model. The accuracy of avoidance behavior and grouping behavior is validated in the microscopic level, while the lane formation phenomenon and fundamental diagrams is validated in the macroscopic level. The experiments results show our model is convincing and has a good expansibility to describe three or more pedestrian groups.

  9. Development of a Measure of Experiential Avoidance: The Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Watson, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) has been conceptualized as the tendency to avoid negative internal experiences and is an important concept in numerous conceptualizations of psychopathology as well as theories of psychotherapy. Existing measures of EA have either been narrowly defined or demonstrated unsatisfactory internal consistency and/or evidence…

  10. Flight Test Evaluation of AVOID II. (Avionic Observation of Intruder Danger) Collision Avoidance System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-13

    31 General Operation Tests ........................................ 31 Altitude Boundary and Altit~ude Discrimination ...Summary ............................... 57 Altitude Zone Discrimination .................................... 61 AVOID I - AVOID II COMPI.TIBILITY...Figure 16. Commad Display Logic. - 33 - NADC-76141 -60 4 ALTITUDE BOUNDARIES AND ALTITUDE DISCRIMINATION TESTS The main objective of these encounters

  11. The Advocacy or Avoidance of Only Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falbo, Toni

    A brief review of the psychological literature on the characteristics of only children is presented in order to determine if the one-child family should be avoided or advocated. The relevant literature is found to be limited in quantity and conceptualization of the only child. Previous literature is divided into three types of study: those with…

  12. An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-07

    The Utah Wind Working Group (UWWG) believes there are currently opportunities to encourage wind power development in the state by seeking changes to the avoided cost tariff paid to qualifying facilities (QFs). These opportunities have arisen as a result of a recent renegotiation of Pacificorp's Schedule 37 tariff for wind QFs under 3 MW, as well as an ongoing examination of Pacificorp's Schedule 38 tariff for wind QFs larger than 3 MW. It is expected that decisions made regarding Schedule 38 will also impact Schedule 37. Through the Laboratory Technical Assistance Program (Lab TAP), the UWWG has requested (through the Utah Energy Office) that LBNL provide technical assistance in determining whether an alternative method of calculating avoided costs that has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QF payments in Utah, and to discuss the pros and cons of this method relative to the methodology recently adopted under Schedule 37 in Utah. To accomplish this scope of work, I begin by summarizing the current method of calculating avoided costs in Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the ''surrogate avoided resource'' or SAR method). I then compare the two methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Next I present Pacificorp's four main objections to the use of the SAR method, and discuss the reasonableness of each objection. Finally, I conclude with a few other potential considerations that might add value to wind QFs in Utah.

  13. Pathological Demand Avoidance: Exploring the Behavioural Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    "Pathological Demand Avoidance" is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to "socially manipulative" behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand…

  14. Learn to Avoid or Overcome Leadership Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Auria, John

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is increasingly recognized as an important factor in moving schools forward, yet we have been relatively random in how we prepare and support them. Four obstacles often block or diminish their effectiveness. Avoiding or overcoming each of these requires an underlying set of skills and knowledge that we believe can be learned and…

  15. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  16. Digital-Difference Processing For Collision Avoidance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, Paul; Lichtenberg, Chris; Kobayashi, Herbert S.; Cunningham, Allen R.

    1988-01-01

    Digital system for automotive crash avoidance measures and displays difference in frequency between two sinusoidal input signals of slightly different frequencies. Designed for use with Doppler radars. Characterized as digital mixer coupled to frequency counter measuring difference frequency in mixer output. Technique determines target path mathematically. Used for tracking cars, missiles, bullets, baseballs, and other fast-moving objects.

  17. Learn to Avoid or Overcome Leadership Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Auria, John

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is increasingly recognized as an important factor in moving schools forward, yet we have been relatively random in how we prepare and support them. Four obstacles often block or diminish their effectiveness. Avoiding or overcoming each of these requires an underlying set of skills and knowledge that we believe can be learned and…

  18. Perspectives in avoidance-preference bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, C.W.; Taylor, D.H.; Strickler-Shaw, S.

    1996-12-31

    Although behavioral endpoints are used in hazard assessment, establishment of water quality criteria and assessment of a contaminant`s hazard to aquatic life rely primarily on standard acute and chronic toxicity tests. Sublethal effects of pollutants should, however, be of major concern because more organisms experience sublethal rather than acutely or chronically lethal exposures of contaminants. The avoidance-preference approach to behavioral bioassays is very useful in screening pollutants for which the mechanisms of perception or response are largely unknown. The underlying philosophy of these studies is that an animal which perceives a chemical can be attracted or repulsed by it. No response is frequently assumed to indicate lack of perception. All three responses have broad ecological implications. The authors discuss the conditions required for performing avoidance-preference bioassays, as well as their sensitivities, advantages, and limitations. In this regard, a comparative approach is used in examining the results of avoidance-preference bioassays with zebrafish in two different apparatuses. Finally, they compare the results of avoidance-preference studies with other measures of the behavioral toxicity of lead to tadpoles.

  19. Specific Language Impairment at Adolescence: Avoiding Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuller, Laurice; Henry, Celia; Sizaret, Eva; Barthez, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study explores complex language in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI) with the aim of finding out how aspects of language characteristic of typical syntactic development after childhood fare and, in particular, whether there is evidence that individuals with SLI avoid using structures whose syntactic derivation involves…

  20. Avoiding the claim of patient abandonment.

    PubMed

    Thieman, S

    1996-10-01

    Because of the fiduciary nature of the relationship, a physician cannot precipitously "call it quits" when the physician-patient relationship becomes untenable. However, termination of the relationship with adequate notice, clear communication, documentation and attention to the patient's continuing needs can successfully avoid any liability for patient abandonment.

  1. Disgust as a Disease-Avoidance Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaten, Megan; Stevenson, Richard J.; Case, Trevor I.

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers have claimed that the emotion of disgust functions to protect us from disease. Although there have been several discussions of this hypothesis, none have yet reviewed the evidence in its entirety. The authors derive 14 hypotheses from a disease-avoidance account and evaluate the evidence for each, drawing upon research on pathogen…

  2. 47 CFR 74.604 - Interference avoidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Stations § 74.604 Interference avoidance. (a) (b) Where two or more licensees are assigned a common channel..., including time sharing arrangements, to assure an equitable distribution of available frequencies. (c) For those interference disputes brought to the Commission for resolution, TV broadcast auxiliary...

  3. Freeze tolerance and avoidance in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cold acclimation is a multigenic, quantitative trait that involves biochemical and structural changes that effect the physiology of a plant. Mechanisms associated with freeze tolerance or freeze avoidance develop and are lost on an annual cycle. When conducting studies to characterize and determin...

  4. Proactive strategies to avoid infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Richard J; Case, Trevor I; Oaten, Megan J

    2011-12-12

    Infectious disease exerts a large selective pressure on all organisms. One response to this has been for animals to evolve energetically costly immune systems to counter infection, while another--the focus of this theme issue--has been the evolution of proactive strategies primarily to avoid infection. These strategies can be grouped into three types, all of which demonstrate varying levels of interaction with the immune system. The first concerns maternal strategies that function to promote the immunocompetence of their offspring. The second type of strategy influences mate selection, guiding the selection of a healthy mate and one who differs maximally from the self in their complement of antigen-coding genes. The third strategy involves two classes of behaviour. One relates to the capacity of the organisms to learn associations between cues indicative of pathogen threat and immune responses. The other relates to prevention and even treatment of infection through behaviours such as avoidance, grooming, quarantine, medicine and care of the sick. In humans, disease avoidance is based upon cognition and especially the emotion of disgust. Human disease avoidance is not without its costs. There is a propensity to reject healthy individuals who just appear sick--stigmatization--and the system may malfunction, resulting in various forms of psychopathology. Pathogen threat also appears to have been a highly significant and unrecognized force in shaping human culture so as to minimize infection threats. This cultural shaping process--moralization--can be co-opted to promote human health.

  5. Social Work Education and Avoidable Ignorance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    The quality of professional education affects the quality of services offered to clients. Examples of avoidable ignorance that dilute the quality of education social workers receive are suggested, indicating that we have not been honest and energetic brokers of knowledge and ignorance. Related reasons are suggested, including a reluctance to take…

  6. Organising European technical documentation to avoid duplication.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The development of comprehensive accurate and well-organised technical documentation that demonstrates compliance with regulatory requirements is a resource-intensive, but critically important activity for medical device manufacturers. This article discusses guidance documents and method of organising technical documentation that may help avoid costly and time-consuming duplication.

  7. Avoiding rejections by European ethics committees.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2003-06-01

    The Competent Authority has been notified. The clinical investigator is anxious to begin. Just when the process of conducting a clinical investigation is proceeding as planned, the ethics committee issues an unfavourable opinion. This article discusses the actions that should be taken to avoid this occurrence and how to meet other requirements related to ethics committees.

  8. Teaching Preschool Children to Avoid Poison Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancho, Kelly A.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rhoades, Melissa M.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of group safety training and in situ feedback and response interruption to teach preschool children to avoid consuming potentially hazardous substances. Three children ingested ambiguous substances during a baited baseline assessment condition and continued to ingest these substances following group safety training.…

  9. Procedural Variation in Behavioral Avoidance Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Douglas A.; Nietzel, Michael T.

    1973-01-01

    The data on approach to snakes provides srong support for the contention that the behavorial avoidance test is not immune to bias introduced by the operation of situational variables that have usually been allowed to vary in uncontrolled fashion in psychotherapy analogue research. Behavior of test subjects can be influenced not only in terms of…

  10. Metacognitive evaluation in the avoidance of demand.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Timothy L; Lutes, David J C; Risko, Evan F

    2016-09-01

    In the current set of experiments our goal was to test the hypothesis that individuals avoid courses of action based on a kind of metacognitive evaluation of demand in a Demand Selection Task (DST). Individuals in Experiment 1 completed a DST utilizing visual stimuli known to yield a dissociation between performance and perceived demand. Patterns of demand avoidance followed that of perceived demand. Experiment 2 provided a replication of the aforementioned results, in addition to demonstrating a second dissociation between a peripheral physiological measure of demand (i.e., blink rates) and demand avoidance. Experiment 3 directly tested the assumption that individuals make use of a general metacognitive evaluation of task demand during selections. A DST was utilized in a forced-choice paradigm that required individuals to either select the most effortful, time demanding, or least accurate of 2 choices. Patterns of selections were similar across all rating dimensions, lending credit to this notion. Findings are discussed within a metacognitive framework of demand avoidance and contrasted to current theories. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Pathological Demand Avoidance: Exploring the Behavioural Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    "Pathological Demand Avoidance" is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to "socially manipulative" behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand…

  12. Social Work Education and Avoidable Ignorance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    The quality of professional education affects the quality of services offered to clients. Examples of avoidable ignorance that dilute the quality of education social workers receive are suggested, indicating that we have not been honest and energetic brokers of knowledge and ignorance. Related reasons are suggested, including a reluctance to take…

  13. Specific Language Impairment at Adolescence: Avoiding Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuller, Laurice; Henry, Celia; Sizaret, Eva; Barthez, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study explores complex language in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI) with the aim of finding out how aspects of language characteristic of typical syntactic development after childhood fare and, in particular, whether there is evidence that individuals with SLI avoid using structures whose syntactic derivation involves…

  14. Pathogen evolution under host avoidance plasticity.

    PubMed

    McLeod, David V; Day, Troy

    2015-09-07

    Host resistance consists of defences that limit pathogen burden, and can be classified as either adaptations targeting recovery from infection or those focused upon infection avoidance. Conventional theory treats avoidance as a fixed strategy which does not vary from one interaction to the next. However, there is increasing empirical evidence that many avoidance strategies are triggered by external stimuli, and thus should be treated as phenotypically plastic responses. Here, we consider the implications of avoidance plasticity for host-pathogen coevolution. We uncover a number of predictions challenging current theory. First, in the absence of pathogen trade-offs, plasticity can restrain pathogen evolution; moreover, the pathogen exploits conditions in which the host would otherwise invest less in resistance, causing resistance escalation. Second, when transmission trades off with pathogen-induced mortality, plasticity encourages avirulence, resulting in a superior fitness outcome for both host and pathogen. Third, plasticity ensures the sterilizing effect of pathogens has consequences for pathogen evolution. When pathogens castrate hosts, selection forces them to minimize mortality virulence; moreover, when transmission trades off with sterility alone, resistance plasticity is sufficient to prevent pathogens from evolving to fully castrate. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Complications to Avoid with Pre-Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Complications to Avoid with Pre-diabetes Updated:Nov 19,2015 If I ignore ... all. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? ...

  16. Avoiding Mathematics Trauma: Alternative Teaching Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ufuktepe, Unal; Ozel, Claire Thomas

    Children in primary education often encounter mathematics having picked up a general fear of mathematics from the society around them. This results in lack of confidence, avoidance of non-standard thought processes, weakness in problem solving strategies, and other negative consequences. This study offers an alternative approach: presenting…

  17. Wake Vortex Avoidance System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Knight, Howard K. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A wake vortex avoidance system includes a microphone array configured to detect low frequency sounds. A signal processor determines a geometric mean coherence based on the detected low frequency sounds. A display displays wake vortices based on the determined geometric mean coherence.

  18. Taking a Holistic Approach to Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how, at the University of Kansas, many students of color are excelling at a rate that has outpaced their peers. Campus officials credit the HAWK Link program and its comprehensive approach to retention. (EV)

  19. 45 CFR 1309.41 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAM HEAD START FACILITIES PURCHASE, MAJOR RENOVATION AND CONSTRUCTION Other Administrative Provisions § 1309.41 Record retention. All records pertinent to the acquisition or major renovation of a facility...

  20. Escitalopram-associated acute urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Dominick; Garrett, Kathleen; Harrison, Marissa

    2013-10-01

    New-onset urinary retention can typically be explained by the use of the routine normally suspected medications (e.g., anticholinergics, antihistamines). However, selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors are not typically presumed as the cause of acute urinary retention (AUR). The following case describes the introduction of escitalopram in a patient and the subsequent development of AUR. Medical causes of urinary retention had been ruled out, and ipratropium was initially suspected to be the cause of urinary difficulties and was discontinued. However, the retention persisted four days after suspending the ipratropium. Normal micturition resumed only after stopping the escitalopram without further need for catheterization. Escitalopram may cause rare cases of AUR and may often times be overlooked possibly because of the paucity of reporting.

  1. Taking a Holistic Approach to Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how, at the University of Kansas, many students of color are excelling at a rate that has outpaced their peers. Campus officials credit the HAWK Link program and its comprehensive approach to retention. (EV)

  2. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  3. [Avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2006-04-01

    To minimize the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), we have routinely adopted aortic root enlargement to avoid PPM for patients with small aortic annulus. The aim of this study was to review our strategy of avoiding PPM. The Carpentier-Edwards Perimount (CEP) valves were implanted in 53 patients who were mostly aged over 65 and the St. Jude Medical (SJM) mechanical valves were used in 128 patients aged under 65. A standard 21-mm SJM valve was used in only 3 patients and no 19-mm valves were employed. However, 19-mm CEP valves were used in 12 patients with a small body surface area (1.43 +/- 0.14 m2). Of these, 26 patients (14.4%) who had a small aortic annulus and 24 patients aged under 65 underwent aortic root enlargement. No patient receiving an SJM valve had an projected indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) < or = 0.85 cm2/m2 because of performing aortic valve replacement (AVR) with annular enlargement and only 2 (3.8%) out of 53 patients receiving CEP valves developed PPM. Consequently, the prevalence of PPM was 1.1% in this series. The prevalence of PPM was low in patients over 65 years old with a relatively small body size who received bioprosthetic valves. A pericardial bioprosthesis was considered to be an appropriate valve in older population with regard to avoiding PPM. In patients under 65 years old with a small annulus, the first choice for avoiding PPM is aortic annular enlargement, which may be avoided by high performance mechanical valves with larger EOA.

  4. Investigating Navy Officer Retention Using Data Farming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    computers to run the designed experiment. The SEED Center for Data Farming is an organization within the Naval Postgraduate School that promotes...OFFICER RETENTION USING DATA FARMING by Aurel N. DeHollan September 2015 Thesis Advisor: Samuel E. Buttrey Second Reader: Thomas W...COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INVESTIGATING NAVY OFFICER RETENTION USING DATA FARMING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) DeHollan

  5. Magnetic denture retention systems: inexpensive and efficient.

    PubMed

    Gillings, B R

    1984-09-01

    A magnetic retention system has been used in more than 6000 complete and partial overdentures, sectional dentures and implant overdentures, with excellent clinical results and patient acceptability. For the overdenture application, decoronated, root-treated teeth are fitted with preformed or cast magnetisable alloy root elements, or 'keepers'. Following conventional denture construction, paired cobalt/samarium magnets in a special configuration are cured into the denture base so that with the denture inserted, the magnets grip the root elements with a retentive force of approximately 300 g per root. The paired magnet arrangement eliminates any external magnetic field and doubles the available retention. Magnetic retention has few of the problems encountered with other retention devices. It offers simplicity, low cost, self-adjustment, inherent stress-breaking, automatic repositioning after denture displacement, comparative freedom of lateral denture movement, reduces trauma to retained roots and eliminates the need for adjustment in service. For the sectional denture application, undesirable undercuts on the abutment teeth are used to provide passive, positive retention. The separate buccal and lingual sections are joined together by parallel pins fitting into matching tubes, assembly being maintained by magnetic attraction between a retention element in one section and a keeper in the other. Insertion and removal are more difficult than with a conventional denture but soft tissue coverage is minimal. There are no visible retainer arms and food traps are eliminated. Abutment tooth preparation is negligible, the laboratory procedures simple, and the treatment inexpensive and reversible. A clinical trial of magnetic overdenture retention in conjunction with osseointegrated titanium implants is now in progress. After 21 months acceptable clinical results have been obtained. An improved implant with an alumina core and a sintered hydroxyapatite coating is at present

  6. Quantitative structure-(chromatographic) retention relationships.

    PubMed

    Héberger, Károly

    2007-07-27

    Since the pioneering works of Kaliszan (R. Kaliszan, Quantitative Structure-Chromatographic Retention Relationships, Wiley, New York, 1987; and R. Kaliszan, Structure and Retention in Chromatography. A Chemometric Approach, Harwood Academic, Amsterdam, 1997) no comprehensive summary is available in the field. Present review covers the period of 1996-August 2006. The sources are grouped according to the special properties of kinds of chromatography: Quantitative structure-retention relationship in gas chromatography, in planar chromatography, in column liquid chromatography, in micellar liquid chromatography, affinity chromatography and quantitative structure enantioselective retention relationships. General tendencies, misleading practice and conclusions, validation of the models, suggestions for future works are summarized for each sub-field. Some straightforward applications are emphasized but standard ones. The sources and the model compounds, descriptors, predicted retention data, modeling methods and indicators of their performance, validation of models, and stationary phases are collected in the tables. Some important conclusions are: Not all physicochemical descriptors correlate with the retention data strongly; the heat of formation is not related to the chromatographic retention. It is not appropriate to give the errors of Kovats indices in percentages. The apparently low values (1-3%) can disorient the reviewers and readers. Contemporary mean interlaboratory reproducibility of Kovats indices are about 5-10 i.u. for standard non polar phases and 10-25 i.u. for standard polar phases. The predictive performance of QSRR models deteriorates as the polarity of GC stationary phase increases. The correlation coefficient alone is not a particularly good indicator for the model performance. Residuals are more useful than plots of measured and calculated values. There is no need to give the retention data in a form of an equation if the numbers of compounds are

  7. A unified framework for inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Yuko; Herd, Seth A; Chatham, Christopher H; Depue, Brendan E; Banich, Marie T; O'Reilly, Randall C

    2011-10-01

    Inhibiting unwanted thoughts, actions and emotions figures centrally in daily life, and the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is widely viewed as a source of this inhibitory control. We argue that the function of the PFC is best understood in terms of representing and actively maintaining abstract information, such as goals, which produces two types of inhibitory effects on other brain regions. Inhibition of some subcortical regions takes a directed global form, with prefrontal regions providing contextual information relevant to when to inhibit all processing in a region. Inhibition within neocortical (and some subcortical) regions takes an indirect competitive form, with prefrontal regions providing excitation of goal-relevant options. These distinctions are crucial for understanding the mechanisms of inhibition and how they can be impaired or improved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A unified framework for inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Munakata, Yuko; Herd, Seth A.; Chatham, Christopher H.; Depue, Brendan E.; Banich, Marie T.; O’Reilly, Randall C.

    2011-01-01

    Inhibiting unwanted thoughts, actions and emotions figures centrally in daily life, and the prefrontal cortex is widely viewed as a source of this inhibitory control. We argue that the function of the prefrontal cortex is best understood in terms of representing and actively maintaining abstract information such as goals, which produces two types of inhibitory effects on other brain regions. Inhibition of some subcortical regions takes a directed, global form, with prefrontal regions providing contextual information relevant to when to inhibit all processing in a region. Inhibition within neocortical (and some subcortical) regions takes an indirect, competitive form, with prefrontal regions providing excitation of goal-relevant options. These distinctions are critical for understanding the mechanisms of inhibition and how they can be impaired or improved. PMID:21889391

  9. Interactions between Autophagy and Inhibitory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tian-tian; Li, Wei-Min; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a degradative pathway that plays an essential role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Most early studies of autophagy focused on its involvement in age-associated degeneration and nutrient deprivation. However, the immunological functions of autophagy have become more widely studied in recent years. Autophagy has been shown to be an intrinsic cellular defense mechanism in the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines belong to a broad and loose category of proteins and are crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. Inhibitory cytokines have evolved to permit tolerance to self while also contributing to the eradication of invading pathogens. Interactions between inhibitory cytokines and autophagy have recently been reported, revealing a novel mechanism by which autophagy controls the immune response. In this review, we discuss interactions between autophagy and the regulatory cytokines IL-10, transforming growth factor-β, and IL-27. We also mention possible interactions between two newly discovered cytokines, IL-35 and IL-37, and autophagy. PMID:27313501

  10. Circadian Plasticity of Mammalian Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons participate in all neuronal circuits in the mammalian brain, including the circadian clock system, and are indispensable for their effective function. Although the clock neurons have different molecular and electrical properties, their main function is the generation of circadian oscillations. Here we review the circadian plasticity of GABAergic interneurons in several areas of the mammalian brain, suprachiasmatic nucleus, neocortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, cerebellum, striatum, and in the retina. PMID:28367335

  11. Two networks of electrically coupled inhibitory neurons in neocortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Jay R.; Beierlein, Michael; Connors, Barry W.

    1999-11-01

    Inhibitory interneurons are critical to sensory transformations, plasticity and synchronous activity in the neocortex. There are many types of inhibitory neurons, but their synaptic organization is poorly understood. Here we describe two functionally distinct inhibitory networks comprising either fast-spiking (FS) or low-threshold spiking (LTS) neurons. Paired-cell recordings showed that inhibitory neurons of the same type were strongly interconnected by electrical synapses, but electrical synapses between different inhibitory cell types were rare. The electrical synapses were strong enough to synchronize spikes in coupled interneurons. Inhibitory chemical synapses were also common between FS cells, and between FS and LTS cells, but LTS cells rarely inhibited one another. Thalamocortical synapses, which convey sensory information to the cortex, specifically and strongly excited only the FS cell network. The electrical and chemical synaptic connections of different types of inhibitory neurons are specific, and may allow each inhibitory network to function independently.

  12. Dysfunctional inhibitory control and impulsivity in Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Park, Su Mi; Roh, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Jun-Young; Park, Chan-Bin; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Gwak, Ah Reum; Jung, Hee Yeon

    2014-02-28

    The purpose of this study was to explore a psychological profile of Internet addiction (IA) considering impulsivity as a key personality trait and as a key component of neuropsychological functioning. Twenty three subjects with IA (Young's Internet Addiction Test scores=70 or more) and 24 sex-, age-, and intelligence-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Participants filled out a questionnaire about trait impulsivity, the Trait Characteristic Inventory, depression, and anxiety. Next, we administered traditional neuropsychological tests including the Stroop et al. and computerized neuropsychological tests using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. The IA group exhibited more trait impulsivity than the healthy control group. They also scored higher for novelty seeking and harm avoidance. The IA group performed more poorly than the healthy control group in a computerized stop signal test, a test for inhibitory function and impulsivity; no group differences appeared for other neuropsychological tests. The IA group also scored higher for depression and anxiety, and lower for self-directedness and cooperativeness. In conclusion, individuals with IA exhibited impulsivity as a core personality trait and in their neuropsychological functioning.

  13. Proactive inhibitory control: A general biasing account☆

    PubMed Central

    Elchlepp, Heike; Lavric, Aureliu; Chambers, Christopher D.; Verbruggen, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Flexible behavior requires a control system that can inhibit actions in response to changes in the environment. Recent studies suggest that people proactively adjust response parameters in anticipation of a stop signal. In three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that proactive inhibitory control involves adjusting both attentional and response settings, and we explored the relationship with other forms of proactive and anticipatory control. Subjects responded to the color of a stimulus. On some trials, an extra signal occurred. The response to this signal depended on the task context subjects were in: in the ‘ignore’ context, they ignored it; in the ‘stop’ context, they had to withhold their response; and in the ‘double-response’ context, they had to execute a secondary response. An analysis of event-related brain potentials for no-signal trials in the stop context revealed that proactive inhibitory control works by biasing the settings of lower-level systems that are involved in stimulus detection, action selection, and action execution. Furthermore, subjects made similar adjustments in the double-response and stop-signal contexts, indicating an overlap between various forms of proactive action control. The results of Experiment 1 also suggest an overlap between proactive inhibitory control and preparatory control in task-switching studies: both require reconfiguration of task-set parameters to bias or alter subordinate processes. We conclude that much of the top-down control in response inhibition tasks takes place before the inhibition signal is presented. PMID:26859519

  14. Development of Inhibitory Timescales in Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Alex D.

    2011-01-01

    The time course of inhibition plays an important role in cortical sensitivity, tuning, and temporal response properties. We investigated the development of L2/3 inhibitory circuitry between fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and pyramidal cells (PCs) in auditory thalamocortical slices from mice between postnatal day 10 (P10) and P29. We found that the maturation of the intrinsic and synaptic properties of both FS cells and their connected PCs influence the timescales of inhibition. FS cell firing rates increased with age owing to decreased membrane time constants, shorter afterhyperpolarizations, and narrower action potentials. Between FS–PC pairs, excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) changed with age. The latencies, rise, and peak times of the IPSPs, as well as the decay constants of both EPSPs and IPSPs decreased between P10 and P29. In addition, decreases in short-term depression at excitatory PC–FS synapses resulted in more sustained synaptic responses during repetitive stimulation. Finally, we show that during early development, the temporal properties that influence the recruitment of inhibition lag those of excitation. Taken together, our results suggest that the changes in the timescales of inhibitory recruitment coincide with the development of the tuning and temporal response properties of auditory cortical networks. PMID:21068186

  15. Proactive inhibitory control: A general biasing account.

    PubMed

    Elchlepp, Heike; Lavric, Aureliu; Chambers, Christopher D; Verbruggen, Frederick

    2016-05-01

    Flexible behavior requires a control system that can inhibit actions in response to changes in the environment. Recent studies suggest that people proactively adjust response parameters in anticipation of a stop signal. In three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that proactive inhibitory control involves adjusting both attentional and response settings, and we explored the relationship with other forms of proactive and anticipatory control. Subjects responded to the color of a stimulus. On some trials, an extra signal occurred. The response to this signal depended on the task context subjects were in: in the 'ignore' context, they ignored it; in the 'stop' context, they had to withhold their response; and in the 'double-response' context, they had to execute a secondary response. An analysis of event-related brain potentials for no-signal trials in the stop context revealed that proactive inhibitory control works by biasing the settings of lower-level systems that are involved in stimulus detection, action selection, and action execution. Furthermore, subjects made similar adjustments in the double-response and stop-signal contexts, indicating an overlap between various forms of proactive action control. The results of Experiment 1 also suggest an overlap between proactive inhibitory control and preparatory control in task-switching studies: both require reconfiguration of task-set parameters to bias or alter subordinate processes. We conclude that much of the top-down control in response inhibition tasks takes place before the inhibition signal is presented.

  16. Proactive inhibitory control varies with task context.

    PubMed

    Wardak, Claire; Ramanoël, Stephen; Guipponi, Olivier; Boulinguez, Philippe; Ben Hamed, Suliann

    2012-12-01

    The goal of executive control is to adjust our behaviour to the environment. It involves not only the continuous planning and adaptation of actions but also the inhibition of inappropriate movements. Recently, a proactive form of inhibitory control has been shown, demonstrating that actions can be withheld, in an uncertain environment, thanks to the proactive locking of the mechanism by which motor commands are triggered (e.g. while waiting at traffic lights in a dense pedestrian zone, one will refrain in anticipation of a brisk acceleration when the green light comes on). However, little is known about this executive function and it remains unclear whether the overall amount of inhibitory control can be modulated as a function of the context. Here, we show that the level of this control varies parametrically as a function of the exogenous and endogenous factors setting the task context. We also show that the level of implemented proactive inhibitory control is dynamically readjusted to match the implicit temporal structure of the environment. These observations are discussed in relation to possible underlying functional substrates and related neurological and psychiatric pathologies.

  17. Inhibitory mechanisms of glabridin on tyrosinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianmin; Yu, Xiaojing; Huang, Yufeng

    2016-11-01

    Tyrosinase is an oxidase that is the rate-limiting enzyme for controlling the production of melanin in the human body. Overproduction of melanin could lead to a variety of skin disorders. Glabridin, an isoflavan, isolated from the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra Linn, has exhibited several pharmacological activities, including excellent inhibitory effects on tyrosinase. In this paper, the inhibitory kinetics of glabridin on tyrosinase and their binding mechanisms were determined using spectroscopic, zebrafish model and molecular docking techniques. The results indicate that glabridin reversibly inhibits tyrosinase in a noncompetitive manner through a multiphase kinetic process with the IC50 of 0.43 μmol/L. It has been shown that glabridin had a strong ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of tyrosinase mainly through a static quenching procedure, suggesting a stable glabridin-tyrosinase complex may be generated. The results of molecular docking suggest that glabridin did not directly bind to the active site of tyrosinase. Moreover, according to the results of zebrafish model system, glabridin shows no effects on melanin synthesis in zebrafish but presents toxicity to zebrafish embryo. The possible inhibitory mechanisms, which will help to design and search for tyrosinase inhibitors especially for glabridin analogues, were proposed.

  18. GEO Collision Avoidance using a Service Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M.; Concha, M.

    2013-09-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is defined as the knowledge and characterization of all aspects of space. SSA is now a fundamental and critical component of space operations. The increased dependence on our space assets has in turn lead to a greater need for accurate, near real-time knowledge of all space activities. Key areas of SSA include improved tracking of small objects, determining the intent of maneuvering spacecraft, identifying all potential high risk conjunction events, and leveraging non-traditional sensors in support of the SSA mission. As the size of the space object population grows, the number of collision avoidance maneuvers grows. Moreover, as the SSA mission evolves to near real-time assessment and analysis, the need for new, more sophisticated collision avoidance methods are required. This paper demonstrates the utility of using a service vehicle to perform collision avoidance maneuver for GEO satellites. We present the planning and execution details required to successfully execute a maneuver; given the traditional conjunction analysis timelines. Various operational constraints and scenarios are considered as part of the demonstration. Development of the collision avoidance strategy is created using SpaceNav's collision risk management tool suite. This study aims to determine the agility required of any proposed servicing capability to provide collision avoidance within traditional conjunction analysis and collision avoidance operations timelines. Key trades and analysis items are given to be: 1. How do we fuse the spacecraft state data with the tracking data collected from the proximity sensor that resides on the servicing spacecraft? 2. How do we deal with the possibility that the collision threat for the event may change as the time to close approach is reduced? 3. Perform trade space of maneuver/thrust time versus achievable change in the spacecraft's orbit. 4. Perform trade space of proximity of service vehicle to spacecraft versus time

  19. Tomographic patient registration and conformal avoidance tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, Jennifer Stacy

    Development of tomotherapy has led to the emergence of several processes, providing the basis for many unique investigative opportunities. These processes include setup verification, tomographic verification, megavoltage dose reconstruction, and conformal avoidance tomotherapy. Setup verification and conformal avoidance tomotherapy, in particular, are two closely intertwined matters. In order to avoid critical structures located within or adjacent to indistinct tumor regions, accurate patient positioning from fraction to fraction must be ensured. With tomographic patient registration, a higher level of assurance is offered than with traditional positioning methods. Translational and rotational offsets are calculated directly from projection data using cross- correlation or fast Fourier transforms. Experiments assessing the algorithm's ability to calculate individual offsets were conducted using the University of Wisconsin's Tomotherapy Benchtop. These experiments indicate statistical errors within +/-1 mm for offsets up to approximately 20 mm, with maximum offset errors of about +/-2 mm for displacements up to 35 mm. The angular offset component is within +/-2°. To evaluate the registration process as a whole, experimental results from a few multi-parameter examples are also analyzed. With the development of tomographic patient registration in projection space, efforts to promote further sparing of critical structures are justified. Conformal avoidance tomotherapy has as its objective to treat an indistinct tumor region while conformally avoiding any normal critical structures in that region. To demonstrate the advantages of conformal avoidance tomotherapy, conventional and tomotherapy treatments are contrasted for both nasopharyngeal and breast carcinoma cases. For initial research efforts, computed tomography data sets of a human male and female were obtained via the ``Visible Human Project''. Since these data sets are on the order of hundreds of megabytes, both

  20. Diabetes-related avoidable hospitalizations in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kornelius, Edy; Huang, Chien-Ning; Yang, Yi-Sun; Lu, Ying-Li; Peng, Chiung-Huei; Chiou, Jeng-Yuan

    2014-12-01

    An avoidable hospitalization (AH) is a condition that could have been prevented through effective treatment in outpatient care. Diabetes is often referred to as an ambulatory care-sensitive condition, and its associated hospitalizations are often referred to as avoidable hospitalizations. There are limited data on avoidable hospitalizations for individuals with diabetes in Taiwan. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) dataset to obtain diabetes-related avoidable hospitalizations for subjects aged above 12 years. We included data from 20,826 subjects who had completed the interview between 2004 and 2005. Data were collected from a total of 15,574 people, who had agreed to link their health information to the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, including basic demographic variables, inpatient or outpatient medical events, admission date, discharge date, and diagnosis. The 1005 individuals who self-reported having diabetes or had at least 1 hospitalization or 2 physician service claims for diabetes mellitus with an ICD-9 diagnosis of 250 were included in the analysis. We divided those with diagnosis of diabetes into two groups: never hospitalized and hospitalized. The never hospitalized group served as the control group. We further identified hospitalized subjects with long-term complications due to diabetes (PQI-3) that included ICD-CM codes 250.4-250.9. The mean ages of patients with diabetes-related long-term complications in the hospitalized and never hospitalized groups were 65 years and 58 years, respectively (p-value<0.01). More than half (52%) of the patients with diabetes-related long-term complications had a body mass index (BMI) lower than 24. The hospitalized group also had lower educational status compared with that of patients in the never hospitalized group (equal to or lower than elementary school, 63% vs. 50%; junior high school, 23% vs. 14%; equal or higher than senior high school, 14% vs. 36%). Furthermore, hospitalized