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Sample records for inhibits beta-catenin binding

  1. Inhibition of {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-06-17

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of {beta}-catenin distribution and of nuclear {beta}-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The {beta}-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of {beta}-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting {beta}-catenin/Tcf complex formation.

  2. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2012-11-16

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of {beta}-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/{beta}-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between {beta}-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the {beta}-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/{beta}-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  3. Jade-1 inhibits Wnt signalling by ubiquitylating beta-catenin and mediates Wnt pathway inhibition by pVHL.

    PubMed

    Chitalia, Vipul C; Foy, Rebecca L; Bachschmid, Markus M; Zeng, Liling; Panchenko, Maria V; Zhou, Mina I; Bharti, Ajit; Seldin, David C; Lecker, Stewart H; Dominguez, Isabel; Cohen, Herbert T

    2008-10-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau protein pVHL suppresses renal tumorigenesis in part by promoting the degradation of hypoxia-inducible HIF-alpha transcription factors; additional mechanisms have been proposed. pVHL also stabilizes the plant homeodomain protein Jade-1, which is a candidate renal tumour suppressor that may correlate with renal cancer risk. Here we show that Jade-1 binds the oncoprotein beta-catenin in Wnt-responsive fashion. Moreover, Jade-1 destabilizes wild-type beta-catenin but not a cancer-causing form of beta-catenin. Whereas the well-established beta-catenin E3 ubiquitin ligase component beta-TrCP ubiquitylates only phosphorylated beta-catenin, Jade-1 ubiquitylates both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated beta-catenin and therefore regulates canonical Wnt signalling in both Wnt-off and Wnt-on phases. Thus, the different characteristics of beta-TrCP and Jade-1 may ensure optimal Wnt pathway regulation. Furthermore, pVHL downregulates beta-catenin in a Jade-1-dependent manner and inhibits Wnt signalling, supporting a role for Jade-1 and Wnt signalling in renal tumorigenesis. The pVHL tumour suppressor and the Wnt tumorigenesis pathway are therefore directly linked through Jade-1.

  4. MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Ji; Li, Feng; Lin, Yanting; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei; Jiang, Jiaji

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

  5. {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haeyong; Bae, Sungmin; Kim, Kijeong; Kim, Wonyong; Chung, Sang-In; Yoon, Yoosik

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} Baicalin maintains the levels of {beta}-Catenin during adipogenesis. {yields} {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin. {yields} Baicalin maintains the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway during adipogenesis. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin reportedly inhibits adipogenesis through the down-regulations of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){gamma} and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP){alpha}. We report that baicalin, a natural flavonoid compound, inhibits adipogenesis by modulating {beta}-Catenin. During 3T3-L1 cell adipogenesis, {beta}-Catenin was down-regulated, but baicalin treatment maintained {beta}-Catenin expression. Anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin were significantly attenuated by {beta}-Catenin siRNA transfection. {beta}-Catenin siRNA rescued the reduced expressions of PPAR{gamma}, C/EBP{alpha}, fatty acid binding protein 4 and lipoprotein lipase by baicalin. Furthermore, baicalin modulated members of the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway by maintaining the expressions of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, disheveled (DVL)2 and DVL3. These findings suggest that {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin.

  6. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, differentially inhibits beta-catenin signaling in the MIN mouse and azoxymethane-treated rat models of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Hemant K; Karolski, William J; Wali, Ramesh K; Ratashak, Anne; Hart, John; Smyrk, Thomas C

    2005-01-20

    The mechanisms through which beta-catenin signaling is inhibited during colorectal cancer chemoprevention by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents is incompletely understood. We report that nabumetone decreased uninvolved intestinal mucosal beta-catenin levels in the MIN mouse with a concomitant increase in glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta levels, an enzyme that targets beta-catenin for destruction. However, in the azoxymethane-treated rat, where beta-catenin is frequently rendered GSK-3beta-insensitive, nabumetone failed to alter beta-catenin levels but did decrease beta-catenin nuclear localization and transcriptional activity as gauged by cyclin D1. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the differential mechanisms for beta-catenin suppression may be determined, at least partly, by GSK-3beta.

  7. Inhibition of the Tcf/beta-catenin complex increases apoptosis and impairs adrenocortical tumor cell proliferation and adrenal steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Letícia F.; Bueno, Ana Carolina; Gomes, Débora C.; Abduch, Rafael; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, there is no effective therapy for patients with advanced/metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC). The activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is frequent in ACC and this pathway is a promising therapeutic target. Aim To investigate the effects of the inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin in ACC cells. Methods Adrenal (NCI-H295 and Y1) and non-adrenal (HeLa) cell lines were treated with PNU-74654 (5–200 μM) for 24–96 h to assess cell viability (MTS-based assay), apoptosis (Annexin V), expression/localization of beta-catenin (qPCR, immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and western blot), expression of beta-catenin target genes (qPCR and western blot), and adrenal steroidogenesis (radioimmunoassay, qPCR and western blot). Results In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 significantly decreased cell proliferation 96 h after treatment, increased early and late apoptosis, decreased nuclear beta-catenin accumulation, impaired CTNNB1/beta-catenin expression and increased beta-catenin target genes 48 h after treatment. No effects were observed on HeLa cells. In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione secretion 24 and 48 h after treatment. Additionally, in NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased SF1 and CYP21A2 mRNA expression as well as the protein levels of STAR and aldosterone synthase 48 h after treatment. In Y1 cells, PNU-74654 impaired corticosterone secretion 24 h after treatment but did not decrease cell viability. Conclusions Blocking the Tcf/beta-catenin complex inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in adrenocortical tumor cells triggering increased apoptosis, decreased cell viability and impairment of adrenal steroidogenesis. These promising findings pave the way for further experiments inhibiting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in pre-clinical models of ACC. The inhibition of this pathway may become a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with ACC. PMID:26515592

  8. The structure of phosphorylated GSK-3beta complexed with a peptide, FRATtide, that inhibits beta-catenin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Bax, B; Carter, P S; Lewis, C; Guy, A R; Bridges, A; Tanner, R; Pettman, G; Mannix, C; Culbert, A A; Brown, M J; Smith, D G; Reith, A D

    2001-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) sequentially phosphorylates four serine residues on glycogen synthase (GS), in the sequence SxxxSxxxSxxx-SxxxS(p), by recognizing and phosphorylating the first serine in the sequence motif SxxxS(P) (where S(p) represents a phosphoserine). FRATtide (a peptide derived from a GSK-3 binding protein) binds to GSK-3 and blocks GSK-3 from interacting with Axin. This inhibits the Axin-dependent phosphorylation of beta-catenin by GSK-3. Structures of uncomplexed Tyr216 phosphorylated GSK-3beta and of its complex with a peptide and a sulfate ion both show the activation loop adopting a conformation similar to that in the phosphorylated and active forms of the related kinases CDK2 and ERK2. The sulfate ion, adjacent to Val214 on the activation loop, represents the binding site for the phosphoserine residue on 'primed' substrates. The peptide FRATtide forms a helix-turn-helix motif in binding to the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain; the FRATtide binding site is close to, but does not obstruct, the substrate binding channel of GSK-3. FRATtide (and FRAT1) does not inhibit the activity of GSK-3 toward GS. The Axin binding site on GSK-3 presumably overlaps with that for FRATtide; its proximity to the active site explains how Axin may act as a scaffold protein promoting beta-catenin phosphorylation. Tyrosine 216 phosphorylation can induce an active conformation in the activation loop. Pre-phosphorylated substrate peptides can be modeled into the active site of the enzyme, with the P1 residue occupying a pocket partially formed by phosphotyrosine 216 and the P4 phosphoserine occupying the 'primed' binding site.

  9. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Il-Rae; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong; Choi, Young-Whan; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Oh, Sangtaek; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  10. beta-Catenin/TCF pathway plays a vital role in selenium induced-growth inhibition and apoptosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Shuang; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Guo; Yang, Shangbin; He, Shun; Bai, Jinfeng; Quan, Lanping; Zhu, Hongxia; Dong, Yan; Xu, Ningzhi

    2010-10-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have indicated selenium could reduce the risk of some cancers. In our present study, growth inhibition and apoptosis were detected upon methylseleninic acid (MSA) treatment in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines EC9706 and KYSE150. MSA reduced beta-catenin protein levels, while there was no significant change observed on transcriptional levels. Moreover, we found MSA accelerated the degradation of beta-catenin and activated glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta). Some targets of beta-catenin/TCF pathway and apoptosis-related genes altered after MSA treatment. Notably, utilizing the inducible 293-TR/beta-catenin cell line, we found the apoptotic phenotypes induced by MSA were partially reversed by the overexpression of beta-catenin. Overall, our data indicate the effects induced by MSA in ESCC cells may act on the inhibition of beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

  11. Beta-catenin inhibits melanocyte migration but induces melanoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Stuart J.; Rambow, Florian; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Champeval, Delphine; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Delmas, Véronique; Larue, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    The canonical Wnt signalling pathway induces the β-catenin/LEF transcription factors. It is activated in various cancers, most characteristically carcinomas, in which it promotes metastatic spread by increasing migration and/or invasion. The Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway is frequently activated in melanoma, but the presence of β-catenin in the nucleus does not seem to be a sign of aggressiveness in these tumours. We found that, unlike its positive role in stimulating migration and invasion of carcinoma cells, β-catenin signalling decreased the migration of melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. In vivo, β-catenin signalling in melanoblasts reduced the migration of these cells, causing a white belly-spot phenotype. The inhibition, by β-catenin of migration was dependent on MITF-M, a key transcription factor of the melanocyte lineage, and CSK, a Src-inhibitor. Despite reducing migration, β-catenin signalling promoted lung metastasis in the Nras-driven melanoma murine model. Thus, β-catenin may play conflicting roles in the metastatic spread of melanoma, repressing migration while promoting metastasis. These results highlight that metastasis formation requires a series of successful cellular processes, any one of which may not be optimally efficient. PMID:22665063

  12. Negative regulation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in AGS gastric cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Chi Hoon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-30

    Functional activation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling plays an important role in early events in carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of naringenin against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that naringenin inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that the {beta}-catenin distribution and the levels of nuclear {beta}-catenin and Tcf-4 proteins were unchanged after naringenin treatment. Moreover, the binding activities of Tcf complexes to consensus DNA were not affected by naringenin. Taken together, these data suggest that naringenin inhibits {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer with unknown mechanisms.

  13. Effects of short-hairpin RNA-inhibited {beta}-catenin expression on the growth of human multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wenqing; Yang, Chengwei; Qian, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CTNNB1 shRNA could inhibit the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significantly profound apoptotic cell death in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo, CTNNB1 silence led to a growth inhibition of myeloma growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc and {beta}-catenin in the expression cells of cleaved caspase-3 were increased. -- Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM) is thrombogenic as a consequence of multiple hemostatic effects. Overexpression of {beta}-catenin has been observed in several types of malignant tumors, including MM. However, the relationship between {beta}-catenin expression and MM remains unclear. In the present study, RNA interference was used to inhibit {beta}-catenin expression in RPMI8226 cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses showed that {beta}-catenin mRNA and protein expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Western blotting showed that the protein levels of cyclin D1 and glutamine synthetase were downregulated and supported the transcriptional regulatory function of {beta}-catenin. The MTT assay showed that CTNNB1 shRNA could have significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. The TOPflash reporter assay demonstrated significant downregulation after CTNNB1 shRNA transfection in RPMI8226 cells. Flow cytometric analyses also showed significantly profound apoptosis in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. We found CTNNB1 silence led to growth inhibition of MM growth in vivo. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that c-myc and {beta}-catenin were reduced in CTNNB1 shRNA tumor tissues, but that expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased. These results show that {beta}-catenin could be a new therapeutic agent that targets the biology of MM cells.

  14. PAK1 interacts with beta-catenin and is required for the regulation of the beta-catenin signalling pathway by gastrins.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2008-10-01

    Beta-catenin regulates cell-cell adhesion by binding to E-cadherin at the cell membrane and, when translocated into the nucleus, mediates signalling by activation of transcription factors such as TCF4. Mutations of the components of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway are found in many gastrointestinal cancers. Gastrins, including amidated (Gamide) and glycine-extended (Ggly) gastrin(17), stimulate the proliferation of gastrointestinal cancer cells. Gastrins also regulate beta-catenin signalling through multiple pathways which seem to converge on p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In this study, we have investigated the role of PAK1 in the regulation of beta-catenin signalling by gastrins. Here we report for the first time that PAK1 associated with beta-catenin. Both Gamide and Ggly stimulated the phosphorylation and activation of beta-catenin in a PAK1-dependent manner. A kinase-inactive mutant PAK1(K299A) blocked the gastrin-stimulated dissociation of beta-catenin from E-cadherin, translocation of beta-catenin from the cell membrane to the nucleus, and association of beta-catenin with the transcription factor TCF4. The PAK1(K299A) mutant also inhibited the stimulation of the expression of c-myc and cyclin D1, and of cell proliferation and migration, by gastrins. The results indicate that gastrins regulate beta-catenin signalling through a PAK1-dependent pathway. PAK1 seems to be the point of convergence of multiple signalling pathways activated by gastrins.

  15. Polymeric black tea polyphenols inhibit 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal carcinogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish B.

    2008-02-15

    Tea polyphenols like epigallocatechin gallate and theaflavins are established chemopreventive agents for colorectal carcinogenesis. However, studies on evaluating similar chemopreventive properties of thearubigins or polymeric black tea polyphenols (PBPs), the most abundant polyphenols in black tea, are limited. Hence, in the present study we aim to investigate chemopreventive effects along with probable mechanisms of action of PBP extract employing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats as experimental model. The present study suggests that PBPs, like other tea polyphenols, also inhibit DMH-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by decreasing tumor volume and multiplicity. This study also shows that although the pretreatment with PBP extract could induce detoxifying enzymes in hepatic and colorectal tissue, it did not show any additional chemopreventive effects when compared to treatments with PBP extract after initiation with DMH. Mechanistically, PBP extract may inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis by decreasing DMH-induced cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Treatments with PBP extract showed decreased levels of COX-2, c-MYC and cyclin D1 proteins which aid cell proliferation probably by regulating {beta}-catenin by maintaining expression of APC and decreasing inactivation of GSK3{beta}. DMH-induced activation of MAP kinases such as ERK and JNK was also found to be inhibited by treatments with PBP extract. In conclusion, the protective effects of PBP extract could be attributed to inhibition of DMH-induced cellular proliferation probably through {beta}-catenin regulation.

  16. Bisindoylmaleimide I suppresses adipocyte differentiation through stabilization of intracellular {beta}-catenin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Munju; Park, Seoyoung; Gwak, Jungsug; Kim, Dong-Eun; Yea, Sung Su; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-02-29

    The Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway plays important roles in cell differentiation. Activation of this pathway, likely by Wnt-10b, has been shown to inhibit adipogenesis in cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and mice. Here we revealed that bisindoylmaleimide I (BIM), which is widely used as a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), inhibits adipocyte differentiation through activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. BIM increased {beta}-catenin responsive transcription (CRT) and up-regulated intracellular {beta}-catenin levels in HEK293 cells and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. BIM significantly decreased intracellular lipid accumulation and reduced expression of important adipocyte marker genes including peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and CAATT enhancer-binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Taken together, our findings indicate that BIM inhibits adipogenesis by increasing the stability of {beta}-catenin protein in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells.

  17. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus latent membrane protein 2A activates {beta}-catenin signaling and inhibits differentiation in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Catherine A.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is a {gamma}-herpesvirus closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is highly homologous to EBV LMP2A. EBV LMP2A activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and {beta}-catenin signaling pathways in epithelial cells and affects differentiation. In the present study, the biochemical and biological properties of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells were investigated. The expression of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells induced Akt activation, GSK3{beta} inactivation and accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear translocation, but not accumulation of {beta}-catenin was dependent on Akt activation. Rhesus LMP2A also impaired epithelial cell differentiation; however, this process was not dependent upon Akt activation. A mutant rhesus LMP2A lacking six transmembrane domains functioned similarly to wild-type rhesus LMP2A indicating that the full number of transmembrane domains is not required for effects on {beta}-catenin or cell differentiation. These results underscore the similarity of LCV to EBV and the suitability of the macaque as an animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis.

  18. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  19. Inhibition of beta-catenin signaling by Pb leads to incomplete fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Beier, Eric E; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Buckley, Taylor; Yukata, Kiminori; O'Keefe, Regis; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, J Edward

    2014-11-01

    There is strong evidence in the clinical literature to suggest that elevated lead (Pb) exposure impairs fracture healing. Since Pb has been demonstrated to inhibit bone formation, and Wnt signaling is an important anabolic pathway in chondrocyte maturation and endochondral ossification, we investigated the impact of Wnt therapy on Pb-exposed mice undergoing bone repair in a mouse tibial fracture model. We established that tibial fracture calluses from Pb-treated mice were smaller and contained less mineralized tissue than vehicle controls. This resulted in the persistence of immature cartilage in the callus and decreased β-catenin levels. Reduction of β-catenin protein was concurrent with systemic elevation of LRP5/6 antagonists DKK1 and sclerostin in Pb-exposed mice throughout fracture healing. β-catenin stimulation by the GSK3 inhibitor BIO reversed these molecular changes and restored the amount of mineralized callus. Overall, Pb is identified as a potent inhibitor of endochondral ossification in vivo with correlated effects on bone healing with noted deficits in β-catenin signaling, suggesting the Wnt/β-catenin as a pivotal pathway in the influence of Pb on fracture repair.

  20. Inhibition of beta-catenin signaling by Pb leads to incomplete fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Eric E; Buckley, Taylor; Yukata, Kiminori; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; O’Keefe, Regis; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, J Edward

    2015-01-01

    There is strong evidence in the clinical literature to suggest that elevated lead (Pb) exposure impairs fracture healing. Since Pb has been demonstrated to inhibit bone formation, and Wnt signaling is an important anabolic pathway in chondrocyte maturation and endochondral ossification, we investigated the impact of Wnt therapy on Pb-exposed mice undergoing bone repair in a mouse tibial fracture model. We established that tibial fracture calluses from Pb-treated mice were smaller and contained less mineralized tissue than vehicle controls. This resulted in the persistence of immature cartilage in the callus and decreased β-catenin levels. Reduction of β-catenin protein was concurrent with systemic elevation of LRP5/6 antagonists DKK1 and sclerostin in Pb-exposed mice throughout fracture healing. β-catenin stimulation by the GSK3 inhibitor BIO reversed these molecular changes and restored the amount of mineralized callus. Overall, Pb is identified as a potent inhibitor of endochondral ossification in vivo with correlated effects on bone healing with noted deficits in β-catenin signaling, suggesting the Wnt/β-catenin as a pivotal pathway in the influence of Pb on fracture repair. PMID:25044211

  1. The human and mouse sex-determining SRY genes repress the Rspol/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yun-Fai Chris; Li, Yunmin

    2009-04-01

    The sex-determining region Y (SRY) is the gene on the Y chromosome responsible for switching on male sex determination during mammalian embryogenesis. In its absence, ovaries develop in the embryo. Hence, ovarian determination and differentiation is considered to be a default, or passive, developmental pathway. Recently this classical paradigm of sex determination has been challenged with the discovery of the R-spondin 1 (RSPO1) as an active ovarian determinant. Mutations of RSPO1 cause a female-to-male sex reversal. RSPO1 synergizes with WNT4 in activating an ovarian development in the bipotential gonad via the canonical Wnt signaling. Early studies showed that SRY represses such Wnt signaling, but also generated discrepancies on whether only mouse Sry is capable of inhibiting such Wnt signaling and whether both human and mouse SRY proteins are able to interact with beta-catenin, the intracellular messenger responsible for executing the Wnt signals. Our studies show that both human SRY and mouse Sry are capable of repressing the Rspo1/Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. However, the repression activities vary among different SRY/Sry proteins and paradoxically related to the presence and/or size of an acidic/glutamine-rich domain. The HMG box of human SRY could bind directly to beta-catenin while the mouse Sry binds to beta-catenin via its HMG box and glutamine-rich domain. The results clarify some of the initial discrepancies, and raise the possibility that SRY interacts with beta-catenin in the nucleus and represses the transcriptional activation of the Rspo1/Wnt target genes involved in ovarian determination, thereby switching on testis determination.

  2. E-cadherin and APC compete for the interaction with beta-catenin and the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    beta-Catenin is involved in the formation of adherens junctions of mammalian epithelia. It interacts with the cell adhesion molecule E- cadherin and also with the tumor suppressor gene product APC, and the Drosophila homologue of beta-catenin, armadillo, mediates morphogenetic signals. We demonstrate here that E-cadherin and APC directly compete for binding to the internal, armadillo-like repeats of beta-catenin; the NH2-terminal domain of beta-catenin mediates the interaction of the alternative E-cadherin and APC complexes to the cytoskeleton by binding to alpha-catenin. Plakoglobin (gamma-catenin), which is structurally related to beta-catenin, mediates identical interactions. We thus show that the APC tumor suppressor gene product forms strikingly similar associations as found in cell junctions and suggest that beta-catenin and plakoglobin are central regulators of cell adhesion, cytoskeletal interaction, and tumor suppression. PMID:7806582

  3. Molecular plasticity of beta-catenin: new insights from single-molecule measurements and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Ritco-Vonsovici, Monica; Ababou, Abdessamad; Horton, Michael

    2007-09-01

    The multifunctional protein, beta-catenin, has essential roles in cell adhesion and, through the Wnt signaling pathway, in controlling cell differentiation, development, and generation of cancer. Could distinct molecular forms of beta-catenin underlie these two functions? Our single-molecule force spectroscopy of armadillo beta-catenin, with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, suggests a model in which the cell generates various forms of beta-catenin, in equilibrium. We find beta-catenin and the transcriptional factor Tcf4 form two complexes with different affinities. Specific cellular response is achieved by the ligand binding to a particular matching preexisting conformer. Our MD simulation indicates that complexes derive from two conformers of the core region of the protein, whose preexisting molecular forms could arise from small variations in flexible regions of the beta-catenin main binding site. This mechanism for the generation of the various forms offers a route to tailoring future therapeutic strategies.

  4. SKI-606 decreases growth and motility of colorectal cancer cells by preventing pp60(c-Src)-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and its nuclear signaling.

    PubMed

    Coluccia, Addolorata Maria Luce; Benati, Daniela; Dekhil, Hafedh; De Filippo, Annamaria; Lan, Cathy; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo

    2006-02-15

    Inhibition of deregulated protein tyrosine kinases represents an attractive strategy for controlling cancer growth. However, target specificity is an essential aim of this strategy. In this report, pp60(c-Src) kinase and beta-catenin were found physically associated and constitutively activated on tyrosine residues in human colorectal cancer cells. The use of specific small-interfering RNAs (siRNA) validated pp60(c-Src) as the major kinase responsible for beta-catenin tyrosine phosphorylation in colorectal cancer. Src-dependent activation of beta-catenin was prevented by SKI-606, a novel Src family kinase inhibitor, which also abrogated beta-catenin nuclear function by impairing its binding to the TCF4 transcription factor and its trans-activating ability in colorectal cancer cells. These effects were seemingly specific, as cyclin D1, a crucial beta-catenin/TCF4 target gene, was also down-regulated by SKI-606 in a dose-dependent manner accounting, at least in part, for the reduced growth (IC50, 1.5-2.4 micromol/L) and clonogenic potential of colorectal cancer cells. Protein levels of beta-catenin remained substantially unchanged by SKI-606, which promoted instead a cytosolic/membranous retention of beta-catenin as judged by immunoblotting analysis of cytosolic/nuclear extracts and cell immunofluorescence staining. The SKI-606-mediated relocalization of beta-catenin increased its binding affinity to E-cadherin and adhesion of colorectal cancer cells, with ensuing reduced motility in a wound healing assay. Interestingly, the siRNA-driven knockdown of beta-catenin removed the effect of SKI-606 on cell-to-cell adhesion, which was associated with prolonged stability of E-cadherin protein in a pulse-chase experiment. Thus, our results show that SKI-606 operates a switch between the transcriptional and adhesive function of beta-catenin by inhibiting its pp60(c-Src)-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation; this could constitute a new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

  5. Once upon a time there was beta-catenin in cadherin-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Gavard, Julie; Mège, René-Marc

    2005-12-01

    beta-Catenin was initially characterized as a protein interacting with the cadherin cytoplasmic tail and regulating cell-cell contacts and actin cytoskeleton interactions. Moreover, the gene coding for the Drosophila orthologue of beta-catenin, armadillo, was independently identified downstream of wingless in the segment-polarity signalling pathway. In fact, beta-catenin/Armadillo turned out to be key mediators of the Wnt/Wingless pathways in vertebrates and invertebrates. beta-Catenin participates in both adhesion and signalling functions in a mutually exclusive manner; bound to cadherins at the plasma membrane or 'unbound' in cytosolic or nuclear complexes. This model had placed beta-catenin at the crossroads between cadherin and Wnt signalling, leading to the dogma of inhibition of beta-catenin signalling by cadherins.

  6. beta-Catenin regulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Easwaran, Vijay; Lee, Sang H; Inge, Landon; Guo, Lida; Goldbeck, Cheryl; Garrett, Evelyn; Wiesmann, Marion; Garcia, Pablo D; Fuller, John H; Chan, Vivien; Randazzo, Filippo; Gundel, Robert; Warren, Robert S; Escobedo, Jaime; Aukerman, Sharon L; Taylor, Robert N; Fantl, Wendy J

    2003-06-15

    To evaluate whether beta-catenin signaling has a role in the regulation of angiogenesis in colon cancer, a series of angiogenesis-related gene promoters was analyzed for beta-catenin/TCF binding sites. Strikingly, the gene promoter of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, or VEGF-A) contains seven consensus binding sites for beta-catenin/TCF. Analysis of laser capture microdissected human colon cancer tissue indicated a direct correlation between up-regulation of VEGF-A expression and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutational status (activation of beta-catenin signaling) in primary tumors. In metastases, this correlation was not observed. Analysis by immunohistochemistry of intestinal polyps in mice heterozygous for the multiple intestinal neoplasia gene (Min/+) at 5 months revealed an increase and redistribution of VEGF-A in proximity to those cells expressing nuclear beta-catenin with a corresponding increase in vessel density. Transfection of normal colon epithelial cells with activated beta-catenin up-regulated levels of VEGF-A mRNA and protein by 250-300%. When colon cancer cells with elevated beta-catenin levels were treated with beta-catenin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, VEGF-A expression was reduced by more than 50%. Taken together, our observations indicate a close link between beta-catenin signaling and the regulation of VEGF-A expression in colon cancer.

  7. beta-Catenin promotes self-renewal of skeletal-muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ruiz, Ana; Ono, Yusuke; Gnocchi, Viola F; Zammit, Peter S

    2008-05-01

    Satellite cells are the resident stem cells of adult skeletal muscle. As with all stem cells, how the choice between self-renewal or differentiation is controlled is central to understanding their function. Here, we have explored the role of beta-catenin in determining the fate of myogenic satellite cells. Satellite cells express beta-catenin, and expression is maintained as they activate and undergo proliferation. Constitutive retroviral-driven expression of wild-type or stabilised beta-catenin results in more satellite cells expressing Pax7 without any MyoD -- therefore, adopting the self-renewal pathway, with fewer cells undergoing myogenic differentiation. Similarly, preventing the degradation of endogenous beta-catenin by inhibiting GSK3beta activity also results in more Pax7-positive-MyoD-negative (Pax7(+)MyoD(-)) satellite-cell progeny. Consistent with these observations, downregulation of beta-catenin using small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the proportion of satellite cells that express Pax7 and augmented myogenic differentiation after mitogen withdrawal. Since a dominant-negative version of beta-catenin had the same effect as silencing beta-catenin using specific siRNA, beta-catenin promotes self-renewal via transcriptional control of target genes. Thus, beta-catenin signalling in proliferating satellite cells directs these cells towards the self-renewal pathway and, so, contributes to the maintenance of this stem-cell pool in adult skeletal muscle.

  8. Overexpression of EB1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) may promote cellular growth by activating beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihua; Zhou, Xiaobo; Zhu, Hongxia; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Cuiqi; Zhang, Guo; Xue, Liyan; Lu, Ning; Quan, Lanping; Bai, Jinfeng; Zhan, Qimin; Xu, Ningzhi

    2005-10-06

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a multifactorial etiology involving environmental and/or genetic factors. End-binding protein 1 (EB1), which was cloned as an interacting partner of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor protein, was previously found overexpressed in ESCC. However, the precise role of EB1 in the development of this malignancy has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we analysed freshly resected ESCC specimens and demonstrated that EB1 was overexpressed in approximately 63% of tumor samples compared to matched normal tissue. We report that overexpression of EB1 in the ESCC line EC9706 significantly promotes cell growth, whereas suppression of EB1 protein level by RNA interference significantly inhibited growth of esophageal tumor cells. In addition, EB1 overexpression induced nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin and promoted the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF). These effects were partially or completely abolished by coexpression of APC or DeltaN TCF4, respectively. Also, we found that EB1 affected the interaction between beta-catenin and APC. Furthermore, EB1 overexpression was correlated with cytoplasmic/nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin in primary human ESCC. Taken together, these results support the novel hypothesis that EB1 overexpression may play a role in the development of ESCC by affecting APC function and activating the beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

  9. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 activated enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 complex could activate enamelin gene transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 can directly bind to enamelin 5' regulatory region. {yields} Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling can upregulate enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells. -- Abstract: Enamelin is an ameloblast-specific matrix protein believed to play essential roles in enamel formation. However, mechanisms of enamelin transcription regulation are not clear. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 is a key transcriptional complex involved in tooth development. In this study, the role of {beta}-catenin/LEF1 in enamelin expression was investigated. The 5'-flanking region of the mouse enamelin gene was analyzed and cloned. Co-transfection analysis and mutation assays revealed that two conserved LEF1 responsive elements located at -1002 and -597 bp upstream of the enamelin translation initiation site could augment transcriptional activity of the enamelin. The interaction between the enamelin elements and {beta}-catenin/LEF1 was further confirmed by electrophoresis mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In addition, LiCl treatment induced nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin and elevated endogenous enamelin expression in mouse ameloblast-like cells. The results suggested that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling could function in enamelin gene expression by direct interaction through two conserved LEF1 responsive elements on the enamelin gene in ameloblast-like cells.

  10. Expression of beta-catenin by acute myeloid leukemia cells predicts enhanced clonogenic capacities and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ysebaert, L; Chicanne, G; Demur, C; De Toni, F; Prade-Houdellier, N; Ruidavets, J-B; Mansat-De Mas, V; Rigal-Huguet, F; Laurent, G; Payrastre, B; Manenti, S; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2006-07-01

    Activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway has recently been shown to be crucial to the establishment of leukemic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. We sought to determine whether beta-catenin was correlated to clonogenic capacity also in the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) setting. Eighty-two patients were retrospectively evaluated for beta-catenin expression by Western blot. beta-Catenin was expressed (although at various protein levels) in 61% of patients, and was undetectable in the remaining cases. In our cohort, beta-catenin expression was correlated with the clonogenic proliferation of AML-colony forming cells (AML-CFC or CFU-L) in methylcellulose in the presence of 5637-conditioned medium, and more strikingly with self-renewing of leukemic cells, as assessed in vitro by a re-plating assay. In survival analyses, beta-catenin appeared as a new independent prognostic factor predicting poor event-free survival and shortened overall survival (both with P<0.05). Furthermore, variations in beta-catenin protein levels were dependent on post-transcriptional mechanisms involving the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway only in leukemic cells. Indeed, beta-catenin negative leukemic cells were found to increase beta-catenin in response to Wnt3a agonist in contrast to normal counterparts. Altogether, our data pave the way to the evaluation of Wnt pathway inhibition as a new rationale for eradicating the clonogenic pool of AML cells.

  11. Downregulation of E-cadherin is an essential event in activating beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription and expression of its target genes in Pdcd4 knockdown cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Sun, Z-X; Allgayer, H; Yang, H-S

    2010-01-07

    We reported earlier that knockdown of tumor suppressor Pdcd4 (programed cell death 4) downregulates E-cadherin expression and activates beta-catenin/Tcf (T-cell factor)-dependent transcription in colon tumor cells. However, the underlying mechanism of these observations remains unknown. In this study, we showed that knockdown of Pdcd4 downregulates E-cadherin expression through elevated protein level of Snail. Over-expression of Pdcd4 upregulates E-cadherin expression and inhibits beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. We then showed that knockdown of E-cadherin activates beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. Conversely, over-expression of E-cadherin in Pdcd4 knockdown cells inhibits beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription. In addition, Pdcd4 knockdown stimulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) and c-Myc expression, whereas u-PAR and c-Myc expression can be reversed by over-expressing E-cadherin in Pdcd4 knockdown cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed that beta-catenin/Tcf4 directly binds to the promoters of u-PAR and c-myc in Pdcd4 knockdown cells. Futhermore, knockdown of u-PAR or c-Myc inhibits invasion in Pdcd4 knockdown cells, suggesting that both u-PAR and c-Myc contribute to invasion induced by Pdcd4 knockdown. Taken together, our data showed that elevated Snail expression by Pdcd4 knockdown leads to downregulation of E-cadherin resulting in activating beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcription and stimulating the expression of c-Myc and u-PAR, thus providing molecular explanation of how Pdcd4 suppresses tumor invasion.

  12. IKK and (Beta) - Catenin in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    activity is not due to a decrease in total beta-catenin protein levels, however, the dephosphorylated form of beta-catenin within the nucleus...2000. 19. Staal F J, Noort MM, Strous G J, and Clevers HC, Wnt signals are transmitted through N-terminally dephosphorylated beta-catenin. EMBO Rep. 3...catenin is phoshorylated sequentially by casein kinase 1 (CK1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3-P (GSK-313) (4,52); activation of frizzled receptors by Wnt

  13. Growth inhibition of human colon cancer cells by nitric oxide (NO)-donating aspirin is associated with cyclooxygenase-2 induction and beta-catenin/T-cell factor signaling, nuclear factor-kappaB, and NO synthase 2 inhibition: implications for chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennie L; Nath, Niharika; Chen, Jie; Hundley, Thomas R; Gao, Jianjun; Kopelovich, Levy; Kashfi, Khosrow; Rigas, Basil

    2003-11-15

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing aspirin (ASA), consisting of a traditional ASA molecule to which a NO-donating moiety is covalently bound, is a promising colon cancer chemopreventive agent. NO-ASA inhibits colon cancer cell growth more potently than ASA by inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing cell killing. We examined in cultured human colon cancer cells the effect of NO-ASA on the beta-catenin/T-cell factor signaling pathway, nuclear factor-kappaB, and NO synthase 2 and on cyclooxygenase (COX) expression, all presumed to participate in colon carcinogenesis. Besides inhibiting cell growth, NO-ASA inhibited the beta-catenin/T-cell factor signaling pathway (IC(50), 1.1 microM), nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding (IC(50), 7.5 microM), and NO synthase 2 expression (IC(50), 2 microM). Interestingly, NO-ASA induced COX-2 expression, although it had no effect on COX-1. COX-2 induction was accompanied by increased prostaglandin E(2) production. These effects occurred at NO-ASA concentrations below or near its IC(50) for cell growth (IC(50), 2-50 microM). The metabolism of NO-ASA by these cells is characterized by a rapid deacetylation step and the formation of a conjugate with glutathione. NO-ASA had no effect on intracellular cyclic GMP concentrations. We propose a model incorporating the pleiotropic effects of NO-ASA on cell signaling and postulate that collectively these effects may contribute to its strong chemopreventive effect.

  14. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin in esophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Y; Shiozaki, H; Doki, Y; Yamamoto, M; Utsunomiya, T; Kawanishi, K; Fukuchi, N; Inoue, M; Tsujinaka, T; Monden, M

    1999-04-20

    beta-Catenin has 2 distinct roles in E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and carcinogenesis through APC gene mutation. One occurs at cell-adhesion sites, where cadherins become linked to the actin-based cytoskeleton. The others occur in the cytoplasm and nuclei and are thought to regulate cell transformation. We studied these different beta-catenins and evaluated their significance in carcinogenesis. Fresh surgical specimens were obtained from 22 patients with squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus. beta-Catenin in the free soluble fraction and the insoluble fraction was immunoblotted separately. At the same time, its localization was observed by immuno-histochemical techniques. In the normal esophageal epithelium, 91% of beta-catenin was detected in the insoluble fraction and beta-catenin staining occurred at the cell membrane, in co-existence with E-cadherin. In cancerous tissues, the amount of soluble beta-catenin was significantly (about 4-fold) higher than in normal tissues. Also, in cancerous tissues with higher amounts of soluble beta-catenin, immuno-histochemical techniques revealed the presence of beta-catenin in the cytoplasm and nuclei, as well as in the cell membrane. However, in samples with lower amounts of beta-catenin, expression was found only at the cell boundaries. The amount of soluble beta-catenin was not associated with the clinico-pathological grading of the tumors. Our results show that the accumulation of free soluble beta-catenin in the cytoplasm and nuclei frequently occurs during carcinogenesis of the squamous epithelium of the esophagus.

  15. Ibuprofen inhibits activation of nuclear {beta}-catenin in human colon adenomas and induces the phosphorylation of GSK-3{beta}.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, Emily J; Madigan, James P; Boardman, Lisa A; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2011-01-01

    Nonselective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors target many of the same cancer-associated molecular pathways as COX-2-specific inhibitors. Although these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often associated with gastrointestinal toxicity, there is renewed interest in their use as colorectal cancer (CRC) chemopreventive agents due to the adverse side effects associated with long-term use of selective COX-2 inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term use (up to 25 years) of NSAIDs (ibuprofen or aspirin) on adenoma pathology and β-catenin-mediated signaling in sporadic human colon adenomas. Although NSAID use did not impact overall adenoma size or degree of dysplasia, it did cause a significant inhibition of nuclear β-catenin localization, which correlated with suppression of cyclin D1 expression. To further elucidate the effect of these agents in regulating β-catenin, we treated SW480 colon cancer cells with a panel of NSAIDs and determined their effects on β-catenin levels and cellular localization. In agreement with our in vivo results, both S-ibuprofen and aspirin were found to decrease total levels of β-catenin while increasing its phosphorylation. In addition, S-ibuprofen induced both degradation of IκBα and nuclear localization of NF-κB. Despite its nuclear localization, however, the activation of the NF-κB target genes, Bcl-2, survivin, and cyclin D1, was suppressed. This reduction in NF-κB transcriptional activity may be due to increased phosphorylation of GSK-3β following S-ibuprofen treatment. These data suggest that ibuprofen can effectively target both the Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB pathways, and potentially uncovers a novel mechanism through which NSAIDS may exert their chemopreventive efficacy.

  16. Transient activation of beta-catenin signalling in adult mouse epidermis is sufficient to induce new hair follicles but continuous activation is required to maintain hair follicle tumours.

    PubMed

    Lo Celso, Cristina; Prowse, David M; Watt, Fiona M

    2004-04-01

    When beta-catenin signalling is disturbed from mid-gestation onwards lineage commitment is profoundly altered in postnatal mouse epidermis. We have investigated whether adult epidermis has the capacity for beta-catenin-induced lineage conversion without prior embryonic priming. We fused N-terminally truncated, stabilised beta-catenin to the ligand-binding domain of a mutant oestrogen receptor (DeltaNbeta-cateninER). DeltaNbeta-cateninER was expressed in the epidermis of transgenic mice under the control of the keratin 14 promoter and beta-catenin activity was induced in adult epidermis by topical application of 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT). Within 7 days of daily 4OHT treatment resting hair follicles were recruited into the hair growth cycle and epithelial outgrowths formed from existing hair follicles and from interfollicular epidermis. The outgrowths expressed Sonic hedgehog, Patched and markers of hair follicle differentiation, indicative of de novo follicle formation. The interfollicular epidermal differentiation program was largely unaffected but after an initial wave of sebaceous gland duplication sebocyte differentiation was inhibited. A single application of 4OHT was as effective as repeated doses in inducing new follicles and growth of existing follicles. Treatment of epidermis with 4OHT for 21 days resulted in conversion of hair follicles to benign tumours resembling trichofolliculomas. The tumours were dependent on continuous activation of beta-catenin and by 28 days after removal of the drug they had largely regressed. We conclude that interfollicular epidermis and sebaceous glands retain the ability to be reprogrammed in adult life and that continuous beta-catenin signalling is required to maintain hair follicle tumours.

  17. Interactions Between the Canonical WNT/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPAR Gamma on Neuroinflammation, Demyelination, and Remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Alexandre; Vallée, Jean-Noël; Guillevin, Rémy; Lecarpentier, Yves

    2017-09-13

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is marked by neuroinflammation and demyelination with loss of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. The immune response is regulated by WNT/beta-catenin pathway in MS. Activated NF-kappaB, a major effector of neuroinflammation, and upregulated canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway positively regulate each other. Demyelinating events present an upregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, whereas proper myelinating phases show a downregulation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway essential for the promotion of oligodendrocytes precursors cells proliferation and differentiation. The activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway results in differentiation failure and impairment in remyelination. However, PI3K/Akt pathway and TCF7L2, two downstream targets of WNT/beta-catenin pathway, are upregulated and promote proper remyelination. The interactions of these signaling pathways remain unclear. PPAR gamma activation can inhibit NF-kappaB, and can also downregulate the WNT/beta-catenin pathway. PPAR gamma and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway act in an opposite manner. PPAR gamma agonists appear as a promising treatment for the inhibition of demyelination and the promotion of proper remyelination through the control of both NF-kappaB activity and canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway.

  18. beta-Catenin associates with the actin-bundling protein fascin in a noncadherin complex

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Catenins were first characterized as linking the cytoplasmic domains of cadherin cell-cell adhesion molecules to the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In addition to their essential role in modulating cadherin adhesivity, catenins have more recently been indicated to participate in cell and developmental signaling pathways. beta-Catenin, for example, associates directly with at least two receptor tyrosine kinases and transduces developmental signals within the Wnt pathway. Catenins also complex with the tumor suppressor protein adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), which appears to have a role in regulating cell proliferation. We have used the yeast two-hybrid method to reveal that fascin, a bundler of actin filaments, binds to beta-catenin's central Armadillo repeat domain. Western blotting of immunoprecipitates from cell line and mouse and rat brain extracts indicate that this interaction exists in vivo. Fascin and beta-catenin's association was further substantiated in vitro using purified proteins isolated from recombinant bacterial and baculoviral sources. Immunoprecipitation analysis indicates that fascin additionally binds to plakoglobin, which is highly homologous to beta-catenin but not to p120cas, a newly described catenin which contains a more divergent Armadillo-repeat domain. Immunoprecipitation, in vitro competition, and domain-mapping experiments demonstrate that fascin and E-cadherin utilize a similar binding site within beta-catenin, such that they form mutually exclusive complexes with beta-catenin. Immunofluorescence microscopy reveals that fascin and beta-catenin colocalize at cell-cell borders and dynamic cell leading edges of epithelial and endothelial cells. In addition to cell-cell borders, cadherins were unexpectedly observed to colocalize with fascin and beta-catenin at cell leading edges. It is conceivable that beta-catenin participates in modulating cytoskeletal dynamics in association with the microfilament-bundling protein fascin, perhaps in a

  19. Roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in epithelial differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yajing; Sun, Zhaorui; Qiu, Xuefeng; Li, Yan; Qin, Jizheng; Han, Xiaodong

    2009-12-25

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to be able to differentiate into epithelial lineage, but the precise mechanisms controlling this process are unclear. Our aim is to explore the roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin in the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Using indirect co-culture of rat MSCs with rat airway epithelial cells (RTE), MSCs expressed several airway epithelial markers (cytokeratin 18, tight junction protein occudin, cystic fibrosis transmembrance regulator). The protein levels of some important members in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling were determined, suggested down-regulation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin with epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, Wnt3{alpha} can inhibit the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. A loss of {beta}-catenin induced by Dickkopf-1 can enhance MSCs differentiation into epithelial cells. Lithium chloride transiently activated {beta}-catenin expression and subsequently decreased {beta}-catenin level and at last inhibited MSCs to differentiate into airway epithelium. Taken together, our study indicated that RTE cells can trigger epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Blocking Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling may promote MSCs to differentiate towards airway epithelial cells.

  20. Murrayafoline A attenuates the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by promoting the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyuk; Gwak, Jungsug; Cho, Munju; Ryu, Min-Jung; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Gye Won; Yun, Mi-Young; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Shin, Jae-Gook; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2010-01-01

    Molecular lesions in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling and subsequent up-regulation of {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT) occur frequently during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that suppress CRT, we screened natural compounds in a cell-based assay for detection of TOPFalsh reporter activity. Murrayafoline A, a carbazole alkaloid isolated from Glycosmis stenocarpa, antagonized CRT that was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a-CM) or LiCl, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin without altering its N-terminal phosphorylation at the Ser33/37 residues, marking it for proteasomal degradation, or the expression of Siah-1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Murrayafoline A repressed the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is known {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes and thus inhibited the proliferation of various colon cancer cells. These findings indicate that murrayafoline A may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for use in the treatment of colon cancer.

  1. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  2. Rac1 GTPase and the Rac1 exchange factor Tiam1 associate with Wnt-responsive promoters to enhance beta-catenin/TCF-dependent transcription in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Buongiorno, Pinella; Pethe, Vaijayanti V; Charames, George S; Esufali, Susmita; Bapat, Bharati

    2008-09-30

    beta-catenin is a key mediator of the canonical Wnt pathway as it associates with members of the T-cell factor (TCF) family at Wnt-responsive promoters to drive the transcription of Wnt target genes. Recently, we showed that Rac1 GTPase synergizes with beta-catenin to increase the activity of a TCF-responsive reporter. This synergy was dependent on the nuclear presence of Rac1, since inhibition of its nuclear localization effectively abolished the stimulatory effect of Rac1 on TCF-responsive reporter activity. We hypothesised that Rac1 plays a direct role in enhancing the transcription of endogenous Wnt target genes by modulating the beta-catenin/TCF transcription factor complex. We employed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies to demonstrate that Rac1 associates with the beta-catenin/TCF complex at Wnt-responsive promoters of target genes. This association served to facilitate transcription, since overexpression of active Rac1 augmented Wnt target gene activation, whereas depletion of endogenous Rac1 by RNA interference abrogated this effect. In addition, the Rac1-specific exchange factor, Tiam1, potentiated the stimulatory effects of Rac1 on the canonical Wnt pathway. Tiam1 promoted the formation of a complex containing Rac1 and beta-catenin. Furthermore, endogenous Tiam1 associated with endogenous beta-catenin, and this interaction was enhanced in response to Wnt3a stimulation. Intriguingly, Tiam1 was recruited to Wnt-responsive promoters upon Wnt3a stimulation, whereas Rac1 was tethered to TCF binding elements in a Wnt-independent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that Rac1 and the Rac1-specific activator Tiam1 are components of transcriptionally active beta-catenin/TCF complexes at Wnt-responsive promoters, and the presence of Rac1 and Tiam1 within these complexes serves to enhance target gene transcription. Our results demonstrate a novel functional mechanism underlying the cross-talk between Rac1 and the canonical Wnt signalling pathway.

  3. Compromised E-cadherin adhesion and epithelial barrier function with activation of G protein-coupled receptors is rescued by Y-to-F mutations in beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Winter, Michael C; Shasby, Sandra; Shasby, D Michael

    2008-03-01

    Activation of the type 1 histamine (H1) or the type 2 protease-activated (PAR-2) G protein-coupled receptors interrupts E-cadherin adhesion and decreases the transepithelial resistance (TER) of epithelium. Several reports suggest that cadherin adhesive function depends on the association of cadherin with beta-catenin and that this association is regulated by phosphorylation of tyrosines in beta-catenin. We tested the hypothesis that loss of cadherin adhesion and compromise of TER on activation of the H1 or PAR-2 receptor is due to phosphorylation of tyrosines in beta-catenin. L cells were stably transfected to express E-cadherin (L-E-cad cells) and H1 (L-H1-E-cad cells). L cells and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells constitutively express PAR-2. Stably transfected L-E-cad, L-H1-E-cad, and MDCK cells were also stably transfected with FLAG-tagged wild-type (WT) or mutant beta-catenin, converting tyrosine 142, 489, or 654 to the nonphosphorylatable mimetic, phenylalanine (WT, Y142F, Y489F, or Y654F). Activation of H1 or PAR-2 interrupted adhesion to an immobilized E-cadherin-Fc fusion protein of L-H1-E-cad, L-E-cad, and MDCK cells expressing WT or Y142F beta-catenin but did not interrupt adhesion of L-H1-E-cad, L-E-cad, and MDCK cells expressing the Y489F or Y654F mutant beta-catenins. PAR-2 activation decreased the TER of monolayers of MDCK cells expressing WT or Y142F beta-catenin 40-45%. However, PAR-2 activation did not decrease the TER of monolayers of MDCK cells expressing Y489F or Y654F beta-catenin. The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B binds to the cadherin cytoplasmic domain and dephosphorylates beta-catenin. Inhibition of PTP1B interrupted adhesion to E-cadherin-Fc of MDCK cells expressing WT beta-catenin but did not affect the adhesion of MDCK cells expressing Y489F or Y654F beta-catenin. Similarly, inhibition of PTP1B compromised the TER of MDCK cells expressing WT beta-catenin but did not affect the TER of MDCK cells expressing Y489F or Y654F beta-catenin

  4. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway interacts differentially with PTHrP signaling to control chondrocyte hypertrophy and final maturation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xizhi; Mak, Kinglun Kingston; Taketo, Makoto M; Yang, Yingzi

    2009-06-26

    Sequential proliferation, hypertrophy and maturation of chondrocytes are required for proper endochondral bone development and tightly regulated by cell signaling. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway acts through beta-catenin to promote chondrocyte hypertrophy whereas PTHrP signaling inhibits it by holding chondrocytes in proliferating states. Here we show by genetic approaches that chondrocyte hypertrophy and final maturation are two distinct developmental processes that are differentially regulated by Wnt/beta-catenin and PTHrP signaling. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates initiation of chondrocyte hypertrophy by inhibiting PTHrP signaling activity, but it does not regulate PTHrP expression. In addition, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling regulates chondrocyte hypertrophy in a non-cell autonomous manner and Gdf5/Bmp signaling may be one of the downstream pathways. Furthermore, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling also controls final maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, but such regulation is PTHrP signaling-independent.

  5. SpKrl: a direct target of beta-catenin regulation required for endoderm differentiation in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Howard, E W; Newman, L A; Oleksyn, D W; Angerer, R C; Angerer, L M

    2001-02-01

    Localization of nuclear beta-catenin initiates specification of vegetal fates in sea urchin embryos. We have identified SpKrl, a gene that is activated upon nuclear entry of beta-catenin. SpKrl is upregulated when nuclear beta-catenin activity is increased with LiCl and downregulated in embryos injected with molecules that inhibit beta-catenin nuclear function. LiCl-mediated SpKrl activation is independent of protein synthesis, indicating that SpKrl is a direct target of beat-catenin and TCF. Embryos in which SpKrl translation is inhibited with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides lack endoderm. Conversely, SpKrl mRNA injection rescues some vegetal structures in beta-catenin-deficient embryos. SpKrl negatively regulates expression of the animalizing transcription factor, SpSoxB1. We propose that SpKrl functions in patterning the vegetal domain by suppressing animal regulatory activities.

  6. Activity-dependent regulation of {beta}-catenin via {epsilon}-cleavage of N-cadherin

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, Kengo; Kihara, Takeshi; Kuzuya, Akira; Okawa, Katsuya; Nishimoto, Takaaki; Bito, Haruhiko; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Kinoshita, Ayae . E-mail: akinoshita@hs.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Shimohama, Shun

    2006-07-07

    N-cadherin is essential for excitatory synaptic contact in the hippocampus. Presenilin 1 (PS1) is located at sites of synaptic contact, forming a complex with N-cadherin and {beta}-catenin. Here, we report that human N-cadherin is cleaved by PS1/{gamma}-secretase in response to physiological concentration of glutamate (Glu) stimulation, yielding a fragment Ncad/CTF2. The expression of Ncad/CTF2 in neuronal cells led to its translocation to the nucleus, and caused a prominent enhancement of cytoplasmic and nuclear {beta}-catenin levels in a cell-cell contact dependent manner, via following mechanisms: 1, inhibition of {beta}-catenin phosphorylation; 2, transactivation of {beta}-catenin; and 3, inhibition of N-cadherin transcription, and finally enhanced {beta}-catenin nuclear signaling. Since the regulation of cellular {beta}-catenin level is essential for synaptic function, disruption in the cleavage of N-cadherin may be causally linked to the synaptic dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD)

  7. Bioinformatics Knowledge Map for Analysis of Beta-Catenin Function in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arighi, Cecilia N.; Wu, Cathy H.

    2015-01-01

    Given the wealth of bioinformatics resources and the growing complexity of biological information, it is valuable to integrate data from disparate sources to gain insight into the role of genes/proteins in health and disease. We have developed a bioinformatics framework that combines literature mining with information from biomedical ontologies and curated databases to create knowledge “maps” of genes/proteins of interest. We applied this approach to the study of beta-catenin, a cell adhesion molecule and transcriptional regulator implicated in cancer. The knowledge map includes post-translational modifications (PTMs), protein-protein interactions, disease-associated mutations, and transcription factors co-activated by beta-catenin and their targets and captures the major processes in which beta-catenin is known to participate. Using the map, we generated testable hypotheses about beta-catenin biology in normal and cancer cells. By focusing on proteins participating in multiple relation types, we identified proteins that may participate in feedback loops regulating beta-catenin transcriptional activity. By combining multiple network relations with PTM proteoform-specific functional information, we proposed a mechanism to explain the observation that the cyclin dependent kinase CDK5 positively regulates beta-catenin co-activator activity. Finally, by overlaying cancer-associated mutation data with sequence features, we observed mutation patterns in several beta-catenin PTM sites and PTM enzyme binding sites that varied by tissue type, suggesting multiple mechanisms by which beta-catenin mutations can contribute to cancer. The approach described, which captures rich information for molecular species from genes and proteins to PTM proteoforms, is extensible to other proteins and their involvement in disease. PMID:26509276

  8. Stimulation of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity and Na{sup +} coupled glucose transport by {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Wilmes, Jan; Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Lam, Rebecca S.; Jakupi, Muharrem; Foeller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} The oncogenic transcription factor {beta}-catenin stimulates the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. {yields} {beta}-Catenin stimulates SGLT1 dependent Na{sup +}, glucose cotransport. {yields} The effects are independent of transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin sensitive transport may contribute to properties of proliferating cells. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin is a multifunctional protein stimulating as oncogenic transcription factor several genes important for cell proliferation. {beta}-Catenin-regulated genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which is known to stimulate a variety of transport systems. The present study explored the possibility that {beta}-catenin influences membrane transport. To this end, {beta}-catenin was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGLT1 and electrogenic transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. As a result, expression of {beta}-catenin significantly enhanced the ouabain-sensitive current of the endogeneous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. Inhibition of vesicle trafficking by brefeldin A revealed that the stimulatory effect of {beta}-catenin on the endogenous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase was not due to enhanced stability of the pump protein in the cell membrane. Expression of {beta}-catenin further enhanced glucose-induced current (Ig) in SGLT1-expressing oocytes. In the absence of SGLT1 Ig was negligible irrespective of {beta}-catenin expression. The stimulating effect of {beta}-catenin on both Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase and SGLT1 activity was observed even in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. The experiments disclose a completely novel function of {beta}-catenin, i.e. the regulation of transport.

  9. Evidence that the beta-catenin nuclear translocation assay allows for measuring presenilin 1 dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gassen, G.; De Jonghe, C.; Nishimura, M.; Yu, G.; Kuhn, S.; St George-Hyslop, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the presenilin (PSEN) genes are responsible for the majority of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) cases. PSEN1 is a component of a high molecular weight, endoplasmic reticulum, membrane-bound protein complex, including beta-catenin. Pathogenic PSEN1 mutations were demonstrated to have an effect on beta-catenin and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta(GSK-3beta), two members of the wingless Wnt pathway. The nuclear translocation and the stability of beta-catenin, and the interaction between GSK3beta and PSEN1 were influenced. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stably transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells overexpressing wild-type (wt) and mutant (mt) PSEN1, treated with and without LiCl, were used to isolate cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. By Western blot analysis, endogenous beta-catenin levels were examined. By analyzing cytosolic fractions of PSEN1, transfected and nontransfected HEK 293 cells, and total brain extracts of AD patients and controls, we evaluated the effect of PSEN1 overexpression on beta-catenin stability. Finally, we analyzed the effect of pathogenic PSEN1 mutations on the interaction between PSEN1 and GSK3beta by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. RESULTS: We report reduced nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in cells stably expressing I143T, G384A, and T113-114ins PSEN1. The G384A PSEN1 mutation showed a similar pronounced effect on nuclear translocation of beta-catenin, as reported for processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into amyloid beta(Abeta). Overexpression of PSEN1 and the presence of pathogenic mutations in PSEN1 had no significant effect on the stability of beta-catenin. Nonspecific binding of overexpressed PSEN1 to endogenous GSK3beta was observed when GSK3beta was immunoprecipitated. Immunoprecipitation of PSEN1 in cells overexpressing PSEN1 and in native cells, however, did not result in co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous GSK3beta. CONCLUSION: Our results further establish the nuclear

  10. Activation of beta-catenin signalling increases StarD7 gene expression in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Rena, V; Angeletti, S; Panzetta-Dutari, G; Genti-Raimondi, S

    2009-10-01

    StarD7 gene encodes a protein that belongs to the StAR-related lipid transfer proteins involved in intracellular transport and metabolism of lipids. It has been previously documented that StarD7 has a wide-spread mRNA expression in trophoblastic tissues and several tumour cell lines with highest levels in both choriocarcinoma JEG-3 and JAR cells, hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2, and colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of the human StarD7 gene, we have cloned and characterized the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Transient transfections of several 5'deleted StarD7-promoter-firefly luciferase constructs into JEG-3 cells indicated that the -312/+157 region contains the gene minimal promoter. In addition, sequence analysis of a 1.6kb gene fragment revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter as well as multiple regulatory motifs, including one regulatory element corresponding to the T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) binding site. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta), a component of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling, increased both StarD7 mRNA and protein expression as well as its promoter activity. Co-transfection experiments in JEG-3 cell line revealed that the StarD7 promoter is activated by TCF4 transcription factor and by its beta-catenin coactivator. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of the TCF4 site located -614/-608bp relative to the transcription start site markedly diminished StarD7 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that beta-catenin and TCF4 are bound in vivo to the StarD7 gene promoter in JEG-3 cells treated with lithium chloride. Collectively, these studies show that beta-catenin and TCF4 activate the human StarD7 gene interacting with its promoter region through Wnt/beta-catenin signalling.

  11. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling regulates cancer stem cells in lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Yawei; Ma, Daoxin

    2010-02-12

    Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays an important role not only in cancer, but also in cancer stem cells. In this study, we found that {beta}-catenin and OCT-4 was highly expressed in cisplatin (DDP) selected A549 cells. Stimulating A549 cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin and up-regulation of a typical Wnt target gene cyclin D1. This stimulation also significantly enhanced proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities in A549 cells. Moreover, the up-regulation of OCT-4, a stem cell marker, was observed through real-time PCR and Western blotting. In a reverse approach, we inhibited Wnt signaling by knocking down the expression of {beta}-catenin using RNA interference technology. This inhibition resulted in down-regulation of the Wnt target gene cyclin D1 as well as the proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities. Meanwhile, the expression of OCT-4 was reduced after the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in lung cancer stem cell properties, and it also regulates OCT-4, a lung cancer stem cell marker.

  12. Wnt-3A/beta-catenin signaling induces transcription from the LEF-1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Filali, Mohammed; Cheng, Ningli; Abbott, Duane; Leontiev, Vladimir; Engelhardt, John F

    2002-09-06

    Members of the Wnt family of secreted molecules have been established as key factors in determining cell fate and morphogenic signaling. It has long been recognized that Wnt induces morphogenic signaling through the Tcf/LEF-1 cascade by regulating free intracellular levels of beta-catenin, a co-factor for Tcf/LEF-1 transcription factors. In the present study, we have demonstrated that Wnt-3A can also directly induce transcription from the LEF-1 promoter. This induction was dependent on glycogen synthase kinase 3beta inactivation, a rise in free intracellular beta-catenin, and a short 110-bp Wnt-responsive element (WRE) in the LEF-1 promoter. Linear and internal deletion of this WRE led to a dramatic increase in constitutive LEF-1 promoter activity and loss of Wnt-3A responsiveness. In isolation, the 110-bp WRE conferred context-independent Wnt-3A or beta-catenin(S37A) responsiveness to a heterologous SV40 promoter. Studies expressing dominant active and negative forms of LEF-1, beta-catenin, GSK-3beta, and beta-catenin/LEF-1 fusions suggest that Wnt-3A activates the LEF-1 promoter through a beta-catenin-dependent and LEF-1-independent process. Wnt-3A expression also induced multiple changes in the binding of factors to the WRE and suggests that regulatory mechanisms may involve modulation of a multiprotein complex. In summary, these results provide evidence for transcriptional regulation of the LEF-1 promoter by Wnt and enhance the mechanistic understanding of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the regulation of LEF-1-dependent developmental processes.

  13. Smad6 promotes neuronal differentiation in the intermediate zone of the dorsal neural tube by inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihui; Chen, Yongfeng; Li, Zhenfei; Bai, Ge; Zhu, Yue; Yan, Rui; Tan, Fangzhi; Chen, Ye-Guang; Guillemot, Francois; Li, Lin; Jing, Naihe

    2011-07-19

    Proliferation of the neural/neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) at the ventricular zone of the dorsal spinal cord requires the stimuli of Wnt and bone morphogenic protein (BMP). However, how these two signaling pathways are regulated to initiate differentiation in the NPCs as they enter the intermediate zone is not known. Here, we show that Smad6, a negative regulator of BMP signaling, is expressed in the intermediate zone of the chick dorsal spinal cord. Knockdown experiments show that Smad6 is required for promoting NPCs to exit the cell cycle and differentiate into neurons. Although we find that Smad6 inhibits BMP signaling, as expected, we also find that Smad6 unexpectedly inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by Smad6 is independent of its effect on the BMP pathway. Rather, Smad6 through its N-terminal domain and link region enhances the interaction of C-terminal binding protein with the β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) complex and the TCF-binding element to inhibit β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation. Our study provides evidence that transition of NPCs from a proliferative state to a differentiating state is controlled by the dual inhibitory role of Smad6 to both BMP and Wnt signaling at the level of transcription.

  14. Interactions between PPAR Gamma and the Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Type 2 Diabetes and Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Claes, Victor

    2017-01-01

    In both colon cancer and type 2 diabetes, metabolic changes induced by upregulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) may help account for the frequent association of these two diseases. In both diseases, PPAR gamma is downregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated. In colon cancer, upregulation of the canonical Wnt system induces activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and deactivation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. As a result, a large part of cytosolic pyruvate is converted into lactate through activation of lactate dehydrogenase. Lactate is extruded out of the cell by means of activation of monocarboxylate lactate transporter-1. This phenomenon is called Warburg effect. PPAR gamma agonists induce beta-catenin inhibition, while inhibition of the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activates PPAR gamma. PMID:28298922

  15. Effects of curcumin in pediatric epithelial liver tumors: inhibition of tumor growth and alpha-fetoprotein in vitro and in vivo involving the NFkappaB- and the beta-catenin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bortel, Nicola; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Schmid, Evi; Kirchner, Bettina; Frank, Jan; Kocher, Alexa; Schiborr, Christina; Warmann, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Ellerkamp, Verena

    2015-01-01

    In children with hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC) the 5-year overall survival rate is poor. Effects of cytostatic therapies such as cisplatin and doxorubicin are limited due to chemoresistance and tumor relapse. In adult HCC, several antitumor properties are described for the use of curcumin. Curcumin is one of the best-investigated phytochemicals in complementary oncology without relevant side effects. Its use is limited by low bioavailability. Little is known about the influence of curcumin on pediatric epithelial hepatic malignancies. We investigated the effects of curcumin in combination with cisplatin on two pediatric epithelial liver tumor cell lines. As mechanisms of action inhibition of NFkappaB, beta-catenin, and decrease of cyclin D were identified. Using a mouse xenograft model we could show a significant decrease of alpha-fetoprotein after combination therapy of oral micellar curcumin and cisplatin. Significant concentrations of curcuminoids were found in blood samples, organ lysates, and tumor tissue after oral micellar curcumin administration. Micellar curcumin in combination with cisplatin can be a promising strategy for treatment of pediatric HCC. PMID:26515460

  16. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Jeong, Yongsu; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  17. Beta-catenin--a supporting role in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Case, Natasha; Rubin, Janet

    2010-06-01

    In the last 5 years a role for beta-catenin in the skeleton has been cemented. Beginning with mutations in the Lrp5 receptor that control beta-catenin canonical downstream signals, and progressing to transgenic models with bone-specific alteration of beta-catenin, research has shown that beta-catenin is required for normal bone development. A cell critical to bone in which beta-catenin activity determines function is the marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), where sustained beta-catenin prevents its distribution into adipogenic lineage. beta-Catenin actions are less well understood in mature osteoblasts: while beta-catenin contributes to control of osteoclastic bone resorption via alteration of the osteoprotegerin/RANKL ratio, a specific regulatory role during osteoblast bone synthesis has not yet been determined. The proven ability of mechanical factors to prevent beta-catenin degradation and induce nuclear translocation through Lrp-independent mechanisms suggests processes by which exercise might modulate bone mass via control of lineage allocation, in particular, by preventing precursor distribution into the adipocyte pool. Effects resulting from mechanical activation of beta-catenin in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes likely modulate bone resorption, but whether beta-catenin is involved in osteoblast synthetic function remains to be proven for both mechanical and soluble mediators. As beta-catenin appears to support the downstream effects of multiple osteogenic factors, studies clarifying when and where beta-catenin effects occur will be relevant for translational approaches aimed at preventing bone loss and terminal adipogenic conversion.

  18. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin promotes angiogenic and anti-apoptotic signaling through the induction of VEGF, Bcl-2 and survivin expression in rat ischemic preconditioned myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Shigeaki; Zhan, Lijun; Altaf, Elham; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2006-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Bcl-2 and survivin expression after myocardial infarction (MI). Mechanisms of angiogenic and anti-apoptotic effects due to IP still remain unclear. The present study attempts to address whether GSK-3beta-beta-catenin signaling in turn interacts with T-cell transcription factor/lymphoid-enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) and regulates these genes in the ischemic preconditioned myocardium. In a rat MI model with permanent occlusion of left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), IP (four cycles of 4-min of ischemia and 4-min of reperfusion) significantly phosphorylated and inhibited GSK-3beta and accumulated beta-catenin in the cytosol and nucleus. Wortmannin, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, repressed this effect in our model. We examined whether pretreatment with GSK-3beta inhibitor lithium or SB216763, mimicked IP-mediated angiogenesis and cardioprotection. Lithium- or SB216763- treated rats revealed accumulation of cytosolic and nuclear beta-catenin. This was followed by increased TCF/LEF transcriptional activity and the upregulation of VEGF, Bcl-2 and survivin mRNA expression accompanied by reduction of apoptotic cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells and increased capillary density after MI. The results of this study demonstrate, first time that inhibition of GSK-3beta followed by accumulation of beta-catenin in the cytosol and nucleus has potent anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effects after MI and that the PI3-kinase/GSK-3beta/beta-catenin signaling pathway plays an important role in IP.

  19. Micro RNA-214 contributes to proteasome independent downregulation of beta catenin in Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cell model STHdhQ111/Q111.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Supratim; Raha, Sanghamitra

    2015-04-10

    Role of beta catenin in Huntington's disease (HD) is not clear. Previous studies on HD reported varied levels of beta catenin. In the present study we showed that beta catenin is post transcriptionally down-regulated in mutant huntingtin knock-in cell model STHdhQ111/Q111. This in turn leads to decreased level of wnt/beta catenin responsive genes. We observed that Gsk3beta or Gsk3beta (phospho Ser 9) is unaltered in HD and this down-regulation of beta catenin is independent of proteasomal degradation. Finally, we showed that the overexpression of miR-214 leads to the down-regulation of beta catenin at protein level only and reduces its transcriptional activity. We concluded that, miR-214 contributes to the processes that result in proteasome independent post transcriptional down-regulation of beta catenin in STHdhQ111/Q111, probably through inhibition of protein synthesis from beta catenin mRNA.

  20. Modulation of Wnt3a-mediated nuclear beta-catenin accumulation and activation by integrin-linked kinase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, A; Syam, S; Dedhar, S

    2006-12-14

    The Wnt gene family encodes secreted signaling molecules that play important roles in tumorgenesis and embryogenesis. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates target gene expression via the stabilization and nuclear translocation of the cytoplasmic pool of beta-catenin. The activation of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is also known to regulate the stabilization and subsequent nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in several epithelial cell models. We now report that molecular and pharmacological inhibition of ILK activity in mammalian cells directly modulates Wnt signaling by suppressing the stabilization and nuclear translocation of beta-catenin, as well as beta-catenin/Lef-mediated transcription. Inhibition of ILK activity, but not phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) or MEK activities suppresses nuclear beta-catenin stabilization in cells stably expressing Wnt3a as well as in cells exposed to either Wnt3a conditioned media or purified Wnt3a. Furthermore, ILK inhibition reverses the Wnt3a-induced suppression of beta-catenin phosphorylation that accompanies beta-catenin stabilization. In addition, we show that ILK can be identified in a complex with Wnt pathway components such as adenomatous polyposis coli and GSK-3. Upon treatment of L cells with Wnt3a-CM, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3beta) becomes highly phosphorylated on Ser 9, which is completely abolished upon inhibition of ILK activity. However, acute exposure of L cells to purified Wnt3a does not result in the stimulation of GSK-3beta Ser 9 phosphorylation, despite beta-catenin stabilization. Together our data demonstrate that ILK activity can modulate acute Wnt3a mediated beta-catenin phosphorylation, stabilization and nuclear activation in a PI3K-independent manner, as well as the more prolonged PI3K-dependent secondary effects of Wnt signaling on GSK-3 phosphorylation. Finally, we suggest that a novel small molecule inhibitor of ILK, QLT-0267, may be a useful tool in the regulation of pathological

  1. Aerobic Glycolysis Hypothesis Through WNT/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Exudative Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Alexandre; Lecarpentier, Yves; Guillevin, Rémy; Vallée, Jean-Noël

    2017-08-01

    Exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by molecular mechanisms responsible for the initiation of choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Inflammatory processes are associated with upregulation of the canonical WNT/beta-catenin pathway in exudative AMD. We focus this review on the link between WNT/beta-catenin pathway activation and neovascular progression in exudative AMD through activation of aerobic glycolysis for production of angiogenic factors. Increased WNT/beta-catenin pathway involves hexokinase 2 (HK2) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2). WNT/beta-catenin pathway stimulates PI3K/Akt pathway and then HIF-1alpha which activates glycolytic enzymes: glucose transporter (Glut), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A), and monocarboxylate lactate transporter (MCT-1). This phenomenon is called aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. Consequently, phosphorylation of PDK-1 inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). Thus, a large part of pyruvate cannot be converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and only a part of acetyl-CoA can enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Cytosolic pyruvate is converted into lactate through the action of LDH-A. In exudative AMD, high level of cytosolic lactate is correlated with increase of VEGF expression, the angiogenic factor of CNV. Photoreceptors in retina cells can metabolize glucose through aerobic glycolysis to protect them against oxidative damage, as cancer cells do.

  2. Upregulation of TCF4 expression as a transcriptional target of beta-catenin/p300 complexes during trans-differentiation of endometrial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Makoto; Hashimura, Miki; Kuwata, Takeshi; Hamano, Mieko; Okayasu, Isao

    2005-06-01

    Nuclear stabilization of beta-catenin and its interaction with TCF/LEF factors are key events in transduction of the Wnt/beta-catenin signal pathway. Our previous study indicated that nuclear beta-catenin accumulation provides an initial signal for trans-differentiation toward the squamoid phenotype of endometrial carcinoma (Em Ca) cells in a TCF4-dependent manner, which makes this a possible factor for a positive prognosis. However, little is known about regulation of TCF4 expression in Em Cas. We show here that beta-catenin can directly induce transcription from the TCF4 promoter, the effect being enhanced by the p300 coactivator. In clinical cases, nuclear beta-catenin accumulation was found to frequently overlap with TCF4 immunoreactivity in morules and surrounding glandular carcinoma lesions, showing a significant positive correlation (r = 0.82, P < 0.0001), in contrast to areas of squamous metaplasia (SqM) within Em Cas. In cases with coexistence of two squamoid features in trans-differentiated areas, loss of nuclear beta-catenin and TCF4 immunoreactivity was closely related to change in the morphology from the morular to the SqM phenotype. The TCF4 promoter contains a single consensus TCF-binding site that is critical for activation by beta-catenin. The p300 coactivator, in particular N-terminal residues 1 to 670, appears sufficient to enhance beta-catenin-dependent transcription, again with TCF4-dependence. These findings indicate that a positive feedback loop of TCF4 expression mediated by beta-catenin/p300 may be important for initial steps during trans-differentiation of Em Ca cells. In addition, its downregulation is associated with induction of a more-differentiated squamoid phenotype.

  3. Enhancing Beta-Catenin Activity via GSK3beta Inhibition Protects PC12 Cells against Rotenone Toxicity through Nurr1 Induction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Cen, Luan; Qu, Shaogang; Wei, Lei; Mo, Mingshu; Feng, Junmin; Sun, Congcong; Xiao, Yousheng; Luo, Qin; Li, Shaomin; Yang, Xinling; Xu, Pingyi

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Increasing evidence showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 play crucial roles in the survival and functional maintenance of DA neurons in the midbrain and GSK-3β antagonists LiCl and SB216763 were used to activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway experimentally. However, the detail mechanism underlying the neuroprotection against apoptosis on DA neuron is still unclear and the interaction between Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 remains undisclosed. In this study, using cell biological assay we investigated the function of Wnt/β-catenin and its crosstalk with Nurr1 on the course of PC12 cell degeneration in vitro. Our data showed that PC12 cell viability was inhibited by rotenone, but attenuated by GSK-3β antagonists LiCl or SB216763. The activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway was deregulated on exposure of rotenone in a concentration-dependent manner. After the interference of β-catenin with siRNA, LiCl or SB216763 failed to protect PC12 cells from apoptosis by the rotenone toxicity. Our data confirmed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling activated by LiCl or SB216763 enhanced Nurr1 expression to 2.75 ± 0.55 and 4.06 ± 0.41 folds respectively compared with control detected by real-time PCR and the interaction of β-catenin with Nurr1 was identified by co-immunoprecipitate analysis. In conclusion, the data suggested that Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 are crucial factors in the survival of DA neurons, and the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway exerts protective effects on DA neurons partly by mean of a co-active pattern with Nurr1. This finding may shed a light on the potential treatment of Parkinson disease.

  4. Enhancing Beta-Catenin Activity via GSK3beta Inhibition Protects PC12 Cells against Rotenone Toxicity through Nurr1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Mo, Mingshu; Feng, Junmin; Sun, Congcong; Xiao, Yousheng; Luo, Qin; Li, Shaomin; Yang, Xinling; Xu, Pingyi

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Increasing evidence showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 play crucial roles in the survival and functional maintenance of DA neurons in the midbrain and GSK-3β antagonists LiCl and SB216763 were used to activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway experimentally. However, the detail mechanism underlying the neuroprotection against apoptosis on DA neuron is still unclear and the interaction between Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 remains undisclosed. In this study, using cell biological assay we investigated the function of Wnt/β-catenin and its crosstalk with Nurr1 on the course of PC12 cell degeneration in vitro. Our data showed that PC12 cell viability was inhibited by rotenone, but attenuated by GSK-3β antagonists LiCl or SB216763. The activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway was deregulated on exposure of rotenone in a concentration-dependent manner. After the interference of β-catenin with siRNA, LiCl or SB216763 failed to protect PC12 cells from apoptosis by the rotenone toxicity. Our data confirmed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling activated by LiCl or SB216763 enhanced Nurr1 expression to 2.75 ± 0.55 and 4.06 ± 0.41 folds respectively compared with control detected by real-time PCR and the interaction of β-catenin with Nurr1 was identified by co-immunoprecipitate analysis. In conclusion, the data suggested that Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 are crucial factors in the survival of DA neurons, and the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway exerts protective effects on DA neurons partly by mean of a co-active pattern with Nurr1. This finding may shed a light on the potential treatment of Parkinson disease. PMID:27045591

  5. Positive reciprocal regulation of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 and beta-catenin/TCF signaling.

    PubMed

    Bheda, Anjali; Yue, Wei; Gullapalli, Anuradha; Whitehurst, Chris; Liu, Renshui; Pagano, Joseph S; Shackelford, Julia

    2009-06-18

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are involved in the regulation of distinct critical cellular processes. Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCH L1) has been linked to several neurological diseases as well as human cancer, but the physiological targets and the regulation of UCH L1 expression in vivo have been largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that UCH L1 up-regulates beta-catenin/TCF signaling: UCH L1 forms endogenous complexes with beta-catenin, stabilizes it and up-regulates beta-catenin/TCF-dependent transcription. We also show that, reciprocally, beta-catenin/TCF signaling up-regulates expression of endogenous UCH L1 mRNA and protein. Moreover, using ChIP assay and direct mutagenesis we identify two TCF4-binding sites on the uch l1 promoter that are involved in this regulation. Since the expression and deubiquitinating activity of UCH L1 are required for its own basic promoter activity, we propose that UCH L1 up-regulates its expression by activation of the oncogenic beta-catenin/TCF signaling in transformed cells.

  6. Beta-catenin expression in psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    El-wahed Gaber, Mohamed Abd; El-Halim Kandil, Mona Abd; El-Farargy, Shawki Mahmoud; Galbet, Doaa Abd Elmoniem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease characterized by abnormal keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Beta-catenin participates in intercellular adhesion. Catenins are proteins found in complexes with cadherin cell adhesion molecules of cells. The role of catenin in regulating keratinocyte stem cell differentiation and hair follicle morphogenesis has been extensively reported. Aims and Objectives: is to study β-catenin expression in lesional and non-lesional psoriatic skin to throw light upon its possible role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Materials and Methods: Biopsies were taken from 20 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and from 10 normal controls. The distribution of Beta catenin was investigated using polycolonal rabbits B-catenin antibody-1 by immunohistochemical method. Results: In this study membranous β-catenin expression was significantly demonstrated in the control group then the non-lesional areas in comparison to the lesional areas (P < 0.001). Nuclear β-catenin staining expression was significantly more demonstrated in lesional and non-lesional areas in comparison to the control cases (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The down regulation of membranous β-catenin expression in lesional psoriatic skin might reflect a useful phenotypic marker of hyperprolifration of keratinocytes in psoriasis. Moreover, the mild down regulation of membranous β-catenin expression in non lesional psoriatic skin may provide clues about incipient structural abnormalities in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, providing an early diagnostic indicator for evolution to a generalized form of the disease. Nuclear β-catenin expression was not found in the control group but was demonstrated in lesional and moderately in non-lesional reflecting its role in kerationcyte proliferation. PMID:25657910

  7. Expression of beta-catenin is regulated by PI-3 kinase and sodium butyrate in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Turecková, Jolana; Kucerová, Dana; Vojtechová, Martina; Sloncová, Eva; Tuhácková, Zdena

    2006-01-01

    beta-catenin has a dual function; it is implicated in intercellular junctions and transcriptional co-activation. Here we examined the regulation of the expression and localization of beta-catenin in HT29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Our results showed that inhibition of PI-3 kinase with wortmannin was accompanied by a considerably reduced expression of beta-catenin. This effect was overcome by butyrate and occurred at the protein level, not at the level of mRNA. Moreover, NaBT significantly increased the phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein, S6, known to participate in the translational control of gene expression. This was accompanied by the increased phosphorylation of p70 S6K and MAPKs, the effector proteins that are upstream of protein S6 in the distinct signaling pathways. These facts indicate that different signaling pathways may be involved in the regulation of beta-catenin synthesis. Modulation of beta-catenin expression induced by NaBT appeared to occur at the level of protein translation, suggesting that NaBT may act as a translational regulator.

  8. Natural derivatives of curcumin attenuate the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway through down-regulation of the transcriptional coactivator p300

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Min-Jung; Cho, Munju; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Dong-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-12-26

    Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT), which is aberrantly activated in colorectal cancer. However, the effects of its natural analogs (demethoxycurcumin [DMC] and bisdemethoxycurcumin [BDMC]) and metabolite (tetrahydrocurcumin [THC]) on the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway have not been investigated. Here, we show that DMC and BDMC suppressed CRT that was activated by Wnt3a conditioned-medium (Wnt3a-CM) without altering the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, and inhibited the growth of various colon cancer cells, with comparable potency to curcumin. Additionally, DMC and BDMC down-regulated p300, which is a positive regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Notably, THC also inhibited CRT and cell proliferation, but to a much lesser degree than curcumin, DMC, or BDMC, indicating that the conjugated bonds in the central seven-carbon chain of curcuminoids are essential for the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway and the anti-proliferative activity of curcuminoids. Thus, our findings suggest that curcumin derivatives inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by decreasing the amount of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

  9. Jagged 1 is a beta-catenin target gene required for ectopic hair follicle formation in adult epidermis.

    PubMed

    Estrach, Soline; Ambler, Carrie A; Lo Celso, Cristina; Hozumi, Katsuto; Watt, Fiona M

    2006-11-01

    The Wnt and Notch signalling pathways regulate hair follicle maintenance, but how they intersect is unknown. We show that Notch signalling is active in the hair follicle pre-cortex, a region of high Wnt activity, where commitment to hair lineages occurs. Deletion of jagged 1 (Jag1) results in inhibition of the hair growth cycle and conversion of hair follicles into cysts of cells undergoing interfollicular epidermal differentiation. Conversely, activation of Notch in adult epidermis triggers expansion of the base of the hair follicle, sebaceous gland enlargement and abnormal clumping of the follicles. In adult epidermis, the induction of new hair follicle formation by beta-catenin is prevented by blocking Notch signalling pharmacologically or through Jag1 deletion. Conversely, activation of both pathways accelerates growth and differentiation of ectopic follicles. beta-catenin stimulates Notch signalling by inducing Jag1 transcription. We conclude that the Notch pathway acts downstream of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway to determine epidermal cell fate.

  10. Crystal Structure of a Full-Length [beta]-Catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yi; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Liu, Jing; Berndt, Jason D.; Zheng, Jie J.; Moon, Randall T.; Xu, Wenqing

    2008-08-19

    {beta}-catenin plays essential roles in cell adhesion and Wnt signaling, while deregulation of {beta}-catenin is associated with multiple diseases including cancers. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length zebrafish {beta}-catenin and a human {beta}-catenin fragment that contains both the armadillo repeat and the C-terminal domains. Our structures reveal that the N-terminal region of the C-terminal domain, a key component of the C-terminal transactivation domain, forms a long {alpha} helix that packs on the C-terminal end of the armadillo repeat domain, and thus forms part of the {beta}-catenin superhelical core. The existence of this helix redefines our view of interactions of {beta}-catenin with some of its critical partners, including ICAT and Chibby, which may form extensive interactions with this C-terminal domain {alpha} helix. Our crystallographic and NMR studies also suggest that the unstructured N-terminal and C-terminal tails interact with the ordered armadillo repeat domain in a dynamic and variable manner.

  11. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu; Boyer, Arthur; Liu, Fei

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  12. Alzheimer Disease: Crosstalk between the Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPARs Alpha and Gamma

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Alexandre; Lecarpentier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still not fully understood. In AD, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been shown to be downregulated while the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma (mARN and protein) is upregulated. Certain neurodegenerative diseases share the same Wnt/beta-catenin/PPAR gamma profile, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Conversely, other NDs share an opposite profile, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, and Friedreich's ataxia. AD is characterized by the deposition of extracellular Abeta plaques and the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in the central nervous system (CNS). Activation of Wnt signaling or inhibition of both glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and Dickkopf 1, two key negative regulators of the canonical Wnt pathway, are able to protect against Abeta neurotoxicity and to ameliorate cognitive performance in AD patients. Although PPAR gamma is upregulated in AD patients, and despite the fact that it has been shown that the PPAR gamma and Wnt/beta catenin pathway systems work in an opposite manner, PPAR gamma agonists diminish learning and memory deficits, decrease Abeta activation of microglia, and prevent hippocampal and cortical neurons from dying. These beneficial effects observed in AD transgenic mice and patients might be partially due to the anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR gamma agonists. Moreover, activation of PPAR alpha upregulates transcription of the alpha-secretase gene and represents a new therapeutic treatment for AD. This review focuses largely on the behavior of two opposing pathways in AD, namely Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and PPAR gamma. It is hoped that this approach may help to develop novel AD therapeutic strategies integrating PPAR alpha signaling. PMID:27807401

  13. Apc bridges Wnt/{beta}-catenin and BMP signaling during osteoblast differentiation of KS483 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miclea, Razvan L.; Horst, Geertje van der; Robanus-Maandag, Els C.; Loewik, Clemens W.G.M.; Oostdijk, Wilma; Wit, Jan M.; Karperien, Marcel

    2011-06-10

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway influences the differentiation of mesenchymal cell lineages in a quantitative and qualitative fashion depending on the dose of {beta}-catenin signaling. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) is the critical intracellular regulator of {beta}-catenin turnover. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Apc in regulating the differentiation capacity of skeletal progenitor cells, we have knocked down Apc in the murine mesenchymal stem cell-like KS483 cells by stable expression of Apc-specific small interfering RNA. In routine culture, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells displayed a mesenchymal-like spindle shape morphology, exhibited markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Apc knockdown resulted in upregulation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin and the BMP/Smad signaling pathways, but osteogenic differentiation was completely inhibited. This effect could be rescued by adding high concentrations of BMP-7 to the differentiation medium. Furthermore, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells showed no potential to differentiate into chondrocytes or adipocytes. These results demonstrate that Apc is essential for the proliferation, survival and differentiation of KS483 cells. Apc knockdown blocks the osteogenic differentiation of skeletal progenitor cells, a process that can be overruled by high BMP signaling.

  14. Neurofilament heavy polypeptide regulates the Akt-beta-catenin pathway in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Chang, Xiaofei; LeBron, Cynthia; Nagpal, Jatin K; Lee, Juna; Huang, Yiping; Yamashita, Keishi; Trink, Barry; Ratovitski, Edward A; Sidransky, David

    2010-02-03

    Aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features of aggressive cancer growth. We observed promoter methylation and loss of expression in neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH) in a significant proportion of primary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) samples that were of a high tumor grade and advanced stage. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NEFH accelerated ESCC cell growth in culture and increased tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas forced expression of NEFH significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation. Loss of NEFH caused up-regulation of pyruvate kinase-M2 type and down-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, via activation of the Akt/beta-catenin pathway, resulting in enhanced aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. The acceleration of glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction in NEFH-knockdown cells was suppressed in the absence of beta-catenin expression, and was decreased by the treatment of 2-Deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, or API-2, an Akt inhibitor. Loss of NEFH activates the Akt/beta-catenin pathway and increases glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cancer cells with methylated NEFH can be targeted for destruction with specific inhibitors of deregulated downstream pathways.

  15. Brn-2 expression controls melanoma proliferation and is directly regulated by beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Jane; Martinozzi, Silvia; Dexter, Timothy J; Champeval, Delphine; Carreira, Suzanne; Larue, Lionel; Goding, Colin R

    2004-04-01

    Constitutive activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway is a notable feature of a large minority of cases of malignant melanoma, an aggressive and increasingly common cancer. The identification of target genes downstream from this pathway is therefore crucial to our understanding of the disease. The POU domain transcription factor Brn-2 has been implicated in control of proliferation and melanoma survival, and its expression is strongly upregulated in melanoma. We show here that in vivo Brn-2 is expressed in melanocytes but not in embryonic day 11.5 melanoblasts and that its expression is directly controlled by the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in melanoma cell lines and in transgenic mice. Moreover, silent interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of Brn-2 expression in melanoma cells overexpressing beta-catenin results in significantly decreased proliferation. These results, together with the observation that BRAF signaling also induces Brn-2 expression, reveal that Brn-2 is a focus for the convergence of two key melanoma-associated signaling pathways that are linked to cell proliferation.

  16. Calcium fluxes in dorsal forerunner cells antagonize beta-catenin and alter left-right patterning.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Igor; Houston, Douglas W; Rebagliati, Michael R; Slusarski, Diane C

    2008-01-01

    Establishment of the left-right axis is essential for normal organ morphogenesis and function. Ca(2+) signaling and cilia function in the zebrafish Kuppfer's Vesicle (KV) have been implicated in laterality. Here we describe an endogenous Ca(2+) release event in the region of the KV precursors (dorsal forerunner cells, DFCs), prior to KV and cilia formation. Manipulation of Ca(2+) release to disrupt this early flux does not impact early DFC specification, but results in altered DFC migration or cohesion in the tailbud at somite stages. This leads to disruption of KV formation followed by bilateral expression of asymmetrical genes, and randomized organ laterality. We identify beta-catenin inhibition as a Ca(2+)-signaling target and demonstrate that localized loss of Ca(2+) within the DFC region or DFC-specific activation of beta-catenin is sufficient to alter laterality in zebrafish. We identify a previously unknown DFC-like cell population in Xenopus and demonstrate a similar Ca(2+)-sensitive stage. As in zebrafish, manipulation of Ca(2+) release results in ectopic nuclear beta-catenin and altered laterality. Overall, our data support a conserved early Ca(2+) requirement in DFC-like cell function in zebrafish and Xenopus.

  17. PECAM-1 (CD31) functions as a reservoir for and a modulator of tyrosine-phosphorylated beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ilan, N; Mahooti, S; Rimm, D L; Madri, J A

    1999-09-01

    Catenins function as regulators of cellular signaling events in addition to their previously documented roles in adherens junction formation and function. Evidence to date suggests that beta and gamma catenins can act as signaling molecules, bind transcriptional factors and translocate to the nucleus. Beta- and gamma-catenin are also major substrates for protein tyrosine kinases, and tyrosine phosphorylation of junctional proteins is correlated with decreased adhesiveness. One way in which catenin functions are modulated is by dynamic incorporation into junctional complexes which controls, in part, the cytoplasmic levels of catenins. Here we show that: (1) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces beta-catenin tyrosine phosphorylation in a time-, and dose-dependent manner and that VEGF receptors co-localize to areas of endothelial cell-cell contact in vitro and in vivo. (2) Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 can function as a reservoir for, and modulator of, tyrosine phosphorylated beta-catenin. (3) PECAM-1 can prevent beta-catenin nuclear translocation in transfected SW480 colon carcinoma cells. We suggest that PECAM-1 may play a role in modulating beta-catenin tyrosine phosphorylation levels, localization and signaling and by doing so, functions as an important modulator of the endothelium.

  18. WNT10B functional dualism: beta-catenin/Tcf-dependent growth promotion or independent suppression with deregulated expression in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Hirohide; Matsubara, Kenichi; Zhou, Xiaoling; Okamura, Shu; Kubo, Takahiko; Murase, Yaeko; Shikauchi, Yuko; Esteller, Manel; Herman, James G; Wei Wang, Xin; Harris, Curtis C

    2007-11-01

    We found aberrant DNA methylation of the WNT10B promoter region in 46% of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 15% of colon cancer samples. Three of 10 HCC and one of two colon cancer cell lines demonstrated low or no expression, and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine reactivated WNT10B expression with the induction of demethylation, indicating that WNT10B is silenced by DNA methylation in some cancers, whereas WNT10B expression is up-regulated in seven of the 10 HCC cell lines and a colon cancer cell line. These results indicate that WNT10B can be deregulated by either overexpression or silencing in cancer. We found that WNT10B up-regulated beta-catenin/Tcf activity. However, WNT10B-overexpressing cells demonstrated a reduced growth rate and anchorage-independent growth that is independent of the beta-catenin/Tcf activation, because mutant beta-catenin-transduced cells did not suppress growth, and dominant-negative hTcf-4 failed to alleviate the growth suppression by WNT10B. Although WNT10B expression alone inhibits cell growth, it acts synergistically with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) to stimulate cell growth. WNT10B is bifunctional, one function of which is involved in beta-catenin/Tcf activation, and the other function is related to the down-regulation of cell growth through a different mechanism. We suggest that FGF switches WNT10B from a negative to a positive cell growth regulator.

  19. Polarity of response to transforming growth factor-beta1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells is regulated by beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Lee, Chien-Hung; Luo, Dong Dong; Krupa, Aleksandra; Fraser, Donald; Phillips, Aled

    2007-09-28

    Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1)-mediated loss of proximal tubular epithelial cell-cell interaction is regulated in a polarized fashion. The aim of this study was to further explore the polarity of the TGF-beta1 response and to determine the significance of R-Smad-beta-catenin association previously demonstrated to accompany adherens junction disassembly. Smad3 signaling response to TGF-beta1 was assessed by activity of the Smad3-responsive reporter gene construct (SBE)(4)-Lux and by immunoblotting for phospho-Smad proteins. Similar results were obtained with both methods. Apical application of TGF-beta1 led to increased Smad3 signaling compared with basolateral stimulation. Association of Smad proteins with beta-catenin was greater following basolateral TGFbeta-1 stimulation, as was the expression of cytoplasmic Triton-soluble beta-catenin. Inhibition of beta-catenin expression by small interfering RNA augmented Smad3 signaling. Lithium chloride, a GSK-3 inhibitor, increased expression of beta-catenin and attenuated TGF-beta1-dependent Smad3 signaling. Lithium chloride did not influence degradation of Smad3 but resulted in decreased nuclear translocation. Smad2 activation as assessed by Western blot analysis and activity of the Smad2-responsive reporter constructs ARE/MF1 was also greater following apical as compared with basolateral TGFbeta-1 stimulation, suggesting that this is a generally applicable mechanism for the regulation of TGF-beta1-dependent R-Smads. Caco-2 cells are a colonic carcinoma cell line, with known resistance to the anti-proliferative effects of TGF-beta1 and increased expression of beta-catenin. We used this cell line to address the general applicability of our observations. Inhibition of beta-catenin in this cell line by small interfering RNA resulted in increased TGF-beta1-dependent Smad3 phosphorylation and restoration of TGF-beta1 anti-proliferative effects.

  20. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Huang, Yi; Li, Ji-Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Meng, Yan-Ling; Yan, Bo; Bian, Yong-Qian; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wei-Zhong; and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  1. Lithium and neuropsychiatric therapeutics: neuroplasticity via glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, beta-catenin, and neurotrophin cascades.

    PubMed

    Wada, Akihiko

    2009-05-01

    Mood disorders are not merely attributed to the functional defect of neurotransmission, but also are due to the structural impairment of neuroplasticity. Chronic stress decreases neurotrophin levels, precipitating or exacerbating depression; conversely, antidepressants increase expression of various neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor), thereby blocking or reversing structural and functional pathologies via promoting neurogenesis. Since the worldwide approval of lithium therapy in 1970, lithium has been used for its anti-manic, antidepressant, and anti-suicidal effects, yet the therapeutic mechanisms at the cellular level remain not-fully defined. During the last five years, multiple lines of evidence have shown that the mood stabilization and neurogenesis by lithium are due to the lithium-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), allowing accumulation of beta-catenin and beta-catenin-dependent gene transcriptional events. Altered levels of GSK-3beta and beta-catenin are associated with various neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, while various classical neuropsychiatric drugs inhibit GSK-3beta and up-regulate beta-catenin expression. In addition, evidence has emerged that insulin-like growth factor-I enhances antidepression, anti-anxiety, memory, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis; antidepressants up-regulate expression of insulin-like growth factor-I, while insulin-like growth factor-I up-regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and its receptor TrkB level, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced synaptic protein levels. More importantly, physical exercise and healthy diet raise transport of peripheral circulating insulin-like growth factor I into the brain, reinforcing the expression of neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and the strength of cell survival signalings (e.g., phosphoinositide 3-kinase / Akt / GSK-3beta pathway

  2. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  3. Convergence of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate/protein kinase A and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin signaling in corpus luteum progesterone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Lynn; McDonald, Claudia A; Jiang, Chao; Maroni, Dulce; Zeleznik, Anthony J; Wyatt, Todd A; Hou, Xiaoying; Davis, John S

    2009-11-01

    Progesterone secretion by the steroidogenic cells of the corpus luteum (CL) is essential for reproduction. Progesterone synthesis is under the control of LH, but the exact mechanism of this regulation is unknown. It is established that LH stimulates the LH receptor/choriogonadotropin receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor, to increase cAMP and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA-dependent regulation of the Wnt pathway components glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and beta-catenin contributes to LH-dependent steroidogenesis in luteal cells. We observed that LH via a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism stimulated the phosphorylation of GSK3beta at N-terminal Ser9 causing its inactivation and resulted in the accumulation of beta-catenin. Overexpression of N-terminal truncated beta-catenin (Delta90 beta-catenin), which lacks the phosphorylation sites responsible for its destruction, significantly augmented LH-stimulated progesterone secretion. In contrast, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3beta (GSK-S9A) reduced beta-catenin levels and inhibited LH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the association of beta-catenin with the proximal promoter of the StAR gene, a gene that expresses the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, which is a cholesterol transport protein that controls a rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Collectively these data suggest that cAMP/PKA regulation of GSK3beta/beta-catenin signaling may contribute to the acute increase in progesterone production in response to LH.

  4. Beta-catenin and Hedgehog signal strength can specify number and location of hair follicles in adult epidermis without recruitment of bulge stem cells.

    PubMed

    Silva-Vargas, Violeta; Lo Celso, Cristina; Giangreco, Adam; Ofstad, Tyler; Prowse, David M; Braun, Kristin M; Watt, Fiona M

    2005-07-01

    Using K14deltaNbeta-cateninER transgenic mice, we show that short-term, low-level beta-catenin activation stimulates de novo hair follicle formation from sebaceous glands and interfollicular epidermis, while only sustained, high-level activation induces new follicles from preexisting follicles. The Hedgehog pathway is upregulated by beta-catenin activation, and inhibition of Hedgehog signaling converts the low beta-catenin phenotype to wild-type epidermis and the high phenotype to low. beta-catenin-induced follicles contain clonogenic keratinocytes that express bulge markers; the follicles induce dermal papillae and provide a niche for melanocytes, and they undergo 4OHT-dependent cycles of growth and regression. New follicles induced in interfollicular epidermis are derived from that cellular compartment and not through bulge stem cell migration or division. These results demonstrate the remarkable capacity of adult epidermis to be reprogrammed by titrating beta-catenin and Hedgehog signal strength and establish that cells from interfollicular epidermis can acquire certain characteristics of bulge stem cells.

  5. Wnt-beta-catenin pathway signals metastasis-associated tumor cell phenotypes in triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    De, Pradip; Carlson, Jennifer H.; Wu, Hui; Marcus, Adam; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Dey, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells acquire metastasis-associated (MA) phenotypes following genetic alterations in them which cause deregulation of different signaling pathways. Earlier, we reported that an upregulation of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway (WP) is one of the genetic salient features of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and WP signaling is associated with metastasis in TNBC. Using cBioPortal, here we found that collective % of alteration(s) in WP genes, CTNNB1, APC and DVL1 among breast-invasive-carcinomas was 21% as compared to 56% in PAM50 Basal. To understand the functional relevance of WP in the biology of heterogeneous/metastasizing TNBC cells, we undertook this comprehensive study using 15 cell lines in which we examined the role of WP in the context of integrin-dependent MA-phenotypes. Directional movement of tumor cells was observed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative confocal-video-microscopy while matrigel-invasion was studied by MMP7-specific casein-zymography. WntC59, XAV939, sulindac sulfide and beta-catenin siRNA (1) inhibited fibronectin-directed migration, (2) decreased podia-parameters and motility-descriptors, (3) altered filamentous-actin, (4) decreased matrigel-invasion and (5) inhibited cell proliferation as well as 3D clonogenic growth. Sulindac sulfide and beta-catenin siRNA decreased beta-catenin/active-beta-catenin and MMP7. LWnt3ACM-stimulated proliferation, clonogenicity, fibronection-directed migration and matrigel-invasion were perturbed by WP-modulators, sulindac sulfide and GDC-0941. We studied a direct involvement of WP in metastasis by stimulating brain-metastasis-specific MDA-MB231BR cells to demonstrate that LWnt3ACM-stimulated proliferation, clonogenicity and migration were blocked following sulindac sulfide, GDC-0941 and beta-catenin knockdown. We present the first evidence showing a direct functional relationship between WP activation and integrin-dependent MA-phenotypes. By proving the functional relationship

  6. Teaching resource. Beta-catenin signaling and axis specification.

    PubMed

    Moon, Randall T

    2004-06-29

    This animation provides a representation of the beta-catenin signaling pathway in response to fertilization and the process of axis specification that occurs early in development. The process shown is based on analysis of embryos of the amphibian Xenopus. This animation would be useful in illustrating events that occur early in embryogenesis and how embryos become polarized as a consequence of localized signaling processes.

  7. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  8. alpha-Catenin overrides Src-dependent activation of beta-catenin oncogenic signaling.

    PubMed

    Inge, Landon J; Rajasekaran, Sigrid A; Wolle, Daniel; Barwe, Sonali P; Ryazantsev, Sergey; Ewing, Charles M; Isaacs, William B; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K

    2008-06-01

    Loss of alpha-catenin is one of the characteristics of prostate cancer. The catenins (alpha and beta) associated with E-cadherin play a critical role in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin dissociates it from E-cadherin and facilitates its entry into the nucleus, where beta-catenin acts as a transcriptional activator inducing genes involved in cell proliferation. Thus, beta-catenin regulates cell-cell adhesion and cell proliferation. Mechanisms controlling the balance between these functions of beta-catenin invariably are altered in cancer. Although a wealth of information is available about beta-catenin deregulation during oncogenesis, much less is known about how or whether alpha-catenin regulates beta-catenin functions. In this study, we show that alpha-catenin acts as a switch regulating the cell-cell adhesion and proliferation functions of beta-catenin. In alpha-catenin-null prostate cancer cells, reexpression of alpha-catenin increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased beta-catenin transcriptional activity, cyclin D1 levels, and cell proliferation. Further, Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin is a major mechanism for decreased beta-catenin interaction with E-cadherin in alpha-catenin-null cells. alpha-Catenin attenuated the effect of Src phosphorylation by increasing beta-catenin association with E-cadherin. We also show that alpha-catenin increases the sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to a Src inhibitor in suppressing cell proliferation. This study reveals for the first time that alpha-catenin is a key regulator of beta-catenin transcriptional activity and that the status of alpha-catenin expression in tumor tissues might have prognostic value for Src targeted therapy.

  9. Cables links Robo-bound Abl kinase to N-cadherin-bound beta-catenin to mediate Slit-induced modulation of adhesion and transcription.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jinseol; Buchan, Tim; Zukerberg, Lawrence; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2007-08-01

    Binding of the secreted axon guidance cue Slit to its Robo receptor results in inactivation of the neural, calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin, providing a rapid epigenetic mechanism for integrating guidance and adhesion information. This requires the formation of a multimolecular complex containing Robo, Abl tyrosine kinase and N-cadherin. Here we show that on binding of Slit to Robo, the adaptor protein Cables is recruited to Robo-associated Abl and forms a multimeric complex by binding directly to N-cadherin-associated beta-catenin. Complex formation results in Abl-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin on tyrosine 489, leading to a decrease in its affinity for N-cadherin, loss of N-cadherin function, and targeting of phospho-Y489-beta-catenin to the nucleus. Nuclear beta-catenin combines with the transcription factor Tcf/Lef and activates transcription. Thus, Slit-induced formation of the Robo-N-cadherin complex results in a rapid loss of cadherin-mediated adhesion and has more lasting effects on gene transcription.

  10. Flavonoids of Herba Epimedii regulate osteogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells through BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-fang; Li, Guo; Chan, Chu-yan; Meng, Chun-ling; Lin, Marie Chia-mi; Chen, Yang-chao; He, Ming-liang; Leung, Ping-chung; Kung, Hsiang-fu

    2010-01-15

    Herba Epimedii is one of the most commonly used Chinese herbs for treating osteoporosis. In the present study, the flavonoids of Herba Epimedii (HEF) have shown to promote the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. They were noted to enhance the mRNA expression of BMP-2, BMP-4, Runx2, beta-catenin and cyclinD1, all of which are BMP or Wnt-signaling pathway related regulators. The osteogenic effect was inhibited by the introduction of noggin and DKK-1, which is classical inhibitor of BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, respectively. These results suggest that HEF exerts promoting effect on osteogenic differentiation, which plausibly functions via the BMP and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways. Considering the therapeutic efficiency and economical issues, HEF may be a potential candidate for promoting bone regeneration. On the other hand, osteogenic differentiation of MSCs may also be a promising and attractive tool to apply in bone repair.

  11. Teaching resource. Canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Randall T

    2004-06-29

    This animation provides an interactive presentation of the Wnt signaling pathway as it may occur in multiple cell types. This animation would be useful in teaching developmental biology, immunology, and cell signaling courses. Activation of Wnt pathways can modulate cell proliferation, cell survival, cell behavior, and cell fate. In the basal, unstimulated state in the absence of ligand, there is a constitutively active kinase, which phosphorylates target proteins, resulting in their degradation. Thus, the presence of the ligand Wnt inactivates the kinase allowing accumulation of beta-catenin, which then translocates to the nucleus and acts as a transcriptional regulator.

  12. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor IX (GSI) Impairs Concomitant Activation of Notch and wnt-beta-catenin Pathways in CD44(+) Gastric Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Barat, Samarpita; Chen, Xi; Cuong Bui, Khac; Bozko, Przemyslaw; Götze, Julian; Christgen, Matthias; Krech, Till; Malek, Nisar P; Plentz, Ruben R

    2017-02-03

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are associated with tumor resistance and are characterized in gastric cancer (GC). Studies have indicated that Notch and wnt-beta-catenin pathways are crucial for CSC development. Using CD44(+) CSCs, we investigated the role of these pathways in GC carcinogenesis. We performed cell proliferation, wound healing, invasion, tumorsphere, and apoptosis assays. Immunoblot analysis of downstream signaling targets of Notch and wnt-beta-catenin were tested after gamma-secretase inhibitor IX (GSI) treatment. Immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) were used to determine CD44 and Hairy enhancer of split-1 (Hes1) expression in human GC tissues. CD44(+) CSCs were subcutaneously injected into NMR-nu/nu mice and treated with vehicle or GSI. GC patients with expression of CD44 and Hes1 showed overall reduced survival. CD44(+) CSCs showed high expression of Hes1. GSI treatment showed effective inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, invasion, tumor sphere formation of CD44(+) CSCs, and induced apoptosis. Importanly, Notch1 was found to be important in mediating a crosstalk between Notch and wnt-beta-catenin in CD44(+) CSCs. Our study highlights a crosstalk between Notch and wnt-beta-catenin in gastric CD44(+) CSCs. Expression of CD44 and Hes1 is associated with patient overall survival. GSI could be an alternative drug to treat GC. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  13. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinomas cases from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Suarez M, Iris; Uribe, Diego; Jaramillo, Carlos M; Osorio, German; Perez, Juan C; Lopez, Rocio; Hoyos, Sergio; Hainaut, Pierre; Pineau, Pascal; Navas, Maria-C

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer diagnosed worldwide. Deregulation of Wnt/beta-catenin pathway has been associated with the development of HCC in a substantial number of cases in Europe and far less in Asia. Nothing is known about this pathway in HCC cases from South America. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of mutations in beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1) and the subcellular localization of beta-catenin in HCC cases from Colombia. We determine by direct sequencing the frequency of mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1 gene and by immunohistochemistry the subcellular localization of beta-catenin in 54 samples of HCC obtained from three pathology units in Bogota and Medellin cities. Only three HCC cases (5.6%) were found mutated at residues (G34E, S45P, P44S, T41I) important for phosphorylation and ubiquitination of beta-catenin protein. Strikingly, nuclear or cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin, hallmark of Wnt pathway activation, was found in 42.6% HCC cases (23/54). Interestingly, beta-catenin accumulation was significantly more frequent in young patients and hepatitis B virus-related HCC. Although, CTNNB1 exon 3 mutations are not frequent in HCC from Colombian patients, our findings indicate that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is activated in 42.6% of HCC samples. Furthermore, Wnt signaling was demonstrated in HCC cases associated of HBV infection, one of the most important HCC risk factors in Colombia.

  14. miR-92b controls glioma proliferation and invasion through regulating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling via Nemo-like kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Xuan; Zou, Jian; Zhang, Anling; Wan, Yingfeng; Pu, Peiyu; Song, Zhengfei; Qian, Cong; Chen, Yili; Yang, Shuxu; Wang, Yirong

    2013-01-01

    Background Nemo-like kinase (NLK) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase involved in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, which has been reported to be associated with gliomagenesis. In the present study, we aimed to identify a concrete mechanism of Wnt/beta-catenin pathway regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) in glioma. Methods Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization were conducted to detect the expression of miR-92b. The cell proliferation rate and cell cycle kinetics were detected using 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1)-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry, cell invasion and migration were evaluated using Transwell assay and wound healing assay, and cell apoptosis was detected using annexin V staining. Furthermore, the relevant molecules regulating proliferation and invasion were examined using Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence staining. Luciferase reporter assay was used to identify the direct regulation of NLK by miR-92b and beta-catenin/TCF4 activity. Results We first showed that the expression of miR-92b was elevated in both glioma samples and glioma cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of miR-92b triggered growth inhibition, induced apoptosis, and suppressed invasion of glioma in vitro and in vivo. Luciferase assay and Western blot analysis revealed that NLK is a direct target of miR-92b. Restoring expression of NLK inhibited glioma proliferation and invasion. Mechanistic investigation revealed that miR-92b deletion suppressed beta-catenin/TCF-4 transcription activity by targeting NLK. Moreover, expression of NLK was inversely correlated with miR-92b in glioma samples and was predictive of patient survival in a retrospective analysis. Conclusions Our findings identify a role for miR-92b in glioma proliferation and invasion after activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling via NLK. PMID:23416699

  15. Genomic organization of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nollet, F.; Berx, G.; Molemans, F.; Roy, F. van

    1996-03-05

    The cytoplasmic {beta}-catenin protein is implicated in signal transduction and associates with both the cell-cell adhesion protein E-cadherin and the tumor suppressor gene product APC. We determined the primary structure of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1) by analysis cDNA and genomic clones. The size of the complete gene was determined to be 23.2 kb. Restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis revealed 16 exons. All splice donor and acceptor sites were conformable to the GT/AG rule. The exon size ranged from 61 to 790 bp. Half of the introns were smaller than 550 bp, with the smallest being 84 pb and the longest being 6700 bp. The intron-exon boundaries did not coincide either with conserved sites in the 12 armadillo repeat sequences of {beta}-catenin or with intron-exon boundaries in the armadillo gene of Drosophila. A major site for transcription initiation was identified as an A residue 214 nucleotides upstream of the ATG initiation codon. The resulting transcript is 3362 nucleotides long. Compared to the previously published mRNA sequence, additional residues were identified, 16 at the 5{prime} end and 766 at the 3{prime} end of the mRNA. An alternative splice acceptor site within exon 16 reduced the 3{prime} UTR sequence by 159 bp. Polymerase chain reaction on cDNA from 14 human cell lines demonstrated the general occurrence of both splice variants. The 5{prime}-flanking region is highly GC-rich and lacks a CCAAT box, but contains a TATA box and potential binding sites for several transcription factors, such as NFkB, SP1, AP2, and EGR1. Both a 437-bp fragment and a 6-kb fragment, containing about 4.7 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region in addition to the noncoding exon 1 and 1 kb of intron 1, showed clear promoter activity when these fragments were linked to a secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter gene and transfected into a mouse epithelial cell line. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Amide derivatives of ethacrynic acid: synthesis and evaluation as antagonists of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and CLL cell survival.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guangyi; Lu, Desheng; Yao, Shiyin; Wu, Christina C N; Liu, Jerry X; Carson, Dennis A; Cottam, Howard B

    2009-02-01

    A series of amides of ethacrynic acid was prepared and evaluated for their ability to inhibit Wnt signaling and decrease the survival of CLL cells. Several of the most potent derivatives were active in the low micromolar range. Reduction of the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbon-carbon double bond of EA abrogated both the inhibition of Wnt signaling as well as the decrease in CLL survival. Preliminary mechanism of action studies suggest that these derivatives covalently modify sulfhydryl groups present on transcription factors important for Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

  17. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    SciTech Connect

    Scherbakov, Alexander M.; Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E.; Berstein, Lev M.; Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A.

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  18. E-cadherin is required for caveolin-1-mediated down-regulation of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin via reduced beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente A; Tapia, Julio C; Rodriguez, Diego A; Lladser, Alvaro; Arredondo, Cristian; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2007-11-01

    Caveolin-1 reportedly acts as a tumor suppressor and promotes events associated with tumor progression, including metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying such radical differences in function are not understood. Recently, we showed that caveolin-1 inhibits expression of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin via a transcriptional mechanism involving the beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef pathway. Surprisingly, while caveolin-1 expression decreased survivin mRNA and protein levels in HT29(ATCC) human colon cancer cells, this was not the case in metastatic HT29(US) cells. Survivin down-regulation was paralleled by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin in HT29(ATCC) but not HT29(US) cells. Unlike HT29(ATCC) cells, HT29(US) cells expressed small amounts of E-cadherin that accumulated in intracellular patches rather than at the cell surface. Re-expression of E-cadherin in HT29(US) cells restored the ability of caveolin-1 to down-regulate beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription and survivin expression, as seen in HT29(ATCC) cells. In addition, coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization between caveolin-1 and beta-catenin increased upon E-cadherin expression in HT29(US) cells. In human embryonic kidney HEK293T and HT29(US) cells, caveolin-1 and E-cadherin cooperated in suppressing beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription as well as survivin expression. Finally, mouse melanoma B16-F10 cells, another metastatic cell model with low endogenous caveolin-1 and E-cadherin levels, were characterized. In these cells, caveolin-1-mediated down-regulation of survivin in the presence of E-cadherin coincided with increased apoptosis. Thus, the absence of E-cadherin severely compromises the ability of caveolin-1 to develop activities potentially relevant to its role as a tumor suppressor.

  19. Wnt5a is required for endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells and vascularization via pathways involving both Wnt/beta-catenin and protein kinase Calpha.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Hwa; Yoon, Ju-Young; Lee, Soung-Hoon; Bryja, Vitezslav; Andersson, Emma R; Arenas, Ernest; Kwon, Young-Guen; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2009-02-13

    In this study, we examined the signaling pathways activated by Wnt5a in endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells and the function of Wnt5a during vascular development. We first found that Wnt5a(-/-) mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells exhibited a defect in endothelial differentiation, which was rescued by addition of Wnt5a, suggesting that Wnt5a is required for endothelial differentiation of ES cells. Involvement of both beta-catenin and protein kinase (PK)Calpha pathways in endothelial differentiation of mES cells requiring Wnt5a was indicated by activation of both beta-catenin and PKCalpha in Wnt5a(+/-) but not in Wnt5a(-/-) mES cells. We also found that beta-catenin or PKCalpha knockdowns inhibited the Wnt5a-induced endothelial differentiation of ES cells. Moreover, the lack of endothelial differentiation of Wnt5a(-/-) mES cells was rescued only by transfection of both beta-catenin and PKCalpha, indicating that both genes are required for Wnt5a-mediated endothelial differentiation. Wnt5a was also found to be essential for the differentiation of mES cells into immature endothelial progenitor cells, which are known to play a role in repair of damaged endothelium. Furthermore, a defect in the vascularization of the neural tissue was detected at embryonic day 14.5 in Wnt5a(-/-) mice, implicating Wnt5a in vascular development in vivo. Thus, we conclude that Wnt5a is involved in the endothelial differentiation of ES cells via both Wnt/beta-catenin and PKC signaling pathways and regulates embryonic vascular development.

  20. A mutated beta-catenin gene encodes a melanoma-specific antigen recognized by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A number of antigens recognized by tumor-reactive T cells have recently been identified. The antigens identified in mouse model systems appear, with one exception, to represent the products of mutated genes. In contrast, most of the antigens recognized by human tumor-reactive T cells reported to date appear to represent the products of non-mutated genes. Here we report the isolation of a cDNA clone encoding beta- catenin, which was shown to be recognized by the tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) 1290, a HLA-A24 restricted melanoma-specific CTL line from patient 888. The cDNA clone, which was isolated from the autologous melanoma cDNA library, differed by a single base pair from the published beta-catenin sequence, resulting in a change from a serine to a phenylalanine residue at position 37. Normal tissues from this patient did not express the altered sequence, nor did 12 allogeneic melanomas, indicating that this represented a unique mutation in this patient's melanoma. A peptide corresponding to the sequence between amino acids 29 and 37 of the mutant gene product was identified as the T cell epitope recognized by TIL 1290. The observation that HLA-A24 binding peptides contain an aromatic or hydrophobic residue at position 9 suggested that the change at position 37 may have generated a peptide (SYLDSGIHF) which was capable of binding to HLA-A24, and a competitive binding assay confirmed this hypothesis. The beta-catenin protein has been shown previously to be involved in cell adhesion mediated through the cadherin family of cell surface adhesion molecules. The high frequency of mutations found in members of cellular adhesion complexes in a variety of cancers suggests that these molecules may play a role in development of the malignant phenotype. PMID:8642260

  1. Excess beta-catenin promotes accumulation of transcriptionally active p53.

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, A; Ben-Ze'ev, A; Simcha, I; Shtutman, M; Leal, J F; Zhurinsky, J; Geiger, B; Oren, M

    1999-01-01

    beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein, acting both as a structural component of the cell adhesion machinery and as a transducer of extracellular signals. Deregulated beta-catenin protein expression, due to mutations in the beta-catenin gene itself or in its upstream regulator, the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, is prevalent in colorectal cancer and in several other tumor types, and attests to the potential oncogenic activity of this protein. Increased expression of beta-catenin is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and is usually followed by a later mutational inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. To examine whether these two key steps in carcinogenesis are interrelated, we studied the effect of excess beta-catenin on p53. We report here that overexpression of beta-catenin results in accumulation of p53, apparently through interference with its proteolytic degradation. This effect involves both Mdm2-dependent and -independent p53 degradation pathways, and is accompanied by augmented transcriptional activity of p53 in the affected cells. Increased p53 activity may provide a safeguard against oncogenic deregulation of beta-catenin, and thus impose a pressure for mutational inactivation of p53 during the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:10357817

  2. APC and beta-catenin protein expression patterns in HNPCC-related endometrial and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Kariola, Reetta; Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Ollikainen, Miina; Butzow, Ralf; Peltomäki, Päivi; Nyström, Minna

    2005-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1) genes are the two major components of the Wnt signaling pathway that has been shown to play an important role in the formation of certain cancers. The overactivation of the pathway, which results in abnormal accumulation of beta-catenin protein in nuclei, contributes to most colorectal cancers (CRCs), both sporadic and hereditary, as well as sporadic endometrial cancers (ECs). Here, we studied the involvement of APC and beta-catenin in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)-related ECs, and compared the expression patterns to those in HNPCC-related CRCs. Nineteen ECs and 31 CRCs derived from HNPCC patients were immunohistochemically stained with anti-APC- and anti-beta-catenin-antibodies. Tumor-specific loss of APC was observed in 16 of endometrial cancers (3 of 19) and in 39 of colorectal cancers (12 of 31). Consistently, the loss of APC expression was associated with nuclear beta-catenin staining. Altogether, aberrant beta-catenin localization was observed in 53 of ECs (10 of 19) as compared to 84 of CRCs (26 of 31) (P=0.02). Our results suggest a frequent overactivation of the Wnt signaling pathway in hereditary endometrial cancer. In accordance with studies on sporadic cancers, abnormal accumulation of beta-catenin protein in nuclei occurred much less frequently in HNPCC-related ECs than CRCs, which may reflect organ-specific differences in their pathogenesis.

  3. Tumors from rats given 1,2-dimethylhydrazine plus chlorophyllin or indole-3-carbinol contain transcriptional changes in beta-catenin that are independent of beta-catenin mutation status.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Dashwood, W Mohaiza; Bailey, George S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2006-10-10

    Tumors induced in the rat by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) contain mutations in beta-catenin, but the spectrum of such mutations can be influenced by phytochemicals such as chlorophyllin (CHL) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C). In the present study, we determined the mutation status of beta-catenin in more than 50 DMH-induced colon tumors and small intestine tumors, and compared this with the concomitant expression of beta-catenin mRNA using quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis. In total, 19/57 (33%) of the tumors harbored mutations in beta-catenin, and 14/19 (74%) of the genetic changes substituted amino acids adjacent to Ser33, a key site for phosphorylation and beta-catenin degradation. These tumors were found to express a 10-fold range of beta-catenin mRNA levels, independent of the beta-catenin mutation status and phytochemical exposure, i.e. CHL or I3C given post-initiation. However, beta-catenin mRNA levels were strongly correlated with mRNA levels of c-myc, c-jun and cyclin D1, which are targets of beta-catenin/Tcf signaling. Tumors with the highest levels of beta-catenin mRNA often had over-expressed beta-catenin protein, and those with lower beta-catenin mRNA typically had low beta-catenin protein expression, but there were exceptions (high beta-catenin mRNA/low beta-catenin protein, or vice versa). We conclude that DMH-induced mutations stabilize beta-catenin protein in tumors, which increase c-myc, c-jun and cyclin D1, but there also can be over-expression of beta-catenin itself at the mRNA level, contributing to high beta-catenin protein levels. Similar findings have been reported in primary human colon cancers and their liver metastases, compared with matched normal-looking tissue. Thus, further studies are warranted on the mechanisms that upregulate beta-catenin at the transcriptional level in human and rodent colon cancers.

  4. Multiple roles of mesenchymal beta-catenin during murine limb patterning.

    PubMed

    Hill, Theo P; Taketo, Makoto M; Birchmeier, Walter; Hartmann, Christine

    2006-04-01

    Recently canonical Wnt signaling in the ectoderm has been shown to be required for maintenance of the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and for dorsoventral signaling. Using conditional gain- and loss-of-function beta-catenin alleles, we have studied the role of mesenchymal beta-catenin activity during limb development. Here, we show that loss of beta-catenin results in limb truncations due to a defect in AER maintenance. Stabilization of beta-catenin also results in truncated limbs, caused by a premature regression of the AER. Concomitantly, in these limbs, the expression of Bmp2, Bmp4 and Bmp7, and of the Bmp target genes Msx1, Msx2 and gremlin, is expanded in the mesenchyme. Furthermore, we found that the expression of Lmx1b, a gene exclusively expressed in the dorsal limb mesenchyme and involved in dorsoventral patterning, is reduced upon loss of beta-catenin activity and is expanded ventrally in gain-of-function limbs. However, the known ectodermal regulators Wnt7a and engrailed 1 are expressed normally. This suggests that Lmx1b is also regulated, in part, by a beta-catenin-mediated Wnt signal, independent of the non-canoncial Wnt7a signaling pathway. In addition, loss of beta-catenin results in a severe agenesis of the scapula. Concurrently, the expression of two genes, Pax1 and Emx2, which have been implicated in scapula development, is lost in beta-catenin loss-of-function limbs; however, only Emx2 is upregulated in gain-of-function limbs. Mesenchymal beta-catenin activity is therefore required for AER maintenance, and for normal expression of Lmx1b and Emx2.

  5. Heterocellular interaction enhances recruitment of {alpha} and {beta}-catenins and ZO-2 into functional gap-junction complexes and induces gap junction-dependant differentiation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Talhouk, Rabih S. Mroue, Rana; Mokalled, Mayssa; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Nehme, Ralda; Ismail, Ayman; Khalil, Antoine; Zaatari, Mira; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2008-11-01

    Gap junctions (GJ) are required for mammary epithelial differentiation. Using epithelial (SCp2) and myoepithelial-like (SCg6) mouse-derived mammary cells, the role of heterocellular interaction in assembly of GJ complexes and functional differentiation ({beta}-casein expression) was evaluated. Heterocellular interaction is critical for {beta}-casein expression, independent of exogenous basement membrane or cell anchoring substrata. Functional differentiation of SCp2, co-cultured with SCg6, is more sensitive to GJ inhibition relative to homocellular SCp2 cultures differentiated by exogenous basement membrane. Connexin (Cx)32 and Cx43 levels were not regulated across culture conditions; however, GJ functionality was enhanced under differentiation-permissive conditions. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated association of junctional complex components ({alpha}-catenin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-2) with Cx32 and Cx43, in differentiation conditions, and additionally with Cx30 in heterocellular cultures. Although {beta}-catenin did not shuttle between cadherin and GJ complexes, increased association between connexins and {beta}-catenin in heterocellular cultures was observed. This was concomitant with reduced nuclear {beta}-catenin, suggesting that differentiation in heterocellular cultures involves sequestration of {beta}-catenin in GJ complexes.

  6. Beta-Catenin Signaling in Hepatic Development and Progenitors: Which Way Does the WNT Blow?

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Abigale G.; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling cascade that plays key roles in development and adult tissue homeostasis and is aberrantly activated in many tumors. Over a decade of work in mouse, chick, xenopus, and zebrafish models has uncovered multiple functions of this pathway in hepatic pathophysiology. Specifically, beta-catenin, the central component of the canonical Wnt pathway, is implicated in the regulation of liver regeneration, development, and carcinogenesis. Wnt-independent activation of beta-catenin by receptor tyrosine kinases has also been observed in the liver. In liver development across various species, through regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and maturation, beta-catenin directs foregut endoderm specification, hepatic specification of the foregut, and hepatic morphogenesis. Its role has also been defined in adult hepatic progenitors or oval cells especially in their expansion and differentiation. Thus, beta-catenin undergoes tight temporal regulation to exhibit pleiotropic effects during hepatic development and in hepatic progenitor biology. PMID:21337461

  7. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  8. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates beta-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of beta-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of beta-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and beta-catenin-induced cell death.

  9. [Dual-role regulations of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Chen-guang; Zhou, Chun-yan

    2010-04-18

    In recent years, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been identified as a key player in embryogenesis and human diseases. Canonical Wnt signaling pathway is controlled by a variety of classic molecules like Wnt, beta-catenin, Axin, APC, GSK-3beta and CK1, which interact and coordinate to regulate the expressions of cell signaling molecules. The latest evidences suggest that some components of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, like APC, GSK-3beta, CK1, Dkk2 and WISE, play dual roles different from what they have been thought previously. Here we reviewed some recent discoveries on the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway to provide some new ideas and principles for signaling transduction studies.

  10. Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 Axis Controls Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Axis Controls Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xiuping Yu CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Vanderbilt University...COVERED 01 July 2013 - 30 June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 axis controls prostate cancer ...development of castration resistant prostate cancer . Our previous studies have shown that Foxa2 is a Wnt/beta-catenin target gene in prostates. Our

  11. Tyrosine residues 654 and 670 in {beta}-cat enin are crucial in regulation of Met-{beta}-catenin interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Gang; Apte, Udayan; Micsenyi, Amanda; Bell, Aaron; Monga, Satdarshan P.S. . E-mail: smonga@pitt.edu

    2006-11-01

    {beta}-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt pathway, is also regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation that regulates its association to E-cadherin. Previously, we reported its association with the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor Met at the membrane. HGF induced Met-{beta}-catenin dissociation and nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin, which was tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent. Here, we further investigate the Met-{beta}-catenin interaction by selectively mutating several tyrosine residues, alone or in combination, in {beta}-catenin. The mutants were subcloned into FLAG-CMV vector and stably transfected into rat hepatoma cells, which were treated with HGF. All single or double-mutant-transfected cells continued to show HGF-induced nuclear translocation of FLAG-{beta}-catenin except the mutations affecting 654 and 670 simultaneously (Y654/670F), which coincided with the lack of formation of {beta}-catenin-TCF complex and DNA synthesis, in response to the HGF treatment. In addition, the Y654/670F-transfected cells also showed no phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin or dissociation from Met in response to HGF. Thus, intact 654 and 670 tyrosine residues in {beta}-catenin are crucial in HGF-mediated {beta}-catenin translocation, activation and mitogenesis.

  12. Immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in ameloblastomas and tooth germs.

    PubMed

    Alves Pereira, Karuza Maria; do Amaral, Bruna Aguiar; dos Santos, Bruna Rafaela Martins; Galvão, Hébel Cavalcanti; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida; de Souza, Lélia Batista

    2010-03-01

    The aim was to analyze the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in ameloblastomas and tooth germs to determine their roles in cell differentiation processes and invasiveness compared with odontogenesis. Twenty-one ameloblastoma cases (16 solid and 5 unicystic tumors) and 5 tooth germs were submitted to the immunohistochemical detection of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Immunoreactivity was evaluated using descriptive and semiquantitative analysis, investigating the location and intensity of staining. The Fisher exact test was performed, and P values of <.05 were considered to indicate statistical significance. There was no statistically significant difference in the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin between solid and unicystic ameloblastomas (P = .59; P = .63; respectively). The same was found when comparing solid and unicystic ameloblastomas with the tooth germs for both E-cadherin (P = .53; P = .44; respectively) and beta-catenin (P = .12; P = .16; respectively). Nuclear staining of beta-catenin was observed in only 4 cases (3 solid and 1 unicystic tumor). The results showed no differences in the expression of E-cadherin or beta-catenin between tooth germs and solid and unicystic ameloblastomas. The expression of these molecules seems mainly to be related to the process of cell differentiation. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. TGF-{beta} modulates {beta}-Catenin stability and signaling in mesenchymal proliferations

    SciTech Connect

    Amini Nik, Saeid; Ebrahim, Rasoul Pour; Dam, Kim van; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Tejpar, Sabine . E-mail: sabine.tejpar@med.kuleuven.be

    2007-08-01

    Here for the first time we showed, despite the oncogenic mutations in {beta}-Catenin, that TGF-{beta} is a modulator of {beta}-Catenin levels in tumoral fibroblasts as well as non-tumoral fibroblasts. The results show that the TGF-{beta} pathway is active in desmoids cells and in in situ tumors. A dose dependent increase in {beta}-Catenin protein levels was observed after TGF-{beta} treatment in combination with an increased repression of GSK-3{beta} both in normal and tumoral fibroblasts. TGF-{beta} stimulation also led to an altered - up to 5 fold - transcriptional activity of {beta}-Catenin responsive promoters, such as IGFBP6 as well as increase of TOPflash activity. TGF-{beta} stimulation increased cell proliferation and BrdU incorporation 2.5 times. Taken together, we propose that TGF-{beta} is a modulator of {beta}-Catenin levels in tumoral fibroblasts and non-tumoral fibroblasts, despite the oncogenic mutations already present in this gene in tumoral fibroblasts of desmoid tumors. This modulation of {beta}-Catenin levels by TGF-{beta} may be involved in determining the tumoral phenotype of the cells.

  14. Negative regulation of p21 by beta-catenin/TCF signaling: a novel mechanism by which cell adhesion molecules regulate cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Junko; Toyofuku, Toshihiko; Hori, Masatsugu

    2003-12-12

    Cell proliferation is regulated in part by cell-cell interactions mediated by cadherin and connexin. Here we present evidence that these two molecules act synergistically to suppress HEK293 cell proliferation by prolonging the G2/M phase. This event was accompanied by expression of p21, a potent Cdc2 kinase inhibitor. Not surprisingly, there was a concomitant decline in Cdc2 kinase activity. beta-Catenin/TCF signaling, which was downregulated by overexpression of N-cadherin, was found to inhibit transactivation of p21 gene expression. The effect of N-cadherin on cell proliferation and p21 expression was augmented by co-expression of connexin-43. Moreover, the magnitude of the connexin's effect was dependent on its ability to mediate intercellular communication. We conclude, therefore, that two major components of cell-cell interaction synergistically regulate cell cycle progression in HEK293 cells by regulating p21 expression in a beta-catenin/TCF-dependent manner.

  15. Sonic hedgehog acts as a negative regulator of {beta}-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Fabian T; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Plate, Karl H; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear beta-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. beta-Catenin activation in APC(min/+) mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses beta-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate beta-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear beta-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched(+/-) mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear beta-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce beta-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on beta-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/beta-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control beta-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC.

  16. Nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin occurs commonly in the epithelial cells of juvenile polyps.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Michiko; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Carethers, John M; Doctolero, Ryan; Tajima, Akihiro; Sugano, Kentaro; Franklin, Wilbur A; Ahnen, Dennis J

    2005-01-01

    In the two conditions juvenile polyps (JPs) and juvenile polyposis coli (JPC), colonic polyps may have overlapping histologic and phenotypic appearance, but JPC confers a significant risk for colon adenocarcinoma. Although not thought to contain adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations, the status of beta-catenin and full-length APC protein expression in JPs is not known. We evaluated beta-catenin and full-length APC protein expression in JPs from children with JPs and JPC. Cases were identified through endoscopic procedure records. Immunohistochemistry was performed for beta-catenin and full-length APC protein. Loss of heterozygosity at the APC gene locus on chromosome 5 was assessed using two APC-linked microsatellite markers. Polyp and normal colonic tissue were analyzed from 36 children with JPs and 9 with JPC. Both APC and beta-catenin immunoreactivity were present in epithelial cells from all samples but in different patterns. In all normal colon and polyp samples, APC expression was cytoplasmic with maximal immunoreactivity in the goblet cells. In contrast, beta-catenin immunoreactivity in epithelial cells was limited to the plasma membrane in normal colon but was both cytoplasmic and nuclear in all 45 JPs. No evidence of APC gene loss of heterozygosity was found. In polyps from children with JPs and JPC, nuclear beta-catenin accumulation is a consistent feature, and it is not due to APC gene mutation or loss of full-length APC protein expression. Thus, beta-catenin accumulation may be intrinsic to the formation of juvenile-type polyps through an as-yet-undefined mechanism.

  17. Evaluation of myosin VI, E-cadherin and beta-catenin immunostaining in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a cancer of increasing incidence and mortality. Currently, there are no immunohistochemical prognostic markers for RCCs in routine use. The aim of this study was to examine for the first time the immunostaining of myosin VI in RCCs as well as its association with E-cadherin and beta-catenin immunostaining and the prognostic significance of these markers in RCCs. Methods Our study population consisted of 152 patients who underwent surgery for RCCs between 1990 and 1999. The tumours were examined with three immunohistochemical markers: myosin VI, E-cadherin and beta-catenin. Results The immunostaining for cytoplasmic myosin VI was common (72%). One-third of the tumours were immunopositive for nuclear myosin VI. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunopositivity and nuclear beta-catenin immunostaining were associated with lower Fuhrman grades (p = 0.04 and p = 0.005, respectively), but not stages. There was no significant association between myosin VI immunostaining and the histological subtype of RCC. Nuclear myosin VI was associated with the nuclear expression of beta-catenin. A direct association could also be proven between membranous E-cadherin and cytoplasmic beta-catenin. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunostaining was a marker of poorer prognosis in multivariate Cox regression model adjusted with stage and Fuhrman grade with hazard ratio 2.4 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 5.0 with p = 0.024). Conclusions Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunopositivity and nuclear beta-catenin immunostaining were associated with lower Fuhrman grades, and there was a strong positive relationship between E-cadherin immunostaining and beta-catenin immunostaining in RCCs. Cytoplasmic myosin VI immunostaining was associated with poorer prognosis in RCCs. PMID:20074327

  18. Beta-catenin up-regulates the expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator in human colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Regus, Susanne; Wassermann, Stella; Hlubek, Falk; Haynl, Angela; Dimmler, Arno; Koch, Claudia; Knoll, Claudia; van Beest, Moniek; Reuning, Ute; Brabletz, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas

    2004-02-15

    Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) increases during the progression of colorectal tumors from adenomas to carcinomas. The highest amounts of uPA are found at the invasion front of carcinomas, which also displays a strong expression of nuclear beta-catenin and is therefore a region expressing beta-catenin target genes at high levels. Here we show that beta-catenin contributes to the transactivation of uPA. Therefore, beta-catenin might have an impact on the capacity of colorectal tumors for invasion and metastasis, as well as dormancy, which are hallmarks of cancer.

  19. Lack of Muc1-regulated beta-catenin stability results in aberrant expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells from the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Tze Wei; Bradley, Judy M.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that inhibit T cell activity and contribute to the immune suppression characteristic of most tumors. We discovered that bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from the Muc1 knockout (KO) mice differentiated into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs in vitro under GM-CSF and IL-4 signaling. MUC1 is a tumor-associated mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (MUC1-CT) can regulate beta-catenin to promote oncogenesis. Given the importance of beta-catenin in hematopoiesis, we hypothesized that the MUC1 regulation of beta-catenin is important for MDSC development. Our current study shows that the aberrant development of BM progenitors into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs is dependent on the down regulation of beta-catenin levels that occurs in the absence of Muc1. In light of this, KO mice showed enhanced EL4 tumor growth and were able to better tolerate allogeneic BM185 tumor growth, with an accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the blood and tumor draining lymph nodes. WT mice were able to similarly tolerate allogeneic tumor growth when they were injected with CD11b+Gr1+ cells from tumor-bearing KO mice, suggesting that tolerance of allogeneic tumors is dependent on MDSC-mediated immune suppression. This further delineates the ability of Muc1 to control MDSC development which could directly impact tumorigenesis. Knowledge of the biology by which Muc1 regulates the development of myeloid progenitors into MDSCs would also be very useful in enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in the face of tumor immune suppression. PMID:19351842

  20. Activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling increases insulin sensitivity through a reciprocal regulation of Wnt10b and SREBP-1c in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Abiola, Mounira; Favier, Maryline; Christodoulou-Vafeiadou, Eleni; Pichard, Anne-Lise; Martelly, Isabelle; Guillet-Deniau, Isabelle

    2009-12-30

    Intramyocellular lipid accumulation is strongly related to insulin resistance in humans, and we have shown that high glucose concentration induced de novo lipogenesis and insulin resistance in murin muscle cells. Alterations in Wnt signaling impact the balance between myogenic and adipogenic programs in myoblasts, partly due to the decrease of Wnt10b protein. As recent studies point towards a role for Wnt signaling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes, we hypothesized that activation of Wnt signaling could play a crucial role in muscle insulin sensitivity. Here we demonstrate that SREBP-1c and Wnt10b display inverse expression patterns during muscle ontogenesis and regeneration, as well as during satellite cells differentiation. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway was reactivated in contracting myotubes using siRNA mediated SREBP-1 knockdown, Wnt10b over-expression or inhibition of GSK-3beta, whereas Wnt signaling was inhibited in myoblasts through silencing of Wnt10b. SREBP-1 knockdown was sufficient to induce Wnt10b protein expression in contracting myotubes and to activate the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Conversely, silencing Wnt10b in myoblasts induced SREBP-1c protein expression, suggesting a reciprocal regulation. Stimulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway i) drastically decreased SREBP-1c protein and intramyocellular lipid deposition in myotubes; ii) increased basal glucose transport in both insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant myotubes through a differential activation of Akt and AMPK pathways; iii) restored insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant myotubes. We conclude that activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in skeletal muscle cells improved insulin sensitivity by i) decreasing intramyocellular lipid deposition through downregulation of SREBP-1c; ii) increasing insulin effects through a differential activation of the Akt/PKB and AMPK pathways; iii) inhibiting the MAPK pathway. A crosstalk between these pathways and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in skeletal

  1. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  2. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  3. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  4. beta-Catenin in early development of the lancelet embryo indicates specific determination of embryonic polarity.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kinya; Li, Guorong; Wang, Yong; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Zhang, Peijun; Aizawa, Shinichi

    2002-12-01

    The lancelet (amphioxus) embryo develops from a miolecithal egg and starts gastrulation when it is approximately 400 cells in size, in a fashion similar to that of some non-chordate deuterostomes. Throughout this type of gastrulation, the embryo develops characteristics such as the notochord and hollow nerve cord that commonly appear in chordates. beta-Catenin is an important factor in initiating body patterning. The behavior and developmental pattern of this protein in early lancelet development was examined in this study. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin was localized to the animal pole after fertilization and then was incorporated asymmetrically into the blastomeres during the first cleavage. Asymmetric distribution was observed at least until the 32-cell stage. The first nuclear localization was at the 64-cell stage, and involved all of the cells. At the initial gastrula stage, however, concentrated beta-catenin was found on the dorsal side. LiCl treatment affected the asymmetric pattern of beta-catenin during the first cleavage. LiCl also changed distribution of nuclear beta-catenin at the initial gastrula stage: distribution extended to cells on the animal side. Apparently associated with this change, expression domains of goosecoid, lhx3 and otx also changed to a radially symmetric pattern centered at the animal pole. However, LiCl-treated embryos were able to establish embryonic polarity. The present study suggests that in the lancelet embryo, polarity determination is independent of dorsal morphogenesis.

  5. Activation of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Kun . E-mail: leedk@memorialhealthsource.com; Nathan Grantham, R.; Trachte, Aaron L.; Mannion, John D.; Wilson, Colleen L.

    2006-08-18

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta} or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules.

  6. The destruction complex of beta-catenin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Bourroul, Guilherme Muniz; Fragoso, Hélio José; Gomes, José Walter Feitosa; Bourroul, Vivian Sati Oba; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Palma, Rogério Tadeu; Waisberg, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the destruction complex of beta-catenin by the expression of the proteins beta-catetenin, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axin and ubiquitin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma. Methods Tissue samples from 64 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 53 patients with colonic adenoma were analyzed. Tissue microarray blocks and slides were prepared and subjected to immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies in carcinoma, adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa, and adenoma tissues. The immunoreactivity was evaluated by the percentage of positive stained cells and by the intensity assessed through of the stained grade of proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. In the statistical analysis, the Spearman correlation coefficient, Student’s t, χ2, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests, and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. Results In colorectal carcinoma, the expressions of beta-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli proteins were significantly higher than in colonic adenomas (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). The immunoreactivity of GSK3β, axin 1 and ubiquitin proteins was significantly higher (p=0.03, p=0.039 and p=0.03, respectively) in colorectal carcinoma than in the colonic adenoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa. The immunohistochemistry staining of these proteins did not show significant differences with the clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer and colonic adenoma. Conclusions These results suggest that, in adenomas, the lower expression of the beta-catenin, axin 1 and GSK3β proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was maintained, while in colorectal carcinoma, the increased expression of beta-catenin, GSK3β, axin 1, and ubiquitin proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was disrupted. PMID:27462886

  7. An ancient role for nuclear beta-catenin in the evolution of axial polarity and germ layer segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikramanayake, Athula H.; Hong, Melanie; Lee, Patricia N.; Pang, Kevin; Byrum, Christine A.; Bince, Joanna M.; Xu, Ronghui; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2003-01-01

    The human oncogene beta-catenin is a bifunctional protein with critical roles in both cell adhesion and transcriptional regulation in the Wnt pathway. Wnt/beta-catenin signalling has been implicated in developmental processes as diverse as elaboration of embryonic polarity, formation of germ layers, neural patterning, spindle orientation and gap junction communication, but the ancestral function of beta-catenin remains unclear. In many animal embryos, activation of beta-catenin signalling occurs in blastomeres that mark the site of gastrulation and endomesoderm formation, raising the possibility that asymmetric activation of beta-catenin signalling specified embryonic polarity and segregated germ layers in the common ancestor of bilaterally symmetrical animals. To test whether nuclear translocation of beta-catenin is involved in axial identity and/or germ layer formation in 'pre-bilaterians', we examined the in vivo distribution, stability and function of beta-catenin protein in embryos of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa). Here we show that N. vectensis beta-catenin is differentially stabilized along the oral-aboral axis, translocated into nuclei in cells at the site of gastrulation and used to specify entoderm, indicating an evolutionarily ancient role for this protein in early pattern formation.

  8. Targeted disruption of beta-catenin in Sf1-expressing cells impairs development and maintenance of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Alex C; Reuter, Anne L; Zubair, Mohamad; Else, Tobias; Serecky, Kerri; Bingham, Nathan C; Lavery, Gareth G; Parker, Keith L; Hammer, Gary D

    2008-08-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (Sf1, Nr5a1) is essential for adrenal development and regulates genes that specify differentiated adrenocortical function. The transcriptional coactivator beta-catenin reportedly synergizes with Sf1 to regulate a subset of these target genes; moreover, Wnt family members, signaling via beta-catenin, are also implicated in adrenocortical development. To investigate the role of beta-catenin in the adrenal cortex, we used two Sf1/Cre transgenes to inactivate conditional beta-catenin alleles. Inactivation of beta-catenin mediated by Sf1/Cre(high), a transgene expressed at high levels, caused adrenal aplasia in newborn mice. Analysis of fetal adrenal development with Sf1/Cre(high)-mediated beta-catenin inactivation showed decreased proliferation in presumptive adrenocortical precursor cells. By contrast, the Sf1/Cre(low) transgene effected a lesser degree of beta-catenin inactivation that did not affect all adrenocortical cells, permitting adrenal survival to reveal age-dependent degeneration of the cortex. These results define crucial roles for beta-catenin--presumably as part of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway--in both embryonic development of the adrenal cortex and in maintenance of the adult organ.

  9. Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 Axis Controls Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0212 TITLE: Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 Axis Controls Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0212 Wnt/beta-Catenin, Foxa2, and CXCR4 axis controls prostate cancer progression 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC111074 5c...target gene in prostates. Our preliminary study suggests a Wnt−Foxa2− CXCR4 axis that is involved in PCa bone metastasis, and activation of this axis

  10. Beta-catenin/TCF Pathway and Castrate Resistant Progression in Osteoblastic Bone Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    beta-catenin complex (1)); fibroblast growth factor 19 ( FGF19 , a high-affinity ligand for FGFR4 (2)); NOTUM, WNT11, WISP1 (regulator [NOTUM (3)] and...we initially selected FGF19 , NOTUM, WNT11, HA synthase 3, and HA synthase 2 and assessed their expression in MDA PCa 118 cells transfected with beta...regulation of cells or are components of the ECM (Table 1). We confirmed that both beta-catenin and FGF19 were reduced by about 3.8 times. Table 1. Gene

  11. {beta}-Catenin up-regulates Nanog expression through interaction with Oct-3/4 in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Yukinari; Yokota, Takashi; Koide, Hiroshi . E-mail: hkoide@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2007-02-16

    It is well known that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be maintained by the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Recent studies have revealed that Wnt also exhibits activity similar to LIF. The molecular mechanism behind the maintenance of ES cells by these factors, however, is not fully understood. In this study, we found that LIF enhances level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, a component of the Wnt signaling pathway. Expression of an activated mutant of {beta}-catenin led to the long-term proliferation of ES cells, even in the absence of LIF. Furthermore, it was found that {beta}-catenin up-regulates Nanog in an Oct-3/4-dependent manner and that {beta}-catenin physically associates with Oct-3/4. These results suggest that up-regulating Nanog through interaction with Oct-3/4 involves {beta}-catenin in the LIF- and Wnt-mediated maintenance of ES cell self-renewal.

  12. Role of cyclin D1 as a mediator of c-Met- and beta-catenin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mohini A; Lee, Susie A; Macias, Everardo; Lam, Ernest T; Xu, Chuanrui; Jones, Kirk D; Ho, Coral; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo; Chen, Xin

    2009-01-01

    Activation of c-Met signaling and beta-catenin mutations are frequent genetic events observed in liver cancer development. Recently, we demonstrated that activated beta-catenin can cooperate with c-Met to induce liver cancer formation in a mouse model. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is an important cell cycle regulator that is considered to be a downstream target of beta-catenin. To determine the importance of CCND1 as a mediator of c-Met- and beta-catenin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, we investigated the genetic interactions between CCND1, beta-catenin, and c-Met in liver cancer development using mouse models. We coexpressed CCND1 with c-Met in mice and found CCND1 to cooperate with c-Met to promote liver cancer formation. Tumors induced by CCND1/c-Met had a longer latency period, formed at a lower frequency, and seemed to be more benign compared with those induced by beta-catenin/c-Met. In addition, when activated beta-catenin and c-Met were coinjected into CCND1-null mice, liver tumors developed despite the absence of CCND1. Intriguingly, we observed a moderate accelerated tumor growth and increased tumor malignancy in these CCND1-null mice. Molecular analysis showed an up-regulation of cyclin D2 (CCND2) expression in CCND1-null tumor samples, indicating that CCND2 may replace CCND1 in hepatic tumorigenesis. Together, our results suggest that CCND1 functions as a mediator of beta-catenin during HCC pathogenesis, although other molecules may be required to fully propagate beta-catenin signaling. Moreover, our data suggest that CCND1 expression is not essential for liver tumor development induced by c-Met and beta-catenin.

  13. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Transdisciplinary Research in Epigenetics and Cancer Journal Clubs and Transdisciplinary Science Meetings, biweekly and monthly 3. To gain expertise...Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Lamb CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Washington University...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genes in

  14. BDNF mobilizes synaptic vesicles and enhances synapse formation by disrupting cadherin-beta-catenin interactions.

    PubMed

    Bamji, Shernaz X; Rico, Beatriz; Kimes, Nikole; Reichardt, Louis F

    2006-07-17

    Neurons of the vertebrate central nervous system have the capacity to modify synapse number, morphology, and efficacy in response to activity. Some of these functions can be attributed to activity-induced synthesis and secretion of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); however, the molecular mechanisms by which BDNF mediates these events are still not well understood. Using time-lapse confocal analysis, we show that BDNF mobilizes synaptic vesicles at existing synapses, resulting in small clusters of synaptic vesicles "splitting" away from synaptic sites. We demonstrate that BDNF's ability to mobilize synaptic vesicle clusters depends on the dissociation of cadherin-beta-catenin adhesion complexes that occurs after tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin. Artificially maintaining cadherin-beta-catenin complexes in the presence of BDNF abolishes the BDNF-mediated enhancement of synaptic vesicle mobility, as well as the longer-term BDNF-mediated increase in synapse number. Together, this data demonstrates that the disruption of cadherin-beta-catenin complexes is an important molecular event through which BDNF increases synapse density in cultured hippocampal neurons.

  15. Localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Hayley; Patel, Shyam; Wong, Janelle; Chu, Julia; Li, Adrian; Li, Song

    2008-08-08

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are pluripotent, and can be directed to differentiate into different cell types for therapeutic applications. To expand hESCs, it is desirable to maintain hESC growth without differentiation. As hESC colonies grow, differentiated cells are often found at the periphery of the colonies, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we utilized micropatterning techniques to pattern circular islands or strips of matrix proteins, and examined the spatial pattern of hESC renewal and differentiation. We found that micropatterned matrix restricted hESC differentiation at colony periphery but allowed hESC growth into multiple layers in the central region, which decreased hESC proliferation and induced hESC differentiation. In undifferentiated hESCs, {beta}-catenin primarily localized at cell-cell junctions but not in the nucleus. The amount of {beta}-catenin in differentiating hESCs at the periphery of colonies or in multiple layers decreased significantly at cell-cell junctions. Consistently, knocking down {beta}-catenin decreased Oct-4 expression in hESCs. These results indicate that localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the spatial pattern of differentiation in hESC colonies.

  16. Regulation of AR and (beta)-Catenin Signaling by Pin 1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    phosphatidylinositol 3 - kinase AKT pathway in human cancer . Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:489–501. 51. Voeller, H. J., C. I. Truica, and E. P. Gelmann. 1998. Beta-catenin...4 complex imposes a crypt progenitor phenotype on colorectal cancer cells. Cell 111:241–250. 50. Vivanco, I., and C. L. Sawyers. 2002. The

  17. LRP6 expression promotes cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by altering beta-catenin subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yonghe; Lu, Wenyan; He, Xi; Schwartz, Alan L; Bu, Guojun

    2004-12-02

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays key roles in both embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6), a novel member of the expanding LDL receptor family, functions as an indispensable co-receptor for the Wnt signaling pathway. Although the role of LRP6 in embryonic development is now well established, its role in tumorigenesis is unclear. We report that LRP6 is readily expressed at the transcript level in several human cancer cell lines and human malignant tissues. Furthermore, using a retroviral gene transfer system, we find that stable expression of LRP6 in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells alters subcellular beta-catenin distribution such that the cytosolic beta-catenin level is significantly increased. This is accompanied by a significant increase in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and cell proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that LRP6 expression promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. These results thus indicate that LRP6 may function as a potential oncogenic protein by modulating Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

  18. Participation of OCT3/4 and beta-catenin during dysgenetic gonadal malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Palma, Icela; Peña, Rocio-Yolanda; Contreras, Alejandra; Ceballos-Reyes, Guillermo; Coyote, Ninel; Eraña, Luis; Kofman-Alfaro, Susana; Queipo, Gloria

    2008-05-18

    Gonadoblastoma (GB) is an in situ tumor consisting of a heterogeneous population of mature and immature germ cells, other cells resembling immature Sertoli/granulosa cells, and Leydig/lutein-like cells, may also be present. GB almost exclusively affects a subset of patients with intersex disorders and in 30% of them overgrowth of the germinal component of the tumor is observed and the lesion is term dysgerminoma/seminoma. Several pathways have been proposed to explain the malignant process, and abnormal OCT3/4 expression is the most robust risk factor for malignant transformation. Some authors have suggested that OCT3/4 and beta-catenin might both be involved in the same oncogenic pathway, as both genes are master regulators of cell differentiation and, overexpression of either gene may result in cancer development. The mechanism by which beta-catenin participates in GB transformation is not completely clear and exploration of the E-cadherin pathway did not conclusively show that this pathway participated in the molecular pathogenesis of GB. Here we analyze seven patients with mixed gonadal dysgenesis and GB, in an effort to elucidate the participation of beta-catenin and E-cadherin, as well as OCT3/4, in the oncogenic pathways involved in the transformation of GB into seminoma/dysgerminoma. We conclude that the proliferation of immature germ cells in GB may be due to an interaction between OCT3/4 and accumulated beta-catenin in the nuclei of the immature germ cells.

  19. [Effects of K-ras gene mutation on colon cancer cell line Caco-2 metastasis by regulating E-cadherin/beta-catenin/p120 protein complex formation and RhoA protein activity].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-nan; Li, Xiao; Qian, Jia-ming; Lu, Xin-qing; Yang, Hong

    2010-02-01

    To explore the effects of K-ras gene mutation on colon cancer cell line Caco-2 metastasis by regulating E-cadherin/beta-catenin/p120 protein complex formation and RhoA protein activity. K-ras wild-type colon cancer cell line Caco-2 was transiently transfected by phr-GFP vector (control group), transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector (transfection group), transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector and treated by specific MAPK pathway inhibitor PD98059 (MAPK inhibition group), or transfected by mutant K-ras gene phr-K-ras (Val12) vector and treated by specific PI-3K pathway inhibitor LY294002 (PI-3K inhibition group), respectively. Cell migration was tested by Transwell experiment. E-cadherin and beta-catenin protein expression and intracellular location were detected by cell immunofluorescence method. Intracellular p120 protein expression was detected by Western blot. beta-catenin protein level which combined with E-cadherin was detected by immunoprecipitation. RhoA activity was analyzed by Pull-down assay. The Caco-2 cell migration rate was (19.8 +/- 5.6) % in transfection group, which was significantly higher than that in control group [(14.0 +/- 4.2) %] (P = 0.001) and in MAPK inhibition group [(15.8 +/- 1.2) %] (P = 0.044), but was not significantly different from that in PI-3K inhibition group [(17.5 +/- 2.8) %] (P = 0.095). Immunofluorescence method showed that the E-cadherin and beta-catenin stain located in the cell membrane decreased in transfection group. Western blot showed that the total intracellular p120 protein decreased in transfection group and PI-3K inhibition group. Immunoprecipitation data showed that beta-catenin protein level combined with E-cadherin decreased in transfection group and PI-3K group. Pull-down test showed that RhoA protein activity was up-regulated in transfection group. K-ras gene mutation stimulates the migration of colon cancer cell Caco-2, which may be achieved by decreasing the E-cadherin/beta-catenin

  20. Regulation of intracellular beta-catenin levels by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor-suppressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Munemitsu, S; Albert, I; Souza, B; Rubinfeld, B; Polakis, P

    1995-01-01

    The APC tumor-suppressor protein associates with beta-catenin, a cell adhesion protein that is upregulated by the WNT1 oncogene. We examined the effects of exogenous APC expression on the distribution and amount of beta-catenin in a colorectal cancer cell containing only mutant APC. Expression of wild-type APC caused a pronounced reduction in total beta-catenin levels by eliminating an excessive supply of cytoplasmic beta-catenin indigenous to the SW480 colorectal cancer cell line. This reduction was due to an enhanced rate of beta-catenin protein degradation. Truncated mutant APC proteins, characteristic of those associated with cancer, lacked this activity. Mutational analysis revealed that the central region of the APC protein, which is typically deleted or severely truncated in tumors, was responsible for the down-regulation of beta-catenin. These results suggest that the tumor-suppressor activity of mutant APC may be compromised due to a defect in its ability to regulate beta-catenin. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7708772

  1. Involvement of PPAR gamma and E-cadherin/beta-catenin pathway in the antiproliferative effect of conjugated linoleic acid in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Bocca, Claudia; Bozzo, Francesca; Francica, Simona; Colombatto, Sebastiano; Miglietta, Antonella

    2007-07-15

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a naturally occurring fatty acid, which has been shown to exert beneficial effects against breast carcinogenesis. It has been reported that CLA could modulate cellular proliferation and differentiation through the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Among different PPAR isotypes, PPAR gamma is involved in growth inhibition of transformed cells. Ligands of PPAR gamma are considered as potential anticancer drugs, so CLA was tested for its ability to induce PPAR gamma expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The effects of CLA and of a specific synthetic PPAR gamma antagonist were evaluated on cell growth as well as on parameters responsible for cell growth regulation. We demonstrated here that CLA stimulated the expression of PPAR gamma to levels up to control and caused PPAR gamma translocation into the nucleus. Furthermore, the overexpression of PPAR gamma positively correlates with the inhibition of cell proliferation and with the modulation of ERK signaling induced by CLA; in all cases the administration of the antagonist reverted CLA effects. The PPAR-signaling pathway is connected with the beta-catenin/E-cadherin pathway, thus we evaluated CLA effects on the expression and cellular distribution of these proteins, which are involved in cell adhesion and responsible for invasive behavior. The treatment with CLA determined the up-regulation and the redistribution of beta-catenin and E-cadherin and the antagonist reverted only the effect on beta-catenin. These studies indicate that CLA regulates PPAR gamma expression by selectively acting as an agonist and may influence cell-cell adhesion and invasiveness of MCF-7 cells. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. {beta}-Catenin stabilization imparts crypt progenitor phenotype to hyperproliferating colonic epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, Joseph H.; Wang Yu; Singh, Pomila; Umar, Shahid

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the Citrobacter rodentium (CR)-induced transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia (TMCH) model, we provide mechanistic basis of changes in {beta}-catenin/APC/CKI{epsilon} leading to progression and/or regression of hyperplasia in vivo. In response to CR-induced TMCH, crypt lengths increased significantly between days 6-27 post-infection, followed by a steep decline by day 34. {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/total {beta}-catenin were elevated on day 1 post-infection, preceding changes in crypt length, and persisted for 27 days before declining by day 34. Importantly, cellular CKI{epsilon} and {beta}-catenin co-immunoprecipitated and exhibited remarkable parallel changes in kinetics during hyperplasia/regression phases. {beta}-catenin, phosphorylated at Ser33,37 and Thr41 ({beta}-cat{sup 33,37/41}), was low till day 12, followed by gradual increase until day 27 before declining by day 34. GSK-3{beta} exhibited significant Ser{sup 9}-phosphorylation/inactivation at days 6-12 with partial recovery at days 27-34. Wild type (wt) APC (p312) levels increased at day 6 with transient proteolysis/truncation to p130 form between days 12 and 15; p312 reappeared by day 19 and returned to baseline by day 34. The kinetics of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin nuclear accumulation and acetylation (Ac-{beta}-Cat{sup Lys49}) from days 6 to 27, followed by loss of phosphorylation/acetylation by day 34 was almost identical; Tcf-4 co-immunoprecipitated with {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin and localized immunohistochemically to {beta}-Cat{sup 41/45}-positive regions leading to elevated cyclin D1 expression, during the hyperproliferative, but not regression phases of TMCH. CKI{epsilon} mediated phosphorylation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}, resulting in stabilization/nuclear translocation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45} may be critical for maintaining proliferation at days 6-27. Reversal of GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation and APC changes may be equally critical during the regression phase from days 27 to 34.

  3. Induction of p16INK4A mediated by beta-catenin in a TCF4-independent manner: implications for alterations in p16INK4A and pRb expression during trans-differentiation of endometrial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, Makoto; Hashimura, Miki; Kuwata, Takeshi; Hamano, Mieko; Okayasu, Isao

    2006-11-15

    Excessive beta-catenin is considered to contribute to tumor progression by inducing transcription of cell cycle-related genes such as cyclin D1 and c-myc. In contrast, our recent studies demonstrated that beta-catenin could inhibit cell proliferation through activation of p14(ARF)/p53/p21(WAF1) pathway during trans-differentiation toward morular phenotype of endometrial carcinoma (Em Ca) cells. Here, we focused on associations with alterations in p16(INK4A) and pRb expression during this process. In clinical cases, p16(INK4A) immunoreactivity was found to frequently overlap with nuclear beta-catenin accumulation in small-sized morules and surrounding glandular carcinomas (Sur-Ca), demonstrating a significant positive correlation (r = 0.447, p < 0.0001) overall, while the immunoreactions showed stepwise decrease in enlarged morules, despite persistent accumulation of beta-catenin and p21(WAF1) in nuclei. Immunoreactivity for both total pRb and its phosphorylated form was apparently decreased in all morules as compared to Sur-Ca lesions, with a significantly positive correlation. In cell lines, transcriptional activation of p16(INK) (4A) promoter by active form beta-catenin, as well as p21(WAF1), occurred through the region from -385 to -280 bp relative to the translation start site, in a TCF4-independent manner. Moreover, cell proliferation was accompanied with phosphorylation of pRb and increased p16(INK4A) expression, while its inhibition by serum starvation caused decreased expression of total pRb but not p16(INK4A), resulting in high relative amounts of the latter. These findings indicate that induction of p16(INK4A) mediated by nuclear beta-catenin and p21(WAF1), along with loss of pRb expression, may be important for initial steps during trans-differentiation of Em Ca cells. In addition, its down-regulation is associated with progression of lesions.

  4. [CELL CONTACT PROTEIN BETA-CATENIN IN EPENDYMAL AND EPITHELIAL CELLS OF THE CHOROID PLEXUS OF THE CEREBRAL LATERAL VENTRICLES].

    PubMed

    Kirik, O V; Sufieyva, D A; Nazarenkova, A V; Korzhevskiy, D E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution pattern of cellular contacts protein beta-catenin in the choroid plexus and ependyma of lateral ventricles of the brain. The study was conducted on frontal sections of the brain of Wistar rats (n = 10) using polyclonal antibodies against beta-catenin. The obtained preparations were analyzed by microscopy in transmitted light and using confocal laser microscopy. To study the distribution of beta-catenin in different projections, three-dimensional reconstruction was performed. The study demonstrated different distribution patterns of this protein in ependyma and choroid plexus. Unlike ependyma, in the cells of the choroid plexus beta-catenin was distributed in the same way as in simple epithelial tissues (on the basal and lateral borders of the cells). This may indicate different tissue attribution of the ependyma and the choroid plexus epithelium, despite their common origin.

  5. Mutational activation of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene is a common event in the development of Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Koesters, R; Ridder, R; Kopp-Schneider, A; Betts, D; Adams, V; Niggli, F; Briner, J; von Knebel Doeberitz, M

    1999-08-15

    Activation of beta-catenin-mediated transcription is the nuclear end point of organ-specific Wnt signaling. In the developing kidney, Wnt-4, a secreted glycoprotein, acts as an autoinducer of the mesenchymal to epithelial transition that underlies normal nephron development. Dysregulation of this epithelial transformation process may lead to Wilms' tumors (WTs). In this study, we investigated the potential role of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene, a candidate downstream target molecule of Wnt-4 signaling, in the development of WTs. In 6 of 40 tumors (15%), mutation analysis revealed heterozygous missense mutations or small deletions that result in the loss of important regulatory phosphorylation sites within the beta-catenin protein. These findings indicate that activating beta-catenin mutations may play a significant role in the development of WTs and establish a direct link between Wilms' tumorigenesis and the Wnt signal transduction pathway governing normal kidney development.

  6. p53 and beta-catenin expression in gallbladder tissues and correlation with tumor progression in gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mila; Sakhuja, Puja; Singh, Shivendra; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    The inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene and activation of the proto-oncogene are key steps in the development of human cancer. p53 and beta-catenin are examples of such genes, respectively. In the present study, our aim was to determine the role of these genes in the carcinogenesis of the gallbladder by immunohistochemistry. Sections from paraffin-embedded blocks of surgically resected specimens of gallbladder cancer (GBC) (80 cases), chronic cholecystitis (60 cases), and control gallbladders (10 cases) were stained with the monoclonal antibody p53, and polyclonal antibody beta-catenin. Results were scored semiquantitatively and statistical analysis performed. p53 expression was scored as percentage of the nuclei stained. Beta-catenin expression was scored as type of expression-membranous, cytoplasmic, and nuclear staining. Beta-catenin expression was correlated with tumor invasiveness, differentiation, and stage. Over-expression of p53 was seen in 56.25% of GBC cases and was not seen in chronic cholecystitis or in control gallbladders. p53 expression in gallbladder cancer was significantly higher than in inflammatory or control gallbladders (P < 0.0001). p53 expression increased with increasing tumor grade (P = 0.039). Beta-catenin nuclear expression was seen in 75% cases of gallbladder cancer and in no case of chronic cholecystitis and control gallbladder. Beta-catenin nuclear expression increased with tumor depth invasiveness, and grade (P = 0.028 and P = 0.0152, respectively). p53 and beta-catenin nuclear expression is significantly higher in GBC. p53 expression correlates with increasing tumor grade while beta-catenin nuclear expression correlates with tumor grade and depth of invasion, thus suggesting a role for these genes in tumor progression of GBC.

  7. p53 and Beta-Catenin Expression in Gallbladder Tissues and Correlation with Tumor Progression in Gallbladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mila; Sakhuja, Puja; Singh, Shivendra; Agarwal, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: The inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene and activation of the proto-oncogene are key steps in the development of human cancer. p53 and beta-catenin are examples of such genes, respectively. In the present study, our aim was to determine the role of these genes in the carcinogenesis of the gallbladder by immunohistochemistry. Patients and Methods: Sections from paraffin-embedded blocks of surgically resected specimens of gallbladder cancer (GBC) (80 cases), chronic cholecystitis (60 cases), and control gallbladders (10 cases) were stained with the monoclonal antibody p53, and polyclonal antibody beta-catenin. Results were scored semiquantitatively and statistical analysis performed. p53 expression was scored as percentage of the nuclei stained. Beta-catenin expression was scored as type of expression–membranous, cytoplasmic, and nuclear staining. Beta-catenin expression was correlated with tumor invasiveness, differentiation, and stage. Results: Over-expression of p53 was seen in 56.25% of GBC cases and was not seen in chronic cholecystitis or in control gallbladders. p53 expression in gallbladder cancer was significantly higher than in inflammatory or control gallbladders (P < 0.0001). p53 expression increased with increasing tumor grade (P = 0.039). Beta-catenin nuclear expression was seen in 75% cases of gallbladder cancer and in no case of chronic cholecystitis and control gallbladder. Beta-catenin nuclear expression increased with tumor depth invasiveness, and grade (P = 0.028 and P = 0.0152, respectively). Conclusion: p53 and beta-catenin nuclear expression is significantly higher in GBC. p53 expression correlates with increasing tumor grade while beta-catenin nuclear expression correlates with tumor grade and depth of invasion, thus suggesting a role for these genes in tumor progression of GBC. PMID:23319036

  8. Bryostatin 1 modulates beta-catenin subcellular localization and transcription activity through protein kinase D1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C; Du, Cheng; Balaji, K C

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, the use of natural products for cancer prevention and treatment has received considerable attention. Bryostatin 1 is a natural macrocyclic lactone and a protein kinase D (PKD) modulator with potent antineoplastic properties that has been used to treat human cancers in clinical trials with limited success. Further understanding the mechanistic basis of Bryostatin 1 action may provide opportunities to improve clinical results of treatment with Bryostatin 1. We identified that PKD1, founding member of PKD family of serine/threonine kinases, modulates E-cadherin/beta-catenin activity, which plays an important role in cell integrity, polarity, growth, and morphogenesis. An aberrant expression and localization of E-cadherin/beta-catenin has been strongly associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined the effect of Bryostatin 1 treatment on PKD1 activation, beta-catenin translocation and transcription activity, and malignant phenotype of prostate cancer cells. Initial activation of PKD1 with Bryostatin 1 leads to colocalization of the cytoplasmic pool of beta-catenin with PKD1, trans-Golgi network markers, and proteins involved in vesicular trafficking. Activation of PKD1 by Bryostatin 1 decreases nuclear beta-catenin expression and beta-catenin/TCF transcription activity. Activation of PKD1 alters cellular aggregation and proliferation in prostate cancer cells associated with subcellular redistribution of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. For the first time, we have identified that Bryostatin 1 modulates beta-catenin signaling through PKD1, which identifies a novel mechanism to improve efficacy of Bryostatin 1 in clinical settings.

  9. Pituitary gland and beta-catenin signaling: from ontogeny to oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gueorguiev, Maria; Grossman, Ashley B

    2009-01-01

    Although pituitary tumors are mostly benign, they share certain molecular events with more malignant neoplasia, although their precise pathogenesis is far from established. The acquisition of new functional characteristics during their evolution suggests a multistep process that leads to tumor transformation. Mutations in classical tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes are infrequently associated with pituitary tumorigenesis. However, alterations in different signaling pathways, especially those involved in pituitary gland development, have emerged as significant features in pituitary adenomas. In particular, changes in inhibitory components of the beta-catenin pathway and its relationship to the cadherin family of peptides may well play an important role in tumorigenesis. We review and assess the role of the beta-catenin signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas.

  10. The emergence of pattern in embryogenesis: regulation of beta-catenin localization during early sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Ettensohn, Charles A

    2006-11-14

    The accumulation of beta-catenin in the nuclei of blastomeres at one pole of the early embryo is a highly conserved and essential feature of animal development. In the sea urchin, beta-catenin accumulates in the nuclei of vegetal blastomeres during early cleavage and activates gene regulatory networks that drive mesoderm and endoderm formation. Measurements of beta-catenin half-life in vivo have demonstrated a gradient in stability along the animal-vegetal axis. Dishevelled (Dsh), a protein that regulates beta-catenin turnover, is localized in the vegetal cortex, where it has an essential role in stabilizing beta-catenin and activating endomesodermal gene networks. Two motifs of Dsh are required for targeting to the vegetal cortex. Overexpression of Dsh in animal blastomeres does not alter their fate, which suggests that a localized activator of Dsh may be missing in these cells. Wnt signaling may be localized in the early sea urchin embryo, as it is in Xenopus, but findings point to possible differences in the initial polarizing signal in amphibians and echinoderms. Further studies will be required to determine the extent to which mechanisms that control beta-catenin nuclearization in early embryogenesis have been conserved during animal evolution.

  11. Modulation of Beta-catenin Activity With PKD1 Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    remaining specific aims and to have couple more publications. In brief, in 2008-09 funding period we have investigated the effect of bryostatin on PKD1...expression, beta-catenin transcription, cell proliferation, and cellular aggregation. In this study we examined the effect of Bryostatin 1 treatment...with Bryostatin 1 leads to colocalization of the cytoplasmic pool of β-catenin with PKD1, trans-Golgi network markers and proteins involved in

  12. Glioblastoma microvesicles promote endothelial cell proliferation through Akt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihai; Sun, Junfeng; Lan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma tumor cells release microvesicles, which contain mRNA, miRNA and angiogenic proteins. These tumor-derived microvesicles transfer genetic information and proteins to normal cells. Previous reports demonstrated that the increased microvesicles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with glioblastoma up-regulate procoagulant activity. The concentration of microvesicles was closely related to thromboembolism incidence and clinical therapeutic effects of glioblastoma patients. However, it is still not clear how CSF microvesicles and what factors affect glioblastoma development. In this study, we collected the plasma and CSF from glioblastoma patients and healthy volunteers. Microvesicles acquired from serum or CSF were added to cultured endothelial cells. And the effects of these microvesicles on endothelial cells were examined. Our results showed that microvesicles from CSF of patients, but not from circulating blood, promoted endothelial cells migration and proliferation in vitro. In addition, the degree of endothelial cell proliferation triggered by microvesicles from CSF was reduced when treated with siRNA targeting Akt/beta-catenin, suggesting that the Akt/beta-catenin pathway is involved in the microvesicle-initiated endothelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, glioblastoma mainly affects microvesicles within CSF without showing significant impact on microvesicles in circulating blood. Microvesicles from the CSF of glioblastoma patients may initiate endothelial cell growth and thus promote cell invasion. This effect may be directly exerted by activated Akt/beta-catenin pathway.

  13. MicroRNA-1826 directly targets beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and MEK1 (MAP2K1) in VHL-inactivated renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Nakajima, Koichi; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this project is to identify new therapeutic microRNAs (miRNAs) for von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-inactivated renal cancer cells. We initially identified several potential miRNAs targeting CTNNB1 and MEK1 using several targets scan algorithms. Only miR-1826 was found to target CTNNB1 and MEK1. Therefore, we focused on miRNA-1826 and performed 3' untranslated region (UTR) luciferase assay, functional analyses and association study between miR-1826 expression and renal cancer patient outcomes. miR-1826 expression was significantly lower in renal cancer tissues compared with non-neoplastic areas and lower expression was significantly associated with overall shorter survival and earlier recurrence after radical nephrectomy. Following miR-1826 transfection, 3' UTR luciferase activity and protein expression of beta-catenin and MEK1 were significantly downregulated in renal cancer cells. Introduction of miR-1826 also inhibited renal cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Additionally, miR-1826 promoted apoptosis and G(1) arrest in VHL-inactivated renal cancer cells. Knockdowns of CTNNB1 and MEK1 by small interfering RNAs reproduced the tumor-suppressive effect of miR-1826. Our data suggest that the miR-1826 plays an important role as a tumor suppressor by downregulating beta-catenin and MEK1 in VHL-inactivated renal cancers.

  14. MicroRNA-1826 directly targets beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and MEK1 (MAP2K1) in VHL-inactivated renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Nakajima, Koichi; Ishii, Nobuhisa; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this project is to identify new therapeutic microRNAs (miRNAs) for von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-inactivated renal cancer cells. We initially identified several potential miRNAs targeting CTNNB1 and MEK1 using several targets scan algorithms. Only miR-1826 was found to target CTNNB1 and MEK1. Therefore, we focused on miRNA-1826 and performed 3′ untranslated region (UTR) luciferase assay, functional analyses and association study between miR-1826 expression and renal cancer patient outcomes. miR-1826 expression was significantly lower in renal cancer tissues compared with non-neoplastic areas and lower expression was significantly associated with overall shorter survival and earlier recurrence after radical nephrectomy. Following miR-1826 transfection, 3′ UTR luciferase activity and protein expression of beta-catenin and MEK1 were significantly downregulated in renal cancer cells. Introduction of miR-1826 also inhibited renal cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Additionally, miR-1826 promoted apoptosis and G1 arrest in VHL-inactivated renal cancer cells. Knockdowns of CTNNB1 and MEK1 by small interfering RNAs reproduced the tumor-suppressive effect of miR-1826. Our data suggest that the miR-1826 plays an important role as a tumor suppressor by downregulating beta-catenin and MEK1 in VHL-inactivated renal cancers. PMID:22180573

  15. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inactivation and stabilization of beta-catenin induce nephron differentiation in isolated mouse and rat kidney mesenchymes.

    PubMed

    Kuure, Satu; Popsueva, Anna; Jakobson, Madis; Sainio, Kirsi; Sariola, Hannu

    2007-04-01

    Wnt proteins are required for induction of nephrons in mouse metanephric kidneys, but the downstream pathways that mediate tubule induction and epithelial differentiation have remained obscure. The intracellular mechanisms by which Wnt signaling mediates nephron induction in embryonic kidney mesenchymes were studied. First is shown that transient exposure of isolated kidney mesenchymes to structurally different glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitors lithium or 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime results in abundant epithelial differentiation and full segregation of nephrons. Shown further by mice with genetically disrupted ureteric bud or Wolffian duct development is that this nephrogenic competence arises independent of the influence of Wolffian duct-derived epithelia. Analysis of the intracellular signaling cascades downstream of GSK3 inhibition revealed stabilization of beta-catenin and upregulation of Lef1 and Tcf1, both events that are associated with the active canonical Wnt signaling. Last, genetic evidence that metanephric mesenchyme-specific stabilization of beta-catenin is sufficient to induce nephron differentiation in isolated kidney mesenchymes, similar to that induced by GSK3 inhibitors, is provided. These data show that activation of canonical Wnt pathway is sufficient to induce nephrogenesis and suggest that this pathway mediates the nephron induction in murine kidney mesenchymes.

  16. Aberrant distributions and relationships among E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and connexin 26 and 43 in endometrioid adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Baltaziak, Marek; Kanczuga-Koda, Luiza; Lesniewicz, Tomasz; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria; Sulkowski, Stanislaw; Koda, Mariusz; Sulkowska, Mariola

    2010-07-01

    During carcinogenesis, loss of intracellular cohesion is observed among cancer cells with altered expression of such adhesion molecules as E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and aberrant expression and cellular location of intercellular gap junction proteins-connexins. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunohistochemically the expression and relationship between E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in 86 endometrioid adenocarcinomas. The aberrant cytoplasmic translocation of the studied proteins was a predominant finding, whereas only a minority of cases showed normal, nuclear beta-catenin labeling or membranous distribution of the remaining molecules. E-cadherin was positively and significantly associated with beta-catenin (P=0.001, r=0.366), as was Cx26 with Cx43 (P<0.001, r=0.719), E-cadherin with Cx26 (P<0.001, r=0.413), and E-cadherin and Cx43 (P<0.001, r=0.434) in all cancers. A subgroup of endometrioid adenocarcinomas (FIGO IB+II) exclusively showed a positive significant association between the expression of beta-catenin and Cx26 (P=0.038, r=0.339). In addition, there were significantly more beta-catenin-positive carcinomas among superficially spreading cancers (FIGO IA) than among deeper invading neoplasms (FIGO IB+II) (P=0.056). The altered location of the studied proteins indicates impairment of their physiological functions. In particular, normal membranous distribution of E-cadherin and connexins is lost and replaced by abnormal cytoplasmic accumulation in most cancers, and thus intercellular ties are expected to be weakened and loosened as a consequence. In contrast, the lack of relationship between beta-catenin and connexins, E-cadherin seems to be closely associated with the expression of Cx26 and Cx43 in endometrioid adenocarcinomas.

  17. Loss of p53 expression is accompanied by upregulation of beta-catenin in meningiomas: a concomitant reciprocal expression.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Vladušić, Tomislav; Tomas, Davor; Logara, Monika; Skoko, Josip; Hrašćan, Reno

    2016-04-01

    Crosstalk between Wnt and p53 signalling pathways in cancer has long been suggested. Therefore in this study we have investigated the involvement of these pathways in meningiomas by analysing their main effector molecules, beta-catenin and p53. Cellular expression of p53 and beta-catenin proteins and genetic changes in TP53 were analysed by immunohistochemistry, PCR/RFLP and direct sequencing of TP53 exon 4. All the findings were analysed statistically. Our analysis showed that 47.5% of the 59 meningiomas demonstrated loss of expression of p53 protein. Moderate and strong p53 expression in the nuclei was observed in 8.5% and 6.8% of meningiomas respectively. Gross deletion of TP53 gene was observed in one meningioma, but nucleotide alterations were observed in 35.7% of meningiomas. In contrast, beta-catenin, the main Wnt signalling molecule, was upregulated in 71.2%, while strong expression was observed in 28.8% of meningiomas. The concomitant expressions of p53 and beta-catenin were investigated in the same patients. In the analysed meningiomas, the levels of the two proteins were significantly negatively correlated (P = 0.002). This indicates that meningiomas with lost p53 upregulate beta-catenin and activate Wnt signalling. Besides showing the reciprocal relationship between proteins, we also showed that the expression of p53 was significantly (P = 0.021) associated with higher meningioma grades (II and III), while beta-catenin upregulation was not associated with malignancy grades. Additionally, women exhibited significantly higher values of p53 loss when compared to males (P = 0.005). Our findings provide novel information about p53 involvement in meningeal brain tumours and reveal the complex relationship between Wnt and p53 signalling, they suggest an important role for beta-catenin in these tumours.

  18. Combined E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin expression is a favorable prognostic factor in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Scholten, A N; Aliredjo, R; Creutzberg, C L; Smit, V T H B M

    2006-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules, such as epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), might be involved in the processes of tumor invasion and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin in endometrial carcinoma and to determine the prognostic value of these factors. We have investigated the expression of E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin by immunohistochemistry in 225 endometrial carcinomas. The correlation between the E-cadherin and the catenins and their correlation with several histologic and clinical parameters were analyzed. Negative E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin expression was observed in 44%, 47%, and 33% of endometrial carcinomas, respectively, and was correlated with histologic FIGO grade 3 (P < 0.001). Negative E-cadherin expression was more often observed in nonendometrioid endometrial carcinomas (NEECs) than in endometrioid carcinomas (75% versus 43%; P= 0.04). Combined positive E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin expression was an independent positive prognostic factor for survival in patients with grade 1-2 carcinomas (P= 0.02). Negative E-cadherin expression was found to be associated with histologic grade 3 and with NEEC. Combined positive E-cadherin, alpha-catenin, and beta-catenin expression was a significant prognostic factor.

  19. Beta-catenin deficiency causes DiGeorge syndrome-like phenotypes through regulation of Tbx1.

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung-Ho; Ornitz, David M

    2010-04-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a common genetic disease characterized by pharyngeal apparatus malformations and defects in cardiovascular, craniofacial and glandular development. TBX1 is the most likely candidate disease-causing gene and is located within a 22q11.2 chromosomal deletion that is associated with most cases of DGS. Here, we show that canonical Wnt-beta-catenin signaling negatively regulates Tbx1 expression and that mesenchymal inactivation of beta-catenin (Ctnnb1) in mice caused abnormalities within the DGS phenotypic spectrum, including great vessel malformations, hypoplastic pulmonary and aortic arch arteries, cardiac malformations, micrognathia, thymus hypoplasia and mislocalization of the parathyroid gland. In a heterozygous Fgf8 or Tbx1 genetic background, ectopic activation of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling caused an increased incidence and severity of DGS-like phenotypes. Additionally, reducing the gene dosage of Fgf8 rescued pharyngeal arch artery defects caused by loss of Ctnnb1. These findings identify Wnt-beta-catenin signaling as a crucial upstream regulator of a Tbx1-Fgf8 signaling pathway and suggest that factors that affect Wnt-beta-catenin signaling could modify the incidence and severity of DGS.

  20. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV is a target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Arrázola, Macarena S; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Colombres, Marcela; Toledo, Enrique M; Cruzat, Fernando; Pavez, Leonardo; Assar, Rodrigo; Aravena, Andrés; González, Mauricio; Montecino, Martín; Maass, Alejandro; Martínez, Servet; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2009-12-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) plays a key role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression. The expression of CaMKIV and the activation of CREB regulated genes are involved in memory and neuronal survival. We report here that: (a) a bioinformatic analysis of 15,476 promoters of the human genome predicted several Wnt target genes, being CaMKIV a very interesting candidate; (b) CaMKIV promoter contains TCF/LEF transcription motifs similar to those present in Wnt target genes; (c) biochemical studies indicate that lithium and the canonical ligand Wnt-3a induce CaMKIV mRNA and protein expression levels in rat hippocampal neurons as well as CaMKIV promoter activity; (d) treatment of hippocampal neurons with Wnt-3a increases the binding of beta-catenin to the CaMKIV promoter: (e) In vivo activation of the Wnt signaling improve spatial memory impairment and restores the expression of CaMKIV in a mice double transgenic model for Alzheimer's disease which shows decreased levels of the kinase. We conclude that CaMKIV is regulated by the Wnt signaling pathway and that its expression could play a role in the neuroprotective function of the Wnt signaling against the Alzheimer's amyloid peptide.

  1. Correlation of beta-catenin localization with cyclooxygenase-2 expression and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takako; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Ohnishi, Mutsuko; Suemoto, Yuko; Kirkner, Gregory J; Dehari, Reiko; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2007-07-01

    The WNT/beta-catenin (CTNNB1) pathway is commonly activated in the carcinogenic process. Cross-talks between the WNT and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 or PTGS2)/prostaglandin pathways have been suggested. The relationship between beta-catenin activation and microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer has been controversial. The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP or CIMP-high) with widespread promoter methylation is a distinct epigenetic phenotype in colorectal cancer, which is associated with MSI-high. However, no study has examined the relationship between beta-catenin activation and CIMP status. Using 832 population-based colorectal cancer specimens, we assessed beta-catenin localization by immunohistochemistry. We quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters [CACNA1G, CDKN2A(p16), CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1] by real-time polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight). MSI-high, CIMP-high, and BRAF mutation were associated inversely with cytoplasmic and nuclear beta-catenin expressions (i.e., beta-catenin activation) and associated positively with membrane expression. The inverse relation between beta-catenin activation and CIMP was independent of MSI. COX-2 overexpression correlated with cytoplasmic beta-catenin expression (even after tumors were stratified by CIMP status), but did not correlate significantly with nuclear or membrane expression. In conclusion, beta-catenin activation is inversely associated with CIMP-high independent of MSI status. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin is associated with COX-2 overexpression, supporting the role of cytoplasmic beta-catenin in stabilizing PTGS2 (COX-2) mRNA.

  2. Differential sensitivity of epidermal cell subpopulations to beta-catenin-induced ectopic hair follicle formation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher M; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Jensen, Kim B; Watt, Fiona M

    2010-07-01

    Wnt signalling is required for hair follicle development and for the growth phase (anagen) of postnatal follicles. When the pathway is activated at high levels in adult mouse epidermis, ectopic follicles form from existing follicles, interfollicular epidermis (IFE) and sebaceous glands, revealing a remarkable ability of the tissue to be reprogrammed. To compare the competence of different epidermal cell populations to form ectopic follicles, we expressed a 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4OHT) inducible, stabilised beta-catenin transgene (DeltaNbeta-cateninER) under the control of two different promoters. We targeted the reservoir of stem cells in the hair follicle bulge via the keratin 15 (K15) promoter and targeted the sebaceous glands and base of the follicle (bulb) with a truncated K5 promoter (DeltaK5). No ectopic follicles formed in the IFE in either model, establishing the autonomy of the IFE stem cell compartment in undamaged epidermis. Activation of beta-catenin in the bulge stimulated proliferation and bulge expansion. Existing hair follicles entered anagen, but no ectopic follicles formed. DeltaK5DeltaNbeta-cateninER expressing hair follicles also entered anagen on 4OHT treatment. In addition, a subpopulation of cells at the base of the sebaceous gland readily formed ectopic follicles, resulting in complete and reversible conversion of sebaceous glands into hair follicles. Combined activation of beta-catenin and the vitamin D receptor enhanced differentiation of sebaceous gland-derived hair follicles and stimulated ectopic follicle formation in the hair follicle bulb, but not in the bulge. Our results suggest that the bulge and sebaceous gland are, respectively, non-permissive and permissive niches for Wnt induced hair follicle differentiation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Somatic FGF9 mutations in colorectal and endometrial carcinomas associated with membranous beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Wael M; Kalinina, Juliya; Shoman, Soheir; Eissa, Saad; Ollikainen, Miina; Elomaa, Outi; Eliseenkova, Anna V; Bützow, Ralf; Mohammadi, Moosa; Peltomäki, Päivi

    2008-03-01

    We previously described striking molecular features including high frequency of membranous beta-catenin in subsets of familial colon cancers with as yet unknown predisposition. We hypothesized that such tumors might carry mutations in Wnt/beta-catenin target genes. Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) was an attractive target, as it maps to a common area of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in colorectal carcinomas on 13q12.11. Here, we report, for the first time, the occurrence of FGF9 mutations in human cancers. We found a total of six distinct FGF9 mutations including one frameshift, four missense, and one nonsense, in 10 (six colorectal and four endometrial) out of 203 tumors and cell lines. The frameshift mutation was detected in five different tumors. Mapping of these mutations onto the crystal structure of FGF9 predicted that they should all lead to loss of function albeit through variable mechanisms. The p.R173K mutation should diminish ligand affinity for heparin/heparan sulfate, the p.V192M, p.D203G, and p.L188YfsX18 (FGF9(Delta205-208)) mutations should negatively impact ligand's interaction with receptor, while p.G84E and p.E142X (FGF9(Delta142-208)) mutations should interfere with ligand folding. Consistent with these structural predictions, the p.V192M, p.D203G, and p.L188YfsX18 (FGF9(Delta205-208)) mutations impaired the ability of ligand to activate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in cultured cells expressing FGF receptors. LOH was observed in seven out of nine FGF9 mutant tumors, supporting the predicted loss of function. Interestingly, eight out of 10 (80%) of the FGF9 mutant tumors showed normal membranous beta-catenin expression and the absence of mutation in the beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1). These data suggest that FGF9 plays a role in colorectal and endometrial carcinogenesis.

  4. PPARgamma and Wnt/beta-Catenin pathway in human breast cancer: expression pattern, molecular interaction and clinical/prognostic correlations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Zou, Lin; Zhang, Chunhui; He, Song; Cheng, Chun; Xu, Junfei; Lu, Weiqi; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Donglin; Shen, Aiguo

    2009-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a nuclear receptor expressed in a large number of human cancers and plays important roles in breast cancer cell proliferation. Its association with clinicopathologic features and Wnt/beta-Catenin signaling pathway, a crucial factor in embryonic and malignant development, in breast cancer has not been reported systematically. In the present study, expression patterns, interaction and the correlations with clinical/prognostic factors of PPARgamma and beta-Catenin were investigated among patients with breast cancer. Using immunohistochemistry, we performed a study on 70 patient-derived human breast tumors and compared the protein expression levels of PPARgamma, beta-Catenin and Ki-67. Correlations were then analyzed between IHC-assessed level of these molecules and major clinicopathologic variables and survival. Furthermore, western blot (WB) analysis before and after immunoprecipitation with PPARgamma and beta-Catenin were performed on breast cancer tissues and cell lines to evaluate their protein level and molecular interaction. We showed that PPARgamma expression was of significant prognostic value in the outcome of breast carcinomas, which positively correlated with ER status (P = 0.012) and inversely associated with histologic grade (P = 0.012), tumor size (P = 0.007), axillary lymph node status (P = 0.044), TNM stage (P = 0.026), Ki-67 (P = 0.006) and abnormal beta-Catenin expression (P = 0.023), whereas no correlation was seen between PPARgamma and age (P = 0.513), histology (P = 0.764), PR (P = 0.099) or HER-2 status (P = 0.175). Kaplan-Meier survival curves of the study population showed that high expression level of PPARgamma significantly correlated with long-term survival. Molecular interaction could also be demonstrated between PPARgamma and beta-Catenin both in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples. On the basis of these results, we suggested that PPARgamma might serve as a future

  5. Excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling promotes midbrain floor plate neurogenesis, but results in vacillating dopamine progenitors.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Navid; Patel, Meera J; Joksimovic, Milan; Poulin, Jean-Francois; Anderegg, Angela; Taketo, M Mark; Ma, Yong-Chao; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2015-09-01

    The floor plate (FP), a ventral midline structure of the developing neural tube, has differential neurogenic capabilities along the anterior-posterior axis. The midbrain FP, unlike the hindbrain and spinal cord floor plate, is highly neurogenic and produces midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons. Canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, at least in part, is thought to account for the difference in neurogenic capability. Removal of beta-catenin results in mDA progenitor specification defects as well as a profound reduction of neurogenesis. To examine the effects of excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling on mDA specification and neurogenesis, we have analyzed a model wherein beta-catenin is conditionally stabilized in the Shh+domain. Here, we show that the Foxa2+/Lmx1a+ domain is extended rostrally in mutant embryos, suggesting that canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling can drive FP expansion along the rostrocaudal axis. Although excess canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling generally promotes neurogenesis at midbrain levels, less tyrosine hydroxylase (Th)+, mDA neurons are generated, particularly impacting the Substantia Nigra pars compacta. This is likely because of improper progenitor specification. Excess canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling causes downregulation of net Lmx1b, Shh and Foxa2 levels in mDA progenitors. Moreover, these progenitors assume a mixed identity to that of Lmx1a+/Lmx1b+/Nkx6-1+/Neurog1+ progenitors. We also show by lineage tracing analysis that normally, Neurog1+ progenitors predominantly give rise to Pou4f1+ neurons, but not Th+ neurons. Accordingly, in the mutant embryos, Neurog1+ progenitors at the midline generate ectopic Pou4f1+ neurons at the expense of Th+ mDA neurons. Our study suggests that an optimal dose of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is critical for proper establishment of the mDA progenitor character. Our findings will impact embryonic stem cell protocols that utilize Wnt pathway reagents to derive mDA neuron models and therapeutics for

  6. Sulindac reverses aberrant expression and localization of beta-catenin in papillary thyroid cancer cells with the BRAFV600E mutation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nancy L; Lin, Chi-Iou; Whang, Edward E; Carothers, Adelaide M; Moore, Francis D; Ruan, Daniel T

    2010-06-01

    Activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway is implicated in thyroid tumorigenesis, and up to 90% of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) demonstrate aberrant expression of beta-catenin. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs reverse aberrant beta-catenin expression and localization in colon cancer. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug sulindac would reverse aberrant beta-catenin activity in thyroid cancer cells. beta-catenin protein levels were determined in thyroidectomy specimens from six consecutive patients and in three different thyroid cancer cells lines (8505-C, KTC-1, and TPC-1) by immunoblotting. Cells of 8505-C and KTC-1 harbor the BRAF(V600E) mutation, and TPC-1 has the RET/PTC rearrangement. All cell lines were treated with sulindac (100 microM for up to 72 hours). Protein levels of c-myc and cyclin D1 were detected by immunoblotting, and beta-catenin localization was determined by immunocytochemistry in the PTC cell lines. PCCL3 rat thyroid cells that conditionally overexpress either BRAF(V600E) or RET/PTC were also treated with sulindac. All PTC specimens and cell lines expressed high levels of beta-catenin protein and displayed aberrant nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of beta-catenin. Exposure to sulindac for 48 hours reduced beta-catenin expression in 8505-C and KTC-1 cells, but not in TPC-1 cells. Further, sulindac treatment reduced c-myc and cyclin D1 levels in 8505-C and KTC-1 cells, but had no effect in TPC-1 cells. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that sulindac treatment redistributed beta-catenin from the nucleus to the membrane in 8505-C and KTC-1 cells. However, sulindac did not affect beta-catenin localization in TPC-1 cells. Finally, sulindac was effective in decreasing beta-catenin expression and cellular proliferation in BRAF(V600E)-overexpressing cells, but not in RET/PTC3-overexpressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that sulindac treatment reverses beta-catenin

  7. Reappraisal of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma: novel morphologic observations of the hyaline cartilage and endochondral ossification and beta-catenin, Sox9, and osteocalcin immunostaining of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Fanburg-Smith, Julie C; Auerbach, Aaron; Marwaha, Jayson S; Wang, Zengfeng; Rushing, Elisabeth J

    2010-05-01

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma, a rare malignant round cell and hyaline cartilage tumor, is most commonly intraosseous but can occur in extraskeletal sites. We intensively observed the morphology and applied Sox9 (master regulator of chondrogenesis), beta-catenin (involved in bone formation, thought to inhibit chondrogenesis in a Sox9-dependent manner), and osteocalcin (a marker for osteoblastic phenotype) to 22 central nervous system and musculoskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. Cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma were retrieved and reviewed from our files. Immunohistochemistry and follow-up were obtained on mesenchymal chondrosarcoma and tumor controls. Twenty-two mesenchymal chondrosarcomas included 5 central nervous system (all female; mean age, 30.2; mean size, 7.8 cm; in frontal lobe [n = 4] and spinal cord [n = 1]) and 17 musculoskeletal (female-male ratio, 11:6; mean age, 31.1; mean size, 6.2 cm; 3 each of humerus and vertebrae; 2 each of pelvis, rib, tibia, neck soft tissue; one each of femur, unspecified bone, and elbow soft tissue). The hyaline cartilage in most tumors revealed a consistent linear progression of chondrocyte morphology, from resting to proliferating to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Sixty-seven percent of cases demonstrated cell death and acquired osteoblastic phenotype, cells positive for osteocalcin at the site of endochondral ossification. Small round cells of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma were negative for osteocalcin. SOX9 was positive in both components of 21 of 22 cases of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. beta-Catenin highlighted rare nuclei at the interface between round cells and hyaline cartilage in 35% cases. Control skull and central nervous system cases were compared, including chondrosarcomas and small cell osteosarcoma, the latter positive for osteocalcin in small cells. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma demonstrates centrally located hyaline cartilage with a linear progression of chondrocytes from resting to proliferative to hypertrophic

  8. Associations of beta-catenin alterations and MSI screening status with expression of key cell cycle regulating proteins and survival from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wangefjord, Sakarias; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lindquist, Kajsa Ericson; Nodin, Björn; Jirström, Karin; Eberhard, Jakob

    2013-01-21

    Despite their pivotal roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, the interrelationship and prognostic significance of beta-catenin alterations and microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer (CRC) needs to be further clarified. In this paper, we studied the associations between beta-catenin overexpression and MSI status with survival from CRC, and with expression of p21, p27, cyclin D1 and p53, in a large, prospective cohort study. Immunohistochemical MSI-screening status and expression of p21, p27 and p53 was assessed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 557 cases of incident CRC in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Chi Square and Spearman's correlation tests were used to explore the associations between beta-catenin expression, MSI status, clinicopathological characteristics and investigative parameters. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to assess the relationship between beta-catenin overexpression, MSI status and cancer specific survival (CSS). Positive MSI screening status was significantly associated with older age, female sex, proximal tumour location, non-metastatic disease, and poor differentiation, and inversely associated with beta-catenin overexpression. Beta-catenin overexpression was significantly associated with distal tumour location, low T-stage and well-differentiated tumours. Patients with MSI tumours had a significantly prolonged CSS in the whole cohort, and in stage III-IV disease, also in multivariable analysis, but not in stage I-II disease. Beta-catenin overexpression was associated with a favourable prognosis in the full cohort and in patients with stage III-IV disease. Neither MSI nor beta-catenin status were predictive for response to adjuvant chemotherapy in curatively treated stage III patients. P53 and p27 expression was positively associated with beta-catenin overexpression and inversely associated with MSI. Cyclin D1 expression was positively associated with MSI and beta-catenin

  9. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays an essential role in activation of odontogenic mesenchyme during early tooth development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianquan; Lan, Yu; Baek, Jin-A; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Rulang

    2009-10-01

    Classical tissue recombination studies demonstrated that initiation of tooth development depends on activation of odontogenic potential in the mesenchyme by signals from the presumptive dental epithelium. Although several members of the Wnt family of signaling molecules are expressed in the presumptive dental epithelium at the beginning of tooth initiation, whether Wnt signaling is directly involved in the activation of the odontogenic mesenchyme has not been characterized. In this report, we show that tissue-specific inactivation of beta-catenin, a central component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, in the developing tooth mesenchyme caused tooth developmental arrest at the bud stage in mice. We show that mesenchymal beta-catenin function is required for expression of Lef1 and Fgf3 in the developing tooth mesenchyme and for induction of primary enamel knot in the developing tooth epithelium. Expression of Msx1 and Pax9, two essential tooth mesenchyme transcription factors downstream of Bmp and Fgf signaling, respectively, were not altered in the absence of beta-catenin in the tooth mesenchyme. Moreover, we found that constitutive stabilization of beta-catenin in the developing palatal mesenchyme induced aberrant palatal epithelial invaginations that resembled early tooth buds both morphologically and in epithelial molecular marker expression, but without activating expression of Msx1 and Pax9 in the mesenchyme. Together, these results indicate that activation of the mesenchymal odontogenic program during early tooth development requires concerted actions of Bmp, Fgf and Wnt signaling from the presumptive dental epithelium to the mesenchyme.

  10. Pleiotrophin regulates lung epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation during fetal lung development via beta-catenin and Dlk1.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tingting; Gao, Li; Bhaskaran, Manoj; Guo, Yujie; Gou, Deming; Narayanaperumal, Jeyaparthasarathy; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Zhang, Kexiong; Liu, Lin

    2009-10-09

    The role of pleiotrophin in fetal lung development was investigated. We found that pleiotrophin and its receptor, protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor beta/zeta, were highly expressed in mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the fetal lungs, respectively. Using isolated fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells, we demonstrated that pleiotrophin promoted fetal type II cell proliferation and arrested type II cell trans-differentiation into alveolar epithelial type I cells. Pleiotrophin also increased wound healing of injured type II cell monolayer. Knockdown of pleiotrophin influenced lung branching morphogenesis in a fetal lung organ culture model. Pleiotrophin increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, promoted beta-catenin translocation into the nucleus, and activated T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors. Dlk1, a membrane ligand that initiates the Notch signaling pathway, was identified as a downstream target of the pleiotrophin/beta-catenin pathway by endogenous dlk1 expression, promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. These results provide evidence that pleiotrophin regulates fetal type II cell proliferation and differentiation via integration of multiple signaling pathways including pleiotrophin, beta-catenin, and Notch pathways.

  11. MicroRNA-1826 targets VEGFC, beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and MEK1 (MAP2K1) in human bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Shahryari, Varahram; Tabatabai, Z.Laura; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway play an important role in bladder cancer (BC) progression. Tumor-suppressive microRNAs (miRNAs) targeting these cancer pathways may provide a new therapeutic approach for BC. We initially identified miRNA-1826 potentially targeting CTNNB1, VEGFC and MEK1 using several target scan algorithms. Also 3′ untranslated region luciferase activity and protein expression of these target genes were significantly downregulated in miR-1826-transfected BC cells (J82 and T24). The expression of miR-1826 was lower in BC tissues and inverse correlation of miR-1826 with several clinical parameters (pT, grade) was observed. Also the expression of miR-1826 was much lower in three BC cell lines (J82, T24 and TCCSUP) compared with a normal bladder cell line (SV-HUC-1). We then performed analyses to look at miR-1826 function and found that miR-1826 inhibited BC cell viability, invasion and migration. We also found increased apoptosis and G1 cell cycle arrest in miR-1826-transfected BC cells. To examine whether the effect of miR-1826 was through CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) or MEK1 knockdown, we knocked down CTNNB1/MEK1 messenger RNA using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique. We observed that CTNNB1 or MEK1 siRNA knockdown resulted in effects similar to those with miR-1826 in BC cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the miR-1826 plays an important role as tumor suppressor via CTNNB1/MEK1/VEGFC downregulation in BC. PMID:22049531

  12. MicroRNA-1826 targets VEGFC, beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and MEK1 (MAP2K1) in human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Hinoda, Yuji; Ueno, Koji; Shahryari, Varahram; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt/beta-catenin (CTNNB1) and Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway play an important role in bladder cancer (BC) progression. Tumor-suppressive microRNAs (miRNAs) targeting these cancer pathways may provide a new therapeutic approach for BC. We initially identified miRNA-1826 potentially targeting CTNNB1, VEGFC and MEK1 using several target scan algorithms. Also 3' untranslated region luciferase activity and protein expression of these target genes were significantly downregulated in miR-1826-transfected BC cells (J82 and T24). The expression of miR-1826 was lower in BC tissues and inverse correlation of miR-1826 with several clinical parameters (pT, grade) was observed. Also the expression of miR-1826 was much lower in three BC cell lines (J82, T24 and TCCSUP) compared with a normal bladder cell line (SV-HUC-1). We then performed analyses to look at miR-1826 function and found that miR-1826 inhibited BC cell viability, invasion and migration. We also found increased apoptosis and G(1) cell cycle arrest in miR-1826-transfected BC cells. To examine whether the effect of miR-1826 was through CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) or MEK1 knockdown, we knocked down CTNNB1/MEK1 messenger RNA using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique. We observed that CTNNB1 or MEK1 siRNA knockdown resulted in effects similar to those with miR-1826 in BC cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the miR-1826 plays an important role as tumor suppressor via CTNNB1/MEK1/VEGFC downregulation in BC.

  13. Exploration of the APC/beta-catenin (WNT) pathway and a histologic classification system for pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma. A study of 18 cases.

    PubMed

    Gaumann, A; Bode-Lesniewska, B; Zimmermann, D R; Fanburg-Smith, J C; Kirkpatrick, C J; Hofstädter, F; Woenckhaus, M; Stoehr, R; Obermann, E C; Dietmaier, W; Hartmann, A

    2008-11-01

    APC, a tumor suppressor gene in the Wnt pathway, stabilizes beta-catenin and controls cell growth. Mutation of APC or beta-catenin leads to nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin and transcription of cyclin D1/cyclin A. Pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS) were studied by morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic methods of the Wnt pathway. Eighteen cases were included: mean age 52 years, primary intraluminal location with typical clinical presentation. PAS were classified as epithelioid (n = 4) or malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH; spindled/pleomorphic, n = 4), myxofibrosarcoma (n = 8), and one each hemangiopericytoma-like or malignant inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor-like. The tumor cells demonstrated vimentin, focal actins, and rare focal desmin positivity. All but one were grade 2 or 3 by FNCLCC grading. Alteration in chromosome 5q21 (APC) was found in 4/14 PAS by LOH, mostly epithelioid-type; an MFH-type case demonstrated microsatellite instability (MSI) and nuclear beta-catenin. Cyclin D1 was expressed in seven tumors, all myxofibrosarcoma-type. No mutations were detected in APC or beta-catenin. In summary, PAS are predominantly intermediate grade myxofibrosarcoma in middle-aged males, and fatal in two-thirds of patients. Despite myofibroblastic phenotype, APC/beta-catenin pathway changes are rare. Cyclin D1, only expressed in the myxofibrosarcoma-type, is likely transcribed via factors other than beta-catenin.

  14. Stabilized beta-catenin in thymic epithelial cells blocks thymus development and function.

    PubMed

    Zuklys, Saulius; Gill, Jason; Keller, Marcel P; Hauri-Hohl, Mathias; Zhanybekova, Saule; Balciunaite, Gina; Na, Kyung-Jae; Jeker, Lukas T; Hafen, Katrin; Tsukamoto, Noriyuki; Amagai, Takashi; Taketo, Makoto M; Krenger, Werner; Holländer, Georg A

    2009-03-01

    Thymic T cell development is dependent on a specialized epithelial microenvironment mainly composed of cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells (TECs). The molecular programs governing the differentiation and maintenance of TECs remain largely unknown. Wnt signaling is central to the development and maintenance of several organ systems but a specific role of this pathway for thymus organogenesis has not yet been ascertained. In this report, we demonstrate that activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by a stabilizing mutation of beta-catenin targeted exclusively to TECs changes the initial commitment of endodermal epithelia to a thymic cell fate. Consequently, the formation of a correctly composed and organized thymic microenvironment is prevented, thymic immigration of hematopoietic precursors is restricted, and intrathymic T cell differentiation is arrested at a very early developmental stage causing severe immunodeficiency. These results suggest that a precise regulation of canonical Wnt signaling in thymic epithelia is essential for normal thymus development and function.

  15. Frequent deletions and mutations of the beta-catenin gene are associated with overexpression of cyclin D1 and fibronectin and poorly differentiated histology in childhood hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, H; Horie, H; Hiyama, E; Matsunaga, T; Hayashi, Y; Watanabe, Y; Suita, S; Kaneko, M; Sasaki, F; Hashizume, K; Ozaki, T; Furuuchi, K; Tada, M; Ohnuma, N; Nakagawara, A

    2001-04-01

    Hepatoblastoma (HBL) is the most common malignant liver tumor in young children. Recent reports have shown that the beta-catenin gene was frequently mutated or deleted in HBLS: To elucidate the role of beta-catenin abnormalities in HBLs, we searched for mutations of beta-catenin and APC as well as expression of the target genes, cyclin D1, c-myc, and fibronectin, in 68 primary HBLS: The mutation analysis revealed that 44 (65%) tumors carried missense mutations or deletions of beta-catenin, all of which were somatic and targeted to the exon 3 encoding the amino acid residues involved in its degradation. However, no loss of function mutation of the APC gene was detected by the yeast functional assay. Of interest, beta-catenin mutation was significantly correlated with overexpression of the target genes, cyclin D1 and fibronectin, but not with that of c-myc in HBLs as measured by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. The immunohistochemical studies in 15 HBLs demonstrated that the nuclear/cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin was positive in 13 tumors, 9 of which had the deletion or mutation of the gene. The significant correlation between the beta-catenin gene abnormality and the positive staining of cyclin D1 was also confirmed. Furthermore, the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin was strongly associated with the poorly differentiated tumor cell components as well as with the positive staining of cyclin D1 within the tumor. Thus, our present results suggested that the gain of function mutation of beta-catenin played a crucial role in the malignant progression of HBL in vivo.

  16. Beta-catenin Forms Protein Aggregation at High Concentrations in HEK293TCells

    PubMed Central

    Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Najafi, Seyed Mahmoud Arab

    2017-01-01

    Background: The canonical Wnt signal transduction (or the Wnt/β-catenin pathway) plays a crucial role in the development of animals and in carcinogenesis. Beta-catenin is the central component of this signaling pathway. The activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling results in the cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with the TCF/LEF transcription factors and, therefore, participates in the upregulation or downregulation of some important genes involved in diverse cellular activities. In addition, β-catenin is a critical component of the cadherin-mediated cell adherens junction. We had previously noticed that very high cellular concentrations of β-catenin had a negative effect on the transcriptional activity of this protein and, therefore, the aim of this study was to find a mechanism for this negative interaction. Methods: Cell fractionation, western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy experiments were performed to measure β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin cellular localization in HEK293Tcells transfected with various amounts of a β-catenin-encoding plasmid. Also, total RNA was extracted from the cells and used for reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments to measure the expression of the β-catenin target genes. SPSS, version 16, was used to analyze the results statistically. Results: We demonstrated that overexpression of β-catenin led to the formation of rod-shaped protein aggregates. The aggregate structures were mainly formed in the cell nucleus and were heavy enough to be isolated by centrifugation. Beta-catenin aggregate formation was accompanied by a decrease in the expression of the β-catenin target genes used in this study. Conclusion: Since deregulation of β-catenin function occurs in several human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders, the results of this paper further support the possible biological and clinical significance of β-catenin aggregate formation. PMID

  17. The destruction complex of beta-catenin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Bourroul, Guilherme Muniz; Fragoso, Hélio José; Gomes, José Walter Feitosa; Bourroul, Vivian Sati Oba; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Palma, Rogério Tadeu; Waisberg, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the destruction complex of beta-catenin by the expression of the proteins beta-catetenin, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axin and ubiquitin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma. Tissue samples from 64 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 53 patients with colonic adenoma were analyzed. Tissue microarray blocks and slides were prepared and subjected to immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies in carcinoma, adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa, and adenoma tissues. The immunoreactivity was evaluated by the percentage of positive stained cells and by the intensity assessed through of the stained grade of proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. In the statistical analysis, the Spearman correlation coefficient, Student's t, χ2, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests, and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. In colorectal carcinoma, the expressions of beta-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli proteins were significantly higher than in colonic adenomas (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). The immunoreactivity of GSK3β, axin 1 and ubiquitin proteins was significantly higher (p=0.03, p=0.039 and p=0.03, respectively) in colorectal carcinoma than in the colonic adenoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa. The immunohistochemistry staining of these proteins did not show significant differences with the clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer and colonic adenoma. These results suggest that, in adenomas, the lower expression of the beta-catenin, axin 1 and GSK3β proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was maintained, while in colorectal carcinoma, the increased expression of beta-catenin, GSK3β, axin 1, and ubiquitin proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was disrupted. Avaliar o complexo de destruição da betacatenina no carcinoma colorretal e no adenoma do colo pela expressão das proteínas betacatenina, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axina e

  18. Negative regulation of the Wnt signal by MM-1 through inhibiting expression of the wnt4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Kitaura, Hirotake; Hagio, Yuko; Sato, Toshiya; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2008-04-01

    We have reported that a novel c-Myc-binding protein, MM-1, repressed the E-box-dependent transcription activity of c-Myc through TIF1beta/KAP1, a transcriptional corepressor, and that the c-fms gene was a target gene involved in this pathway. We have also reported that a mutation of A157R in MM-1, which is often observed in patients with leukemia or lymphoma, abrogated all of the repressive activities of MM-1 toward c-Myc, indicating that MM-1 is a novel tumor suppressor. In this study, to further identify target genes of MM-1, DNA microarray analysis was carried out by comparing expression levels of genes in MM-1 knockdown and parental cells, and the wnt4 gene, a member of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway, was identified as a target gene of MM-1. Increased expression level of the wnt4 gene, accumulation and translocation of beta-catenin to the cytoplasm and nucleus, and upregulation of TCF/Lef-1, a target protein of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway, were found in MM-1 knockdown cells. Reporter assays using various deletion constructs of the wnt4 gene promoter showed that MM-1 recognized the region spanning -286 to -229 from a transcription start site, and MM-1 complex was found to bind to this region by chromatin immunoprecipitation and gel mobility shift assays. Furthermore, it was found that Egr-1 and MM-1 were bound to this region and that both proteins mutually down-regulate promoter activity of the wnt4 gene. Since the c-myc gene is the target gene of the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway, these findings suggest that MM-1 inhibits c-Myc by a dual mechanism.

  19. Germinated brown rice (GBR) reduces the incidence of aberrant crypt foci with the involvement of beta-catenin and COX-2 in azoxymethane-induced colon cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Latifah, Saiful Yazan; Armania, Nurdin; Tze, Tan Hern; Azhar, Yaacob; Nordiana, Abdul Hadi; Norazalina, Saad; Hairuszah, Ithnin; Saidi, Moin; Maznah, Ismail

    2010-03-26

    Chemoprevention has become an important area in cancer research due to the failure of current therapeutic modalities. Epidemiological and preclinical studies have demonstrated that nutrition plays a vital role in the etiology of cancer. This study was conducted to determine the chemopreventive effects of germinated brown rice (GBR) in rats induced with colon cancer. GBR is brown rice that has been claimed to be richer in nutrients compared to the common white rice. The male Sprague Dawley rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups: (G1) positive control (with colon cancer, unfed with GBR), (G2) fed with 2.5 g/kg of GBR (GBR (g)/weight of rat (kg)), (G3) fed with 5 g/kg of GBR, (G4) fed with 10 g/kg of GBR and (G5) negative control (without colon cancer, unfed with GBR). GBR was administered orally once daily via gavage after injection of 15 mg/kg of body weight of azoxymethane (AOM) once a week for two weeks, intraperitonially. After 8 weeks of treatment, animals were sacrificed and colons were removed. Colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were evaluated histopathologically. Total number of ACF and AC, and multicrypt of ACF, and the expression of beta-catenin and COX-2 reduced significantly (p < 0.05) in all the groups treated with GBR (G2, G3 and G4) compared to the control group (G1). Spearman rank correlation test showed significant positive linear relationship between total beta-catenin and COX-2 score (Spearman's rho = 0.616, p = 0.0001). It is demonstrated that GBR inhibits the development of total number of ACF and AC, and multicrypt of ACF, reduces the expression of beta-catenin and COX-2, and thus can be a promising dietary supplement in prevention of colon cancer.

  20. Identification of a Wnt/Dvl/beta-Catenin --> Pitx2 pathway mediating cell-type-specific proliferation during development.

    PubMed

    Kioussi, Chrissa; Briata, Paola; Baek, Sung Hee; Rose, David W; Hamblet, Natasha S; Herman, Thomas; Ohgi, Kenneth A; Lin, Chijen; Gleiberman, Anatoli; Wang, Jianbo; Brault, Veronique; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar; Nguyen, H D; Kemler, Rolf; Glass, Christopher K; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2002-11-27

    Understanding the cell type-specific molecular mechanisms by which distinct signaling pathways combinatorially control proliferation during organogenesis is a central issue in development and disease. Here, we report that the bicoid-related transcription factor Pitx2 is rapidly induced by the Wnt/Dvl/beta-catenin pathway and is required for effective cell-type-specific proliferation by directly activating specific growth-regulating genes. Regulated exchange of HDAC1/beta-catenin converts Pitx2 from repressor to activator, analogous to control of TCF/LEF1. Pitx2 then serves as a competence factor required for the temporally ordered and growth factor-dependent recruitment of a series of specific coactivator complexes that prove necessary for Cyclin D2 gene induction. The molecular strategy underlying interactions between the Wnt and growth factor-dependent signaling pathways in cardiac outflow tract and pituitary proliferation is likely to be prototypic of cell-specific proliferation strategies in other tissues.

  1. Gene expression of beta-catenin is up-regulated in inner dental epithelium and enamel knots during molar tooth morphogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Obara, Nobuko; Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Masako

    2006-07-01

    Beta-catenin is a multi-functional molecule that is involved in both cell-cell adhesion and signaling. We analyzed changes in beta-catenin gene expression during mouse molar tooth development by in situ hybridization. Prominent up-regulation of the expression of this gene was evident exclusively in the enamel knot at the early cap stage. During the cap and bell stages, the enamel knot, inner dental epithelium, and differentiating stratum intermedium expressed the beta-catenin gene more strongly than other parts of the enamel organ. During these stages, the strength of the gene expression changed heterogeneously within the inner dental epithelium and stratum intermedium. However, the heterogeneity was not evident at the late bell stage, when the cells in the inner dental epithelium had differentiated into ameloblasts at the cusp tip. No spatiotemporal change in beta-catenin gene expression was apparent in the dental papilla except for the cells that differentiated into odontoblasts, which became negative for the expression of the gene after their differentiation. Thus, the up-regulated expression of the beta-catenin gene was strongly associated with epithelial morphogenesis. These findings raise the possibility that the up-regulation of the gene expression and the stabilization of the protein by Wnt signaling play a role in the regulation of the activities of beta-catenin in tooth morphogenesis.

  2. Polyethylenimine-cationized beta-catenin protein transduction activates the Wnt canonical signaling pathway more effectively than cationic lipid-based transduction.

    PubMed

    Kitazoe, Midori; Futami, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Yamada, Hidenori; Maeda, Yoshitake

    2010-04-01

    The Wnt canonical signaling pathway is essential for the early development of eukaryotic organisms and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis. Moreover, the Wnt canonical signaling pathway contributes to the self-renewal of mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here, we demonstrate artificial activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway by beta-catenin protein transduction. Constitutively active beta-catenin protein was introduced into human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells using a polyethylenimine (PEI) cationization method, or with the BioPORTER protein transduction reagent. We have previously shown that modification with PEI effectively causes proteins to be internalized by living mammalian cells. PEI-cationized, constitutively active beta-catenin protein was added to HEK-293 cells, and induction of several Wnt/beta-catenin target genes was detected by real-time PCR. However, using BioPORTER to introduce active beta-catenin did not activate the Wnt canonical signaling pathway. Introduction of eGFPNuc (enhanced green fluorescent protein variant containing a nuclear localization signal) into HEK-293 cells using the BioPORTER reagent caused significant cell death, as determined by propidium iodide staining. In contrast, the PEI-modified eGFPNuc did not impair survival of HEK-293 cells. These results indicate that the Wnt canonical signaling pathway could be successfully activated by transduction of PEI-cationized active beta-catenin, and the PEI-cationization method is an effective and safe technology for protein transduction into mammalian cells.

  3. Prenatal cadmium exposure dysregulates sonic hedgehog and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the thymus resulting in altered thymocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Tou, Janet C.; Barnett, John B.

    2010-01-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is both an environmental pollutant and a component of cigarette smoke. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports in the literature of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways are required for thymocyte maturation. Several studies have demonstrated that Cd exposure affects these pathways in different organ systems. This study was designed to investigate the effect of prenatal Cd exposure on thymocyte development, and to determine if these effects were linked to dysregulation of Shh and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose (10 ppm) of Cd throughout pregnancy and effects on the thymus were assessed on the day of birth. Thymocyte phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. A Gli:luciferase reporter cell line was used to measure Shh signaling. Transcription of target genes and translation of key components of both signaling pathways were assessed using real-time RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Prenatal Cd exposure increased the number of CD4{sup +} cells and a subpopulation of double-negative cells (DN; CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}), DN4 (CD44{sup -}CD25{sup -}). Shh and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling were both decreased in the thymus. Target genes of Shh (Patched1 and Gli1) and Wnt/beta-catenin (c-fos, and c-myc) were affected differentially among thymocyte subpopulations. These findings suggest that prenatal exposure to Cd dysregulates two signaling pathways in the thymus, resulting in altered thymocyte development.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons disrupt axial development in sea urchin embryos through a beta-catenin dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Murali C; Vines, Carol A; Wikramanayake, Athula H; Cherr, Gary N

    2003-04-15

    Sea urchin (Lytechinus anemesis) embryos were used as an experimental system to investigate the mechanisms of the developmental toxicity of creosote, one of the most widely used wood preserving chemicals, as well as some of its polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) constituents (phenanthrene, fluoranthene, fluorene, pyrene and quinoline). Data suggest that creosote and PAHs affect axial development and patterning in sea urchin embryos by disrupting the regulation of beta-catenin, a crucial transcriptional co-activator of specific target genes in the Wnt/wg signaling pathway. When ciliated blastula stage embryos were exposed to these compounds, they developed into exogastrulae with completely evaginated archentera, demonstrating that these chemicals disrupt axial development and patterning. This response occurred in a dose-dependent fashion, with the EC(50) of creosote for complete exogastrulation being 1.57 ppm, while the EC(50)s of the PAHs ranged from 0.41 ppm (2.0 microM) to 4.33 ppm (33.5 microM). Morphologically, the exogastrulae that developed from embryos exposed to creosote and PAHs appeared to be identical to those that resulted from exposure to lithium chloride, a classical agent known to induce vegetalization and exogastrulation in sea urchin embryos. Immunological studies using antibodies against beta-catenin, a multi-functional protein known to be involved in cell-cell adhesion and cell fate specification during embryonic development, revealed high levels of nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin by cells of creosote- and PAH-exposed embryos, irrespective of their positions in the developing embryo. Dissociated embryonic cells cultured in the presence of these agents rapidly responded in a similar fashion. Since beta-catenin accumulation occurs in nuclei of several types of cancer cells, it is possible this may be a general mechanism by which PAHs affect a variety of different cell types.

  5. Chronic oxidative stress causes amplification and overexpression of ptprz1 protein tyrosine phosphatase to activate beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Shang, Donghao; Akatsuka, Shinya; Ohara, Hiroki; Dutta, Khokon Kumar; Mizushima, Katsura; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Izumiya, Masashi; Abe, Kouichiro; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Noriko; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2007-12-01

    Ferric nitrilotriacetate induces oxidative renal tubular damage via Fenton-reaction, which subsequently leads to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in rodents. Here, we used gene expression microarray and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analyses to find target oncogenes in this model. At the common chromosomal region of amplification (4q22) in rat RCCs, we found ptprz1, a tyrosine phosphatase (also known as protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta or receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta) highly expressed in the RCCs. Analyses revealed genomic amplification up to eightfold. Despite scarcity in the control kidney, the amounts of PTPRZ1 were increased in the kidney after 3 weeks of oxidative stress, and mRNA levels were increased 16 approximately 552-fold in the RCCs. Network analysis of the expression revealed the involvement of the beta-catenin pathway in the RCCs. In the RCCs, dephosphorylated beta-catenin was translocated to nuclei, resulting in the expression of its target genes cyclin D1, c-myc, c-jun, fra-1, and CD44. Furthermore, knockdown of ptprz1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA), in FRCC-001 and FRCC-562 cell lines established from the induced RCCs, decreased the amounts of nuclear beta-catenin and suppressed cellular proliferation concomitant with a decrease in the expression of target genes. These results demonstrate that chronic oxidative stress can induce genomic amplification of ptprz1, activating beta-catenin pathways without the involvement of Wnt signaling for carcinogenesis. Thus, iron-mediated persistent oxidative stress confers an environment for gene amplification.

  6. Smed-Evi/Wntless is required for beta-catenin-dependent and -independent processes during planarian regeneration.

    PubMed

    Adell, Teresa; Salò, Emili; Boutros, Michael; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2009-03-01

    Planarians can regenerate a whole animal from only a small piece of their body, and have become an important model for stem cell biology. To identify regenerative processes dependent on Wnt growth factors in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (Smed), we analyzed RNAi phenotypes of Evi, a transmembrane protein specifically required for the secretion of Wnt ligands. We show that, during regeneration, Smed-evi loss-of-function prevents posterior identity, leading to two-headed planarians that resemble Smed-beta-catenin1 RNAi animals. In addition, we observe regeneration defects of the nervous system that are not found after Smed-beta-catenin1 RNAi. By systematic knockdown of all putative Smed Wnts in regenerating planarians, we identify Smed-WntP-1 and Smed-Wnt11-2 as the putative posterior organizers, and demonstrate that Smed-Wnt5 is a regulator of neuronal organization and growth. Thus, our study provides evidence that planarian Wnts are major regulators of regeneration, and that they signal through beta-catenin-dependent and -independent pathways.

  7. Overexpression of orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, Gpr49, in human hepatocellular carcinomas with beta-catenin mutations.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Sakamoto, Michiie; Fujii, Gen; Tsuiji, Hitomi; Kenetaka, Kengo; Asaka, Masahiro; Hirohashi, Setsuo

    2003-03-01

    To identify the genes responsible for carcinogenesis and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we screened differentially expressed genes in several human HCC cell lines. Among these genes, Gpr49 was up-regulated in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2. Gpr49 is a member of the glycoprotein hormone receptor subfamily, which includes the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). However, Gpr49 remains to be an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor. By real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, overexpression (>3-fold increase compared with the corresponding noncancerous liver tissue) of Gpr49 mRNA was observed in 18 of 38 (47%) HCCs compared with corresponding noncancerous livers. Clinicopathologically, overexpression of Gpr49 was frequently observed in HCC with mutation in beta-catenin exon 3 (14 of 16 cases, 87.5%). Moreover, introduction of mutant beta-catenin into mouse hepatocytes in culture caused up-regulation of the Gpr49 mouse homologue. Therefore, Gpr49 is likely to be a target gene activated by Wnt-signaling in HCC. In conclusion, although much is still unknown, Gpr49 may be critically involved in the development of HCCs with beta-catenin mutations and has the potential to be a new therapeutic target in the treatment of HCC.

  8. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling changes C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation by inducing Id3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Shi, Songting; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Fangfang; Dijke, Peter ten

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Id3 but not Id1 is induced by Wnt3a stimulation in C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a induces Id3 expression via canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a-induced Id3 expression does not depend on BMP signaling activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induction of Id3 expression is critical determinant in Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we report that inhibitor of differentiation (Id)3 is a Wnt-inducible gene in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Wnt3a induced Id3 expression in a {beta}-catenin-dependent manner. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) also potently induced Id3 expression. However, Wnt-induced Id3 expression occurred independent of the BMP/Smad pathway. Functional studies showed that Id3 depletion in C2C12 cells impaired Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast cells. Id3 depletion elevated myogenin induction during myogenic differentiation and partially impaired Wnt3a suppressed myogenin expression in C2C12 cells. These results suggest that Id3 is an important Wnt/{beta}-catenin induced gene in myoblast cell fate determination.

  9. E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression in breast medullary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Charpin, C; Bonnier, P; Garcia, S; Andrac, L; Crebassa, B; Dorel, M; Lavaut, M N; Allasia, C

    1999-08-01

    The initial step of cancer invasion and metastasis is the escape of tumour cells from the primary site, involving disruption of normal cell-cell adhesion and E-cadherin (E-cad) and beta-catenin (beta-cat) down-regulation, as shown in various types of human malignancies including breast carcinomas. Medullary carcinomas are high grade and poorly differentiated tumours with syncytial typical pattern, and prognosis unexpectedly better than that in high grade breast carcinomas. In a series of 55 breast typical medullary carcinomas diagnosed according to the strict use of Ridolfi et al (Cancer 40: 1365-1385, 1977) criteria, E-cad and beta-cat were investigated using quantitative (SAMBA 2005 system) immunocytochemical assays on frozen sections. Results were compared to that obtained on paraffin sections and in a series (n=55) of grade 3 ductal carcinomas. It was shown that medullary carcinomas significantly (p<0.001) expressed more E-cad and beta-cat than grade 3 ductal carcinomas. E-cad and beta-cat correlated with high expression of P53, of c-erbB, and of Ki-67 antigens, and with lack of hormone receptors antigenic sites (p<0.001). It was concluded that favourable prognosis and syncytial pattern of typical breast medullary carcinomas likely results, at least partly, from a particular expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules, significantly limiting tumour growth and efficiently mastering the tumour cell dissemination, opposing to high proliferative activity (grade 3).

  10. Solid-pseudopapillary tumors of the pancreas are genetically distinct from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and almost always harbor beta-catenin mutations.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Susan C; Klimstra, David S; Wilentz, Robb E; Yeo, Charles J; Conlon, Kevin; Brennan, Murray; Cameron, John L; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Hruban, Ralph H

    2002-04-01

    Solid-pseudopapillary tumors (SPTs) are unusual pancreatic neoplasms of low malignant potential that most frequently affect young women. Genetic events contributing to the development of SPTs are unknown. Whereas the more common ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas essentially never harbor beta-catenin or APC gene mutations, we have recently identified alterations of the APC/beta-catenin pathway in other nonductal pancreatic neoplasms including pancreatoblastomas and acinar cell carcinomas. We analyzed a series of 20 SPTs for somatic alterations of the APC/beta-catenin pathway using immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin protein accumulation, direct DNA sequencing of beta-catenin exon 3, and direct DNA sequencing of the mutation cluster region in exon 15 of the APC gene in those SPTs that did not harbor beta-catenin mutations. Immunohistochemical labeling for cyclin D1 was performed to evaluate the overexpression of this cell-cycle protein as one of the putative downstream effectors of beta-catenin dysregulation. In addition, we analyzed the SPTs for genetic alterations commonly found in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, including mutations in the K-ras oncogene and p53 and DPC4 tumor suppressor genes, using direct DNA sequencing of K-ras and immunostaining for p53 and Dpc4. Almost all SPTs harbored alterations in the APC/beta-catenin pathway. Nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin protein was present in 95% (19 of 20), and activating beta-catenin oncogene mutations were identified in 90% (18 of 20) of the SPTs. Seventy-four percent (14 of 19) showed overexpression of cyclin D1, ranging from 10 to 70% of tumor nuclei. In contrast, no K-ras mutations were present in any of the 20 SPTs, and Dpc4 expression was intact in all 16 SPTs for which immunohistochemical labeling was successful. Overexpression of p53 was limited to only 3 of 19 (15.8%) SPTs. These results emphasize the two distinct, divergent genetic pathways of neoplastic progression in pancreatic ductal and

  11. A subset of high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas shows up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-7 associated with nuclear beta-catenin immunoreactivity, independent of EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Scarpa, Aldo; Veronesi, Giulia; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Del Curto, Barbara; Moore, Patrick S; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Sonzogni, Angelica; Masullo, Michele; Viale, Giuseppe

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear translocation of beta-catenin has been correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression/activation in non-small cell lung cancer. Less is known on beta-catenin transactivation in high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors and on the status of beta-catenin activating EGFR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) or beta-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7). beta-catenin immunoreactivity was evaluated in 51 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (LCNEC) and 45 small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLC). Nineteen cases were assessed for beta-catenin gene exon 3 mutations, expression of MMP-7, and expression/gene amplification of EGFR, HER-2, and cyclin D1. beta-catenin was expressed in all 96 high-grade neuroendocrine tumors, the vast majority (94%) showing >50% immunopositive cells. A disarrayed immunoreactivity, however, was commonly encountered consisting in variably altered membrane-associated patterns of staining along with progressive accumulation of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In LCNEC, but not in SCLC, the disarrayed patterns correlated with EGFR and HER-2 protein expression. beta-catenin nuclear accumulation was found in nine tumors, including seven LCNEC and two SCLC, and was always associated with disarrayed immunoreactivity and increased MMP-7, but not cyclin D1 expression. These cases, however, did not show beta-catenin gene mutations or EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression. No association was found between nuclear beta-catenin and any clinicopathological variable including patients' survival. The subcellular compartmentalization of beta-catenin is profoundly altered in high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. A minor subset of these tumors shows beta-catenin nuclear accumulation in association with increased expression of MMP-7, but not of cyclin D1, independent of EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression.

  12. Gonadal Identity in the Absence of Pro-Testis Factor SOX9 and Pro-Ovary Factor Beta-Catenin in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Barbara; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2015-08-01

    Sex-reversal cases in humans and genetic models in mice have revealed that the fate of the bipotential gonad hinges upon the balance between pro-testis SOX9 and pro-ovary beta-catenin pathways. Our central query was: if SOX9 and beta-catenin define the gonad's identity, then what do the gonads become when both factors are absent? To answer this question, we developed mouse models that lack either Sox9, beta-catenin, or both in the somatic cells of the fetal gonads and examined the morphological outcomes and transcriptome profiles. In the absence of Sox9 and beta-catenin, both XX and XY gonads progressively lean toward the testis fate, indicating that expression of certain pro-testis genes requires the repression of the beta-catenin pathway, rather than a direct activation by SOX9. We also observed that XY double knockout gonads were more masculinized than their XX counterpart. To identify the genes responsible for the initial events of masculinization and to determine how the genetic context (XX vs. XY) affects this process, we compared the transcriptomes of Sox9/beta-catenin mutant gonads and found that early molecular changes underlying the XY-specific masculinization involve the expression of Sry and 21 SRY direct target genes, such as Sox8 and Cyp26b1. These results imply that when both Sox9 and beta-catenin are absent, Sry is capable of activating other pro-testis genes and drive testis differentiation. Our findings not only provide insight into the mechanism of sex determination, but also identify candidate genes that are potentially involved in disorders of sex development.

  13. Gonadal Identity in the Absence of Pro-Testis Factor SOX9 and Pro-Ovary Factor Beta-Catenin in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Barbara; Yao, Humphrey H.-C.

    2015-01-01

    Sex-reversal cases in humans and genetic models in mice have revealed that the fate of the bipotential gonad hinges upon the balance between pro-testis SOX9 and pro-ovary beta-catenin pathways. Our central query was: if SOX9 and beta-catenin define the gonad's identity, then what do the gonads become when both factors are absent? To answer this question, we developed mouse models that lack either Sox9, beta-catenin, or both in the somatic cells of the fetal gonads and examined the morphological outcomes and transcriptome profiles. In the absence of Sox9 and beta-catenin, both XX and XY gonads progressively lean toward the testis fate, indicating that expression of certain pro-testis genes requires the repression of the beta-catenin pathway, rather than a direct activation by SOX9. We also observed that XY double knockout gonads were more masculinized than their XX counterpart. To identify the genes responsible for the initial events of masculinization and to determine how the genetic context (XX vs. XY) affects this process, we compared the transcriptomes of Sox9/beta-catenin mutant gonads and found that early molecular changes underlying the XY-specific masculinization involve the expression of Sry and 21 SRY direct target genes, such as Sox8 and Cyp26b1. These results imply that when both Sox9 and beta-catenin are absent, Sry is capable of activating other pro-testis genes and drive testis differentiation. Our findings not only provide insight into the mechanism of sex determination, but also identify candidate genes that are potentially involved in disorders of sex development. PMID:26108792

  14. Detection of beta-catenin mutations in paraffin-embedded sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion (MSRED): an ancillary diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Amary, Maria Fernanda C; Pauwels, Patrick; Meulemans, Els; Roemen, Guido M; Islam, Lily; Idowu, Bernadine; Bousdras, Konstantinos; Diss, Timothy C; O'Donnell, Paul; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2007-09-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a locally aggressive deep soft tissue tumor. Some cases are associated with adenosis polyposis coli germline mutations whereas others harbor somatic beta-catenin point mutations mainly in exon 3, codons 41 and 45. These mutations result in stabilization of beta-catenin, and activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of these 3 most common beta-catenin mutations in the diagnosis of desmoid-type fibromatosis using paraffin-embedded material. The results were compared with nuclear expression of beta-catenin. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion methodology was employed to detect the 3 mutations. One hundred and thirty-three cases were analyzed, including 76 desmoid-type, and 18 superficial fibromatosis, in addition to a further 39 fibromatosis mimics. A restriction site was present for analysis of the codon 41 mutation. Mismatch primers were designed for the codon 45 mutations. Mutations were detected in 66 cases (87%) of 76 desmoid-type fibromatosis (71 extra-abdominal). Of these, 34 (45%) were in codon 45 (TCT>TTT), 27 (35%) in codon 41 (ACC>GCC), and 5 (7%) in codon 45 (TCT>CCT). No mutations were detected in the other lesions studied. All desmoid-type fibromatosis cases and 72% of the mimics tested showed nuclear positivity for beta-catenin indicating immunohistochemistry is a sensitive but not a specific test for desmoid-type fibromatosis. In contrast, to date, beta-catenin mutations have not been detected in any lesions which mimic desmoid-type fibromatosis. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion, a simple and efficient means of detecting the common beta-catenin mutations in desmoid-type fibromatosis, complements light microscopy in reaching a diagnosis.

  15. Modulation of Beta-catenin activity with PKD1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Moreover, MUC16/CA125 expression has been shown to inhibit the cytotoxic responses of human natural killer (NK) cells and downregulate CD16 activity in...ovarian cancer cells. It has also been shown that MUC16/CA125 selectively binds to 30-40% of CD16 + NK cells in EOC patients. These studies suggest

  16. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanchun; Guan, Yingjun; Liu, Huancai; Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  17. Retinoic acid and Wnt/beta-catenin have complementary roles in anterior/posterior patterning embryos of the basal chordate amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Onai, Takayuki; Lin, Hsiu-Chin; Schubert, Michael; Koop, Demian; Osborne, Peter W; Alvarez, Susana; Alvarez, Rosana; Holland, Nicholas D; Holland, Linda Z

    2009-08-15

    A role for Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in axial patterning has been demonstrated in animals as basal as cnidarians, while roles in axial patterning for retinoic acid (RA) probably evolved in the deuterostomes and may be chordate-specific. In vertebrates, these two pathways interact both directly and indirectly. To investigate the evolutionary origins of interactions between these two pathways, we manipulated Wnt/beta-catenin and RA signaling in the basal chordate amphioxus during the gastrula stage, which is the RA-sensitive period for anterior/posterior (A/P) patterning. The results show that Wnt/beta-catenin and RA signaling have distinctly different roles in patterning the A/P axis of the amphioxus gastrula. Wnt/beta-catenin specifies the identity of the ends of the embryo (high Wnt = posterior; low Wnt = anterior) but not intervening positions. Thus, upregulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling induces ectopic expression of posterior markers at the anterior tip of the embryo. In contrast, RA specifies position along the A/P axis, but not the identity of the ends of the embryo-increased RA signaling strongly affects the domains of Hox expression along the A/P axis but has little or no effect on the expression of either anterior or posterior markers. Although the two pathways may both influence such things as specification of neuronal identity, interactions between them in A/P patterning appear to be minimal.

  18. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and E-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Denise L; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim V; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode "budding" is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions (AJs) is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of AJ component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another AJ component, has been more difficult to study owing to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes, and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent AJ dissolution.

  19. Deciphering the function of canonical Wnt signals in development and disease: conditional loss- and gain-of-function mutations of beta-catenin in mice.

    PubMed

    Grigoryan, Tamara; Wend, Peter; Klaus, Alexandra; Birchmeier, Walter

    2008-09-01

    Wnt signaling is one of a handful of powerful signaling pathways that play crucial roles in the animal life by controlling the genetic programs of embryonic development and adult homeostasis. When disrupted, these signaling pathways cause developmental defects, or diseases, among them cancer. The gateway of the canonical Wnt pathway, which contains >100 genes, is an essential molecule called beta-catenin (Armadillo in Drosophila). Conditional loss- and gain-of-function mutations of beta-catenin in mice provided powerful tools for the functional analysis of canonical Wnt signaling in many tissues and organs. Such studies revealed roles of Wnt signaling that were previously not accessible to genetic analysis due to the early embryonic lethality of conventional beta-catenin knockout mice, as well as the redundancy of Wnt ligands, receptors, and transcription factors. Analysis of conditional beta-catenin loss- and gain-of-function mutant mice demonstrated that canonical Wnt signals control progenitor cell expansion and lineage decisions both in the early embryo and in many organs. Canonical Wnt signaling also plays important roles in the maintenance of various embryonic or adult stem cells, and as recent findings demonstrated, in cancer stem cell types. This has opened new opportunities to model numerous human diseases, which have been associated with deregulated Wnt signaling. Our review summarizes what has been learned from genetic studies of the Wnt pathway by the analysis of conditional beta-catenin loss- and gain-of-function mice.

  20. URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulation of E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Rui; Huang, Chen; Bi, Qian; Zhai, Ying; Xia, Lin; Liu, Jie; Sun, Shiren; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), recently identified as a new HBx-upregulated gene that may activate {beta}-catenin and Wnt signaling, was found to be upregulated in a human tubule cell line under low oxygen. Here, we investigated the potential role of URG11 in hypoxia-induced renal tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT). Overexpression of URG11 in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK2) promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and {alpha}-SMA, while URG11 knockdown by siRNA effectively reversed hypoxia-induced EMT. URG11 promoted the expression of {beta}-catenin and increased its nuclear accumulation under normoxic conditions through transactivation of the {beta}-catenin promoter. This in turn upregulated {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) and its downstream effector genes, vimentin, and {alpha}-SMA. In vivo, strong expression of URG11 was observed in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and a Western blot analysis demonstrated a close correlation between HIF-1{alpha} and URG11 protein levels. Altogether, our results indicate that URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through the suppression of E-cadherin and the activation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF pathway.

  1. Characterization of bipotential epidermal progenitors derived from human sebaceous gland: contrasting roles of c-Myc and beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Lo Celso, Cristina; Berta, Melanie A; Braun, Kristin M; Frye, Michaela; Lyle, Stephen; Zouboulis, Christos C; Watt, Fiona M

    2008-05-01

    The current belief is that the epidermal sebaceous gland (SG) is maintained by unipotent stem cells that are replenished by multipotent stem cells in the hair follicle (HF) bulge. However, sebocytes can be induced by c-Myc (Myc) activation in interfollicular epidermis (IFE), suggesting the existence of bipotential stem cells. We found that every SZ95 immortalized human sebocyte that underwent clonal growth in culture generated progeny that differentiated into both sebocytes and cells expressing involucrin and cornifin, markers of IFE and HF inner root sheath differentiation. The ability to generate involucrin positive cells was also observed in a new human sebocyte line, Seb-E6E7. SZ95 xenografts differentiated into SG and IFE but not HF. SZ95 cells that expressed involucrin had reduced Myc levels; however, this did not correlate with increased expression of the Myc repressor Blimp1, and Blimp1 expression did not distinguish cells undergoing SG, IFE, or HF differentiation in vivo. Overexpression of Myc stimulated sebocyte differentiation, whereas overexpression of beta-catenin stimulated involucrin and cornifin expression. In transgenic mice simultaneous activation of Myc and beta-catenin revealed mutual antagonism: Myc blocked ectopic HF formation and beta-catenin reduced SG differentiation. Overexpression of the Myc target gene Indian hedgehog did not promote sebocyte differentiation in culture and cyclopamine treatment, while reducing proliferation, did not block Myc induced sebocyte differentiation in vivo. Our studies provide evidence for a bipotential epidermal stem cell population in an in vitro model of human epidermal lineage selection and highlight the importance of Myc as a regulator of sebocyte differentiation.

  2. Genomic and immunohistochemical analysis in human adrenal cortical neoplasia reveal beta-catenin mutations as potential prognostic biomarker.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Alexandra E; Nucera, Carmelo; Lam, Quynh T; Nguyen, Ahnthu; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Sadow, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation for malignancy of the adrenal cortex, adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC), is a challenge in surgical pathology due to its relative rarity and histologic overlap with its benign counterpart, adrenocortical adenoma (ACA). We characterized a cohort of human ACC and ACA, including a molecular screen, with a goal of identifying potential diagnostic adjuncts. Thirty-six cases of ACC underwent histologic and clinical review. In the 31 ACC cases with available material and a cohort of 10 ACA cases, a multiplex nucleotide amplification molecular screen from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue was peformed. ACCs demonstrated a wide variety of clinical and histologic characteristics with overall poor but unpredictable survival for subjects with ACC. By mutational screen, 12/31 (38.7%) carcinomas harbored CTNNB1 mutations, 1 with an additional TP53 mutation; 1 case each had isolated APC and TP53 mutations; 16 were wild-type for all tested loci; and 1 case demonstrated repeated assay failures. Two of the 10 ACA (20%) demonstrated CTNNB1 mutations by mutational screen, with no additional mutations. Immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin was performed and compared with the results of the molecular screen. Strong nuclear beta-catenin immunopositivity corresponded to the presence of CTNNB1 mutation by genotyping in 10 of 12 cases (83% sensitivity); the mismatched case(s) demonstrated strong membranous staining by immunohistochemistry. Seventeen of the 18 cases without CTNNB1 mutation showed membranous staining or did not stain (94% specificity); the mismatched case demonstrated scattered (<10%) positive nuclei. Both mutations in ACA were corroborated with immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin. No histomorphologic parameter appeared dominant in lesions with a particular mutational status. Based on these results, mutational status of CTNNB1 in adrenal cortical neoplasms can be predicted with reasonable accuracy by immunohistochemical cellular localization. Nuclear

  3. Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Show Increased Expression of DVL1, DVL3 and Beta-Catenin and Down-Regulation of E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p = 0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p = 0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain. PMID:24933634

  4. Brain metastases from lung cancer show increased expression of DVL1, DVL3 and beta-catenin and down-regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-06-13

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p=0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p=0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain.

  5. Regulation of E-cadherin expression and beta-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activity by the integrin-linked kinase.

    PubMed

    Oloumi, Arusha; McPhee, Timothy; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2004-04-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase which interacts with the cytoplasmic domains of beta1 and beta3 integrins. ILK structure and its localization at the focal adhesion allows it not only to interact with different structural proteins, but also to mediate many different signalling pathways. Extracellular matrices (ECM) and growth factors each stimulate ILK signalling. Constitutive activation of ILK in epithelial cells results in oncogenic phenotypes such as disruption of cell extracellular matrix and cell to cell interactions, suppression of suspension-induced apoptosis, and induction of anchorage independent cell growth and cell cycle progression. More specifically, pathological overexpression of ILK results in down-regulation of E-cadherin expression, and nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin, leading to the subsequent activation of the beta-catenin/Tcf transcription complex, the downstream components of the Wnt signalling pathway. Here we review the data implicating ILK in the regulation of these two signalling pathways, and discuss recent novel insights into the molecular basis and requirement of ILK in the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT).

  6. Mutational analysis of WTX gene in Wnt/ beta-catenin pathway in gastric, colorectal, and hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Nam J; Kim, S; Lee, Sug H

    2009-05-01

    A recent study of Wilms' tumors discovered a new X chromosome gene, Wilms' tumor gene on the X chromosome (WTX), which was found to harbor small deletions and point mutations. WTX protein negatively regulates Wnt/ beta-catenin signaling, and is considered a tumor-suppressor gene. One of the questions about the WTX gene is whether the genetic alterations of the WTX gene are specific to only Wilms' tumors. To see whether somatic point mutations of WTX occur in other malignancies, we analyzed the WTX gene for the detection of mutations in 141 cancer tissues by a single-strand conformation polymorphism assay. The cancer tissues consisted of 47 gastric adenocarcinomas, 47 colorectal adenocarcinomas, and 47 hepatocellular carcinomas. Overall, we detected one WTX mutation in the colorectal carcinomas (1/47; 2.1%), but there was no WTX mutation in other cancers analyzed. The detected mutation was a missense mutation (c. 1117G > A (p.Ala373Thr)). Although the WTX mutation is common in Wilms' tumors, our data indicate that it is rare in colorectal, gastric, and hepatocellular carcinomas. The data also suggest that deregulation of Wnt/ beta-catenin signaling by WTX gene mutation may be a rare event in the pathogenesis of colorectal, gastric, and hepatocellular carcinomas.

  7. EpCAM Intracellular Domain Promotes Porcine Cell Reprogramming by Upregulation of Pluripotent Gene Expression via Beta-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tong; Ma, Yangyang; Wang, Huayan

    2017-01-01

    Previous study showed that expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) was significantly upregulated in porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs). However, the regulatory mechanism and the downstream target genes of EpCAM were not well investigated. In this study, we found that EpCAM was undetectable in fibroblasts, but highly expressed in piPSCs. Promoter of EpCAM was upregulated by zygotic activated factors LIN28, and ESRRB, but repressed by maternal factors OCT4 and SOX2. Knocking down EpCAM by shRNA significantly reduced the pluripotent gene expression. Conversely, overexpression of EpCAM significantly increased the number of alkaline phosphatase positive colonies and elevated the expression of endogenous pluripotent genes. As a key surface-to-nucleus factor, EpCAM releases its intercellular domain (EpICD) by a two-step proteolytic processing sequentially. Blocking the proteolytic processing by inhibitors TAPI-1 and DAPT could reduce the intracellular level of EpICD and lower expressions of OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, and ESRRB. We noticed that increasing intracellular EpICD only was unable to improve activity of EpCAM targeted genes, but by blocking GSK-3 signaling and stabilizing beta-catenin signaling, EpICD could then significantly stimulate the promoter activity. These results showed that EpCAM intracellular domain required beta-catenin signaling to enhance porcine cell reprogramming. PMID:28393933

  8. Soy isoflavone genistein upregulates epithelial adhesion molecule e-cadherin expression and attenuates beta-catenin signaling in mammary epithelial cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enhanced Wnt/beta -catenin signaling and loss of E-cadherin expression are considered hallmarks of mammary tumorigenesis. Mammary tumor protection by dietary intake of soy-rich foods and the soy isoflavone genistein (Gen) is widely regarded based on numerous epidemiological and animal studies; howev...

  9. Attenuated Response to Methamphetamine Sensitization and Deficits in Motor Learning and Memory after Selective Deletion of [beta]-Catenin in Dopamine Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Ruiz, Oscar; Zhang, YaJun; Shan, Lufei; Malik, Nasir; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean Lud; Lupica, Carl R.; Tagliaferro, Adriana; Brusco, Alicia; Backman, Cristina M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed mice with a targeted deletion of [beta]-catenin in DA neurons (DA-[beta]cat KO mice) to address the functional significance of this molecule in the shaping of synaptic responses associated with motor learning and following exposure to drugs of abuse. Relative to controls, DA-[beta]cat KO mice showed significant…

  10. Attenuated Response to Methamphetamine Sensitization and Deficits in Motor Learning and Memory after Selective Deletion of [beta]-Catenin in Dopamine Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Ruiz, Oscar; Zhang, YaJun; Shan, Lufei; Malik, Nasir; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean Lud; Lupica, Carl R.; Tagliaferro, Adriana; Brusco, Alicia; Backman, Cristina M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed mice with a targeted deletion of [beta]-catenin in DA neurons (DA-[beta]cat KO mice) to address the functional significance of this molecule in the shaping of synaptic responses associated with motor learning and following exposure to drugs of abuse. Relative to controls, DA-[beta]cat KO mice showed significant…

  11. DOCK4 promotes loss of proliferation in glioblastoma progenitor cells through nuclear beta-catenin accumulation and subsequent miR-302-367 cluster expression.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D N; Turchi, L; Burel-Vandenbos, F; Fareh, M; Almairac, F; Virolle, V; Figarella-Branger, D; Baeza-Kallee, N; Lagadec, P; Kubiniek, V; Paquis, P; Fontaine, D; Junier, M-P; Chneiweiss, H; Virolle, T

    2017-09-18

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are lethal primitive brain tumours characterized by a strong intra-tumour heterogeneity. We observed in GBM tissues the coexistence of functionally divergent micro-territories either enriched in more differentiated and non-mitotic cells or in mitotic undifferentiated OLIG2 positive cells while sharing similar genomic abnormalities. Understanding the formation of such functionally divergent micro-territories in glioblastomas (GBM) is essential to comprehend GBM biogenesis, plasticity and to develop therapies. Here we report an unexpected anti-proliferative role of beta-catenin in non-mitotic differentiated GBM cells. By cell type specific stimulation of miR-302, which directly represses cyclin D1 and stemness features, beta-catenin is capable to change its known proliferative function. Nuclear beta-catenin accumulation in non-mitotic cells is due to a feed forward mechanism between DOCK4 and beta-catenin, allowed by increased GSK3-beta activity. DOCK4 over expression suppresses selfrenewal and tumorigenicity of GBM stem-like cells. Accordingly in the frame of GBM median of survival, increased level of DOCK4 predicts improved patient survival.Oncogene advance online publication, 18 September 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.323.

  12. Downregulation of HDPR1 is associated with poor prognosis and affects expression levels of p120-catenin and beta-catenin in nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jun-Yi; Zhang, Sheng; Jiang, Gui-Yang; Zhang, Peng-Xin; Yang, Lian-He; Liu, Di; Li, Qing-Chang; Wang, En-Hua

    2010-05-01

    HDPR1 (human homologue of Dapper) is considered as a Dishevelled (DVL) antagonist in WNT signaling. We recently reported that DVL was associated with cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Whether cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-catenin is correlated with HDPR1 is unclear. Xenopus Dapper (XDpr) was found to stabilize p120-catenin (p120ctn) in Xenopus embryogenesis. However, whether HDPR1 can regulate p120ctn expression level is not reported. Furthermore, how HDPR1 influences invasiveness in lung carcinogenesis is also not well understood. In this study, our aims were to explore the effects of HDPR1 on the lung carcinogenesis and to examine the relationship among HDPR1, beta-catenin, and p120ctn. Immunohistochemical analysis in 120 NSCLC tissues showed that HDPR1 was significantly lower in 82 specimens (68.3%). Reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HDPR1 were lower in tumor tissues as compared to corresponding nontumorous tissues. Moreover, reduced HDPR1 expression was related to the clinicopathological factors and was an independent risk factor for prognosis of the patients with NSCLC. In addition, HDPR1 expression was also associated with the expression of p120ctn and beta-catenin in lung cancer tissues. Knockdown of HDPR1 gene enhanced the invasive ability of lung cancer cells, which was dependent on p120ctn and independent of beta-catenin. In conclusion, the function of HDPR1 on regulating p120ctn may play an important role in human lung carcinogenesis. Restoration of HDPR1 gene may be a new therapeutic target of lung cancer. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Circadian rhythms, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR alpha/gamma profiles in diseases with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Duthoit, Guillaume; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clock mechanisms are far-from-equilibrium dissipative structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta/delta, and gamma) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes, particularly in heart muscle. Links between circadian rhythms (CRs) and PPARs have been established. Mammalian CRs involve at least two critical transcription factors, CLOCK and BMAL1 (Gekakis et al., 1998; Hogenesch et al., 1998). PPAR gamma plays a major role in both glucose and lipid metabolisms and presents circadian properties which coordinate the interplay between metabolism and CRs. PPAR gamma is a major component of the vascular clock. Vascular PPAR gamma is a peripheral regulator of cardiovascular rhythms controlling circadian variations in blood pressure and heart rate through BMAL1. We focused our review on diseases with abnormalities of CRs and with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction. Moreover, these diseases presented changes in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPARs, according to two opposed profiles. Profile 1 was defined as follows: inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with increased expression of PPAR gamma. Profile 2 was defined as follows: activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with decreased expression of PPAR gamma. A typical profile 1 disease is arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic cardiac disease which presents mutations of the desmosomal proteins and is mainly characterized by fatty acid accumulation in adult cardiomyocytes mainly in the right ventricle. The link between PPAR gamma dysfunction and desmosomal genetic mutations occurs via inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway presenting oscillatory properties. A typical profile 2 disease is type 2 diabetes, with activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and decreased expression of PPAR gamma. CRs abnormalities are present in numerous pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction, hypertension, diabetes

  14. MENA is a transcriptional target of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Najafov, Ayaz; Seker, Tuncay; Even, Ipek; Hoxhaj, Gerta; Selvi, Osman; Ozel, Duygu Esen; Koman, Ahmet; Birgül-İyison, Necla

    2012-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway plays important roles in embryonic development and carcinogenesis. Overactivation of the pathway is one of the most common driving forces in major cancers such as colorectal and breast cancers. The downstream effectors of the pathway and its regulation of carcinogenesis and metastasis are still not very well understood. In this study, which was based on two genome-wide transcriptomics screens, we identify MENA (ENAH, Mammalian enabled homologue) as a novel transcriptional target of the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway. We show that the expression of MENA is upregulated upon overexpression of degradation-resistant β-catenin. Promoters of all mammalian MENA homologues contain putative binding sites for Tcf4 transcription factor--the primary effector of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and we demonstrate functionality of these Tcf4-binding sites using luciferase reporter assays and overexpression of β-catenin, Tcf4 and dominant-negative Tcf4. In addition, lithium chloride-mediated inhibition of GSK3β also resulted in increase in MENA mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction between β-catenin and MENA promoter in Huh7 and HEK293 cells and also in mouse brain and liver tissues. Moreover, overexpression of Wnt1 and Wnt3a ligands increased MENA mRNA levels. Additionally, knock-down of MENA ortholog in D. melanogaster eyeful and sensitized eye cancer fly models resulted in increased tumor and metastasis formations. In summary, our study identifies MENA as novel nexus for the Wnt/β-catenin and the Notch signalling cascades.

  15. E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma and their prognostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Koriyama, Chihaya; Akiba, Suminori; Itoh, Tetsuhiko; Sueyoshi, Kazunobu; Minakami, Yoshie; Corvalan, Alejandro; Yonezawa, Suguru; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the role of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in carcinogenesis and to assess their prognostic implication in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinomas (EBV-GCs). METHODS: We compared the frequency of E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression in 59 EBV-GCs and 120 non-EBV-GCs, and examined the association between patients' prognosis and the expressions of these proteins. RESULTS: Neither the cellular-membranous nor the cytoplasmic E-cadherin expression showed any difference between EBV-GCs and non-EBV-GCs. On the other hand, loss of membranous expression of beta-catenin occurred more frequently in non-EBV-GCs than EBV-GCs [odds ratio = 0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.19-0.90]. Furthermore, the nuclear and/or cytoplosmic expression of beta-catenin was seen more frequently in EBV-GCs than non-EBV-GCs (odds ratio = 2.23; 95% CI, 0.97-5.09), and was observed in a larger proportion of carcinoma cells of EBV-GCs than non-EBV-GCs (P = 0.024). Survival analysis for non-EBV-GC revealed that lymph node metastasis was significantly associated with poor prognosis (P < 0.001). Among EBV-GCs, the depth of invasion (P = 0.005), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.004) and an intestinal type by Lauren classification (hazard ratio = 9.47; 95% CI, 2.67-33.6) were significantly associated with poor prognosis. On the other hand, nuclear and/or cytoplasmic expression of beta-catenin was associated with a better prognosis in patients with EBV-GC (hazard ratio = 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11-0.93). CONCLUSION: We observed more frequent preservation of beta-catenin in cell membrane and accumulation in nuclei and/or cytoplasm in EBV-GCs than in non-EBV-GCs. Factors involved in the prognosis of EBV-GCs and non-EBV-GCs are different in the two conditions. PMID:17663505

  16. Selection of multipotent stem cells during morphogenesis of small intestinal crypts of Lieberkuhn is perturbed by stimulation of Lef-1/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melissa H; Huelsken, Joerg; Birchmeier, Walter; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2002-05-03

    Studies of chimeric mice have disclosed that the stem cell hierarchy in the small intestinal epithelium is established during formation of its proliferative units (crypts of Lieberkühn). This process involves a selection among several multipotential progenitors so that ultimately only one survives to supply descendants to the fully formed crypt. In this report, we examine the hypothesis that the level of beta-catenin (beta-cat)-mediated signaling is an important factor regulating this stem cell selection. In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, beta-catenin can partner with Lef-1/Tcf high mobility group (HMG) box transcription factors to control gene expression. Both Lef-1 and Tcf-4 mRNAs are produced in the fetal mouse small intestine. Tcf-4 expression is sustained, whereas Lef-1 levels fall as crypt formation is completed during the first two postnatal weeks. A Tcf-4 gene knockout is known to block intestinal epithelial proliferation in late fetal life. Therefore, to test the hypothesis, we enhanced beta-catenin signaling in a chimeric mouse model in which the stem cell selection could be monitored. A fusion protein containing the HMG box domain of Lef-1 linked to the trans-activation domain of beta-catenin (Lef-1/beta-cat) was constructed to promote direct stimulation of signaling without being retained in the cytoplasm through interactions with E-cadherin and Apc/Axin. Lef-1/beta-cat was expressed in 129/Sv embryonic stem cell-derived small intestinal epithelial progenitors present in developing B6-ROSA26<-->129/Sv chimeras. Lef-1/beta-cat stimulated expression of a known beta-catenin target (E-cadherin), suppressed expression of Apc and Axin, and induced apoptosis in 129/Sv but not in neighboring B6-ROSA26 epithelial cells. This apoptotic response was not associated with any detectable changes in cell division within the Lef-1/beta-cat-expressing epithelium. By the time crypt development was completed, all 129/Sv epithelial cells were lost. These results

  17. Discovery of Novel Drugs To Improve Bone Health in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: The Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Fracture Repair and Pseudarthrosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Patients with Neurofibromatosis ( NF1 ) exhibit deficient...bone healing/ The cause of poor bone healing in NF1 is unclear, and pharmacologic approaches to improve bone repair are lacking. Beta-catenin is a...undifferentiated fibroblast-like cells persist at the fracture site, resulting in a pseudarthrosis. Genetically engineered mice in which the Nf1 gene can be

  18. Discovery of Novel Drugs to Improve Bone Health in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: The Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Fracture Repair and Pseudarthrosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Pathway in Fracture Repair and Pseudarthrosis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin Alman CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hospital for Sick Children Toronto, Canada...Discovery of Novel Drugs To Improve Bone Health in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: The Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Fracture Repair and Pseudarthrosis 5a...and undifferentiated fibroblast-like cells persist at the fracture site, resulting in a pseudarthrosis. Genetically engineered mice in which the Nf1

  19. P53 levels determine outcome during beta-catenin tumor initiation and metastasis in the mammary gland and male germ cells.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, A G; McMenamin, J; Leder, P

    2006-06-15

    beta-Catenin, an oncogene, and P53, a tumor suppressor, are common targets of mutation in human cancers. It has been observed that P53 is often inactivated in tumors involving beta-catenin activation. In an attempt to model this situation in vivo, we crossed the previously characterized MMTV-DeltaN-beta-catenin mouse with the P53 knockout mouse. Female multiparous mice that carry the MMTV-DeltaN-beta-catenin transgene and that are heterozygous for P53 (Tg(DeltaN-betaCat)/+, P53+/-) display an increased tumor burden (2.05 vs 1.31 tumors/animal), with a generally more advanced pathology, and increased metastatic rate (39 vs 0%) relative to transgenic female mice that are wild type for P53 (Tg(DeltaN-betaCat)/+, P53+/+). These differences were not due to complete loss of P53 as only one of 21 tumors demonstrated loss of heterozygosity at the P53 locus. Furthermore, no mutations were present in tumors retaining a single wild-type allele. Tg(DeltaN-betaCat)/+, P53-/- male mice developed testicular teratomas and survived an average of 65 days, whereas non-Tg(DeltaN-betaCat), P53-/- males survived an average of 84 days. Sixty-two percent of Tg(DeltaN-betaCat), P53-/- mice developed testicular teratomas, whereas only 10% of the non-Tg(DeltaN-betaCat), P53-/- mice developed these tumors. These results indicate that the level of P53 and the tissue of origin are important factors in determining outcome of cancer caused by oncogene activation.

  20. Analysis of beta-catenin, Ki-ras, and microsatellite stability in azoxymethane-induced colon tumors of BDIX/Orl Ico rats.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Nanna Møller; Kobaek-Larsen, Morten; Bonne, Anita; van Zutphen, Bert; Fenger, Claus; Kristiansen, Karsten; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2003-12-01

    The aim of the study reported here was to investigate whether the azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer rat model mimics the human situation with regard to microsatellite stability, changes in expression of beta-catenin, and/or changes in the sequence of the proto-oncogene Ki-ras. Colon cancer was induced by administration of four weekly doses of AOM (15 mg/kg of body weight per week) separated by a one-week break between the second and third injections. As the histopathologic characteristics of this model resemble those of the human counterpart, further characterization of the genetic changes was undertaken. The animals were euthanized 28 to 29 weeks after the first AOM injection, and tumor specimens were taken for histologic and DNA analyses. Since microsatellite variation was found in only a few (< 2%) specimens, the model can be considered as having stable microsatellites. This result is in accordance with those of similar studies in other rat models and with most human colorectal cancers. Immunohistochemical analyses of beta-catenin did not reveal loss of gene activity, nor did the sequencing of Ki-ras reveal mutations. These results are in contrast to most findings in comparable rat studies. The deviations may be due to differences in exposure to the carcinogen or difference in strain and/or age. The lack of beta-catenin and Ki-ras alterations in this colon cancer model is unlike human sporadic colorectal cancers where these genetic changes are common findings.

  1. Critical interactions between TGF-beta signaling/ELF, and E-cadherin/beta-catenin mediated tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Katuri, V; Tang, Y; Li, C; Jogunoori, W; Deng, C-X; Rashid, A; Sidawy, A N; Evans, S; Reddy, E P; Mishra, B; Mishra, L

    2006-03-23

    Inactivation of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) pathway occurs often in malignancies of the gastrointestinal (GI) system. However, only a fraction of sporadic GI tumors exhibit inactivating mutations in early stages of cancer formation, suggesting that other mechanisms play a critical role in the inactivation of this pathway. Here, we show a wide range of GI tumors, including those of the stomach, liver and colon in elf+/- and elf+/- / Smad4+/- mutant mice. We found that embryonic liver fodrin (ELF), a beta-Spectrin originally identified in endodermal stem/progenitor cells committed to foregut lineage, possesses potent antioncogenic activity and is frequently inactivated in GI cancers. Specifically, E-cadherin accumulation at cell-cell contacts and E-cadherin-beta-catenin-dependent epithelial cell-cell adhesion is disrupted in elf+/- / Smad4+/- mutant gastric epithelial cells, and could be rescued by ectopic expression of full-length elf, but not Smad3 or Smad4. Subcellular fractionation revealed that E-cadherin is expressed mainly at the cell membrane after TGF-beta stimulation. In contrast, elf+/- / Smad4+/- mutant tissues showed abnormal distribution of E-cadherin that could be rescued by overexpression of ELF but not Smad3 or Smad4. Our results identify a group of common lethal malignancies in which inactivation of TGF-beta signaling, which is essential for tumor suppression, is disrupted by inactivation of the ELF adaptor protein.

  2. beta-catenin is strongly elevated in rat colonic epithelium following short-term intermittent treatment with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Dashwood, W Mohaiza; Löhr, Christiane V; Fischer, Kay A; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2008-09-01

    Colon tumors expressing high levels of beta-catenin and c-myc have been reported in male F344 rats given three short cycles of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) alternating with a high-fat (HF) diet. Using the same experimental protocol, rats were euthanized 24 h after the last dose of PhIP so as to examine early changes in colonic crypt homeostasis and beta-catenin expression, before the onset of frank tumors. PhIP/HF dosing caused a significant increase in the bromodeoxyuridine labeling index throughout the entire colon, and within the colonic crypt column cleaved caspase-3 was elevated in the basal and central zones, but reduced in the luminal region. In vehicle/HF controls, beta-catenin was immunolocalized primarily at the border between cells at the top of the crypt, whereas in rats given PhIP/HF diet there was strong cytoplasmic staining, which appeared as a gradient of increased beta-catenin extending from the base of the crypt column to the luminal region. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses confirmed that beta-catenin and c-myc were increased significantly in the colonic mucosa of rats given PhIP/HF diet. Collectively, these findings suggest that PhIP/HF cycling alters beta-catenin and c-myc expression in the colonic mucosa, resulting in expansion of the proliferative zone and redistribution of apoptotic cells from the lumen to the central and basal regions of the colonic crypt. Thus, during the early stages of colon carcinogenesis, alternating exposure to heterocyclic amines and a high-fat diet might facilitate molecular changes resulting in dysregulated beta-catenin and c-myc expression.

  3. Regulation of AR and (Beta)-Catenin Signaling by Pin 1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    function. Nature 406:1009-1012. 41. Rubinfeld, B., I. Albert , E. Porfiri, C. Fiol, S. Munemitsu, and P. Polakis. 1996. Binding of GSK3beta to the APC...Hurlstone, H. K. van der, E. Batlle , D. Coudreuse, A. P. Haramis, M. Tjon-Pon-Fong, P. Moerer, B. M. van den, G Soete, S. Pals, M. Eilers, R. Medema

  4. PTEN Regulates Beta-Catenin in Androgen Signaling: Implication in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    tested for their abilities to modulate transcription from a minimal promoter, derived from the chicken myelomonocytic growth factor gene (41 to 61...constructs, luciferase reporter constructs containing the chicken myelomonocytic growth factor gene minimal promoter (41 to 61) containing GAL4...Biochemistry 29:5145–5152 19. Sullivan WP, Vroman BT, Bauer VJ 1992 Isolation of steroid receptor binding protein from chicken oviduct and

  5. PTEN Regulates Beta-Catenin in Androgen Signaling: Implication in Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    modulation of the PI3K/Akt downstream effector, GSK3 3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3 3). Its inactivation by phosphorylation results in increased nuclear...ng 30 ng MNormal IgG - + Figure 3. Overexpression of IGF-1 receptors enhances AR-mediated transcription. (A) Transient transfections were performed in...Ruel, L. and Woodgett, J.R. (1996) Lithium inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity and mimics wingless signalling in intact cells. Curr Biol, 6

  6. Developing Strategies to Block Beta-Catenin Action in Signaling and Cell Adhesion During Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    lx Riesgo -Escovar et al., 1996; Sluss et al., 1996), as well as the HYB buffer (50% formamide, 5x SSC, 100 gg/ml salmon sperm transcription factors Fos...2. Armadillo:dTCF, a bipartite transcription factor Year 1 1. Construct, introduce into flies and begin to test effects of arm mutants with C-termini...junctions but effectively inhibited 03-catenin-mediated signaling. This suggests that the interaction between /3-catenin and T cell factor family

  7. CB1 cannabinoid receptors increase neuronal precursor proliferation through AKT/glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Trazzi, Stefania; Steger, Martin; Mitrugno, Valentina Maria; Bartesaghi, Renata; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2010-03-26

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of many physiological effects in the central and peripheral nervous system. Recent findings have demonstrated the presence of a functional endocannabinoid system within neuronal progenitors located in the hippocampus and ventricular/subventricular zone that participates in the regulation of cell proliferation. It is presently unknown whether the endocannabinoid system exerts a widespread effect on neuronal precursors from different neurogenic regions, and very little is known about the signaling by which it regulates neuronal precursor proliferation. Herein, we demonstrate the presence of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in granule cell precursors (GCPs) during early cerebellar development. Activation of CB(1) receptors by HU-210 promoted GCP proliferation in vitro, an effect that was prevented by a selective CB(1) antagonist. Accordingly, in vivo experiments showed that GCP proliferation was increased by chronic HU-210 treatment and that in CB(1)-deficient mice cell proliferation was significantly lower than in wild-type littermates, indicating that the endocannabinoid system is physiologically involved in regulation of GCP proliferation. The pro-proliferative effect of cannabinoids in GCPs was mediated through the CB(1)/AKT/glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin pathway. Involvement of this pathway was also observed in cultures of neuronal precursors from the subventricular zone, suggesting that this pathway may be a general mechanism by which endocannabinoids regulate proliferation of neuronal precursors. These observations suggest that endocannabinoids constitute a new family of lipid signaling cues that may exert a widespread effect on neuronal precursor proliferation during brain development.

  8. Dpr Acts as a molecular switch, inhibiting Wnt signaling when unphosphorylated, but promoting Wnt signaling when phosphorylated by casein kinase Idelta/epsilon.

    PubMed

    Teran, Evelyn; Branscomb, Aron D; Seeling, Joni M

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt pathway is a key regulator of development and tumorigenesis. Dpr (Dact/Frodo) influences Wnt signaling in part through the interaction of its PDZ-B domain with Dsh's PDZ domain. Studies have shown that XDpr1a and its close relative, Frodo, are involved in multiple steps of the Wnt pathway in either inhibitory or activating roles. We found that XDpr1a is phosphorylated by casein kinase Idelta/epsilon (CKIdelta/epsilon), an activator of Wnt signaling, in the presence of XDsh. Abrogating XDpr1a's ability to bind XDsh through mutation of XDpr1a's PDZ-B domain blocks CK1delta/epsilon's phosphorylation of XDpr1a. Conversely, XDsh possessing a mutation in its PDZ domain that is unable to bind XDpr1a does not promote XDpr1a phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of XDpr1a and XDsh by CKIdelta/epsilon decreases their interaction. Moreover, the phosphorylation of XDpr1a by CKIdelta/epsilon not only abrogates XDpr1a's promotion of beta-catenin degradation but blocks beta-catenin degradation. Our data suggest that XDpr1a phosphorylation by CKIdelta/epsilon is dependent on the interaction of XDpr1a's PDZ-B domain with XDsh's PDZ domain, and that the phosphorylation state of XDpr1a determines whether it inhibits or activates Wnt signaling.

  9. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Is a Negative Regulator of a Pro-Tumorigenic Wnt/Beta-Catenin-Collagen 1 Axis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Catherine M.; Klüppel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate-E (CS-E) is misregulated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. Cell-surface associated CS-E has been shown to have pro-tumorigenic functions, and pharmacological treatment with exogenous CS-E has been proposed to interfere with tumor progression mediated by endogenous CS-E. However, the effects of exogenous CS-E on breast cancer cell behavior, and the molecular mechanisms deployed by CS-E are not well understood. We show here that treatment with CS-E, but not other chondroitin forms, could interfere with the invasive protrusion formation and migration of breast cancer cells in three-dimensional organotypic cultures. Microarray analysis identified transcriptional programs controlled by CS-E in these cells. Importantly, negative regulation of the pro-metastatic extracellular matrix gene Col1a1 was required for the anti-migratory effects of exogenous CS-E. Knock-down of Col1a1 gene expression mimics the effects of CS-E treatment, while exposing cells to a preformed collagen I matrix interfered with the anti-migratory effects of CS-E. In addition, CS-E specifically interfered with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, a known pro-tumorigenic pathway. Lastly, we demonstrate that Col1a1 is a positively regulated target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. Together, our data identify treatment with exogenous CS-E as negative regulatory mechanism of breast cancer cell motility through interference with a pro-tumorigenic Wnt/beta-catenin - Collagen I axis. PMID:25090092

  10. The expression of syndecan-1 and -2 is associated with Gleason score and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers, E-cadherin and beta-catenin, in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Hector R; Ledezma, Rodrigo A; Vergara, Jorge; Cifuentes, Federico; Barra, Cristina; Cabello, Pablo; Gallegos, Ivan; Morales, Bernardo; Huidobro, Christian; Castellón, Enrique A

    2010-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is considered a key step in tumor progression, where the invasive cancer cells change from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype. During this process, a decrease or loss in adhesion molecules expression and an increase in migration molecules expression are observed. The aim of this work was to determine the expression and cellular distribution of syndecan-1 and -2 (migration molecules) and E-cadherin and beta-catenin (adhesion molecules) in different stages of prostate cancer progression. A quantitative immunohistochemical study of these molecules was carried out in tissue samples from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate carcinoma, with low and high Gleason score, obtained from biopsies archives of the Clinic Hospital of the University of Chile and Dipreca Hospital. Polyclonal specific antibodies and amplification system of estreptavidin-biotin peroxidase and diaminobenzidine were used. Syndecan-1 was uniformly expressed in basolateral membranes of normal epithelium, changing to a granular cytoplasmatic expression pattern in carcinomas. Syndecan-2 was observed mainly in a cytoplasmatic granular pattern, with high immunostaining intensity in areas of low Gleason score. E-cadherin was detected in basolateral membrane of normal epithelia showing decreased expression in high Gleason score samples. beta-Catenin was found in cell membranes of normal epithelia changing its distribution toward the nucleus and cytoplasm in carcinoma samples. We concluded that changes in expression and cell distribution of E-cadherin and beta-catenin correlated with the progression degree of prostate adenocarcinoma, suggesting a role of these molecules as markers of progression and prognosis. Furthermore, changes in the pattern expression of syndecan-1 and -2 indicate that both molecules may be involved in the EMT and tumor progression of prostate cancer.

  11. Novel Cancer Chemotherapy Hits by Molecular Topology: Dual Akt and Beta-Catenin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morell, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Henche, Nieves; Recio-Iglesias, Maria Carmen; Garcia-Domenech, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Colorectal and prostate cancers are two of the most common types and cause of a high rate of deaths worldwide. Therefore, any strategy to stop or at least slacken the development and progression of malignant cells is an important therapeutic choice. The aim of the present work is the identification of novel cancer chemotherapy agents. Nowadays, many different drug discovery approaches are available, but this paper focuses on Molecular Topology, which has already demonstrated its extraordinary efficacy in this field, particularly in the identification of new hit and lead compounds against cancer. This methodology uses the graph theoretical formalism to numerically characterize molecular structures through the so called topological indices. Once obtained a specific framework, it allows the construction of complex mathematical models that can be used to predict physical, chemical or biological properties of compounds. In addition, Molecular Topology is highly efficient in selecting and designing new hit and lead drugs. According to the aforementioned, Molecular Topology has been applied here for the construction of specific Akt/mTOR and β-catenin inhibition mathematical models in order to identify and select novel antitumor agents. Experimental Approach Based on the results obtained by the selected mathematical models, six novel potential inhibitors of the Akt/mTOR and β-catenin pathways were identified. These compounds were then tested in vitro to confirm their biological activity. Conclusion and Implications Five of the selected compounds, CAS n° 256378-54-8 (Inhibitor n°1), 663203-38-1 (Inhibitor n°2), 247079-73-8 (Inhibitor n°3), 689769-86-6 (Inhibitor n°4) and 431925-096 (Inhibitor n°6) gave positive responses and resulted to be active for Akt/mTOR and/or β-catenin inhibition. This study confirms once again the Molecular Topology’s reliability and efficacy to find out novel drugs in the field of cancer. PMID:25910265

  12. RhoA GTPase interacts with beta-catenin signaling in clinorotated osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue under constant remodeling in response to various signals including mechanical loading. A lack of proper mechanical loading induces disuse osteoporosis that reduces bone mass and structural integrity. β-catenin signaling together with a network of GTPases is known to play a primary role in load-driven bone formation, but little is known about potential interactions of β-catenin signaling and GTPases in bone loss. In this study, we addressed a question: Does unloading suppress an activation level of RhoA GTPase and β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts? If yes, what is the role of RhoA GTPase and actin filaments in osteoblasts in regulating β-catenin signaling? Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique with a biosensor for RhoA together with a fluorescent T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) reporter, we examined the effects of clinostat-driven simulated unloading. The results revealed that both RhoA activity and TCF/LEF activity were downregulated by unloading. Reduction in RhoA activity was correlated to a decrease in cytoskeletal organization of actin filaments. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling blocked unloading-induced RhoA suppression, and dominant negative RhoA inhibited TCF/LEF suppression. On the other hand, a constitutively active RhoA enhanced unloading-induced reduction of TCF/LEF activity. The TCF/LEF suppression by unloading was enhanced by co-culture with osteocytes, but it was independent on organization of actin filaments, myosin II activity, or a myosin light chain kinase. Collectively, the results suggest that β-catenin signaling is required for unloading-driven regulation of RhoA, and RhoA, but not actin cytoskeleton or intracellular tension, mediates the responsiveness of β-catenin signaling to unloading. PMID:23529802

  13. Promotion versus suppression of rat colon carcinogenesis by chlorophyllin and chlorophyll: modulation of apoptosis, cell proliferation, and beta-catenin/Tcf signaling.

    PubMed

    Blum, Carmen A; Xu, Meirong; Orner, Gayle A; Darío Díaz, G; Li, Qingjie; Dashwood, Wan Mohaiza; Bailey, George S; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2003-01-01

    The carcinogens 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induce colon tumors in the rat that contain mutations in beta-catenin, but the mutation pattern can be influenced by exposure to dietary phytochemicals, such as the water-soluble derivative of chlorophyll called chlorophyllin. Whereas chlorophyllin is an effective blocking agent during the initiation phase, post-initiation responses depend upon the exposure protocol, and can be influenced by the initiating agent and the concentration of chlorophyllin. Post-initiation treatment with 0.001% chlorophyllin (w/v) in the drinking water promoted colon carcinogenesis in the rat, but much higher concentrations (1.0% chlorophyllin) led to suppression. Bromodeoxyuridine and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) indices revealed that the promotional concentration of 0.001% chlorophyllin increased the ratio of cell proliferation to apoptosis in the colonic crypts, whereas concentrations in the range 0.0l-1.0% chlorophyllin modestly reduced this ratio. Molecular studies showed that the spectrum of beta-catenin mutations was markedly different in chlorophyllin-promoted colon tumors--many of the mutations led to direct substitutions of critical Ser/Thr residues within the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) region, whereas in all other groups, including DMH and IQ controls, the mutations typically affected amino acids adjacent to Ser(33). Substitution of critical Ser/Thr residues caused beta-catenin and c-Jun proteins to be markedly over-expressed compared with tumors in which the mutations substituted amino acid residues flanking these critical Ser/Thr sites. In a separate study, rats were exposed to IQ or azoxymethane (AOM), a metabolite of DMH, and they were treated post-initiation with chlorophyllin, chlorophyll, copper, or phytol in the diet. Natural chlorophyll (0.08%) suppressed AOM- and IQ-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF), whereas

  14. Monitoring Interactions and Dynamics of Endogenous Beta-catenin With Intracellular Nanobodies in Living Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Traenkle, Bjoern; Emele, Felix; Anton, Roman; Poetz, Oliver; Haeussler, Ragna S.; Maier, Julia; Kaiser, Philipp D.; Scholz, Armin M.; Nueske, Stefan; Buchfellner, Andrea; Romer, Tina; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    β-catenin is the key component of the canonical Wnt pathway and plays a crucial role in a multitude of developmental and homeostatic processes. The different tasks of β-catenin are orchestrated by its subcellular localization and participation in multiprotein complexes. To gain a better understanding of β-catenin's role in living cells we have generated a new set of single domain antibodies, referred to as nanobodies, derived from heavy chain antibodies of camelids. We selected nanobodies recognizing the N-terminal, core or C-terminal domain of β-catenin and applied these new high-affinity binders as capture molecules in sandwich immunoassays and co-immunoprecipitations of endogenous β-catenin complexes. In addition, we engineered intracellularly functional anti-β-catenin chromobodies by combining the binding moieties of the nanobodies with fluorescent proteins. For the first time, we were able to visualize the subcellular localization and nuclear translocation of endogenous β-catenin in living cells using these chromobodies. Moreover, the chromobody signal allowed us to trace the accumulation of diffusible, hypo-phosphorylated β-catenin in response to compound treatment in real time using High Content Imaging. The anti-β-catenin nanobodies and chromobodies characterized in this study are versatile tools that enable a novel and unique approach to monitor the dynamics of subcellular β-catenin in biochemical and cell biological assays. PMID:25595278

  15. Anti-Cadherin-17 Antibody Modulates Beta-Catenin Signaling and Tumorigenicity of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling Xiao; Zhang, Xiao Qian; Yuan, Yi; Khin, Ester; Hu, Mei-yu; Wang, Jian Hua; Poon, Ronnie T. P.; Hong, Wanjin; Lee, Nikki P.; Luk, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Cadherin-17 (CDH17) is an oncofetal molecule associated with poor prognostic outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which the treatment options are very limited. The present study investigates the therapeutic potential of a monoclonal antibody (Lic5) that targets the CDH17 antigen in HCC. In vitro experiments showed Lic5 could markedly reduce CDH17 expression in a dose-dependent manner, suppress β-catenin signaling, and induce cleavages of apoptotic enzymes caspase-8 and -9 in HCC cells. Treatment of animals in subcutaneous HCC xenograft model similarly demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition (TGI) using Lic5 antibody alone (5 mg/kg, i.p., t.i.w.; ca.60–65% TGI vs. vehicle at day 28), or in combination with conventional chemotherapy regimen (cisplatin 1 mg/kg; ca. 85–90% TGI). Strikingly, lung metastasis was markedly suppressed by Lic5 treatments. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses of xenograft explants revealed inactivation of the Wnt pathway and suppression of Wnt signaling components in HCC tissues. Collectively, anti-CDH17 antibody promises as an effective biologic agent for treating malignant HCC. PMID:24039755

  16. Neutrophil transmigration triggers repair of the lung epithelium via beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Zemans, Rachel L; Briones, Natalie; Campbell, Megan; McClendon, Jazalle; Young, Scott K; Suzuki, Tomoko; Yang, Ivana V; De Langhe, Stijn; Reynolds, Susan D; Mason, Robert J; Kahn, Michael; Henson, Peter M; Colgan, Sean P; Downey, Gregory P

    2011-09-20

    Injury to the epithelium is integral to the pathogenesis of many inflammatory lung diseases, and epithelial repair is a critical determinant of clinical outcome. However, the signaling pathways regulating such repair are incompletely understood. We used in vitro and in vivo models to define these pathways. Human neutrophils were induced to transmigrate across monolayers of human lung epithelial cells in the physiological basolateral-to-apical direction. This allowed study of the neutrophil contribution not only to the initial epithelial injury, but also to its repair, as manifested by restoration of transepithelial resistance and reepithelialization of the denuded epithelium. Microarray analysis of epithelial gene expression revealed that neutrophil transmigration activated β-catenin signaling, and this was verified by real-time PCR, nuclear translocation of β-catenin, and TOPFlash reporter activity. Leukocyte elastase, likely via cleavage of E-cadherin, was required for activation of β-catenin signaling in response to neutrophil transmigration. Knockdown of β-catenin using shRNA delayed epithelial repair. In mice treated with intratracheal LPS or keratinocyte chemokine, neutrophil emigration resulted in activation of β-catenin signaling in alveolar type II epithelial cells, as demonstrated by cyclin D1 expression and/or reporter activity in TOPGAL mice. Attenuation of β-catenin signaling by IQ-1 inhibited alveolar type II epithelial cell proliferation in response to neutrophil migration induced by intratracheal keratinocyte chemokine. We conclude that β-catenin signaling is activated in lung epithelial cells during neutrophil transmigration, likely via elastase-mediated cleavage of E-cadherin, and regulates epithelial repair. This pathway represents a potential therapeutic target to accelerate physiological recovery in inflammatory lung diseases.

  17. Pharmacologically targeting beta-catenin for NF1 associated deficiencies in fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Baht, Gurpreet S; Nadesan, Puviindran; Silkstone, David; Alman, Benjamin A

    2017-02-22

    Patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 display delayed fracture healing and the increased deposition of fibrous tissue at the fracture site. Severe cases can lead to non-union and even congenital pseudarthrosis. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is caused by a mutation in the NF1 gene and mice lacking the Nf1 gene show a fracture repair phenotype similar to that seen in patients. Tissue from the fracture site of patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 and from mice deficient in the Nf1 gene both show elevated levels of β-catenin protein and activation of β-catenin mediated signaling. Constitutively elevated β-catenin leads to a delayed and fibrous fracture repair process, and (RS)-5-methyl-1-phenyl-1,3,4,6-tetrahydro-2,5-benzoxazocine (Nefopam, a centrally-acting, non-narcotic analgesic agent) inhibits β-catenin mediated signaling during skin wound repair. Here we investigate Nefopam's potential as a modulator of bone repair in mice deficient in Nf1. Mice were treated with Nefopam and investigated for bone fracture repair. Bone marrow stromal cells flushed from the long bones of unfractured mice were treated with Nefopam and investigated for osteogenic potential. Treatment with Nefopam was able to lower the β-catenin level and the Axin2 transcript level in the fracture calluses of Nf1 deficient mice. Cultures from the bone marrow of Nf1(-/-) mice had significantly lower osteoblastic colonies and mineralized nodules, which was increased when cells were cultured in the presence of Nefopam. Fracture calluses were harvested and analyzed 14days and 21days after injury. Nf1(-/-) calluses had less bone, less cartilage, and higher fibrous tissue content than control calluses. Treatment with Nefopam increased the bone and cartilage content and decreased the fibrous tissue content in Nf1(-/-) calluses. These findings present a potential treatment for patients with Neurofibromatosis 1 in the context of bone repair. Since Nefopam is already in use in patient care, it could be

  18. Mucin-depleted foci have beta-catenin gene mutations, altered expression of its protein, and are dose- and time-dependent in the colon of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Giannini, Augusto; Salvadori, Maddalena; Pinzani, Pamela; Dolara, Piero; Caderni, Giovanna

    2005-08-10

    Mucin-depleted foci (MDF) are purported preneoplastic lesions that can be easily visualized in the unsectioned colon of carcinogen-treated rats stained with high-iron diamine alcian blue (HID-AB). In F344 rats treated twice with 150 mg/kg of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and sacrificed after 5, 9, 13 and 28 weeks, MDF increased over time from 5 to 13 weeks, whereas they decreased at 28 weeks, when tumors appear. MDF multiplicity (crypts/MDF) linearly increased with time. Increasing doses of DMH (100, 150 and 200 mg/kg x 2 times) caused a dose-related increase in MDF. Mutations in Ctnnb1 gene codifying for beta-catenin were identified with PCR amplification and direct sequencing in 6/15 tumors (40%), 7/28 MDF (25%) and 2/27 (7%) aberrant crypt foci (ACF) identified in HID-AB-stained colon. All mutations in tumors and MDF caused amino acid substitution, while one mutation in ACF was silent. Beta-catenin detected at membrane level by immunohistochemistry was markedly reduced in MDF and tumors and, to a lesser extent, in ACF identified with HID-AB. By contrast, nuclear localization of beta-catenin was significantly increased in MDF and tumors, while no variation was observed in ACF. Beta-catenin cytoplasmic expression was also significantly increased in MDF and tumors but to a lesser extent in ACF. In conclusion, MDF are induced dose-dependently by DMH, increase in size with time, have mutations in the beta-catenin gene and marked alterations in beta-catenin cellular localization. Since all these phenomena are considered specific steps for colon tumorigenesis, these results further support the hypothesis that MDF are cancer precursors and can be proposed as endpoints in short-term carcinogenesis experiments.

  19. Collagen type I may influence the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Vera C; Demasi, Ana Paula Dias; Furuse, Cristiane; Altemani, Albina; Alves, Venâncio A; Freitas, Leandro L; Araújo, Ney S

    2009-07-01

    Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is an aggressive salivary gland malignancy, usually derived from a long-standing or a recurrent benign tumor, the pleomorphic adenoma (PA). In the context of dynamic reciprocity, changes in the composition and structure of extracellular matrix proteins and cell surface receptors have been frequently associated with dysfunctional adhesion and invasive behavior of tumor cells. It is not fully understood if these changes are involved in the conversion of PA to CXPA. In this study, different progression stages of CXPA were investigated regarding the expression of the major extracellular matrix proteins, collagen type I, and of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, the components of adherens junctions. By immunohistochemical analysis, we have demonstrated that direct contact of tumor cells with fibrillar type I collagen, particularly near the invasive front and in invasive areas prevailing small nests of CXPA cells, could be associated with reduced expression of the E-cadherin and beta-catenin adhesion molecules and with invasive behavior of epithelial, but not of CXPA with myoepithelial component. Our results also suggested that this association could depend on the organization of collagen molecules, being prevented by high-order polymeric structures. These findings could implicate the local microenvironment in the transition from the premalignant PA to invasive CXPA.

  20. Role of Akt/GSK-3beta/beta-catenin transduction pathway in the muscle anti-atrophy action of insulin-like growth factor-I in glucocorticoid-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Schakman, O; Kalista, S; Bertrand, L; Lause, P; Verniers, J; Ketelslegers, J M; Thissen, J P

    2008-08-01

    Decrease of muscle IGF-I plays a critical role in muscle atrophy caused by glucocorticoids (GCs) because IGF-I gene electrotransfer prevents muscle atrophy caused by GCs. The goal of the present study was to identify the intracellular mediators responsible for the IGF-I anti-atrophic action in GC-induced muscle atrophy. We first assessed the IGF-I transduction pathway alterations caused by GC administration and their reversibility by local IGF-I overexpression performed by electrotransfer. Muscle atrophy induced by dexamethasone (dexa) administration occurred with a decrease in Akt (-53%; P<0.01) phosphorylation together with a decrease in beta-catenin protein levels (-40%; P<0.001). Prevention of atrophy by IGF-I was associated with restoration of Akt phosphorylation and beta-catenin levels. We then investigated whether muscle overexpression of these intracellular mediators could mimic the IGF-I anti-atrophic effects. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of Akt induced a marked fiber hypertrophy in dexa-treated animals (+175% of cross-sectional area; P<0.001) and prevented dexa-induced atrophy. This hypertrophy was associated with an increase in phosphorylated GSK-3beta (+17%; P<0.05) and in beta-catenin content (+35%; P<0.05). Furthermore, overexpression of a dominant-negative GSK-3beta or a stable form of beta-catenin increased fiber cross-sectional area by, respectively, 23% (P<0.001) and 29% (P<0.001) in dexa-treated rats, preventing completely the atrophic effect of GC. In conclusion, this work indicates that Akt, GSK-3beta, and beta-catenin probably contribute together to the IGF-I anti-atrophic effect in GC-induced muscle atrophy.

  1. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    DOEpatents

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  2. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    DOEpatents

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W.; Konowalchuk, Jack

    2017-07-18

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods of inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further includes methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  3. Saccharin and cyclamate inhibit binding of epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, L S

    1981-01-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit. PMID:6262753

  4. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  5. Ghrelin Increases Beta-Catenin Level through Protein Kinase A Activation and Regulates OPG Expression in Rat Primary Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mrak, Emanuela; Casati, Lavinia; Pagani, Francesca; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Zarattini, Guido; Sibilia, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, by binding growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), promotes osteoblast proliferation but the signaling mechanism of GHS-R on these cells remains unclear. Since canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is critically associated with bone homeostasis, we investigated its involvement in mediating ghrelin effects in osteoblasts and in osteoblast-osteoclast cross talk. Ghrelin (10−10M) significantly increased β-catenin levels in rat osteoblasts (rOB). This stimulatory action on β-catenin involves a specific interaction with GHS-R1a, as it is prevented by the selective GHS-R1a antagonist, D-Lys3-GHRP-6 (10−7M). The effect of ghrelin on β-catenin involves the phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β via protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of PKA activity reduces the facilitatory action of ghrelin on β-catenin stabilization. Ghrelin treatment of rOB significantly increases the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), which plays an important role in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis, and this effect is blocked by D-Lys3-GHRP-6. Furthermore, ghrelin reduced RANKL/OPG ratio thus contrasting osteoclastogenesis. Accordingly, conditioned media from rOB treated with ghrelin decreased the number of multinucleated TRAcP+ cells as compared with the conditioned media from untreated-control rOB. Our data suggest new roles for ghrelin in modulating bone homeostasis via a specific interaction with GHSR-1a in osteoblasts with subsequent enhancement of both β-catenin levels and OPG expression. PMID:25866509

  6. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W; Baum, Justin; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin.

  7. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  8. Inhibition of tristetraprolin deadenylation by poly(A) binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Rowlett, Robert M.; Chrestensen, Carol A.; Schroeder, Melanie J.; Harp, Mary G.; Pelo, Jared W.; Shabanowitz, Jeffery; DeRose, Robert; Hunt, Donald F.; Sturgill, Thomas W.; Worthington, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype for a family of RNA binding proteins that bind the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) messenger RNA AU-rich element (ARE), causing deadenylation of the TNF poly(A) tail, RNA decay, and silencing of TNF protein production. Using mass spectrometry sequencing we identified poly(A) binding proteins-1 and -4 (PABP1 and PABP4) in high abundance and good protein coverage from TTP immunoprecipitates. PABP1 significantly enhanced TNF ARE binding by RNA EMSA and prevented TTP-initiated deadenylation in an in vitro macrophage assay of TNF poly(A) stability. Neomycin inhibited TTP-promoted deadenylation at concentrations shown to inhibit the deadenylases poly(A) ribonuclease and CCR4. Stably transfected RAW264.7 macrophages overexpressing PABP1 do not oversecrete TNF; instead they upregulate TTP protein without increasing TNF protein production. The PABP1 inhibition of deadenylation initiated by TTP does not require the poly(A) binding regions in RRM1 and RRM2, suggesting a more complicated interaction than simple masking of the poly(A) tail from a 3′-exonuclease. Like TTP, PABP1 is a substrate for p38 MAP kinase. Finally, PABP1 stabilizes cotransfected TTP in 293T cells and prevents the decrease in TTP levels seen with p38 MAP kinase inhibition. These findings suggest several levels of functional antagonism between TTP and PABP1 that have implications for regulation of unstable mRNAs like TNF. PMID:18467502

  9. The prognostic value of the immunohistochemical expression and mutational pattern of the key mediator of Wnt signaling: beta-catenin in Tunisian patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khiari, Meriem; Arfaoui, Amira; Kriaa, Lilia; Chaar, Inés; Amara, Sameh; Lounis, Med Amine; Sammoud, Souraya; Dhraeif, Monia; Gharbi, Lassaad; Mzabi-Regaya, Sabeh; Bouraoui, Saadia

    2012-01-01

    Beta-catenin plays a critical role with E-cadherin in cell-cell adhesion and is also a key molecule of the highly conserved Wnt signaling pathway that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. Abrogation of this pathway is implicated in the carcinogenesis of several malignancies, especially colorectal cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the prognostic value of β-catenin/E-cadherin complex in Tunisian patients with colorectal cancer. Matched primary tumors from 150 patients with sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas were stained for β-catenin and E-cadherin by using immunohistochemistry. Deletion of exon 3 of CTNNB1 gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Our results showed that β-catenin and E-cadherin expressions were related inversely to tumor differentiation. Furthermore, the nuclear expression of β-catenin was considerably increased in advanced colorectal adenocarcinomas and was highly associated with shorter survival of patients. Deletion of exon 3 of CTNNB1 was identified in 2 cases by using polymerase chain reaction and was significantly related to tumor invasion and aberrant expression of E-cadherin. The major finding of this study is that activation of β-catenin gene by deletions involving exon 3 may be considered as an advanced event in colorectal tumorigenesis in Tunisian patients, in contrast to some worldwide studies. Moreover, disruption of β-catenin/E-cadherin complex may be considered as a dependent predictor of disease outcome.

  10. Promoter swapping between the genes for a novel zinc finger protein and beta-catenin in pleiomorphic adenomas with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations.

    PubMed

    Kas, K; Voz, M L; Röijer, E; Aström, A K; Meyen, E; Stenman, G; Van de Ven, W J

    1997-02-01

    Pleiomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands is a benign epithelial tumour occurring primarily in the major and minor salivary glands. It is by far the most common type of salivary gland tumour. Microscopically, pleiomorphic adenomas show a marked histological diversity with epithelial, myoepithelial and mesenchymal components in a variety of patterns. In addition to a cytogenetic subgroup with normal karyotypes, pleiomorphic adenomas are characterized by recurrent chromosome rearrangements, particularly reciprocal translocations, with breakpoints at 8q12, 3p21, and 12q13-15, in that order of frequency. The most common abnormality is a reciprocal t(3;8)(p21;q12). We here demonstrate that the t(3;8)(p21;q12) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1, a novel, developmentally regulated zinc finger gene at 8q12, and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), a protein interface functioning in the WG/WNT signalling pathway and specification of cell fate during embryogenesis. Fusions occur in the 5'-non-coding regions of both genes, exchanging regulatory control elements while preserving the coding sequences. Due to the t(3;8)(p21;q12), PLAG1 is activated and expression levels of CTNNB1 are reduced. Activation of PLAG1 was also observed in an adenoma with a variant translocation t(8;15)(q12;q14). Our results indicate that PLAG1 activation due to promoter swapping is a crucial event in salivary gland tumourigenesis.

  11. A Method for Serial Tissue Processing and Parallel Analysis of Aberrant Crypt Morphology, Mucin Depletion, and Beta-Catenin Staining in an Experimental Model of Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of architectural and morphological characteristics of cells for establishing prognostic indicators by which individual pathologies are assigned grade and stage is a well-accepted practice. Advances in automated micro- and macroscopic image acquisition and digital image analysis have created new opportunities in the field of prognostic assessment; but, one area in experimental pathology, animal models for colon cancer, has not taken advantage of these opportunities. This situation is primarily due to the methods available to evaluate the colon of the rodent for the presence of premalignant and malignant pathologies. We report a new method for the excision and processing of the entire colon of the rat and illustrate how this procedure permitted the quantitative assessment of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a premalignant colon pathology, for characteristics consistent with progression to malignancy. ACF were detected by methylene blue staining and subjected to quantitative morphometric analysis. Colons were then restained with high iron diamine–alcian blue for assessment of mucin depletion using an image overlay to associate morphometric data with mucin depletion. The subsequent evaluation of ACF for beta-catenin staining is also demonstrated. The methods described are particularly relevant to the screening of compounds for cancer chemopreventive activity. PMID:21406072

  12. Binding sites associated with inhibition of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Shipman, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of experimental and theoretical evidence has been integrated into coherent molecular mechanisms for the action of photosystem II herbicides. Photosystem II herbicides act by inhibiting electron transfers between the first and second plastoquinones on the reducing side of photosystem II. Each herbicide molecule must have a flat polar component with hydrophobic substituents to be active. The hydrophobic substituents serve to partition the molecule into lipid regions of the cell and to fit the hydrophobic region of the herbicide binding site. The flat polar portion of the herbicide is used for electrostatic binding to the polar region of the herbicide binding site. Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of herbicides to model proteinaceous binding sites.

  13. Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Bargatze, Robert F.

    2001-05-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  14. Inhibition Of Call-Cell Binding By Kipid Assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O. , Bargatze, Robert F.

    2003-12-16

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  15. Structural changes and inhibition of sucrase after binding of scopolamine.

    PubMed

    Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Fooladi, Negar; Minoui, Saeed; Sobhani-Damavandifar, Zahra; Aavani, Tooka; Heydarzadeh, Soraya; Attar, Farnoosh; Ghaffari, Mina; Nazem, Habibollah

    2010-06-10

    Scopolamine (hyoscine) is commonly used as an anticholinergic drug to relieve nausea, vomiting and dizziness of a motion sickness as well as recovery from anesthesia and surgery. Sucrase as a hydrolytic enzyme breaks down sucrose into its monomers, glucose and fructose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scopolamine on the activity and the structural changes of yeast sucrase. The results showed that binding of scopolamine to sucrase could inhibit the enzyme activity. A non-competitive inhibition was observed in different concentrations of scopolamine (0.6 to 3.6mM). The study by circular dichroism measurement in far-UV showed that the absolute enzyme exhibited a flat negative trough, indicating the presence of alpha-helices and beta-sheet structures in the enzyme. Binding of the inhibitor on the enzyme made a deeper trough at 218nm, suggesting the increasing of beta-sheet content of the enzyme. Fluorescence measurement showed that binding of scopolamine to free enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex increased the peak intensity at 350nm and also induced red shift. Our findings suggest that scopolamine binds to the location other than the active site of enzyme and that the binding causes structural changes and inhibits the enzyme activity.

  16. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jay M; Cura, Anthony J; Lloyd, Kenneth P; Carruthers, Anthony

    2015-05-15

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites-the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis.

  17. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Jay M.; Cura, Anthony J.; Lloyd, Kenneth P.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites—the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis. PMID:25715702

  18. Inhibition of tobramycin diffusion by binding to alginate.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, W W; Dorrington, S M; Slack, M P; Walmsley, H L

    1988-01-01

    [3H]tobramycin bound to sodium alginate and to exopolysaccharide prepared from two mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Binding to sodium alginate was similar to binding to exopolysaccharide, both in the dependence on tobramycin concentration and in the maximum binding observed at saturation. Incorporation of sodium alginate into agar plates reduced the zone sizes of growth inhibition caused by tobramycin. The reductions in zone sizes were quantitatively accounted for by the binding of tobramycin to sodium alginate during diffusion of the antibiotic away from the well in which it had been placed at the start of the experiment. However, the binding of tobramycin to the exopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, and the resulting inhibition of diffusion of the antibiotic, did not significantly increase the penetration time of a spherical microcolony with a radius of 125 micron, such as might be found in the respiratory tract of a patient with cystic fibrosis (from a 90% penetration time of 12 s in the absence of exopolysaccharide to one of 35 s with an exopolysaccharide concentration of 1.0% [wt/vol]). PMID:3132093

  19. Inhibition of tobramycin diffusion by binding to alginate

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.W.; Dorrington, S.M.; Slack, M.P.; Walmsley, H.L.

    1988-04-01

    (/sup 3/H)tobramycin bound to sodium alginate and to exopolysaccharide prepared from two mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Binding to sodium alginate was similar to binding to exopolysaccharide, both in the dependence on tobramycin concentration and in the maximum binding observed at saturation. Incorporation of sodium alginate into agar plates reduced the zone sizes of growth inhibition caused by tobramycin. The reductions in zone sizes were quantitatively accounted for by the binding of tobramycin to sodium alginate during diffusion of the antibiotic away from the well in which it had been placed at the start of the experiment. However, the binding of tobramycin to the exopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, and the resulting inhibition of diffusion of the antibiotic, did not significantly increase the penetration time of a spherical microcolony with a radius of 125 micron, such as might be found in the respiratory tract of a patient with cystic fibrosis (from a 90% penetration time of 12 s in the absence of exopolysaccharide to one of 35 s with an exopolysaccharide concentration of 1.0% (wt/vol)).

  20. IGFBP-4 activates the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway and induces M-CAM expression in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Koji; Hirata, Hiroshi; Majid, Shahana; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Hinoda, Yuji; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2011-11-15

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is inactivated by Wnt antagonists in most cancers and IGFBP-4 is an antagonist of the Wnt/ β-catenin signaling pathway. However, the function of IGFBP-4 is not currently understood in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We initially found that the expression of IGFBP-4 was significantly lower in primary RCC and higher in metastatic RCC compared to normal human kidney tissues. To assess the function of IGFBP4, we established IGFBP4 transfectants (primary renal cancer cell line) and performed functional analyses including Tcf reporter assays, cell viability, invasive capability, mortality, and in vivo tumor growth. Interestingly IGFBP-4 transfectants promoted cell growth (in vitro and in vivo), invasion, and motility in primary renal cancer. Tcf transcriptional activity was significantly increased in IGFBP-4 transfectants compared to mock cells and β-catenin expression was increased. Also the β-catenin downstream effector, MT1-MMP showed increased expression in IGFBP4 transfectants. Additionally IGFBP4 induced the expression of M-CAM, a marker of tumor progression. In order to assess the role of IGFBP4 in metastatic renal cancer, IGFBP-4 mRNA in a metastatic renal cancer cell lines (ACHN) was knocked-down using a siRNA technique. The cell growth and motility was decreased in si-IGFBP4 transfected ACHN cells compared to cells transfected with control siRNA. Tcf activity in ACHN cells was also decreased with si-IGFBP-4 transfection. This is a first report documenting that IGFBP-4 expression in RCC activates cell growth, metastasis, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and may be involved in RCC metastasis.

  1. Maintenance of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-mutant colorectal cancer is dependent on Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Scholer-Dahirel, Alix; Schlabach, Michael R; Loo, Alice; Bagdasarian, Linda; Meyer, Ronald; Guo, Ribo; Woolfenden, Steve; Yu, Kristine K; Markovits, Judit; Killary, Karen; Sonkin, Dmitry; Yao, Yung-Mae; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R; Schlegel, Robert; Stegmeier, Frank; Mosher, Rebecca E; McLaughlin, Margaret E

    2011-10-11

    Persistent expression of certain oncogenes is required for tumor maintenance. This phenotype is referred to as oncogene addiction and has been clinically validated by anticancer therapies that specifically inhibit oncoproteins such as BCR-ABL, c-Kit, HER2, PDGFR, and EGFR. Identifying additional genes that are required for tumor maintenance may lead to new targets for anticancer drugs. Although the role of aberrant Wnt pathway activation in the initiation of colorectal cancer has been clearly established, it remains unclear whether sustained Wnt pathway activation is required for colorectal tumor maintenance. To address this question, we used inducible β-catenin shRNAs to temporally control Wnt pathway activation in vivo. Here, we show that active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for maintenance of colorectal tumor xenografts harboring APC mutations. Reduced tumor growth upon β-catenin inhibition was due to cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Upon reactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway colorectal cancer cells resumed proliferation and reacquired a crypt progenitor phenotype. In human colonic adenocarcinomas, high levels of nuclear β-catenin correlated with crypt progenitor but not differentiation markers, suggesting that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway may also control colorectal tumor cell fate during the maintenance phase of tumors in patients. These results support efforts to treat human colorectal cancer by pharmacological inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  2. Regulation of beta catenin signaling and parathyroid hormone anabolic effects in bone by the matricellular protein periostin.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Conway, Simon J; Ferrari, Serge L

    2012-09-11

    Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein preferentially expressed by osteocytes and periosteal osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Whether and how periostin expression influences bone anabolism, however, remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of adult Postn(-/-) and Postn(+/+) mice to intermittent PTH. Compared with Postn(+/+), Postn(-/-) mice had a lower bone mass, cortical bone volume, and strength response to PTH. PTH-stimulated bone-forming indices were all significantly lower in Postn(-/-) mice, particularly at the periosteum. Furthermore, in vivo stimulation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling by PTH, as evaluated in TOPGAL reporter mice, was inhibited in the absence of periostin (TOPGAL;Postn(-/-) mice). PTH stimulated periostin and inhibited MEF2C and sclerostin (Sost) expression in bone and osteoblasts in vitro. Recombinant periostin also suppressed Sost expression, which was mediated through the integrin αVβ3 receptor, whereas periostin-blocking antibody prevented inhibition of MEF2C and Sost by PTH. In turn, administration of a Sost-blocking antiboby partially restored the PTH-mediated increase in bone mass in Postn(-/-) mice. In addition, primary osteoblasts from Postn(-/-) mice showed a lower proliferation, mineralization, and migration, both spontaneously and in response to PTH. Osteoblastic gene expression levels confirmed a defect of Postn(-/-) osteoblast differentiation with and without PTH, as well as an increased osteoblast apoptosis in the absence of periostin. These data elucidate the complex role of periostin on bone anabolism, through the regulation of Sost, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, and osteoblast differentiation.

  3. Regulation of beta catenin signaling and parathyroid hormone anabolic effects in bone by the matricellular protein periostin

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Conway, Simon J.; Ferrari, Serge L.

    2012-01-01

    Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein preferentially expressed by osteocytes and periosteal osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Whether and how periostin expression influences bone anabolism, however, remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of adult Postn−/− and Postn+/+ mice to intermittent PTH. Compared with Postn+/+, Postn−/− mice had a lower bone mass, cortical bone volume, and strength response to PTH. PTH-stimulated bone-forming indices were all significantly lower in Postn−/− mice, particularly at the periosteum. Furthermore, in vivo stimulation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling by PTH, as evaluated in TOPGAL reporter mice, was inhibited in the absence of periostin (TOPGAL;Postn−/− mice). PTH stimulated periostin and inhibited MEF2C and sclerostin (Sost) expression in bone and osteoblasts in vitro. Recombinant periostin also suppressed Sost expression, which was mediated through the integrin αVβ3 receptor, whereas periostin-blocking antibody prevented inhibition of MEF2C and Sost by PTH. In turn, administration of a Sost-blocking antiboby partially restored the PTH-mediated increase in bone mass in Postn−/− mice. In addition, primary osteoblasts from Postn−/− mice showed a lower proliferation, mineralization, and migration, both spontaneously and in response to PTH. Osteoblastic gene expression levels confirmed a defect of Postn−/− osteoblast differentiation with and without PTH, as well as an increased osteoblast apoptosis in the absence of periostin. These data elucidate the complex role of periostin on bone anabolism, through the regulation of Sost, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, and osteoblast differentiation. PMID:22927401

  4. Invasive Fusobacterium nucleatum activates beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer via a TLR4/P-PAK1 cascade.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyu; Peng, Yan; Yu, Jiahui; Chen, Ting; Wu, Yaxin; Shi, Lei; Li, Qing; Wu, Jiao; Fu, Xiangsheng

    2017-05-09

    The underlying mechanism of Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) in the carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is poorly understood. Here, we examined Fn abundance in CRC tissues, as well as β-catenin, TLR4 and PAK1 protein abundance in Fn positive and Fn negative CRCs. Furthermore, we isolated a strain of Fn (F01) from a CRC tissue and examined whether Fn (F01) infection of colon cancer cells activated β-catenin signaling via the TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675 cascade. Invasive Fn was abundant in 62.2% of CRC tissues. TLR4, PAK1 and nuclear β-catenin proteins were more abundant within Fn-positive over Fn-negative CRCs (P < 0.05). Fn and its lipopolysaccharide induced a significant increase in TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675/C-myc/CyclinD1 protein abundance, as well as in the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Furthermore, inhibition of TLR4 or PAK1 prior to challenge with Fn significantly decreased protein abundance of P-β-catenin S675, C-myc and Cyclin D1, as well as nuclear β-catenin accumulation. Inhibition of TLR4 significantly decreased P-PAK1 protein abundance, and for the first time, we observed an interaction between TLR4 and P-PAK1 using immunoprecipitation. Our data suggest that invasive Fn activates β-catenin signaling via a TLR4/P-PAK1/P-β-catenin S675 cascade in CRC. Furthermore, TLR4 and PAK1 could be potential pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of Fn-related CRCs.

  5. Dact2 represses PITX2 transcriptional activation and cell proliferation through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Florez, Sergio; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Dact2 Represses PITX2 Transcriptional Activation and Cell Proliferation through Wnt/beta-Catenin Signaling during Odontogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Florez, Sergio; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:23349981

  7. Cardiac tissue-restricted deletion of plakoglobin results in progressive cardiomyopathy and activation of {beta}-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jifen; Swope, David; Raess, Natalia; Cheng, Lan; Muller, Eliane J; Radice, Glenn L

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in the plakoglobin (JUP) gene have been identified in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) patients. However, the mechanisms underlying plakoglobin dysfunction involved in the pathogenesis of ARVC remain poorly understood. Plakoglobin is a component of both desmosomes and adherens junctions located at the intercalated disc (ICD) of cardiomyocytes, where it functions to link cadherins to the cytoskeleton. In addition, plakoglobin functions as a signaling protein via its ability to modulate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. To investigate the role of plakoglobin in ARVC, we generated an inducible cardiorestricted knockout (CKO) of the plakoglobin gene in mice. Plakoglobin CKO mice exhibited progressive loss of cardiac myocytes, extensive inflammatory infiltration, fibrous tissue replacement, and cardiac dysfunction similar to those of ARVC patients. Desmosomal proteins from the ICD were decreased, consistent with altered desmosome ultrastructure in plakoglobin CKO hearts. Despite gap junction remodeling, plakoglobin CKO hearts were refractory to induced arrhythmias. Ablation of plakoglobin caused increase β-catenin stabilization associated with activated AKT and inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β. Finally, β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity may contribute to the cardiac hypertrophy response in plakoglobin CKO mice. This novel model of ARVC demonstrates for the first time how plakoglobin affects β-catenin activity in the heart and its implications for disease pathogenesis.

  8. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity.

  9. Menthol Binding and Inhibition of α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C.; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C.; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing Ba2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner. PMID:23935840

  10. A Novel LZAP-binding Protein, NLBP, Inhibits Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Junhye; Cho, Hyun Jung; Han, Seung Hun; No, Jin Gu; Kwon, Jae Young; Kim, Hongtae

    2010-01-01

    LXXLL/leucine zipper-containing alternative reading frame (ARF)-binding protein (LZAP) was recently shown to function as a tumor suppressor through inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. LZAP is also known as a negative regulator of cell invasion, and its expression was demonstrated to be reduced in several tumor tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of the negative effect of LZAP on cell invasion is unclear. In this study, we identify NLBP as a novel LZAP-binding protein using tandem affinity purification. We demonstrate the negative effects of NLBP on cell invasion and the NF-κB signaling pathway. NLBP expression was not detected in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with strong invasive activity, whereas its expression was detected in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line with no invasive activity. We also demonstrate that these two proteins mutually affect the stability of each other by inhibiting ubiquitination of the other protein. Based on these results, we suggest that NLBP may act as a novel tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell invasion, blocking NF-κB signaling, and increasing stability of the LZAP protein. PMID:20164180

  11. A novel LZAP-binding protein, NLBP, inhibits cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junhye; Cho, Hyun Jung; Han, Seung Hun; No, Jin Gu; Kwon, Jae Young; Kim, Hongtae

    2010-04-16

    LXXLL/leucine zipper-containing alternative reading frame (ARF)-binding protein (LZAP) was recently shown to function as a tumor suppressor through inhibition of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. LZAP is also known as a negative regulator of cell invasion, and its expression was demonstrated to be reduced in several tumor tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of the negative effect of LZAP on cell invasion is unclear. In this study, we identify NLBP as a novel LZAP-binding protein using tandem affinity purification. We demonstrate the negative effects of NLBP on cell invasion and the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. NLBP expression was not detected in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with strong invasive activity, whereas its expression was detected in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line with no invasive activity. We also demonstrate that these two proteins mutually affect the stability of each other by inhibiting ubiquitination of the other protein. Based on these results, we suggest that NLBP may act as a novel tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell invasion, blocking NF-kappaB signaling, and increasing stability of the LZAP protein.

  12. Inhibition of oxytocin receptor function by direct binding of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Grazzini, E; Guillon, G; Mouillac, B; Zingg, H H

    1998-04-02

    The steroid hormone progesterone (P4) is essential for establishing and maintaining pregnancy in mammals. One of its functions includes maintenance of uterine quiescence by decreasing uterine sensitivity to the uterotonic peptide hormone oxytocin. Although it is generally held that steroid hormones such as P4 act at a genomic level by binding to nuclear receptors and modulating the expression of specific target genes, we show here that the effect of P4 on uterine sensitivity to oxytocin involves direct, non-genomic action of P4 on the uterine oxytocin receptor (OTR), a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. P4 inhibits oxytocin binding to OTR-containing membranes in vitro, binds with high affinity to recombinant rat OTR expressed in CHO cells, and suppresses oxytocin-induced inositol phosphate production and calcium mobilization. These effects are highly steroid- and receptor-specific, because binding and signalling functions of the closely related human OTR are not affected by P4 itself but by the P4 metabolite 5beta-dihydroprogesterone. Our findings provide the first evidence for a direct interaction between a steroid hormone and a G-protein-coupled receptor and define a new level of crosstalk between the peptide- and steroid-hormone signalling pathways.

  13. Competitive inhibition of benzodiazepine binding by fractions from porcine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Colello, G D; Hockenbery, D M; Bosmann, H B; Fuchs, S; Folkers, K

    1978-01-01

    Fractions of porcine cerebral cortex extract separated by molecular weight on a Sephadex G-75 column were tested for their activities and potencies to inhibit [3H]benzodiazepine binding to rat brain homogenates. The fractions spanned molecular weights from 500 to 100,000. A potent inhibitor (benzodiazepine-competitive factor I, BCF-I) was discovered in the fraction containing substances with molecular weights from 40,000 to 70,000. Equilibrium binding studies indicated that BCF-I was a competitive inhibitor, making it a candidate as a benzodiazepine endogenous factor or profactor. BCF-I was heat stable, but trypsin digestion destroyed its activity. Another inhibitory fraction (BCF-II) was 1/5th as active as BCF-I and contained substances with molecular weights from 1000 to 2000. Images PMID:32539

  14. Inhibition of Midkine Augments Osteoporotic Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haffner-Luntzer, Melanie; Kemmler, Julia; Heidler, Verena; Prystaz, Katja; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Kovtun, Anna; Rapp, Anna E.; Ignatius, Anita; Liedert, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The heparin-binding growth and differentiation factor midkine (Mdk) is proposed to negatively regulate osteoblast activity and bone formation in the adult skeleton. As Mdk-deficient mice were protected from ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss, this factor may also play a role in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We have previously demonstrated that Mdk negatively influences bone regeneration during fracture healing. Here, we investigated whether the inhibition of Mdk using an Mdk-antibody (Mdk-Ab) improves compromised bone healing in osteoporotic OVX-mice. Using a standardized femur osteotomy model, we demonstrated that Mdk serum levels were significantly enhanced after fracture in both non-OVX and OVX-mice, however, the increase was considerably greater in osteoporotic mice. Systemic treatment with the Mdk-Ab significantly improved bone healing in osteoporotic mice by increasing bone formation in the fracture callus. On the molecular level, we demonstrated that the OVX-induced reduction of the osteoanabolic beta-catenin signaling in the bony callus was abolished by Mdk-Ab treatment. Furthermore, the injection of the Mdk-Ab increased trabecular bone mass in the skeleton of the osteoporotic mice. These results implicate that antagonizing Mdk may be useful for the therapy of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture-healing complications. PMID:27410432

  15. Fucosyl neoglycoprotein binds to mouse epididymal spermatozoa and inhibits sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2013-12-01

    Glycan epitopes of cellular glycoconjugates act as versatile biochemical signals, and this sugar coding plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition processes. In this study, our aims were to determine the distribution of sperm receptors with activity for fucosyl- and galactosyl glycans and to address whether monosugar neoglycoproteins functionally mimic the binding between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and spermatozoa. In mouse epididymal spermatozoa with intact acrosomes, fucopyranosyl bovine serum albumin (BSA-Fuc) bound to the segment of the acrosome, the equatorial segment, and the postacrosome region of the sperm head. Galactosyl BSA (BSA-Gal) binding activity was similar to that of BSA-Fuc, but was weaker. In acrosome-reacted spermatozoa treated with the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, BSA-zuc binding was lost in the apical segment of the acrosome but remained in the equatorial segment and postacrosome regions. BSA-Gal binding to the equatorial region was increased. In the presence of 2.5 μg ml(-1) BSA-Fuc, in vitro sperm-ZP binding was significantly decreased, indicating that fucosyl BSA functionally mimics ZP glycoproteins during sperm-egg ZP interactions. At the same concentration, BSA-Gal was not effective. Fucosyl BSA that efficiently inhibited the sperm-ZP binding can mimic the ZP glycoconjugate and has potential for use as a sperm fertility control agent in mouse.

  16. Endothelial proteoglycans inhibit bFGF binding and mitogenesis.

    PubMed

    Forsten, K E; Courant, N A; Nugent, M A

    1997-08-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is a known mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells and has been implicated as having a role in a number of proliferative vascular disorders. Binding of bFGF to heparin or heparan sulfate has been demonstrated to both stimulate and inhibit growth factor activity. The activity, towards bFGF, of heparan sulfate proteoglycans present within the vascular system is likely related to the chemical characteristics of the glycosaminoglycan as well as the structure and pericellular location of the intact proteoglycans. We have previously shown that endothelial conditioned medium inhibits both bFGF binding to vascular smooth muscle cells and bFGF stimulated cell proliferation in vitro. In the present study, we have isolated proteoglycans from endothelial cell conditioned medium and demonstrated that they are responsible for the bFGF inhibitory activity. We further separated endothelial secreted proteoglycans into two fractions, PG-A and PG-B. The large sized fraction (PG-A) had greater inhibitory activity than did PG-B for both bFGF binding and bFGF stimulation of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The increased relative activity of PG-A was attributed, in part, to larger heparan sulfate chains which were more potent inhibitors of bFGF binding than the smaller heparan sulfate chains on PG-B. Both proteoglycan fractions contained perlecan-like core proteins; however, PG-A contained an additional core protein (approximately 190 kDa) that was not observed in PG-B. Both proteoglycan fractions bound bFGF directly, and PG-A bound a significantly greater relative amount of bFGF than did PG-B. Thus the ability of endothelial heparan sulfate proteoglycans to bind bFGF and prevent its association with vascular smooth muscle cells appears essential for inhibition of bFGF-induced mitogenesis. The production of potent bFGF inhibitory heparan sulfate proteoglycans by endothelial cells might contribute to the maintenance of vascular homeostasis.

  17. Prolyl hydroxylase 3 inhibited the tumorigenecity of gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Qu, Jianguo; Dang, Shengchun; Mao, Zhengfa; Wang, Xuqing; Fan, Xin; Sun, Kang; Zhang, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world, and it is very urgent to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Although HIF-1α is the most highly characterized target of prolyl hydroxylase 3 (PHD3), PHD3 has been shown to regulate several signal pathways independent of HIF-1α. Here, we found that the expression of PHD3 was decreased in the clinical gastric cancer samples and reversely correlated with tumor size and tumor stage. Over-expression of PHD3 in the gastric cancer cells significantly inhibited cell growth in vitro and in vivo, while knockdown the expression of PHD3 promoted the tumorigenecity of gastric cancer cells. Mechanistically, it showed that PHD3 downregulated the expression of beta-catenin and inhibited beta-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) signaling. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PHD3 inhibits gastric cancer by suppressing the beta-catenin/TCF signaling and PHD3 might be an important therapeutic target in gastric cancer.

  18. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through Inhibition of Wnt / Beta-catenin Signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain largely unclear. Especially in females, skeletal response to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event le...

  19. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Female skeletal responses to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the current study, we chronically infused EtOH-containing liquid diets ...

  20. A role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain unclear. In females, the skeletal response to ethanol varies depending on physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be a key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the c...

  1. Thiazolidinediones modulate the expression of beta-catenin and other cell-cycle regulatory proteins by targeting the F-box proteins of Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase independently of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuo; Lin, Li-Fang; Yang, Chih-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Chang, Geen-Dong; Chen, Hungwen; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2007-09-01

    Considering the role of aberrant beta-catenin signaling in tumorigenesis, we investigated the mechanism by which the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonist troglitazone facilitated beta-catenin down-regulation. We demonstrate that troglitazone and its more potent PPARgamma-inactive analogs Delta2TG and STG28 mediated the proteasomal degradation of beta-catenin in prostate cancer cells by up-regulating the expression of beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (beta-TrCP), an F-box component of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase. Evidence indicates that although small interfering RNA-mediated beta-TrCP knockdown protected cells against STG28-facilitated beta-catenin ablation, ectopic beta-TrCP expression enhanced the degradation. The involvement of beta-TrCP in beta-catenin degradation was also corroborated by the pull-down analysis and the concurrent down-regulation of known beta-TrCP substrates examined, including Wee1, Ikappabetaalpha, cdc25A, and nuclear factor-kappaB/p105. Furthermore, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta represented a key regulator in the effect of these thiazolidinedione derivatives on beta-catenin proteolysis even though these agents increased its phosphorylation level. It is noteworthy that this drug-induced beta-TrCP up-regulation was accompanied by the concomitant down-regulation of Skp2 and Fbw7, thereby affecting many of the target proteins of these two F-box proteins (such as p27 and cyclin E). As a consequence, the ability of troglitazone to target these F-box proteins provides a molecular basis to account for its reported effect on modulating the expression of aforementioned cell-cycle regulatory proteins. Despite this complicated mode of pharmacological actions, normal prostate epithelial cells, relative to LNCaP cells, were less susceptible to the effects of STG28 on modulating the expression of beta-catenin and beta-TrCP, suggesting the translation potential of using STG28 as a scaffold to

  2. An ent-kaurene that inhibits mitotic chromosome movement and binds the kinetochore protein ran-binding protein 2.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Natalie T; Nelson, Jim; Flory, Mark R; Joseph, Jomon; Th'ng, John; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dasso, Mary; Andersen, Raymond J; Roberge, Michel

    2006-08-22

    Using a chemical genetics screen, we have identified ent-15-oxokaurenoic acid (EKA) as a chemical that causes prolonged mitotic arrest at a stage resembling prometaphase. EKA inhibits the association of the mitotic motor protein centromeric protein E with kinetochores and inhibits chromosome movement. Unlike most antimitotic agents, EKA does not inhibit the polymerization or depolymerization of tubulin. To identify EKA-interacting proteins, we used a cell-permeable biotinylated form that retains biological activity to isolate binding proteins from living cells. Mass spectrometric analysis identified six EKA-binding proteins, including Ran-binding protein 2, a kinetochore protein whose depletion by small interfering RNA causes a similar mitotic arrest phenotype.

  3. Roles of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 expression and beta-catenin activation in gastric carcinogenesis in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-treated K19-C2mE transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Shinji; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Cao, Xue-Yuan; Toyoda, Takeshi; Hirata, Akihiro; Ban, Hisayo; Yamamoto, Masami; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Masegi, Toshiaki; Oshima, Masanobu; Tatematsu, Masae

    2008-12-01

    K19-C2mE transgenic (Tg) mice, simultaneously expressing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in the gastric mucosa under the cytokeratin 19 gene promoter, were here treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and inoculated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to investigate gastric carcinogenesis. Wild-type (WT) and Tg mice undergoing MNU treatment frequently developed tumors in the pyloric region (100% and 94.7%, respectively); multiplicity in Tg was higher than that in WT (P < 0.05) with H. pylori infection. Larger pyloric tumors were more frequently observed in Tg than in WT (P < 0.05). In addition, Tg developed fundic tumors, where WT did not. No gastric tumors were observed without MNU treatment. Transcripts of TNF-alpha, iNOS, IL-1beta, and CXCL14 were up-regulated with H. pylori infection in both genotypes and were also increased more in Tg than in WT within H. pylori-inoculated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated significantly greater beta-catenin accumulation in pyloric tumors, compared with those in the fundus (P < 0.01) with mutations of exon 3; 18.2% and 31.6% in MNU-alone and MNU + H. pylori-treated WT, whereas 21.4% and 62.5% was observed in the Tg, respectively; the latter significantly higher (P < 0.05), suggesting the role of H. pylori in Wnt activation. In conclusion, K19-C2mE mice promoted gastric cancer in both fundic and pyloric regions. Furthermore beta-catenin activation may play the important role of pyloric carcinogenesis especially in H. pylori-infected Tg. Induction of various inflammatory cytokines in addition to overexpression of COX-2/mPGES-1 could be risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis and may serve as a better gastric carcinogenesis model.

  4. Green tea catechins inhibit VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro through suppression of VE-cadherin phosphorylation and inactivation of Akt molecule.

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng-Yao; Nguyen, Nhan; Meydani, Mohsen

    2003-10-10

    Studies have indicated that the consumption of green tea is associated with a reduced risk of developing certain forms of cancer and angiogenesis. The mechanism of inhibition of angiogenesis by green tea or its catechins, however, has not been well-established. Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an adhesive molecule located at the site of intercellular contact, is involved in cell-cell recognition during vascular morphogenesis. The extracellular domain of VE-cadherin mediates initial cell adhesion, whereas the cytosolic tail binding with beta-catenin is required for interaction with the cytoskeleton and junctional strength. Therefore, the cadherin-catenin adhesion system is implicated in cell recognition, differentiation, growth and migration of capillary endothelium. Using tube formation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) in culture as an in vitro model of angiogenesis, we reported that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced tube formation is inhibited by anti-VE-cadherin antibody and dose-dependently by green tea catechins. We also demonstrated here that inhibition of tube formation by epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), one of the green tea catechins, is in part mediated through suppression of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibition of Akt activation during VEGF-induced tube formation. These findings indicate that VE-cadherin and Akt, known downstream proteins in VEGFR-2-mediated cascade, are the new-targeted proteins by which green tea catechins inhibit angiogenesis.

  5. Inhibition by Elongation Factor EF G of Aminoacyl-tRNA Binding to Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cabrer, Bartolomé; Vázquez, David; Modolell, Juan

    1972-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF G), bound to ribosomes either with GMPPCP or with fusidic acid and GDP, inhibits elongation factor Tu (EF Tu)-dependent binding of Phe-tRNA on the ribosome-poly(U) complex and binding of Ala-tRNA on the initiation complex formed with RNA from bacteriophage R17; GTP hydrolysis associated with Phe-tRNA binding is also inhibited. Moreover, nonenzymic binding of Phe-tRNA at high Mg++ concentration is completely blocked by EF G. Thus, EF G appears to bind at a site that overlaps or interacts with the ribosomal A-site. PMID:4551985

  6. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  7. Auto-Inhibition of Ets-1 Is Counteracted by DNA Binding Cooperativity with Core-Binding Factor α2

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Tamara L.; Gu, Ting-Lei; Speck, Nancy A.; Graves, Barbara J.

    2000-01-01

    Auto-inhibition is a common transcriptional control mechanism that is well characterized in the regulatory transcription factor Ets-1. Autoinhibition of Ets-1 DNA binding works through an inhibitory module that exists in two conformations. DNA binding requires a change in the inhibitory module from the packed to disrupted conformation. This structural switch provides a mechanism to tightly regulate Ets-1 DNA binding. We report that the Ets-1 partner protein core-binding factor α2 (CBFα2; also known as AML1 or PEBP2) stimulates Ets-1 DNA binding and counteracts auto-inhibition. Support for this conclusion came from three observations. First, the level of cooperative DNA binding (10-fold) was similar to the level of repression by auto-inhibition (10- to 20-fold). Next, a region necessary for cooperative DNA binding mapped to the inhibitory module. Third, an Ets-1 mutant with a constitutively disrupted inhibitory module did not bind DNA cooperatively with CBFα2. Furthermore, two additional lines of evidence indicated that CBFα2 affects the structural switch by direct interactions with Ets-1. First, the retention of cooperative DNA binding on nicked duplexes eliminated a potential role of through-DNA effects. Second, cooperative DNA binding was observed on composite sites with altered spacing or reversed orientation. We suggest that only protein interactions can accommodate this observed flexibility. These findings provide a mechanism by which CBF relieves the auto-inhibition of Ets-1 and illustrates one strategy for the synergistic activity of regulatory transcription factors. PMID:10594011

  8. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis. PMID:24026239

  9. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis.

  10. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  11. TAFII170 Interacts with the Concave Surface of TATA-Binding Protein To Inhibit Its DNA Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lloyd A.; van der Knaap, Jan A.; van den Boom, Vincent; van den Heuvel, Fiona A. J.; Timmers, H. T. Marc

    2001-01-01

    The human RNA polymerase II transcription factor B-TFIID consists of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the TBP-associated factor (TAF) TAFII170 and can rapidly redistribute over promoter DNA. Here we report the identification of human TBP-binding regions in human TAFII170. We have defined the TBP interaction domain of TAFII170 within three amino-terminal regions: residues 2 to 137, 290 to 381, and 380 to 460. Each region contains a pair of Huntington-elongation-A subunit-Tor repeats and exhibits species-specific interactions with TBP family members. Remarkably, the altered-specificity TBP mutant (TBPAS) containing a triple mutation in the concave surface is defective for binding the TAFII170 amino-terminal region of residues 1 to 504. Furthermore, within this region the TAFII170 residues 290 to 381 can inhibit the interaction between Drosophila TAFII230 (residues 2 to 81) and TBP through competition for the concave surface of TBP. Biochemical analyses of TBP binding to the TATA box indicated that TAFII170 region 290-381 inhibits TBP-DNA complex formation. Importantly, the TBPAS mutant is less sensitive to TAFII170 inhibition. Collectively, our results support a mechanism in which TAFII170 induces high-mobility DNA binding by TBP through reversible interactions with its concave DNA binding surface. PMID:11585931

  12. Water may inhibit oxygen binding in hemoprotein models.

    PubMed

    Collman, James P; Decréau, Richard A; Dey, Abhishek; Yang, Ying

    2009-03-17

    Three distal imidazole pickets in a cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) model form a pocket hosting a cluster of water molecules. The cluster makes the ferrous heme low spin, and consequently the O(2) binding slow. The nature of the rigid proximal imidazole tail favors a high spin/low spin cross-over. The O(2) binding rate is enhanced either by removing the water, increasing the hydrophobicity of the gas binding pocket, or inserting a metal ion that coordinates to the 3 distal imidazole pickets.

  13. Psoralens potentiate ultraviolet light-induced inhibition of epidermal growth factor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, J D; Lee, E; Laskin, D L; Gallo, M A

    1986-01-01

    The psoralens, when activated by ultraviolet light of 320-400 nm (UVA light), are potent modulators of epidermal cell growth and differentiation. Previously, we reported that, in mammalian cells, these compounds bind to specific saturable high-affinity cellular receptor sites. In the present studies, we demonstrate that binding of psoralens to their receptors followed by UVA light activation is associated with inhibition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding. Inhibition of EGF binding, which required UVA light, was rapid and dependent on the dose of UVA light (0.5-2.0 J/cm2), as well as the concentration of psoralens (10 nM to 1 microM). Higher doses of UVA light (2.0-6.0 J/cm2) by themselves were also inhibitory, indicating that psoralens potentiate the UVA-induced inhibition of EGF binding. A number of biologically active analogs of psoralen, including 8-methoxypsoralen, 5-methoxypsoralen, and 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen, when activated by UVA light, were found to be inhibitors of binding. Inhibition of EGF binding by psoralens was observed in a variety of human and mouse cell culture lines known to possess psoralen receptors. In the epidermal-derived line PAM 212, at least two populations of receptors with different affinities for EGF were found. Psoralens and UVA light selectively inhibited binding to the higher-affinity EGF receptors, an effect analogous to that of the phorbol ester tumor promoters. As observed with phorbol esters, photoactivated psoralens appeared to inhibit EGF binding by an indirect mechanism. These data demonstrate that the psoralens and UVA light have direct biological effects on cell-surface membranes. Since EGF is a growth-regulatory peptide, the ability of psoralens and UVA light to inhibit EGF binding may underlie the biologic effects of these agents in the skin. PMID:3490664

  14. Psoralens potentiate ultraviolet light-induced inhibition of epidermal growth factor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    The psoralens, when activated by ultraviolet light of 320-400 nm (UVA light), are potent modulators of epidermal cell growth and differentiation. Previously, we reported that, in mammalian cells, these compounds bind to specific saturable high-affinity cellular receptor sites. In the present studies, we demonstrate that binding of psoralens to their receptors followed by UVA light activation is associated with inhibition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor binding. Inhibition of EGF binding, which required UVA light, was rapid and dependent on the dose of UVA light (0.5-2.0 J/cm2), as well as the concentration of psoralens (10 nM to 1 microM). Higher doses of UVA light (2.0-6.0 J/cm2) by themselves were also inhibitory, indicating that psoralens potentiate the UVA-induced inhibition of EGF binding. A number of biologically active analogs of psoralen, including 8-methoxypsoralen, 5-methoxypsoralen, and 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen, when activated by UVA light, were found to be inhibitors of binding. Inhibition of EGF binding by psoralens was observed in a variety of human and mouse cell culture lines known to possess psoralen receptors. In the epidermal-derived line PAM 212, at least two populations of receptors with different affinities for EGF were found. Psoralens and UVA light selectively inhibited binding to the higher-affinity EGF receptors, an effect analogous to that of the phorbol ester tumor promoters. As observed with phorbol esters, photoactivated psoralens appeared to inhibit EGF binding by an indirect mechanism. These data demonstrate that the psoralens and UVA light have direct biological effects on cell-surface membranes. Since EGF is a growth-regulatory peptide, the ability of psoralens and UVA light to inhibit EGF binding may underlie the biologic effects of these agents in the skin.

  15. Sticky Plans: Inhibition and Binding during Serial-Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests substantial response-time costs associated with lag-2 repetitions of tasks within explicitly controlled task sequences [Koch, I., Philipp, A. M., Gade, M. (2006). Chunking in task sequences modulates task inhibition. "Psychological Science," 17, 346-350; Schneider, D. W. (2007). Task-set inhibition in chunked task…

  16. Sticky Plans: Inhibition and Binding during Serial-Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests substantial response-time costs associated with lag-2 repetitions of tasks within explicitly controlled task sequences [Koch, I., Philipp, A. M., Gade, M. (2006). Chunking in task sequences modulates task inhibition. "Psychological Science," 17, 346-350; Schneider, D. W. (2007). Task-set inhibition in chunked task…

  17. Competitive inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to mammary glucocorticoid receptor by leupeptin

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, L.C.C.; Su, C.; Markland, F.S. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The inhibitory effect of leupeptin on (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor from lactating goat mammary cytosol has been studied. Leupeptin (10 mM) caused a significant (about 35%) inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to glucocorticoid receptor. Binding inhibition is further increased following filtration of unlabeled cytosolic receptor through a Bio-Gel A 0.5-m column. Binding inhibition was partially reversed by monothioglycerol at 10 mM concentration. A double reciprocal plot revealed that leupeptin appears to be a competitive inhibitor of (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. Low salt sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed that the leupeptin-treated sample formed a slightly larger (approximately 9 S) receptor complex (leupeptin-free complex sediments at 8 S).

  18. A human TATA binding protein-related protein with altered DNA binding specificity inhibits transcription from multiple promoters and activators.

    PubMed

    Moore, P A; Ozer, J; Salunek, M; Jan, G; Zerby, D; Campbell, S; Lieberman, P M

    1999-11-01

    The TATA binding protein (TBP) plays a central role in eukaryotic and archael transcription initiation. We describe the isolation of a novel 23-kDa human protein that displays 41% identity to TBP and is expressed in most human tissue. Recombinant TBP-related protein (TRP) displayed barely detectable binding to consensus TATA box sequences but bound with slightly higher affinities to nonconsensus TATA sequences. TRP did not substitute for TBP in transcription reactions in vitro. However, addition of TRP potently inhibited basal and activated transcription from multiple promoters in vitro and in vivo. General transcription factors TFIIA and TFIIB bound glutathione S-transferase-TRP in solution but failed to stimulate TRP binding to DNA. Preincubation of TRP with TFIIA inhibited TBP-TFIIA-DNA complex formation and addition of TFIIA overcame TRP-mediated transcription repression. TRP transcriptional repression activity was specifically reduced by mutations in TRP that disrupt the TFIIA binding surface but not by mutations that disrupt the TFIIB or DNA binding surface of TRP. These results suggest that TFIIA is a primary target of TRP transcription inhibition and that TRP may modulate transcription by a novel mechanism involving the partial mimicry of TBP functions.

  19. Correlation Between Growth Inhibition and the Binding of Various Penicillins and Cephalosporins to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John R.; Park, James T.

    1969-01-01

    The concentration of penicillin (or cephalosporin) required to achieve a given rate of binding to Staphylococcus aureus H correlates well with that required for inhibition of growth. This result suggests that the irreversible binding of penicillins and cephalosporins to cells is responsible for their biological activity. PMID:5808073

  20. Expression and hormonal regulation of calcyclin-binding protein (CacyBP) in the mouse uterus during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Jun; Liu, Wei-Min; Zhou, Jia-Xi; Cao, Yu-Jing; Li, Jing; Peng, Sha; Wang, Li; Yuan, Jiang-Gang; Duan, En-Kui

    2006-01-11

    Calcyclin-binding protein (Siah-1-Interacting Protein, CacyBP/SIP), is a calcium signaling protein involved in the degradation of beta-catenin, however, little is known about its role in reproductive biology. The present study was to character its temporospatial expression pattern and regulation in mouse uterus and to investigate whether it plays a role in the regulation of normal endometrial events. While prominently expressed in both luminal and glandular epithelia, CacyBP underwent dynamic changes during early pregnancy. CacyBP expression was observed weakly from days 1-4. An intense accumulation in luminal and glandular epithelia as well as decidua surrounding the embryo at later stages (days 5-7) was observed. Most notably, CacyBP accumulation in trophoblast was pronounced at day 7. Using ovariectomized and pseudopregnant mice, we found that progesterone (P(4)) and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) led to increased expression of CacyBP gene and this could be abolished by Ru486 and tamoxifen, respectively. Antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) against CacyBP significantly inhibited cultured endometrial stromal cells' (ESCs) apoptosis induced by UV irradiation. Injection of antisense ODNs into mouse uterine horn severely impaired the number of implanted blastocysts. Taken together, our results suggested that CacyBP expression was positively regulated by P(4) and E(2). CacyBP may be involved in the regulation of endometrial cell apoptosis during early pregnancy and play an important role in mouse endometrial events such as pregrancy establishment.

  1. The phenolic monoterpenoid carvacrol inhibits the binding of nicotine to the housefly nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Tong, Fan; Gross, Aaron D; Dolan, Marc C; Coats, Joel R

    2013-07-01

    The phenolic monoterpenoid carvacrol, which is found in many plant essential oils (thyme, oregano and Alaska yellow cedar), is highly active against pest arthropods, but its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Here, carvacrol is shown to bind in a membrane preparation containing insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). [(14) C]-Nicotine binding assays with Musca domestica (housefly) nAChRs were used in this study to demonstrate carvacrol's binding to nAChRs, thereby acting as a modulator of the receptors. Carvacrol showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of [(14) C]-nicotine binding in a membrane preparation of housefly heads containing nAChRs, with IC50 = 1.4 μM, in a non-competitive pattern. Binding studies with neonicotinoid insecticides revealed that imidacloprid and thiamethoxam did not inhibit the binding of [(14) C]-nicotine, while dinotefuran, from the guanidine subclass of neonicotinoids, inhibited nicotine binding like carvacrol. Carvacrol binds to housefly nAChRs at a binding site distinct from nicotine and acetylcholine, and the nAChRs are a possible target of carvacrol for its insecticidal activity. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Inhibition of TDP-43 Aggregation by Nucleic Acid Binding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Chen; Lin, Ku-Feng; He, Ruei-Yu; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Koubek, Jiri; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation of TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43) has been shown as a hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) since 2006. While evidence has suggested that mutation or truncation in TDP-43 influences its aggregation process, nevertheless, the correlation between the TDP-43 aggregation propensity and its binding substrates has not been fully established in TDP-43 proteinopathy. To address this question, we have established a platform based on the in vitro protein expression system to evaluate the solubility change of TDP-43 in response to factors such as nucleotide binding and temperature. Our results suggest that the solubility of TDP-43 is largely influenced by its cognate single-strand DNA (ssDNA) or RNA (ssRNA) rather than hnRNP, which is known to associate with TDP-43 C-terminus. The direct interaction between the refolded TDP-43, purified from E.coli, and ssDNA were further characterized by Circular Dichroism (CD) as well as turbidity and filter binding assay. In addition, ssDNA or ssRNA failed to prevent the aggregation of the F147L/F149L double mutant or truncated TDP-43 (TDP208–414). Consistently, these two mutants form aggregates, in contrast with the wild-type TDP-43, when expressed in Neuro2a cells. Our results demonstrate an intimate relationship between the solubility of TDP-43 and its DNA or RNA binding affinity, which may shed light on the role of TDP-43 in ALS and FTLD. PMID:23737961

  3. Protein-protein interface-binding peptides inhibit the cancer therapy target human thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Daniela; Guaitoli, Giambattista; Tondi, Donatella; Luciani, Rosaria; Henrich, Stefan; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Ferrari, Stefania; Marverti, Gaetano; Guerrieri, Davide; Ligabue, Alessio; Frassineti, Chiara; Pozzi, Cecilia; Mangani, Stefano; Fessas, Dimitrios; Guerrini, Remo; Ponterini, Glauco; Wade, Rebecca C; Costi, M Paola

    2011-08-23

    Human thymidylate synthase is a homodimeric enzyme that plays a key role in DNA synthesis and is a target for several clinically important anticancer drugs that bind to its active site. We have designed peptides to specifically target its dimer interface. Here we show through X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic, kinetic, and calorimetric evidence that the peptides do indeed bind at the interface of the dimeric protein and stabilize its di-inactive form. The "LR" peptide binds at a previously unknown binding site and shows a previously undescribed mechanism for the allosteric inhibition of a homodimeric enzyme. It inhibits the intracellular enzyme in ovarian cancer cells and reduces cellular growth at low micromolar concentrations in both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant cells without causing protein overexpression. This peptide demonstrates the potential of allosteric inhibition of hTS for overcoming platinum drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  4. Addition of lysophospholipids with large head groups to cells inhibits Shiga toxin binding

    PubMed Central

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kvalvaag, Audun Sverre; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB5 toxin, binds specifically to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface before being transported into cells. We here demonstrate that addition of conical lysophospholipids (LPLs) with large head groups inhibit Stx binding to cells whereas LPLs with small head groups do not. Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI 18:0), the most efficient LPL with the largest head group, was selected for in-depth investigations to study how the binding of Stx is regulated. We show that the inhibition of Stx binding by LPI is reversible and possibly regulated by cholesterol since addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) reversed the ability of LPI to inhibit binding. LPI-induced inhibition of Stx binding is independent of signalling and membrane turnover as it occurs in fixed cells as well as after depletion of cellular ATP. Furthermore, data obtained with fluorescent membrane dyes suggest that LPI treatment has a direct effect on plasma membrane lipid packing with shift towards a liquid disordered phase in the outer leaflet, while lysophosphoethanolamine (LPE), which has a small head group, does not. In conclusion, our data show that cellular treatment with conical LPLs with large head groups changes intrinsic properties of the plasma membrane and modulates Stx binding to Gb3. PMID:27458147

  5. Metabolic inhibition of galectin-1-binding carbohydrates accentuates antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Opperman, Matthew J; Barthel, Steven R; Hays, Danielle; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; He, Xiaoying; Matta, Khushi L; Supko, Jeffrey G; Frank, Markus H; Murphy, George F; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2012-02-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) has been shown to play a major role in tumor immune escape by inducing apoptosis of effector leukocytes and correlating with tumor aggressiveness and disease progression. Thus, targeting the Gal-1/Gal-1 ligand axis represents a promising cancer therapeutic approach. Here, to test the Gal-1-mediated tumor immune evasion hypothesis and demonstrate the importance of Gal-1-binding N-acetyllactosamines in controlling the fate and function of antitumor immune cells, we treated melanoma- or lymphoma-bearing mice with peracetylated 4-fluoro-glucosamine (4-F-GlcNAc), a metabolic inhibitor of N-acetyllactosamine biosynthesis, and analyzed tumor growth and immune profiles. We found that 4-F-GlcNAc spared Gal-1-mediated apoptosis of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells by decreasing their expression of Gal-1-binding determinants. 4-F-GlcNAc enhanced tumor lymphocytic infiltration and promoted elevations in tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells and IFN-γ levels, while lowering IL-10 production. Collectively, our data suggest that metabolic lowering of Gal-1-binding N-acetyllactosamines may attenuate tumor growth by boosting antitumor immune cell levels, representing a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  6. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Dave A.; Kaplan, Craig D.; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C.; Engelke, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template. PMID:24614752

  7. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template.

    PubMed

    Pai, Dave A; Kaplan, Craig D; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C; Engelke, David R

    2014-05-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template.

  8. Rapid kinetics of 2-adrenergic agonist binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, W.; Neubig, R.R.

    1987-05-01

    Activation of 2-adrenergic receptors in human platelets results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase (AC). To elucidate the relation between agonist binding and response, the authors have used a novel rapid-mix quench method to compare the kinetics of binding and response. At functionally effective concentrations, the time course of binding of the full 2-agonist, (TH)UK14,304 (UK), to purified platelet membranes was faster than could be measured manually. Using the rapid-mix quench method, agonist binding was quantitated for times for 0.3 to 60 seconds. UK binding exhibited biexponential kinetics. The rate constant of the fast binding component increases linearly with agonist concentration from 1 to 100 nM with a second order rate constant and 7 x 10WM s (at 25C). The slow rate constant was nearly independent of agonist concentration. The half times of the fast and slow components of binding for 100 nM UK are 1.5 seconds and approximately 2 minutes respectively. The rate and magnitude of the fast binding was unaffected by 10 M GTP whereas the magnitude of the slow phase was markedly reduced. Inhibition of forskolin stimulated AC by 100 M epinephrine occurs with a lag of 5-10 seconds in the presence of 10 M GTP. At lower GTP concentrations, this lag is prolonged. The observation that the fast component of agonist binding precedes inhibition even at agonist concentrations 20-fold lower than the EC40 for responses indicates that the rate limiting step in inhibition of AC is distal to the binding of agonist.

  9. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Song, Jie [Shrewsbury, MA; Lee, Seung-Wuk [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  10. Targeting beta-Catenin signaling to induce apoptosis in human breast cancer cells by z-Guggulsterone and Gugulipid extract of Ayurvedic medicine plant Commiphora mukul

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background z-Guggulsterone (z-Gug) and Gugulipid (GL) have been used to treat a variety of ailments. We now report their anti-cancer effect and mechanism against human breast cancer. Methods Using the human estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and triple-negative (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells as well as the normal human mammary epithelial cell line (HMEC), we evaluated the anti-breast-cancer efficacy and apoptosis inducing activity of GL. We determined the cellular and molecular mechanism of GL-inhibited breast cancer cell growth. Results GL significantly inhibited growth of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells with an IC50~2 μM at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-Gug. The GL-induced growth inhibition correlated with apoptosis induction as evidenced by an increase in cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation and caspase 3 activity. The GL-induced apoptosis was associated with down-regulation of the β-Catenin signaling pathway. The decreased expression of Wnt/β-Catenin targeting genes, such as cyclin D1, C-myc and survivin, and the inhibition of the activity of the transcription factor (T-cell factor 4, TCF-4) were observed in GL-treated breast cancer cells. The GL treatment resulted in a significant reduction of β-Catenin /TCF-4 complex in both of the cancer cells. The GL-induced apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced by RNA Interference of β-Catenin and TCF-4. On the other hand, the normal human mammary epithelial cell HMEC, compared with the human breast cancer cells, is significantly more resistant to growth inhibition and apoptosis induction by GL. Conclusion The present study indicates that the β-Catenin signaling pathway is the target for GL-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast cancer. PMID:23914993

  11. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-04-29

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors.

  12. Aspartate aminotransferase is potently inhibited by copper complexes: Exploring copper complex-binding proteome.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuqi; Lu, Liping; Yuan, Caixia; Feng, Sisi; Zhu, Miaoli

    2017-05-01

    Recent researches indicated that a copper complex-binding proteome that potently interacted with copper complexes and then influenced cellular metabolism might exist in organism. In order to explore the copper complex-binding proteome, a copper chelating ion-immobilized affinity chromatography (Cu-IMAC) column and mass spectrometry were used to separate and identify putative Cu-binding proteins in primary rat hepatocytes. A total of 97 putative Cu-binding proteins were isolated and identified. Five higher abundance proteins, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), catalase (CAT), calreticulin (CRT) and albumin (Alb) were further purified using a SP-, and (or) Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column. The interaction between the purified proteins and selected 11 copper complexes and CuCl2 was investigated. The enzymes inhibition tests demonstrated that AST was potently inhibited by copper complexes while MDH and CAT were weakly inhibited. Schiff-based copper complexes 6 and 7 potently inhibited AST with the IC50 value of 3.6 and 7.2μM, respectively and exhibited better selectivity over MDH and CAT. Fluorescence titration results showed the two complexes tightly bound to AST with binding constant of 3.89×10(6) and 3.73×10(6)M(-1), respectively and a stoichiometry ratio of 1:1. Copper complex 6 was able to enter into HepG2 cells and further inhibit intracellular AST activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of benzodiazepine binding in vitro by amentoflavone, a constituent of various species of Hypericum.

    PubMed

    Baureithel, K H; Büter, K B; Engesser, A; Burkard, W; Schaffner, W

    1997-06-01

    Flower extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum hirsutum, Hypericum patulum and Hypericum olympicum efficiently inhibited binding of [3H]flumazenil to rat brain benzodiazepine binding sites of the GABAA-receptor in vitro with IC50 values of 6.83, 6.97, 13.2 and 6.14 micrograms/ml, respectively. Single constituents of the extracts like hypericin, the flavones quercetin and luteolin, the glycosylated flavonoides rutin, hyperoside and quercitrin and the biflavone 13, II8-biapigenin did not inhibit binding up to concentrations of 1 microM. In contrast, amentoflavone revealed an IC50 = 14.9 +/- 1.9 nM on benzodiazepine binding in vitro. Comparative HPLC analyses of hypericin and amentoflavone in extracts of different Hypericum species revealed a possible correlation between the amentoflavone concentration and the inhibition of flumazenil binding. For hypericin no such correlation was observed. Our experimental data demonstrate that amentoflavone, in contrast to hypericin, presents a very active compound with regard to the inhibition of [3H]-flumazenil binding in vitro and thus might be involved in the antidepressant effects of Hypericum perforatum extracts.

  14. Computational insights into the suicide inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Fk506-binding protein 35.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Corey A; Boyd, Russell J

    2015-08-15

    Malaria is a parasite affecting millions of people worldwide. With the risk of malarial resistance reaching catastrophic levels, novel methods into the inhibition of this disease need to be prioritized. The exploitation of active site differences between parasitic and human peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases can be used for suicide inhibition, effectively poisoning the parasite without affecting the patient. This method of inhibition was explored using Plasmodium falciparum and Homo sapiens Fk506-binding proteins as templates for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. Modification of the natural substrate has shown suicide inhibition is a valid approach for novel anti-malarials with little risk for parasitic resistance.

  15. The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding during Object Recognition.

    PubMed

    Wyatte, Dean; Herd, Seth; Mingus, Brian; O'Reilly, Randall

    2012-01-01

    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. Top-down feedback contributes to binding in a similar manner, but by reinforcing relevant features. Together, inhibition and top-down feedback contribute to a competitive environment that ensures only the most appropriate features are bound together. We demonstrate this overall proposal using a biologically realistic neural model of vision that processes features across a hierarchy of interconnected brain areas. Finally, we argue that temporal synchrony plays only a limited role in binding - it does not simultaneously bind multiple objects, but does aid in creating additional contrast between relevant and irrelevant features. Thus, our overall theory constitutes a solution to the binding problem that relies only on simple neural principles without any binding-specific processes.

  16. The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding during Object Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wyatte, Dean; Herd, Seth; Mingus, Brian; O’Reilly, Randall

    2012-01-01

    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain’s binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. Top-down feedback contributes to binding in a similar manner, but by reinforcing relevant features. Together, inhibition and top-down feedback contribute to a competitive environment that ensures only the most appropriate features are bound together. We demonstrate this overall proposal using a biologically realistic neural model of vision that processes features across a hierarchy of interconnected brain areas. Finally, we argue that temporal synchrony plays only a limited role in binding – it does not simultaneously bind multiple objects, but does aid in creating additional contrast between relevant and irrelevant features. Thus, our overall theory constitutes a solution to the binding problem that relies only on simple neural principles without any binding-specific processes. PMID:22719733

  17. A nucleolar localizing Rev binding element inhibits HIV replication

    PubMed Central

    Michienzi, Alessandro; De Angelis, Fernanda G; Bozzoni, Irene; Rossi, John J

    2006-01-01

    The Rev protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) facilitates the nuclear export of intron containing viral mRNAs allowing formation of infectious virions. Rev traffics through the nucleolus and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Rev multimerization and interaction with the export protein CRM1 takes place in the nucleolus. To test the importance of Rev nucleolar trafficking in the HIV-1 replication cycle, we created a nucleolar localizing Rev Response Element (RRE) decoy and tested this for its anti-HIV activity. The RRE decoy provided marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in both the CEM T-cell line and in primary CD34+ derived monocytes. These results demonstrate that titration of Rev in the nucleolus impairs HIV-1 replication and supports a functional role for Rev trafficking in this sub-cellular compartment. PMID:16712721

  18. A novel human gene (SARM) at chromosome 17q11 encodes a protein with a SAM motif and structural similarity to Armadillo/beta-catenin that is conserved in mouse, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mink, M; Fogelgren, B; Olszewski, K; Maroy, P; Csiszar, K

    2001-06-01

    A novel human gene, SARM, encodes the orthologue of a Drosophila protein (CG7915) and contains a unique combination of the sterile alpha (SAM) and the HEAT/Armadillo motifs. The SARM gene was identified on chromosome 17q11, between markers D17S783 and D17S841 on BAC clone AC002094, which also included a HERV repeat and keratin-18-like, MAC30, TNFAIP1, HSPC017, and vitronectin genes in addition to three unknown genes. The mouse SARM gene was located on a mouse chromosome 11 BAC clone (AC002324). The SARM gene is 1.8 kb centromeric to the vitronectin gene, and the two genes share a promoter region that directs a high level of liver-specific expression of both the SARM and the vitronectin genes. In addition to the liver, the SARM gene was highly expressed in the kidney. A 0.4-kb antisense transcript was coordinately expressed with the SARM gene in the kidney and liver, while in the brain and malignant cell lines, it appeared independent of SARM gene transcription. The SARM gene encodes a protein of 690 amino acids. Based on amino acid sequence homology, we have identified a SAM motif within this derived protein. Structure modeling and protein folding recognition studies confirmed the presence of alpha-alpha right-handed superhelix-like folds consistent with the structure of the Armadillo and HEAT repeats of the beta-catenin and importin protein families. Both motifs are known to be involved in protein-protein interactions promoting the formation of diverse protein complexes. We have identified the same conserved SAM/Armadillo motif combination in the mouse, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans SARM proteins.

  19. Pharmacological inhibition of mannose-binding lectin ameliorates neurobehavioral dysfunction following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Daiana; Fumagalli, Stefano; Longhi, Luca; Orsini, Franca; Palmioli, Alessandro; Stravalaci, Matteo; Vegliante, Gloria; Zanier, Elisa R; Bernardi, Anna; Gobbi, Marco; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is present in the contusion area of traumatic brain-injured patients and in that of traumatic brain-injured mice, where mannose-binding lectin-C exceeds mannose-binding lectin-A. The reduced susceptibility to traumatic brain injury of mannose-binding lectin double knock-out mice (mannose-binding lectin(-/-)) when compared to wild type mice suggests that mannose-binding lectin may be a therapeutic target following traumatic brain injury. Here, we evaluated the effects of a multivalent glycomimetic mannose-binding lectin ligand, Polyman9, following traumatic brain injury in mice. In vitro surface plasmon resonance assay indicated that Polyman9 dose-dependently inhibits the binding to immobilized mannose residues of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C selectively over that of mannose-binding lectin-A. Male C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham/controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury and intravenous treatment with Polyman9/saline. Ex-vivo surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed that Polyman9 effectively reduces the binding of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C to immobilized mannose residues. In vivo studies up to four weeks post injury, showed that Polyman9 induces significant improvement in sensorimotor deficits (by neuroscore and beam walk), promotes neurogenesis (73% increase in doublecortin immunoreactivity), and astrogliosis (28% increase in glial fibrillary acid protein). Polyman9 administration in brain-injured mannose-binding lectin(-/-) mice had no effect on post-traumatic brain-injured functional deficits, suggestive of the specificity of its neuroprotective effects. The neurobehavioral efficacy of Polyman9 implicates mannose-binding lectin-C as a novel therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury.

  20. Inhibition of DNA Binding Proteins by Oligonucleotide-Directed Triple Helix Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Louis J.; Wold, Barbara; Dervan, Peter B.

    1989-08-01

    Oligonucleotides that bind to duplex DNA in a sequence-specific manner by triple helix formation offer an approach to the experimental manipulation of sequence-specific protein binding. Micromolar concentrations of pyrimidine oligodeoxyribonucleotides are shown to block recognition of double helical DNA by prokaryotic modifying enzymes and a eukaryotic transcription factor at a homopurine target site. Inhibition is sequence-specific. Oligonucleotides containing 5-methylcytosine provide substantially more efficient inhibition than oligonucleotides containing cytosine. The results have implications for gene-specific repression by oligonucleotides or their analogs.

  1. Inhibition of platelet (/sup 3/H)- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha/sub 1/ acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding site.

  2. TIMP-2 modulates cancer cell transcriptional profile and enhances E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex expression in A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bourboulia, Dimitra; Han, HuiYing; Isaac, Biju; Wei, Beiyang; Neckers, Len; Stetler-Stevenson, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) plays an essential role in regulating matrix remodeling, cell growth, differentiation, angiogenesis and apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. We have recently shown that TIMP-2-mediated inhibition of tumor growth is independent of matrix metalloproteinase-mediated mechanisms, and is a consequence of modulating both the tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. In the current study we aim to identify the molecular pathways associated with these effects. We analyzed the transcriptional profile of the human lung cancer cell line A549 upon overexpression of TIMP-2 and Ala+TIMP-2 (mutant that does not inhibit MMP activity), and we found changes in gene expression predominantly related to decreased tumor development and metastasis. Increased E-cadherin expression in response to both TIMP-2 and Ala+TIMP-2 expression was confirmed by real time quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting. A549 cells treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF) displayed loss of cobblestone morphology and cell-cell contact, while cells overexpressing TIMP-2 or Ala+TIMP-2 were resistant to EGF-induced morphological changes. Moreover, exogenous treatment with recombinant Ala+TIMP-2 blocked EGF induced down-regulation of E-cadherin. In vivo, immunohistochemistry of A549 xenografts expressing either TIMP-2 or Ala+TIMP-2 demonstrated increased E-cadherin protein levels. More importantly, transcriptional profile analysis of tumor tissue revealed critical pathways associated with effects on tumor-host interaction and inhibition of tumor growth. In conclusion, we show that TIMP-2 promotes an anti-tumoral transcriptional profile in vitro and in vivo, including upregulation of E-cadherin, in A549 lung cancer cells. PMID:23371049

  3. Regulation of cell cycle transcription factor Swi4 through auto-inhibition of DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Baetz, K; Andrews, B

    1999-10-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two transcription factors, SBF (SCB binding factor) and MBF (MCB binding factor), promote the induction of gene expression at the G(1)/S-phase transition of the mitotic cell cycle. Swi4 and Mbp1 are the DNA binding components of SBF and MBF, respectively. The Swi6 protein is a common subunit of both transcription factors and is presumed to play a regulatory role. SBF binding to its target sequences, the SCBs, is a highly regulated event and requires the association of Swi4 with Swi6 through their C-terminal domains. Swi4 binding to SCBs is restricted to the late M and G(1) phases, when Swi6 is localized to the nucleus. We show that in contrast to Swi6, Swi4 remains nuclear throughout the cell cycle. This finding suggests that the DNA binding domain of Swi4 is inaccessible in the full-length protein when not complexed with Swi6. To explore this hypothesis, we expressed Swi4 and Swi6 in insect cells by using the baculovirus system. We determined that partially purified Swi4 cannot bind SCBs in the absence of Swi6. However, Swi4 derivatives carrying point mutations or alterations in the extreme C terminus were able to bind DNA or activate transcription in the absence of Swi6, and the C terminus of Swi4 inhibited Swi4 derivatives from binding DNA in trans. Full-length Swi4 was determined to be monomeric in solution, suggesting an intramolecular mechanism for auto-inhibition of binding to DNA by Swi4. We detected a direct in vitro interaction between a C-terminal fragment of Swi4 and the N-terminal 197 amino acids of Swi4, which contain the DNA binding domain. Together, our data suggest that intramolecular interactions involving the C-terminal region of Swi4 physically prevent the DNA binding domain from binding SCBs. The interaction of the carboxy-terminal region of Swi4 with Swi6 alleviates this inhibition, allowing Swi4 to bind DNA.

  4. Phytochrome B inhibits binding of Phytochrome-Interacting Factors to their target promoters

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunae; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Junghyun; Nagatani, Akira; Lagarias, J. Clark; Choi, Giltsu

    2012-01-01

    Summary Phytochromes are red and far-red light receptors in plants that mediate critical responses to light throughout the life cycle. They achieve this in part by targeting negatively acting bHLH transcription factors called phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) for degradation within the nucleus. It is not known, however, if protein degradation is the primary mechanism by which phytochromes inhibit these repressors of photomorphogenesis. Here, we use ChIP analysis to show that phyB inhibits the regulatory activity of PIF1 and PIF3 by releasing them from their DNA targets. The N-terminal fragment of phyB (NG-GUS-NLS; NGB) also inhibits the binding of PIF3 to its target promoters. Unlike the full-length phyB, however, NGB does not promote PIF3 degradation, establishing the activity of NGB reflects its ability to inhibit PIFs’ binding to DNA. We further show that Pfr forms of both full-length phyB and NGB inhibit the DNA binding of PIF1 and PIF3 in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that phyB inhibition of PIF function involves two separate processes, sequestration and protein degradation. PMID:22849408

  5. Beta-catenin directs the transformation of testis Sertoli cells to ovarian granulosa-like cells by inducing Foxl2 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Zhang, Lianjun; Hu, Yuqiong; Chen, Min; Han, Feng; Qin, Yan; Chen, Min; Cui, Xiuhong; Duo, Shuguang; Tang, Fuchou; Gao, Fei

    2017-09-12

    Sertoli and granulosa cells are two major types of somatic cells in the male and female gonads,respectively. Previous studies have shown that Sertoli and granulosa cells are derived from common progenitor cells and that differentiation of these two cell types is regulated by sex differentiation genes. The signaling pathway including the adhesion and transcription factor Ctnnb1 (cadherin-associated protein, beta 1, also known as β-catenin) regulates differentiation of granulosa cells in the absence of the transcription factor Sry, and over-activation of β-catenin in the presence of Sry leads to granulosa prior to sex determination. Surprisingly, our previous study found that β-catenin over-activation in Sertoli cells after sex determination can also cause disruption of the testicular cord and aberrant testis development. However, the underlying molecular mechanism was unclear. In this study, we found that constitutive activation of Ctnnb1 in Sertoli cells led to ectopic expression of the granulosa cell-specific marker FOXL2 in testes. Co-staining experiments revealed that FOXL2-positive cells were derived from Sertoli cells, and Sertoli cells were transformed into granulosa-like cells after Ctnnb1 over-activation. Further studies demonstrated that CTNNB1 induced Foxl2 expression by directly binding to transcription factor Tcf/Lef binding sites in the FOXL2 promoter region. We also found that directly over-expression of Foxl2 indecreased the expression of Sertoli cell-specific genes in primary Sertoli cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that repression of β-catenin (CTNNB1) signaling is required for lineage maintenance of Sertoli cells. Our study provides a new mechanism for Sertoli cell lineage maintenance during gonad development. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. A Common Anesthetic Binding Site for Inhibition of Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bu, Weiming; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Yan; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying functionally relevant anesthetic binding sites in pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) is an important step toward understanding molecular mechanisms underlying anesthetic action. The anesthetic propofol is known to inhibit cation-conducting pLGICs, including a prokaryotic pLGIC ELIC, but the sites responsible for functional inhibition remain undetermined. Methods We photolabeled ELIC with a light-activated derivative of propofol (AziPm) and performed 19F NMR to support propofol binding to a transmembrane domain (TMD) intra-subunit pocket. To differentiate sites responsible for propofol inhibition from those that are functionally irrelevant, we made an ELIC-GABAAR chimera that replaced the ELIC TMD with the α1β3GABAAR TMD and compared functional responses of ELIC-GABAAR and ELIC to propofol modulations. Results Photolabeling showed multiple AziPm-binding sites in the extracellular domain (ECD), but only one site in the TMD with labeled residues M265 and F308 in the resting state of ELIC. Notably, this TMD site is an intra-subunit pocket that overlaps with binding sites for anesthetics, including propofol, found previously in other pLGICs. 19F NMR supported propofol binding to this TMD intra-subunit pocket only in the absence of agonist. Functional measurements of ELIC-GABAAR showed propofol potentiation of the agonist-elicited current instead of inhibition observed on ELIC. Conclusions The distinctly different responses of ELIC and ELIC-GABAAR to propofol support the functional relevance of propofol binding to the TMD. Combining the newly identified TMD intra-subunit pocket in ELIC with equivalent TMD anesthetic sites found previously in other cationic pLGICs, we propose this TMD pocket as a common site for anesthetic inhibition of pLGICs. PMID:26756520

  7. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling down-regulates N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III expression: the implications of two mutually exclusive pathways for regulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingsong; Akama, Ryota; Isaji, Tomoya; Lu, Yingying; Hashimoto, Hirokazu; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Du, Yuguang; Gu, Jianguo

    2011-02-11

    In previous studies, we reported that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III (GnT-III) activity and the enzyme product, bisected N-glycans, both were induced in cells cultured under dense conditions in an E-cadherin-dependent manner (Iijima, J., Zhao, Y., Isaji, T., Kameyama, A., Nakaya, S., Wang, X., Ihara, H., Cheng, X., Nakagawa, T., Miyoshi, E., Kondo, A., Narimatsu, H., Taniguchi, N., and Gu, J. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 13038-13046). Furthermore, we found that α-catenin, a component of the E-cadherin-catenin complex, was also required for this induction (Akama, R., Sato, Y., Kariya, Y., Isaji, T., Fukuda, T., Lu, L., Taniguchi, N., Ozawa, M., and Gu, J. (2008) Proteomics 8, 3221-3228). To further explore the molecular mechanism of this regulation, the roles of β-catenin, an essential molecule in both cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and canonical Wnt signaling, were investigated. Unexpectedly, shRNA knockdown of β-catenin resulted in a dramatic increase in GnT-III expression and its product, the bisected N-glycans, which was confirmed by RT-PCR and GnT-III activity and by E4-PHA lectin blot analysis. The induction of GnT-III expression increased bisecting GlcNAc residues on β1 integrin, which led to down-regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion and cell migration. Immunostaining showed that nuclear localization of β-catenin was greatly suppressed; intriguingly, the knockdown of β-catenin in the nuclei was more effective than that in cell-cell contacts in the knockdown cells, which was also confirmed by Western blot analysis. Stimulation of the Wnt signaling pathway by the addition of exogenous Wnt3a or BIO, a GSK-3β inhibitor, consistently and significantly inhibited GnT-III expression and its products. Conversely, the inhibition of β-catenin translocation into the nuclei increased GnT-III activation. Taken together, the results of the present study are the first to clearly demonstrate that GnT-III expression may be precisely regulated by the

  8. Glutamate racemase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits DNA gyrase by affecting its DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sugopa; Shah, Meera; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2006-01-01

    Glutamate racemase (MurI) catalyses the conversion of l-glutamate to d-glutamate, an important component of the bacterial cell wall. MurI from Escherichia coli inhibits DNA gyrase in presence of the peptidoglycan precursor. Amongst the two-glutamate racemases found in Bacillus subtilis, only one inhibits gyrase, in absence of the precursor. Mycobacterium tuberculosis has a single gene encoding glutamate racemase. Action of M.tuberculosis MurI on DNA gyrase activity has been examined and its mode of action elucidated. We demonstrate that mycobacterial MurI inhibits DNA gyrase activity, in addition to its precursor independent racemization function. The inhibition is not species-specific as E.coli gyrase is also inhibited but is enzyme-specific as topoisomerase I activity remains unaltered. The mechanism of inhibition is different from other well-known gyrase inhibitors. MurI binds to GyrA subunit of the enzyme leading to a decrease in DNA-binding of the holoenzyme. The sequestration of the gyrase by MurI results in inhibition of all reactions catalysed by DNA gyrase. MurI is thus not a typical potent inhibitor of DNA gyrase and instead its role could be in modulation of the gyrase activity. PMID:17020913

  9. Binding modes of decavanadate to myosin and inhibition of the actomyosin ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Tiago, Teresa; Martel, Paulo; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos; Aureliano, Manuel

    2007-04-01

    Decavanadate, a vanadate oligomer, is known to interact with myosin and to inhibit the ATPase activity, but the putative binding sites and the mechanism of inhibition are still to be clarified. We have previously proposed that the decavanadate (V(10)O(28)(6-)) inhibition of the actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity is non-competitive towards both actin and ATP. A likely explanation for these results is that V(10) binds to the so-called back-door at the end of the Pi-tube opposite to the nucleotide-binding site. In order to further investigate this possibility, we have carried out molecular docking simulations of the V(10) oligomer on three different structures of the myosin motor domain of Dictyostelium discoideum, representing distinct states of the ATPase cycle. The results indicate a clear preference of V(10) to bind at the back-door, but only on the "open" structures where there is access to the phosphate binding-loop. It is suggested that V(10) acts as a "back-door stop" blocking the closure of the 50-kDa cleft necessary to carry out ATP-gamma-phosphate hydrolysis. This provides a simple explanation to the non-competitive behavior of V(10) and spurs the use of the oligomer as a tool to elucidate myosin back-door conformational changes in the process of muscle contraction.

  10. Quercetin-3-rutinoside Inhibits Protein Disulfide Isomerase by Binding to Its b′x Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Gopal, Srila; Sharda, Anish; Passam, Freda; Bowley, Sheryl R.; Stopa, Jack; Xue, Guangpu; Yuan, Cai; Furie, Barbara C.; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Huang, Mingdong; Furie, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin-3-rutinoside inhibits thrombus formation in a mouse model by inhibiting extracellular protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme required for platelet thrombus formation and fibrin generation. Prior studies have identified PDI as a potential target for novel antithrombotic agents. Using a fluorescence enhancement-based assay and isothermal calorimetry, we show that quercetin-3-rutinoside directly binds to the b′ domain of PDI with a 1:1 stoichiometry. The binding of quercetin-3-rutinoside to PDI induces a more compact conformation and restricts the conformational flexibility of PDI, as revealed by small angle x-ray scattering. The binding sites of quercetin-3-rutinoside to PDI were determined by studying its interaction with isolated fragments of PDI. Quercetin-3-rutinoside binds to the b′x domain of PDI. The infusion of the b′x fragment of PDI rescued thrombus formation that was inhibited by quercetin-3-rutinoside in a mouse thrombosis model. This b′x fragment does not possess reductase activity and, in the absence of quercetin-3-rutinoside, does not affect thrombus formation in vivo. The isolated b′ domain of PDI has potential as an antidote to reverse the antithrombotic effect of quercetin-3-rutinoside by binding and neutralizing quercetin-3-rutinoside. PMID:26240139

  11. Quercetin-3-rutinoside Inhibits Protein Disulfide Isomerase by Binding to Its b'x Domain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Gopal, Srila; Sharda, Anish; Passam, Freda; Bowley, Sheryl R; Stopa, Jack; Xue, Guangpu; Yuan, Cai; Furie, Barbara C; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Huang, Mingdong; Furie, Bruce

    2015-09-25

    Quercetin-3-rutinoside inhibits thrombus formation in a mouse model by inhibiting extracellular protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an enzyme required for platelet thrombus formation and fibrin generation. Prior studies have identified PDI as a potential target for novel antithrombotic agents. Using a fluorescence enhancement-based assay and isothermal calorimetry, we show that quercetin-3-rutinoside directly binds to the b' domain of PDI with a 1:1 stoichiometry. The binding of quercetin-3-rutinoside to PDI induces a more compact conformation and restricts the conformational flexibility of PDI, as revealed by small angle x-ray scattering. The binding sites of quercetin-3-rutinoside to PDI were determined by studying its interaction with isolated fragments of PDI. Quercetin-3-rutinoside binds to the b'x domain of PDI. The infusion of the b'x fragment of PDI rescued thrombus formation that was inhibited by quercetin-3-rutinoside in a mouse thrombosis model. This b'x fragment does not possess reductase activity and, in the absence of quercetin-3-rutinoside, does not affect thrombus formation in vivo. The isolated b' domain of PDI has potential as an antidote to reverse the antithrombotic effect of quercetin-3-rutinoside by binding and neutralizing quercetin-3-rutinoside. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Glucose phosphorylated on carbon 6 suppresses lipopolysaccharide binding to lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and inhibits its bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuu; Yagi, Kiyohito

    2017-04-01

    Lipid A comprises the active region of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and its phosphate group is required for LPS activities. Additionally, it is essential for effects of inhibitors of LPS-induced coagulation activity in limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) tests. Lipid A has phosphorylated glucosamine residues, which are structurally similar to glucose 1-phosphate (G1P) and glucose 6-phosphate (G6P). This study focused on the antagonistic effects of glucose phosphates on the action of protein or non-protein inhibitors against LAL coagulation, LPS-LPS-binding protein (LBP) interaction, and LPS bioactivities. These effects of glucose phosphates were evaluated and compared with those of other charged sugars such as fructose 6-phosphate and glucuronic acid by LAL tests, ELISA-based LPS-LBP binding assay, cell-based assay, and using a mouse endotoxin shock model. G6P neutralized the interfering actions of drug substances and plasma proteins on LPS coagulation activity in LAL tests. Compared to other sugars, G6P more strongly inhibited LPS binding to LBP, leading to significant inhibition of LPS-induced cellular responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and in the THP-1 human leukemic line. Consistent herewith, G6P inhibited inflammatory cytokine release and decreased serum alanine aminotransferase and hepatic caspase-3/7 activities and mortality in LPS-stimulated d-galactosamine-sensitized mice. These data indicated that the structural properties of G6P, such as its glucose moiety and phosphorylation on carbon 6, are important for suppressing the interaction of proteins with LPS. Therefore, G6P is useful to improve sensitivity and accuracy of plasma and drug LPS assays, and such structural property is more suitable to antagonize LPS activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic chemotherapeutic stress promotes evolution of stemness and WNT/beta-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells: implications for clinical use of WNT-signaling inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ayadi, Meriam; Bouygues, Anaïs; Ouaret, Djamila; Ferrand, Nathalie; Chouaib, Salem; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Muchardt, Christian; Sabbah, Michèle; Larsen, Annette K

    2015-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain a subfraction of cells with stem/progenitor cell features. Stem cells are naturally chemoresistant suggesting that chronic chemotherapeutic stress may select for cells with increased “stemness”. We carried out a comprehensive molecular and functional analysis of six independently selected colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with acquired resistance to three different chemotherapeutic agents derived from two distinct parental cell lines. Chronic drug exposure resulted in complex alterations of stem cell markers that could be classified into three categories: 1) one cell line, HT-29/5-FU, showed increased “stemness” and WNT-signaling, 2) three cell lines showed decreased expression of stem cell markers, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, attenuated WNT-signaling and lost the capacity to form colonospheres and 3) two cell lines displayed prominent expression of ABC transporters with a heterogeneous response for stem cell markers. While WNT-signaling could be attenuated in the HT-29/5-FU cells by the WNT-signaling inhibitors ICG-001 and PKF-118, this was not accompanied by any selective growth inhibitory effect suggesting that the cytotoxic activity of these compounds is not directly linked to WNT-signaling inhibition. We conclude that classical WNT-signaling inhibitors have toxic off-target activities that need to be addressed for clinical development. PMID:26041882

  14. Lactoferrin inhibits enterovirus 71 infection by binding to VP1 protein and host cells.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tsui-Ying; Chen, Lien-Cheng; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Jen-Ren; Yu, Chun-Keung; Lei, Huan-Yao; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2005-07-01

    The antiviral activities of bovine lactoferrin (LF) against enterovirus 71 (EV71) were studied both in vitro and in vivo. LF protected both human rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell lines from EV71 infection when it was added at the same time, before, or within 30min after EV71 infection. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based binding assay and indirect fluorescent stain, we found that LF could bind to the target cells. Furthermore, it was found that LF could bind to the VP1 protein of EV71, which was blocked in the presence of anti-VP1 antibody. In addition, LF could induce IFN-alpha expression of SK-N-SH cells and inhibit EV71-induced IL-6 production. Finally, LF protected mice against lethal EV71 challenge. Taken together, these results suggest that LF can inhibit EV71 infection by interacting with both EV71 and host cells.

  15. Acetylene inhibition of Azotobacter vinelandii hydrogenase: Acetylene binds tightly to the large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Jinhua Sun; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1992-03-31

    Acetylene is a slow-binding inhibitor of the Ni- and Fe-containing dimeric hydrogenase isolated from Azotobacter vinelandii. Acetylene was released from hydrogenase during the recovery from inhibition. This indicates that no transformation of acetylene to another compound occurred as a result of the interaction with hydrogenase. However, the release of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} proceeds more rapidly than the recovery of activity, which indicates that release of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} is not sufficient for recovery of activity. Acetylene binds tightly to native hydrogenase; hydrogenase and radioactivity coelute from a gel permeation column following inhibition with {sup 14}C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. Acetylene, or a derivative, remains bound to the large 65,000 MW subunit (and not to the small 35,000 MW subunit) of hydrogenase following denaturation as evidence by SDS-PAGE and fluorography of {sup 14}C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-inhibited hydrogenase. This result suggests that C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, and by analogy H{sub 2}, binds to and is activated by the large subunit of this dimeric hydrogenase. Radioactivity is lost from {sup 14}C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-inhibited protein during recovery. The inhibition is remarkably specific for C{sub 2}H{sub 2}; propyne, butyne, and ethylene are not inhibitors.

  16. Tumor suppressor berberine binds VASP to inhibit cell migration in basal-like breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Kuang, Changchun; Xiang, Qingmin; Yang, Fang; Xiang, Jin; Zhu, Shan; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jingwei

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is a plant-derived compound used in traditional Chinese medicine, which has been shown to inhibit cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer. On the other hand, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) promotes actin filament elongation and cell migration. We previously showed that VASP is overexpressed in high-motility breast cancer cells. Here we investigated whether the anti-tumorigenic effects of berberine are mediated by binding VASP in basal-like breast cancer. Our results show that berberine suppresses proliferation and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells as well as tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 nude mouse xenografts. We also show that berberine binds to VASP, inducing changes in its secondary structure and inhibits actin polymerization. Our study reveals the mechanism underlying berberine's inhibition of cell proliferation and migration in basal-like breast cancer, highlighting the use of berberine as a potential adjuvant therapeutic agent. PMID:27322681

  17. FOXO1 Binds to the TAU5 Motif and Inhibits Constitutively Active Androgen Receptor Splice Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bohrer, Laura R.; Liu, Ping; Zhong, Jian; Pan, Yunqian; Angstman, James; Brand, Lucas J.; Dehm, Scott M.; Huang, Haojie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aberrant activation of the androgen receptor (AR) is a major factor highly relevant to castration-resistant progression of prostate cancer (PCa). FOXO1, a key downstream effector of PTEN, inhibits androgen-independent activation of the AR. However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. METHODS The inhibitory effect of FOXO1 on full-length and constitutively active splice variants of the AR was examined by luciferase reporter assays and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). In vitro protein binding assays and western blot analyses were used to determine the regions in FOXO1 and AR responsible for their interaction. RESULTS We found that a putative transcription repression domain in the NH2-terminus of FOXO1 is dispensable for FOXO1 inhibition of the AR. In vitro protein binding assays showed that FOXO1 binds to the transcription activation unit 5 (TAU5) motif in the AR NH2-terminal domain (NTD), a region required for recruitment of p160 activators including SRC-1. Ectopic expression of SRC-1 augmented transcriptional activity of some, but not all AR splice variants examined. Forced expression of FOXO1 blocked the effect of SRC-1 on AR variants’ transcriptional activity by decreasing the binding of SRC-1 to the AR NTD. Ectopic expression of FOXO1 inhibited expression of endogenous genes activated primarily by alternatively spliced AR variants in human castration-resistant PCa 22Rv1 cells. CONCLUSIONS FOXO1 binds to the TAU5 motif in the AR NTD and inhibits ligand-independent activation of AR splice variants, suggesting the PTEN/FOXO1 pathway as a potential therapeutic target for inhibition of aberrant AR activation and castration-resistant PCa growth. PMID:23389878

  18. Inhibition of androgen receptor binding by natural and synthetic steroids in cultured human genital skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Breiner, M; Romalo, G; Schweikert, H U

    1986-08-15

    The ability of various natural and synthetic steroids (some of which are widely used in clinical practice) to compete with dihydrotestosterone receptor binding in human genital skin fibroblasts was studied. Binding was assessed in fibroblast monolayers after incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C with 2 nM 3H-dihydrotestosterone in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of the steroid to be tested. Inhibition constants (Ki) were determined as the concentration of competitor-required for 50% inhibition of 3H-dihydrotestosterone binding. In addition, relative binding activity (RBA) of each test compound was calculated. Each competitor was tested in at least two different cell strains. The concentrations of unlabeled methyltrienolone (a synthetic nonmetabolizable androgen) and dihydrotestosterone for 50% inhibition of 3H-dihydrotestosterone binding were in the same order of magnitude, namely, 2 nM (2.2 respectively, 2.4 nM), whereas the affinity of testosterone was approximately one-fifth that of dihydrotestosterone. Other potent competitors for dihydrotestosterone binding were three progestins (norgestrel, gestoden, and medroxyprogesterone acetate) which have Ki values similar to testosterone. An order of magnitude lower Ki values (around 10(-7) M) were found for the androgen 17 alpha-propylmesterolone, the antiandrogen cyproterone acetate, and the progestin norethisterone acetate. Binding affinities of all other steroids to the androgen receptor were markedly lower and showed the following order of potency: estrogens (estradiol, ethinyl estradiol, diethylstilbestrol) greater than glucocorticoids as well as aromatase inhibitors and potassium canrenoate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Multivalent Binding Oligomers Inhibit HIV Tat-TAR Interaction Critical for Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deyun; Iera, Jaclyn; Baker, Heather; Hogan, Priscilla; Ptak, Roger; Yang, Lu; Hartman, Tracy; Buckheit, Robert W.; Desjardins, Alexandre; Yang, Ao; Legault, Pascale; Yedavalli, Venkat; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Appella, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development of a new type of scaffold to target RNA structures. Multivalent binding oligomers (MBOs) are molecules in which multiple sidechains extend from a polyamine backbone such that favorable RNA binding occurs. We have used this strategy to develop MBO-based inhibitors to prevent the association of a protein-RNA complex, Tat-TAR, that is essential for HIV replication. In vitro binding assays combined with model cell-based assays demonstrate that the optimal MBOs inhibit Tat-TAR binding at low micromolar concentrations. Antiviral studies are also consistent with the in vitro and cell-based assays. MBOs provide a framework for the development of future RNA-targeting molecules. PMID:19896372

  20. Multivalent binding oligomers inhibit HIV Tat-TAR interaction critical for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deyun; Iera, Jaclyn; Baker, Heather; Hogan, Priscilla; Ptak, Roger; Yang, Lu; Hartman, Tracy; Buckheit, Robert W; Desjardins, Alexandre; Yang, Ao; Legault, Pascale; Yedavalli, Venkat; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Appella, Daniel H

    2009-12-15

    We describe the development of a new type of scaffold to target RNA structures. Multivalent binding oligomers (MBOs) are molecules in which multiple sidechains extend from a polyamine backbone such that favorable RNA binding occurs. We have used this strategy to develop MBO-based inhibitors to prevent the association of a protein-RNA complex, Tat-TAR, that is essential for HIV replication. In vitro binding assays combined with model cell-based assays demonstrate that the optimal MBOs inhibit Tat-TAR binding at low micromolar concentrations. Antiviral studies are also consistent with the in vitro and cell-based assays. MBOs provide a framework for the development of future RNA-targeting molecules.

  1. Green tea catechins inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase by interaction with its ATP binding site.

    PubMed

    Gradisar, Helena; Pristovsek, Primoz; Plaper, Andreja; Jerala, Roman

    2007-01-25

    Catechins are the main ingredients of green tea extracts and have been shown to possess versatile biological activities, including antimicrobial. We determined that the catechins inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase by binding to the ATP binding site of the gyrase B subunit. In the group of four tested catechins, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) had the highest activity, followed by epicatechin gallate (ECG) and epigallocatechin (EGC). Specific binding to the N-terminal 24 kDa fragment of gyrase B was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy and confirmed using heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy of the EGCG-15N-labeled gyrase B fragment complex. Protein residues affected by binding to EGCG were identified through chemical shift perturbation. Molecular docking calculations suggest that the benzopyran ring of EGCG penetrates deeply into the active site while the galloyl moiety anchors it to the cleft through interactions with its hydroxyl groups, which explains the higher activity of EGCG and ECG.

  2. WZB117 (2-Fluoro-6-(m-hydroxybenzoyloxy) Phenyl m-Hydroxybenzoate) Inhibits GLUT1-mediated Sugar Transport by Binding Reversibly at the Exofacial Sugar Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Ojelabi, Ogooluwa A; Lloyd, Kenneth P; Simon, Andrew H; De Zutter, Julie K; Carruthers, Anthony

    2016-12-23

    WZB117 (2-fluoro-6-(m-hydroxybenzoyloxy) phenyl m-hydroxybenzoate) inhibits passive sugar transport in human erythrocytes and cancer cell lines and, by limiting glycolysis, inhibits tumor growth in mice. This study explores how WZB117 inhibits the erythrocyte sugar transporter glucose transport protein 1 (GLUT1) and examines the transporter isoform specificity of inhibition. WZB117 reversibly and competitively inhibits erythrocyte 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) uptake with Ki(app) = 6 μm but is a noncompetitive inhibitor of sugar exit. Cytochalasin B (CB) is a reversible, noncompetitive inhibitor of 3MG uptake with Ki(app) = 0.3 μm but is a competitive inhibitor of sugar exit indicating that WZB117 and CB bind at exofacial and endofacial sugar binding sites, respectively. WZB117 inhibition of GLUTs expressed in HEK293 cells follows the order of potency: insulin-regulated GLUT4 ≫ GLUT1 ≈ neuronal GLUT3. This may explain WZB117-induced murine lipodystrophy. Molecular docking suggests the following. 1) The WZB117 binding envelopes of exofacial GLUT1 and GLUT4 conformers differ significantly. 2) GLUT1 and GLUT4 exofacial conformers present multiple, adjacent glucose binding sites that overlap with WZB117 binding envelopes. 3) The GLUT1 exofacial conformer lacks a CB binding site. 4) The inward GLUT1 conformer presents overlapping endofacial WZB117, d-glucose, and CB binding envelopes. Interrogating the GLUT1 mechanism using WZB117 reveals that subsaturating WZB117 and CB stimulate erythrocyte 3MG uptake. Extracellular WZB117 does not affect CB binding to GLUT1, but intracellular WZB117 inhibits CB binding. These findings are incompatible with the alternating conformer carrier for glucose transport but are consistent with either a multisubunit, allosteric transporter, or a transporter in which each subunit presents multiple, interacting ligand binding sites. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Binding of dihydroxynaphthyl aryl ketones to tubulin colchicine site inhibits microtubule assembly.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Eunices; Benites, Julio; Valderrama, Jaime A; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Verrax, Julien; Nova, Esteban; Villanelo, Felipe; Maturana, Daniel; Escobar, Cristian; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2015-10-23

    Dihydroxynaphthyl aryl ketones 1-5 have been evaluated for their abilities to inhibit microtubule assembly and the binding to tubulin. Compounds 3, 4 and 5 displayed competitive inhibition against colchicine binding, and docking analysis showed that they bind to the tubulin colchicine-binding pocket inducing sheets instead of microtubules. Remarkable differences in biological activity observed among the assayed compounds seem to be related to the structure and position of the aryl substituent bonded to the carbonyl group. Compounds 2, 3 and 4, which contain a heterocyclic ring, presented higher affinity for tubulin compared to the carbocyclic analogue 5. Compound 4 showed the best affinity of the series, with an IC50 value of 2.1 μM for microtubule polymerization inhibition and a tubulin dissociation constant of 1.0 ± 0.2 μM, as determined by thermophoresis. Compound 4 was more efficacious in disrupting microtubule assembly in vitro than compound 5 although it contains the trimethoxyphenyl ring present in colchicine. Hydrogen bonds with Asn101 of α-tubulin seem to be responsible for the higher affinity of compound 4 respects to the others.

  4. Inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus movement by expression of an actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christina; Niehl, Annette; Sambade, Adrian; Steinmetz, André; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-04-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) required for the cell-to-cell spread of viral RNA interacts with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as with the cytoskeleton during infection. Whereas associations of MP with ER and microtubules have been intensely investigated, research on the role of actin has been rather scarce. We demonstrate that Nicotiana benthamiana plants transgenic for the actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin (AtFIM1) fused to green fluorescent protein (ABD2:GFP) exhibit a dynamic ABD2:GFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton and myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking. These plants also support the movement of TMV. In contrast, both myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking and TMV movement are dominantly inhibited when ABD2:GFP is expressed transiently. Inhibition is mediated through binding of ABD2:GFP to actin filaments, since TMV movement is restored upon disruption of the ABD2:GFP-labeled actin network with latrunculin B. Latrunculin B shows no significant effect on the spread of TMV infection in either wild-type plants or ABD2:GFP transgenic plants under our treatment conditions. We did not observe any binding of MP along the length of actin filaments. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that TMV movement does not require an intact actomyosin system. Nevertheless, actin-binding proteins appear to have the potential to exert control over TMV movement through the inhibition of myosin-associated protein trafficking along the ER membrane.

  5. Nitric oxide inhibits c-Jun DNA binding by specifically targeted S-glutathionylation.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Molina, E P; Lamas, S

    1999-05-28

    This study addresses potential molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of the transcription factor c-Jun by nitric oxide. We show that in the presence of the physiological sulfhydryl glutathione nitric oxide modifies the two cysteine residues contained in the DNA binding module of c-Jun in a selective and distinct way. Although nitric oxide induced the formation of an intermolecular disulfide bridge between cysteine residues in the leucine zipper site of c-Jun monomers, this same radical directed the covalent incorporation of stoichiometric amounts of glutathione to a single conserved cysteine residue in the DNA-binding site of the protein. We found that covalent dimerization of c-Jun apparently did not affect its DNA binding activity, whereas the formation of a mixed disulfide with glutathione correlated well with the inhibition of transcription factor binding to DNA. Furthermore, we provide experimental evidence that nitric oxide-induced S-glutathionylation and inhibition of c-Jun involves the formation of S-nitrosoglutathione. In conclusion, our results support the reversible formation of a mixed disulfide between glutathione and c-Jun as a potential mechanism by which nitrosative stress may be transduced into a functional response at the level of transcription.

  6. Inositol hexaphosphate hydrolysate competitively binds to AKT to inhibit the proliferation of colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Yang, Fuguo; Liu, Cuiping; Cui, Lianhua; Fu, Min; Song, Yang

    2017-09-07

    Phytate, myto-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6 hexaphosphate (IP6), is recognized as an anti-nutrition phytochemical for decades. Recently, numerous studies have indicated that IP6 and its hydrolysates could suppress colon oncogenesis. However, very little is known concerning the mechanism of IP6 hydrolysates in regulating colon oncogenesis. The aim of the present study was to identify the underlying relationship between IP6 hydrolysates and colon cancer. Three types of human colorectal cancer cells were utilized in the present study. The proliferation inhibition and migration assays were employed to reveal that IP6 hydrolysates inhibited the proliferation of SW620 cells. Real-time PCR, cell-based ELISA and the AKT inhibitor assay were utilized to reveal that 20 and 30% degree of hydrolysis hydrolysates of IP6 inhibited SW620 cell growth by inhibiting the activation of AKT protein. The docking simulation study revealed that IP4 and IP5 could inhibit the activation of AKT by binding to PIP3 receptor. Collectively, our results indicated that the IP6 hydrolysates inhibit SW620 cell proliferation; IP4 and IP5, the probable primary constituents of the 20-30% degree of hydrolysis hydrolysates of IP6, inhibited the proliferation of SW620 cells by competitively inhibiting the AKT protein.

  7. Inhibition of pulmonary fibrosis in mice by CXCL10 requires glycosaminoglycan binding and syndecan-4

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dianhua; Liang, Jiurong; Campanella, Gabriele S.; Guo, Rishu; Yu, Shuang; Xie, Ting; Liu, Ningshan; Jung, Yoosun; Homer, Robert; Meltzer, Eric B.; Li, Yuejuan; Tager, Andrew M.; Goetinck, Paul F.; Luster, Andrew D.; Noble, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, dysregulated response to injury culminating in compromised lung function due to excess extracellular matrix production. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-4 is important in mediating fibroblast-matrix interactions, but its role in pulmonary fibrosis has not been explored. To investigate this issue, we used intratracheal instillation of bleomycin as a model of acute lung injury and fibrosis. We found that bleomycin treatment increased syndecan-4 expression. Moreover, we observed a marked decrease in neutrophil recruitment and an increase in both myofibroblast recruitment and interstitial fibrosis in bleomycin-treated syndecan-4–null (Sdc4–/–) mice. Subsequently, we identified a direct interaction between CXCL10, an antifibrotic chemokine, and syndecan-4 that inhibited primary lung fibroblast migration during fibrosis; mutation of the heparin-binding domain, but not the CXCR3 domain, of CXCL10 diminished this effect. Similarly, migration of fibroblasts from patients with pulmonary fibrosis was inhibited in the presence of CXCL10 protein defective in CXCR3 binding. Furthermore, administration of recombinant CXCL10 protein inhibited fibrosis in WT mice, but not in Sdc4–/– mice. Collectively, these data suggest that the direct interaction of syndecan-4 and CXCL10 in the lung interstitial compartment serves to inhibit fibroblast recruitment and subsequent fibrosis. Thus, administration of CXCL10 protein defective in CXCR3 binding may represent a novel therapy for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:20484822

  8. Rat and human colonic mucins bind to and inhibit adherence lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K; Petri, W A; Innes, D J; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of adherence by Entamoeba histolytica is mediated by a 170-kD Gal/GalNAc inhibitable lectin and is required for cytolysis and phagocytosis of mammalian target cells. We studied the biochemical mechanisms of the in vitro interaction between rat and human colonic mucins and axenic E. histolytica trophozoites. Crude mucus prevented amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by up to 70%. Purification of the colonic mucins by Sepharose 4B chromatography, nuclease digestion, and cesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in a 1,000-fold enrichment of the inhibitory mucins. Purified rat mucin inhibited amebic adherence to and cytolysis of homologous rat colonic epithelial cells. Oxidation and enzymatic cleavage of rat mucin Gal and GalNAc residues completely abrogated mucin inhibition of amebic adherence. The binding of rat 125I-mucin to amebae was galactose specific, saturable, reversible, and pH dependent. A monoclonal antibody specific for the 170-kD amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin completely inhibited the binding of rat 125I-mucin. Rat mucin bound to Affigel affinity purified the amebic lectin from conditioned medium. Colonic mucin glycoproteins act as an important host defense by binding to the parasite's adherence lectin, thus preventing amebic attachment to and cytolysis of host epithelial cells. Images PMID:2890655

  9. Inhibition of NF-kappaB DNA binding by nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, J R; Botting, C H; Panico, M; Morris, H R; Hay, R T

    1996-01-01

    It has been suggested that the NF-kappaB transcription factor family may mediate expression of the gene encoding the cytokine-inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). To establish if nitric oxide (NO) could in turn affect activity of NF-kappaB, the ability of NO-donor compounds to influence NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in vitro was investigated. NO-donor compounds sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) both inhibited the DNA binding activity of recombinant NF-kappaB p50 and p65 homodimers and of p50-p65 heterodimers. Inhibition of NF-kappaB p50 DNA binding by NO-donor compounds involved modification of the conserved redox-sensitive C62 residue, as a C62S p50 mutant was significantly more resistant to SNP-mediated inactivation. Non-reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that SNP could inhibit p50 DNA binding by mechanisms other than the formation of intersubunit disulphide bonds involving p50 residue C62. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of a synthetic NF-kappaB p5O peptide containing the C62 residue suggested that NO gas can modify C62 by S-nitrosylation. This study indicates that NO-donors can directly inhibit the DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB family proteins, suggesting that cellular NO provides another control mechanism for modulating the expression of NF-kappaB-responsive genes. PMID:8710491

  10. Inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by ursolic acid. Evidence for a binding site for pentacyclic triterpenes.

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Q L; Rinehart, A R; Simon, S R; Cheronis, J C

    1991-01-01

    Several pentacyclic triterpenoid metabolites of plant origin are inhibitors of hydrolysis of both synthetic peptide substrates and elastin by human leucocyte elastase (HLE). Ursolic acid, the most potent of these compounds, has an inhibition constant of 4-6 microM for hydrolysis of peptide substrates in phosphate-buffered saline. With tripeptide and tetrapeptide substrates, the inhibition is purely competitive, whereas with a shorter dipeptide substrate the inhibition is non-competitive, suggesting that ursolic acid interacts with subsite S3 of the extended substrate-binding domain in HLE, but not with subsites S1 and S2. The carboxy group at position 28 in the pentacyclic-ring system of the triterpenes contributes to binding to HLE, since replacement of this group with a hydroxy group, as in uvaol, the alcohol analogue of ursolic acid, reduces the potency of inhibition. The inhibitory potency of ursolic acid is also reduced by addition of 1 M-NaCl, further supporting a postulated electrostatic interaction between the negative charge on the triterpene and a positively charged residue on the enzyme, which we assign to the side chain of Arg-217, located in the vicinity of subsites S4 and S5 in HLE. These observations are consistent with a binding site for ursolic acid which extends from S3 towards S4 and S5 on the enzyme. Other triterpenes, including oleanolic acid, erythrodiol, hederagenin and 18 beta-glycyrrhetic acid, can also interact with this binding site. On the basis of these results we conclude that the extended substrate-binding domain of HLE can accommodate a variety of hydrophobic ligands, including not only such molecules as fatty acids [Ashe & Zimmerman (1977) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 75, 194-199; Cook & Ternai (1988) Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler 369, 629-637], but also polycyclic molecules such as the pentacyclic triterpenoids. PMID:1859379

  11. Lucanthone and its derivative hycanthone inhibit apurinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) by direct protein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, M.; Naidu, M.; Agarwal, R.; Pena, L.A.; Cunha, L.; Mezei, M.; Shen, M.; Wilson, D.M.; Liu, Y.; Sanchez, Z.; Chaudhary, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Waring, M.J.

    2011-09-15

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC{sub 50} values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 {mu}M and 80 nM, respectively. The K{sub D} values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e

  12. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, A.; Cauhan, V.P.S.; Deshmukh, D.S.; Brokerhoff, H. )

    1989-06-13

    Calcium phospholipid dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diacylglycerol (DG) and by phorbol esters and is recognized to be the phorbol ester receptor of cells; DG displaces phorbol ester competitively from PKC. A phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), can also activate PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca{sup 2+} with a K{sub PIP{sub 2}} of 0.04 mol %. Preliminary experiments have suggested a common binding site for PIP{sub 2} and DG on PKC. Here, the authors investigate the effect of PIP{sub 2} on phorbol ester binding to PKC in a mixed micellar assay. In the presence of 20 mol % PS, PIP{sub 2} inhibited specific binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) in a dose-dependent fashion up to 85% at 1 mol %. Inhibition of binding was more pronounced with PIP{sub 2} than with DG. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding of PDBu in the presence of PIP{sub 2} is the result of an altered affinity for the phorbol ester rather than of a change in maximal binding. The plot of apparent dissociation constants (K{sub d{prime}}) against PIP{sub 2} concentration was linear over a range of 0.01-1 mol % with a K{sub i} of 0.043 mol % and confirmed the competitive nature of inhibition between PDBu and PIP{sub 2}. Competition between PIP{sub 2} and phorbol ester could be determined in a liposomal assay system also. These results indicate that PIP{sub 2}, DG, and phorbol ester all compete for the same activator-receiving region on the regulatory moiety of protein kinase C, and they lend support to the suggestion that PIP{sub 2} is a primary activator of the enzyme.

  13. Polycomb inhibits histone acetylation by CBP by binding directly to its catalytic domain

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Feng; Banerjee, Rakhee; Fu, Chen; Stratton, Carl A.; Fang, Ming; Harte, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila Polycomb (PC), a subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), is well known for its role in maintaining repression of the homeotic genes and many others and for its binding to trimethylated histone H3 on Lys 27 (H3K27me3) via its chromodomain. Here, we identify a novel activity of PC: inhibition of the histone acetylation activity of CREB-binding protein (CBP). We show that PC and its mammalian CBX orthologs interact directly with the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain of CBP, binding to the previously identified autoregulatory loop, whose autoacetylation greatly enhances HAT activity. We identify a conserved PC motif adjacent to the chromodomain required for CBP binding and show that PC binding inhibits acetylation of histone H3. CBP autoacetylation impairs PC binding in vitro, and PC is preferentially associated with unacetylated CBP in vivo. PC knockdown elevates the acetylated H3K27 (H3K27ac) level globally and at promoter regions of some genes that are bound by both PC and CBP. Conversely, PC overexpression decreases the H3K27ac level in vivo and also suppresses CBP-dependent Polycomb phenotypes caused by overexpression of Trithorax, an antagonist of Polycomb silencing. We find that PC is physically associated with the initiating form of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and that many promoters co-occupied by PC and CBP are associated with paused Pol II, suggesting that PC may play a role in Pol II pausing. These results suggest that PC/PRC1 inhibition of CBP HAT activity plays a role in regulating transcription of both repressed and active PC-regulated genes. PMID:26802126

  14. Methylene blue inhibits GABAA receptors by interaction with GABA binding site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenglan; Liu, Ran; Yang, Shao-Hua; Dillon, Glenn H; Huang, Renqi

    2017-06-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is commonly used in diagnostic procedures and is also used to treat various medical conditions. Neurological effects of MB have been reported in clinical observations and experimental studies. Thus the modulation of GABAA receptor function by MB was investigated. Whole-cell GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK293 cells expressing various GABAA receptor subunit configurations. MB inhibition of GABA currents was apparent at 3 μM, and it had an IC50 of 31 μM in human α1β2γ2 receptors. The MB action was rapid and reversible. MB inhibition was not mediated via the picrotoxin site, as a mutation (T6'F of the β2 subunit) known to confer resistance to picrotoxin had no effect on MB-induced inhibition. Blockade of GABAA receptors by MB was demonstrated across a range of receptors expressing varying subunits, including those expressed at extrasynaptic sites. The sensitivity of α1β2 receptors to MB was similar to that observed in α1β2γ2 receptors, indicating that MB's action via the benzodiazepine or Zn(2+) site is unlikely. MB-induced inhibition of GABA response was competitive with respect to GABA. Furthermore, mutation of α1 F64 to A and β2 Y205 to F in the extracellular N-terminus, both residues which are known to comprise GABA binding pocket, remarkably diminished MB inhibition of GABA currents. These data suggest that MB inhibits GABAA receptor function by direct or allosteric interaction with the GABA binding site. Finally, in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, MB inhibited GABA-activated currents as well as GABAergic IPSCs. We demonstrate that MB directly inhibits GABAA receptor function, which may underlie some of the effects of MB on the CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible.

  16. Anterior cingulate serotonin 1B receptor binding is associated with emotional response inhibition.

    PubMed

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Hjordt, Liv Vadskjær; Dam, Vibeke Høyrup; Stenbæk, Dea Siggaard; Sestoft, Dorte; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2017-09-01

    Serotonin has a well-established role in emotional processing and is a key neurotransmitter in impulsive aggression, presumably by facilitating response inhibition and regulating subcortical reactivity to aversive stimuli. In this study 44 men, of whom 19 were violent offenders and 25 were non-offender controls, completed an emotional Go/NoGo task requiring inhibition of prepotent motor responses to emotional facial expressions. We also measured cerebral serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) binding with [(11)C]AZ10419369 positron emission tomography within regions of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that 5-HT1BR would be positively associated with false alarms (failures to inhibit nogo responses) in the context of aversive (angry and fearful) facial expressions. Across groups, we found that frontal cortex 5-HT1BR binding was positively correlated with false alarms when angry faces were go stimuli and neutral faces were nogo stimuli (p = 0.05, corrected alpha = 0.0125), but not with false alarms for non-emotional stimuli (failures to inhibit geometric figures). A posthoc analysis revealed the strongest association in anterior cingulate cortex (p = 0.006). In summary, 5-HT1BRs in the anterior cingulate are involved in withholding a prepotent response in the context of angry faces. Our findings suggest that serotonin modulates response inhibition in the context of certain emotional stimuli. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  18. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  19. HIV-1 Vif binds to APOBEC3G mRNA and inhibits its translation.

    PubMed

    Mercenne, Gaëlle; Bernacchi, Serena; Richer, Delphine; Bec, Guillaume; Henriet, Simon; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells (including most natural HIV-1 targets) by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC-3G (hA3G) and hA3F. The Vif-induced degradation of these restriction factors by the proteasome has been extensively studied, but little is known about the translational repression of hA3G and hA3F by Vif, which has also been proposed to participate in Vif function. Here, we studied Vif binding to hA3G mRNA and its role in translational repression. Filter binding assays and fluorescence titration curves revealed that Vif tightly binds to hA3G mRNA. Vif overall binding affinity was higher for the 3'UTR than for the 5'UTR, even though this region contained at least one high affinity Vif binding site (apparent K(d) = 27 +/- 6 nM). Several Vif binding sites were identified in 5' and 3'UTRs using RNase footprinting. In vitro translation evidenced that Vif inhibited hA3G translation by two mechanisms: a main time-independent process requiring the 5'UTR and an additional time-dependent, UTR-independent process. Results using a Vif protein mutated in the multimerization domain suggested that the molecular mechanism of translational control is more complicated than a simple physical blockage of scanning ribosomes.

  20. Inhibition of brain [(3)H]cimetidine binding by improgan-like antinociceptive drugs.

    PubMed

    Stadel, Rebecca; Carpenter, Amanda B; Nalwalk, Julia W; de Esch, Iwan J P; Janssen, Elwin; Hough, Lindsay B

    2010-04-25

    [(3)H]cimetidine, a radiolabeled histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, binds with high affinity to an unknown hemoprotein in the brain which is not the histamine H(2) receptor. Improgan, a close chemical congener of cimetidine, is a highly effective pain-relieving drug following CNS administration, yet its mechanism of action remains unknown. To test the hypothesis that the [(3)H]cimetidine-binding site is the improgan antinociceptive target, improgan, cimetidine, and 8 other chemical congeners were studied as potential inhibitors of [(3)H]cimetidine binding in membrane fractions from the rat brain. All compounds produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of [(3)H]cimetidine binding over a 500-fold range of potencies (K(i) values were 14.5 to >8000nM). However, antinociceptive potencies in rats did not significantly correlate with [(3)H]cimetidine-binding affinities (r=0.018, p=0.97, n=10). These results suggest that the [(3)H]cimetidine-binding site is not the analgesic target for improgan-like drugs.

  1. Copper binding in IscA inhibits iron-sulfur cluster assembly in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Guoqiang; Cheng, Zishuo; Pang, Yilin; Landry, Aaron P.; Li, Jianghui; Lu, Jianxin; Ding, Huangen

    2014-01-01

    Among the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins encoded by gene cluster iscSUA-hscBA-fdx in Escherichia coli, IscA has a unique and strong iron binding activity and can provide iron for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in proteins in vitro. Deletion of IscA and its paralogue SufA results in an E. coli mutant that fails to assemble [4Fe-4S] clusters in proteins under aerobic conditions, suggesting that IscA has a crucial role for iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. Here we report that among the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins, IscA also has a strong and specific binding activity for Cu(I) in vivo and in vitro. The Cu(I) center in IscA is stable and resistant to oxidation under aerobic conditions. Mutation of the conserved cysteine residues that are essential for the iron binding in IscA abolishes the copper binding activity, indicating that copper and iron may share the same binding site in the protein. Additional studies reveal that copper can compete with iron for the metal binding site in IscA and effectively inhibits the IscA-mediated [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly in E. coli cells. The results suggest that copper may not only attack the [4Fe-4S] clusters in dehydratases, but also block the [4Fe-4S] cluster assembly in proteins by targeting IscA in cells. PMID:24946160

  2. HIV-1 Vif binds to APOBEC3G mRNA and inhibits its translation

    PubMed Central

    Mercenne, Gaëlle; Bernacchi, Serena; Richer, Delphine; Bec, Guillaume; Henriet, Simon; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells (including most natural HIV-1 targets) by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC-3G (hA3G) and hA3F. The Vif-induced degradation of these restriction factors by the proteasome has been extensively studied, but little is known about the translational repression of hA3G and hA3F by Vif, which has also been proposed to participate in Vif function. Here, we studied Vif binding to hA3G mRNA and its role in translational repression. Filter binding assays and fluorescence titration curves revealed that Vif tightly binds to hA3G mRNA. Vif overall binding affinity was higher for the 3′UTR than for the 5′UTR, even though this region contained at least one high affinity Vif binding site (apparent Kd = 27 ± 6 nM). Several Vif binding sites were identified in 5′ and 3′UTRs using RNase footprinting. In vitro translation evidenced that Vif inhibited hA3G translation by two mechanisms: a main time-independent process requiring the 5′UTR and an additional time-dependent, UTR-independent process. Results using a Vif protein mutated in the multimerization domain suggested that the molecular mechanism of translational control is more complicated than a simple physical blockage of scanning ribosomes. PMID:19910370

  3. Dicalcin Inhibits Fertilization through Its Binding to a Glycoprotein in the Egg Envelope in Xenopus laevis*

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Naofumi; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Shinmyo, Yukiko; Hiraoka, Yoshiki; Takamatsu, Ken; Kawamura, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Fertilization comprises oligosaccharide-mediated sperm-egg interactions, including sperm binding to an extracellular egg envelope, sperm penetration through the envelope, and fusion with an egg plasma membrane. We show that Xenopus dicalcin, an S100-like Ca2+-binding protein, present in the extracellular egg envelope (vitelline envelope (VE)), is a suppressive mediator of sperm-egg interaction. Preincubation with specific antibody greatly increased the efficiency of in vitro fertilization, whereas prior application of exogenous dicalcin substantially inhibited fertilization as well as sperm binding to an egg and in vitro sperm penetration through the VE protein layer. Dicalcin showed binding to protein cores of gp41 and gp37, constituents of VE, in a Ca2+-dependent manner and increased in vivo reactivity of VE with a lectin, Ricinus communis agglutinin I, which was accounted for by increased binding ability of gp41 to the lectin and greater exposure of gp41 to an external environment. Our findings strongly suggest that dicalcin regulates the distribution of oligosaccharides within the VE through its binding to the protein core of gp41, probably by modulating configuration of oligosaccharides on gp41 and the three-dimensional structure of VE framework, and thereby plays a pivotal role in sperm-egg interactions during fertilization. PMID:20299459

  4. Curcumin inhibits Zika and chikungunya virus infection by inhibiting cell binding.

    PubMed

    Mounce, Bryan C; Cesaro, Teresa; Carrau, Lucia; Vallet, Thomas; Vignuzzi, Marco

    2017-03-24

    Several compounds extracted from spices and herbs exhibit antiviral effects in vitro, suggesting potential pharmacological uses. Curcumin, a component of turmeric, has been used as a food additive and herbal supplement due to its potential medicinal properties. Previously, curcumin exhibited antiviral properties against several viruses, including dengue virus and hepatitis C virus, among others. Here, we describe the antiviral effect of curcumin on Zika and chikungunya viruses, two mosquito-borne outbreak viruses. Both viruses responded to treatment of cells with up to 5 μM curumin without impacting cellular viability. We observed that direct treatment of virus with curcumin reduced infectivity of virus in a dose- and time-dependent manner for these enveloped viruses, as well as vesicular stomatitis virus. In contrast, we found no change in infectivity for Coxsackievirus B3, a non-enveloped virus. Derivatives of curcumin also exhibited antiviral activity against enveloped viruses. Further examination revealed that curcumin interfered with the binding of the enveloped viruses to cells in a dose-dependent manner, though the integrity of the viral RNA was maintained. Together, these results expand the family of viruses sensitive to curcumin and provide a mechanism of action for curcumin's effect on these enveloped viruses.

  5. Beta Catenin in Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    to be injected with LNCaP prostate cancer cells and following approval from Loyola IACUC and ACURO, the xenograft studies were initiated. As...xenograft studies. 12. Obtained Loyola -IACUC and ACURO approval to utilize the C4-2 and C4-2B cells for in vivo studies. Reportable Outcomes: We had

  6. Beta Catenin in Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-03

    resistance (15). Studies by others have revealed that combinatorial treatment with TRAIL and ligands of PPAR  (Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor...prostate (LNCaP) and liver (Huh-7) cancer cells with a com bination of TRAIL and PPAR  ligand Troglitazone (TZD) reduced TR AIL resistance and sign...demonstrated that PPAR  activation via TZD can lead to a reduction of full length -catenin expression, which operates via a GS K3-independent non

  7. Beta Catenin in Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Cleaved PARP, however, was enriched in the nuclear/cytoskeletal compartment and was extracted in Sarkosyl and SDS fractions (lanes 15, 16). Caspase 3...retained strong interaction with E-Cadherin, as indicated by immunoprecipitation studies. Detergent fractionation of the cell extracts treated with the...LNCaP cells were treated with TRAIL and TZD alone or in combination for 16hrs and extracted sequentially as Fig 3: Effect of Caspase inhibitors

  8. Active and inhibited human catalase structures: ligand and NADPH binding and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Putnam, C D; Arvai, A S; Bourne, Y; Tainer, J A

    2000-02-11

    Human catalase is an heme-containing peroxisomal enzyme that breaks down hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen; it is implicated in ethanol metabolism, inflammation, apoptosis, aging and cancer. The 1. 5 A resolution human enzyme structure, both with and without bound NADPH, establishes the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold and assembly, implicates Tyr370 as the tyrosine radical, suggests the structural basis for redox-sensitive binding of cognate mRNA via the catalase NADPH binding site, and identifies an unexpectedly substantial number of water-mediated domain contacts. A molecular ruler mechanism based on observed water positions in the 25 A-long channel resolves problems for selecting hydrogen peroxide. Control of water-mediated hydrogen bonds by this ruler selects for the longer hydrogen peroxide and explains the paradoxical effects of mutations that increase active site access but lower catalytic rate. The heme active site is tuned without compromising peroxide binding through a Tyr-Arg-His-Asp charge relay, arginine residue to heme carboxylate group hydrogen bonding, and aromatic stacking. Structures of the non-specific cyanide and specific 3-amino-1,2, 4-triazole inhibitor complexes of human catalase identify their modes of inhibition and help reveal the catalytic mechanism of catalase. Taken together, these resting state and inhibited human catalase structures support specific, structure-based mechanisms for the catalase substrate recognition, reaction and inhibition and provide a molecular basis for understanding ethanol intoxication and the likely effects of human polymorphisms. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Engineering Cel7A carbohydrate binding module and linker for reduced lignin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-06-01

    Non-productive binding of cellulases to lignin inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass, increasing enzyme requirements and the cost of biofuels. This study used site-directed mutagenesis of the Trichoderma Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM) and linker to investigate the mechanisms of adsorption to lignin and engineer a cellulase with increased binding specificity for cellulose. CBM mutations that added hydrophobic or positively charged residues decreased the specificity for cellulose, while mutations that added negatively charged residues increased the specificity. Linker mutations that altered predicted glycosylation patterns selectively impacted lignin affinity. Beneficial mutations were combined to generate a mutant with 2.5-fold less lignin affinity while fully retaining cellulose affinity. This mutant was uninhibited by added lignin during hydrolysis of Avicel and generated 40% more glucose than the wild-type enzyme from dilute acid-pretreated Miscanthus. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1369-1374. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  11. Activin inhibits binding of transcription factor Pit-1 to the growth hormone promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Struthers, R S; Gaddy-Kurten, D; Vale, W W

    1992-01-01

    Activin A is a potent growth and differentiation factor related to transforming growth factor beta. In somatotrophs, activin suppresses the biosynthesis and secretion of growth hormone (GH) and cellular proliferation. We report here that, in MtTW15 somatotrophic tumor cells, activin decreased GH mRNA levels and inhibited expression of transfected GH promoter--chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion genes. Deletion mapping of nucleotide sequences mediating this inhibition led to the identification of a region that has previously been characterized as binding the pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1/GHF-1. Characterization of nuclear factor binding to this region demonstrated that binding of Pit-1 to the GH promoter is lost on activin treatment. These results indicate that activin-induced repression of GH biosynthesis is mediated by the loss of tissue-specific transcription factor binding to the GH promoter and suggest a possible general mechanism for other activin responses, whereby activin regulates the function of other POU- or homeodomain-containing transcription factors. Images PMID:1454833

  12. A Conjugate of Two tPA-Binding RNA Aptamers Efficiently Inhibits Fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Dupont, Daniel M; Andreasen, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Uncontrolled bleeding is a major cause of mortality. Lysine analogues are routinely used in the management of bleeding, but several studies indicate a risk of serious detrimental effects upon their administration. In this study, we report a bivalent conjugate "3218" of two RNA aptamers selected for binding to the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), the principal initiator of fibrinolysis in mammals. The constituent monomeric aptamers, K32v2 and K18v2, were previously demonstrated to weakly inhibit fibrinolysis. We now show that K32v2 and K18v2 recognize distinct binding sites, presumably in the A- and B-chain of tPA, respectively. Both aptamers bind tPA with low nanomolar affinity and inhibit tPA-mediated activities in a way that is consistent with the proposed localization of their binding sites. The 3218 conjugate possesses the inhibitory activities of both K32v2 and K18v2 and additionally exhibits increased inhibitory efficiency relative to the monomeric aptamers. The 3218 conjugate proved an efficient inhibitor of fibrinolysis and may find application in the management of bleeding as a substitute for, or in combination with, currently used lysine analogues.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, DNA-binding studies and acetylcholinesterase inhibition activity of new 3-formyl chromone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Mehtab; Malla, Ali Mohammed; Yaseen, Zahid; Ali, Akhtar; Alam, Mahboob

    2014-01-05

    A series of new substituted 3-formyl chromone derivatives (4-6) were synthesized by one step reaction methodology by knoevenagel condensation, structurally similar to known bisintercalators. The new compounds were characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, MS and analytical data. The in vitro DNA binding profile of compounds (4-6) was carried out by absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. It was found that synthesized compounds, especially compound 6 (evident from binding constant value) bind strongly with calf thymus DNA, presumably via an intercalation mode. Additionally, molecular docking studies of compounds (4-6) were carried out with B-DNA (PDBID: 1BNA) which revealed that partial intercalative mode of mechanism is operational in synthesized compounds (4-6) with CT-DNA. The binding constants evaluated from fluorescence spectroscopy of compounds with CT-DNA follows the order compound 6>compound 5>compound 4. All the compounds (4-6) were screened for acetylcholinesterase inhibition assay. It can be inferred from data, that compound (6) showed potent AChE inhibition having IC50=0.27μM, almost in vicinity to reference drug Tacrine (IC50=0.19μM). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Id Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins Antagonize Pax Transcription Factor Activity by Inhibiting DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, E. Claire; Deed, Richard W.; Inoue, Toshiaki; Norton, John D.; Sharrocks, Andrew D.

    2001-01-01

    The Id subfamily of helix-loop-helix (HLH) proteins plays a fundamental role in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation. The major mechanism by which Id proteins are thought to inhibit differentiation is through interaction with other HLH proteins and inhibition of their DNA-binding activity. However, Id proteins have also been shown to interact with other proteins involved in regulating cellular proliferation and differentiation, suggesting a more widespread regulatory function. In this study we demonstrate functional interactions between Id proteins and members of the Pax-2/-5/-8 subfamily of paired-domain transcription factors. Members of the Pax transcription factor family have key functions in regulating several developmental processes exemplified by B lymphopoiesis, in which Pax-5 plays an essential role. Id proteins bind to Pax proteins in vitro and in vivo. Binding occurs through the paired DNA-binding domain of the Pax proteins and results in the disruption of DNA-bound complexes containing Pax-2, Pax-5, and Pax-8. In vivo, Id proteins modulate the transcriptional activity mediated by Pax-5 complexes on the B-cell-specific mb-1 promoter. Our results therefore demonstrate a novel facet of Id function in regulating cellular differentiation by functionally antagonizing the action of members of the Pax transcription factor family. PMID:11134340

  15. Auto-Inhibition and Partner Proteins, Core-Binding Factor β (CBFβ) and Ets-1, Modulate DNA Binding by CBFα2 (AML1)

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ting-Lei; Goetz, Tamara L.; Graves, Barbara J.; Speck, Nancy A.

    2000-01-01

    Core-binding factor α2 (CBFα2; otherwise known as AML1 or PEBP2αB) is a DNA-binding subunit in the family of core-binding factors (CBFs), heterodimeric transcription factors that play pivotal roles in multiple developmental processes in mammals, including hematopoiesis and bone development. The Runt domain in CBFα2 (amino acids 51 to 178) mediates DNA binding and heterodimerization with the non-DNA-binding CBFβ subunit. Both the CBFβ subunit and the DNA-binding protein Ets-1 stimulate DNA binding by the CBFα2 protein. Here we quantify and compare the extent of cooperativity between CBFα2, CBFβ, and Ets-1. We also identify auto-inhibitory sequences within CBFα2 and sequences that modulate its interactions with CBFβ and Ets-1. We show that sequences in the CBFα2 Runt domain and sequences C terminal to amino acid 214 inhibit DNA binding. Sequences C terminal to amino acid 214 also inhibit heterodimerization with the non-DNA-binding CBFβ subunit, particularly heterodimerization off DNA. CBFβ rescinds the intramolecular inhibition of CBFα2, stimulating DNA binding approximately 40-fold. In comparison, Ets-1 stimulates CBFα2 DNA binding 7- to 10-fold. Although the Runt domain alone is sufficient for heterodimerization with CBFβ, sequences N terminal to amino acid 41 and between amino acids 190 and 214 are required for cooperative DNA binding with Ets-1. Cooperative DNA binding with Ets-1 is less pronounced with the CBFα2-CBFβ heterodimer than with CBFα2 alone. These analyses demonstrate that CBFα2 is subject to both negative regulation by intramolecular interactions, and positive regulation by two alternative partnerships. PMID:10594012

  16. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  17. Inhibition of LtxA toxicity by blocking cholesterol binding with peptides.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Koufos, E; Balashova, N V; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of (334) LEEYSKR(340), in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC(336) motif of LtxA (CRAC(336WT)). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of repeats-in-toxin-producing organisms.

  18. Inhibition of LtxA Toxicity by Blocking Cholesterol Binding With Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Koufos, Evan; Balashova, Nataliya; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of 334LEEYSKR340, in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC336 motif of LtxA (CRAC336WT). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of RTX-producing organisms. PMID:26352738

  19. Katanin Severing and Binding Microtubules Are Inhibited by Tubulin Carboxy Tails

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Megan E.; Sackett, Dan L.; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule dynamics in cells are regulated by associated proteins that can be either stabilizers or destabilizers. A class of destabilizers that is important in a large number of cellular activities is the microtubule-severing enzymes, yet little is known about how they function. Katanin p60 was the first ATPase associated with microtubule severing. Here, we investigate the activity of katanin severing using a GFP-labeled human version. We quantify the effect of katanin concentration on katanin binding and severing activity. We find that free tubulin can inhibit severing activity by interfering with katanin binding to microtubules. The inhibition is mediated by the sequence of the tubulin and specifically depends on the carboxy-terminal tails. We directly investigate the inhibition effect of tubulin carboxy-terminal tails using peptide sequences of α-, β-, or detyrosinated α-tubulin tails that have been covalently linked to bovine serum albumin. Our results show that β-tubulin tails are the most effective at inhibiting severing, and that detyrosinated α-tubulin tails are the least effective. These results are distinct from those for other severing enzymes and suggest a scheme for regulation of katanin activity in cells dependent on free tubulin concentration and the modification state of the tubulin. PMID:26682813

  20. Binding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebsamen, Werner

    1981-01-01

    Categorizes contemporary methods of binding printed materials in terms of physical preservation--hand binding (archival restoration), edition binding (paperback, hardcover), publication binding (magazines), textbook binding (sidesewn), single-sheet binding (loose-leaf, mechanical), and library binding (oversewn, sidesewn). Seven references are…

  1. 3-Hydroxypyridin-2-thione as novel zinc binding group for selective histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vishal; Sodji, Quaovi H; Kornacki, James R; Mrksich, Milan; Oyelere, Adegboyega K

    2013-05-09

    Small molecules bearing hydroxamic acid as the zinc binding group (ZBG) have been the most effective histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) to date. However, concerns about the pharmacokinetic liabilities of the hydroxamic acid moiety have stimulated research efforts aimed at finding alternative nonhydroxamate ZBGs. We have identified 3-hydroxypyridin-2-thione (3-HPT) as a novel ZBG that is compatible with HDAC inhibition. 3-HPT inhibits HDAC 6 and HDAC 8 with an IC50 of 681 and 3675 nM, respectively. Remarkably, 3-HPT gives no inhibition of HDAC 1. Subsequent optimization led to several novel 3HPT-based HDACi that are selective for HDAC 6 and HDAC 8. Furthermore, a subset of these inhibitors induces apoptosis in various cancer cell lines.

  2. 3-Hydroxypyridin-2-thione as Novel Zinc Binding Group for Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vishal; Sodji, Quaovi H.; Kornacki, James R.; Mrksich, Milan; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2013-01-01

    Small molecules bearing hydroxamic acid as the zinc binding group (ZBG) have been the most effective histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) to date. However, concerns about the pharmacokinetic liabilities of the hydroxamic acid moiety have stimulated research efforts aimed at finding alternative non-hydroxamate ZBGs. We have identified 3-hydroxypyridin-2-thione (3-HPT) as a novel ZBG that is compatible with HDAC inhibition. 3-HPT inhibits HDAC 6 and HDAC 8 with an IC50 of 681 nM and 3675 nM respectively. Remarkably, 3-HPT gives no inhibition of HDAC 1. Subsequent optimization led to several novel 3HPT-based HDACi that are selective for HDAC 6 and HDAC 8. Furthermore, a subset of these inhibitors induces apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. PMID:23547652

  3. Isocitrate lyase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is inhibited by quercetin through binding at N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Harish; Kumar, Vikash; Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Khan, Shaheb Raj; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Krishnan, Manju Yasoda; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Combating tuberculosis requires new therapeutic strategies that not only target the actively dividing bacilli but also the dormant bacilli during persistent infection. Isocitrate lyase (ICL) is a key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, crucial for the survival of bacteria in macrophages and mice. MtbICL is considered as one of the potential and attractive drug targets against persistent infection. We report the inhibition of MtbICL by quercetin with IC50 of 3.57 μM. In addition, quercetin strongly inhibited the growth of Mtb H37Rv utilizing acetate, rather than glucose as the sole carbon source, suggesting the inhibition of glyoxylate shunt. Quercetin binds at the N-terminus of MtbICL (Kd - 6.68 μM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A Small Molecule Inhibits Akt through Direct Binding to Akt and Preventing Akt Membrane Translocation*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghwa; Sun, Mei; He, Lili; Zhou, Qing-Hua; Chen, Jun; Sun, Xia-Meng; Bepler, Gerold; Sebti, Said M.; Cheng, Jin Q.

    2010-01-01

    The Akt pathway is frequently hyperactivated in human cancer and functions as a cardinal nodal point for transducing extracellular and intracellular oncogenic signals and, thus, presents an exciting target for molecular therapeutics. Here we report the identification of a small molecule Akt/protein kinase B inhibitor, API-1. Although API-1 is neither an ATP competitor nor substrate mimetic, it binds to pleckstrin homology domain of Akt and blocks Akt membrane translocation. Furthermore, API-1 treatment of cancer cells results in inhibition of the kinase activities and phosphorylation levels of the three members of the Akt family. In contrast, API-1 had no effects on the activities of the upstream Akt activators, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase-1, and mTORC2. Notably, the kinase activity and phosphorylation (e.g. Thr(P)308 and Ser(P)473) levels of constitutively active Akt, including a naturally occurring mutant AKT1-E17K, were inhibited by API-1. API-1 is selective for Akt and does not inhibit the activation of protein kinase C, serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase, protein kinase A, STAT3, ERK1/2, or JNK. The inhibition of Akt by API-1 resulted in induction of cell growth arrest and apoptosis selectively in human cancer cells that harbor constitutively activated Akt. Furthermore, API-1 inhibited tumor growth in nude mice of human cancer cells in which Akt is elevated but not of those cancer cells in which it is not. These data indicate that API-1 directly inhibits Akt through binding to the Akt pleckstrin homology domain and blocking Akt membrane translocation and that API-1 has anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo and could be a potential anti-cancer agent for patients whose tumors express hyperactivated Akt. PMID:20068047

  5. Vitamin B12 Inhibits Tau Fibrillization via Binding to Cysteine Residues of Tau.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Saharnaz; Asadollahi, Kazem; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Ahmadian, Shahin; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2017-09-06

    Two mechanisms underlie the inhibitory/acceleratory action of chemical compounds on tau aggregation including the regulation of cellular kinases and phosphatases activity and direct binding to tau protein. Vitamin B12 is one of the tau polymerization inhibitors, and its deficiency is linked to inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequently hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein. Regarding the structure and function of vitamin B12 and tau protein, we assumed that vitamin B12 is also able to directly bind to tau protein. Hence, we investigated the interaction of vitamin B12 with tau protein in vitro using fluorometry and circular dichrosim. Interaction studies was followed by investigation into the effect of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation using ThT fluorescence, circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy, and SDS-PAGE. The results indicated that vitamin B12 interacts with tau protein and prevents fibrillization of tau protein. Blocking the cysteine residues of tau confirmed the cysteine-mediated binding of vitamin B12 to tau and showed that binding to cysteine is essential for inhibitory effect of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that vitamin B12 inhibits tau aggregation and that tau oligomers formed in the presence of vitamin B12 are mostly SDS-soluble. We propose that direct binding of vitamin B12 is another mechanism underlying the inhibitory role of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation and neurodegeneration.

  6. Voltage-induced inhibition of antigen-antibody binding at conducting optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Liron, Zvi; Tender, Leonard M; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2002-06-01

    Optical waveguides coated with electrically conducting indium-tin oxide (ITO) are demonstrated here as a new class of substrate for fluorescent immunosensors. These waveguides combine electrochemical control with evanescent excitation and image-based detection. Presented here are preliminary results utilizing these waveguides that demonstrate influence of waveguide voltage on antigen binding. Specifically, waveguide surfaces were bisected into electrically addressable halves, anti-ovalbumin immobilized in patterns on their surfaces, and a 1.3 V bias applied between waveguide halves in the presence of Cy5-labeled ovalbumin in 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 150 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween-20. Fluorescence imaging indicated that binding of the antigen to positively biased waveguide halves was inhibited nearly 10-fold compared with negatively biased waveguide halves and unbiased controls. Furthermore, it is shown that ovalbumin binding to positively biased waveguide regions is regenerated after removal of applied voltage. These results suggest that electrochemical control of immunosensor substrates can be used as a possible strategy toward minimizing cross-reactive binding and/or nonspecific adsorption, immunosensor regeneration, and controlled binding.

  7. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori urease activity in vivo by the synthetic nickel binding protein Hpn.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Kerstin A; Fischer, André; Göbel, Ulf B; Henklein, Peter; Heimesaat, Markus M; Bereswill, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the most common cause of gastroduodenal ulcerations worldwide. Adaptation of H. pylori to the acidic environment is mediated by urease splitting urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia. Whereas neutralization of acid by ammonia is essential for gastric H. pylori colonization, the catalytic activity of urease is mediated by nickel ions. Therefore, nickel uptake and metabolism play key roles in H. pylori infection and urease is considered first line target for drug development and vaccination. Since nickel binding within H. pylori cells is mediated by the Histidine-rich protein designated Hpn, we investigated whether nickel binding by a synthetic Hpn is capable of abrogating urease activity of live H. pylori in liquid cultures. Supplementation of growth media with synthetic Hpn completely inhibited urease acitivity in live cells, indicating that H. pylori nickel uptake is effectively blocked by Hpn. Thus, nickel chelation by Hpn is stronger than nickel uptake of H. pylori offering therapeutic use of Hpn. Although the nickel binding of Hpn was confirmed by binding assays in vitro, its use in anti-H. pylori directed strategy will further need to be adapted to the gastric environment given that protons interfere with nickel binding and Hpn is degraded by pepsin.

  8. Thiol-modifying phenylarsine oxide inhibits guanine nucleotide binding of Rho but not of Rac GTPases.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Ralf; John, Harald; Aktories, Klaus; Just, Ingo

    2003-06-01

    Phenylarsine oxide (PAO) is a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor that cross-links vicinal thiol groups, thereby inactivating phosphatases possessing XCysXXCysX motifs. The RhoA-GTPase, but not the Rac1-GTPase, also possesses vicinal cysteines within the guanine nucleotide-binding region (aa 13-20) and the phosphohydrolase activity site. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with PAO showed a dose-dependent reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, indicating involvement of Rho GTPases. As tested by pull-down experiments, RhoA, but not Rac1, from cell lysates was inactivated by PAO in a concentration-dependent manner. Modification of RhoA by PAO resulted in altered mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and PAO-modified RhoA was no longer substrate for C3-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Furthermore, RhoA treated with PAO, but not Rac1 treated with PAO, lost its property to bind to guanine nucleotides. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass analysis of PAO-modified RhoA showed a mass shift according to an adduction of a single PAO molecule per molecule RhoA. Further analysis of Glu-C-generated RhoA peptides confirmed binding of PAO to a peptide harboring the guanine nucleotide binding region. Thus, PAO does not exclusively inhibit phosphotyrosine phosphatases but also inactivates RhoA by alteration of nucleotide binding.

  9. Identification of an allosteric binding site for RORγt inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Scheepstra, Marcel; Leysen, Seppe; van Almen, Geert C.; Miller, J. Richard; Piesvaux, Jennifer; Kutilek, Victoria; van Eenennaam, Hans; Zhang, Hongjun; Barr, Kenneth; Nagpal, Sunil; Soisson, Stephen M.; Kornienko, Maria; Wiley, Kristen; Elsen, Nathaniel; Sharma, Sujata; Correll, Craig C.; Trotter, B. Wesley; van der Stelt, Mario; Oubrie, Arthur; Ottmann, Christian; Parthasarathy, Gopal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    RORγt is critical for the differentiation and proliferation of Th17 cells associated with several chronic autoimmune diseases. We report the discovery of a novel allosteric binding site on the nuclear receptor RORγt. Co-crystallization of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RORγt with a series of small-molecule antagonists demonstrates occupancy of a previously unreported allosteric binding pocket. Binding at this non-canonical site induces an unprecedented conformational reorientation of helix 12 in the RORγt LBD, which blocks cofactor binding. The functional consequence of this allosteric ligand-mediated conformation is inhibition of function as evidenced by both biochemical and cellular studies. RORγt function is thus antagonized in a manner molecularly distinct from that of previously described orthosteric RORγt ligands. This brings forward an approach to target RORγt for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of an unprecedented modality of pharmacological antagonism establishes a mechanism for modulation of nuclear receptors. PMID:26640126

  10. Stepwise binding of nickel to horseradish peroxidase and inhibition of the enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Keyhani, Jacqueline; Keyhani, Ezzatollah; Zarchipour, Sekineh; Tayefi-Nasrabadi, Hossein; Einollahi, Nahid

    2005-04-15

    The incubation of horseradish peroxidase C (HRPC) with millimolar concentrations of nickel, at room temperature and at pH 4.0, induced the progressive formation of a metal-enzyme complex characterized by alterations of the enzyme Soret absorption band that were time- as well as nickel concentration- dependent. For any given incubation period between 1 and 60 min, 2 values for the apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) were found, suggesting the presence of binding sites with different affinities for nickel. The value of each K(d) dropped as the incubation time increased, indicating a progressive stabilization of the metal-enzyme complex. Hill plots suggested a cooperative binding of up to four Ni2+ ions per molecule of HRPC. The inhibition of the enzymatic activity by nickel was studied by following the H2O2-mediated oxidation of o-dianisidine by HRPC under steady-state kinetic conditions. Ni2+ was found to be either a noncompetitive or a mixed inhibitor of HRPC depending both on the duration of preincubation with the enzyme and on Ni2+ concentration. The enzyme remained active only over a limited metal concentration range and data indicated that binding of one Ni2+ affected the substrate binding site, binding of a second Ni2+ affected both substrate and peroxide binding sites, and binding of more than 2 Ni2+ per HRPC molecule led to complete loss of enzymatic activity. Results pointed to the damaging effects of prolonged exposure to heavy metals and also to the existence of a critical metal concentration beyond which immediate abolishing of enzymatic activity was observed.

  11. Triazoles inhibit cholesterol export from lysosomes by binding to NPC1.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Michael N; Lu, Feiran; Li, Xiaochun; Das, Akash; Liang, Qiren; De Brabander, Jef K; Brown, Michael S; Goldstein, Joseph L

    2017-01-03

    Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a membrane protein of lysosomes, is required for the export of cholesterol derived from receptor-mediated endocytosis of LDL. Lysosomal cholesterol export is reportedly inhibited by itraconazole, a triazole that is used as an antifungal drug [Xu et al. (2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:4764-4769]. Here we show that posaconazole, another triazole, also blocks cholesterol export from lysosomes. We prepared P-X, a photoactivatable cross-linking derivative of posaconazole. P-X cross-linked to NPC1 when added to intact cells. Cross-linking was inhibited by itraconazole but not by ketoconazole, an imidazole that does not block cholesterol export. Cross-linking of P-X was also blocked by U18666A, a compound that has been shown to bind to NPC1 and inhibit cholesterol export. P-X also cross-linked to purified NPC1 that was incorporated into lipid bilayer nanodiscs. In this in vitro system, cross-linking of P-X was inhibited by itraconazole, but not by U18666A. P-X cross-linking was not prevented by deletion of the N-terminal domain of NPC1, which contains the initial binding site for cholesterol. In contrast, P-X cross-linking was reduced when NPC1 contained a point mutation (P691S) in its putative sterol-sensing domain. We hypothesize that the sterol-sensing domain has a binding site that can accommodate structurally different ligands.

  12. Muscle palmitate uptake and binding are saturable and inhibited by antibodies to FABP(PM).

    PubMed

    Turcotte, L P; Swenberger, J R; Tucker, M Z; Yee, A J; Trump, G; Luiken, J J; Bonen, A

    2000-07-01

    Studies show that uptake of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) across the plasma membranes (PM) may occur partly via a carrier-mediated process and that the plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (FABP(PM)) may be a component of this system. To test the hypothesis that FABP(PM) is involved in transsarcolemmal transport of LCFA in muscle, we measured palmitate uptake in giant sarcolemmal vesicles and palmitate binding to PM proteins in rat muscles, (1) in the presence of increasing amounts of unbound palmitate and (2) in the absence or presence of antibody to FABP(PM). Both palmitate uptake and binding were found to be saturable functions of the unbound palmitate concentration with calculated Vmax values of 10.5 +/- 1.2 pmol/mg protein/15 sec and 45.6 +/- 2.9 nmol/mg protein/15 min and Km values of 12.8 +/- 3.8 and 18.4 +/- 1.8 nmol/L, respectively. The Vmax values for both palmitate uptake and binding were significantly decreased by 75-79% in the presence of a polyclonal antibody to the rat hepatic FABP(PM). Antibody inhibition was found to be dose-dependent and specific to LCFA. Glucose uptake was not affected by the presence of the antibody to FABP(PM). Palmitate uptake and binding were also inhibited in the presence of trypsin and phloretin. These results support the hypothesis that transsarcolemmal LCFA transport occurs in part by a carrier-mediated process and that FABP(PM) is a component of this process in muscle.

  13. Hepatocyte insulin receptor is a calmodulin binding protein and is functionally inhibited by calmidazolium

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, T.P.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Insulin-induced autophosphorylation of the insulin receptor and changes in intracellular Ca/sup + +/ have been proposed as possible mediators of insulin action in target tissues. The authors have investigated the association of the 17kD calcium binding protein calmodulin with the insulin receptor solubilized from rat liver plasma membranes. Insulin receptors solubilized in 0.1% Triton X-100 exhibited strong binding to calmodulin-agarose affinity columns in the presence of 100..mu..M calcium and could be eluded with 100..mu..M ethelene glycol-bis (amino ethel ether) Tetra Acetic Acid (EGTA) with an 80% yield in insulin binding activity. In addition, /sup 125/I-Calmodulin was shown to bind to wheat germ agglutinin purified solubilized receptors, was specifically inhibited by EGTA (100 ..mu..M) and/or calmidazolium (10 ..mu..M) and was found to be insulin-dependent (max 10/sup -10/ M insulin). SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis data suggests that /sup 125/I-calmodulin may be associated with the 92 kD beta-subunit of the insulin receptor, consistent with the cytoplasmic domain of this subunit. While they have confirmed previous reports that the addition of calcium and calmodulin to solubilized insulin receptors preparations produces no demonstrable change in receptor phosphorylation, the addition of the calmodulin inhibitor calmidazolium did show more than 50% inhibition of insulin stimulated receptor phosphorylation, suggesting that a domain of the calmodulin molecule may be very tightly associated with the insulin receptor. These results indicate that calmodulin binds tightly and specifically to the insulin receptor of the hepatocyte and is insulin dependent. The findings also suggest that this interaction may be functionally significant in mediating insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation as well as other insulin actions. Thus, calmodulin may play a major role as an intracellular contributor to insulin action.

  14. Plasmodium vivax Invasion of Human Erythrocytes Inhibited by Antibodies Directed against the Duffy Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Grimberg, Brian T; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Xainli, Jia; McHenry, Amy; Panichakul, Tasanee; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cui, Liwang; Bockarie, Moses; Chitnis, Chetan; Adams, John; Zimmerman, Peter A; King, Christopher L

    2007-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax invasion requires interaction between the human Duffy antigen on the surface of erythrocytes and the P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) expressed by the parasite. Given that Duffy-negative individuals are resistant and that Duffy-negative heterozygotes show reduced susceptibility to blood-stage infection, we hypothesized that antibodies directed against region two of P. vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBPII) would inhibit P. vivax invasion of human erythrocytes. Methods and Findings Using a recombinant region two of the P. vivax Duffy binding protein (rPvDBPII), polyclonal antibodies were generated from immunized rabbits and affinity purified from the pooled sera of 14 P. vivax–exposed Papua New Guineans. It was determined by ELISA and by flow cytometry, respectively, that both rabbit and human antibodies inhibited binding of rPvDBPII to the Duffy antigen N-terminal region and to Duffy-positive human erythrocytes. Additionally, using immunofluorescent microscopy, the antibodies were shown to attach to native PvDBP on the apical end of the P. vivax merozoite. In vitro invasion assays, using blood isolates from individuals in the Mae Sot district of Thailand, showed that addition of rabbit anti-PvDBPII Ab or serum (antibodies against, or serum containing antibodies against, region two of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein) (1:100) reduced the number of parasite invasions by up to 64%, while pooled PvDBPII antisera from P. vivax–exposed people reduced P. vivax invasion by up to 54%. Conclusions These results show, for what we believe to be the first time, that both rabbit and human antibodies directed against PvDBPII reduce invasion efficiency of wild P. vivax isolated from infected patients, and suggest that a PvDBP-based vaccine may reduce human blood-stage P. vivax infection. PMID:18092885

  15. Mefloquine inhibits voltage dependent Nav1.4 channel by overlapping the local anaesthetic binding site.

    PubMed

    Paiz-Candia, Bertin; Islas, Angel A; Sánchez-Solano, Alfredo; Mancilla-Simbro, Claudia; Scior, Thomas; Millan-PerezPeña, Lourdes; Salinas-Stefanon, Eduardo M

    2017-02-05

    Mefloquine constitutes a multitarget antimalaric that inhibits cation currents. However, the effect and the binding site of this compound on Na(+) channels is unknown. To address the mechanism of action of mefloquine, we employed two-electrode voltage clamp recordings on Xenopus laevis oocytes, site-directed mutagenesis of the rat Na(+) channel, and a combined in silico approach using Molecular Dynamics and docking protocols. We found that mefloquine: i) inhibited Nav1.4 currents (IC50 =60μM), ii) significantly delayed fast inactivation but did not affect recovery from inactivation, iii) markedly the shifted steady-state inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials. The presence of the β1 subunit significantly reduced mefloquine potency, but the drug induced a significant frequency-independent rundown upon repetitive depolarisations. Computational and experimental results indicate that mefloquine overlaps the local anaesthetic binding site by docking at a hydrophobic cavity between domains DIII and DIV that communicates the local anaesthetic binding site with the selectivity filter. This is supported by the fact that mefloquine potency significantly decreased on mutant Nav1.4 channel F1579A and significantly increased on K1237S channels. In silico this compound docked above F1579 forming stable π-π interactions with this residue. We provide structure-activity insights into how cationic amphiphilic compounds may exert inhibitory effects by docking between the local anaesthetic binding site and the selectivity filter of a mammalian Na(+) channel. Our proposed synergistic cycle of experimental and computational studies may be useful for elucidating binding sites of other drugs, thereby saving in vitro and in silico resources.

  16. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExsA DNA-Binding Activity by N-Hydroxybenzimidazoles.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Anne E; King, Jessica M; Spies, M Ashley; Kim, Oak K; Yahr, Timothy L

    2016-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS) is a primary virulence determinant and a potential target for antivirulence drugs. One candidate target is ExsA, a member of the AraC family of DNA-binding proteins required for expression of the T3SS. A previous study identified small molecules based on an N-hydroxybenzimidazole scaffold that inhibit the DNA-binding activity of several AraC proteins, including ExsA. In this study, we further characterized a panel of N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the tested N-hydroxybenzimidazoles ranged from 8 to 45 μM in DNA-binding assays. Each of the N-hydroxybenzimidazoles protected mammalian cells from T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity, and protection correlated with reduced T3SS gene expression in a coculture infection model. Binding studies with the purified ExsA DNA-binding domain (i.e., lacking the amino-terminal self-association domain) confirmed that the activity of N-hydroxybenzimidazoles results from interactions with the DNA-binding domain. The interaction is specific, as an unrelated DNA-binding protein (Vfr) was unaffected by N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. ExsA homologs that control T3SS gene expression in Yersinia pestis, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were also sensitive to N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. Although ExsA and Y. pestis LcrF share 79% sequence identity in the DNA-binding domain, differential sensitivities to several of the N-hydroxybenzimidazoles were observed. Site-directed mutagenesis based on in silico docking of inhibitors to the DNA-binding domain, and on amino acid differences between ExsA and LcrF, resulted in the identification of several substitutions that altered the sensitivity of ExsA to N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. Development of second-generation compounds targeted to the same binding pocket could lead to drugs with improved pharmacological properties.

  17. Covalent binding of 4-carbamoylbenzenediazonium chloride to deoxyguanine bases of DNA resulting in apparent irreversible inhibition of Poly(adenosine diphosphoribose) polymerase at the nicotinamide binding site

    SciTech Connect

    McLick, J.; Bauer, P.I.; Hakam, A.; Kun, E.

    1987-04-21

    The poly(adenosine diphosphoribose) polymerase activity of isolated liver nuclei was inhibited by 4-carbamoylbenzenediazonium chloride, referred to as 4-diazoniobenzamide, an effect that was dependent on the time of incubation and the concentration of the diazonium compound, with inhibition following first-order kinetics. The inhibition was not reversed by reisolation of nuclie and centrifugal washing, whereas the inhibition by benzamide or 4-aminobenzamide was completely reversible under these conditions. Simultaneous incubation of 4-diazoniobenzamide with benzamide prevented enzyme inhibition. The 4-diazoniobenzoic acid analogue was not inhibitory. The mechanism of action of 4-diazoniobenzamide was traced to a specific covalent binding to (/sup 14/C) dGMP of DNA to form N/sup 2/-((4-carbamoylphenyl)azo)-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate. Coenzymic DNA, by tight association with the polymerase protein, fixes the -C(O)NH/sub 2/ moiety of the adduct at the (/sup 32/P) nicotinamide-binding site of the enzyme.

  18. Recombinant glycoproteins that inhibit complement activation and also bind the selectin adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Rittershaus, C W; Thomas, L J; Miller, D P; Picard, M D; Geoghegan-Barek, K M; Scesney, S M; Henry, L D; Sen, A C; Bertino, A M; Hannig, G; Adari, H; Mealey, R A; Gosselin, M L; Couto, M; Hayman, E G; Levin, J L; Reinhold, V N; Marsh, H C

    1999-04-16

    Soluble human complement receptor type 1 (sCR1, TP10) has been expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) DUKX-B11 cells and shown to inhibit the classical and alternative complement pathways in vitro and in vivo. A truncated version of sCR1 lacking the long homologous repeat-A domain (LHR-A) containing the C4b binding site has similarly been expressed and designated sCR1[desLHR-A]. sCR1[desLHR-A] was shown to be a selective inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in vitro and to function in vivo. In this study, sCR1 and sCR1[desLHR-A] were expressed in CHO LEC11 cells with an active alpha(1,3)-fucosyltransferase, which makes possible the biosynthesis of the sialyl-Lewisx (sLex) tetrasaccharide (NeuNAcalpha2-3Galbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc) during post-translational glycosylation. The resulting glycoproteins, designated sCR1sLex and sCR1[desLHR-A]sLex, respectively, retained the complement regulatory activities of their DUKX B11 counterparts, which lack alpha(1-3)-fucose. Carbohydrate analysis of purified sCR1sLex and sCR1[desLHR-A]sLex indicated an average incorporation of 10 and 8 mol of sLex/mol of glycoprotein, respectively. sLex is a carbohydrate ligand for the selectin adhesion molecules. sCR1sLex was shown to specifically bind CHO cells expressing cell surface E-selectin. sCR1[desLHR-A]sLex inhibited the binding of the monocytic cell line U937 to human aortic endothelial cells, which had been activated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha to up-regulate the expression of E-selectin. sCR1sLex inhibited the binding of U937 cells to surface-adsorbed P-selectin-IgG. sCR1sLex and sCR1[desLHR-A]sLex have thus demonstrated both complement regulatory activity and the capacity to bind selectins and to inhibit selectin-mediated cell adhesion in vitro.

  19. Synthetic sialylphosphatidylethanolamine derivatives bind to human influenza A viruses and inhibit viral infection.

    PubMed

    Guo, C T; Wong, C H; Kajimoto, T; Miura, T; Ida, Y; Juneja, L R; Kim, M J; Masuda, H; Suzuki, T; Suzuki, Y

    1998-11-01

    We synthesized the sialylphosphatidylethanolamine (sialyl PE) derivatives Neu5Ac-PE, (Neu5Ac)2-PE, Neu5Ac-PE (amide) and Neu5Ac-PE (methyl). We examined the anti-viral effects of the derivatives on human influenza A virus infection by ELISA/virus-binding, hemagglutination inhibition, hemolysis inhibition and neutralization assays. The sialyl PE derivatives that we examined bound to A/Aichi/2/68, A/Singapore/1/57 and A/Memphis/1/71 strains of H3N2 subtype, but not to A/PR/8/34 strain of H1N1 subtype. The derivatives inhibited viral hemagglutination and hemolysis of human erythrocytes with A/Aichi/2/68 and A/Singapore/1/57 (H3N2), but not with A/PR/8/34 (H1N1). The inhibitory activity of the (Neu5Ac)2-PE derivative was the strongest of all sialyl PE derivatives (IC50, 35 microM to 40 microM). Sialyl PE derivatives also inhibited the infection of A/Aichi/2/68 in MDCK cells. Complete inhibition was observed at a concentration between 0.3 to 1.3 mM. IC50 of (Neu5Ac)2-PE was 15 microM in A/Aichi/2/68 strain. Taken together, the synthetic sialyl PE derivatives may be effective reagents against infection of some types of influenza A viruses.

  20. Caffeoylquinic acids competitively inhibit pancreatic lipase through binding to the catalytic triad.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Cui, Fengchao; Yin, Fangping; Zeng, Xiaoxiong; Sun, Yi; Li, Yunqi

    2015-09-01

    Caffeoylquinic acid and its isomers inhibited porcine Pancreatic Lipase (PL) activity according to a competitive mode where binding and interaction with the catalytic triad of Ser153, His264 and Asp177 simultaneously occurred. The IC50 values under which 3-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA) and its isomers 4-, 5-CQA, 3,4-, 3,5- and 4,5-diCQA inhibited half of the porcine PL activity were 1.10, 1.23, 1.24, 0.252, 0.591 and 0.502 mM, respectively. The binding affinities in the range from -8.4 to -9.5 kCal/mol were well predicted from docking, which showed a high linear correlation coefficient of 0.893 and Spearman correlation of 1.0 with log(IC50) values. Caffeoylquinic acid and its isomers were stabilized by hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction in the binding pocket. This finding provided molecular mechanism of coffee and other natural food or drink containing caffeoylquinic acid and its isomers against lipase activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  2. Drosophila distal-less negatively regulates dDREF by inhibiting its DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuko; Kato, Masaki; Seto, Hirokazu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2006-07-01

    The Drosophila DNA replication-related element binding factor (dDREF) is required for expression of many proliferation-related genes carrying the DRE sequence, 5'-TATCGATA. Over-expression of dDREF in the eye imaginal disc induces ectopic DNA synthesis, apoptosis and inhibition of photoreceptor cell specification, and results in rough eye phenotype in adults. In the present study, half dose reduction of the Distal-less (Dll) gene enhanced the dDREF-induced rough eye phenotype, suggesting that Dll negatively regulates dDREF activity in eye imaginal disc cells. Biochemical analyses revealed the N-terminal (30aa to 124aa) and C-terminal (190aa to 327aa) regions of Dll to interact with the DNA binding domain (16aa to 125aa) of dDREF, although it is not clear yet whether the interaction is direct or indirect. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Dll thereby inhibits DNA binding. The repression of this dDREF-function by a homeodomain protein like Dll may contribute to the differentiation-coupled repression of cell proliferation during development.

  3. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  4. Inhibition of corticosteroid-binding globulin gene expression by glucocorticoids involves C/EBPβ.

    PubMed

    Verhoog, Nicolette; Allie-Reid, Fatima; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Smith, Carine; Haegeman, Guy; Hapgood, Janet; Louw, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), a negative acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, is responsible for the transport of glucocorticoids (GCs). It also modulates the bioavailability of GCs, as only free or unbound steroids are biologically active. Fluctuations in CBG levels therefore can directly affect GC bioavailability. This study investigates the molecular mechanism whereby GCs inhibit the expression of CBG. GCs regulate gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which either directly binds to DNA or acts indirectly via tethering to other DNA-bound transcription factors. Although no GC-response elements (GRE) are present in the Cbg promoter, putative binding sites for C/EBPβ, able to tether to the GR, as well as HNF3α involved in GR signaling, are present. C/EBPβ, but not HNF3α, was identified as an important mediator of DEX-mediated inhibition of Cbg promoter activity by using specific deletion and mutant promoter reporter constructs of Cbg. Furthermore, knockdown of C/EBPβ protein expression reduced DEX-induced repression of CBG mRNA, confirming C/EBPβ's involvement in GC-mediated CBG repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) after DEX treatment indicated increased co-recruitment of C/EBPβ and GR to the Cbg promoter, while C/EBPβ knockdown prevented GR recruitment. Together, the results suggest that DEX repression of CBG involves tethering of the GR to C/EBPβ.

  5. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  6. Inhibition of the angiogenesis by the MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee Young; Byeon, Cheol Woo; Hong, Kyung Hee; Han, Ki Hoon; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2005-03-14

    The CC chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), plays a crucial role in the initiation of atherosclerosis and has direct effects that promote angiogenesis. To develop a specific inhibitor for MCP-1-induced angiogenesis, we performed in vitro selection employing phage display random peptide libraries. Most of the selected peptides were found to be homologous to the second extracellular loops of CCR2 and CCR3. We synthesized the peptide encoding the homologous sequences of the receptors and tested its effect on the MCP-1 induced angiogenesis. Surface plasmon resonance measurements demonstrated specific binding of the peptide to MCP-1 but not to the other homologous protein, MCP-3. Flow cytometry revealed that the peptide inhibited the MCP-1 binding to THP-1 monocytes. Moreover, CAM and rat aortic ring assays showed that the peptide inhibited MCP-1 induced angiogenesis. Our observations indicate that the MCP-1-binding peptide exerts its anti-angiogenic effect by interfering with the interaction between MCP-1 and its receptor.

  7. Calcium channel antagonists inhibit the acrosome reaction and bind to plasma membranes of sea urchin sperm.

    PubMed Central

    Kazazoglou, T; Schackmann, R W; Fosset, M; Shapiro, B M

    1985-01-01

    As a prerequisite to fertilization, sea urchin sperm undergo an acrosome reaction that is mediated in part by increased permeability to Ca2+, with an attendant rapid, massive intracellular Ca2+ accumulation. The acrosome reaction is inhibited by Ca2+ channel antagonists, including verapamil, D600, and dihydropyridines such as nitrendipine, nimodipine, and nisoldipine. To examine the interaction of Ca2+ antagonists with sperm, a plasma membrane preparation enriched for Na+,K+-ATPase was isolated from sea urchin sperm. These plasma membranes specifically bound [3H]nitrendipine and [3H]verapamil at concentrations similar to those that inhibit the acrosome reaction. The binding of verapamil was sigmoidal and half-maximal at 1 microM. There was a high specificity in the binding interaction, since by competition binding verapamil, (-)-D600, and (+)-D600 had different relative Kd values, 11, 2.5, and 0.5 microM, respectively. These data suggest that sperm mediate the Ca2+ influx required for induction of the acrosome reaction via Ca2+ channels with properties similar, but not identical, to those of other excitable tissues. Images PMID:3856274

  8. Zinc binds to and directly inhibits protein phosphatase 2A in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Luo, Dan-Ju; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Qiu, Mei; Yang, Yang; Yan, Xiong; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Ye, Qi-Fa; Liu, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Zinc induces protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inactivation and tau hyperphosphorylation through PP2A (tyrosine 307) phosphorylation in cells and the brain, but whether Zn(2+) has a direct inhibitory effect on PP2A is not clear. Here we explored the effect of Zn(2+) on PP2A and their direct interaction in vitro. The results showed that Zn(2+) mimicked the inhibitory effect of okadaic acid on protein phosphatase and prevented tau dephosphorylation in N2a cell lysates. PP2A activity assays indicated that a low concentration (10 μmol/L) of Zn(2+) inhibited PP2A directly. Further Zn(2+)-IDA-agarose affinity binding assays showed that Zn(2+) bound to and inhibited PP2Ac(51-270) but not PP2Ac(1-50) or PP2Ac(271-309). Taken together, Zn(2+) inhibits PP2A directly through binding to PP2Ac(51-270) in vitro.

  9. Nongenomic signaling of the retinoid X receptor through binding and inhibiting Gq in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Leonardo A.; Swales, Karen E.; Wray, Jessica A.; Damazo, Amilcar; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are important transcriptional nuclear hormone receptors, acting as either homodimers or the binding partner for at least one fourth of all the known human nuclear receptors. Functional nongenomic effects of nuclear receptors are poorly understood; however, recently peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, PPARβ, and the glucocorticoid receptor have all been found active in human platelets. Human platelets express RXRα and RXRβ. RXR ligands inhibit platelet aggregation and TXA2 release to ADP and the TXA2 receptors, but only weakly to collagen. ADP and TXA2 both signal via the G protein, Gq. RXR rapidly binds Gq but not Gi/z/o/t/gust in a ligand-dependent manner and inhibits Gq-induced Rac activation and intracellular calcium release. We propose that RXR ligands may have beneficial clinical actions through inhibition of platelet activation. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a novel nongenomic mode for nuclear receptor action and a functional cross-talk between G-protein and nuclear receptor signaling families. PMID:17213293

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans numb inhibits endocytic recycling by binding TAT-1 aminophospholipid translocase.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Lars; Jonsson, Eva; Tuck, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Numb regulates endocytosis in many metazoans, but the mechanism by which it functions is not completely understood. Here we report that the Caenorhabditis elegans Numb ortholog, NUM-1A, a regulator of endocytic recycling, binds the C isoform of transbilayer amphipath transporter-1 (TAT-1), a P4 family adenosine triphosphatase and putative aminophospholipid translocase that is required for proper endocytic trafficking. We demonstrate that TAT-1 is differentially spliced during development and that TAT-1C-specific splicing occurs in the intestine where NUM-1A is known to function. NUM-1A and TAT-1C colocalize in vivo. We have mapped the binding site to an NXXF motif in TAT-1C. This motif is not required for TAT-1C function but is required for NUM-1A's ability to inhibit recycling. We demonstrate that num-1A and tat-1 defects are both suppressed by the loss of the activity of PSSY-1, a phosphatidylserine (PS) synthase. PS is mislocalized in intestinal cells with defects in tat-1 or num-1A function. We propose that NUM-1A inhibits recycling by inhibiting TAT-1C's ability to translocate PS across the membranes of recycling endosomes. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. [Inhibition of tumor growth by a peptide fusion protein binding to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor Flt-1].

    PubMed

    Lei, Hetian; Shou, Chengchao; Wu, Jian; Liu, Xiaoying; He, Luowen; Liu, Meisheng; Guo, Qi; Jiang, Beihai

    2002-10-10

    Investigating the bio-activities of peptides selected from phage display peptide library with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor Flt-1. Activities of DHFR-F56/F90 binding to human ubilial vein endothelial cells were detected by immunocytochemistry, and the activity of antiangiogenesis was determined with chick embryo chorioallantoric membrane (CAM) assay. Balb/c nude mice were used as model to detect the activity of DHFR-F56/F90 on inhibiting tumor growth, and immunohistochemistry was employed to determine the localization of the DHFR-F56/F90 in tumor. DHFR-F56/F90 can bind to HUVEC, and DHFR-F56 inhibite angiogenesis in CAM. Meanwhile DHFR-F56 can bind with tumor cells, induce tumor necrosis and inhibit tumor growth in vivo. The peptide F56 is an effective antagonist of VEGF binding to Flt-1 and has a potent utility in antiangiogenesis and inhibiting tumor growth.

  12. Drosophila Mi-2 negatively regulates dDREF by inhibiting its DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Fumiko; Ohshima, Nobuko; Kwon, Eun-Jeong; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2002-07-01

    Drosophila melanogaster DNA replication-related element (DRE) factor (dDREF) is a transcriptional regulatory factor required for the expression of genes carrying the 5'-TATCGATA DRE. dDREF has been reported to bind to a sequence in the chromatin boundary element, and thus, dDREF may play a part in regulating insulator activity. To generate further insights into dDREF function, we carried out a Saccharomyces cerevisiae two-hybrid screening with DREF polypeptide as bait and identified Mi-2 as a DREF-interacting protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the C-terminal region of Drosophila Mi-2 (dMi-2) specifically binds to the DNA-binding domain of dDREF. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that dMi-2 thereby inhibits the DNA-binding activity of dDREF. Ectopic expression of dDREF and dMi-2 in eye imaginal discs resulted in severe and mild rough-eye phenotypes, respectively, whereas flies simultaneously expressing both proteins exhibited almost-normal eye phenotypes. Half-dose reduction of the dMi-2 gene enhanced the DREF-induced rough-eye phenotype. Immunostaining of polytene chromosomes of salivary glands showed that dDREF and dMi-2 bind in mutually exclusive ways. These lines of evidence define a novel function of dMi-2 in the negative regulation of dDREF by its DNA-binding activity. Finally, we postulated that dDREF and dMi-2 may demonstrate reciprocal regulation of their functions.

  13. Design of sequence-specific DNA binding molecules for DNA methyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kang, JeenJoo S; Meier, Jordan L; Dervan, Peter B

    2014-03-05

    The CpG dyad, an important genomic feature in DNA methylation and transcriptional regulation, is an attractive target for small molecules. To assess the utility of minor groove binding oligomers for CpG recognition, we screened a small library of hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides targeting the sequence 5'-CGCG-3' and assessed their sequence specificity using an unbiased next-generation sequencing assay. Our findings indicate that hairpin polyamide of sequence PyImβIm-γ-PyImβIm (1), previously identified as a high affinity 5'-CGCG-3' binder, favors 5'-GCGC-3' in an unanticipated reverse binding orientation. Replacement of one β alanine with Py to afford PyImPyIm-γ-PyImβIm (3) restores the preference for 5'-CGCG-3' binding in a forward orientation. The minor groove binding hairpin 3 inhibits DNA methyltransferase activity in the major groove at its target site more effectively than 1, providing a molecular basis for design of sequence-specific antagonists of CpG methylation.

  14. Barbiturates Bind in the GLIC Ion Channel Pore and Cause Inhibition by Stabilizing a Closed State.

    PubMed

    Fourati, Zaineb; Ruza, Reinis Reinholds; Laverty, Duncan; Drège, Emmanuelle; Delarue-Cochin, Sandrine; Joseph, Delphine; Koehl, Patrice; Smart, Trevor; Delarue, Marc

    2017-02-03

    Barbiturates induce anesthesia by modulating the activity of anionic and cationic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs). Despite more than a century of use in clinical practice, the prototypic binding site for this class of drugs within pLGICs is yet to be described. In this study, we present the first X-ray structures of barbiturates bound to GLIC, a cationic prokaryotic pLGIC with excellent structural homology to other relevant channels sensitive to general anesthetics and, as shown here, to barbiturates, at clinically relevant concentrations. Several derivatives of barbiturates containing anomalous scatterers were synthesized, and these derivatives helped us unambiguously identify a unique barbiturate binding site within the central ion channel pore in a closed conformation. In addition, docking calculations around the observed binding site for all three states of the receptor, including a model of the desensitized state, showed that barbiturates preferentially stabilize the closed state. The identification of this pore binding site sheds light on the mechanism of barbiturate inhibition of cationic pLGICs and allows the rationalization of several structural and functional features previously observed for barbiturates. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Design of Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Molecules for DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The CpG dyad, an important genomic feature in DNA methylation and transcriptional regulation, is an attractive target for small molecules. To assess the utility of minor groove binding oligomers for CpG recognition, we screened a small library of hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides targeting the sequence 5′-CGCG-3′ and assessed their sequence specificity using an unbiased next-generation sequencing assay. Our findings indicate that hairpin polyamide of sequence PyImβIm-γ-PyImβIm (1), previously identified as a high affinity 5′-CGCG-3′ binder, favors 5′-GCGC-3′ in an unanticipated reverse binding orientation. Replacement of one β alanine with Py to afford PyImPyIm-γ-PyImβIm (3) restores the preference for 5′-CGCG-3′ binding in a forward orientation. The minor groove binding hairpin 3 inhibits DNA methyltransferase activity in the major groove at its target site more effectively than 1, providing a molecular basis for design of sequence-specific antagonists of CpG methylation. PMID:24502234

  16. Sulindac-derived RXRα modulators inhibit cancer cell growth by binding to a novel site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Aleshin, Alexander E; Chen, Fan; Chen, Jiebo; Jiang, Fuquan; Alitongbieke, Gulimiran; Zeng, Zhiping; Ma, Yue; Huang, Mingfeng; Zhou, Hu; Cadwell, Gregory; Zheng, Jian-Feng; Huang, Pei-Qiang; Liddington, Robert C; Zhang, Xiao-kun; Su, Ying

    2014-05-22

    Retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRα), an intriguing and unique drug target, can serve as an intracellular target mediating the anticancer effects of certain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including sulindac. We report the synthesis and characterization of two sulindac analogs, K-8008 and K-8012, which exert improved anticancer activities over sulindac in a RXRα-dependent manner. The analogs inhibit the interaction of the N-terminally truncated RXRα (tRXRα) with the p85α subunit of PI3K, leading to suppression of AKT activation and induction of apoptosis. Crystal structures of the RXRα ligand-binding domain (LBD) with K-8008 or K-8012 reveal that both compounds bind to tetrameric RXRα LBD at a site different from the classical ligand-binding pocket. Thus, these results identify K-8008 and K-8012 as tRXRα modulators and define a binding mechanism for regulating the nongenomic action of tRXRα. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prenatal protein deprivation in rats induces changes in prepulse inhibition and NMDA receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Abraham A; Printz, David J; Butler, Pamela D; Dulawa, Stephanie C; Printz, Morton P

    2004-01-23

    Epidemiological studies suggest that prenatal malnutrition increases the risk of developing schizophrenia. Animal models indicate that prenatal protein deprivation (PPD) affects many aspects of adult brain function. We tested the hypothesis that PPD in rats would alter prepulse inhibition (PPI), which is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating that is deficient in schizophrenia patients. Additionally, we examined dopaminergic and glutaminergic receptor binding in the striatum and hippocampus, which have been suggested to play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Rat dams were fed normal (25%) or low (6%) protein diets beginning 5 weeks prior to, and throughout pregnancy. The pups were tested at postnatal days (PND) 35 and 56 for PPI. Striatal and hippocampal NMDA receptor, and striatal dopamine receptor binding were quantified post-mortem in a subset of these rats. Female rats exposed to PPD had reduced levels of PPI at PND 56, but not PND 35, suggesting the emergence of a sensorimotor gating deficit in early adulthood. Striatal NMDA receptor binding was increased in PPD females. A decrease in initial startle response (SR) was also observed in all PPD rats relative to control rats. These results suggest that PPD causes age- and sex-dependent decreases in PPI and increases in NMDA receptor binding. This animal model may be useful for the investigation of neurodevelopmental changes that are associated with schizophrenia in humans.

  18. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies. PMID:26598702

  19. Furoates and thenoates inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 allosterically by binding to its pyruvate regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Masini, Tiziana; Birkaya, Barbara; van Dijk, Simon; Mondal, Milon; Hekelaar, Johan; Jäger, Manuel; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Patel, Mulchand S; Hirsch, Anna K H; Moman, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the reawakening of cancer metabolism as a therapeutic target. In particular, inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) holds remarkable promise. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), currently undergoing clinical trials, is a unique PDK inhibitor in which it binds to the allosteric pyruvate site of the enzyme. However, the safety of DCA as a drug is compromised by its neurotoxicity, whereas its usefulness as an investigative tool is limited by the high concentrations required to exert observable effects in cell culture. Herein, we report the identification - by making use of saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy, enzymatic assays and computational methods - of furoate and thenoate derivatives as allosteric pyruvate-site-binding PDK2 inhibitors. This work substantiates the pyruvate regulatory pocket as a druggable target.

  20. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-Ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-Kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-12-08

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies.

  1. Ceramide-CD300f Binding Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Skin Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Emiko; Izawa, Kumi; Kaitani, Ayako; Isobe, Masamichi; Maehara, Akie; Uchida, Koichiro; Maeda, Keiko; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Kitamura, Toshio; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Kitaura, Jiro

    2017-01-01

    LPS triggers inflammatory responses; however, the negative regulation of LPS responses in vivo remains poorly understood. CD300f is an inhibitory receptor among the CD300 family of paired activating and inhibitory receptors. We have previously identified ceramide as a ligand for CD300f and shown that the binding of ceramide to CD300f inhibits IgE-mediated mast cell activation and allergic responses in mouse models. Here we identify the critical role of CD300f in inhibiting LPS-induced skin inflammation. CD300f deficiency remarkably enhanced LPS-induced skin edema and neutrophil recruitment in mice. Higher levels of factors that increase vascular permeability and of factors that induce neutrophil recruitment were detected in LPS-injected skin pouch exudates of CD300f−/− mice as compared with wild-type mice. CD300f was highly expressed in mast cells and recruited neutrophils, but not in macrophages, among skin myeloid cells. CD300f deficiency failed to influence the intrinsic migratory ability of neutrophils. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppressed the release of chemical mediators from mast cells and from neutrophils in response to LPS. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that mast cells mediated enhanced edema in LPS-stimulated skin of CD300f−/− mice, whereas mast cells together with recruited neutrophils mediated robust neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, administering a ceramide antibody or ceramide-containing vesicles enhanced or suppressed LPS-induced skin inflammation of wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, ceramide-CD300f binding inhibits LPS-induced skin inflammation, implicating CD300f as a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in vivo. PMID:28073916

  2. Ceramide-CD300f Binding Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Emiko; Izawa, Kumi; Kaitani, Ayako; Isobe, Masamichi; Maehara, Akie; Uchida, Koichiro; Maeda, Keiko; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Kitamura, Toshio; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Kitaura, Jiro

    2017-02-17

    LPS triggers inflammatory responses; however, the negative regulation of LPS responses in vivo remains poorly understood. CD300f is an inhibitory receptor among the CD300 family of paired activating and inhibitory receptors. We have previously identified ceramide as a ligand for CD300f and shown that the binding of ceramide to CD300f inhibits IgE-mediated mast cell activation and allergic responses in mouse models. Here we identify the critical role of CD300f in inhibiting LPS-induced skin inflammation. CD300f deficiency remarkably enhanced LPS-induced skin edema and neutrophil recruitment in mice. Higher levels of factors that increase vascular permeability and of factors that induce neutrophil recruitment were detected in LPS-injected skin pouch exudates of CD300f(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type mice. CD300f was highly expressed in mast cells and recruited neutrophils, but not in macrophages, among skin myeloid cells. CD300f deficiency failed to influence the intrinsic migratory ability of neutrophils. Ceramide-CD300f binding suppressed the release of chemical mediators from mast cells and from neutrophils in response to LPS. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that mast cells mediated enhanced edema in LPS-stimulated skin of CD300f(-/-) mice, whereas mast cells together with recruited neutrophils mediated robust neutrophil accumulation. Importantly, administering a ceramide antibody or ceramide-containing vesicles enhanced or suppressed LPS-induced skin inflammation of wild-type mice, respectively. Thus, ceramide-CD300f binding inhibits LPS-induced skin inflammation, implicating CD300f as a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling in vivo. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Inhibition by Siomycin and Thiostrepton of Both Aminoacyl-tRNA and Factor G Binding to Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ll, Juan Modole; Cabrer, Bartolomé; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Azquez, David V

    1971-01-01

    Siomycin, a peptide antibiotic that interacts with the 50S ribosomal subunit and inhibits binding of factor G, is shown also to inhibit binding of aminoacyl-tRNA; however, it does not impair binding of fMet-tRNA and completion of the initiation complex. Moreover, unlike other inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA binding (tetracycline, sparsomycin, and streptogramin A), siomycin completely abolishes the GTPase activity associated with the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA catalyzed by factor Tu. A single-site interaction of siomycin appears to be responsible for its effect on both the binding of the aminoacyl-tRNA-Tu-GTP complex and that of factor G. PMID:4331558

  4. Inhibition of SARS Pseudovirus Cell Entry by Lactoferrin Binding to Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Jianshe; Yang, Ning; Deng, Jiejie; Liu, Kangtai; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Guigen; Jiang, Chengyu

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that lactoferrin (LF) participates in the host immune response against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) invasion by enhancing NK cell activity and stimulating neutrophil aggregation and adhesion. We further investigated the role of LF in the entry of SARS pseudovirus into HEK293E/ACE2-Myc cells. Our results reveal that LF inhibits SARS pseudovirus infection in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis suggested that LF was able to block the binding of spike protein to host cells at 4°C, indicating that LF exerted its inhibitory function at the viral attachment stage. However, LF did not disrupt the interaction of spike protein with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the functional receptor of SARS-CoV. Previous studies have shown that LF colocalizes with the widely distributed cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Our experiments have also confirmed this conclusion. Treatment of the cells with heparinase or exogenous heparin prevented binding of spike protein to host cells and inhibited SARS pseudovirus infection, demonstrating that HSPGs provide the binding sites for SARS-CoV invasion at the early attachment phase. Taken together, our results suggest that, in addition to ACE2, HSPGs are essential cell-surface molecules involved in SARS-CoV cell entry. LF may play a protective role in host defense against SARS-CoV infection through binding to HSPGs and blocking the preliminary interaction between SARS-CoV and host cells. Our findings may provide further understanding of SARS-CoV pathogenesis and aid in treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:21887302

  5. Selective inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by targeting a substrate-specific secondary binding site.

    PubMed

    Kühn-Wache, Kerstin; Bär, Joachim W; Hoffmann, Torsten; Wolf, Raik; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4/CD26 (DP4) is a multifunctional serine protease liberating dipeptide from the N-terminus of (oligo)peptides which can modulate the activity of these peptides. The enzyme is involved in physiological processes such as blood glucose homeostasis and immune response. DP4 substrate specificity is characterized in detail using synthetic dipeptide derivatives. The specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) strongly depends on the amino acid in P₁-position for proline, alanine, glycine and serine with 5.0 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.8 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 3.6 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.1 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. By contrast, kinetic investigation of larger peptide substrates yields a different pattern. The specific activity of DP4 for neuropeptide Y (NPY) cleavage comprising a proline in P₁-position is the same range as the k(cat)/K(m) values of NPY derivatives containing alanine or serine in P₁-position with 4 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 9.5 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹ and 2.1 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. The proposed existence of an additional binding region outside the catalytic center is supported by measurements of peptide substrates with extended chain length. This 'secondary' binding site interaction depends on the amino acid sequence in P₄'-P₈'-position. Interactions with this binding site could be specifically blocked for substrates of the GRF/glucagon peptide family. By contrast, substrates not belonging to this peptide family and dipeptide derivative substrates that only bind to the catalytic center of DP4 were not inhibited. This more selective inhibition approach allows, for the first time, to distinguish between substrate families by substrate-discriminating inhibitors.

  6. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding by phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.E.; Pisano, J.J.

    1985-10-07

    Phospholipase A/sub 2/ from several sources inhibited (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to membranes from brain, heart and ileal longitudinal muscle. The enzymes from bee venom and Russell's viper venom were most potent, having IC/sub 50/ values of approximately 5 and 14 ng/ml, respectively, in all three membrane preparations. Inhibition of binding by bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/ was time- and dose-dependent. Mastoparan, a known facilitator of phospholipase A/sub 2/ enzymatic activity, shifted the bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/ dose-response curve to the left. Pretreatment of brain membranes with bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) for 15 min caused a 2-fold increase in the K/sub d/ without changing the B/sub max/ compared with untreated membranes. Extension of the preincubation period to 30 min caused no further increase in the K/sub d/ but significantly decreased the B/sub max/ to 71% the value for untreated membranes. (/sup 3/H)Nitrendipine, preincubated with bee venom phospholipase A/sub 2/, was recovered and found to be fully active, indicating that the phospholipase A/sub 2/ did not modify the ligand. It is concluded that phospholipase A/sub 2/ acts on the membrane at or near the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding site and that phospholipids play a key role in the interactions of 1,4 dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists with the dihydropyridine binding site. 33 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  7. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  8. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake.

    PubMed

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-05

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs(+)) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs(+) uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs(+), chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs(+) tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs(+) concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs(+). Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs(+) tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs(+) by inhibiting Cs(+) entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  9. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-01

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs+) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs+ uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs+, chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs+ tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs+ concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs+. Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs+ tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs+ by inhibiting Cs+ entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  10. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    D-amino acids (D-aas) are reported to bind to IgE antibodies from people with allergy and asthma. The objectives of this study were to determine if D-aas bind or inhibit IgE binding to peanut allergens, and if they are more effective than L-amino acids (L-aas) in this respect. Several D-aa cocktails...

  11. Antipsychotics inhibit glucose transport: Determination of olanzapine binding site in Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose/H(+) symporter.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Petr; George Thompson, Alayna M; Iancu, Cristina V; Walters, D Eric; Choe, Jun-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug olanzapine is widely prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, it often causes unwanted side effects, including diabetes, due to disruption of insulin-dependant glucose metabolism through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. To determine if olanzapine can affect the first step in glucose metabolism - glucose transport inside cells - we investigated the effect of this drug on the transport activity of a model glucose transporter. The glucose transporter from Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcPSe) is specific for glucose, inhibited by various human glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitors, has high sequence and structure homology to GLUTs, and is readily amenable to transport assay, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. We found that olanzapine inhibits glucose transport of GlcPSe with an IC50 0.9 ± 0.1 mM. Computational docking of olanzapine to the GlcPSe structure revealed potential binding sites that were further examined through mutagenesis and transport assay to identify residues important for olanzapine inhibition. These investigations suggest that olanzapine binds in a polar region of the cytosolic part of the transporter, and interacts with residues R129, strictly conserved in all GLUTs, and N136, conserved in only a few GLUTs, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4. We propose that olanzapine inhibits GlcPSe by impeding the alternating opening and closing of the substrate cavity necessary for glucose transport. It accomplishes this by disrupting a key salt bridge formed by conserved residues R129 and E362, that stabilizes the outward-facing conformation of the transporter.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Alkylpolyamine DS-96 Inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis Infection by Blocking Attachment and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Ichie

    2014-01-01

    Vaginally delivered microbicides are being developed to offer women self-initiated protection against transmission of sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia trachomatis. A small molecule, DS-96, rationally designed for high affinity to Escherichia coli lipid A, was previously demonstrated to bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria (D. Sil et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 51:2811–2819, 2007, doi:10.1128/AAC.00200-07). Aside from the lack of the repeating O antigen, chlamydial lipooligosaccharide (LOS) shares general molecular architecture features with E. coli LPS. Importantly, the portion of lipid A where the interaction with DS-96 is expected to take place is well conserved between the two organisms, leading to the hypothesis that DS-96 inhibits Chlamydia infection by binding to LOS and compromising the function. In this study, antichlamydial activity of DS-96 was examined in cell culture. DS-96 inhibited the intercellular growth of Chlamydia in a dose-dependent manner and offered a high level of inhibition at a relatively low concentration (8 μM). The data also revealed that infectious elementary bodies (EBs) were predominantly blocked at the attachment step, as indicated by the reduced number of EBs associated with the host cell surface following pretreatment. Of those EBs that were capable of attachment, the vast majority was unable to gain entry into the host cell. Inhibition of EB attachment and entry by DS-96 suggests that Chlamydia LOS is critical to these processes during the developmental cycle. Importantly, given the low association of host toxicity previously reported by Sil et al., DS-96 is expected to perform well in animal studies as an active antichlamydial compound in a vaginal microbicide. PMID:24663021

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-binding alkylpolyamine DS-96 inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis infection by blocking attachment and entry.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Ichie; Hefty, P Scott

    2014-06-01

    Vaginally delivered microbicides are being developed to offer women self-initiated protection against transmission of sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia trachomatis. A small molecule, DS-96, rationally designed for high affinity to Escherichia coli lipid A, was previously demonstrated to bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria (D. Sil et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 51: 2811-2819, 2007, doi:10.1128/AAC.00200-07). Aside from the lack of the repeating O antigen, chlamydial lipooligosaccharide (LOS) shares general molecular architecture features with E. coli LPS. Importantly, the portion of lipid A where the interaction with DS-96 is expected to take place is well conserved between the two organisms, leading to the hypothesis that DS-96 inhibits Chlamydia infection by binding to LOS and compromising the function. In this study, antichlamydial activity of DS-96 was examined in cell culture. DS-96 inhibited the intercellular growth of Chlamydia in a dose-dependent manner and offered a high level of inhibition at a relatively low concentration (8 μM). The data also revealed that infectious elementary bodies (EBs) were predominantly blocked at the attachment step, as indicated by the reduced number of EBs associated with the host cell surface following pretreatment. Of those EBs that were capable of attachment, the vast majority was unable to gain entry into the host cell. Inhibition of EB attachment and entry by DS-96 suggests that Chlamydia LOS is critical to these processes during the developmental cycle. Importantly, given the low association of host toxicity previously reported by Sil et al., DS-96 is expected to perform well in animal studies as an active antichlamydial compound in a vaginal microbicide. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. HMGB1 inhibits phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils through binding to phosphatidylserine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Jing; Park, Young-Jun; Tsuruta, Yuko; Lorne, Emmanuel F; Zhao, Xia; Abraham, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, also called efferocytosis, is an essential feature of immune responses and critical to resolution of inflammation. Impaired efferocytosis is associated with unfavorable outcome from inflammatory diseases, including acute lung injury and pulmonary manifestations of cystic fibrosis. HMGB1, a nuclear non-histone DNA-binding protein, has recently been found to be secreted by immune cells upon stimulation with LPS and cytokines. Plasma and tissue levels of HMGB1 are elevated for prolonged periods in chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, including sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis, acute lung injury, burns, and hemorrhage. In this study, we found that HMGB1 inhibits phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages in vivo and in vitro. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is directly involved in the inhibition of phagocytosis by HMGB1, as blockade of HMGB1 by PS eliminates the effects of HMGB1 on efferocytosis. Confocal and FRET demonstrate that HMGB1 interacts with PS on the neutrophil surface. However, HMGB1 does not inhibit PS-independent phagocytosis of viable neutrophils. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from Scnn+ mice, a murine model of cystic fibrosis lung disease, which contains elevated concentrations of HMGB1 inhibits neutrophil efferocytosis. Anti-HMGB1 antibodies reverse the inhibitory effect of Scnn+ BAL on efferocytosis, showing that this effect is due to HMGB1. These findings demonstrate that HMGB1 can modulate phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils and suggest an alternative mechanism by which HMGB1 is involved in enhancing inflammatory responses. PMID:18768881

  15. N-ethylmaleimide inhibition of the DNA-binding activity of the herpes simplex virus type 1 major DNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyechan, W.T. )

    1988-03-01

    The major herpes simplex virus DNA-binding protein, designated ICP8, binds tightly to single-stranded DNA and is required for replication of viral DNA. The sensitivity of the DNA-binding activity of ICP8 to the action of the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide has been examined by using nitrocellulose filter-binding and agarose gel electrophoresis assays. Incubation of ICP8 with N-ethylmaleimide results in a rapid loss of DNA-binding activity. Preincubation of ICP8 with single-stranded DNA markedly inhibits this loss of binding activity. These results imply that a free sulfhydryl group is involved in the interaction of ICP8 with single-stranded DNA and that this sulfhydryl group becomes less accessible to the environment upon binding. Agarose gel electrophoretic analysis of the binding interaction in the presence and absence of N-ethylmaleimide indicates that the cooperative binding exhibited by ICP8 is lost upon treatment with this reagent but that some residual noncooperative binding may remain. This last result was confirmed by equilibrium dialysis experiments with the {sup 32}P-labeled oligonucleotide dT{sub 10} and native and N-ethylmaleimide-treated ICP8.

  16. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits ( sup 3 H) dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of ({sup 3}H) dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances ({sup 3}H)DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+){minus} pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine.

  17. Lipoxin A4 inhibits immune cell binding to salivary epithelium and vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Odusanwo, Olutayo; Mondal, Nandini; Nelson, Joel; Neelamegham, Sriram; Baker, Olga J

    2012-04-01

    Lipoxins are formed by leukocytes during cell-cell interactions with epithelial or endothelial cells. Native lipoxin A(4) (LXA(4)) binds to the G protein-coupled lipoxin receptors formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2)/ALX and CysLT1. Furthermore, LXA(4) inhibits recruitment of neutrophils, by attenuating chemotaxis, adhesion, and transmigration across vascular endothelial cells. LXA(4) thus appears to serve as an endogenous "stop signal" for immune cell-mediated tissue injury (Serhan CN; Annu Rev Immunol 25: 101-137, 2007). The role of LXA(4) has not been addressed in salivary epithelium, and little is known about its effects on vascular endothelium. Here, we determined that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) receptor activation in vascular endothelium and salivary epithelium upregulated the expression of adhesion molecules that facilitates the binding of immune cells. We hypothesize that the activation of the ALX/FPR2 and/or CysLT1 receptors by LXA(4) decreases this cytokine-mediated upregulation of cell adhesion molecules that enhance lymphocyte binding to both the vascular endothelium and salivary epithelium. In agreement with this hypothesis, we observed that nanomolar concentrations of LXA(4) blocked IL-1β- and TNF-α-mediated upregulation of E-selectin and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Binding of Jurkat cells to stimulated HUVECs was abrogated by LXA(4). Furthermore, LXA(4) preincubation with human submandibular gland cell line (HSG) also blocked TNF-α-mediated upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in these cells, and it reduced lymphocyte adhesion. These findings suggest that ALX/FPR2 and/or CysLT1 receptor activation in endothelial and epithelial cells blocks cytokine-induced adhesion molecule expression and consequent binding of lymphocytes, a critical event in the pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome (SS).

  18. Inhibition of adipocytogenesis by canonical WNT signaling in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Longxiang; Glowacki, Julie; Zhou, Shuanhu

    2011-08-01

    The WNT signaling pathway plays important roles in the self-renewal and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Little is known about WNT signaling in adipocyte differentiation of human MSCs. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that canonical and non-canonical WNTs differentially regulate in vitro adipocytogenesis in human MSCs. The expression of adipocyte gene PPAR{gamma}2, lipoprotein lipase, and adipsin increased during adipocytogenesis of hMSCs. Simultaneously, the expression of canonical WNT2, 10B, 13, and 14 decreased, whereas non-canonical WNT4 and 11 increased, and WNT5A was unchanged. A small molecule WNT mimetic, SB-216763, increased accumulation of {beta}-catenin protein, inhibited induction of WNT4 and 11 and inhibited adipocytogenesis. In contrast, knockdown of {beta}-catenin with siRNA resulted in spontaneous adipocytogenesis. These findings support the view that canonical WNT signaling inhibits and non-canonical WNT signaling promotes adipocytogenesis in adult human marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  19. Selective, tight-binding inhibitors of integrin alpha4beta1 that inhibit allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    Lin, K c; Ateeq, H S; Hsiung, S H; Chong, L T; Zimmerman, C N; Castro, A; Lee, W C; Hammond, C E; Kalkunte, S; Chen, L L; Pepinsky, R B; Leone, D R; Sprague, A G; Abraham, W M; Gill, A; Lobb, R R; Adams, S P

    1999-03-11

    Integrin alpha4beta1 mediates leukocyte recruitment, activation, mediator release, and apoptosis inhibition, and it plays a central role in inflammatory pathophysiology. High-affinity, selective inhibitors of alpha4beta1, based on the Leu-Asp-Val (LDV) sequence from the alternatively spliced connecting segment-1 (CS-1) peptide of cellular fibronectin, are described that employ a novel N-terminal peptide "cap" strategy. One inhibitor, BIO-1211, was approximately 10(6)-fold more potent than the starting peptide and exhibited tight-binding properties (koff = 1.4 x 10(-4) s-1, KD = 70 pM), a remarkable finding for a noncovalent, small-molecule inhibitor of a protein receptor. BIO-1211 was also 200-fold selective for the activated form of alpha4beta1, and it stimulated expression of ligand-induced epitopes on the integrin beta1 subunit, a property consistent with occupancy of the receptor's ligand-binding site. Pretreatment of allergic sheep with a 3-mg nebulized dose of BIO-1211 inhibited early and late airway responses following antigen challenge and prevented development of nonspecific airway hyperresponsiveness to carbachol. These results show that highly selective and potent small-molecule antagonists can be identified to integrins with primary specificity for peptide domains other than Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD); they confirm the generality of integrins as small molecule targets; and they validate alpha4beta1 as a therapeutic target for asthma.

  20. p19Arf Inhibits the Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells by Binding to CtBP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Paliwal, Seema; Draheim, Kyle; Grossman, Steven R.; Lewis, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    The INK4A/ARF tumor suppressor locus is frequently inactivated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), yet the consequences of this remain unknown. We recently described a HCC mouse model in which loss of the Ink4a/Arf locus accelerates the development of metastasis and enhances tumor cell migration and invasion in cell culture assays. We show here that knockdown of p19Arf in a HCC cell line increases invasion in cell culture assays. Further, reintroduction of p19Arf into HCC cell lines lacking Ink4a/Arf inhibits tumor cell invasion, without affecting cell proliferation, or cell transformation as measured by soft agar colony formation. Inhibition of cell invasion by p19Arf was dependent on its C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) interaction domain, but independent of Mdm2 binding and nucleolar localization. Indeed, RNAi-mediated knockdown of CtBP1 or CtBP2 decreased cell invasion, and ectopic expression of CtBP2 enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion. Thus, our data indicate a novel role for the Arf tumor suppressor protein in regulating phenotypes associated with tumor progression and metastasis in HCC cells. PMID:18199542

  1. Metastatin: a hyaluronan-binding complex from cartilage that inhibits tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Lapcevich, R K; Underhill, C B; Han, Z; Gao, F; Swartz, G; Plum, S M; Zhang, L; Green, S J

    2001-02-01

    In this study, a hyaluronan-binding complex, which we termed Metastatin, was isolated from bovine cartilage by affinity chromatography and found to have both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic properties. Metastatin was able to block the formation of tumor nodules in the lungs of mice inoculated with B16BL6 melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Single i.v. administration of Metastatin into chicken embryos inhibited the growth of both B16BL6 mouse melanoma and TSU human prostate cancer cells growing on the chorioallantoic membrane. The in vivo biological effect may be attributed to the antiangiogenic activity because Metastatin is able to inhibit the migration and proliferation of cultured endothelial cells as well as vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis on the chorioallantoic membrane. In each case, the effect could be blocked by either heat denaturing the Metastatin or premixing it with hyaluronan, suggesting that its activity critically depends on its ability to bind hyaluronan on the target cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Metastatin is an effective antitumor agent that exhibits antiangiogenic activity.

  2. Phosphorylation of tau at both Thr 231 and Ser 262 is required for maximal inhibition of its binding to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, A; Kabat, J; Novak, M; Wu, Q; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Iqbal, K

    1998-09-15

    The paired helical filaments (PHFs) found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains are composed primarily of the microtubule-associated protein tau. PHF-tau is in a hyperphosphorylated state and is unable to promote microtubule assembly. We investigated whether the inhibition of tau binding to microtubules is increased when tau is phosphorylated by different kinases in combination with GSK-3. We found that when tau was first phosphorylated by A-kinase, C-kinase, cdk5, or CaM kinase II and then by GSK-3, its binding to microtubules was inhibited by 45, 61, 78, and 79%, respectively. Further, the kinase combinations cdk5/GSK-3 and CaM kinase II/GSK-3 rapidly phosphorylated the sites Thr 231 and Ser 235. When these sites were individually replaced by Ala and the phosphorylation experiments repeated, tau binding to microtubules was inhibited by 54 and 71%, respectively. By comparison, when Ser 262 was replaced by Ala, tau binding to microtubules was inhibited by only 8% after phosphorylation by CaM kinase II. From these observations we estimate that the phosphorylation of Thr 231, Ser 235, and Ser 262 contributes approximately 26, approximately 9, and approximately 33%, respectively, of the overall inhibition of tau binding to microtubules. Together, our results indicate that the binding of tau to microtubules is controlled by the phosphorylation of several sites, among which are Thr 231, Ser 235, and Ser 262.

  3. Variola virus E3L Zα domain, but not its Z-DNA binding activity, is required for PKR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Meghna; Seo, Eun Joo; Dever, Thomas E

    2014-02-01

    Responding to viral infection, the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase PKR phosphorylates translation initiation factor eIF2α to inhibit cellular and viral protein synthesis. To overcome this host defense mechanism, many poxviruses express the protein E3L, containing an N-terminal Z-DNA binding (Zα) domain and a C-terminal dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). While E3L is thought to inhibit PKR activation by sequestering dsRNA activators and by directly binding the kinase, the role of the Zα domain in PKR inhibition remains unclear. Here, we show that the E3L Zα domain is required to suppress the growth-inhibitory properties associated with expression of human PKR in yeast, to inhibit PKR kinase activity in vitro, and to reverse the inhibitory effects of PKR on reporter gene expression in mammalian cells treated with dsRNA. Whereas previous studies revealed that the Z-DNA binding activity of E3L is critical for viral pathogenesis, we identified point mutations in E3L that functionally uncouple Z-DNA binding and PKR inhibition. Thus, our studies reveal a molecular distinction between the nucleic acid binding and PKR inhibitory functions of the E3L Zα domain, and they support the notion that E3L contributes to viral pathogenesis by targeting PKR and other components of the cellular anti-viral defense pathway.

  4. Inhibition of RNA binding to hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase: a new mechanism for antiviral intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Guichou, Jean-François; Brillet, Rozenn; Ahnou, Nazim; Hernandez, Eva; Pallier, Coralie; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a key target for antiviral intervention. The goal of this study was to identify the binding site and unravel the molecular mechanism by which natural flavonoids efficiently inhibit HCV RdRp. Screening identified the flavonol quercetagetin as the most potent inhibitor of HCV RdRp activity. Quercetagetin was found to inhibit RdRp through inhibition of RNA binding to the viral polymerase, a yet unknown antiviral mechanism. X-ray crystallographic structure analysis of the RdRp-quercetagetin complex identified quercetagetin's binding site at the entrance of the RNA template tunnel, confirming its original mode of action. This antiviral mechanism was associated with a high barrier to resistance in both site-directed mutagenesis and long-term selection experiments. In conclusion, we identified a new mechanism for non-nucleoside inhibition of HCV RdRp through inhibition of RNA binding to the enzyme, a mechanism associated with broad genotypic activity and a high barrier to resistance. Our results open the way to new antiviral approaches for HCV and other viruses that use an RdRp based on RNA binding inhibition, that could prove to be useful in human, animal or plant viral infections. PMID:25053847

  5. ULK1 inhibits mTORC1 signaling, promotes multisite Raptor phosphorylation and hinders substrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Elaine A; Hunt, David K; Acosta-Jaquez, Hugo A; Fingar, Diane C

    2011-01-01

    Protein synthesis and autophagy work as two opposing processes to control cell growth in response to nutrient supply. The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which acts as a master regulator to control protein synthesis, has recently been shown to inhibit autophagy by phosphorylating and inactivating ULK1, an autophagy regulatory protein. ULK1 also inhibits phosphorylation of a mTORC1 substrate, S6K1, indicating that a complex signaling interplay exists between mTORC1 and ULK1. Here, we demonstrate that ULK1 induces multisite phosphorylation of Raptor in vivo and in vitro. Using phospho-specific antibodies we identify Ser855 and Ser859 as being strongly phosphorylated by ULK1, with moderate phosphorylation of Ser792 also observed. Interestingly, ULK1 overexpression also increases phosphorylation of Raptor Ser863 and the mTOR autophosphorylation site, Ser2481 in a mTORC1-dependent manner. Despite this evidence for heightened mTORC1 kinase activity following ULK1 overexpresssion, mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation of S6K1 and 4E-BP1 is significantly inhibited. ULK1 expression has no effect on protein-protein interactions between the components of mTORC1, but does reduce the ability of Raptor to bind to the substrate 4E-BP1. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of ULK1 leads to increased phosphorylation of mTORC1 substrates and decreased phosphorylation of Raptor at Ser859 and Ser792. We propose a new mechanism whereby ULK1 contributes to mTORC1 inhibition through hindrance of substrate docking to Raptor. This is a novel negative feedback loop that occurs upon activation of autophagy to maintain mTORC1 inhibition when nutrient supplies are limiting. PMID:21460630

  6. Phosphorylation inhibits DNA-binding of alternatively spliced aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator

    SciTech Connect

    Kewley, Robyn J. . E-mail: rkewley@csu.edu.au; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2005-12-09

    The basic helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM homology (bHLH/PAS) transcription factor ARNT (aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator) is a key component of various pathways which induce the transcription of cytochrome P450 and hypoxia response genes. ARNT can be alternatively spliced to express Alt ARNT, containing an additional 15 amino acids immediately N-terminal to the DNA-binding basic region. Here, we show that ARNT and Alt ARNT proteins are differentially phosphorylated by protein kinase CKII in vitro. Phosphorylation had an inhibitory effect on DNA-binding to an E-box probe by Alt ARNT, but not ARNT, homodimers. This inhibitory phosphorylation occurs through Ser77. Moreover, a point mutant, Alt ARNT S77A, shows increased activity on an E-box reporter gene, consistent with Ser77 being a regulatory site in vivo. In contrast, DNA binding by an Alt ARNT/dioxin receptor heterodimer to the xenobiotic response element is not inhibited by phosphorylation with CKII, nor does Alt ARNT S77A behave differently from wild type Alt ARNT in the context of a dioxin receptor heterodimer.

  7. Nucleobindin 1 binds to multiple types of pre-fibrillar amyloid and inhibits fibrillization

    PubMed Central

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Barbash, Shahar; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Graham, W Vallen

    2017-01-01

    During amyloid fibril formation, amyloidogenic polypeptides misfold and self assemble into soluble pre-fibrillar aggregates, i.e., protofibrils, which elongate