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Sample records for inhibits beta-catenin binding

  1. Prenylated Rab acceptor 1 (PRA1) inhibits TCF/{beta}-catenin signaling by binding to {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Tae; Cho, Mi-Young; Choi, Seung-Chul; Kim, Jung Woo; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Yoon, Do-Young; Kim, Jae Wha . E-mail: wjkim@kribb.re.kr; Lim, Jong-Seok . E-mail: jslim@sookmyung.ac.kr

    2006-10-13

    The prenylated Rab acceptor 1 (PRA1) is a ubiquitously expressed 21 kDa protein containing two transmembrane domains that possibly induce its localization to the Golgi complex. It binds to prenylated Rab GTPases and VAMP2. In this study, we report that PRA1-overexpressing cells exhibited a significantly retarded growth rate as compared to that of the mock-transfected cells, and the transcriptional activity of TCF, as evaluated by TOPflash luciferase reporter assay, was profoundly reduced in the PRA1-overexpressed cells. These intracellular functions of PRA1 were verified by introducing deletion mutant or site-directed mutants, or small interfering RNA of PRA1. In addition, the translocation of {beta}-catenin from the cytosol to the nucleus was blocked to a significant degree in the PRA1-cells, and the interaction of PRA1 and {beta}-catenin was identified by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation analysis. Finally, we observed that the inhibition of TCF/{beta}-catenin signaling by PRA1 is associated with ERK1/2 dephosphorylation. Therefore, our data suggest that the in vivo modulation of PRA1 may be involved in TCF/{beta}-catenin signaling, as well as cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis.

  2. ICAT Inhibits beta-Catenin Binding to Tcf/Lef-Family Transcription Factors and in the General Coactivator p300 Using Independent Structural Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, {beta}-catenin activates target genes through its interactions with Tcf/Lef-family transcription factors and additional transcriptional coactivators. The crystal structure of ICAT, an inhibitor of {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription, bound to the armadillo repeat domain of {beta}-catenin, has been determined. ICAT contains an N-terminal helilical domain that binds to repeats 11 and 12 of {beta}-catenin, and an extended C-terminal region that binds to repeats 5-10 in a manner similar that of Tcfs and other {beta}-catenin ligands. Full-length ICAT dissociates complexes of {beta}-catenin, Lef-1, and the transcriptional coactivator p300, whereas the helical domain alone selectively blocks binding to p300. The C-terminal armadillo repeats of {beta}-catenin may be an attractive target for compounds designed to disrupt aberrant {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription associated with various cancers.

  3. Inhibition of {beta}-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-06-17

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of {beta}-catenin distribution and of nuclear {beta}-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The {beta}-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of {beta}-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting {beta}-catenin/Tcf complex formation.

  4. Inhibition of Drosophila Wg signaling involves competition between Mad and Armadillo/beta-catenin for dTcf binding.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi Arial; Rahnama, Maryam; Wang, Simon; Lee, Wendy; Verheyen, Esther M

    2008-01-01

    Precisely regulated signal transduction pathways are crucial for the regulation of developmental events and prevention of tumorigenesis. Both the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFbeta)/Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathways play essential roles in organismal patterning and growth, and their deregulation can lead to cancers. We describe a mechanism of interaction between Drosophila Wg and BMP signaling in which Wg target gene expression is antagonized by BMP signaling. In vivo, high levels of both an activated BMP receptor and the BMP effector Mad can inhibit the expression of Wg target genes. Conversely, loss of mad can induce Wg target gene expression. In addition, we find that ectopic expression in vivo of the Wg transcription factor dTcf is able to suppress the inhibitory effect caused by ectopic Mad. In vitro binding studies revealed competition for dTcf binding between Mad and the Wnt effector beta-catenin/Armadillo (Arm). Our in vivo genetic analyses and target gene studies support a mechanism consistent with the in vitro binding and competition studies, namely that BMP pathway components can repress Wg target gene expression by influencing the binding of Arm and dTcf. PMID:19065265

  5. Ligand-dependent inhibition of beta-catenin/TCF signaling by androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Chesire, Dennis R; Isaacs, William B

    2002-12-01

    Beta-catenin signaling may contribute to prostate cancer (CaP) progression. Although beta-catenin is known to upregulate T cell factor (TCF) target gene expression in CaP cells, recent evidence demonstrates its capacity to enhance ligand-dependent androgen receptor (AR) function. Thus, we wished to further understand the interaction between these two pathways. We find in both CaP cells (CWR22-Rv1, LAPC-4, DU145) and non-CaP cells (HEK-293, TSU, SW480, HCT-116) that beta-catenin/TCF-related transcription (CRT), as measured by activation of a synthetic promoter and that of cyclin D1, is inhibited by androgen treatment. This inhibition is AR-dependent, as it only occurs in cells expressing AR endogenously or transiently, and is abrogated by AR antagonists. Additional analyses convey that the ligand-dependent nature of CRT suppression depends on transactivation-competent AR in the nucleus, but not on indirect effects stemming from AR target gene expression. Given the recent work identifying an AR/beta-catenin interaction, and from our finding that liganded AR does not prompt gross changes in the constitutive nuclear localization of TCF4 or mutant beta-catenin, we hypothesized that transcription factor (i.e. AR and TCF) competition for beta-catenin recruitment may explain, in part, androgen-induced suppression of CRT. To address this idea, we expressed an AR mutant lacking its DNA-binding domain (DBD). This receptor could not orchestrate ligand-dependent CRT repression, thereby providing support for those recent data implicating the AR DBD/LBD as necessary for beta-catenin interaction. Further supporting this hypothesis, TCF/LEF over-expression counteracts androgen-induced suppression of CRT, and requires beta-catenin binding activity to do so. Interestingly, TCF4 over-expression potently antagonizes AR function; however, this inhibition may occur independently of beta-catenin/TCF4 interaction. These results from TCF4 over-expression analyses, taken together, provide

  6. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans, gomisins J and N inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungsu; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yoo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won

    2012-11-16

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of the possible molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway and the induction of G0/G1-phase arrest by gomisins J and N, derived from the fruits of S. chinensis, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N disrupted the binding of {beta}-catenin to specific DNA sequences, TBE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the HCT116 cell proliferation through G0/G1 phase arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gomisins J and N inhibited the expression of Cyc D1, a Wnt/{beta}-catenin target gene. -- Abstract: Here, we report that gomisin J and gomisin N, dibenzocyclooctadiene type lignans isolated from Schisandra chinensis, inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in HCT116 cells. Gomisins J and N appear to inhibit Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction between {beta}-catenin and its specific target DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) rather than by altering the expression of the {beta}-catenin protein. Gomisins J and N inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase arrest induced by gomisins J and N appears to be caused by a decrease in the expression of Cyclin D1, a representative target gene of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway, as well as Cdk2, Cdk4, and E2F-1. Therefore, gomisins J and N, the novel Wnt/{beta}-catenin inhibitors discovered in this study, may serve as potential agents for the prevention and treatment of human colorectal cancers.

  7. Jade-1 inhibits Wnt signalling by ubiquitylating beta-catenin and mediates Wnt pathway inhibition by pVHL.

    PubMed

    Chitalia, Vipul C; Foy, Rebecca L; Bachschmid, Markus M; Zeng, Liling; Panchenko, Maria V; Zhou, Mina I; Bharti, Ajit; Seldin, David C; Lecker, Stewart H; Dominguez, Isabel; Cohen, Herbert T

    2008-10-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau protein pVHL suppresses renal tumorigenesis in part by promoting the degradation of hypoxia-inducible HIF-alpha transcription factors; additional mechanisms have been proposed. pVHL also stabilizes the plant homeodomain protein Jade-1, which is a candidate renal tumour suppressor that may correlate with renal cancer risk. Here we show that Jade-1 binds the oncoprotein beta-catenin in Wnt-responsive fashion. Moreover, Jade-1 destabilizes wild-type beta-catenin but not a cancer-causing form of beta-catenin. Whereas the well-established beta-catenin E3 ubiquitin ligase component beta-TrCP ubiquitylates only phosphorylated beta-catenin, Jade-1 ubiquitylates both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated beta-catenin and therefore regulates canonical Wnt signalling in both Wnt-off and Wnt-on phases. Thus, the different characteristics of beta-TrCP and Jade-1 may ensure optimal Wnt pathway regulation. Furthermore, pVHL downregulates beta-catenin in a Jade-1-dependent manner and inhibits Wnt signalling, supporting a role for Jade-1 and Wnt signalling in renal tumorigenesis. The pVHL tumour suppressor and the Wnt tumorigenesis pathway are therefore directly linked through Jade-1.

  8. MiR-214 inhibits cell growth in hepatocellular carcinoma through suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaojun; Chen, Ji; Li, Feng; Lin, Yanting; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhongwei; Jiang, Jiaji

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 is frequently downregulated in human HCC cell lines and tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 overexpression inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 directly targets {beta}-catenin 3 Prime -UTR in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-214 regulates {beta}-catenin downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: Mounting evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are implicated in carcinogenesis and can function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Recent profile studies of miRNA expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-214) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its potential functions and underlying mechanisms in hepatocarcinogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we confirmed that miR-214 is significantly downregulated in HCC cells and specimens. Ectopic overexpression of miR-214 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-214 could directly target the 3 Prime -untranslated region (3 Prime -UTR) of {beta}-catenin mRNA and suppress its protein expression. Similar to the restoring miR-214 expression, {beta}-catenin downregulation inhibited cell growth, whereas restoring the {beta}-catenin expression abolished the function of miR-214. Moreover, miR-214-mediated reduction of {beta}-catenin resulted in suppression of several downstream genes including c-Myc, cyclinD1, TCF-1, and LEF-1. These findings indicate that miR-214 serves as tumor suppressor and plays substantial roles in inhibiting the tumorigenesis of HCC through suppression of {beta}-catenin. Given these, miR-214 may serve as a useful prognostic or therapeutic target for treatment of HCC.

  9. A specific domain in alpha-catenin mediates binding to beta-catenin or plakoglobin.

    PubMed

    Huber, O; Krohn, M; Kemler, R

    1997-08-01

    The E-cadherin-catenin adhesion complex has been the subject of many structural and functional studies because of its importance in development, normal tissue function and carcinogenesis. It is well established that the cytoplasmic domain of E-cadherin binds either beta-catenin or plakoglobin, which both can assemble alpha-catenin into the complex. Recently we have identified an alpha-catenin binding site in beta-catenin and plakoglobin and postulated, based on sequence analysis, that these protein-protein interactions are mediated by a hydrophobic interaction mechanism. Here we have now identified the reciprocal complementary binding site in alpha-catenin which mediates its interaction with beta-catenin and plakoglobin. Using in vitro association assays with C-terminal truncations of alpha-catenin expressed as recombinant fusion proteins, we found that the N-terminal 146 amino acids are required for this interaction. We then identified a peptide of 27 amino acids within this sequence (amino acid positions 117-143) which is necessary and sufficient to bind beta-catenin or plakoglobin. As shown by mutational analysis, hydrophobic amino acids within this binding site are important for the interaction. The results described here, together with our previous work, give strong support for the idea that these proteins associate by hydrophobic interactions of two alpha-helices.

  10. The APC tumor suppressor binds to C-terminal binding protein to divert nuclear beta-catenin from TCF.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Fumihiko; Bienz, Mariann

    2004-11-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an important tumor suppressor in the colon. APC antagonizes the transcriptional activity of the Wnt effector beta-catenin by promoting its nuclear export and its proteasomal destruction in the cytoplasm. Here, we show that a third function of APC in antagonizing beta-catenin involves C-terminal binding protein (CtBP). APC is associated with CtBP in vivo and binds to CtBP in vitro through its conserved 15 amino acid repeats. Failure of this association results in elevated levels of beta-catenin/TCF complexes and of TCF-mediated transcription. Notably, CtBP is neither associated with TCF in vivo nor does mutation of the CtBP binding motifs in TCF-4 alter its transcriptional activity. This questions the idea that CtBP is a direct corepressor of TCF. Our evidence indicates that APC is an adaptor between beta-catenin and CtBP and that CtBP lowers the availability of free nuclear beta-catenin for binding to TCF by sequestering APC/beta-catenin complexes. PMID:15525529

  11. {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Haeyong; Bae, Sungmin; Kim, Kijeong; Kim, Wonyong; Chung, Sang-In; Yoon, Yoosik

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} Baicalin maintains the levels of {beta}-Catenin during adipogenesis. {yields} {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effect of baicalin. {yields} Baicalin maintains the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway during adipogenesis. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin reportedly inhibits adipogenesis through the down-regulations of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){gamma} and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP){alpha}. We report that baicalin, a natural flavonoid compound, inhibits adipogenesis by modulating {beta}-Catenin. During 3T3-L1 cell adipogenesis, {beta}-Catenin was down-regulated, but baicalin treatment maintained {beta}-Catenin expression. Anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin were significantly attenuated by {beta}-Catenin siRNA transfection. {beta}-Catenin siRNA rescued the reduced expressions of PPAR{gamma}, C/EBP{alpha}, fatty acid binding protein 4 and lipoprotein lipase by baicalin. Furthermore, baicalin modulated members of the WNT/{beta}-Catenin pathway by maintaining the expressions of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6, disheveled (DVL)2 and DVL3. These findings suggest that {beta}-Catenin mediates the anti-adipogenic effects of baicalin.

  12. Inhibition of the Tcf/beta-catenin complex increases apoptosis and impairs adrenocortical tumor cell proliferation and adrenal steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Letícia F.; Bueno, Ana Carolina; Gomes, Débora C.; Abduch, Rafael; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, there is no effective therapy for patients with advanced/metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC). The activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is frequent in ACC and this pathway is a promising therapeutic target. Aim To investigate the effects of the inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin in ACC cells. Methods Adrenal (NCI-H295 and Y1) and non-adrenal (HeLa) cell lines were treated with PNU-74654 (5–200 μM) for 24–96 h to assess cell viability (MTS-based assay), apoptosis (Annexin V), expression/localization of beta-catenin (qPCR, immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and western blot), expression of beta-catenin target genes (qPCR and western blot), and adrenal steroidogenesis (radioimmunoassay, qPCR and western blot). Results In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 significantly decreased cell proliferation 96 h after treatment, increased early and late apoptosis, decreased nuclear beta-catenin accumulation, impaired CTNNB1/beta-catenin expression and increased beta-catenin target genes 48 h after treatment. No effects were observed on HeLa cells. In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione secretion 24 and 48 h after treatment. Additionally, in NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased SF1 and CYP21A2 mRNA expression as well as the protein levels of STAR and aldosterone synthase 48 h after treatment. In Y1 cells, PNU-74654 impaired corticosterone secretion 24 h after treatment but did not decrease cell viability. Conclusions Blocking the Tcf/beta-catenin complex inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in adrenocortical tumor cells triggering increased apoptosis, decreased cell viability and impairment of adrenal steroidogenesis. These promising findings pave the way for further experiments inhibiting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in pre-clinical models of ACC. The inhibition of this pathway may become a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with ACC. PMID:26515592

  13. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Il-Rae; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong; Choi, Young-Whan; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Oh, Sangtaek; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  14. beta-Catenin/TCF pathway plays a vital role in selenium induced-growth inhibition and apoptosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yan, Shuang; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Guo; Yang, Shangbin; He, Shun; Bai, Jinfeng; Quan, Lanping; Zhu, Hongxia; Dong, Yan; Xu, Ningzhi

    2010-10-01

    Epidemiological and experimental studies have indicated selenium could reduce the risk of some cancers. In our present study, growth inhibition and apoptosis were detected upon methylseleninic acid (MSA) treatment in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines EC9706 and KYSE150. MSA reduced beta-catenin protein levels, while there was no significant change observed on transcriptional levels. Moreover, we found MSA accelerated the degradation of beta-catenin and activated glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta). Some targets of beta-catenin/TCF pathway and apoptosis-related genes altered after MSA treatment. Notably, utilizing the inducible 293-TR/beta-catenin cell line, we found the apoptotic phenotypes induced by MSA were partially reversed by the overexpression of beta-catenin. Overall, our data indicate the effects induced by MSA in ESCC cells may act on the inhibition of beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

  15. The catenin p120{sup ctn} inhibits Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the {beta}-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, Christopher M.; Kelly, Kevin F.; O'Kelly, Ita; Graham, Monica; Crawford, Howard C.; Daniel, Juliet M. . E-mail: danielj@mcmaster.ca

    2005-05-01

    The POZ-zinc finger transcription factor Kaiso was first identified as a specific binding partner for the Armadillo catenin and cell adhesion cofactor, p120{sup ctn}. Kaiso is a unique POZ protein with bi-modal DNA-binding properties; it associates with a sequence-specific DNA consensus Kaiso binding site (KBS) or methylated CpG dinucleotides, and regulates transcription of artificial promoters containing either site. Interestingly, the promoter of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin/TCF target gene matrilysin possesses two conserved copies of the KBS, which suggested that Kaiso might regulate matrilysin expression. In this study, we demonstrate using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that Kaiso associates with the matrilysin promoter in vivo. Minimal promoter assays further confirmed that Kaiso specifically repressed transcription of the matrilysin promoter; mutation of the KBS element or RNAi-mediated depletion of Kaiso abrogated this effect. More importantly, Kaiso blocked {beta}-catenin-mediated activation of the matrilysin promoter. Consistent with our previous findings, both Kaiso-DNA binding and Kaiso-mediated transcriptional repression of the matrilysin promoter were inhibited by overexpression of wild-type p120{sup ctn}, but not by a p120{sup ctn} mutant exhibiting impaired nuclear import. Collectively, our data establish Kaiso as a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of the matrilysin promoter, and suggest that p120{sup ctn} and {beta}-catenin act in a synergistic manner, via distinct mechanisms, to activate matrilysin expression.

  16. Beta-catenin inhibits cell growth of a malignant mesothelioma cell line, NCI-H28, with a 3p21.3 homozygous deletion.

    PubMed

    Usami, Noriyasu; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Maeda, Osamu; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Minna, John D; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Yoshioka, Hiromu; Imaizumi, Munehisa; Ueda, Yuichi; Takahashi, Masahide; Shimokata, Kaoru

    2003-09-11

    We have found that a malignant mesothelioma cell line, NCI-H28, had a chromosome 3p21.3 homozygous deletion containing the beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1), which suggested that the deletion of beta-catenin might have a growth advantage in the development of this tumor. To determine whether beta-catenin has a growth-inhibitory activity, we transfected wild-type beta-catenin, Ser37Cys mutant beta-catenin as an activated type, and C-terminus deletion mutant beta-catenin that lacks the transcription activity, into the NCI-H28 cells. A non-small cell lung cancer cell line, NCI-H1299, which expressed endogenous beta-catenin, was also studied. We tested the localization of exogenous beta-catenin in the NCI-H28 cells with immunofluorescence, and found that the wild-type beta-catenin and the C-terminus deletion mutant were more strongly expressed in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm than in the nucleus, while the Ser37Cys mutant was more in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. By using luciferase-reporter assay, the beta-catenin/T-cell factor 4-mediated transactivity of the Ser37Cys mutant was shown to be higher than that of the wild-type beta-catenin in both cell lines. However, the transactivity of the C-terminus deletion mutant was strongly reduced in both. Colony formation of the NCI-H28 cells was reduced by 50% after transfection with the wild-type beta-catenin, and 60% with the Ser37Cys mutant, but only 20% with the C-terminus deletion mutant compared to the vector control. Inhibition of colony formation in NCI-H28 cells was because of apoptosis, manifested by positive staining of Annexin V and TUNEL assays in transfected cells. In contrast, when transfected with the wild-type beta-catenin, no significant reduction in colony formation was seen in beta-catenin wild-type NCI-H1299 cells. In conclusion, our data indicate that inactivation of beta-catenin by a 3p21.3 homozygous deletion might be a crucial event in the development of the mesothelioma NCI-H28 cells. Thus, while

  17. Negative regulation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in AGS gastric cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Chi Hoon; Jung, Kyung Chae; Rhee, Ho Sung; Yang, Chul Hak . E-mail: chulyang@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-30

    Functional activation of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling plays an important role in early events in carcinogenesis. We examined the effect of naringenin against {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that naringenin inhibited {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling by naringenin in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant {beta}-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3{beta}, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to {beta}-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that the {beta}-catenin distribution and the levels of nuclear {beta}-catenin and Tcf-4 proteins were unchanged after naringenin treatment. Moreover, the binding activities of Tcf complexes to consensus DNA were not affected by naringenin. Taken together, these data suggest that naringenin inhibits {beta}-catenin/Tcf signaling in gastric cancer with unknown mechanisms.

  18. Effects of short-hairpin RNA-inhibited {beta}-catenin expression on the growth of human multiple myeloma cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wenqing; Yang, Chengwei; Qian, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CTNNB1 shRNA could inhibit the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significantly profound apoptotic cell death in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo, CTNNB1 silence led to a growth inhibition of myeloma growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc and {beta}-catenin in the expression cells of cleaved caspase-3 were increased. -- Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM) is thrombogenic as a consequence of multiple hemostatic effects. Overexpression of {beta}-catenin has been observed in several types of malignant tumors, including MM. However, the relationship between {beta}-catenin expression and MM remains unclear. In the present study, RNA interference was used to inhibit {beta}-catenin expression in RPMI8226 cells. RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses showed that {beta}-catenin mRNA and protein expression were markedly down-regulated by CTNNB1 shRNA. Western blotting showed that the protein levels of cyclin D1 and glutamine synthetase were downregulated and supported the transcriptional regulatory function of {beta}-catenin. The MTT assay showed that CTNNB1 shRNA could have significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation of RPMI8226 cells. The TOPflash reporter assay demonstrated significant downregulation after CTNNB1 shRNA transfection in RPMI8226 cells. Flow cytometric analyses also showed significantly profound apoptosis in CTNNB1 shRNA cells. We found CTNNB1 silence led to growth inhibition of MM growth in vivo. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that c-myc and {beta}-catenin were reduced in CTNNB1 shRNA tumor tissues, but that expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased. These results show that {beta}-catenin could be a new therapeutic agent that targets the biology of MM cells.

  19. Nuclear Hormone Receptor LXRα Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Wnt/beta-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Kenichi; Morello, Fulvio; Zhang, Zhiping; Masuda, Tomoko; Iwanaga, Shiro; Steffensen, Knut R.; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Pratt, Richard E.; Dzau, Victor J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor-alpha (LXRα) plays a vital role in cholesterol homeostasis and is reported to play a role in adipose function and obesity although this is controversial. Conversely, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are suggested to be a major source of adipocyte generation. Accordingly, we examined the role of LXRα in adipogenesis of MSCs. Adult murine MSCs (mMSCs) were isolated from wild type (WT) and LXR-null mice. Using WT mMSCs, we further generated cell lines stably overexpressing GFP-LXRα (mMSC/LXRα/GFP) or GFP alone (mMSC/GFP) by retroviral infection. Confluent mMSCs were differentiated into adipocytes by the established protocol. Compared with MSCs isolated from WT mice, MSCs from LXR-null mice showed significantly increased adipogenesis, as determined by lipid droplet accumulation and adipogenesis-related gene expression. Moreover, mMSCs stably overexpressing GFP-LXRα (mMSC/LXRα/GFP) exhibited significantly decreased adipogenesis compared with mMSCs overexpressing GFP alone (mMSC/GFP). Since Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is reported to inhibit adipogenesis, we further examined it. The LXR-null group showed significantly decreased Wnt expression accompanied by a decrease of cellular beta-catenin (vs. WT). The mMSC/LXRα/GFP group exhibited significantly increased Wnt expression accompanied by an increase of cellular beta-catenin (vs. mMSC/GFP). These data demonstrate that LXRα has an inhibitory effect on adipogenic differentiation in murine mesenchymal stem cells with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. These results provide important insights into the pathophysiology of obesity and obesity related consequences such as metabolic syndrome and may identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26595172

  20. Polymeric black tea polyphenols inhibit 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal carcinogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish B.

    2008-02-15

    Tea polyphenols like epigallocatechin gallate and theaflavins are established chemopreventive agents for colorectal carcinogenesis. However, studies on evaluating similar chemopreventive properties of thearubigins or polymeric black tea polyphenols (PBPs), the most abundant polyphenols in black tea, are limited. Hence, in the present study we aim to investigate chemopreventive effects along with probable mechanisms of action of PBP extract employing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats as experimental model. The present study suggests that PBPs, like other tea polyphenols, also inhibit DMH-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by decreasing tumor volume and multiplicity. This study also shows that although the pretreatment with PBP extract could induce detoxifying enzymes in hepatic and colorectal tissue, it did not show any additional chemopreventive effects when compared to treatments with PBP extract after initiation with DMH. Mechanistically, PBP extract may inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis by decreasing DMH-induced cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Treatments with PBP extract showed decreased levels of COX-2, c-MYC and cyclin D1 proteins which aid cell proliferation probably by regulating {beta}-catenin by maintaining expression of APC and decreasing inactivation of GSK3{beta}. DMH-induced activation of MAP kinases such as ERK and JNK was also found to be inhibited by treatments with PBP extract. In conclusion, the protective effects of PBP extract could be attributed to inhibition of DMH-induced cellular proliferation probably through {beta}-catenin regulation.

  1. Threonine 393 of beta-catenin regulates interaction with Axin.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Symes, Karen; Seldin, David C; Dominguez, Isabel

    2009-09-01

    CK2 is a regulatory kinase implicated in embryonic development and in cancer. Among the CK2 substrates is beta-catenin, a protein with dual function in Wnt signaling and cell adhesion. Previously, we reported that CK2 activity is required for beta-catenin stability and we identified threonine (T) 393 as a major CK2 phosphorylation site in beta-catenin. However, it is not known whether phosphorylation at T393 increases beta-catenin stability and if so, what is the mechanism. In this study we investigate the molecular mechanism of beta-catenin stabilization through phosphorylation at T393. We found that pseudophosphorylation of beta-catenin at T393 resulted in a stable activated form of beta-catenin with decreased affinity for Axin in vitro. This phosphomimetic mutant also displayed decreased regulation by Axin in vivo in a bioassay in Xenopus laevis embryos. In contrast, the binding of T393 pseudophosphorylated beta-catenin to E-cadherin was unaffected. Further analysis showed that pseudophosphorylation at T393 did not prevent beta-catenin phosphorylation by GSK3beta. Interestingly, we found that in the presence of pseudophophorylated beta-catenin and another activated form of beta-catenin, the recruitment of GSK3beta to Axin is enhanced. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of T393 by CK2 may affect the stability of beta-catenin through decreased binding to Axin. In addition, the increased recruitment of GSK3beta to the destruction complex in the presence of activated beta-catenin mutants could be a feedback mechanism to suppress overactive Wnt signaling.

  2. Bisindoylmaleimide I suppresses adipocyte differentiation through stabilization of intracellular {beta}-catenin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Munju; Park, Seoyoung; Gwak, Jungsug; Kim, Dong-Eun; Yea, Sung Su; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-02-29

    The Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway plays important roles in cell differentiation. Activation of this pathway, likely by Wnt-10b, has been shown to inhibit adipogenesis in cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and mice. Here we revealed that bisindoylmaleimide I (BIM), which is widely used as a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), inhibits adipocyte differentiation through activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. BIM increased {beta}-catenin responsive transcription (CRT) and up-regulated intracellular {beta}-catenin levels in HEK293 cells and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. BIM significantly decreased intracellular lipid accumulation and reduced expression of important adipocyte marker genes including peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and CAATT enhancer-binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Taken together, our findings indicate that BIM inhibits adipogenesis by increasing the stability of {beta}-catenin protein in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells.

  3. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 10 is a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Sekiya, Manami; Hirata, Michiko; Ye, Mingjuan; Yamagishi, Azumi; Lee, Sang-Mi; Kang, Man-Jong; Hosoda, Akemi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Kim, Dong-Ho; Saeki, Shigeru

    2010-02-19

    Wnt signaling pathways play fundamental roles in the differentiation, proliferation and functions of many cells as well as developmental, growth, and homeostatic processes in animals. Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP) 5 and LRP6 serve as coreceptors of Wnt proteins together with Frizzled receptors, triggering activation of canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Here, we found that LRP10, a new member of the LDLR gene family, inhibits the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. The {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) transcriptional activity in HEK293 cells was activated by transfection with Wnt3a or LRP6, which was then inhibited by co-transfection with LRP10. Deletion of the extracellular domain of LRP10 negated its inhibitory effect. The inhibitory effect of LRP10 was consistently conserved in HEK293 cells even when GSK3{beta} phosphorylation was inhibited by incubation with lithium chloride and co-transfection with constitutively active S33Y-mutated {beta}-catenin. Nuclear {beta}-catenin accumulation was unaffected by LRP10. The present studies suggest that LRP10 may interfere with the formation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF complex and/or its binding to target DNA in the nucleus, and that the extracellular domain of LRP10 is critical for inhibition of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  4. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus latent membrane protein 2A activates {beta}-catenin signaling and inhibits differentiation in epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Siler, Catherine A.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is a {gamma}-herpesvirus closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is highly homologous to EBV LMP2A. EBV LMP2A activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and {beta}-catenin signaling pathways in epithelial cells and affects differentiation. In the present study, the biochemical and biological properties of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells were investigated. The expression of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells induced Akt activation, GSK3{beta} inactivation and accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear translocation, but not accumulation of {beta}-catenin was dependent on Akt activation. Rhesus LMP2A also impaired epithelial cell differentiation; however, this process was not dependent upon Akt activation. A mutant rhesus LMP2A lacking six transmembrane domains functioned similarly to wild-type rhesus LMP2A indicating that the full number of transmembrane domains is not required for effects on {beta}-catenin or cell differentiation. These results underscore the similarity of LCV to EBV and the suitability of the macaque as an animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis.

  5. Gamma-secretase-dependent and -independent effects of presenilin1 on beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Raurell, Imma; Codina, Montserrat; Casagolda, David; Del Valle, Beatriz; Baulida, Josep; de Herreros, Antonio García; Duñach, Mireia

    2008-01-01

    Presenilin1 (PS1) is a component of the gamma-secretase complex mutated in cases of Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). PS1 is synthesized as a 50 kDa peptide subsequently processed to two 29 and 20 kDa subunits that remain associated. Processing of PS1 is inhibited by several mutations detected in FAD patients. PS1 acts as negative modulator of beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcriptional activity. In this article we show that in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) the mechanisms of action of the processed and non-processed forms of PS1 on beta-catenin.Tcf-4 transcription are different. Whereas non-processed PS1 inhibits beta-catenin.Tcf-4 activity through a mechanism independent of gamma-secretase and associated with the interaction of this protein with plakoglobin and Tcf-4, the effect of processed PS1 is prevented by gamma-secretase inhibitors, and requires its interaction with E- or N-cadherin and the generation of cytosolic terminal fragments of these two cadherins, which in turn destabilize the beta-catenin transcriptional cofactor CBP. Accordingly, the two forms of PS1 interact differently with E-cadherin or beta-catenin and plakoglobin: whereas processed PS1 binds E-cadherin with high affinity and beta-catenin or plakoglobin weakly, the non-processed form behaves inversely. Moreover, contrarily to processed PS1, that decreases the levels of c-fos RNA, non-processed PS1 inhibits the expression c-myc, a known target of beta-catenin.Tcf-4, and does not block the activity of other transcriptional factors requiring CBP. These results indicate that prevention of PS1 processing in FAD affects the mechanism of repression of the transcriptional activity dependent on beta-catenin. PMID:19114997

  6. Interaction of synaptic scaffolding molecule and Beta -catenin.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Wataru; Yao, Ikuko; Iida, Junko; Tanaka, Noriaki; Hata, Yutaka

    2002-02-01

    Synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) is a synaptic membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted domain organization (MAGI) that interacts with NMDA receptor subunits and neuroligin. In epithelial cells, the non-neuronal isoform of S-SCAM (MAGI-1) is localized at tight or adherens junctions. Recent studies have revealed that the polarized targeting of MAGI-1 to the lateral membrane is mediated by its C-terminal region and that MAGI-1 interacts with beta-catenin in epithelial cells. In this article, we report that S-SCAM interacts with beta-catenin in neurons. beta-Catenin is coimmunoprecipitated with S-SCAM from rat brain. Both S-SCAM and beta-catenin are localized at synapses and are partially colocalized. The C-terminal region of S-SCAM binds to the C-terminal region of beta-catenin. We have tested how the interaction between S-SCAM and beta-catenin plays a role in the synaptic targeting of S-SCAM and beta-catenin. S-SCAM is targeted to synapses via the C-terminal postsynaptic density-95/Dlg-A/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain. beta-Catenin is targeted to synapses with armadillo repeats. The overexpressed C-terminal region of beta-catenin blocks the synaptic targeting of S-SCAM. The overexpressed C-terminal region of S-SCAM is partially targeted to synapses and forms a small number of clusters. In the presence of overexpressed beta-catenin, the C-terminal region of S-SCAM forms more clusters at synapses. These data suggest that the synaptic targeting of S-SCAM is mediated by the interaction with beta-catenin.

  7. Inhibition of beta-catenin signaling by Pb leads to incomplete fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Beier, Eric E; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Buckley, Taylor; Yukata, Kiminori; O'Keefe, Regis; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, J Edward

    2014-11-01

    There is strong evidence in the clinical literature to suggest that elevated lead (Pb) exposure impairs fracture healing. Since Pb has been demonstrated to inhibit bone formation, and Wnt signaling is an important anabolic pathway in chondrocyte maturation and endochondral ossification, we investigated the impact of Wnt therapy on Pb-exposed mice undergoing bone repair in a mouse tibial fracture model. We established that tibial fracture calluses from Pb-treated mice were smaller and contained less mineralized tissue than vehicle controls. This resulted in the persistence of immature cartilage in the callus and decreased β-catenin levels. Reduction of β-catenin protein was concurrent with systemic elevation of LRP5/6 antagonists DKK1 and sclerostin in Pb-exposed mice throughout fracture healing. β-catenin stimulation by the GSK3 inhibitor BIO reversed these molecular changes and restored the amount of mineralized callus. Overall, Pb is identified as a potent inhibitor of endochondral ossification in vivo with correlated effects on bone healing with noted deficits in β-catenin signaling, suggesting the Wnt/β-catenin as a pivotal pathway in the influence of Pb on fracture repair. PMID:25044211

  8. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) targets {beta}-catenin for phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Ji Eon; Sung, Ki Sa; Choi, Dong Wook; Lee, Byeong Jae; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2010-04-16

    The regulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin levels is central in the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling cascade and the activation of the Wnt target genes. Here, we show that homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) acts as a negative regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Knock-down of endogenous HIPK2 increases the stability of {beta}-catenin and results in the accumulation of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus, consequently enhancing the expression of Wnt target genes and cell proliferation both in vivo and in cultured cells. HIPK2 inhibits TCF/LEF-mediated target gene activation via degradation of {beta}-catenin. HIPK2 phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at its Ser33 and Ser37 residues without the aid of a priming kinase. Substitutions of Ser33 and Ser37 for alanines abolished the degradation of {beta}-catenin associated with HIPK2. In ex vivo mouse model, HIPK2 knock-down resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin, thereby potentiated {beta}-catenin-mediated cell proliferation and tumor formation. Furthermore, the axis duplication induced by the ectopic expression of {beta}-catenin was blocked by co-injection of HIPK2 mRNAs into Xenopus embryos. Taken together, HIPK2 appears to function as a novel negative regulator of {beta}-catenin through its phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation.

  9. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) acts via a novel Galpha13-dishevelled axis to stabilize beta-catenin levels.

    PubMed

    Turm, Hagit; Maoz, Myriam; Katz, Vered; Yin, Yong-Jun; Offermanns, Steffan; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2010-05-14

    We have previously shown a novel link between hPar-1 (human protease-activated receptor-1) and beta-catenin stabilization. Although it is well recognized that Wnt signaling leads to beta-catenin accumulation, the role of PAR1 in the process is unknown. We provide here evidence that PAR1 induces beta-catenin stabilization independent of Wnt, Fz (Frizzled), and the co-receptor LRP5/6 (low density lipoprotein-related protein 5/6) and identify selective mediators of the PAR1-beta-catenin axis. Immunohistological analyses of hPar1-transgenic (TG) mouse mammary tissues show the expression of both Galpha(12) and Galpha(13) compared with age-matched control counterparts. However, only Galpha(13) was found to be actively involved in PAR1-induced beta-catenin stabilization. Indeed, a dominant negative form of Galpha(13) inhibited both PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion and Lef/Tcf (lymphoid enhancer factor/T cell factor) transcription activity. PAR1-Galpha(13) association is followed by the recruitment of DVL (Dishevelled), an upstream Wnt signaling protein via the DIX domain. Small interfering RNA-Dvl silencing leads to a reduction in PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion, inhibition of Lef/Tcf transcription activity, and decreased beta-catenin accumulation. It is of note that PAR1 also promotes the binding of beta-arrestin-2 to DVL, suggesting a role for beta-arrestin-2 in PAR1-induced DVL phosphorylation dynamics. Although infection of small interfering RNA-LRP5/6 or the use of the Wnt antagonists, SFRP2 (soluble Frizzled-related protein 2) or SFRP5 potently reduced Wnt3A-mediated beta-catenin accumulation, no effect was observed on PAR1-induced beta-catenin stabilization. Collectively, our data show that PAR1 mediates beta-catenin stabilization independent of Wnt. We propose here a novel cascade of PAR1-induced Galpha(13)-DVL axis in cancer and beta-catenin stabilization. PMID:20223821

  10. Nr-CAM is a target gene of the beta-catenin/LEF-1 pathway in melanoma and colon cancer and its expression enhances motility and confers tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice E; Ben-Yedidia, Tamar; Shtutman, Michael; Feinstein, Elena; Einat, Paz; Ben-Ze'ev, Avri

    2002-08-15

    beta-catenin and plakoglobin (gamma-catenin) are homologous molecules involved in cell adhesion, linking cadherin receptors to the cytoskeleton. beta-catenin is also a key component of the Wnt pathway by being a coactivator of LEF/TCF transcription factors. To identify novel target genes induced by beta-catenin and/or plakoglobin, DNA microarray analysis was carried out with RNA from cells overexpressing either protein. This analysis revealed that Nr-CAM is the gene most extensively induced by both catenins. Overexpression of either beta-catenin or plakoglobin induced Nr-CAM in a variety of cell types and the LEF/TCF binding sites in the Nr-CAM promoter were required for its activation by catenins. Retroviral transduction of Nr-CAM into NIH3T3 cells stimulated cell growth, enhanced motility, induced transformation, and produced rapidly growing tumors in nude mice. Nr-CAM and LEF-1 expression was elevated in human colon cancer tissue and cell lines and in human malignant melanoma cell lines but not in melanocytes or normal colon tissue. Dominant negative LEF-1 decreased Nr-CAM expression and antibodies to Nr-CAM inhibited the motility of B16 melanoma cells. The results indicate that induction of Nr-CAM transcription by beta-catenin or plakoglobin plays a role in melanoma and colon cancer tumorigenesis, probably by promoting cell growth and motility. PMID:12183361

  11. Overexpression of EB1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) may promote cellular growth by activating beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihua; Zhou, Xiaobo; Zhu, Hongxia; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Cuiqi; Zhang, Guo; Xue, Liyan; Lu, Ning; Quan, Lanping; Bai, Jinfeng; Zhan, Qimin; Xu, Ningzhi

    2005-10-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a multifactorial etiology involving environmental and/or genetic factors. End-binding protein 1 (EB1), which was cloned as an interacting partner of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor protein, was previously found overexpressed in ESCC. However, the precise role of EB1 in the development of this malignancy has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we analysed freshly resected ESCC specimens and demonstrated that EB1 was overexpressed in approximately 63% of tumor samples compared to matched normal tissue. We report that overexpression of EB1 in the ESCC line EC9706 significantly promotes cell growth, whereas suppression of EB1 protein level by RNA interference significantly inhibited growth of esophageal tumor cells. In addition, EB1 overexpression induced nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin and promoted the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF). These effects were partially or completely abolished by coexpression of APC or DeltaN TCF4, respectively. Also, we found that EB1 affected the interaction between beta-catenin and APC. Furthermore, EB1 overexpression was correlated with cytoplasmic/nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin in primary human ESCC. Taken together, these results support the novel hypothesis that EB1 overexpression may play a role in the development of ESCC by affecting APC function and activating the beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

  12. Beta-catenin signaling mediates CD4 expression on mature CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Jason M; Zloza, Andrew; Li, Wei; Narasipura, Srinivas D; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2010-08-15

    Upon activation, a subset of mature human CD8(+) T cells re-expresses CD4 dimly. This CD4(dim)CD8(bright) T cell population is genuine and enriched in antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses. The signaling pathway that leads to CD4 re-expression on mature CD8(+) T cells is not clear. Given that Wnt/beta-catenin signaling plays a critical role in the transition of CD4(-)CD8(-) to CD4(+)CD8(+) thymocytes, we determined whether beta-catenin mediates CD4 expression on mature CD8(+) T cells. We demonstrate that active beta-catenin expression is 20-fold higher on CD4(dim)CD8(bright) than CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. Activation of beta-catenin signaling, through LiCl or transfection with a constitutively active construct of beta-catenin, induced CD4 on CD8(+) T cells by approximately 10-fold. Conversely, inhibition of beta-catenin signaling through transfection with a dominant-negative construct for T cell factor-4, a downstream effector of beta-catenin signaling, diminished CD4 expression on CD8(+) T cells by 50% in response to T cell activation. Beta-catenin-mediated induction of CD4 on CD8(+) T cells is transcriptionally regulated, as it induced CD4 mRNA, and T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor sites were identified within the human CD4 promoter. Further, beta-catenin expression induced the antiapoptotic factor BcL-xL, suggesting that beta-catenin may mediate protection against activation-induced cell death. Collectively, these data demonstrate that beta-catenin is critical in inducing CD4 expression on mature CD8(+) T cells, suggesting that it is a common pathway for CD4 upregulation among thymocytes and mature CD8(+) T cells. PMID:20631314

  13. Transactivation of vimentin by beta-catenin in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Christine; Polette, Myriam; Mestdagt, Mélanie; Nawrocki-Raby, Béatrice; Ruggeri, Philippe; Birembaut, Philippe; Foidart, Jean-Michel

    2003-05-15

    The cytoplasmic and nuclear redistribution of beta-catenin and the de novo expression of vimentin are frequently involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition associated with increased invasive/migratory properties of epithelial cells. Because beta-catenin can act as a coactivator of transcription through its binding to the T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor 1 transcription factor family, we have explored the possibility that beta-catenin/TCF could directly transactivate vimentin. We first compared vimentin expression in relation with the localization of beta-catenin in eight breast cancer cell lines displaying various degrees of invasiveness and in a model of cell migration using human mammary MCF10A cells. We could thus show a cytoplasmic and/or nuclear distribution of beta-catenin in invasive/migratory cells expressing vimentin, but not in noninvasive/stationary vimentin-negative cell lines. In addition, the human vimentin promoter was found to be up-regulated by beta-catenin and TCF-4 cotransfection. Varying with the cellular background, a diminution of this up-regulation was observed when the putative beta-catenin/TCF binding site of the vimentin promoter was mutated. Our results therefore demonstrate that the vimentin promoter is a target of the beta-catenin/TCF pathway and strongly suggest an implication of this regulation in epithelial cell migration/invasion.

  14. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 activated enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 complex could activate enamelin gene transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 can directly bind to enamelin 5' regulatory region. {yields} Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling can upregulate enamelin expression in ameloblast-like cells. -- Abstract: Enamelin is an ameloblast-specific matrix protein believed to play essential roles in enamel formation. However, mechanisms of enamelin transcription regulation are not clear. {beta}-Catenin/LEF1 is a key transcriptional complex involved in tooth development. In this study, the role of {beta}-catenin/LEF1 in enamelin expression was investigated. The 5'-flanking region of the mouse enamelin gene was analyzed and cloned. Co-transfection analysis and mutation assays revealed that two conserved LEF1 responsive elements located at -1002 and -597 bp upstream of the enamelin translation initiation site could augment transcriptional activity of the enamelin. The interaction between the enamelin elements and {beta}-catenin/LEF1 was further confirmed by electrophoresis mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In addition, LiCl treatment induced nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin and elevated endogenous enamelin expression in mouse ameloblast-like cells. The results suggested that Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling could function in enamelin gene expression by direct interaction through two conserved LEF1 responsive elements on the enamelin gene in ameloblast-like cells.

  15. Klotho inhibits angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through suppression of the AT1R/beta catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liangzhu; Meng, Wei; Ding, Jieqiong; Cheng, Menglin

    2016-04-29

    Myocardial hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for cardiac morbidity and mortality. The antiaging protein klotho reportedly possesses a protective role in cardiac diseases. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effects of klotho remain unknown. This study was aimed to determine the effects of klotho on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertrophy in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes and the possible mechanism of actions. We found that klotho significantly inhibited Ang II-induced hypertrophic growth of neonatal cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by decreased [(3)H]-Leucine incorporation, cardiomyocyte surface area and β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) mRNA expression. Meanwhile, klotho inhibited Ang II-stimulated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cardiomyocytes, as evidenced by decreased protein expression of active β-catenin, downregulated protein and mRNA expression of the β-catenin target genes c-myc and cyclin D1, and increased β-catenin phosphorylation. Inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by the specific inhibitor XAV939 markedly attenuated Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The further study revealed that klotho treatment significantly downregulated protein expression of Ang II receptor type I (AT1R) but not type II (AT2R). The AT1R antagonist losartan inhibited Ang II-stimulated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Our findings suggest that klotho inhibits Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through suppression of the AT1R/β-catenin signaling pathway, which may provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the protective effects of klotho in heart diseases, and raise the possibility that klotho may act as an endogenous antihypertrophic factor by inhibiting the Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:26970306

  16. Roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in epithelial differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yajing; Sun, Zhaorui; Qiu, Xuefeng; Li, Yan; Qin, Jizheng; Han, Xiaodong

    2009-12-25

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to be able to differentiate into epithelial lineage, but the precise mechanisms controlling this process are unclear. Our aim is to explore the roles of Wnt/{beta}-catenin in the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Using indirect co-culture of rat MSCs with rat airway epithelial cells (RTE), MSCs expressed several airway epithelial markers (cytokeratin 18, tight junction protein occudin, cystic fibrosis transmembrance regulator). The protein levels of some important members in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling were determined, suggested down-regulation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin with epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Furthermore, Wnt3{alpha} can inhibit the epithelial differentiation of MSCs. A loss of {beta}-catenin induced by Dickkopf-1 can enhance MSCs differentiation into epithelial cells. Lithium chloride transiently activated {beta}-catenin expression and subsequently decreased {beta}-catenin level and at last inhibited MSCs to differentiate into airway epithelium. Taken together, our study indicated that RTE cells can trigger epithelial differentiation of MSCs. Blocking Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling may promote MSCs to differentiate towards airway epithelial cells.

  17. Murrayafoline A attenuates the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by promoting the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyuk; Gwak, Jungsug; Cho, Munju; Ryu, Min-Jung; Lee, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Gye Won; Yun, Mi-Young; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Shin, Jae-Gook; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2010-01-01

    Molecular lesions in Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling and subsequent up-regulation of {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT) occur frequently during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that suppress CRT, we screened natural compounds in a cell-based assay for detection of TOPFalsh reporter activity. Murrayafoline A, a carbazole alkaloid isolated from Glycosmis stenocarpa, antagonized CRT that was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a-CM) or LiCl, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}), and promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin without altering its N-terminal phosphorylation at the Ser33/37 residues, marking it for proteasomal degradation, or the expression of Siah-1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Murrayafoline A repressed the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, which is known {beta}-catenin/T cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes and thus inhibited the proliferation of various colon cancer cells. These findings indicate that murrayafoline A may be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for use in the treatment of colon cancer.

  18. Casein kinase iepsilon in the wnt pathway: regulation of beta-catenin function.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, C; Leong, P; Xu, L; Harrison, S D; Williams, L T

    1999-10-26

    Wnt and its intracellular effector beta-catenin regulate developmental and oncogenic processes. Using expression cloning to identify novel components of the Wnt pathway, we isolated casein kinase Iepsilon (CKIepsilon). CKIepsilon mimicked Wnt in inducing a secondary axis in Xenopus, stabilizing beta-catenin, and stimulating gene transcription in cells. Inhibition of endogenous CKIepsilon by kinase-defective CKIepsilon or CKIepsilon antisense-oligonucleotides attenuated Wnt signaling. CKIepsilon was in a complex with axin and other downstream components of the Wnt pathway, including Dishevelled. CKIepsilon appears to be a positive regulator of the pathway and a link between upstream signals and the complexes that regulate beta-catenin. PMID:10535959

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cross-talks with canonical Wnt signaling via phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junxing; Yue, Wanfu; Zhu, Mei J.; Sreejayan, Nair; Du, Min

    2010-04-23

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy metabolism; its activity is regulated by a plethora of physiological conditions, exercises and many anti-diabetic drugs. Recent studies show that AMPK involves in cell differentiation but the underlying mechanism remains undefined. Wingless Int-1 (Wnt)/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway regulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells through enhancing {beta}-catenin/T-cell transcription factor 1 (TCF) mediated transcription. The objective of this study was to determine whether AMPK cross-talks with Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin. C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells were used. Chemical inhibition of AMPK and the expression of a dominant negative AMPK decreased phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin at Ser 552. The {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription was correlated with AMPK activity. In vitro, pure AMPK phosphorylated {beta}-catenin at Ser 552 and the mutation of Ser 552 to Ala prevented such phosphorylation, which was further confirmed using [{gamma}-{sup 32}P]ATP autoradiography. In conclusion, AMPK phosphorylates {beta}-catenin at Ser 552, which stabilizes {beta}-catenin, enhances {beta}-catenin/TCF mediated transcription, expanding AMPK from regulation of energy metabolism to cell differentiation and development via cross-talking with the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway.

  20. PECAM-1 affects GSK-3beta-mediated beta-catenin phosphorylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Purba; Canosa, Sandra; Schoenfeld, David; Schoenfeld, Jonathan; Li, Puyau; Cheas, Lydia C; Zhang, Jin; Cordova, Alfredo; Sumpio, Bauer; Madri, Joseph A

    2006-07-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) regulates a variety of endothelial and immune cell biological responses. PECAM-1-null mice exhibit prolonged and increased permeability after inflammatory insults. We observed that in PECAM-1-null endothelial cells (ECs), beta-catenin remained tyrosine phosphorylated, coinciding with a sustained increase in permeability. Src homology 2 domain containing phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) association with beta-catenin was diminished in PECAM-1-null ECs, suggesting that lack of PECAM-1 inhibits the ability of this adherens junction component to become dephosphorylated, promoting a sustained increase in permeability. beta-Catenin/Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3beta) association and beta-catenin serine phosphorylation levels were increased and beta-catenin expression levels were reduced in PECAM-1-null ECs. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3beta) serine phosphorylation (inactivation) was blunted in PECAM-1-null ECs after histamine treatment or shear stress. Our data suggest that PECAM-1 serves as a critical dynamic regulator of endothelial barrier permeability. On stimulation by a vasoactive substance or shear stress, PECAM-1 became tyrosine phosphorylated, enabling recruitment of SHP-2 and tyrosine-phosphorylated beta-catenin to its cytoplasmic domain, facilitating dephosphorylation of beta-catenin, and allowing reconstitution of adherens junctions. In addition, PECAM-1 modulated the levels of beta-catenin by regulating the activity of GSK-3beta, which in turn affected the serine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and its proteosomal degradation, affecting the ability of the cell to reform adherens junctions in a timely fashion. PMID:16816383

  1. Osteopontin induces {beta}-catenin signaling through activation of Akt in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brian W.; Chellaiah, Meenakshi A.

    2010-01-01

    Secretion of osteopontin (OPN) by cancer cells is a known mediator of tumorigenesis and cancer progression in both experimental and clinical studies. Our work demonstrates that OPN can activate Akt, an important step in cancer progression. Both ILK and PI3K are integral proteins in the OPN/Akt pathway, as inhibition of either kinase leads to a loss of OPN-mediated Akt activation. Subsequent to OPN-induced Akt activation, we observe inactivation of GSK-3{beta}, a regulator of {beta}-catenin. Osteopontin stimulation leads to an overall increase in {beta}-catenin protein levels with a resultant transfer of {beta}-catenin to the nucleus. Through the nuclear import of {beta}-catenin, OPN increases both the transcription and protein levels of MMP-7 and CD44, which are known TCF/LEF transcription targets. This work describes an important aspect of cancer progression induced by OPN.

  2. Bioinformatics Knowledge Map for Analysis of Beta-Catenin Function in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arighi, Cecilia N.; Wu, Cathy H.

    2015-01-01

    Given the wealth of bioinformatics resources and the growing complexity of biological information, it is valuable to integrate data from disparate sources to gain insight into the role of genes/proteins in health and disease. We have developed a bioinformatics framework that combines literature mining with information from biomedical ontologies and curated databases to create knowledge “maps” of genes/proteins of interest. We applied this approach to the study of beta-catenin, a cell adhesion molecule and transcriptional regulator implicated in cancer. The knowledge map includes post-translational modifications (PTMs), protein-protein interactions, disease-associated mutations, and transcription factors co-activated by beta-catenin and their targets and captures the major processes in which beta-catenin is known to participate. Using the map, we generated testable hypotheses about beta-catenin biology in normal and cancer cells. By focusing on proteins participating in multiple relation types, we identified proteins that may participate in feedback loops regulating beta-catenin transcriptional activity. By combining multiple network relations with PTM proteoform-specific functional information, we proposed a mechanism to explain the observation that the cyclin dependent kinase CDK5 positively regulates beta-catenin co-activator activity. Finally, by overlaying cancer-associated mutation data with sequence features, we observed mutation patterns in several beta-catenin PTM sites and PTM enzyme binding sites that varied by tissue type, suggesting multiple mechanisms by which beta-catenin mutations can contribute to cancer. The approach described, which captures rich information for molecular species from genes and proteins to PTM proteoforms, is extensible to other proteins and their involvement in disease. PMID:26509276

  3. Bioinformatics Knowledge Map for Analysis of Beta-Catenin Function in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Çelen, İrem; Ross, Karen E; Arighi, Cecilia N; Wu, Cathy H

    2015-01-01

    Given the wealth of bioinformatics resources and the growing complexity of biological information, it is valuable to integrate data from disparate sources to gain insight into the role of genes/proteins in health and disease. We have developed a bioinformatics framework that combines literature mining with information from biomedical ontologies and curated databases to create knowledge "maps" of genes/proteins of interest. We applied this approach to the study of beta-catenin, a cell adhesion molecule and transcriptional regulator implicated in cancer. The knowledge map includes post-translational modifications (PTMs), protein-protein interactions, disease-associated mutations, and transcription factors co-activated by beta-catenin and their targets and captures the major processes in which beta-catenin is known to participate. Using the map, we generated testable hypotheses about beta-catenin biology in normal and cancer cells. By focusing on proteins participating in multiple relation types, we identified proteins that may participate in feedback loops regulating beta-catenin transcriptional activity. By combining multiple network relations with PTM proteoform-specific functional information, we proposed a mechanism to explain the observation that the cyclin dependent kinase CDK5 positively regulates beta-catenin co-activator activity. Finally, by overlaying cancer-associated mutation data with sequence features, we observed mutation patterns in several beta-catenin PTM sites and PTM enzyme binding sites that varied by tissue type, suggesting multiple mechanisms by which beta-catenin mutations can contribute to cancer. The approach described, which captures rich information for molecular species from genes and proteins to PTM proteoforms, is extensible to other proteins and their involvement in disease. PMID:26509276

  4. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Alman, B A; Li, C; Pajerski, M E; Diaz-Cano, S; Wolfe, H J

    1997-08-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  5. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed Central

    Alman, B. A.; Li, C.; Pajerski, M. E.; Diaz-Cano, S.; Wolfe, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  6. Stimulation of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity and Na{sup +} coupled glucose transport by {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Wilmes, Jan; Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Lam, Rebecca S.; Jakupi, Muharrem; Foeller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} The oncogenic transcription factor {beta}-catenin stimulates the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. {yields} {beta}-Catenin stimulates SGLT1 dependent Na{sup +}, glucose cotransport. {yields} The effects are independent of transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin sensitive transport may contribute to properties of proliferating cells. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin is a multifunctional protein stimulating as oncogenic transcription factor several genes important for cell proliferation. {beta}-Catenin-regulated genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which is known to stimulate a variety of transport systems. The present study explored the possibility that {beta}-catenin influences membrane transport. To this end, {beta}-catenin was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGLT1 and electrogenic transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. As a result, expression of {beta}-catenin significantly enhanced the ouabain-sensitive current of the endogeneous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. Inhibition of vesicle trafficking by brefeldin A revealed that the stimulatory effect of {beta}-catenin on the endogenous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase was not due to enhanced stability of the pump protein in the cell membrane. Expression of {beta}-catenin further enhanced glucose-induced current (Ig) in SGLT1-expressing oocytes. In the absence of SGLT1 Ig was negligible irrespective of {beta}-catenin expression. The stimulating effect of {beta}-catenin on both Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase and SGLT1 activity was observed even in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. The experiments disclose a completely novel function of {beta}-catenin, i.e. the regulation of transport.

  7. Transcription factor Egr1 acts as an upstream regulator of beta-catenin signalling through up-regulation of TCF4 and p300 expression during trans-differentiation of endometrial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, M; Hashimura, M; Kuwata, T; Hamano, M; Watanabe, J; Kawaguchi, M; Okayasu, I

    2008-12-01

    The beta-catenin/TCF4/p300 pathway is involved in early signalling for trans-differentiation towards the morular phenotype of endometrial carcinoma cells, but little is known about the upstream regulators. Here we show that transcription factor early growth response 1 (Egr1) acts as an initial mediator through up-regulating the expression of TCF4 and p300. In an endometrial carcinoma cell line with abundant oestrogen receptor alpha, Egr1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels was significantly increased by serum and 17beta-oestradiol stimuli. Serum-stimulated cells also showed increased expression of TCF4 and p300, while inhibition of Egr1 by specific siRNAs resulted in decreased expression. Transfection of Egr1 led to transactivation of TCF4 as well as p300 genes, through specific binding to a promoter region, and thus in turn resulted in nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin mediated by the up-regulating TCF4. The overexpression also caused inhibition of beta-catenin/TCF4/p300-mediated transcription, probably through sequestration of p300. Egr1 promoter activity was increased by serum but not 17beta-oestradiol, in contrast to the marked repression associated with TCF4, p300, and Egr1 itself, indicating that the regulation involves several feedback loops. In clinical samples, cells immunopositive for nuclear Egr1, as well as beta-catenin and TCF4, were found to be sporadically distributed in glandular components of endometrial carcinoma with morules. A significant positive correlation between nuclear beta-catenin and TCF4 was observed, but no such link was evident for Egr1, probably due to the existence of negative feedback regulation. Together, these data indicate that Egr1 may participate in modulation of the beta-catenin/TCF4/p300 signalling pathway as an initial event during trans-differentiation of endometrial carcinoma cells, through its impact on several signalling networks.

  8. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling regulates cancer stem cells in lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Ying; Wang, Xiuwen; Wang, Yawei; Ma, Daoxin

    2010-02-12

    Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling plays an important role not only in cancer, but also in cancer stem cells. In this study, we found that {beta}-catenin and OCT-4 was highly expressed in cisplatin (DDP) selected A549 cells. Stimulating A549 cells with lithium chloride (LiCl) resulted in accumulation of {beta}-catenin and up-regulation of a typical Wnt target gene cyclin D1. This stimulation also significantly enhanced proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities in A549 cells. Moreover, the up-regulation of OCT-4, a stem cell marker, was observed through real-time PCR and Western blotting. In a reverse approach, we inhibited Wnt signaling by knocking down the expression of {beta}-catenin using RNA interference technology. This inhibition resulted in down-regulation of the Wnt target gene cyclin D1 as well as the proliferation, clone formation, migration and drug resistance abilities. Meanwhile, the expression of OCT-4 was reduced after the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling. Taken together, our study provides strong evidence that canonical Wnt signaling plays an important role in lung cancer stem cell properties, and it also regulates OCT-4, a lung cancer stem cell marker.

  9. Inhibition of GSK3 differentially modulates NF-{kappa}B, CREB, AP-1 and {beta}-catenin signaling in hepatocytes, but fails to promote TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Goetschel, Frank; Kern, Claudia; Lang, Simona; Sparna, Titus; Markmann, Cordula; Schwager, Joseph; McNelly, Sabine; Weizsaecker, Fritz von; Laufer, Stefan; Hecht, Andreas Merfort, Irmgard

    2008-04-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is known to modulate cell survival and apoptosis through multiple intracellular signaling pathways. However, its hepatoprotective function and its role in activation of NF-{kappa}B and anti-apoptotic factors are poorly understood and remain controversial. Here we investigated whether inhibition of GSK-3 could induce apoptosis in the presence of TNF-{alpha} in primary mouse hepatocytes. We show that pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in primary mouse hepatocytes does not lead to TNF-{alpha}-induced apoptosis despite reduced NF-{kappa}B activity. Enhanced stability of I{kappa}B-{alpha} appears to be responsible for lower levels of nuclear NF-{kappa}B and hence reduced transactivation. Additionally, inhibition of GSK-3 was accompanied by marked upregulation of {beta}-catenin, AP-1, and CREB transcription factors. Stimulation of canonical Wnt signaling and CREB activity led to elevated levels of anti-apoptotic factors. Hence, survival of primary mouse hepatocytes may be caused by the activation and/or upregulation of other key regulators of liver homeostasis and regeneration. These signaling molecules may compensate for the compromised anti-apoptotic function of NF-{kappa}B and allow survival of hepatocytes in the presence of TNF-{alpha} and GSK-3 inhibition.

  10. Hit to lead studies on (hetero)arylpyrimidines--agonists of the canonical Wnt-beta-catenin cellular messaging system.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Adam M; Bursavich, Matthew G; Alon, Nippa; Bhat, Bheem M; Bex, Frederick J; Cain, Michael; Coleburn, Valerie; Gironda, Virginia; Green, Paula; Hauze, Diane B; Kharode, Yogendra; Krishnamurthy, Girija; Kirisits, Matthew; Lam, Ho-Sun; Liu, Yao-Bin; Lombardi, Sabrina; Matteo, Jeanne; Murrills, Richard; Robinson, John A; Selim, Sally; Sharp, Michael; Unwalla, Raymond; Varadarajan, Usha; Zhao, Weiguang; Yaworsky, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    A series of (hetero)arylpyrimidines agonists of the Wnt-beta-catenin cellular messaging system have been prepared. These compounds show activity in U2OS cells transfected with Wnt-3a, TCF-luciferase, Dkk-1 and tk-Renilla. Selected compounds show minimal GSK-3beta inhibition indicating that the Wnt-beta-catenin agonism activity most likely comes from interaction at Wnt-3a/Dkk-1. Two examples 1 and 25 show in vivo osteogenic activity in a mouse calvaria model. One example 1 is shown to activate non-phosphorylated beta-catenin formation in bone. PMID:19897365

  11. Smad6 promotes neuronal differentiation in the intermediate zone of the dorsal neural tube by inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihui; Chen, Yongfeng; Li, Zhenfei; Bai, Ge; Zhu, Yue; Yan, Rui; Tan, Fangzhi; Chen, Ye-Guang; Guillemot, Francois; Li, Lin; Jing, Naihe

    2011-07-19

    Proliferation of the neural/neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) at the ventricular zone of the dorsal spinal cord requires the stimuli of Wnt and bone morphogenic protein (BMP). However, how these two signaling pathways are regulated to initiate differentiation in the NPCs as they enter the intermediate zone is not known. Here, we show that Smad6, a negative regulator of BMP signaling, is expressed in the intermediate zone of the chick dorsal spinal cord. Knockdown experiments show that Smad6 is required for promoting NPCs to exit the cell cycle and differentiate into neurons. Although we find that Smad6 inhibits BMP signaling, as expected, we also find that Smad6 unexpectedly inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by Smad6 is independent of its effect on the BMP pathway. Rather, Smad6 through its N-terminal domain and link region enhances the interaction of C-terminal binding protein with the β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) complex and the TCF-binding element to inhibit β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation. Our study provides evidence that transition of NPCs from a proliferative state to a differentiating state is controlled by the dual inhibitory role of Smad6 to both BMP and Wnt signaling at the level of transcription.

  12. Effects of curcumin in pediatric epithelial liver tumors: inhibition of tumor growth and alpha-fetoprotein in vitro and in vivo involving the NFkappaB- and the beta-catenin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bortel, Nicola; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Schmid, Evi; Kirchner, Bettina; Frank, Jan; Kocher, Alexa; Schiborr, Christina; Warmann, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Ellerkamp, Verena

    2015-01-01

    In children with hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC) the 5-year overall survival rate is poor. Effects of cytostatic therapies such as cisplatin and doxorubicin are limited due to chemoresistance and tumor relapse. In adult HCC, several antitumor properties are described for the use of curcumin. Curcumin is one of the best-investigated phytochemicals in complementary oncology without relevant side effects. Its use is limited by low bioavailability. Little is known about the influence of curcumin on pediatric epithelial hepatic malignancies. We investigated the effects of curcumin in combination with cisplatin on two pediatric epithelial liver tumor cell lines. As mechanisms of action inhibition of NFkappaB, beta-catenin, and decrease of cyclin D were identified. Using a mouse xenograft model we could show a significant decrease of alpha-fetoprotein after combination therapy of oral micellar curcumin and cisplatin. Significant concentrations of curcuminoids were found in blood samples, organ lysates, and tumor tissue after oral micellar curcumin administration. Micellar curcumin in combination with cisplatin can be a promising strategy for treatment of pediatric HCC. PMID:26515460

  13. Effects of curcumin in pediatric epithelial liver tumors: inhibition of tumor growth and alpha-fetoprotein in vitro and in vivo involving the NFkappaB- and the beta-catenin pathways.

    PubMed

    Bortel, Nicola; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Schmid, Evi; Kirchner, Bettina; Frank, Jan; Kocher, Alexa; Schiborr, Christina; Warmann, Steven; Fuchs, Jörg; Ellerkamp, Verena

    2015-12-01

    In children with hepatocellular carcinoma (pHCC) the 5-year overall survival rate is poor. Effects of cytostatic therapies such as cisplatin and doxorubicin are limited due to chemoresistance and tumor relapse. In adult HCC, several antitumor properties are described for the use of curcumin. Curcumin is one of the best-investigated phytochemicals in complementary oncology without relevant side effects. Its use is limited by low bioavailability. Little is known about the influence of curcumin on pediatric epithelial hepatic malignancies. We investigated the effects of curcumin in combination with cisplatin on two pediatric epithelial liver tumor cell lines. As mechanisms of action inhibition of NFkappaB, beta-catenin, and decrease of cyclin D were identified. Using a mouse xenograft model we could show a significant decrease of alpha-fetoprotein after combination therapy of oral micellar curcumin and cisplatin. Significant concentrations of curcuminoids were found in blood samples, organ lysates, and tumor tissue after oral micellar curcumin administration. Micellar curcumin in combination with cisplatin can be a promising strategy for treatment of pediatric HCC.

  14. {beta}-Catenin can act as a nuclear import receptor for its partner transcription factor, lymphocyte enhancer factor-1 (lef-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Asally, Munehiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro . E-mail: yyoneda@anat3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2005-08-15

    Nuclear accumulation of {beta}-catenin plays an important role in the Wnt signaling pathway. In the nucleus, {beta}-catenin acts as a transcriptional co-activator for TCF/LEF family of transcription factors. It has been shown that lef-1 contains a typical basic type nuclear localization signal (NLS) and is transported into the nucleus by the conventional import pathway. In this study, we found that a mutant lef-1 lacking the classical NLS accumulated in the nucleus of living cells, when {beta}-catenin was co-expressed. In addition, in a cell-free import assay, lef-1 migrated into the nucleus in the presence of {beta}-catenin alone without any other soluble factors. In contrast, another mutant lef-1 lacking the {beta}-catenin binding domain failed to migrate into the nucleus, even in the presence of {beta}-catenin. These findings indicate that {beta}-catenin alone can mediate the nuclear import of lef-1 through the direct binding. Collectively, we propose that there are two distinct pathways for the nuclear import of lef-1: importin {alpha}/{beta}-mediated and {beta}-catenin-mediated one, which provides a novel paradigm for Wnt signaling pathway.

  15. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Jeong, Yongsu; Shin, Jae-Gook; Oh, Sangtaek

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  16. Direct interaction of tumor suppressor CEACAM1 with beta catenin: identification of key residues in the long cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lan; Li, Yun; Chen, Charng-Jui; Sherman, Mark A; Le, Keith; Shively, John E

    2008-07-01

    CEACAM1-4L (carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1, with 4 extracellular Ig-like domains and a long, 71 amino acid cytoplasmic domain) is expressed in epithelial cells and activated T-cells, but is down-regulated in most epithelial cell cancers and T-cell leukemias. A highly conserved sequence within the cytoplasmic domain has ca 50% sequence homology with Tcf-3 and -4, transcription factors that bind beta-catenin, and to a lesser extent (32% homology), with E-cadherin that also binds beta-catenin. We show by quantitative yeast two-hybrid, BIAcore, GST-pull down, and confocal analyses that this domain directly interacts with beta-catenin, and that H-469 and K-470 are key residues that interact with the armadillo repeats of beta-catenin. Jurkat cells transfected with CEACAM1-4L have 2-fold less activity in the TOPFLASH reporter assay, and in MCF7 breast cancer cells that fail to express CEACAM1, transfection with CEACAM1 and growth in Ca2+ media causes redistribution of beta-catenin from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane, demonstrating a functional role for the long cytoplasmic domain of CEACAM1 in regulation of beta-catenin activity.

  17. Beta-catenin--a supporting role in the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Case, Natasha; Rubin, Janet

    2010-06-01

    In the last 5 years a role for beta-catenin in the skeleton has been cemented. Beginning with mutations in the Lrp5 receptor that control beta-catenin canonical downstream signals, and progressing to transgenic models with bone-specific alteration of beta-catenin, research has shown that beta-catenin is required for normal bone development. A cell critical to bone in which beta-catenin activity determines function is the marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), where sustained beta-catenin prevents its distribution into adipogenic lineage. beta-Catenin actions are less well understood in mature osteoblasts: while beta-catenin contributes to control of osteoclastic bone resorption via alteration of the osteoprotegerin/RANKL ratio, a specific regulatory role during osteoblast bone synthesis has not yet been determined. The proven ability of mechanical factors to prevent beta-catenin degradation and induce nuclear translocation through Lrp-independent mechanisms suggests processes by which exercise might modulate bone mass via control of lineage allocation, in particular, by preventing precursor distribution into the adipocyte pool. Effects resulting from mechanical activation of beta-catenin in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes likely modulate bone resorption, but whether beta-catenin is involved in osteoblast synthetic function remains to be proven for both mechanical and soluble mediators. As beta-catenin appears to support the downstream effects of multiple osteogenic factors, studies clarifying when and where beta-catenin effects occur will be relevant for translational approaches aimed at preventing bone loss and terminal adipogenic conversion.

  18. Anticancer activity of Panax notoginseng extract 20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD: Targetting beta-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiuli; Zhao, Yuqing; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Wancai

    2009-11-01

    1. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway plays a critical role in carcinogenesis and so agents that target Wnt/beta-catenin may have potential in cancer prevention and therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anticancer activity of the novel natural product dammarane-type triterpene sapogenin (20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD; PPD25) isolated from the leaves of Panax notoginseng. 2. The anticancer activity of PPD25 was evaluated in three colon cancer cell lines and in one lung cancer cell line. The effects of PPD25 to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis were evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms underlying the effects of PPD25 were investigated. 3. It was found that the addition of 5 or 25 micromol/L PPD25 to the culture medium significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in all four cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies revealed that PPD25 significantly reduced the expression of beta-catenin, a key mediator in the Wnt pathway, as well as transcriptional targets of beta-catenin, namely c-myc, cyclin D1, cdk4 and T cell factor (TCF)-4. In addition, beta-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity was significantly suppressed by PPD25. 4. The data demonstrate that the PPD25 exerts its anticancer effect by targetting beta-catenin signalling, suggesting that PPD25 may have potential as a chemotherapeutic and/or chemopreventive agent for colon and lung cancer. PMID:19413587

  19. Frequent beta-catenin mutations in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S C; Montgomery, E A; Giardiello, F M; Wu, T T

    2001-03-01

    Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas (JNAs) are locally aggressive vascular tumors occurring predominantly in adolescent males. The pathogenesis of JNAs is unknown. Recently, JNAs have been reported to occur at increased frequency among patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, suggesting that alterations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/beta-catenin pathway might also be involved in the pathogenesis of sporadic JNAs. We analyzed somatic beta-catenin and APC gene mutations in 16 sporadic JNAs from nonfamilial adenomatous polyposis patients using immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin, and direct DNA sequencing for exon 3 of the beta-catenin gene and the mutation cluster region of the APC gene. Nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin was diffusely present in the stromal cells but not in the endothelial cells of all 16 JNAs. Activating beta-catenin gene mutations were present in 75% (12 of 16) of JNAs. Six JNA patients also had recurrent tumors after surgery, and in all cases the beta-catenin gene status of the recurrent JNA was identical to the initial tumor. No mutations in the mutation cluster region of the APC gene were detected in the four JNAs without beta-catenin mutations. The high frequency of beta-catenin mutations in sporadic JNAs and the presence of identical beta-catenin gene mutations in recurrent tumors indicates that activating beta-catenin gene mutations are important in the pathogenesis of JNAs. The immunohistochemical localization of beta-catenin only to the nuclei of stromal cells further suggests that the stromal cells, rather than endothelial cells, are the neoplastic cells of JNAs.

  20. Interactions between SOX factors and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Kormish, Jay D; Sinner, Débora; Zorn, Aaron M

    2010-01-01

    The SOX family of transcription factors have emerged as modulators of canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in diverse development and disease contexts. There are over 20 SOX proteins encoded in the vertebrate genome and recent evidence suggests that many of these can physically interact with beta-catenin and modulate the transcription of Wnt-target genes. The precise mechanisms by which SOX proteins regulate beta-catenin/TCF activity are still being resolved and there is evidence to support a number of models including: protein-protein interactions, the binding of SOX factors to Wnt-target gene promoters, the recruitment of co-repressors or co-activators, modulation of protein stability, and nuclear translocation. In some contexts, Wnt signaling also regulates SOX expression resulting in feedback regulatory loops that fine-tune cellular responses to beta-catenin/TCF activity. In this review, we summarize the examples of Sox-Wnt interactions and examine the underlying mechanisms of this potentially widespread and underappreciated mode of Wnt-regulation. PMID:19655378

  1. Enhancing Beta-Catenin Activity via GSK3beta Inhibition Protects PC12 Cells against Rotenone Toxicity through Nurr1 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Mo, Mingshu; Feng, Junmin; Sun, Congcong; Xiao, Yousheng; Luo, Qin; Li, Shaomin; Yang, Xinling; Xu, Pingyi

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Increasing evidence showed that Wnt/β-catenin pathway and the orphan nuclear receptor Nurr1 play crucial roles in the survival and functional maintenance of DA neurons in the midbrain and GSK-3β antagonists LiCl and SB216763 were used to activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway experimentally. However, the detail mechanism underlying the neuroprotection against apoptosis on DA neuron is still unclear and the interaction between Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 remains undisclosed. In this study, using cell biological assay we investigated the function of Wnt/β-catenin and its crosstalk with Nurr1 on the course of PC12 cell degeneration in vitro. Our data showed that PC12 cell viability was inhibited by rotenone, but attenuated by GSK-3β antagonists LiCl or SB216763. The activity of Wnt/β-catenin pathway was deregulated on exposure of rotenone in a concentration-dependent manner. After the interference of β-catenin with siRNA, LiCl or SB216763 failed to protect PC12 cells from apoptosis by the rotenone toxicity. Our data confirmed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling activated by LiCl or SB216763 enhanced Nurr1 expression to 2.75 ± 0.55 and 4.06 ± 0.41 folds respectively compared with control detected by real-time PCR and the interaction of β-catenin with Nurr1 was identified by co-immunoprecipitate analysis. In conclusion, the data suggested that Wnt/β-catenin and Nurr1 are crucial factors in the survival of DA neurons, and the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway exerts protective effects on DA neurons partly by mean of a co-active pattern with Nurr1. This finding may shed a light on the potential treatment of Parkinson disease. PMID:27045591

  2. Natural derivatives of curcumin attenuate the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway through down-regulation of the transcriptional coactivator p300

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Min-Jung; Cho, Munju; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Dong-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-12-26

    Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress {beta}-catenin response transcription (CRT), which is aberrantly activated in colorectal cancer. However, the effects of its natural analogs (demethoxycurcumin [DMC] and bisdemethoxycurcumin [BDMC]) and metabolite (tetrahydrocurcumin [THC]) on the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway have not been investigated. Here, we show that DMC and BDMC suppressed CRT that was activated by Wnt3a conditioned-medium (Wnt3a-CM) without altering the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, and inhibited the growth of various colon cancer cells, with comparable potency to curcumin. Additionally, DMC and BDMC down-regulated p300, which is a positive regulator of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Notably, THC also inhibited CRT and cell proliferation, but to a much lesser degree than curcumin, DMC, or BDMC, indicating that the conjugated bonds in the central seven-carbon chain of curcuminoids are essential for the inhibition of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway and the anti-proliferative activity of curcuminoids. Thus, our findings suggest that curcumin derivatives inhibit the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway by decreasing the amount of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

  3. Natural derivatives of curcumin attenuate the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway through down-regulation of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Jung; Cho, Munju; Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Il-Whan; Kim, Dong-Eun; Park, Byeoung-Soo; Oh, Sangtaek

    2008-12-26

    Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress beta-catenin response transcription (CRT), which is aberrantly activated in colorectal cancer. However, the effects of its natural analogs (demethoxycurcumin [DMC] and bisdemethoxycurcumin [BDMC]) and metabolite (tetrahydrocurcumin [THC]) on the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway have not been investigated. Here, we show that DMC and BDMC suppressed CRT that was activated by Wnt3a conditioned-medium (Wnt3a-CM) without altering the level of intracellular beta-catenin, and inhibited the growth of various colon cancer cells, with comparable potency to curcumin. Additionally, DMC and BDMC down-regulated p300, which is a positive regulator of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Notably, THC also inhibited CRT and cell proliferation, but to a much lesser degree than curcumin, DMC, or BDMC, indicating that the conjugated bonds in the central seven-carbon chain of curcuminoids are essential for the inhibition of Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and the anti-proliferative activity of curcuminoids. Thus, our findings suggest that curcumin derivatives inhibit the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway by decreasing the amount of the transcriptional coactivator p300.

  4. Concurrent Transient Activation of Wnt/{beta}-Catenin Pathway Prevents Radiation Damage to Salivary Glands

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Bo; Yang Zhenhua; Shangguan Lei; Zhao Yanqiu; Boyer, Arthur; Liu, Fei

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Many head and neck cancer survivors treated with radiotherapy suffer from permanent impairment of their salivary gland function, for which few effective prevention or treatment options are available. This study explored the potential of transient activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling in preventing radiation damage to salivary glands in a preclinical model. Methods and Materials: Wnt reporter transgenic mice were exposed to 15 Gy single-dose radiation in the head and neck area to evaluate the effects of radiation on Wnt activity in salivary glands. Transient Wnt1 overexpression in basal epithelia was induced in inducible Wnt1 transgenic mice before together with, after, or without local radiation, and then saliva flow rate, histology, apoptosis, proliferation, stem cell activity, and mRNA expression were evaluated. Results: Radiation damage did not significantly affect activity of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway as physical damage did. Transient expression of Wnt1 in basal epithelia significantly activated the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in submandibular glands of male mice but not in those of females. Concurrent transient activation of the Wnt pathway prevented chronic salivary gland dysfunction following radiation by suppressing apoptosis and preserving functional salivary stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, Wnt activation 3 days before or after irradiation did not show significant beneficial effects, mainly due to failure to inhibit acute apoptosis after radiation. Excessive Wnt activation before radiation failed to inhibit apoptosis, likely due to extensive induction of mitosis and up-regulation of proapoptosis gene PUMA while that after radiation might miss the critical treatment window. Conclusion: These results suggest that concurrent transient activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway could prevent radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction.

  5. Rad6B is a positive regulator of beta-catenin stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Malathy P V; Gerard, Brigitte; Pauley, Robert J; Williams, Bart O; Tait, Larry

    2008-03-15

    Mutations in beta-catenin or other Wnt pathway components that cause beta-catenin accumulation occur rarely in breast cancer. However, there is some evidence of beta-catenin protein accumulation in a subset of breast tumors. We have recently shown that Rad6B, an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, is a transcriptional target of beta-catenin/TCF. Here, we show that forced Rad6B overexpression in MCF10A breast cells induces beta-catenin accumulation, which despite being ubiquitinated is stable and transcriptionally active. A similar relationship between Rad6B, beta-catenin ubiquitination, and transcriptional activity was found in WS-15 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, and mouse mammary tumor virus-Wnt-1 mammary tumor-derived cells, implicating Rad6B in physiologic regulation of beta-catenin stability and activity. Ubiquitinated beta-catenin was detectable in chromatin immunoprecipitations performed with beta-catenin antibody in MDA-MB-231 but not MCF10A cells. Rad6B silencing caused suppression of beta-catenin monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination, and transcriptional activity. These effects were accompanied by a reduction in intracellular beta-catenin but with minimal effects on cell membrane-associated beta-catenin. Measurement of beta-catenin protein stability by cycloheximide treatment showed that Rad6B silencing specifically decreases the stability of high molecular beta-catenin with minimal effect upon the 90-kDa nascent form. In vitro ubiquitination assays confirmed that Rad6B mediates beta-catenin polyubiquitination, and ubiquitin chain extensions involve lysine 63 residues that are insensitive to 26S proteasome. These findings, combined with our previous data that Rad6B is a transcriptional target of beta-catenin, reveal a positive regulatory feedback loop between Rad6B and beta-catenin and a novel mechanism of beta-catenin stabilization/activation in breast cancer cells.

  6. Alzheimer Disease: Crosstalk between the Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway and PPARs Alpha and Gamma

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Alexandre; Lecarpentier, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still not fully understood. In AD, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been shown to be downregulated while the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma (mARN and protein) is upregulated. Certain neurodegenerative diseases share the same Wnt/beta-catenin/PPAR gamma profile, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Conversely, other NDs share an opposite profile, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, and Friedreich's ataxia. AD is characterized by the deposition of extracellular Abeta plaques and the formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in the central nervous system (CNS). Activation of Wnt signaling or inhibition of both glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and Dickkopf 1, two key negative regulators of the canonical Wnt pathway, are able to protect against Abeta neurotoxicity and to ameliorate cognitive performance in AD patients. Although PPAR gamma is upregulated in AD patients, and despite the fact that it has been shown that the PPAR gamma and Wnt/beta catenin pathway systems work in an opposite manner, PPAR gamma agonists diminish learning and memory deficits, decrease Abeta activation of microglia, and prevent hippocampal and cortical neurons from dying. These beneficial effects observed in AD transgenic mice and patients might be partially due to the anti-inflammatory properties of PPAR gamma agonists. Moreover, activation of PPAR alpha upregulates transcription of the alpha-secretase gene and represents a new therapeutic treatment for AD. This review focuses largely on the behavior of two opposing pathways in AD, namely Wnt/beta-catenin signaling and PPAR gamma. It is hoped that this approach may help to develop novel AD therapeutic strategies integrating PPAR alpha signaling. PMID:27807401

  7. Apc bridges Wnt/{beta}-catenin and BMP signaling during osteoblast differentiation of KS483 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miclea, Razvan L.; Horst, Geertje van der; Robanus-Maandag, Els C.; Loewik, Clemens W.G.M.; Oostdijk, Wilma; Wit, Jan M.; Karperien, Marcel

    2011-06-10

    The canonical Wnt signaling pathway influences the differentiation of mesenchymal cell lineages in a quantitative and qualitative fashion depending on the dose of {beta}-catenin signaling. Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) is the critical intracellular regulator of {beta}-catenin turnover. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of Apc in regulating the differentiation capacity of skeletal progenitor cells, we have knocked down Apc in the murine mesenchymal stem cell-like KS483 cells by stable expression of Apc-specific small interfering RNA. In routine culture, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells displayed a mesenchymal-like spindle shape morphology, exhibited markedly decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Apc knockdown resulted in upregulation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin and the BMP/Smad signaling pathways, but osteogenic differentiation was completely inhibited. This effect could be rescued by adding high concentrations of BMP-7 to the differentiation medium. Furthermore, KSFrt-Apc{sub si} cells showed no potential to differentiate into chondrocytes or adipocytes. These results demonstrate that Apc is essential for the proliferation, survival and differentiation of KS483 cells. Apc knockdown blocks the osteogenic differentiation of skeletal progenitor cells, a process that can be overruled by high BMP signaling.

  8. Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation and myogenic differentiation are induced by cholesterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Mermelstein, Cláudia S; Portilho, Débora M; Mendes, Fábio A; Costa, Manoel L; Abreu, José Garcia

    2007-03-01

    Myogenic differentiation is a multistep process that begins with the commitment of mononucleated precursors that withdraw from cell cycle. These myoblasts elongate while aligning to each other, guided by the recognition between their membranes. This step is followed by cell fusion and the formation of long and striated multinucleated myotubes. We have recently shown that cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD) induces myogenic differentiation by enhancing myoblast recognition and fusion. Here, we further studied the signaling pathways responsible for early steps of myogenesis. As it is known that Wnt plays a role in muscle differentiation, we used the chemical MbetaCD to deplete membrane cholesterol and investigate the involvement of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway during myogenesis. We show that cholesterol depletion promoted a significant increase in expression of beta-catenin, its nuclear translocation and activation of the Wnt pathway. Moreover, we show that the activation of the Wnt pathway after cholesterol depletion can be inhibited by the soluble protein Frzb-1. Our data suggest that membrane cholesterol is involved in Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the early steps of myogenic differentiation.

  9. Neurofilament heavy polypeptide regulates the Akt-beta-catenin pathway in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Chang, Xiaofei; LeBron, Cynthia; Nagpal, Jatin K; Lee, Juna; Huang, Yiping; Yamashita, Keishi; Trink, Barry; Ratovitski, Edward A; Sidransky, David

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction are common features of aggressive cancer growth. We observed promoter methylation and loss of expression in neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH) in a significant proportion of primary esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) samples that were of a high tumor grade and advanced stage. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of NEFH accelerated ESCC cell growth in culture and increased tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas forced expression of NEFH significantly inhibited cell growth and colony formation. Loss of NEFH caused up-regulation of pyruvate kinase-M2 type and down-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, via activation of the Akt/beta-catenin pathway, resulting in enhanced aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. The acceleration of glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction in NEFH-knockdown cells was suppressed in the absence of beta-catenin expression, and was decreased by the treatment of 2-Deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, or API-2, an Akt inhibitor. Loss of NEFH activates the Akt/beta-catenin pathway and increases glycolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cancer cells with methylated NEFH can be targeted for destruction with specific inhibitors of deregulated downstream pathways.

  10. Essential role of T-cell factor/beta-catenin in regulation of Rad6B: a potential mechanism for Rad6B overexpression in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Malathy P V; Tait, Larry; Gerard, Brigitte

    2006-10-01

    We have previously shown that the postreplication DNA repair gene Rad6B plays a critical role in the maintenance of genomic integrity of human breast cells. Whereas normal breast cells express low levels of Rad6B, increases in Rad6B expression occur in hyperplasia with overexpression in breast carcinomas. Here, we show that the human Rad6B gene is a transcriptional target of T-cell factor (TCF)-4/beta-catenin/p300. Rad6B promoter activity is subject to negative regulation in normal human MCF10A breast cells whereas it is constitutively active in metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Derepression and activation of Rad6B promoter in MCF10A cells require coexpression of beta-catenin and p300. Using electrophoresis mobility shift assay, Western blot analysis of electrophoresis mobility shift assay, UV cross-linking, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we show that Rad6B transcriptional repression in MCF10A cells is due to paucity of transcriptionally active beta-catenin assembled on the TCF binding sequence in the Rad6B promoter rather than to a deficit/decreased affinity of TCF-4 for the TCF binding element in Rad6B promoter. Three-dimensional epithelial acini generated in vitro from MCF10A cells cotransfected with beta-catenin and p300 showed beta-catenin expression on the membrane, cytoplasm, and/or nuclei with concomitant Rad6 overexpression, whereas control acini showed beta-catenin on the membranes and negligible Rad6 expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of 12 breast carcinomas showed an approximately 80% correlation between Rad6 and beta-catenin expression, and combined nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of beta-catenin and Rad6 was detected in 25% of the breast carcinomas. In vivo implantation of MCF10A-Rad6B cells produced hyperplastic lesions. These data reveal a potentially important role for transcriptionally active beta-catenin in the regulation of Rad6B gene expression, and link aberrant beta-catenin signaling with transcriptional deregulation

  11. MicroRNA-320a suppresses human colon cancer cell proliferation by directly targeting {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian-Yong; Huang, Yi; Li, Ji-Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Lei; Meng, Yan-Ling; Yan, Bo; Bian, Yong-Qian; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Wei-Zhong; and others

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a is downregulated in human colorectal carcinoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-Catenin is a direct target of miR-320a in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-320a expression inversely correlates with mRNA expression of {beta}-catenin's target genes in human colon carcinoma. -- Abstract: Recent profile studies of microRNA (miRNA) expression have documented a deregulation of miRNA (miR-320a) in human colorectal carcinoma. However, its expression pattern and underlying mechanisms in the development and progression of colorectal carcinoma has not been elucidated clearly. Here, we performed real-time PCR to examine the expression levels of miR-320a in colon cancer cell lines and tumor tissues. And then, we investigated its biological functions in colon cancer cells by a gain of functional strategy. Further more, by the combinational approaches of bioinformatics and experimental validation, we confirmed target associations of miR-320a in colorectal carcinoma. Our results showed that miR-320a was frequently downregulated in cancer cell lines and colon cancer tissues. And we demonstrated that miR-320a restoration inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation and {beta}-catenin, a functionally oncogenic molecule was a direct target gene of miR-320a. Finally, the data of real-time PCR showed the reciprocal relationship between miR-320a and {beta}-catenin's downstream genes in colon cancer tissues. These findings indicate that miR-320a suppresses the growth of colon cancer cells by directly targeting {beta}-catenin, suggesting its application in prognosis prediction and cancer treatment.

  12. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  13. beta-Galactosidase enzyme fragment complementation for the measurement of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Verkaar, Folkert; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Smits, Jos F M; Zaman, Guido J R

    2010-04-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is an important regulator of cell polarity, proliferation, and stem cell maintenance during development and adulthood. Wnt proteins induce the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin, which regulates the expression of Wnt-responsive genes through association with TCF/LEF transcription factors. Aberrant Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in a plethora of pathologies and, most notably, underlies initiation and expansion of several cancers. Here, we apply enzyme fragment complementation to measure the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin. beta-Catenin was tagged with a peptide fragment of beta-galactosidase and transfected into cells expressing a corresponding deletion mutant of the enzyme exclusively in the nucleus. Stimulation of the cells with recombinant Wnt-3a restored beta-galactosidase activity in a dose-dependent manner with nanomolar potency. Using the assay, we confirmed that Wnt-5a represses beta-catenin-driven reporter gene activity downstream of nuclear entry of beta-catenin. In addition, we tested a library of >2000 synthetic chemical compounds for their ability to induce beta-catenin nuclear accumulation. The immunosuppressive protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin (AEB-071) was identified as an activator of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling at micromolar concentrations. It was confirmed that the compound stabilizes endogenous beta-catenin protein and can induce TCF/LEF-dependent gene transcription. Subsequent biochemical profiling of >200 kinases revealed both isoforms of glycogen synthase kinase 3, as previously unappreciated targets of sotrastaurin. We show that the beta-catenin nuclear accumulation assay contributes to our knowledge of molecular interactions within the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and can be used to find new therapeutics targeting Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.-Verkaar, F., Blankesteijn, W. M., Smits, J. F. M., Zaman, G. J. R. beta-Galactosidase enzyme fragment complementation for the measurement of Wnt/beta-catenin

  14. Activation of Beta-Catenin Signaling in Androgen Receptor–Negative Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xinhai; Liu, Jie; Lu, Jing-Fang; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W.; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Efstathiou, Eleni; Vazquez, Elba S.; Troncoso, Patricia; Maity, Sankar N.; Navone, Nora M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study Wnt/beta-catenin in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and understand its function independently of the beta-catenin–androgen receptor (AR) interaction. Experimental Design We performed beta-catenin immunocytochemical analysis, evaluated TOP-flash reporter activity (a reporter of beta-catenin–mediated transcription), and sequenced the beta-catenin gene in MDA PCa 118a, MDA PCa 118b, MDA PCa 2b, and PC-3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We knocked down beta-catenin in AR-negative MDA PCa 118b cells and performed comparative gene-array analysis. We also immunohistochemically analyzed beta-catenin and AR in 27 bone metastases of human CRPCs. Results Beta-catenin nuclear accumulation and TOP-flash reporter activity were high in MDA PCa 118b but not in MDA PCa 2b or PC-3 cells. MDA PCa 118a and 118b cells carry a mutated beta-catenin at codon 32 (D32G). Ten genes were expressed differently (false discovery rate, 0.05) in MDA PCa 118b cells with downregulated beta-catenin. One such gene, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), synthesizes hyaluronan, a core component of the extracellular matrix. We confirmed HAS2 upregulation in PC-3 cells transfected with D32G-mutant beta-catenin. Finally, we found nuclear localization of beta-catenin in 10 of 27 human tissue specimens; this localization was inversely associated with AR expression (P = 0.056, Fisher’s exact test), suggesting that reduced AR expression enables Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Conclusion We identified a previously unknown downstream target of beta-catenin, HAS2, in PCa, and found that high beta-catenin nuclear localization and low or no AR expression may define a subpopulation of men with bone-metastatic PCa. These findings may guide physicians in managing these patients. PMID:22298898

  15. Wnt-dependent beta-catenin signaling is activated after unilateral ureteral obstruction, and recombinant secreted frizzled-related protein 4 alters the progression of renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Surendran, Kameswaran; Schiavi, Susan; Hruska, Keith A

    2005-08-01

    beta-Catenin functions as a transducer of Wnt signals to the nucleus, where it interacts with the T cell factor (TCF) family of DNA binding proteins to regulate gene expression. On the basis of the genes regulated by beta-catenin and TCF in various biologic settings, two predicted functions of beta-catenin/TCF-dependent transcription are to mediate the loss of epithelial polarity and to promote fibroblast activities, such as the increased synthesis of fibronectin during chronic renal disease. These predictions were tested by determination of the expression and function of an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (sFRP4), during renal tubular epithelial injury initiated by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Despite increased sFRP4 gene expression in perivascular regions of injured kidneys, total sFRP4 protein levels decreased after injury. The decreased sFRP4 protein levels after UUO accompanied increased Wnt-dependent beta-catenin signaling in tubular epithelial and interstitial cells, along with increased expression of markers of fibrosis. Administration of recombinant sFRP4 protein caused a reduction in tubular epithelial beta-catenin signaling and suppressed the progression of renal fibrosis, as evidenced by a partial maintenance of E-cadherin mRNA expression and a reduction in the amount of fibronectin and alpha-smooth muscle actin proteins. Furthermore, recombinant sFRP4 reduced the number of myofibroblasts, a central mediator of fibrosis. It is concluded that beta-catenin signaling is activated in tubular epithelial and interstitial cells after renal injury, and recombinant sFRP4 can interfere with epithelial de-differentiation and with fibroblast differentiation and function during progression of renal fibrosis.

  16. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  17. Beta-catenin-mediated cell-adhesion is vital for embryonic forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Dirk; Hack, Iris; Frotscher, Michael; Taylor, Verdon; Kemler, Rolf

    2005-06-01

    Forming a complex structure such as the mammalian brain requires a complex interplay between cells and different signalling cascades during embryonic development. beta-catenin plays pivotal roles in these processes by mediating cadherin-based cell adhesion and Wnt signalling. We show for the first time that beta-catenin functions predominantly as a mediator of cell adhesion during early development of the mammalian telencephalon. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrates that beta-catenin is localized, together with N-cadherin, to adhesion junctions at the apical lining of the neuroepithelium. The ablation of beta-catenin specifically from the forebrain leads to a disruption of apical adherens junctions and a breakdown of neuroepithelial structures. We show that beta-catenin-deficient neuroepithelial cells delaminate and undergo apoptosis. Newborn beta-catenin mutants lack the entire forebrain and anterior facial structures. Our data also indicate a lack of TCF/LEF-beta-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity in the telencephalon of Wnt reporter embryos. Together with the absence of nuclear beta-catenin, this finding suggests that canonical Wnt signalling is not active during early telencephalic development. In summary, we demonstrate that beta-catenin mediates cell-cell adhesion in the early telencephalon and is vital for maintaining the structural integrity of the neuroepithelium.

  18. beta-catenin can be transported into the nucleus in a Ran-unassisted manner.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, F; Imamoto, N; Tachibana, T; Yoneda, Y

    1999-04-01

    The nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin plays an important role in the Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway. This study describes an examination of the nuclear import of beta-catenin in living mammalian cells and in vitro semi-intact cells. When injected into the cell cytoplasm, beta-catenin rapidly migrated into the nucleus in a temperature-dependent and wheat germ agglutinin-sensitive manner. In the cell-free import assay, beta-catenin rapidly migrates into the nucleus without the exogenous addition of cytosol, Ran, or ATP/GTP. Cytoplasmic injection of mutant Ran defective in its GTP hydrolysis did not prevent beta-catenin import. Studies using tsBN2, a temperature-sensitive mutant cell line that possesses a point mutation in the RCC1 gene, showed that the import of beta-catenin is insensitive to nuclear Ran-GTP depletion. These results show that beta-catenin possesses the ability to constitutively translocate through the nuclear pores in a manner similar to importin beta in a Ran-unassisted manner. We further showed that beta-catenin also rapidly exits the nucleus in homokaryons, suggesting that the regulation of nuclear levels of beta-catenin involves both nuclear import and export of this molecule.

  19. N-cadherin mediated distribution of beta-catenin alters MAP kinase and BMP-2 signaling on chondrogenesis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Modarresi, Rozbeh; Lafond, Toulouse; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Danielson, Keith G; Tuan, Rocky S; Seghatoleslami, M Reza

    2005-05-01

    We have examined the effect of calcium-dependent adhesion, mediated by N-cadherin, on cell signaling during chondrogenesis of multipotential embryonic mouse C3H10T1/2 cells. The activity of chondrogenic genes, type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 were examined in monolayer (non-chondrogenic), and micromass (chondrogenic) cultures of parental C3H10T1/2 cells and altered C3H10T1/2 cell lines that express a dominant negative form of N-cadherin (delta390-T1/2) or overexpress normal N-cadherin (MNCD2-T1/2). Our findings show that missexpression or inhibition of N-cadherin in C3H10T1/2 cells results in temporal and spatial changes in expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II. We have also analyzed activity of the serum response factor (SRF), a nuclear target of MAP kinase signaling implicated in chondrogenesis. In semi-confluent monolayer cultures (minimum cell-cell contact) of C3H10T1/2, MNCD2-T1/2, or delta390-T1/2 cells, there was no significant change in the pattern of MAP kinase or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) regulation of SRF. However, in micromass cultures, the effect of MAP kinase and BMP-2 on SRF activity was proportional to the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a Wnt stabilized cytoplasmic factor that can associate with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF) to serve as a transcription factor. Our findings suggest that the extent of adherens junction formation mediated by N-cadherin can modulate the potential Wnt-induced nuclear activity of beta-catenin. PMID:15723280

  20. Caveolin-1-mediated suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 via a beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcriptional mechanism reduced prostaglandin E2 production and survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Diego A; Tapia, Julio C; Fernandez, Jaime G; Torres, Vicente A; Muñoz, Nicolas; Galleguillos, Daniela; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2009-04-01

    Augmented expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and enhanced production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) are associated with increased tumor cell survival and malignancy. Caveolin-1 is a scaffold protein that has been proposed to function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer cells, although mechanisms underlying this ability remain controversial. Intriguingly, the possibility that caveolin-1 regulates the expression of COX-2 has not been explored. Here we show that augmented caveolin-1 expression in cells with low basal levels of this protein, such as human colon cancer (HT29, DLD-1), breast cancer (ZR75), and embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells reduced COX-2 mRNA and protein levels and beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef and COX-2 gene reporter activity, as well as the production of PGE(2) and cell proliferation. Moreover, COX-2 overexpression or PGE(2) supplementation increased levels of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin by a transcriptional mechanism, as determined by PCR analysis, survivin gene reporter assays and Western blotting. Furthermore, addition of PGE(2) to the medium prevented effects attributed to caveolin-1-mediated inhibition of beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription. Finally, PGE(2) reduced the coimmunoprecipitation of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin and their colocalization at the plasma membrane. Thus, by reducing COX-2 expression, caveolin-1 interrupts a feedback amplification loop involving PGE(2)-induced signaling events linked to beta-catenin/Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription of tumor survival genes including cox-2 itself and survivin. PMID:19244345

  1. Genomic organization of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1)

    SciTech Connect

    Nollet, F.; Berx, G.; Molemans, F.; Roy, F. van

    1996-03-05

    The cytoplasmic {beta}-catenin protein is implicated in signal transduction and associates with both the cell-cell adhesion protein E-cadherin and the tumor suppressor gene product APC. We determined the primary structure of the human {beta}-catenin gene (CTNNB1) by analysis cDNA and genomic clones. The size of the complete gene was determined to be 23.2 kb. Restriction mapping and partial sequence analysis revealed 16 exons. All splice donor and acceptor sites were conformable to the GT/AG rule. The exon size ranged from 61 to 790 bp. Half of the introns were smaller than 550 bp, with the smallest being 84 pb and the longest being 6700 bp. The intron-exon boundaries did not coincide either with conserved sites in the 12 armadillo repeat sequences of {beta}-catenin or with intron-exon boundaries in the armadillo gene of Drosophila. A major site for transcription initiation was identified as an A residue 214 nucleotides upstream of the ATG initiation codon. The resulting transcript is 3362 nucleotides long. Compared to the previously published mRNA sequence, additional residues were identified, 16 at the 5{prime} end and 766 at the 3{prime} end of the mRNA. An alternative splice acceptor site within exon 16 reduced the 3{prime} UTR sequence by 159 bp. Polymerase chain reaction on cDNA from 14 human cell lines demonstrated the general occurrence of both splice variants. The 5{prime}-flanking region is highly GC-rich and lacks a CCAAT box, but contains a TATA box and potential binding sites for several transcription factors, such as NFkB, SP1, AP2, and EGR1. Both a 437-bp fragment and a 6-kb fragment, containing about 4.7 kb of the 5{prime}-flanking region in addition to the noncoding exon 1 and 1 kb of intron 1, showed clear promoter activity when these fragments were linked to a secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter gene and transfected into a mouse epithelial cell line. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack.

    PubMed

    Scherbakov, Alexander M; Stefanova, Lidia B; Sorokin, Danila V; Semina, Svetlana E; Berstein, Lev M; Krasil'nikov, Mikhail A

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors--from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O2 atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK - the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well the level of

  3. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    SciTech Connect

    Scherbakov, Alexander M.; Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E.; Berstein, Lev M.; Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A.

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  4. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is activated during advanced arterial aging in humans.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Alexandre; Atassi, Fabrice; Gaaya, Amira; Leprince, Pascal; Le Feuvre, Claude; Soubrier, Florent; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Nadaud, Sophie

    2011-04-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, but the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The Wnt signaling pathway was shown to be induced during aging in muscle and in the skin, but the regulation and role of Wnt signaling in the aged vessel have not yet been addressed. While screening for age-related changes in gene expression in the intima/media of human mammary arteries, we observed that the expression of frizzled 4 (Fzd4), a Wnt receptor, and of several targets of the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway [Wnt-inducible secreted protein 1 (WISP1), versican, osteopontin (SPP1), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2), and p21] were modified with age, suggesting an activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In contrast, we did not observe any regulation of forkhead transcription factor (FoxO) target genes. Beta-catenin-activating phosphorylation at position Ser675 was increased in aging mammary arteries, confirming the activation of this pathway. We confirmed in vitro that Wnt3a or Wnt1 treatment of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser675 and WISP1, SPP1, and IGFBP-2 expression. In vitro, Wnt treatment induced proliferation and cyclin D1 expression in VSMC from young (6 weeks old) rats but not in cells from older rats (8 months old), even though low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 and β-catenin phosphorylation, and β-catenin nuclear translocation demonstrated β-catenin activation in both cell types. Beta-catenin silencing demonstrated that Wnt induction of cyclin D1 expression is β-catenin dependent. Altogether, our data show that the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF pathway is activated in aging human mammary artery cells, but fails to induce the proliferation of aging vascular cells. PMID:21108734

  5. Generation and behavioral characterization of beta-catenin forebrain-specific conditional knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Gould, Todd D; O'Donnell, Kelley C; Picchini, Alyssa M; Dow, Eliot R; Chen, Guang; Manji, Husseini K

    2008-05-16

    The canonical Wnt pathway and beta-catenin have been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. We generated forebrain-specific CRE-mediated conditional beta-catenin knock-out mice to begin exploring the behavioral implications of decreased Wnt pathway signaling in the central nervous system. In situ hybridization revealed a progressive knock-out of beta-catenin that began between 2 and 4 weeks of age, and by 12 weeks resulted in considerably decreased beta-catenin expression in regions of the forebrain, including the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. A significant decrease in protein levels of beta-catenin in these brain regions was observed by Western blot. Behavioral characterization of these mice in several tests (including the forced swim test, tail suspension test (TST), learned helplessness, response and sensitization to stimulants, and light/dark box among other tests) revealed relatively circumscribed alterations. In the TST, knock-out mice spent significantly less time struggling (a depression-like phenotype). However, knock-out mice did not differ from their wild-type littermates in the other behavioral tests of mood-related or anxiety-related behaviors. These results suggest that a 60-70% beta-catenin reduction in circumscribed brain regions is only capable of inducing subtle behavioral changes. Alternatively, regulating beta-catenin may modulate drug effects rather than being a model of mood disorder pathophysiology per se.

  6. Excess beta-catenin promotes accumulation of transcriptionally active p53.

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, A; Ben-Ze'ev, A; Simcha, I; Shtutman, M; Leal, J F; Zhurinsky, J; Geiger, B; Oren, M

    1999-01-01

    beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein, acting both as a structural component of the cell adhesion machinery and as a transducer of extracellular signals. Deregulated beta-catenin protein expression, due to mutations in the beta-catenin gene itself or in its upstream regulator, the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, is prevalent in colorectal cancer and in several other tumor types, and attests to the potential oncogenic activity of this protein. Increased expression of beta-catenin is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and is usually followed by a later mutational inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. To examine whether these two key steps in carcinogenesis are interrelated, we studied the effect of excess beta-catenin on p53. We report here that overexpression of beta-catenin results in accumulation of p53, apparently through interference with its proteolytic degradation. This effect involves both Mdm2-dependent and -independent p53 degradation pathways, and is accompanied by augmented transcriptional activity of p53 in the affected cells. Increased p53 activity may provide a safeguard against oncogenic deregulation of beta-catenin, and thus impose a pressure for mutational inactivation of p53 during the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:10357817

  7. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  8. Tyrosine residues 654 and 670 in {beta}-cat enin are crucial in regulation of Met-{beta}-catenin interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Gang; Apte, Udayan; Micsenyi, Amanda; Bell, Aaron; Monga, Satdarshan P.S. . E-mail: smonga@pitt.edu

    2006-11-01

    {beta}-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt pathway, is also regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation that regulates its association to E-cadherin. Previously, we reported its association with the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor Met at the membrane. HGF induced Met-{beta}-catenin dissociation and nuclear translocation of {beta}-catenin, which was tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent. Here, we further investigate the Met-{beta}-catenin interaction by selectively mutating several tyrosine residues, alone or in combination, in {beta}-catenin. The mutants were subcloned into FLAG-CMV vector and stably transfected into rat hepatoma cells, which were treated with HGF. All single or double-mutant-transfected cells continued to show HGF-induced nuclear translocation of FLAG-{beta}-catenin except the mutations affecting 654 and 670 simultaneously (Y654/670F), which coincided with the lack of formation of {beta}-catenin-TCF complex and DNA synthesis, in response to the HGF treatment. In addition, the Y654/670F-transfected cells also showed no phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin or dissociation from Met in response to HGF. Thus, intact 654 and 670 tyrosine residues in {beta}-catenin are crucial in HGF-mediated {beta}-catenin translocation, activation and mitogenesis.

  9. Functional correlates of mutation of the Asp32 and Gly34 residues of beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Provost, Elayne; McCabe, Anthony; Stern, Jessica; Lizardi, Isabel; D'Aquila, Thomas G; Rimm, David L

    2005-04-14

    Beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein involved in both cadherin-mediated adhesion and the wnt signaling cascade. Mutations in exon 3 of beta-catenin have been identified in many cancers. In addition to disruption of key serine and threonine residues, mutations are frequently reported in other residues in exon 3 that are not kinase substrates. The most frequently mutated nonserine/threonine residues are D32 and G34. Since D32 and G34 are part of the ubiquitination destruction motif, DSGPhiXS, we hypothesize that this motif may contribute to disruption of beta-catenin homeostasis and lead to cellular transformation. We demonstrate that the mutants D32A and G34A exhibit no change in phosphorylation by GSK3beta, but display reduced ubiquitination compared to wild-type and S33A mutant beta-catenin. To assess the functional implications of these mutations, we created stable MDCK cell lines expressing these constructs. We found that stable cell lines harboring D32A-mutated beta-catenin were highly transformed, while S33A and G34 demonstrated only weak transforming properties in our assays. Despite altered ubiquitination status and increased transformation, the D32A mutant cell line does not display transcriptional activation of standard target genes. Therefore, D32A mutation may mediate transformation by an alternative beta-catenin-mediated signaling pathway.

  10. Beta-catenin in schizophrenia: Possibly deleterious novel mutation.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Anastasia; Davtian, Stepan; Freylichman, Olga; Zagrivnaya, Maria; Kostareva, Anna; Malashichev, Yegor

    2015-08-30

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychiatric disorder, affecting approximately 1% of the human population. Mostly genetic factors contribute to schizophrenia, but the genetics are complex and various aspects of brain functioning and structure, from development to synapse plasticity, seem to be involved in the pathogenesis. The goal of the study was to look for novel mutations in genes, implicated in molecular networks, important in schizophrenia. In the study four candidate genes taking part in the WNT signaling pathway were analyzed by sequencing in a cohort of 87 schizophrenia patients from Saint Petersburg, Russia. The gene list included CTNNB1 (beta-catenin), GSK3B, WNT2B and WNT7B. The impact of discovered variants on the protein function was analyzed in silico. We found three variants in the genes CTNNB1 and WNT7B, absent in healthy controls, including 212 controls from the same geographic area. The novel mutation c.1943A>G (p.N648S) in CTNNB1 seems to be the best candidate for disease-associated mutation in this study, as it damages the protein product in silico. This is the first study reporting mutations in CTNNB1 in schizophrenia.

  11. Sonic hedgehog acts as a negative regulator of {beta}-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Fabian T; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Plate, Karl H; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear beta-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. beta-Catenin activation in APC(min/+) mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses beta-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate beta-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear beta-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched(+/-) mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear beta-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce beta-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on beta-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/beta-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control beta-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC. PMID:20508033

  12. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  13. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Caroline

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  14. Inhibition of selectin binding

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Spevak, Wayne R.; Dasgupta, Falguni; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  15. Induction of a secondary body axis in Xenopus by antibodies to beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    McCrea, P D; Brieher, W M; Gumbiner, B M

    1993-10-01

    We have obtained evidence that a known intracellular component of the cadherin cell-cell adhesion machinery, beta-catenin, contributes to the development of the body axis in the frog Xenopus laevis. Vertebrate beta-catenin is homologous to the Drosophila segment polarity gene product armadillo, and to vertebrate plakoglobin (McCrea, P. D., C. W. Turck, and B. Gumbiner. 1991. Science (Wash. DC). 254: 1359-1361.). Beta-Catenin was found present in all Xenopus embryonic stages examined, and associated with C-cadherin, the major cadherin present in early Xenopus embryos. To test beta-catenin's function, affinity purified Fab fragments were injected into ventral blastomeres of developing four-cell Xenopus embryos. A dramatic phenotype, the duplication of the dorsoanterior embryonic axis, was observed. Furthermore, Fab injections were capable of rescuing dorsal features in UV-ventralized embryos. Similar phenotypes have been observed in misexpression studies of the Wnt and other gene products, suggesting that beta-catenin participates in a signaling pathway which specifies embryonic patterning. PMID:8408227

  16. Opposite Interplay between PPAR Gamma and Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Vallée, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The opposite interplay between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has led to the categorization of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) as either NDs in which PPAR gamma is downregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated [amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Friedreich's ataxia] or NDs in which PPAR gamma is upregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is downregulated (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease). ALS, a common adult-onset debilitating ND, is characterized by a chronic and progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons resulting in muscular atrophy, paralysis, and ultimately death. The intent of this review is to provide an analysis of the integration of these two opposed systems, i.e., canonical Wnt/beta-catenin and PPAR gamma, in ALS. Understanding this integration may aid in the development of novel ALS therapies. Although the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated in ALS, riluzole, an enhancer of the canonical Wnt signaling, is classically prescribed in this disease in humans. However, studies carried out on ALS transgenic mice have shown beneficial effects after treatment by PPAR gamma agonists partly due to their anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27445967

  17. Tau overexpression in transgenic mice induces glycogen synthase kinase 3beta and beta-catenin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Shim, S B; Lim, H J; Chae, K R; Kim, C K; Hwang, D Y; Jee, S W; Lee, S H; Sin, J S; Leem, Y H; Lee, S H; Cho, J S; Lee, H H; Choi, S Y; Kim, Y K

    2007-05-11

    The abnormal phosphorylations of tau, GSK3beta, and beta-catenin have been shown to perform a crucial function in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The primary objective of the current study was to determine the manner in which overexpressed htau23 interacts and regulates the behavior and phosphorylation characteristics of tau, GSK3beta, and beta-catenin. In order to accomplish this, transgenic mice expressing neuron-specific enolase (NSE)-controlled human wild-type tau (NSE/htau23) were created. Transgenic mice evidenced the following: (i) tendency toward memory impairments at later stages, (ii) dramatic overexpression of the tau transgene, coupled with increased tau phosphorylation and paired helical filaments (PHFs), (iii) high levels of GSK3beta phosphorylation with advanced age, resulting in increases in the phosphorylations of tau and beta-catenin, (iv) an inhibitory effect of lithium on the phosphorylations of tau, GSK3beta, and beta-catenin, but not in the non-transgenic littermate group. Therefore, the overexpression of NSE/htau23 in the brains of transgenic mice induces abnormal phosphorylations of tau, GSK3beta, and beta-catenin, which are ultimately linked to neuronal degeneration in cases of AD. These transgenic mice are expected to prove useful for the development of new drugs for the treatment of AD.

  18. Opposite Interplay between PPAR Gamma and Canonical Wnt/Beta-Catenin Pathway in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Vallée, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The opposite interplay between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has led to the categorization of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) as either NDs in which PPAR gamma is downregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated [amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Friedreich’s ataxia] or NDs in which PPAR gamma is upregulated while the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is downregulated (bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease). ALS, a common adult-onset debilitating ND, is characterized by a chronic and progressive degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons resulting in muscular atrophy, paralysis, and ultimately death. The intent of this review is to provide an analysis of the integration of these two opposed systems, i.e., canonical Wnt/beta-catenin and PPAR gamma, in ALS. Understanding this integration may aid in the development of novel ALS therapies. Although the canonical Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is upregulated in ALS, riluzole, an enhancer of the canonical Wnt signaling, is classically prescribed in this disease in humans. However, studies carried out on ALS transgenic mice have shown beneficial effects after treatment by PPAR gamma agonists partly due to their anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27445967

  19. Activation of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Kun . E-mail: leedk@memorialhealthsource.com; Nathan Grantham, R.; Trachte, Aaron L.; Mannion, John D.; Wilson, Colleen L.

    2006-08-18

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta} or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules.

  20. APP induces neuronal apoptosis through APP-BP1-mediated downregulation of beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y Z

    2004-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with progressive dementia. This mini-review focuses on how the amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in AD and Down syndrome as the regulator of the APP-BP1/hUba3 activated neddylation pathway. It is argued that the physiological function of APP is to downregulate the level of beta-catenin. However, this APP function is abnormally amplified in patients with familial AD (FAD) mutations in APP and presenilins, resulting in the hyperactivation of neddylation and the decrease of beta-catenin below a threshold level. Evidence in the literature is summarized to show that dysfunction of APP in downregulating beta-catenin may underlie the mechanism of neuronal death in AD and Down syndrome. PMID:15192323

  1. The destruction complex of beta-catenin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Bourroul, Guilherme Muniz; Fragoso, Hélio José; Gomes, José Walter Feitosa; Bourroul, Vivian Sati Oba; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Saba, Gabriela Tognini; Palma, Rogério Tadeu; Waisberg, Jaques

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the destruction complex of beta-catenin by the expression of the proteins beta-catetenin, adenomatous polyposis coli, GSK3β, axin and ubiquitin in colorectal carcinoma and colonic adenoma. Methods Tissue samples from 64 patients with colorectal carcinoma and 53 patients with colonic adenoma were analyzed. Tissue microarray blocks and slides were prepared and subjected to immunohistochemistry with polyclonal antibodies in carcinoma, adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa, and adenoma tissues. The immunoreactivity was evaluated by the percentage of positive stained cells and by the intensity assessed through of the stained grade of proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. In the statistical analysis, the Spearman correlation coefficient, Student’s t, χ2, Mann-Whitney, and McNemar tests, and univariate logistic regression analysis were used. Results In colorectal carcinoma, the expressions of beta-catenin and adenomatous polyposis coli proteins were significantly higher than in colonic adenomas (p<0.001 and p<0.0001, respectively). The immunoreactivity of GSK3β, axin 1 and ubiquitin proteins was significantly higher (p=0.03, p=0.039 and p=0.03, respectively) in colorectal carcinoma than in the colonic adenoma and adjacent non-neoplastic mucosa. The immunohistochemistry staining of these proteins did not show significant differences with the clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer and colonic adenoma. Conclusions These results suggest that, in adenomas, the lower expression of the beta-catenin, axin 1 and GSK3β proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was maintained, while in colorectal carcinoma, the increased expression of beta-catenin, GSK3β, axin 1, and ubiquitin proteins indicated that the destruction complex of beta-catenin was disrupted. PMID:27462886

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-2 activates beta-catenin signaling in the mouse intestinal crypt: role of insulin-like growth factor-I.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Philip E; Rowland, Katherine J; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2008-01-01

    Chronic administration of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) induces intestinal growth and crypt cell proliferation through an indirect mechanism requiring IGF-I. However, the intracellular pathways through which IGF-I mediates GLP-2-induced epithelial tropic signaling remain undefined. Because beta-catenin and Akt are important regulators of crypt cell proliferation, we hypothesized that GLP-2 activates these signaling pathways through an IGF-I-dependent mechanism. In this study, fasted mice were administered Gly(2)-GLP-2 or LR(3)-IGF-I (positive control) for 0.5-4 h. Nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in non-Paneth crypt cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry and expression of its downstream proliferative markers, c-myc and Sox9, by quantitative RT-PCR. Akt phosphorylation and activation of its targets, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and caspase-3, were determined by Western blot. IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) and IGF-I signaling were blocked by preadministration of NVP-AEW541 and through the use of IGF-I knockout mice, respectively. We found that GLP-2 increased beta-catenin nuclear translocation in non-Paneth crypt cells by 72 +/- 17% (P < 0.05) and increased mucosal c-myc and Sox9 mRNA expression by 90 +/- 20 and 376 +/- 170%, respectively (P < 0.05-0.01), with similar results observed with IGF-I. This effect of GLP-2 was prevented by blocking the IGF-IR as well as ablation of IGF-I signaling. GLP-2 also produced a time- and dose-dependent activation of Akt in the intestinal mucosa (P < 0.01), most notably in the epithelium. This action was reduced by IGF-IR inhibition but not IGF-I knockout. We concluded that acute administration of GLP-2 activates beta-catenin and proliferative signaling in non-Paneth murine intestinal crypt cells as well as Akt signaling in the mucosa. However, IGF-I is required only for the GLP-2-induced alterations in beta-catenin.

  3. An ancient role for nuclear beta-catenin in the evolution of axial polarity and germ layer segregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikramanayake, Athula H.; Hong, Melanie; Lee, Patricia N.; Pang, Kevin; Byrum, Christine A.; Bince, Joanna M.; Xu, Ronghui; Martindale, Mark Q.

    2003-01-01

    The human oncogene beta-catenin is a bifunctional protein with critical roles in both cell adhesion and transcriptional regulation in the Wnt pathway. Wnt/beta-catenin signalling has been implicated in developmental processes as diverse as elaboration of embryonic polarity, formation of germ layers, neural patterning, spindle orientation and gap junction communication, but the ancestral function of beta-catenin remains unclear. In many animal embryos, activation of beta-catenin signalling occurs in blastomeres that mark the site of gastrulation and endomesoderm formation, raising the possibility that asymmetric activation of beta-catenin signalling specified embryonic polarity and segregated germ layers in the common ancestor of bilaterally symmetrical animals. To test whether nuclear translocation of beta-catenin is involved in axial identity and/or germ layer formation in 'pre-bilaterians', we examined the in vivo distribution, stability and function of beta-catenin protein in embryos of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa). Here we show that N. vectensis beta-catenin is differentially stabilized along the oral-aboral axis, translocated into nuclei in cells at the site of gastrulation and used to specify entoderm, indicating an evolutionarily ancient role for this protein in early pattern formation.

  4. DKK1, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, is a target of the beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

    PubMed

    Niida, Atsushi; Hiroko, Takatoshi; Kasai, Mana; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2004-11-01

    Wnt signaling plays an important role in embryonic development and tumorigenesis. These biological effects are exerted by activation of the beta-catenin/TCF transcription complex and consequent regulation of a set of downstream genes. TCF-binding elements have been found in the promoter regions of many TCF target genes and characterized by a highly conserved consensus sequence. Utilizing this consensus sequence, we performed an in silico screening for new TCF target genes. Through computational screening and subsequent experimental analysis, we identified a novel TCF target gene, DKK1, which has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of Wnt signaling. Our finding suggests the existence of a novel feedback loop in Wnt signaling. PMID:15378020

  5. {beta}-Catenin up-regulates Nanog expression through interaction with Oct-3/4 in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Yukinari; Yokota, Takashi; Koide, Hiroshi . E-mail: hkoide@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2007-02-16

    It is well known that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be maintained by the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Recent studies have revealed that Wnt also exhibits activity similar to LIF. The molecular mechanism behind the maintenance of ES cells by these factors, however, is not fully understood. In this study, we found that LIF enhances level of nuclear {beta}-catenin, a component of the Wnt signaling pathway. Expression of an activated mutant of {beta}-catenin led to the long-term proliferation of ES cells, even in the absence of LIF. Furthermore, it was found that {beta}-catenin up-regulates Nanog in an Oct-3/4-dependent manner and that {beta}-catenin physically associates with Oct-3/4. These results suggest that up-regulating Nanog through interaction with Oct-3/4 involves {beta}-catenin in the LIF- and Wnt-mediated maintenance of ES cell self-renewal.

  6. Stabilization of beta-catenin in XY gonads causes male-to-female sex-reversal.

    PubMed

    Maatouk, Danielle M; DiNapoli, Leo; Alvers, Ashley; Parker, Keith L; Taketo, Makoto M; Capel, Blanche

    2008-10-01

    During mammalian sex determination, expression of the Y-linked gene Sry shifts the bipotential gonad toward a testicular fate by upregulating a feed-forward loop between FGF9 and SOX9 to establish SOX9 expression in somatic cells. We previously proposed that these signals are mutually antagonistic with counteracting signals in XX gonads and that a shift in the balance of these factors leads to either male or female development. Evidence in mice and humans suggests that the male pathway is opposed by the expression of two signals, WNT4 and R-SPONDIN-1 (RSPO1), that promote the ovarian fate and block testis development. Both of these ligands can activate the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Duplication of the distal portion of chromosome 1p, which includes both WNT4 and RSPO1, overrides the male program and causes male-to-female sex reversal in XY patients. To determine whether activation of beta-catenin is sufficient to block the testis pathway, we have ectopically expressed a stabilized form of beta-catenin in the somatic cells of XY gonads. Our results show that activation of beta-catenin in otherwise normal XY mice effectively disrupts the male program and results in male-to-female sex-reversal. The identification of beta-catenin as a key pro-ovarian and anti-testis signaling molecule will further our understanding of the mechanisms controlling sex determination and the molecular mechanisms that lead to sex-reversal. PMID:18617533

  7. Localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Hayley; Patel, Shyam; Wong, Janelle; Chu, Julia; Li, Adrian; Li, Song

    2008-08-08

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are pluripotent, and can be directed to differentiate into different cell types for therapeutic applications. To expand hESCs, it is desirable to maintain hESC growth without differentiation. As hESC colonies grow, differentiated cells are often found at the periphery of the colonies, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we utilized micropatterning techniques to pattern circular islands or strips of matrix proteins, and examined the spatial pattern of hESC renewal and differentiation. We found that micropatterned matrix restricted hESC differentiation at colony periphery but allowed hESC growth into multiple layers in the central region, which decreased hESC proliferation and induced hESC differentiation. In undifferentiated hESCs, {beta}-catenin primarily localized at cell-cell junctions but not in the nucleus. The amount of {beta}-catenin in differentiating hESCs at the periphery of colonies or in multiple layers decreased significantly at cell-cell junctions. Consistently, knocking down {beta}-catenin decreased Oct-4 expression in hESCs. These results indicate that localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the spatial pattern of differentiation in hESC colonies.

  8. BCR-ABL1-Associated Reduction of Beta Catenin Antagonist Chibby1 in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aluigi, Michela; Luatti, Simona; Castagnetti, Fausto; Testoni, Nicoletta; Soverini, Simona; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Beta Catenin signaling is critical for the self-renewal of leukemic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. It is driven by multiple events, enhancing beta catenin stability and promoting its transcriptional co-activating function. We investigated the impact of BCR-ABL1 on Chibby1, a beta catenin antagonist involved in cell differentiation and transformation. Relative proximity of the Chibby1 encoding gene (C22orf2) on chromosome 22q12 to the BCR breakpoint (22q11) lets assume its involvement in beta catenin activation in chronic myeloid leukemia as a consequence of deletions of distal BCR sequences encompassing one C22orf2 allele. Forty patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase were analyzed for C22orf2 relocation and Chibby1 expression. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses established that the entire C22orf2 follows BCR regardless of chromosomes involved in the translocation. In differentiated hematopoietic progenitors (bone marrow mononuclear cell fractions) of 30/40 patients, the expression of Chibby1 protein was reduced below 50% of the reference value (peripheral blood mononuclear cell fractions of healthy persons). In such cell context, Chibby1 protein reduction is not dependent on C22orf2 transcriptional downmodulation; however, it is strictly dependent upon BCR-ABL1 expression because it was not observed at the moment of major molecular response under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Moreover, it was not correlated with the disease prognosis or response to therapy. Most importantly, a remarkable Chibby1 reduction was apparent in a putative BCR-ABL1+ leukemic stem cell compartment identified by a CD34+ phenotype compared to more differentiated hematopoietic progenitors. In CD34+ cells, Chibby1 reduction arises from transcriptional events and is driven by C22orf2 promoter hypermethylation. These results advance low Chibby1 expression associated with BCR-ABL1 as a component of beta catenin signaling in leukemic stem cells. PMID:24339928

  9. {beta}-Catenin stabilization imparts crypt progenitor phenotype to hyperproliferating colonic epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, Joseph H.; Wang Yu; Singh, Pomila; Umar, Shahid

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the Citrobacter rodentium (CR)-induced transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia (TMCH) model, we provide mechanistic basis of changes in {beta}-catenin/APC/CKI{epsilon} leading to progression and/or regression of hyperplasia in vivo. In response to CR-induced TMCH, crypt lengths increased significantly between days 6-27 post-infection, followed by a steep decline by day 34. {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/total {beta}-catenin were elevated on day 1 post-infection, preceding changes in crypt length, and persisted for 27 days before declining by day 34. Importantly, cellular CKI{epsilon} and {beta}-catenin co-immunoprecipitated and exhibited remarkable parallel changes in kinetics during hyperplasia/regression phases. {beta}-catenin, phosphorylated at Ser33,37 and Thr41 ({beta}-cat{sup 33,37/41}), was low till day 12, followed by gradual increase until day 27 before declining by day 34. GSK-3{beta} exhibited significant Ser{sup 9}-phosphorylation/inactivation at days 6-12 with partial recovery at days 27-34. Wild type (wt) APC (p312) levels increased at day 6 with transient proteolysis/truncation to p130 form between days 12 and 15; p312 reappeared by day 19 and returned to baseline by day 34. The kinetics of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin nuclear accumulation and acetylation (Ac-{beta}-Cat{sup Lys49}) from days 6 to 27, followed by loss of phosphorylation/acetylation by day 34 was almost identical; Tcf-4 co-immunoprecipitated with {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin and localized immunohistochemically to {beta}-Cat{sup 41/45}-positive regions leading to elevated cyclin D1 expression, during the hyperproliferative, but not regression phases of TMCH. CKI{epsilon} mediated phosphorylation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}, resulting in stabilization/nuclear translocation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45} may be critical for maintaining proliferation at days 6-27. Reversal of GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation and APC changes may be equally critical during the regression phase from days 27 to 34.

  10. [CELL CONTACT PROTEIN BETA-CATENIN IN EPENDYMAL AND EPITHELIAL CELLS OF THE CHOROID PLEXUS OF THE CEREBRAL LATERAL VENTRICLES].

    PubMed

    Kirik, O V; Sufieyva, D A; Nazarenkova, A V; Korzhevskiy, D E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution pattern of cellular contacts protein beta-catenin in the choroid plexus and ependyma of lateral ventricles of the brain. The study was conducted on frontal sections of the brain of Wistar rats (n = 10) using polyclonal antibodies against beta-catenin. The obtained preparations were analyzed by microscopy in transmitted light and using confocal laser microscopy. To study the distribution of beta-catenin in different projections, three-dimensional reconstruction was performed. The study demonstrated different distribution patterns of this protein in ependyma and choroid plexus. Unlike ependyma, in the cells of the choroid plexus beta-catenin was distributed in the same way as in simple epithelial tissues (on the basal and lateral borders of the cells). This may indicate different tissue attribution of the ependyma and the choroid plexus epithelium, despite their common origin. PMID:27487660

  11. WISP-1 is a Wnt-1- and beta-catenin-responsive oncogene.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Corcoran, R B; Welsh, J W; Pennica, D; Levine, A J

    2000-03-01

    WISP-1 (Wnt-1 induced secreted protein 1) is a member of the CCN family of growth factors. This study identifies WISP-1 as a beta-catenin-regulated gene that can contribute to tumorigenesis. The promoter of WISP-1 was cloned and shown to be activated by both Wnt-1 and beta-catenin expression. TCF/LEF sites played a minor role, whereas the CREB site played an important role in this transcriptional activation. WISP-1 demonstrated oncogenic activities; overexpression of WISP-1 in normal rat kidney fibroblast cells (NRK-49F) induced morphological transformation, accelerated cell growth, and enhanced saturation density. Although these cells did not acquire anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, they readily formed tumors in nude mice, suggesting that appropriate cellular attachment is important for signaling oncogenic events downstream of WISP-1.

  12. Beta-catenin versus the other armadillo catenins: assessing our current view of canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel K; Hong, Ji Yeon; Muñoz, William A; McCrea, Pierre D

    2013-01-01

    The prevailing view of canonical Wnt signaling emphasizes the role of beta-catenin acting downstream of Wnt activation to regulate transcriptional activity. However, emerging evidence indicates that other armadillo catenins in vertebrates, such as members of the p120 subfamily, convey parallel signals to the nucleus downstream of canonical Wnt pathway activation. Their study is thus needed to appreciate the networked mechanisms of canonical Wnt pathway transduction, especially as they may assist in generating the diversity of Wnt effects observed in development and disease. In this chapter, we outline evidence of direct canonical Wnt effects on p120 subfamily members in vertebrates and speculate upon these catenins' roles in conjunction with or aside from beta-catenin. PMID:23481204

  13. Loss of p53 expression is accompanied by upregulation of beta-catenin in meningiomas: a concomitant reciprocal expression.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Vladušić, Tomislav; Tomas, Davor; Logara, Monika; Skoko, Josip; Hrašćan, Reno

    2016-04-01

    Crosstalk between Wnt and p53 signalling pathways in cancer has long been suggested. Therefore in this study we have investigated the involvement of these pathways in meningiomas by analysing their main effector molecules, beta-catenin and p53. Cellular expression of p53 and beta-catenin proteins and genetic changes in TP53 were analysed by immunohistochemistry, PCR/RFLP and direct sequencing of TP53 exon 4. All the findings were analysed statistically. Our analysis showed that 47.5% of the 59 meningiomas demonstrated loss of expression of p53 protein. Moderate and strong p53 expression in the nuclei was observed in 8.5% and 6.8% of meningiomas respectively. Gross deletion of TP53 gene was observed in one meningioma, but nucleotide alterations were observed in 35.7% of meningiomas. In contrast, beta-catenin, the main Wnt signalling molecule, was upregulated in 71.2%, while strong expression was observed in 28.8% of meningiomas. The concomitant expressions of p53 and beta-catenin were investigated in the same patients. In the analysed meningiomas, the levels of the two proteins were significantly negatively correlated (P = 0.002). This indicates that meningiomas with lost p53 upregulate beta-catenin and activate Wnt signalling. Besides showing the reciprocal relationship between proteins, we also showed that the expression of p53 was significantly (P = 0.021) associated with higher meningioma grades (II and III), while beta-catenin upregulation was not associated with malignancy grades. Additionally, women exhibited significantly higher values of p53 loss when compared to males (P = 0.005). Our findings provide novel information about p53 involvement in meningeal brain tumours and reveal the complex relationship between Wnt and p53 signalling, they suggest an important role for beta-catenin in these tumours.

  14. beta-catenin-dependent and -independent effects of DeltaN-plakoglobin on epidermal growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Teulière, J; Faraldo, M M; Shtutman, M; Birchmeier, W; Huelsken, J; Thiery, J P; Glukhova, M A

    2004-10-01

    Both beta-catenin and plakoglobin can stimulate the expression of Lef/Tcf target genes in vitro. beta-Catenin is known to associate with Lef/Tcf factors and to participate directly in transactivation in vivo, whereas the role of plakoglobin in transcriptional regulation has been less studied. To analyze the functions of plakoglobin in vivo, we generated transgenic mice expressing in the epidermis N-terminally truncated plakoglobin (DeltaN122-PG) lacking the glycogen synthase kinase 3beta phosphorylation sites and therefore protected against degradation (transgenic line K5-DeltaN122-PG). The expression of DeltaN122-PG led to the formation of additional hair germs, hyperplastic hair follicles, and noninvasive hair follicle tumors, a phenotype reminiscent of that induced by expression of N-terminally truncated beta-catenin. However, if expressed in beta-catenin-null epidermis, DeltaN122-PG did not induce new hair follicle germs and follicular tumors. Thus, DeltaN122-PG cannot substitute for beta-catenin in its signaling functions in vivo and the phenotype observed in K5-DeltaN122-PG mouse skin must be due to the aberrant activation of beta-catenin signaling. On the other hand, the expression of DeltaN122-PG in beta-catenin-null skin significantly increased the survival rate of mutant mice, rescued differentiation, and limited excessive proliferation in the interfollicular epidermis, suggesting that plakoglobin may be involved in the intracellular signaling events essential for epidermal differentiation. PMID:15367683

  15. Molecular mechanisms of hormone-mediated Müllerian duct regression: involvement of beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Allard, S; Adin, P; Gouédard, L; di Clemente, N; Josso, N; Orgebin-Crist, M C; Picard, J Y; Xavier, F

    2000-08-01

    Regression of the Müllerian duct in the male embryo is one unequivocal effect of anti-Müllerian hormone, a glycoprotein secreted by the Sertoli cells of the testis. This hormone induces ductal epithelial regression through a paracrine mechanism originating in periductal mesenchyme. To probe the mechanisms of action of anti-Müllerian hormone, we have studied the sequence of cellular and molecular events involved in duct regression. Studies were performed in male rat embryos and in transgenic mice overexpressing or lacking anti-Müllerian hormone, both in vivo and in vitro. Anti-Müllerian hormone causes regression of the cranial part of the Müllerian duct whereas it continues to grow caudally. Our work shows that this pattern of regression is correlated with a cranial to caudal gradient of anti-Müllerian hormone receptor protein, followed by a wave of apoptosis spreading along the Müllerian duct as its progresses caudally. Apoptosis is also induced by AMH in female Müllerian duct in vitro. Furthermore, apoptotic indexes are increased in Müllerian epithelium of transgenic mice of both sexes overexpressing the human anti-Müllerian hormone gene, exhibiting a positive correlation with serum hormone concentration. Inversely, apoptosis is reduced in male anti-Müllerian hormone-deficient mice. We also show that apoptosis is a decisive but not sufficient process, and that epitheliomesenchymal transformation is an important event of Müllerian regression. The most striking result of this study is that anti-Müllerian hormone action in peri-Müllerian mesenchyme leads in vivo and in vitro to an accumulation of cytoplasmic beta-catenin. The co-localization of beta-catenin with lymphoid enhancer factor 1 in the nucleus of peri-Müllerian mesenchymal cells, demonstrated in primary culture, suggests that overexpressed beta-catenin in association with lymphoid enhancer factor 1 may alter transcription of target genes and may lead to changes in mesenchymal gene expression

  16. Excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling promotes midbrain floor plate neurogenesis, but results in vacillating dopamine progenitors.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Navid; Patel, Meera J; Joksimovic, Milan; Poulin, Jean-Francois; Anderegg, Angela; Taketo, M Mark; Ma, Yong-Chao; Awatramani, Rajeshwar

    2015-09-01

    The floor plate (FP), a ventral midline structure of the developing neural tube, has differential neurogenic capabilities along the anterior-posterior axis. The midbrain FP, unlike the hindbrain and spinal cord floor plate, is highly neurogenic and produces midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons. Canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, at least in part, is thought to account for the difference in neurogenic capability. Removal of beta-catenin results in mDA progenitor specification defects as well as a profound reduction of neurogenesis. To examine the effects of excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling on mDA specification and neurogenesis, we have analyzed a model wherein beta-catenin is conditionally stabilized in the Shh+domain. Here, we show that the Foxa2+/Lmx1a+ domain is extended rostrally in mutant embryos, suggesting that canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling can drive FP expansion along the rostrocaudal axis. Although excess canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling generally promotes neurogenesis at midbrain levels, less tyrosine hydroxylase (Th)+, mDA neurons are generated, particularly impacting the Substantia Nigra pars compacta. This is likely because of improper progenitor specification. Excess canonical Wnt/beta-catenin signaling causes downregulation of net Lmx1b, Shh and Foxa2 levels in mDA progenitors. Moreover, these progenitors assume a mixed identity to that of Lmx1a+/Lmx1b+/Nkx6-1+/Neurog1+ progenitors. We also show by lineage tracing analysis that normally, Neurog1+ progenitors predominantly give rise to Pou4f1+ neurons, but not Th+ neurons. Accordingly, in the mutant embryos, Neurog1+ progenitors at the midline generate ectopic Pou4f1+ neurons at the expense of Th+ mDA neurons. Our study suggests that an optimal dose of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is critical for proper establishment of the mDA progenitor character. Our findings will impact embryonic stem cell protocols that utilize Wnt pathway reagents to derive mDA neuron models and therapeutics for

  17. SLIT2 attenuation during lung cancer progression deregulates beta-catenin and E-cadherin and associates with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ruo-Chia; Lee, Shih-Hua; Hsu, Han-Shui; Chen, Ben-Han; Tsai, Wan-Ching; Tzao, Ching; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2010-01-15

    Chromosome 4p15.3 is frequently deleted in late-stage lung cancer. We investigated the significance of the SLIT2 gene located in this region to lung cancer progression. SLIT2 encodes an extracellular glycoprotein that can suppress breast cancer by regulating beta-catenin. In this study, we examined alterations in the structure or expression of SLIT2, its receptor ROBO1, and beta-catenin, along with the AKT/glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta)/beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (betaTrCP) pathway in lung cancer cell lines and patients. Low SLIT2 expression correlated with an upward trend of pathological stage and poorer survival in lung cancer patients. Importantly, SLIT2, betaTrCP, and beta-catenin expression levels predicted postoperative recurrence of lung cancer in patients. Stimulating SLIT2 expression by various methods increased the level of E-cadherin caused by attenuation of its transcriptional repressor SNAI1. Conversely, knocking down SLIT2 expression increased cell migration and reduced cell adhesion through coordinated deregulation of beta-catenin and E-cadherin/SNAI1 in the AKT/GSK3beta/betaTrCP pathway. Our findings indicate that SLIT2 suppresses lung cancer progression, defining it as a novel "theranostic" factor with potential as a therapeutic target and prognostic predictor in lung cancer. Cancer Res; 70(2); 543-51.

  18. Lithium induces gene expression through lymphoid enhancer-binding factor/T-cell factor responsive element in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Ezio; Magnani, Enrico; Terstappen, Georg C

    2002-01-01

    Lithium inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), which leads to an increase of cytoplasmic beta-catenin levels. In some cell types, but not in others, activated beta-catenin interacts with members of the lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF)/T-cell factor (TCF) family of transcription factors and induces gene expression. Lithium effect on LEF/TCF-mediated gene expression has never been evaluated in cells with a neuronal phenotype. We have constructed a LEF/TCF-dependent luciferase reporter gene to investigate lithium effects on transcription in PC12 cells. In transiently transfected PC12 cells, lithium induced a time-dependent increase in LEF/TCF-mediated luciferase activity. These results are consistent with the known inhibitory effects of lithium on GSK-3 and represent the first demonstration that a LEF/TCF responsive element also mediates lithium-induced gene expression in PC12 cells.

  19. CONSORT: Sam68 Is Directly Regulated by MiR-204 and Promotes the Self-Renewal Potential of Breast Cancer Cells by Activating the Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Tian, Han; Yuan, Jie; Wu, Hongmei; Wu, Jueheng; Zhu, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to be responsible for recurrence in breast cancer. The 68 kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) has been linked to the development and progression of breast cancer; however, the posttranscriptional regulation and role of Sam68 in BCSC self-renewal remain unclear. Sam68 was ectopically overexpressed or knocked down using a siRNA; the self-renewal potential of breast cancer cell lines was assessed using flow cytometry, in vitro mammosphere culture and a xenograft model in NOD/SCID mice. Activation of beta-catenin was assessed by immunohistochemical staining, Western blotting, and luciferase reporter gene assays. The ArrayExpress dataset GSE45666 was used to identify conserved microRNAs downregulated in breast cancer; real-time PCR, Western blotting, luciferase reporter assay, and xenografted tumor model were used to confirm miR-204 regulated Sam68. We found that endogenous Sam68 expression correlated positively with the self-renewal potential of breast cancer cell lines. Overexpression of Sam68 promoted, whereas knockdown reduced, breast cancer cell self-renewal potential in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway was identified as a functional mediator of Sam68-induced self-renewal in SKBR-3 and MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, miR-204 was found to be frequently downregulated in human breast cancer and confirmed to directly target Sam68; miR-204 inhibited the self-renewal of breast cancer cell lines by targeting and suppressing Sam68. Our study reveals that Sam68 is regulated by miR-204 and may play an important role in the self-renewal of BCSCs via activating the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Sam68 may represent a novel therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:26656364

  20. Prenatal cadmium exposure dysregulates sonic hedgehog and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in the thymus resulting in altered thymocyte development

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Tou, Janet C.; Barnett, John B.

    2010-01-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is both an environmental pollutant and a component of cigarette smoke. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports in the literature of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. The sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways are required for thymocyte maturation. Several studies have demonstrated that Cd exposure affects these pathways in different organ systems. This study was designed to investigate the effect of prenatal Cd exposure on thymocyte development, and to determine if these effects were linked to dysregulation of Shh and Wnt/beta-catenin pathways. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose (10 ppm) of Cd throughout pregnancy and effects on the thymus were assessed on the day of birth. Thymocyte phenotype was determined by flow cytometry. A Gli:luciferase reporter cell line was used to measure Shh signaling. Transcription of target genes and translation of key components of both signaling pathways were assessed using real-time RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Prenatal Cd exposure increased the number of CD4{sup +} cells and a subpopulation of double-negative cells (DN; CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}), DN4 (CD44{sup -}CD25{sup -}). Shh and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling were both decreased in the thymus. Target genes of Shh (Patched1 and Gli1) and Wnt/beta-catenin (c-fos, and c-myc) were affected differentially among thymocyte subpopulations. These findings suggest that prenatal exposure to Cd dysregulates two signaling pathways in the thymus, resulting in altered thymocyte development.

  1. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling changes C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation by inducing Id3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Shi, Songting; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Fangfang; Dijke, Peter ten

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Id3 but not Id1 is induced by Wnt3a stimulation in C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a induces Id3 expression via canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a-induced Id3 expression does not depend on BMP signaling activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induction of Id3 expression is critical determinant in Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we report that inhibitor of differentiation (Id)3 is a Wnt-inducible gene in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Wnt3a induced Id3 expression in a {beta}-catenin-dependent manner. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) also potently induced Id3 expression. However, Wnt-induced Id3 expression occurred independent of the BMP/Smad pathway. Functional studies showed that Id3 depletion in C2C12 cells impaired Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast cells. Id3 depletion elevated myogenin induction during myogenic differentiation and partially impaired Wnt3a suppressed myogenin expression in C2C12 cells. These results suggest that Id3 is an important Wnt/{beta}-catenin induced gene in myoblast cell fate determination.

  2. The protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is a major phosphatase of adherens junctions and dephosphorylates beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Wadham, Carol; Gamble, Jennifer R; Vadas, Mathew A; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim

    2003-06-01

    Cell-cell adhesion regulates processes important in embryonal development, normal physiology, and cancer progression. It is regulated by various mechanisms including tyrosine phosphorylation. We have previously shown that the protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez is concentrated at intercellular junctions in confluent, quiescent monolayers but is nuclear in cells lacking cell-cell contacts. We show here with an epithelial cell model that Pez localizes to the adherens junctions in confluent monolayers. A truncation mutant lacking the catalytic domain acts as a dominant negative mutant to upregulate tyrosine phosphorylation at adherens junctions. We identified beta-catenin, a component of adherens junctions, as a substrate of Pez by a "substrate trapping" approach and by in vitro dephosphorylation with recombinant Pez. Consistent with this, ectopic expression of the dominant negative mutant caused an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, demonstrating that Pez regulates the level of tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins, including beta-catenin. Increased tyrosine phosphorylation of adherens junction proteins has been shown to decrease cell-cell adhesion, promoting cell migration as a result. Accordingly, the dominant negative Pez mutant enhanced cell motility in an in vitro "wound" assay. This suggests that Pez is also a regulator of cell motility, most likely through its action on cell-cell adhesion. PMID:12808048

  3. Pharmacological modulation of beta-catenin and its applications in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Ravi; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Beta-catenin (β-catenin) is a multifunction protein with a central role in physiological homeostasis. Its abnormal expression leads to various diseases including cancer. In normal physiology, β-catenin either maintains integrity of epithelial tissues or controls transcription of various genes on extracellular instigations. In epithelial tissues, β-catenin functions as a component of the cadherin protein complex and regulates epithelial cell growth and intracellular adhesion. In Wnt signalling, β-catenin is a major transcriptional modulator and plays a crucial role in embryogenesis, stem cell renewal and organ regeneration. Aberrant expression of β-catenin can induce malignant pathways in normal cells and its abnormal activity is also exploited by existing malignant programmes. It acts as an oncogene and modulates transcription of genes to drive cancer initiation, progression, survival and relapse. Abnormal expression and function of β-catenin in cancer makes it a putative drug target. In the past decade, various attempts have been made to identify and characterize various pharmacological inhibitors of β-catenin. Many of these inhibitors are currently being investigated for their anticancer activities in a variety of cancers. The first half of this review will focus on the role of β-catenin in cancer initiation, maintenance, progression and relapse whereas the second half will briefly summarize the recent progress in development of agents for the pharmacological modulation of β-catenin activity in cancer therapeutics. PMID:23490077

  4. Decreased nuclear beta-catenin, tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration in GSK-3beta conditional transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Lucas, J J; Hernández, F; Gómez-Ramos, P; Morán, M A; Hen, R; Avila, J

    2001-01-15

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) has been postulated to mediate Alzheimer's disease tau hyperphosphorylation, beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity and presenilin-1 mutation pathogenic effects. By using the tet-regulated system we have produced conditional transgenic mice overexpressing GSK-3beta in the brain during adulthood while avoiding perinatal lethality due to embryonic transgene expression. These mice show decreased levels of nuclear beta-catenin and hyperphosphorylation of tau in hippocampal neurons, the latter resulting in pretangle-like somatodendritic localization of tau. Neurons displaying somatodendritic localization of tau often show abnormal morphologies and detachment from the surrounding neuropil. Reactive astrocytosis and microgliosis were also indicative of neuronal stress and death. This was further confirmed by TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining of dentate gyrus granule cells. Our results demonstrate that in vivo overexpression of GSK-3beta results in neurodegeneration and suggest that these mice can be used as an animal model to study the relevance of GSK-3beta deregulation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Gonadal Identity in the Absence of Pro-Testis Factor SOX9 and Pro-Ovary Factor Beta-Catenin in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Barbara; Yao, Humphrey H-C

    2015-08-01

    Sex-reversal cases in humans and genetic models in mice have revealed that the fate of the bipotential gonad hinges upon the balance between pro-testis SOX9 and pro-ovary beta-catenin pathways. Our central query was: if SOX9 and beta-catenin define the gonad's identity, then what do the gonads become when both factors are absent? To answer this question, we developed mouse models that lack either Sox9, beta-catenin, or both in the somatic cells of the fetal gonads and examined the morphological outcomes and transcriptome profiles. In the absence of Sox9 and beta-catenin, both XX and XY gonads progressively lean toward the testis fate, indicating that expression of certain pro-testis genes requires the repression of the beta-catenin pathway, rather than a direct activation by SOX9. We also observed that XY double knockout gonads were more masculinized than their XX counterpart. To identify the genes responsible for the initial events of masculinization and to determine how the genetic context (XX vs. XY) affects this process, we compared the transcriptomes of Sox9/beta-catenin mutant gonads and found that early molecular changes underlying the XY-specific masculinization involve the expression of Sry and 21 SRY direct target genes, such as Sox8 and Cyp26b1. These results imply that when both Sox9 and beta-catenin are absent, Sry is capable of activating other pro-testis genes and drive testis differentiation. Our findings not only provide insight into the mechanism of sex determination, but also identify candidate genes that are potentially involved in disorders of sex development.

  6. Nodal signaling in Xenopus gastrulae is cell-autonomous and patterned by beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Partyka, Minako K; Yuge, Masahiro; Cho, Ken W Y

    2003-01-01

    The classical three-signal model of amphibian mesoderm induction and more recent modifications together propose that an activin-like signaling activity is uniformly distributed across the vegetal half of the Xenopus blastula and that this activity contributes to mesoderm induction. In support of this, we have previously shown that the activin-response element (DE) of the goosecoid promoter is uniformly activated across the vegetal half of midgastrula-stage embryos. Here, we further examine the nature of this activity by measuring DE activation by endogenous signals over time. We find that the spatiotemporal pattern of DE activation is much more dynamic than was previously appreciated and also conclude that DE(6X)Luc activity reflects endogenous nodal signaling in the embryo. Using both the DE(6X)Luc construct and endogenous Xbra and Xgsc expression as read-outs for nodal activity, and the cleavage-mutant version of Xnr2 (CmXnr2) to regionally suppress endogenous nodal activity, we demonstrate that nodal signals act cell-autonomously in Xenopus gastrulae. Nodal-expressing cells are unable to rescue either reporter gene activation or target gene expression in distant nodal-deficient cells, suggesting that nodals function at short range in this context. Finally, we show that DE activation by endogenous signals occurs in the absence of dorsal beta-catenin-mediated signaling, but that the timing of dorsal initiation is altered. We conclude that nodal signals in Xenopus gastrulae function cell autonomously at short ranges and that the spatiotemporal pattern of this signaling along the dorsoventral axis is regulated by maternal Wnt-like signaling. PMID:12490202

  7. Activation of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway is associated with glial proliferation in the adult spinal cord of ALS transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yanchun; Guan, Yingjun; Liu, Huancai; Wu, Xin; Yu, Li; Wang, Shanshan; Zhao, Chunyan; Du, Hongmei; Wang, Xin

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 were upregulated in the spinal cord of the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus in the ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin and Cyclin D1 co-localized for astrocytes were all increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of ALS mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. -- Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive and fatal loss of motor neurons. In ALS, there is a significant cell proliferation in response to neurodegeneration; however, the exact molecular mechanisms of cell proliferation and differentiation are unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative processes. Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 are three key signaling molecules of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway. We determined the expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 in the adult spinal cord of SOD1{sup G93A} ALS transgenic mice at different stages by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. We found that the mRNA and protein of Wnt3a and Cyclin D1 in the spinal cord of the ALS mice were upregulated compared to those in wild-type mice. In addition, {beta}-catenin translocated from the cell membrane to the nucleus and subsequently activated transcription of the target gene, Cyclin D1. BrdU and Cyclin D1 double-positive cells were increased in the spinal cord of these mice. Moreover, Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin, and Cyclin D1 were also expressed in both neurons and astrocytes. The expression of Wnt3a, {beta}-catenin or Cyclin D1 in mature GFAP{sup +} astrocytes increased. Moreover, BrdU/Cyclin D1/GFAP triple-positive cells were detected in the ALS mice. Our findings suggest that

  8. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) promote Wnt/Wg signaling through stabilization of beta-catenin/Arm and stimulation of target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wendy; Swarup, Sharan; Chen, Joanna; Ishitani, Tohru; Verheyen, Esther M

    2009-01-01

    The Wnt/Wingless (Wg) pathway represents a conserved signaling cascade involved in diverse biological processes. Misregulation of Wnt/Wg signal transduction has profound effects on development. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinases (Hipks) represent a novel family of serine/threonine kinases. Members of this group (in particular Hipk2) are implicated as important factors in transcriptional regulation to control cell growth, apoptosis and development. Here, we provide genetic and phenotypic evidence that the sole Drosophila member of this family, Hipk, functions as a positive regulator in the Wg pathway. Expression of hipk in the wing rescues loss of the Wg signal, whereas loss of hipk can enhance decreased wg signaling phenotypes. Furthermore, loss of hipk leads to diminished Arm protein levels, whereas overexpression of hipk promotes the Wg signal by stabilizing Arm, resulting in activation of Wg responsive targets. In Wg transcriptional assays, Hipk enhanced Tcf/Arm-mediated gene expression in a kinase-dependent manner. In addition, Hipk can bind to Arm and Drosophila Tcf, and phosphorylate Arm. Using both in vitro and in vivo assays, Hipk was found to promote the stabilization of Arm. We observe similar molecular interactions between Lef1/beta-catenin and vertebrate Hipk2, suggesting a direct and conserved role for Hipk proteins in promoting Wnt signaling. PMID:19088090

  9. A genome-wide RNAi screen for Wnt/beta-catenin pathway components identifies unexpected roles for TCF transcription factors in cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Dodge, Michael; Gundapaneni, Deepika; Michnoff, Carolyn; Roth, Michael; Lum, Lawrence

    2008-07-15

    The Wnt family of secreted proteins coordinate cell fate decision-making in a broad range of developmental and homeostatic contexts. Corruption of Wnt signal transduction pathways frequently results in degenerative diseases and cancer. We have used an iterative genome-wide screening strategy that employs multiple nonredundant RNAi reagents to identify mammalian genes that participate in Wnt/beta-catenin pathway response. Among the genes that were assigned high confidence scores are two members of the TCF/LEF family of DNA-binding proteins that control the transcriptional output of the pathway. Surprisingly, we found that the presumed cancer-promoting gene TCF7L2 functions instead as a transcriptional repressor that restricts colorectal cancer (CRC) cell growth. Mutations in TCF7L2 identified from cancer genome sequencing efforts abolish its ability to function as a transcriptional regulator and result in increased CRC cell growth. We describe a growth-promoting transcriptional program that is likely activated in CRC tumors with compromised TCF7L2 function. Taken together, the results from our screen and studies focused on members of the TCF/LEF gene family refine our understanding of how aberrant Wnt pathway activation sustains CRC growth.

  10. Retinoic acid and Wnt/beta-catenin have complementary roles in anterior/posterior patterning embryos of the basal chordate amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Onai, Takayuki; Lin, Hsiu-Chin; Schubert, Michael; Koop, Demian; Osborne, Peter W; Alvarez, Susana; Alvarez, Rosana; Holland, Nicholas D; Holland, Linda Z

    2009-08-15

    A role for Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in axial patterning has been demonstrated in animals as basal as cnidarians, while roles in axial patterning for retinoic acid (RA) probably evolved in the deuterostomes and may be chordate-specific. In vertebrates, these two pathways interact both directly and indirectly. To investigate the evolutionary origins of interactions between these two pathways, we manipulated Wnt/beta-catenin and RA signaling in the basal chordate amphioxus during the gastrula stage, which is the RA-sensitive period for anterior/posterior (A/P) patterning. The results show that Wnt/beta-catenin and RA signaling have distinctly different roles in patterning the A/P axis of the amphioxus gastrula. Wnt/beta-catenin specifies the identity of the ends of the embryo (high Wnt = posterior; low Wnt = anterior) but not intervening positions. Thus, upregulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling induces ectopic expression of posterior markers at the anterior tip of the embryo. In contrast, RA specifies position along the A/P axis, but not the identity of the ends of the embryo-increased RA signaling strongly affects the domains of Hox expression along the A/P axis but has little or no effect on the expression of either anterior or posterior markers. Although the two pathways may both influence such things as specification of neuronal identity, interactions between them in A/P patterning appear to be minimal.

  11. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and E-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Denise L; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim V; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E; Cotsarelis, George

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode "budding" is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions (AJs) is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of AJ component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another AJ component, has been more difficult to study owing to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes, and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent AJ dissolution.

  12. URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition by modulation of E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Rui; Huang, Chen; Bi, Qian; Zhai, Ying; Xia, Lin; Liu, Jie; Sun, Shiren; Fan, Daiming

    2010-01-01

    Upregulated gene 11 (URG11), recently identified as a new HBx-upregulated gene that may activate {beta}-catenin and Wnt signaling, was found to be upregulated in a human tubule cell line under low oxygen. Here, we investigated the potential role of URG11 in hypoxia-induced renal tubular epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT). Overexpression of URG11 in a human proximal tubule cell line (HK2) promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and {alpha}-SMA, while URG11 knockdown by siRNA effectively reversed hypoxia-induced EMT. URG11 promoted the expression of {beta}-catenin and increased its nuclear accumulation under normoxic conditions through transactivation of the {beta}-catenin promoter. This in turn upregulated {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) and its downstream effector genes, vimentin, and {alpha}-SMA. In vivo, strong expression of URG11 was observed in the tubular epithelia of 5/6-nephrectomized rats, and a Western blot analysis demonstrated a close correlation between HIF-1{alpha} and URG11 protein levels. Altogether, our results indicate that URG11 mediates hypoxia-induced EMT through the suppression of E-cadherin and the activation of the {beta}-catenin/TCF pathway.

  13. Proteomic analysis of beta-catenin activation in mouse liver by DIGE analysis identifies glucose metabolism as a new target of the Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Chafey, Philippe; Finzi, Laetitia; Boisgard, Raphael; Caüzac, Michèle; Clary, Guillem; Broussard, Cédric; Pégorier, Jean-Paul; Guillonneau, François; Mayeux, Patrick; Camoin, Luc; Tavitian, Bertrand; Colnot, Sabine; Perret, Christine

    2009-08-01

    The Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway has been increasingly implicated in liver development and physiology. Aberrant activation of this pathway is one of the major genetic events observed during the process of human HCC development. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying beta-catenin action in the liver, we conducted a quantitative differential proteomic analysis using 2-D DIGE combined with MS, in mice with liver-specific deletion of Apc resulting in acute activation of beta-catenin signaling (Apc(KOliv) mice). We identified 94 protein spots showing differential expression between mutant Apc(KOliv) and control mice, corresponding to 56 individual proteins. Most of the proteins identified were associated with metabolic pathways, such as ammonia and glucose metabolism. Our analysis showed an increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity together with a downregulation of two mitochondrial ATPase subunits (ATP5a1 and ATP5b). These observations indicate that beta-catenin signaling may induce a shift in the glucose metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, known as the "Warburg effect". Imaging with (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography suggests that the specific metabolic reprogramming induced by beta-catenin in the liver does not imply the first step of glycolysis. This observation may explain why some HCCs are difficult to assess by fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography imaging.

  14. CD133 expression correlates with membrane beta-catenin and e-cadherin loss from human hair follicle placodes during morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Denise; Yang, Chao-Chun; Plikus, Maksim; Ito, Mayumi; Rivera, Charlotte; Treffeisen, Elsa; Doherty, Laura; Spata, Michelle; Millar, Sarah E.; Cotsarelis, George

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the major events of human hair follicle development are similar to those in mice, but detailed analyses of this process are lacking. In mice, hair follicle placode ‘budding’ is initiated by invagination of Wnt-induced epithelium into the underlying mesenchyme. Modification of adherens junctions is clearly required for budding. Snail-mediated downregulation of adherens junction component E-cadherin is important for placode budding in mice. Beta-catenin, another adherens junction component, has been more difficult to study due to its essential functions in Wnt signaling, a prerequisite for hair follicle placode induction. Here, we show that a subset of human invaginating hair placode cells expresses the stem cell marker CD133 during early morphogenesis. CD133 associates with membrane beta-catenin in early placodes and its continued expression correlates with loss of beta-catenin and E-cadherin from the cell membrane at a time when E-cadherin transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug are not implicated. Stabilization of CD133 via anti-CD133 antibody treatment of human fetal scalp explants depresses beta-catenin and E-cadherin membrane localization. We discuss this unique correlation and suggest a hypothetical model whereby CD133 promotes morphogenesis in early hair follicle placodes through the localized removal of membrane beta-catenin proteins and subsequent adherens junction dissolution. PMID:25010141

  15. Sfrp1, Sfrp2, and Sfrp5 regulate the Wnt/beta-catenin and the planar cell polarity pathways during early trunk formation in mouse.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Wataru; Matsuyama, Makoto; Takemura, Hiromasa; Aizawa, Shinichi; Shimono, Akihiko

    2008-02-01

    Sfrp is a secreted Wnt antagonist that directly interacts with Wnt ligand. We show here that inactivation of Sfrp1, Sfrp2, and Sfrp5 leads to fused somites formation in early-somite mouse embryos, simultaneously resulting in defective convergent extension (CE), which causes severe shortening of the anteroposterior axis. These observations indicate the redundant roles of Sfrp1, Sfrp2, and Sfrp5 in early trunk formation. The roles of the Sfrps were genetically distinguished in terms of the regulation of Wnt pathways. Genetic analysis combining Sfrps mutants and Loop-tail mice revealed the involvement of Sfrps in CE through the regulation of the planar cell polarity pathway. Furthermore, Dkk1-deficient embryos carrying Sfrp1 homozygous and Sfrp2 heterozygous mutations display irregular somites and indistinct intersomitic boundaries, which indicates that Sfrps-mediated inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is necessary for somitogenesis. Our results suggest that Sfrps regulation of the canonical and noncanonical pathways is essential for proper trunk formation. PMID:18257070

  16. Mouse model of human ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma based on somatic defects in the Wnt/beta-catenin and PI3K/Pten signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rong; Hendrix-Lucas, Neali; Kuick, Rork; Zhai, Yali; Schwartz, Donald R; Akyol, Aytekin; Hanash, Samir; Misek, David E; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Williams, Bart O; Fearon, Eric R; Cho, Kathleen R

    2007-04-01

    One histologic subtype of ovarian carcinoma, ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma (OEA), frequently harbors mutations that constitutively activate Wnt/beta-catenin-dependent signaling. We now show that defects in the PI3K/Pten and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathways often occur together in a subset of human OEAs, suggesting their cooperation during OEA pathogenesis. Deregulation of these two pathways in the murine ovarian surface epithelium by conditional inactivation of the Pten and Apc tumor suppressor genes results in the formation of adenocarcinomas morphologically similar to human OEAs with 100% penetrance, short latency, and rapid progression to metastatic disease in upwards of 75% of mice. The biological behavior and gene expression patterns of the murine cancers resemble those of human OEAs with defects in the Wnt/beta-catenin and PI3K/Pten pathways.

  17. Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Show Increased Expression of DVL1, DVL3 and Beta-Catenin and Down-Regulation of E-Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p = 0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p = 0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain. PMID:24933634

  18. Brain metastases from lung cancer show increased expression of DVL1, DVL3 and beta-catenin and down-regulation of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Anja; Tomas, Davor; Beroš, Vili; Pećina, Hrvoje Ivan; Zeljko, Martina; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-06-13

    The susceptibility of brain to secondary formation from lung cancer primaries is a well-known phenomenon. In contrast, the molecular basis for invasion and metastasis to the brain is largely unknown. In the present study, 31 brain metastases that originated from primary lung carcinomas were analyzed regarding over expression of Dishevelled-1 (DVL1), Dishevelled-3 (DVL3), E-cadherin (CDH1) and beta-catenin (CTNNB1). Protein expressions and localizations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Genetic alterations of E-cadherin were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Heteroduplex was used to investigate mutations in beta-catenin. DVL1 and DVL3 showed over expression in brain metastasis in 87.1% and 90.3% of samples respectively. Nuclear staining was observed in 54.8% of cases for DVL1 and 53.3% for DVL3. The main effector of the Wnt signaling, beta-catenin, was up-regulated in 56%, and transferred to the nucleus in 36% of metastases. When DVL1 and DVL3 were up-regulated the number of cases with nuclear beta-catenin significantly increased (p=0.0001). Down-regulation of E-cadherin was observed in 80% of samples. Genetic analysis showed 36% of samples with LOH of the CDH1. In comparison to other lung cancer pathologies, the diagnoses adenocarcinoma and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were significantly associated to CDH1 LOH (p=0.001). Microsatellite instability was detected in one metastasis from adenocarcinoma. Exon 3 of beta-catenin was not targeted. Altered expression of Dishevelled-1, Dishevelled-3, E-cadherin and beta-catenin were present in brain metastases which indicates that Wnt signaling is important and may contribute to better understanding of genetic profile conditioning lung cancer metastasis to the brain.

  19. Attenuated Response to Methamphetamine Sensitization and Deficits in Motor Learning and Memory after Selective Deletion of [beta]-Catenin in Dopamine Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Ruiz, Oscar; Zhang, YaJun; Shan, Lufei; Malik, Nasir; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Cadet, Jean Lud; Lupica, Carl R.; Tagliaferro, Adriana; Brusco, Alicia; Backman, Cristina M.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed mice with a targeted deletion of [beta]-catenin in DA neurons (DA-[beta]cat KO mice) to address the functional significance of this molecule in the shaping of synaptic responses associated with motor learning and following exposure to drugs of abuse. Relative to controls, DA-[beta]cat KO mice showed significant…

  20. Sequencing of the rat beta-catenin gene (Ctnnb1) and mutational analysis of liver tumors induced by 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingjie; Dixon, Brian M; Al-Fageeh, Mohamed; Blum, Carmen A; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2002-01-23

    beta-Catenin, a protein that functions in cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion as well as in signal transduction, has received increasing attention in recent years due to its role as an oncogene in various human cancers. The primary sequence of the human beta-catenin gene (CTNNB1) has been known for some time, but that of the rat beta-catenin gene (Ctnnb1) has not heretofore been studied in detail. We report here the primary structure of Ctnnb1 using PCR-based methods and direct sequencing. The size of the complete Ctnnb1 gene was determined to be 9082 bp. We found the rat Ctnnb1 gene to contain 14 exons, ranging in size from 61 to 356 bp, and 13 introns ranging in size from 76 to 2524 bp. The transcription start site appears to be 157 bp upstream of the ATG codon located in exon 1. The resulting transcript is 2650 nucleotides long (encoding a protein of 781 amino acids). We found the 5' UTR to consist of 157 nucleotides and the 3' UTR to be 147 nucleotides long. The region coding for the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta domain of beta-catenin is located in exon 2 of rat Ctnnb1, in contrast to human CTNNB1 in which it is found in exon 3. Based on the newly acquired knowledge of the primary sequence, more than a dozen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ)-induced rat liver tumors were screened for the presence or absence of mutations in all 14 exons of rat Ctnnb1. Surprisingly, no mutations were found. The results are discussed in the context of the organ-specificity of IQ-induced mutations in beta-catenin, being highly prevalent in colon tumors, but much less common in liver tumors.

  1. Circadian rhythms, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPAR alpha/gamma profiles in diseases with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Duthoit, Guillaume; Hébert, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clock mechanisms are far-from-equilibrium dissipative structures. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta/delta, and gamma) play a key role in metabolic regulatory processes, particularly in heart muscle. Links between circadian rhythms (CRs) and PPARs have been established. Mammalian CRs involve at least two critical transcription factors, CLOCK and BMAL1 (Gekakis et al., 1998; Hogenesch et al., 1998). PPAR gamma plays a major role in both glucose and lipid metabolisms and presents circadian properties which coordinate the interplay between metabolism and CRs. PPAR gamma is a major component of the vascular clock. Vascular PPAR gamma is a peripheral regulator of cardiovascular rhythms controlling circadian variations in blood pressure and heart rate through BMAL1. We focused our review on diseases with abnormalities of CRs and with primary or secondary cardiac dysfunction. Moreover, these diseases presented changes in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and PPARs, according to two opposed profiles. Profile 1 was defined as follows: inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with increased expression of PPAR gamma. Profile 2 was defined as follows: activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway with decreased expression of PPAR gamma. A typical profile 1 disease is arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, a genetic cardiac disease which presents mutations of the desmosomal proteins and is mainly characterized by fatty acid accumulation in adult cardiomyocytes mainly in the right ventricle. The link between PPAR gamma dysfunction and desmosomal genetic mutations occurs via inactivation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway presenting oscillatory properties. A typical profile 2 disease is type 2 diabetes, with activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and decreased expression of PPAR gamma. CRs abnormalities are present in numerous pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases, sympathetic/parasympathetic dysfunction, hypertension, diabetes

  2. Beta-catenin-activated hepatocellular adenoma showing hyperintensity on hepatobiliary-phase gadoxetic-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and overexpression of OATP8.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Norihide; Matsui, Osamu; Kitao, Azusa; Kozaka, Kazuto; Gabata, Toshifumi; Sasaki, Motoko; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Murata, Kiyoshi; Tani, Toru

    2012-11-01

    We report a male case of beta-catenin-activated hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) focusing on findings of gadoxetic-acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) and discussing the molecular background and possible clinical significance. The patient was a 31-year-old man in whom computed tomography (CT) showed a large nodule of 14 cm in diameter in the right liver lobe. On dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, heterogeneous and slight to moderate enhancement was observed during the early phase, with washout in the late phase. Focal fat deposits and a scar-like portion in the lesion were also seen. Most of the lesion was slightly hyperintense compared with the background liver on the hepatobiliary phase of EOB-MRI. After operation, this patient was confirmed pathologically as having beta-catenin-activated HCA with a portion suggestive of malignant transformation. In addition, intense organic anion transporter polypeptide 8 expression was observed throughout the tumor by immunohistochemical staining.

  3. Expression of e-cadherin, alpha-catenins and Beta-catenins in human gastric carcinomas - correlation with histology and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Yasui, W; Kuniyasu, H; Akama, Y; Kitahara, K; Nagafuchi, A; Ishihara, S; Tsukita, S; Tahara, E

    1995-01-01

    The expression of cell-cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin and its associated proteins, alpha- and beta-catenins in human gastric carcinomas was examined by Western blotting. All the seven gastric carcinoma cell lines expressed E-cadherin except KATOIII, which was derived from pleural effusion of a scirrhous type stomach cancer or Borrmann's type-4 carcinoma. The expression of alpha-catenin was not detected in HSC43 derived from scirrhous carcinoma, while HSC39 expressed abnormal beta-catenin caused by genetic alteration. In gastric carcinoma cases, the levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin were significantly lower in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas and scirrhous carcinomas when compared to other types of gastric carcinomas. Deeply invasive carcinomas expressed E-cadherin and alpha-catenin at lower levels. However, the expression level of alpha-catenin was not necessarily consistent with that of E-cadherin. One of 10 gastric carcinomas examined showed complete deletion of alpha-catenin gene in Southern blotting. beta-catenin was expressed at lower level in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas than in well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. These findings suggest that reduction in the expression of E-cadherin and its associated molecules, catenins, is involved in the development and infiltrative growth of scirrhous type gastric carcinomas. PMID:21597700

  4. Dog as model for down-expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in tubular epithelial cells in renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Aresu, Luca; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Pregel, Paola; Valenza, Federico; Radaelli, Enrico; Scanziani, Eugenio; Castagnaro, Massimo

    2008-12-01

    Mechanism of renal fibrosis leading to end stage kidney remains still a challenge of interest in humans. The pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease is characterized by progressive loss of kidney function and fibrosis. The mechanism of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been predominantly studied in in vitro studies, and we previously demonstrated the EMT of tubular epithelial cells in dogs. In this study, we examined and quantified the modifications of cadherin-catenin complex by immunohistochemistry of E-cadherin and beta-catenin and the mesenchymal marker vimentin in 25 dogs with three different spontaneous inflammatory renal diseases. Results showed a significant down-expression of levels of E-cadherin and beta-catenin directly correlated with the tubular-interstitial damage (TID). In TID grades 2 and 3, E-cadherin expression was significantly reduced (p < 0.001). beta-catenin expression was overall similar to E-cadherin. The mesenchymal-associated protein, vimentin, was de novo identified in tubules within areas of inflammation. In this work, we identified the loss of cadherin or catenin expression as a progressive mechanism in tubulo-interstitial fibrosis, which allows dissociation of structural integrity of renal epithelia and loss of epithelial polarity. The dog might result more significant as model for new therapies.

  5. Beta-catenin (CTNNB1) induces Bmp expression in urogenital sinus epithelium and participates in prostatic bud initiation and patterning

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vatsal; Schmitz, Christopher T.; Keil, Kimberly P.; Joshi, Pinak S.; Abler, Lisa L.; Lin, Tien-Min; Taketo, Makoto M.; Sun, Xin; Vezina, Chad M.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal prostate development is initiated by androgens and patterned by androgen dependent and independent signals. How these signals integrate to control epithelial cell differentiation and prostatic bud patterning is not fully understood. To test the role of beta-catenin (Ctnnb1) in this process, we used a genetic approach to conditionally delete or stabilize Ctnnb1 in urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium from which the prostate derives. Two opposing mechanisms of action were revealed. By deleting Ctnnb1, we found it is required for separation of UGS from cloaca, emergence or maintenance of differentiated UGS basal epithelium and formation of prostatic buds. By genetically inducing a patchy subset of UGS epithelial cells to express excess CTNNB1, we found its excess abundance increases Bmp expression and leads to a global impairment of prostatic bud formation. Addition of NOGGIN partially restores prostatic budding in UGS explants with excess Ctnnb1. These results indicate a requirement for Ctnnb1 in UGS basal epithelial cell differentiation, prostatic bud initiation and bud spacing and suggest some of these actions are mediated in part through activation of BMP signaling. PMID:23396188

  6. beta-catenin is strongly elevated in rat colonic epithelium following short-term intermittent treatment with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Dashwood, W Mohaiza; Löhr, Christiane V; Fischer, Kay A; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2008-09-01

    Colon tumors expressing high levels of beta-catenin and c-myc have been reported in male F344 rats given three short cycles of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) alternating with a high-fat (HF) diet. Using the same experimental protocol, rats were euthanized 24 h after the last dose of PhIP so as to examine early changes in colonic crypt homeostasis and beta-catenin expression, before the onset of frank tumors. PhIP/HF dosing caused a significant increase in the bromodeoxyuridine labeling index throughout the entire colon, and within the colonic crypt column cleaved caspase-3 was elevated in the basal and central zones, but reduced in the luminal region. In vehicle/HF controls, beta-catenin was immunolocalized primarily at the border between cells at the top of the crypt, whereas in rats given PhIP/HF diet there was strong cytoplasmic staining, which appeared as a gradient of increased beta-catenin extending from the base of the crypt column to the luminal region. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses confirmed that beta-catenin and c-myc were increased significantly in the colonic mucosa of rats given PhIP/HF diet. Collectively, these findings suggest that PhIP/HF cycling alters beta-catenin and c-myc expression in the colonic mucosa, resulting in expansion of the proliferative zone and redistribution of apoptotic cells from the lumen to the central and basal regions of the colonic crypt. Thus, during the early stages of colon carcinogenesis, alternating exposure to heterocyclic amines and a high-fat diet might facilitate molecular changes resulting in dysregulated beta-catenin and c-myc expression.

  7. [Effect of phenylhexyl isothiocyanate on Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in Jurkat cell line].

    PubMed

    Lin, Juan; Huang, Yi-Qun; Ma, Xu-Dong

    2013-04-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the effect of phenylhexyl isothiocyanate (PHI) on Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, histone acetylation, histone methylation and cell apoptosis in Jurkat cell line. The viability of Jurkat cells after treatment with PHI was tested by MTT. Apoptotic rate of Jurkat cells was measured by flow cytometry. The levels of Wnt/β-catenin related proteins including β-catenin, TCF, c-myc, and cyclinD1, histone acetylated H3 and H4, histone methylated H3K9 and H3K4 were detected by Western blot. The results showed that PHI inhibited the cell growth and induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells in time-and dose-dependent manners. Its IC50 at 48 h was about 20 µmol/L. Expression of histone acetylated H3, H4 and histone methylated H3k4 increased after exposure to PHI for 3 h, while histone methylated H3K9 decreased. Expression of β-catenin was not changed after exposure to PHI for 3 h, but expression of β-catenin, and its cell cycle-related genes such as TCF, c-myc and cyclinD1 decreased after exposure to PHI for 7 h. It is concluded that PHI regulates acetylation and methylation of histone, inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signal pathway, and is able to induce apoptosis and inhibits growth of Jurkat cells. PMID:23628033

  8. Next-generation sequencing is highly sensitive for the detection of beta-catenin mutations in desmoid-type fibromatoses.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Sarah J; Presneau, Nadège; Kalimuthu, Sangeetha; Dileo, Palma; Berisha, Fitim; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, M Fernanda; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2015-08-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatoses are locally aggressive and frequently recurrent tumours, and an accurate diagnosis is essential for patient management. The majority of sporadic lesions harbour beta-catenin (CTNNB1) mutations. We used next-generation sequencing to detect CTNNB1 mutations and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of next-generation sequencing with currently employed mutation detection techniques: mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion and polymerase chain reaction amplification. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded needle biopsy or resection tissue sections from 144 patients with sporadic desmoid-type fibromatoses, four patients with syndrome-related desmoid-type fibromatoses and 11 morphological mimics. Two primer pairs were designed for CTNNB1 mutation hotspots. Using ≥10 ng of DNA, libraries were generated by Fluidigm and sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Next-generation sequencing had a sensitivity of 92.36 % (133/144, 95 % CIs: 86.74 to 96.12 %) and a specificity of 100 % for the detection of CTNNB1 mutations in desmoid-type fibromatoses-like spindle cell lesions. All mutations detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion were identified by next-generation sequencing. Next-generation sequencing identified additional mutations in 11 tumours that were not detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion, two of which have not been previously described. Next-generation sequencing is highly sensitive for the detection of CTNNB1 mutations. This multiplex assay has the advantage of detecting additional mutations compared to those detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion (sensitivity 82.41 %). The technology requires minimal DNA and is time- and cost-efficient.

  9. R-ETODOLAC DECREASES BETA-CATENIN LEVELS ALONG WITH SURVIVAL AND PROLIFERATION OF HEPATOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Behari, Jaideep; Zeng, Gang; Otruba, Wade; Thompson, Michael; Muller, Peggy; Micsenyi, Amanda; Sekhon, Sandeep S.; Leoni, Lorenzo; Monga, Satdarshan P. S.

    2007-01-01

    Background Inhibition of hepatoma cells by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 dependent and independent mechanisms has been shown previously. Here, we examine the effect of Celecoxib, a COX-2-inhibitor and R-Etodolac, an enantiomer of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug Etodolac, which lacks COX-inhibitory activity, on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and human hepatoma cells. Methods Hep3B and HepG2 cell lines were treated with Celecoxib or R-Etodolac, and examined for viability, DNA synthesis, Wnt/β-catenin pathway components, and downstream target gene expression. Results Celecoxib at high doses affected β-catenin protein by inducing its degradation via GSK3β and APC along with diminished tumor cell proliferation and survival. R-Etodolac at physiological doses caused decrease in total and activated β-catenin protein secondary to decrease in its gene expression and post-translationally through GSK3β activation. In addition, increased β-catenin-E-cadherin was also observed at the membrane. An associated inhibition of β-catenin-dependent Tcf reporter activity, decreased levels of downstream target gene products glutamine synthetase and cyclin-D1, and decreased proliferation and survival of hepatoma cells was evident. Conclusion The antitumor effects of Celecoxib (at high concentrations) and R-Etodolac (at physiological doses) on HCC cells were accompanied by the down-regulation of β-catenin demonstrating a useful therapeutic strategy in hepatocellular cancer. PMID:17275129

  10. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Is a Negative Regulator of a Pro-Tumorigenic Wnt/Beta-Catenin-Collagen 1 Axis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Catherine M.; Klüppel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate-E (CS-E) is misregulated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. Cell-surface associated CS-E has been shown to have pro-tumorigenic functions, and pharmacological treatment with exogenous CS-E has been proposed to interfere with tumor progression mediated by endogenous CS-E. However, the effects of exogenous CS-E on breast cancer cell behavior, and the molecular mechanisms deployed by CS-E are not well understood. We show here that treatment with CS-E, but not other chondroitin forms, could interfere with the invasive protrusion formation and migration of breast cancer cells in three-dimensional organotypic cultures. Microarray analysis identified transcriptional programs controlled by CS-E in these cells. Importantly, negative regulation of the pro-metastatic extracellular matrix gene Col1a1 was required for the anti-migratory effects of exogenous CS-E. Knock-down of Col1a1 gene expression mimics the effects of CS-E treatment, while exposing cells to a preformed collagen I matrix interfered with the anti-migratory effects of CS-E. In addition, CS-E specifically interfered with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, a known pro-tumorigenic pathway. Lastly, we demonstrate that Col1a1 is a positively regulated target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. Together, our data identify treatment with exogenous CS-E as negative regulatory mechanism of breast cancer cell motility through interference with a pro-tumorigenic Wnt/beta-catenin - Collagen I axis. PMID:25090092

  11. Novel Cancer Chemotherapy Hits by Molecular Topology: Dual Akt and Beta-Catenin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morell, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Henche, Nieves; Recio-Iglesias, Maria Carmen; Garcia-Domenech, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Colorectal and prostate cancers are two of the most common types and cause of a high rate of deaths worldwide. Therefore, any strategy to stop or at least slacken the development and progression of malignant cells is an important therapeutic choice. The aim of the present work is the identification of novel cancer chemotherapy agents. Nowadays, many different drug discovery approaches are available, but this paper focuses on Molecular Topology, which has already demonstrated its extraordinary efficacy in this field, particularly in the identification of new hit and lead compounds against cancer. This methodology uses the graph theoretical formalism to numerically characterize molecular structures through the so called topological indices. Once obtained a specific framework, it allows the construction of complex mathematical models that can be used to predict physical, chemical or biological properties of compounds. In addition, Molecular Topology is highly efficient in selecting and designing new hit and lead drugs. According to the aforementioned, Molecular Topology has been applied here for the construction of specific Akt/mTOR and β-catenin inhibition mathematical models in order to identify and select novel antitumor agents. Experimental Approach Based on the results obtained by the selected mathematical models, six novel potential inhibitors of the Akt/mTOR and β-catenin pathways were identified. These compounds were then tested in vitro to confirm their biological activity. Conclusion and Implications Five of the selected compounds, CAS n° 256378-54-8 (Inhibitor n°1), 663203-38-1 (Inhibitor n°2), 247079-73-8 (Inhibitor n°3), 689769-86-6 (Inhibitor n°4) and 431925-096 (Inhibitor n°6) gave positive responses and resulted to be active for Akt/mTOR and/or β-catenin inhibition. This study confirms once again the Molecular Topology’s reliability and efficacy to find out novel drugs in the field of cancer. PMID:25910265

  12. RhoA GTPase interacts with beta-catenin signaling in clinorotated osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue under constant remodeling in response to various signals including mechanical loading. A lack of proper mechanical loading induces disuse osteoporosis that reduces bone mass and structural integrity. β-catenin signaling together with a network of GTPases is known to play a primary role in load-driven bone formation, but little is known about potential interactions of β-catenin signaling and GTPases in bone loss. In this study, we addressed a question: Does unloading suppress an activation level of RhoA GTPase and β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts? If yes, what is the role of RhoA GTPase and actin filaments in osteoblasts in regulating β-catenin signaling? Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique with a biosensor for RhoA together with a fluorescent T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) reporter, we examined the effects of clinostat-driven simulated unloading. The results revealed that both RhoA activity and TCF/LEF activity were downregulated by unloading. Reduction in RhoA activity was correlated to a decrease in cytoskeletal organization of actin filaments. Inhibition of β-catenin signaling blocked unloading-induced RhoA suppression, and dominant negative RhoA inhibited TCF/LEF suppression. On the other hand, a constitutively active RhoA enhanced unloading-induced reduction of TCF/LEF activity. The TCF/LEF suppression by unloading was enhanced by co-culture with osteocytes, but it was independent on organization of actin filaments, myosin II activity, or a myosin light chain kinase. Collectively, the results suggest that β-catenin signaling is required for unloading-driven regulation of RhoA, and RhoA, but not actin cytoskeleton or intracellular tension, mediates the responsiveness of β-catenin signaling to unloading. PMID:23529802

  13. The human DEK oncogene stimulates beta catenin signaling, invasion and mammosphere formation in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Privette Vinnedge, Lisa M.; McClaine, Rebecca; Wagh, Purnima K.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Waltz, Susan E.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of cancer-related deaths in American women; therefore, the identification of novel breast-cancer related molecules for the discovery of new markers and drug targets remains essential. The human DEK gene, which encodes a chromatin-binding protein and DNA topology regulator, is up-regulated in many types of cancer. DEK has been implicated as an oncogene in breast cancer based on mRNA expression studies, but its functional significance in breast cancer growth and progression has not yet been tested directly. We demonstrate that DEK is highly expressed in breast cancer cells compared to normal tissue, and functionally important for cellular growth, invasion and mammosphere formation. DEK over-expression in non-tumorigenic MCF10A cells resulted in increased growth and motility with a concomitant down-regulation of E-cadherin. Conversely, DEK knockdown in MCF7 and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells resulted in decreased growth and motility with up-regulation of E-cadherin. The use of DEK-proficient and -deficient breast cancer cells in orthotopic xenografts provided further in vivo evidence that DEK contributes to tumor growth. Activation of the β-catenin signaling pathway is important for normal and cancer stem cell character, growth and metastasis. We show that DEK expression stimulated and DEK knockdown repressed β-catenin nuclear translocation and activity. Importantly, the expression of constitutively active β-catenin rescued breast cancer invasion defects of DEK knockdown cells. Together, our data indicate that DEK expression stimulates the growth, stem cell character, and motility of breast cancer cells, and that DEK-dependent cellular invasion occurs at least in part via β-catenin activation. PMID:21317931

  14. Alterations of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and its target genes for the N- and C-terminal domains of parathyroid hormone-related protein in bone from diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Portal-Núñez, S; Lozano, D; de Castro, L Fernández; de Gortázar, A R; Nogués, X; Esbrit, P

    2010-07-16

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is associated with bone loss. Given that the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is a major regulator of bone accrual, we assessed this pathway in mice with streptozotozin-induced T1D. In diabetic mouse long bones, we found alterations favouring the suppression of this pathway by using PCR arrays and beta-catenin immunostaining. Downregulation of sclerostin, an inhibitor of this pathway, also occurred, and related to increased osteocyte apoptosis. Our data show that both N- and C-terminal parathyroid hormone-related peptide fragments might exert osteogenic effects in this setting by targeting several genes of this pathway and increasing beta-catenin in osteoblastic cells.

  15. R-Spondin 1/Dickkopf-1/Beta-Catenin Machinery Is Involved in Testicular Embryonic Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Maria; Ferranti, Francesca; Corano Scheri, Katia; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Ciccarone, Fabio; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Testicular vasculogenesis is one of the key processes regulating male gonad morphogenesis. The knowledge of the molecular cues underlining this phenomenon is one of today’s most challenging issues and could represent a major contribution toward a better understanding of the onset of testicular morphogenetic disorders. R-spondin 1 has been clearly established as a candidate for mammalian ovary determination. Conversely, very little information is available on the expression and role of R-spondin 1 during testicular morphogenesis. This study aims to clarify the distribution pattern of R-spondin 1 and other partners of its machinery during the entire period of testicular morphogenesis and to indicate the role of this system in testicular development. Our whole mount immunofluorescence results clearly demonstrate that R-spondin 1 is always detectable in the testicular coelomic partition, where testicular vasculature is organized, while Dickkopf-1 is never detectable in this area. Moreover, organ culture experiments of embryonic male UGRs demonstrated that Dickkopf-1 acted as an inhibitor of testis vasculature formation. Consistent with this observation, real-time PCR analyses demonstrated that DKK1 is able to slightly but significantly decrease the expression level of the endothelial marker Pecam1. The latter experiments allowed us to observe that DKK1 administration also perturbs the expression level of the Pdgf-b chain, which is consistent with some authors’ observations relating this factor with prenatal testicular patterning and angiogenesis. Interestingly, the DKK1 induced inhibition of testicular angiogenesis was rescued by the co-administration of R-spondin 1. In addition, R-spondin 1 alone was sufficient to enhance, in culture, testicular angiogenesis. PMID:25910078

  16. Molecular genetic alterations in endometrioid carcinomas of the ovary: similar frequency of beta-catenin abnormalities but lower rate of microsatellite instability and PTEN alterations than in uterine endometrioid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Catasús, Lluis; Bussaglia, Elena; Rodrguez, Ingrid; Gallardo, Alberto; Pons, Cristina; Irving, Julie A; Prat, Jaime

    2004-11-01

    Endometrioid carcinomas of the ovary closely resemble their uterine counterparts. It has been suggested that the former tumors have the same molecular alterations (microsatellite instability [MSI], PTEN, and beta-catenin) described in endometrioid carcinomas of the uterus. We analyzed 55 ovarian carcinomas, including 22 endometrioid, 18 clear cell, and 15 mixed types. MSI was detected in 5 of 39 cases (13%). MLH1 promoter hypermethylation was identified in 2 of the 5 MSI-positive tumors. PTEN was mutated in 5 of 54 cases (9%); of these, 3 had MSI and exhibited frameshift mutations in short-coding mononucleotide repeats. Beta-catenin nuclear expression was detected in 11 of 54 cases (20%) by immunostaining; of these, 7 exhibited CTNNB1 gene mutations. These alterations were found more frequently in endometrioid carcinomas than in tumors of the other 2 groups. Among the former tumors, MSI was detected in 3 of 17 cases (17.5%); PTEN mutations, in 3 of 21 (14%); and beta-catenin, in 8 of 21 (38%). The molecular alterations were found more often in tumors associated with endometriosis than in tumors without endometriosis. Six endometrioid tumors demonstrating matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) immunoreactivity with nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin had good outcomes, in contrast to poor outcomes in 7 of 9 predominantly nonendometrioid tumors demonstrating expression of MMP-7 only. We found a similar frequency of beta-catenin abnormalities but lower rates of MSI and PTEN alterations than in uterine endometrioid carcinomas. Alterations in beta-catenin and PTEN genes, as well as MSI, are frequent in low-stage ovarian carcinomas of endometrioid type that have a favorable prognosis.

  17. Bioactive substance from Grifola frondosa (maitake) mushroom inhibits CCAAT enhancer binding protein beta and delta expression on C3H10T1/2 B2C1 adipocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Minamino, Katsuhiko; Yanaga, Yuri; Ohtsuru, Masaru

    2008-06-01

    Bioactive compound substances from Grifola frondosa (maitake) inhibited adipocyte differentiation of B(2)C(1) preadipocytes. This compound is not related to MAP kinase (ERK1 and ERK2) cascades or beta-catenin, which inhibit the expression of Glut4, PPARgamma and C/EBPalpha. The compound reduced the expression time of C/EBPbeta and C/EBPdelta. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of these bioactive compounds on adipocyte differentiation is exhibited through preadipocytes. They cannot induce the expression of PPARgamma or C/EBPalpha because of the reduced expression time of C/EBPbeta and C/EBPdelta. PMID:18635913

  18. De novo mutations in beta-catenin (CTNNB1) appear to be a frequent cause of intellectual disability: expanding the mutational and clinical spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kuechler, Alma; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Albrecht, Beate; Bacino, Carlos A; Bartholomew, Dennis W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van den Boogaard, Marie Jose H; Bramswig, Nuria; Büttner, Christian; Cremer, Kirsten; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Engels, Hartmut; van Gassen, Koen; Graf, Elisabeth; van Haelst, Mieke; He, Weimin; Hogue, Jacob S; Kempers, Marlies; Koolen, David; Monroe, Glen; de Munnik, Sonja; Pastore, Matthew; Reis, André; Reuter, Miriam S; Tegay, David H; Veltman, Joris; Visser, Gepke; van Hasselt, Peter; Smeets, Eric E J; Vissers, Lisenka; Wieland, Thomas; Wissink, Willemijn; Yntema, Helger; Zink, Alexander Michael; Strom, Tim M; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, de novo heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in beta-catenin (CTNNB1) were described for the first time in four individuals with intellectual disability (ID), microcephaly, limited speech and (progressive) spasticity, and functional consequences of CTNNB1 deficiency were characterized in a mouse model. Beta-catenin is a key downstream component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Somatic gain-of-function mutations have already been found in various tumor types, whereas germline loss-of-function mutations in animal models have been shown to influence neuronal development and maturation. We report on 16 additional individuals from 15 families in whom we newly identified de novo loss-of-function CTNNB1 mutations (six nonsense, five frameshift, one missense, two splice mutation, and one whole gene deletion). All patients have ID, motor delay and speech impairment (both mostly severe) and abnormal muscle tone (truncal hypotonia and distal hypertonia/spasticity). The craniofacial phenotype comprised microcephaly (typically -2 to -4 SD) in 12 of 16 and some overlapping facial features in all individuals (broad nasal tip, small alae nasi, long and/or flat philtrum, thin upper lip vermillion). With this detailed phenotypic characterization of 16 additional individuals, we expand and further establish the clinical and mutational spectrum of inactivating CTNNB1 mutations and thereby clinically delineate this new CTNNB1 haploinsufficiency syndrome.

  19. Collagen type I may influence the expression of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Vera C; Demasi, Ana Paula Dias; Furuse, Cristiane; Altemani, Albina; Alves, Venâncio A; Freitas, Leandro L; Araújo, Ney S

    2009-07-01

    Carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) is an aggressive salivary gland malignancy, usually derived from a long-standing or a recurrent benign tumor, the pleomorphic adenoma (PA). In the context of dynamic reciprocity, changes in the composition and structure of extracellular matrix proteins and cell surface receptors have been frequently associated with dysfunctional adhesion and invasive behavior of tumor cells. It is not fully understood if these changes are involved in the conversion of PA to CXPA. In this study, different progression stages of CXPA were investigated regarding the expression of the major extracellular matrix proteins, collagen type I, and of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, the components of adherens junctions. By immunohistochemical analysis, we have demonstrated that direct contact of tumor cells with fibrillar type I collagen, particularly near the invasive front and in invasive areas prevailing small nests of CXPA cells, could be associated with reduced expression of the E-cadherin and beta-catenin adhesion molecules and with invasive behavior of epithelial, but not of CXPA with myoepithelial component. Our results also suggested that this association could depend on the organization of collagen molecules, being prevented by high-order polymeric structures. These findings could implicate the local microenvironment in the transition from the premalignant PA to invasive CXPA.

  20. Adenosylcobalamin inhibits ribosome binding to btuB RNA.

    PubMed

    Nou, X; Kadner, R J

    2000-06-20

    Expression of the btuB gene encoding the outer membrane cobalamin transporter in Escherichia coli is strongly reduced on growth with cobalamins. Previous studies have shown that this regulation occurs in response to adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and operates primarily at the translational level. Changes in the level and stability of btuB RNA are consequences of the modulated translation initiation. To examine how Ado-Cbl affects translation, the binding of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits to btuB RNA was investigated by using a primer extension inhibition assay. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was much less efficient than to other RNAs and was preferentially lost when the ribosomes were subjected to a high-salt wash. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was inhibited by Ado-Cbl but not by cyanocobalamin, with half-maximal inhibition around 0.3 microM Ado-Cbl. Ribosome-binding activity was increased or decreased by mutations in the btuB leader region, which affected two predicted RNA hairpins and altered expression of btuB-lacZ reporters. Finally, the presence of Ado-Cbl elicited formation of a single primer extension-inhibition product with the same specificity and Cbl-concentration dependence as the inhibition of ribosome binding. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled by the specific binding of Ado-Cbl to btuB RNA, which then affects access to its ribosome-binding sequence. PMID:10852957

  1. Adenosylcobalamin inhibits ribosome binding to btuB RNA

    PubMed Central

    Nou, Xiangwu; Kadner, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the btuB gene encoding the outer membrane cobalamin transporter in Escherichia coli is strongly reduced on growth with cobalamins. Previous studies have shown that this regulation occurs in response to adenosylcobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and operates primarily at the translational level. Changes in the level and stability of btuB RNA are consequences of the modulated translation initiation. To examine how Ado-Cbl affects translation, the binding of E. coli 30S ribosomal subunits to btuB RNA was investigated by using a primer extension inhibition assay. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was much less efficient than to other RNAs and was preferentially lost when the ribosomes were subjected to a high-salt wash. Ribosome binding to btuB RNA was inhibited by Ado-Cbl but not by cyanocobalamin, with half-maximal inhibition around 0.3 μM Ado-Cbl. Ribosome-binding activity was increased or decreased by mutations in the btuB leader region, which affected two predicted RNA hairpins and altered expression of btuB-lacZ reporters. Finally, the presence of Ado-Cbl elicited formation of a single primer extension-inhibition product with the same specificity and Cbl-concentration dependence as the inhibition of ribosome binding. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled by the specific binding of Ado-Cbl to btuB RNA, which then affects access to its ribosome-binding sequence. PMID:10852957

  2. High molecular weight polysaccharide that binds and inhibits virus

    DOEpatents

    Konowalchuk, Thomas W

    2014-01-14

    This invention provides a high molecular weight polysaccharide capable of binding to and inhibiting virus and related pharmaceutical formulations and methods on inhibiting viral infectivity and/or pathogenicity, as well as immunogenic compositions. The invention further methods of inhibiting the growth of cancer cells and of ameliorating a symptom of aging. Additionally, the invention provides methods of detecting and/or quantifying and/or isolating viruses.

  3. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  4. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W; Baum, Justin; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  5. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  6. Binding sites associated with inhibition of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Shipman, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of experimental and theoretical evidence has been integrated into coherent molecular mechanisms for the action of photosystem II herbicides. Photosystem II herbicides act by inhibiting electron transfers between the first and second plastoquinones on the reducing side of photosystem II. Each herbicide molecule must have a flat polar component with hydrophobic substituents to be active. The hydrophobic substituents serve to partition the molecule into lipid regions of the cell and to fit the hydrophobic region of the herbicide binding site. The flat polar portion of the herbicide is used for electrostatic binding to the polar region of the herbicide binding site. Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of herbicides to model proteinaceous binding sites.

  7. A Method for Serial Tissue Processing and Parallel Analysis of Aberrant Crypt Morphology, Mucin Depletion, and Beta-Catenin Staining in an Experimental Model of Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of architectural and morphological characteristics of cells for establishing prognostic indicators by which individual pathologies are assigned grade and stage is a well-accepted practice. Advances in automated micro- and macroscopic image acquisition and digital image analysis have created new opportunities in the field of prognostic assessment; but, one area in experimental pathology, animal models for colon cancer, has not taken advantage of these opportunities. This situation is primarily due to the methods available to evaluate the colon of the rodent for the presence of premalignant and malignant pathologies. We report a new method for the excision and processing of the entire colon of the rat and illustrate how this procedure permitted the quantitative assessment of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), a premalignant colon pathology, for characteristics consistent with progression to malignancy. ACF were detected by methylene blue staining and subjected to quantitative morphometric analysis. Colons were then restained with high iron diamine–alcian blue for assessment of mucin depletion using an image overlay to associate morphometric data with mucin depletion. The subsequent evaluation of ACF for beta-catenin staining is also demonstrated. The methods described are particularly relevant to the screening of compounds for cancer chemopreventive activity. PMID:21406072

  8. Promoter swapping between the genes for a novel zinc finger protein and beta-catenin in pleiomorphic adenomas with t(3;8)(p21;q12) translocations.

    PubMed

    Kas, K; Voz, M L; Röijer, E; Aström, A K; Meyen, E; Stenman, G; Van de Ven, W J

    1997-02-01

    Pleiomorphic adenoma of the salivary glands is a benign epithelial tumour occurring primarily in the major and minor salivary glands. It is by far the most common type of salivary gland tumour. Microscopically, pleiomorphic adenomas show a marked histological diversity with epithelial, myoepithelial and mesenchymal components in a variety of patterns. In addition to a cytogenetic subgroup with normal karyotypes, pleiomorphic adenomas are characterized by recurrent chromosome rearrangements, particularly reciprocal translocations, with breakpoints at 8q12, 3p21, and 12q13-15, in that order of frequency. The most common abnormality is a reciprocal t(3;8)(p21;q12). We here demonstrate that the t(3;8)(p21;q12) results in promoter swapping between PLAG1, a novel, developmentally regulated zinc finger gene at 8q12, and the constitutively expressed gene for beta-catenin (CTNNB1), a protein interface functioning in the WG/WNT signalling pathway and specification of cell fate during embryogenesis. Fusions occur in the 5'-non-coding regions of both genes, exchanging regulatory control elements while preserving the coding sequences. Due to the t(3;8)(p21;q12), PLAG1 is activated and expression levels of CTNNB1 are reduced. Activation of PLAG1 was also observed in an adenoma with a variant translocation t(8;15)(q12;q14). Our results indicate that PLAG1 activation due to promoter swapping is a crucial event in salivary gland tumourigenesis.

  9. Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Bargatze, Robert F.

    2001-05-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  10. Inhibition Of Call-Cell Binding By Kipid Assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O. , Bargatze, Robert F.

    2003-12-16

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  11. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jay M; Cura, Anthony J; Lloyd, Kenneth P; Carruthers, Anthony

    2015-05-15

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites-the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis.

  12. Inhibition of insulin receptor binding by phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, P; Testa, U; Gourdin, M F; Hervy, C; Titeux, M; Vainchenker, W

    1982-12-15

    Phorbol esters inhibit the binding of insulin to its receptors on U-937 monocyte-like and HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia human cell lines. Within 20-30 min, exposure of these cells to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) at 37 degrees C results in a 50% reduction of the specific binding of 125I-insulin. Half-maximal inhibition occurs at 1 nM TPA. Other tumor-promoting phorbol esters also inhibit 125I-insulin binding in a dose-dependent manner which parallels their known promoting activity in vivo. TPA does not alter the degradation of the hormone nor does it induce any shedding of its receptors in the medium. The effect of phorbol esters is dependent on temperature and cell type. It is less prominent at 22 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. It is reversible within 2 h at 37 degrees C. TPA reduces the binding of insulin predominantly by increasing its dissociation rate. This effect results in an accelerated turnover of the hormone on its receptors. PMID:6891320

  13. Phosphoinositide binding inhibits alpha-actinin bundling activity.

    PubMed

    Fraley, Tamara S; Tran, Thuan C; Corgan, Anne Marie; Nash, Coral A; Hao, Jie; Critchley, David R; Greenwood, Jeffrey A

    2003-06-27

    alpha-Actinin is an abundant actin-bundling and adhesion protein that directly links actin filaments to integrin receptors. Previously, in platelet-derived growth factor-treated fibroblasts, we demonstrated that phosphoinositides bind to alpha-actinin, regulating its localization (Greenwood, J. A., Theibert, A. B., Prestwich, G. D., and Murphy-Ullrich, J. E. (2000) J. Cell Biol. 150, 627- 642). In this study, phosphoinositide binding and regulation of alpha-actinin function is further characterized. Phosphoinositide binding specificity, determined using a protein-lipid overlay procedure, suggests that alpha-actinin interacts with phosphates on the 4th and 5th position of the inositol head group. Binding assays and mutational analyses demonstrate that phosphoinositides bind to the calponin homology domain 2 of alpha-actinin. Phosphoinositide binding inhibited the bundling activity of alpha-actinin by blocking the interaction of the actin-binding domain with actin filaments. Consistent with these results, excessive bundling of actin filaments was observed in fibroblasts expressing an alpha-actinin mutant with decreased phosphoinositide affinity. We conclude that the interaction of alpha-actinin with phosphoinositides regulates actin stress fibers in the cell by controlling the extent to which microfilaments are bundled.

  14. Calmodulin binds to and inhibits the activity of phosphoglycerate kinase.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) functions as a cytoplasmic ATP-generating glycolytic enzyme, a nuclear mediator in DNA replication and repair, a stimulator of Sendai virus transcription and an extracellular disulfide reductase in angiogenesis. Probing of a developmental expression library from Dictyostelium discoideum with radiolabelled calmodulin led to the isolation of a cDNA encoding a putative calmodulin-binding protein (DdPGK) with 68% sequence similarity to human PGK. Dictyostelium, rabbit and yeast PGKs bound to calmodulin-agarose in a calcium-dependent manner while DdPGK constructs lacking the calmodulin-binding domain (209KPFLAILGGAKVSDKIKLIE228) failed to bind. The calmodulin-binding domain shows 80% identity between diverse organisms and is situated beside the hinge and within the ATP binding domain adjacent to nine mutations associated with PGK deficiency. Calmodulin addition inhibits yeast PGK activity in vitro while the calmodulin antagonist W-7 abrogates this inhibition. Together, these data suggest that PGK activity may be negatively regulated by calcium and calmodulin signalling in eukaryotic cells. PMID:15363631

  15. Inhibition of tobramycin diffusion by binding to alginate.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, W W; Dorrington, S M; Slack, M P; Walmsley, H L

    1988-01-01

    [3H]tobramycin bound to sodium alginate and to exopolysaccharide prepared from two mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Binding to sodium alginate was similar to binding to exopolysaccharide, both in the dependence on tobramycin concentration and in the maximum binding observed at saturation. Incorporation of sodium alginate into agar plates reduced the zone sizes of growth inhibition caused by tobramycin. The reductions in zone sizes were quantitatively accounted for by the binding of tobramycin to sodium alginate during diffusion of the antibiotic away from the well in which it had been placed at the start of the experiment. However, the binding of tobramycin to the exopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, and the resulting inhibition of diffusion of the antibiotic, did not significantly increase the penetration time of a spherical microcolony with a radius of 125 micron, such as might be found in the respiratory tract of a patient with cystic fibrosis (from a 90% penetration time of 12 s in the absence of exopolysaccharide to one of 35 s with an exopolysaccharide concentration of 1.0% [wt/vol]). PMID:3132093

  16. Inhibition of tobramycin diffusion by binding to alginate

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.W.; Dorrington, S.M.; Slack, M.P.; Walmsley, H.L.

    1988-04-01

    (/sup 3/H)tobramycin bound to sodium alginate and to exopolysaccharide prepared from two mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Binding to sodium alginate was similar to binding to exopolysaccharide, both in the dependence on tobramycin concentration and in the maximum binding observed at saturation. Incorporation of sodium alginate into agar plates reduced the zone sizes of growth inhibition caused by tobramycin. The reductions in zone sizes were quantitatively accounted for by the binding of tobramycin to sodium alginate during diffusion of the antibiotic away from the well in which it had been placed at the start of the experiment. However, the binding of tobramycin to the exopolysaccharide of P. aeruginosa, and the resulting inhibition of diffusion of the antibiotic, did not significantly increase the penetration time of a spherical microcolony with a radius of 125 micron, such as might be found in the respiratory tract of a patient with cystic fibrosis (from a 90% penetration time of 12 s in the absence of exopolysaccharide to one of 35 s with an exopolysaccharide concentration of 1.0% (wt/vol)).

  17. Regulation of beta catenin signaling and parathyroid hormone anabolic effects in bone by the matricellular protein periostin.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Conway, Simon J; Ferrari, Serge L

    2012-09-11

    Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein preferentially expressed by osteocytes and periosteal osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Whether and how periostin expression influences bone anabolism, however, remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of adult Postn(-/-) and Postn(+/+) mice to intermittent PTH. Compared with Postn(+/+), Postn(-/-) mice had a lower bone mass, cortical bone volume, and strength response to PTH. PTH-stimulated bone-forming indices were all significantly lower in Postn(-/-) mice, particularly at the periosteum. Furthermore, in vivo stimulation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling by PTH, as evaluated in TOPGAL reporter mice, was inhibited in the absence of periostin (TOPGAL;Postn(-/-) mice). PTH stimulated periostin and inhibited MEF2C and sclerostin (Sost) expression in bone and osteoblasts in vitro. Recombinant periostin also suppressed Sost expression, which was mediated through the integrin αVβ3 receptor, whereas periostin-blocking antibody prevented inhibition of MEF2C and Sost by PTH. In turn, administration of a Sost-blocking antiboby partially restored the PTH-mediated increase in bone mass in Postn(-/-) mice. In addition, primary osteoblasts from Postn(-/-) mice showed a lower proliferation, mineralization, and migration, both spontaneously and in response to PTH. Osteoblastic gene expression levels confirmed a defect of Postn(-/-) osteoblast differentiation with and without PTH, as well as an increased osteoblast apoptosis in the absence of periostin. These data elucidate the complex role of periostin on bone anabolism, through the regulation of Sost, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, and osteoblast differentiation.

  18. Inhibition of HMGA2 binding to DNA by netropsin

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yi; Cui, Tengjiao; Leng, Fenfei; Wilson, W. David

    2008-01-01

    The design of small synthetic molecules that can be used to affect gene expression is an area of active interest for development of agents in therapeutic and biotechnology applications. Many compounds that target the minor groove in AT sequences in DNA are well characterized and are promising reagents for use as modulators of protein-DNA complexes. The mammalian high mobility group transcriptional factor, HMGA2, also targets the DNA minor groove and plays critical roles in disease processes from cancer to obesity. Biosensor-surface plasmon resonance methods were used to monitor HMGA2 binding to target sites on immobilized DNA and a competition assay for inhibition of the HMGA2-DNA complex was designed. HMGA2 binds strongly to the DNA through AT hook domains with KD values of 20 - 30 nM depending on the DNA sequence. The well-characterized minor groove binder, netropsin, was used to develop and test the assay. The compound has two binding sites in the protein-DNA interaction sequence and this provides an advantage for inhibition. An equation for analysis of results when the inhibitor has two binding sites in the biopolymer recognition surface is presented with the results. The assay provides a platform for discovery of HMGA2 inhibitors. PMID:18023407

  19. Regulation of beta catenin signaling and parathyroid hormone anabolic effects in bone by the matricellular protein periostin

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Conway, Simon J.; Ferrari, Serge L.

    2012-01-01

    Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein preferentially expressed by osteocytes and periosteal osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Whether and how periostin expression influences bone anabolism, however, remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of adult Postn−/− and Postn+/+ mice to intermittent PTH. Compared with Postn+/+, Postn−/− mice had a lower bone mass, cortical bone volume, and strength response to PTH. PTH-stimulated bone-forming indices were all significantly lower in Postn−/− mice, particularly at the periosteum. Furthermore, in vivo stimulation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling by PTH, as evaluated in TOPGAL reporter mice, was inhibited in the absence of periostin (TOPGAL;Postn−/− mice). PTH stimulated periostin and inhibited MEF2C and sclerostin (Sost) expression in bone and osteoblasts in vitro. Recombinant periostin also suppressed Sost expression, which was mediated through the integrin αVβ3 receptor, whereas periostin-blocking antibody prevented inhibition of MEF2C and Sost by PTH. In turn, administration of a Sost-blocking antiboby partially restored the PTH-mediated increase in bone mass in Postn−/− mice. In addition, primary osteoblasts from Postn−/− mice showed a lower proliferation, mineralization, and migration, both spontaneously and in response to PTH. Osteoblastic gene expression levels confirmed a defect of Postn−/− osteoblast differentiation with and without PTH, as well as an increased osteoblast apoptosis in the absence of periostin. These data elucidate the complex role of periostin on bone anabolism, through the regulation of Sost, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, and osteoblast differentiation. PMID:22927401

  20. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K.; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K. Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  1. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  2. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity. PMID:26263125

  3. Binding Kinetics versus Affinities in BRD4 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming; Zhou, Jingwei; Wang, Laiyou; Liu, Zhihong; Guo, Jiao; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-09-28

    Bromodomains (BRDs) are protein modules that selectively recognize histones as a "reader" by binding to an acetylated lysine substrate. The human BRD4 has emerged as a promising drug target for a number of disease pathways, and several potent BRD inhibitors have been discovered experimentally recently. However, the detailed inhibition mechanism especially for the inhibitor binding kinetics is not clear. Herein, by employing classical molecular dynamics (MD) and state-of-the-art density functional QM/MM MD simulations, the dynamic characteristics of ZA-loop in BRD4 are revealed. And then the correlation between binding pocket size and ZA-loop motion is elucidated. Moreover, our simulations found that the compound (-)-JQ1 could be accommodated reasonably in thermodynamics whereas it is infeasible in binding kinetics against BRD4. Its racemate (+)-JQ1 proved to be both thermodynamically reasonable and kinetically achievable against BRD4, which could explain the previous experimental results that (+)-JQ1 shows a high inhibitory effect toward BRD4 (IC50 is 77 nM) while (-)-JQ1 is inactive (>10 μM). Furthermore, the L92/L94/Y97 in the ZA-loop and Asn140 in the BC-loop are identified to be critical residues in (+)-JQ1 binding/releasing kinetics. All these findings shed light on further selective inhibitor design toward BRD family, by exploiting the non-negligible ligand binding kinetics features and flexible ZA-loop motions of BRD, instead of only the static ligand-protein binding affinity.

  4. Dact2 represses PITX2 transcriptional activation and cell proliferation through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Florez, Sergio; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  5. Menthol Binding and Inhibition of α7-Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C.; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Al Kury, Lina; Shuba, Yaroslav; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Howarth, Frank C.; Sadek, Bassem; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Menthol is a common compound in pharmaceutical and commercial products and a popular additive to cigarettes. The molecular targets of menthol remain poorly defined. In this study we show an effect of menthol on the α7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor function. Using a two-electrode voltage-clamp technique, menthol was found to reversibly inhibit α7-nACh receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Inhibition by menthol was not dependent on the membrane potential and did not involve endogenous Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels, since menthol inhibition remained unchanged by intracellular injection of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA and perfusion with Ca2+-free bathing solution containing Ba2+. Furthermore, increasing ACh concentrations did not reverse menthol inhibition and the specific binding of [125I] α-bungarotoxin was not attenuated by menthol. Studies of α7- nACh receptors endogenously expressed in neural cells demonstrate that menthol attenuates α7 mediated Ca2+ transients in the cell body and neurite. In conclusion, our results suggest that menthol inhibits α7-nACh receptors in a noncompetitive manner. PMID:23935840

  6. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Piater, Birgit; Doerner, Achim; Guenther, Ralf; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Bjoern

    2015-01-01

    The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding. PMID:26658271

  7. Biphasic role of chondroitin sulfate in cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Robert D; Willis, Catherine M; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Klüppel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate is a critical component of proteoglycans on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. As such, chondroitin sulfate side chains and the sulfation balance of chondroitin play important roles in the control of signaling pathways, and have a functional importance in human disease. In contrast, very little is known about the roles of chondroitin sulfate molecules and sulfation patterns during mammalian development and cell lineage specification. Here, we report a novel biphasic role of chondroitin sulfate in the specification of the cardiac cell lineage during embryonic stem cell differentiation through modulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Lineage marker analysis demonstrates that enzymatic elimination of endogenous chondroitin sulfates leads to defects specifically in cardiac differentiation. This is accompanied by a reduction in the number of beating cardiac foci. Mechanistically, we show that endogenous chondroitin sulfate controls cardiac differentiation in a temporal biphasic manner through inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, a known regulatory pathway for the cardiac lineage. Treatment with a specific exogenous chondroitin sulfate, CS-E, could mimic these biphasic effects on cardiac differentiation and Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. These results establish chondroitin sulfate and its sulfation balance as important regulators of cardiac cell lineage decisions through control of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. Our work suggests that targeting the chondroitin biosynthesis and sulfation machinery is a novel promising avenue in regenerative strategies after heart injury.

  8. Inhibition of Midkine Augments Osteoporotic Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Haffner-Luntzer, Melanie; Kemmler, Julia; Heidler, Verena; Prystaz, Katja; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Kovtun, Anna; Rapp, Anna E.; Ignatius, Anita; Liedert, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The heparin-binding growth and differentiation factor midkine (Mdk) is proposed to negatively regulate osteoblast activity and bone formation in the adult skeleton. As Mdk-deficient mice were protected from ovariectomy (OVX)-induced bone loss, this factor may also play a role in the pathogenesis of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We have previously demonstrated that Mdk negatively influences bone regeneration during fracture healing. Here, we investigated whether the inhibition of Mdk using an Mdk-antibody (Mdk-Ab) improves compromised bone healing in osteoporotic OVX-mice. Using a standardized femur osteotomy model, we demonstrated that Mdk serum levels were significantly enhanced after fracture in both non-OVX and OVX-mice, however, the increase was considerably greater in osteoporotic mice. Systemic treatment with the Mdk-Ab significantly improved bone healing in osteoporotic mice by increasing bone formation in the fracture callus. On the molecular level, we demonstrated that the OVX-induced reduction of the osteoanabolic beta-catenin signaling in the bony callus was abolished by Mdk-Ab treatment. Furthermore, the injection of the Mdk-Ab increased trabecular bone mass in the skeleton of the osteoporotic mice. These results implicate that antagonizing Mdk may be useful for the therapy of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture-healing complications. PMID:27410432

  9. Fucosyl neoglycoprotein binds to mouse epididymal spermatozoa and inhibits sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Oh, Y S; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2013-12-01

    Glycan epitopes of cellular glycoconjugates act as versatile biochemical signals, and this sugar coding plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition processes. In this study, our aims were to determine the distribution of sperm receptors with activity for fucosyl- and galactosyl glycans and to address whether monosugar neoglycoproteins functionally mimic the binding between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and spermatozoa. In mouse epididymal spermatozoa with intact acrosomes, fucopyranosyl bovine serum albumin (BSA-Fuc) bound to the segment of the acrosome, the equatorial segment, and the postacrosome region of the sperm head. Galactosyl BSA (BSA-Gal) binding activity was similar to that of BSA-Fuc, but was weaker. In acrosome-reacted spermatozoa treated with the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, BSA-zuc binding was lost in the apical segment of the acrosome but remained in the equatorial segment and postacrosome regions. BSA-Gal binding to the equatorial region was increased. In the presence of 2.5 μg ml(-1) BSA-Fuc, in vitro sperm-ZP binding was significantly decreased, indicating that fucosyl BSA functionally mimics ZP glycoproteins during sperm-egg ZP interactions. At the same concentration, BSA-Gal was not effective. Fucosyl BSA that efficiently inhibited the sperm-ZP binding can mimic the ZP glycoconjugate and has potential for use as a sperm fertility control agent in mouse.

  10. Beta-catenin in disease

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma; Nagamalini, BR; Krishnamurthy, Ashwini Balkuntla

    2016-01-01

    In continuation with the previous review on “β-catenin in health”, in this review we discuss the role of β-catenin in the pathogenesis of common oral lesions in the oral and maxillofacial region- oral potentially malignant disorders, their progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma, salivary gland tumors and odontogenic tumours. This review is based on a pubmed search of all the lesions included in the review. PMID:27601825

  11. Beta-catenin in disease

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma; Nagamalini, BR; Krishnamurthy, Ashwini Balkuntla

    2016-01-01

    In continuation with the previous review on “β-catenin in health”, in this review we discuss the role of β-catenin in the pathogenesis of common oral lesions in the oral and maxillofacial region- oral potentially malignant disorders, their progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma, salivary gland tumors and odontogenic tumours. This review is based on a pubmed search of all the lesions included in the review.

  12. Beta-catenin in disease.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sharada; Swaminathan, Uma; Nagamalini, B R; Krishnamurthy, Ashwini Balkuntla

    2016-01-01

    In continuation with the previous review on "β-catenin in health", in this review we discuss the role of β-catenin in the pathogenesis of common oral lesions in the oral and maxillofacial region- oral potentially malignant disorders, their progression to oral squamous cell carcinoma, salivary gland tumors and odontogenic tumours. This review is based on a pubmed search of all the lesions included in the review. PMID:27601825

  13. A role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain unclear. In females, the skeletal response to ethanol varies depending on physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be a key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the c...

  14. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through inhibition of wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Female skeletal responses to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event leading to skeletal toxicity. In the current study, we chronically infused EtOH-containing liquid diets ...

  15. A crucial role for ethanol-induced oxidative stress in controlling lineage commitment of mesenchymal stromal cells through Inhibition of Wnt / Beta-catenin Signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanisms by which chronic ethanol intake induces bone loss remain largely unclear. Especially in females, skeletal response to ethanol may vary depending on the physiologic status (viz. cycling, pregnancy, lactation). Nonetheless, ethanol-induced oxidative stress appears to be the key event le...

  16. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  17. Plasma binding proteins for platelet-derived growth factor that inhibit its binding to cell-surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Raines, E W; Bowen-Pope, D F; Ross, R

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the binding of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to plasma constituents inhibits the binding of PDGF to its cell-surface mitogen receptor. Approximately equivalent amounts of PDGF-binding activity were found in plasma from a number of different species known by radioreceptor assay to contain PDGF homologues in their clotted blood. Activation of the coagulation cascade did not significantly alter the PDGF-binding activity of the plasma components. Three molecular weight classes of plasma fractions that inhibit PDGF binding to its cell-surface receptor were defined by gel filtration: approximately equal to 40,000, 150,000, and greater than 500,000. Specific binding of 125I-labeled PDGF to the highest molecular weight plasma fraction could also be demonstrated by gel filtration. The binding of PDGF to these plasma components was reversible under conditions of low pH or with guanidine X HCl, and active PDGF could be recovered from the higher molecular weight fractions. Immunologic and functional evidence is presented that the highest molecular weight plasma fraction may be alpha 2-macroglobulin. A model is proposed in which the activity of PDGF released in vivo may be regulated by association with these plasma binding components and by high-affinity binding to cell-surface PDGF receptors. PMID:6203121

  18. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase induction by retinobenzoic acids in relation to their binding affinities to cellular retinoid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Takagi, K; Suganuma, M; Kagechika, H; Shudo, K; Ninomiya, M; Muto, Y; Fujiki, H

    1988-01-01

    Retinobenzoic acids induce differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60). Like retinoic acid, 14 retinobenzoic acids inhibited the induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by teleocidin in mouse skin. The mechanism(s) of inhibition of ODC induction by 7 retinobenzoic acids, Am 80, Am 81, Am 580, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, and Ch 55 was compared with those by all-trans-retinoic acid and the arotinoid compound 19. Application of 114 nmol of Am 80, Am 81, Am 580, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, or Ch 55, 10 min before 11.4 nmol of teleocidin, resulted in 76.7%, 82.0%, 76.2%, 28.3%, 48.4%, 58.6%, and 85.1% inhibition of ODC induction, respectively. Since all-trans-retinoic acid and compound 19 were also inhibitory, we determined whether retinobenzoic acids bind to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) isolated from bovine adrenal glands. Am 80 and Am 580 inhibited the specific binding of 3H-retinoic acid to CRABP, but also showed less affinity than authentic unlabeled retinoic acid and compound 19. Am 81, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, and Ch 55 at up to 10 microM were not effective competitors of the binding of either 3H-retinoic acid or 3H-retinol. These results suggest that the inhibition of ODC induction can be mediated by pathways that do not involve CRABP or the cellular retinol-binding protein.

  19. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis.

  20. Dysregulation of the Wnt pathway inhibits timely myelination and remyelination in the mammalian CNS.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Stephen P J; Baranzini, Sergio E; Zhao, Chao; Yuk, Dong-In; Irvine, Karen-Amanda; Kaing, Sovann; Sanai, Nader; Franklin, Robin J M; Rowitch, David H

    2009-07-01

    The progressive loss of CNS myelin in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been proposed to result from the combined effects of damage to oligodendrocytes and failure of remyelination. A common feature of demyelinated lesions is the presence of oligodendrocyte precursors (OLPs) blocked at a premyelinating stage. However, the mechanistic basis for inhibition of myelin repair is incompletely understood. To identify novel regulators of OLP differentiation, potentially dysregulated during repair, we performed a genome-wide screen of 1040 transcription factor-encoding genes expressed in remyelinating rodent lesions. We report that approximately 50 transcription factor-encoding genes show dynamic expression during repair and that expression of the Wnt pathway mediator Tcf4 (aka Tcf7l2) within OLPs is specific to lesioned-but not normal-adult white matter. We report that beta-catenin signaling is active during oligodendrocyte development and remyelination in vivo. Moreover, we observed similar regulation of Tcf4 in the developing human CNS and lesions of MS. Data mining revealed elevated levels of Wnt pathway mRNA transcripts and proteins within MS lesions, indicating activation of the pathway in this pathological context. We show that dysregulation of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling in OLPs results in profound delay of both developmental myelination and remyelination, based on (1) conditional activation of beta-catenin in the oligodendrocyte lineage in vivo and (2) findings from APC(Min) mice, which lack one functional copy of the endogenous Wnt pathway inhibitor APC. Together, our findings indicate that dysregulated Wnt-beta-catenin signaling inhibits myelination/remyelination in the mammalian CNS. Evidence of Wnt pathway activity in human MS lesions suggests that its dysregulation might contribute to inefficient myelin repair in human neurological disorders.

  1. Inhibition of RNA polymerase by captan at both DNA and substrate binding sites.

    PubMed

    Luo, G; Lewis, R A

    1992-12-01

    RNA synthesis carried out in vitro by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase was inhibited irreversibly by captan when T7 DNA was used as template. An earlier report and this one show that captan blocks the DNA binding site on the enzyme. Herein, it is also revealed that captan acts at the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site, and kinetic relationships of the action of captan at the two sites are detailed. The inhibition by captan via the DNA binding site of the enzyme was confirmed by kinetic studies and it was further shown that [14C]captan bound to the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase. This subunit contains the DNA binding site. Competitive-like inhibition by captan versus UTP led to the conclusion that captan also blocked the NTP binding site. In support of this conclusion, [14C]captan was observed to bind to the beta subunit which contains the NTP binding site. Whereas, preincubation of RNA polymerase with both DNA and NTPs prevented captan inhibition, preincubation with either DNA or NTPs alone was insufficient to protect the enzyme from the action of captan. Furthermore, the interaction of [14C]captan with the beta and beta' subunits was not prevented by a similar preincubation. Captan also bound, to a lesser extent, to the alpha and sigma subunits. Therefore, captan binding appears to involve interaction with RNA polymerase at sites in addition to those for DNA and NTP; however, this action does not inhibit the polymerase activity.

  2. Water may inhibit oxygen binding in hemoprotein models

    PubMed Central

    Collman, James P.; Decréau, Richard A.; Dey, Abhishek; Yang, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Three distal imidazole pickets in a cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) model form a pocket hosting a cluster of water molecules. The cluster makes the ferrous heme low spin, and consequently the O2 binding slow. The nature of the rigid proximal imidazole tail favors a high spin/low spin cross-over. The O2 binding rate is enhanced either by removing the water, increasing the hydrophobicity of the gas binding pocket, or inserting a metal ion that coordinates to the 3 distal imidazole pickets. PMID:19246375

  3. Downregulation of adenomatous polyposis coli by microRNA-663 promotes odontogenic differentiation through activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Park, Min-Gyeong; Lee, Seul Ah; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Heung-Joong; Yu, Sun-Kyoung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Seo, Yo-Seob; Chun, Hong Sung; Park, Joo-Cheol; Kim, Do Kyung

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • miR-663 is significantly up-regulated during MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell differentiation. • miR-663 accelerates mineralization in MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells without cell proliferation. • miR-663 promotes odontoblastic cell differentiation by targeting APC and activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in MDPC-23 cells. - Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation by inhibiting mRNA translation or by inducing its degradation. However, the role of miRNAs in odontogenic differentiation is largely unknown. In this present study, we observed that the expression of miR-663 increased significantly during differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts. Furthermore, up-regulation of miR-663 expression promoted odontogenic differentiation and accelerated mineralization without proliferation in MDPC-23 cells. In addition, target gene prediction for miR-663 revealed that the mRNA of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, which is associated with the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has a miR-663 binding site in its 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). Furthermore, APC expressional was suppressed significantly by miR-663, and this down-regulation of APC expression triggered activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through accumulation of β-catenin in the nucleus. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-663 promotes differentiation of MDPC-23 cells to odontoblasts by targeting APC-mediated activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Therefore, miR-663 can be considered a critical regulator of odontoblast differentiation and can be utilized for developing miRNA-based therapeutic agents.

  4. Sticky Plans: Inhibition and Binding during Serial-Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests substantial response-time costs associated with lag-2 repetitions of tasks within explicitly controlled task sequences [Koch, I., Philipp, A. M., Gade, M. (2006). Chunking in task sequences modulates task inhibition. "Psychological Science," 17, 346-350; Schneider, D. W. (2007). Task-set inhibition in chunked task…

  5. Mechanism of P815 cell binding to endothelial cells and the inhibition of this binding by lymphokines

    SciTech Connect

    Antonia, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    A short term in vitro assay was developed for the study of tumor cell binding to endothelium. Monolayers of BPA endothelial cells were grown to confluence in 12-well tissue culture plates. /sup 51/Cr labeled P815 cells were then aliquoted onto the monolayers and incubated at 37/degree/C. Non adherent cells were washed off and the radioactivity bound to the monolayers was determined. The mechanisms of tumor cell binding to endothelial cells was studied. Specifically, evidence for cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) was sought. It was found that trypsin treatment of P815 mastocytoma cells resulted in a reduction in their ability to bind to monolayers of endothelial cells in vitro. The supernatant from trypsin treated P815 cells inhibited the binding of untreated P815 cells to endothelial cells. The binding was also found to be increased with the addition of divalent cations, with Mg/sup 2 +/ being more effective than Ca/sup 2 +/. Tunicamycin treatment of P815 cells resulted in a reduction of their ability to bind. The soluble monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine, but not other monosaccharides commonly present in the carbohydrate regions of glycoproteins, inhibited the binding of P815 cells to endothelial cells. A sensitive assay for the detection of CAMs was developed.

  6. Competitive inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to mammary glucocorticoid receptor by leupeptin

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, L.C.C.; Su, C.; Markland, F.S. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    The inhibitory effect of leupeptin on (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor from lactating goat mammary cytosol has been studied. Leupeptin (10 mM) caused a significant (about 35%) inhibition of (TH)dexamethasone binding to glucocorticoid receptor. Binding inhibition is further increased following filtration of unlabeled cytosolic receptor through a Bio-Gel A 0.5-m column. Binding inhibition was partially reversed by monothioglycerol at 10 mM concentration. A double reciprocal plot revealed that leupeptin appears to be a competitive inhibitor of (TH)dexamethasone binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. Low salt sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed that the leupeptin-treated sample formed a slightly larger (approximately 9 S) receptor complex (leupeptin-free complex sediments at 8 S).

  7. Selective inhibition of c-Myc/Max dimerization and DNA binding by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Anke; Sperl, Bianca; Hollis, Angela; Eick, Dirk; Berg, Thorsten

    2006-07-01

    bZip and bHLHZip protein family members comprise a large fraction of eukaryotic transcription factors and need to bind DNA in order to exert most of their fundamental biological roles. Their binding to DNA requires homo- or heterodimerization via alpha-helical domains, which generally do not contain obvious binding sites for small molecules. We have identified two small molecules, dubbed Mycro1 and Mycro2, which inhibit the protein-protein interactions between the bHLHZip proteins c-Myc and Max. Mycros are the first inhibitors of c-Myc/Max dimerization, which have been demonstrated to inhibit DNA binding of c-Myc with preference over other dimeric transcription factors in vitro. Mycros inhibit c-Myc-dependent proliferation, gene transcription, and oncogenic transformation in the low micromolar concentration range. Our data support the idea that dimeric transcription factors can be druggable even in the absence of obvious small-molecule binding pockets.

  8. Bovine Muc1 inhibits binding of enteric bacteria to Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Phillip; Sando, Lillian; Pearson, Roger; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Tellam, Ross L; Smith, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial receptors by the consumption of natural food components is an attractive strategy for the prevention of microbial related gastrointestinal illness. We hypothesised that Muc1, a highly glycosylated mucin present in cows' milk, may be one such food component. Purified bovine Muc1 was tested for its ability to inhibit binding of common enteric bacterial pathogens to Caco-2 cells grown in vitro. Muc1 caused dose-dependent binding inhibition of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. This inhibition was more pronounced for the Gram negative compared with Gram positive bacteria. It was also demonstrated that Muc1, immobilised on a membrane, bound all these bacterial species in a dose-dependent manner, although there was greater interaction with the Gram negative bacteria. A range of monosaccharides, representative of the Muc1 oligosaccharide composition, were tested for their ability to prevent binding of E. coli and S. Typhimurium to Caco-2 cells. Inhibition was structure dependent with sialic acid, L(-) fucose and D(+) mannose significantly inhibiting binding of both Gram negative species. N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine significantly inhibited binding of E. coli whilst galactose, one of the most abundant Muc1 monosaccharides, showed the strongest inhibition against S. Typhimurium. Treatment with sialidase significantly decreased the inhibitory properties of Muc1, demonstrating the importance of sialic acid in adhesion inhibition. It is concluded that bovine Muc1 prevents binding of bacteria to human intestinal cells and may have a role in preventing the binding of common enteropathogenic bacteria to human intestinal epithelial surfaces.

  9. Kinesin's light chains inhibit the head- and microtubule-binding activity of its tail.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yao Liang; Rice, Sarah E

    2010-06-29

    Kinesin-1 is a microtubule-based motor comprising two heavy chains (KHCs) and two light chains (KLCs). Motor activity is precisely regulated to avoid futile ATP consumption and to ensure proper intracellular localization of kinesin-1 and its cargoes. The KHC tail inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the enzymatic KHC heads, and the tail also binds microtubules. Here, we present a role for the KLCs in regulating both the head- and microtubule-binding activities of the kinesin-1 tail. We show that KLCs reduce the affinity of the head-tail interaction over tenfold and concomitantly repress the tail's regulatory activity. We also show that KLCs inhibit tail-microtubule binding by a separate mechanism. Inhibition of head-tail binding requires steric and electrostatic factors. Inhibition of tail-microtubule binding is largely electrostatic, pH dependent, and mediated partly by a highly negatively charged linker region between the KHC-interacting and cargo-binding domains of the KLCs. Our data support a model wherein KLCs promote activation of kinesin-1 for cargo transport by simultaneously suppressing tail-head and tail-microtubule interactions. KLC-mediated inhibition of tail-microtubule binding may also influence diffusional movement of kinesin-1 on microtubules, and kinesin-1's role in microtubule transport/sliding. PMID:20547877

  10. Trichinella spiralis Paramyosin Binds Human Complement C1q and Inhibits Classical Complement Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ran; Zhao, Xi; Wang, Zixia; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Limei; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Background Trichinella spiralis expresses paramyosin (Ts-Pmy) as a defense mechanism. Ts-Pmy is a functional protein with binding activity to human complement C8 and C9 and thus plays a role in evading the attack of the host’s immune system. In the present study, the binding activity of Ts-Pmy to human complement C1q and its ability to inhibit classical complement activation were investigated. Methods and Findings The binding of recombinant and natural Ts-Pmy to human C1q were determined by ELISA, Far Western blotting and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Binding of recombinant Ts-Pmy (rTs-Pmy) to C1q inhibited C1q binding to IgM and consequently inhibited C3 deposition. The lysis of antibody-sensitized erythrocytes (EAs) elicited by the classical complement pathway was also inhibited in the presence of rTs-Pmy. In addition to inhibiting classical complement activation, rTs-Pmy also suppressed C1q binding to THP-1-derived macrophages, thereby reducing C1q-induced macrophages migration. Conclusion Our results suggest that T. spiralis paramyosin plays an important role in immune evasion by interfering with complement activation through binding to C1q in addition to C8 and C9. PMID:26720603

  11. Binding inhibition of type 1 fimbriae to human granulocytes: a flow cytometric inhibition assay using trivalent cluster mannosides.

    PubMed

    Horst, A K; Kötter, S; Lindhorst, T K; Ludwig, A; Brandt, E; Wagener, C

    2001-12-01

    The binding of type 1 fimbriae from Escherichia coli to vital human neutrophilic granulocytes was inhibited by synthetic trivalent cluster mannosides. Binding of type 1 fimbriae was measured in a flow cytometric assay. Based on the molarity of mannosyl residues, the clusters exceed the inhibitory potency of methyl alpha-D-mannoside by a factor of more than 1,000 and the inhibitory potency of p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannoside by a factor of more than 10. The inhibition studies indicate that the trivalent cluster mannosides are very potent inhibitors of the binding of type 1 fimbriae to human neutrophilic granulocytes. Based on their defined structure, cluster mannosides are well suited for characterizing the molecular interactions of mannose-sensitive fimbriae with their cell membrane receptors.

  12. Loss of epithelial differentiation and gain of invasiveness correlates with tyrosine phosphorylation of the E-cadherin/beta-catenin complex in cells transformed with a temperature-sensitive v-SRC gene

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Loss of histotypic organization of epithelial cells is a common feature in normal development as well as in the invasion of carcinomas. Here we show that the v-src oncogene is a potent effector of epithelial differentiation and invasiveness. MDCK epithelial cells transformed with a temperature-sensitive mutant of v-src exhibit a strictly epithelial phenotype at the nonpermissive temperature for pp60v-src activity (40.5 degrees C) but rapidly loose cell-to-cell contacts and acquire a fibroblast-like morphology after culture at the permissive temperature (35 degrees C). Furthermore, the invasiveness of the cells into collagen gels or into chick heart fragments was increased at the permissive temperature. The profound effects of v-src on intercellular adhesion were not linked to changes in the levels of expression of the epithelial cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. Rather, we observed an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin and, in particular, of the associated protein beta-catenin. These results suggest a mechanism by which v-src counteracts junctional assembly and thereby promotes invasiveness and dedifferentiation of epithelial cells through phosphorylation of the E-cadherin/catenin complex. PMID:8425900

  13. Pleiotrophin induces neurite outgrowth and up-regulates growth-associated protein (GAP)-43 mRNA through the ALK/GSK3beta/beta-catenin signaling in developing mouse neurons.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Hiroko; Komuta, Yukari; Kawano, Hitoshi; Toyoda, Masashi; Sango, Kazunori

    2010-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is highly expressed in the nervous system during embryogenesis; however, little is known about its functional role in neural development. By using whole mount in situ hybridization, we observed that the expression pattern of PTN was similar to that of Wnt3a; PTN mRNA was abundant in the nervous tissue along the dorsal midline and in the forelimb and hindlimb buds of embryonic mice (E8.5-E12.5). Treatment with recombinant PTN (100ng/ml) induced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta), nuclear localization of beta-catenin and up-regulation of growth-associated protein (GAP)-43 mRNA in cultured embryonic mouse (E14.5) neurons. Furthermore, recombinant PTN enhanced neurite outgrowth from cortical explants embedded in Matrigel. These PTN-induced biochemical changes and neurite outgrowth were attenuated by the co-treatment with anti-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) antibodies, but not with anti-protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)zeta antibodies. These findings imply that ALK is involved in the PTN signaling on neural development.

  14. A human serum mannose-binding protein inhibits in vitro infection by the human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    In vitro infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) of CD4+ H9 lymphoblasts is inhibited by a mannose-binding protein (MBP) purified from human serum. In addition, MBP is able to selectively bind to HIV- infected H9 cells and HIV-infected cells from the monocyte cell line U937. These results indicate MBP most likely recognizes high mannose glycans known to be present on gp120 in the domain that is recognized by CD4 and thereby inhibits viral entry to susceptible cells. In support of this contention, recombinant gp120 binds directly to MBP; the binding is saturable, mannan inhibitable, removed by N-glycanase treatment, and dependent on divalent cations. PMID:2909656

  15. Sulfatides inhibit binding of Helicobacter pylori to the gastric cancer Kato III cell line.

    PubMed

    Wadström, T; Hirmo, S; Novak, H; Guzman, A; Ringnér-Pantzar, M; Utt, M; Aleljung, P

    1997-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori adhere to Kato III and Hela S3 cells in monolayer cultures. To explore whether cell surface glycoconjugates on these two cell lines mediate binding of H. pylori, various carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and glycolipids were tested to inhibit H.pylori cell adhesion. The adhesion was measured (i) with a urease-based assay and (ii) by cells stained with fluorescein. Sodium periodate and sialidase treatment (but not alpha- or beta-galactosidase, heparitinase,lysozyme, or trypsin) inhibited H. pylori binding to both cell lines. Sulfatides and sulfated glycoconjugates (50 microg/ml) but not heparin or a number of simple carbohydrates inhibited binding (1 mg/ml). The two H.pylori strains studied (CCUG 17874 and strain 25) showed high binding of soluble 125I-labeled heparin and other sulfated carbohydrate compounds. PMID:9099625

  16. Addition of lysophospholipids with large head groups to cells inhibits Shiga toxin binding.

    PubMed

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kvalvaag, Audun Sverre; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB5 toxin, binds specifically to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface before being transported into cells. We here demonstrate that addition of conical lysophospholipids (LPLs) with large head groups inhibit Stx binding to cells whereas LPLs with small head groups do not. Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI 18:0), the most efficient LPL with the largest head group, was selected for in-depth investigations to study how the binding of Stx is regulated. We show that the inhibition of Stx binding by LPI is reversible and possibly regulated by cholesterol since addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) reversed the ability of LPI to inhibit binding. LPI-induced inhibition of Stx binding is independent of signalling and membrane turnover as it occurs in fixed cells as well as after depletion of cellular ATP. Furthermore, data obtained with fluorescent membrane dyes suggest that LPI treatment has a direct effect on plasma membrane lipid packing with shift towards a liquid disordered phase in the outer leaflet, while lysophosphoethanolamine (LPE), which has a small head group, does not. In conclusion, our data show that cellular treatment with conical LPLs with large head groups changes intrinsic properties of the plasma membrane and modulates Stx binding to Gb3. PMID:27458147

  17. Addition of lysophospholipids with large head groups to cells inhibits Shiga toxin binding

    PubMed Central

    Ailte, Ieva; Lingelem, Anne Berit Dyve; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Bergan, Jonas; Kvalvaag, Audun Sverre; Myrann, Anne-Grethe; Skotland, Tore; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), an AB5 toxin, binds specifically to the neutral glycosphingolipid Gb3 at the cell surface before being transported into cells. We here demonstrate that addition of conical lysophospholipids (LPLs) with large head groups inhibit Stx binding to cells whereas LPLs with small head groups do not. Lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI 18:0), the most efficient LPL with the largest head group, was selected for in-depth investigations to study how the binding of Stx is regulated. We show that the inhibition of Stx binding by LPI is reversible and possibly regulated by cholesterol since addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD) reversed the ability of LPI to inhibit binding. LPI-induced inhibition of Stx binding is independent of signalling and membrane turnover as it occurs in fixed cells as well as after depletion of cellular ATP. Furthermore, data obtained with fluorescent membrane dyes suggest that LPI treatment has a direct effect on plasma membrane lipid packing with shift towards a liquid disordered phase in the outer leaflet, while lysophosphoethanolamine (LPE), which has a small head group, does not. In conclusion, our data show that cellular treatment with conical LPLs with large head groups changes intrinsic properties of the plasma membrane and modulates Stx binding to Gb3. PMID:27458147

  18. RNAs nonspecifically inhibit RNA polymerase II by preventing binding to the DNA template.

    PubMed

    Pai, Dave A; Kaplan, Craig D; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Murakami, Kenji; Andrews, Philip C; Engelke, David R

    2014-05-01

    Many RNAs are known to act as regulators of transcription in eukaryotes, including certain small RNAs that directly inhibit RNA polymerases both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We have examined the potential for a variety of RNAs to directly inhibit transcription by yeast RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and find that unstructured RNAs are potent inhibitors of purified yeast Pol II. Inhibition by RNA is achieved by blocking binding of the DNA template and requires binding of the RNA to Pol II prior to open complex formation. RNA is not able to displace a DNA template that is already stably bound to Pol II, nor can RNA inhibit elongating Pol II. Unstructured RNAs are more potent inhibitors than highly structured RNAs and can also block specific transcription initiation in the presence of basal transcription factors. Crosslinking studies with ultraviolet light show that unstructured RNA is most closely associated with the two large subunits of Pol II that comprise the template binding cleft, but the RNA has contacts in a basic residue channel behind the back wall of the active site. These results are distinct from previous observations of specific inhibition by small, structured RNAs in that they demonstrate a sensitivity of the holoenzyme to inhibition by unstructured RNA products that bind to a surface outside the DNA cleft. These results are discussed in terms of the need to prevent inhibition by RNAs, either though sequestration of nascent RNA or preemptive interaction of Pol II with the DNA template.

  19. Actinomycin D specifically inhibits the interaction between transcription factor Sp1 and its binding site.

    PubMed

    Czyz, M; Gniazdowski, M

    1998-01-01

    The mode of action of many anticancer drugs involves DNA interactions. We here examine the ability of actinomycin D to alter the specific binding of transcription factors Spl and NFkappaB to their DNA sequences. Employing an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, it is shown that actinomycin D inhibits complex formation between nuclear proteins present in the extracts from stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells and the Sp1-binding site. Actinomycin D is also able to induce disruption of preformed DNA-protein complexes, pointing to the importance of an equilibrium of three components: actinomycin D, protein and DNA for drug action. The effect of actinomycin D is sequence-specific, since no inhibition is observed for interaction of nuclear proteins with the NFkappaB binding site. The results support the view that DNA-binding drugs displaying high sequence-selectivity can exhibit distinct effects on the interaction between DNA and different DNA-binding proteins. PMID:9701497

  20. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  1. Inhibition of transferring binding and iron uptake of hematopoietic cell lines by phorbol esters.

    PubMed

    Pelicci, P G; Testa, U; Thomopoulos, P; Tabilio, A; Vainchenker, W; Titeux, M; Gourdin, M F; Rochant, H

    1984-01-01

    Phorbol esters inhibit cell growth and the binding of transferrin to receptors on K 562, HL 60 and U 937 human leukemic cell lines. Exposure of these cells to 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at 37 degrees C results in a 40% reduction of the specific binding of 125I-transferrin, which is apparent within 15 min. Half-maximal inhibition occurs at about 1 nM. Other tumor promoting phorbol esters also inhibit 125I-transferrin binding in a dose-dependent manner which parallels their known promoting activity in vivo. TPA reduces the number of transferrin receptors, and does not alter the degradation or the internalization of transferrin. In addition, TPA inhibits iron uptake by these cell lines. These effects are specific, since phorbol esters do not affect either cell growth or the binding of transferrin to Friend erythroleukemia cells and Raji cell line. On the basis of these findings it is suggested that the inhibition of transferrin binding may represent one of the mechanisms by which phorbol esters affect the growth and the differentiation of hematopoietic cell lines. PMID:6088899

  2. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  3. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  4. A nucleolar localizing Rev binding element inhibits HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Michienzi, Alessandro; De Angelis, Fernanda G; Bozzoni, Irene; Rossi, John J

    2006-01-01

    The Rev protein of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) facilitates the nuclear export of intron containing viral mRNAs allowing formation of infectious virions. Rev traffics through the nucleolus and shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Rev multimerization and interaction with the export protein CRM1 takes place in the nucleolus. To test the importance of Rev nucleolar trafficking in the HIV-1 replication cycle, we created a nucleolar localizing Rev Response Element (RRE) decoy and tested this for its anti-HIV activity. The RRE decoy provided marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in both the CEM T-cell line and in primary CD34+ derived monocytes. These results demonstrate that titration of Rev in the nucleolus impairs HIV-1 replication and supports a functional role for Rev trafficking in this sub-cellular compartment.

  5. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  6. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori binding to gastrointestinal epithelial cells by sialic acid-containing oligosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, P M; Goode, P L; Mobasseri, A; Zopf, D

    1997-01-01

    Helicobacterpylori, the ulcer pathogen residing in the human stomach, binds to epithelial cells of the gastric antrum. We have examined binding of 13 bacterial isolates to epithelial cell lines by use of a sensitive microtiter plate method in which measurement of bacterial urease activity provides the means for quantitation of bound organisms. Several established human gastrointestinal carcinoma cell lines grown as monolayers were compared for suitability in these assays, and the duodenum-derived cell line HuTu-80 was selected for testing bacterial binding inhibitors. When bacteria are pretreated with oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, a complex picture of bacterial-epithelial adherence specificities emerges. Among the monovalent inhibitors tested, 3'-sialyllactose (NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-4Glc; 3'SL) was the most active oligosaccharide, inhibiting adherence for recent clinical isolates of H. pylori with a millimolar 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Its alpha2-6 isomer (6'SL) was less active. Most of the recent clinical isolates examined were inhibited by sialyllactose, whereas long-passaged isolates were insensitive. Among the long-passaged bacterial strains whose binding was not inhibited by 3'SL was the strain ATCC 43504, also known as NCTC 11637 and CCUG 17874, in which the proposed sialyllactose adhesin was recently reported to lack surface expression (P. G. O'Toole, L. Janzon, P. Doig, J. Huang, M. Kostrzynska, and T. H. Trust, J. Bacteriol. 177:6049-6057, 1995). Pretreatment of the epithelial monolayer with neuraminidase reduced the extent of binding by those bacteria that are sensitive to inhibition by 3'SL. Other potent inhibitors of bacterial binding are the glycoproteins alpha1-acid glycoprotein, fetuin, porcine gastric and bovine submaxillary mucins, and the glycolipid sulfatide, all of which present multivalent sialylated and/or sulfated galactosyl residues under the conditions of the binding assay. Consistent with this pattern, a

  7. Inhibition of platelet (/sup 3/H)- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha/sub 1/ acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding site.

  8. SFS, a Novel Fibronectin-Binding Protein from Streptococcus equi, Inhibits the Binding between Fibronectin and Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Lindmark, Hans; Guss, Bengt

    1999-01-01

    The obligate parasitic bacterium Streptococcus equi subsp. equi is the causative agent of strangles, a serious disease of the upper respiratory tract in horses. In this study we have, using shotgun phage display, cloned from S. equi subsp. equi and characterized a gene, called sfs, encoding a protein termed SFS, representing a new type of fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein. The sfs gene was found to be present in all 50 isolates of S. equi subsp. equi tested and in 41 of 48 S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates tested. The sfs gene is down-regulated during growth in vitro compared to fnz, a previously characterized gene encoding an Fn-binding protein from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Sequence comparisons revealed no similarities to previously characterized Fn-binding proteins, but high scores were obtained against collagen. Besides similarity due to the high content of glycine, serine, and proline residues present in both proteins, there was a nine-residue motif present both in collagen and in the Fn-binding domain of SFS. By searching the Oklahoma S. pyogenes database, we found that this motif is also present in a potential cell surface protein from S. pyogenes. Protein SFS was found to inhibit the binding between Fn and collagen in a concentration-dependent way. PMID:10225899

  9. Inhibition of Protein Synthesis by Y Box-Binding Protein 1 Blocks Oncogenic Cell Transformation†

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Andreas G.; Vogt, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    The multifunctional Y box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) is transcriptionally repressed by the oncogenic phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway (with P3K as an oncogenic homolog of the catalytic subunit) and, when reexpressed with the retroviral vector RCAS, interferes with P3K- and Akt-induced transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts. Retrovirally expressed YB-1 binds to the cap of mRNAs and inhibits cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. To determine the requirements for the inhibitory role of YB-1 in P3K-induced transformation, we conducted a mutational analysis, measuring YB-1-induced interference with transformation, subcellular localization, cap binding, mRNA binding, homodimerization, and inhibition of translation. The results show that (i) interference with transformation requires RNA binding and a C-terminal domain that is distinct from the cytoplasmic retention domain, (ii) interference with transformation is tightly correlated with inhibition of translation, and (iii) masking of mRNAs by YB-1 is not sufficient to block transformation or to inhibit translation. We identified a noncanonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal half of YB-1. A mutant lacking the NLS retains its ability to interfere with transformation, indicating that a nuclear function is not required. These results suggest that YB-1 interferes with P3K-induced transformation by a specific inhibition of translation through its RNA-binding domain and a region in the C-terminal domain. Potential functions of the C-terminal region are discussed. PMID:15743808

  10. Enzymatic regulation of pattern: BMP4 binds CUB domains of Tolloids and inhibits proteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojoon X.; Mendes, Fabio A.; Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2009-01-01

    In Xenopus embryos, a dorsal–ventral patterning gradient is generated by diffusing Chordin/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) complexes cleaved by BMP1/Tolloid metalloproteinases in the ventral side. We developed a new BMP1/Tolloid assay using a fluorogenic Chordin peptide substrate and identified an unexpected negative feedback loop for BMP4, in which BMP4 inhibits Tolloid enzyme activity noncompetitively. BMP4 binds directly to the CUB (Complement 1r/s, Uegf [a sea urchin embryonic protein] and BMP1) domains of BMP1 and Drosophila Tolloid with high affinity. Binding to CUB domains inhibits BMP4 signaling. These findings provide a molecular explanation for a long-standing genetical puzzle in which antimorphic Drosophila tolloid mutant alleles displayed anti-BMP effects. The extensive Drosophila genetics available supports the relevance of the interaction described here at endogenous physiological levels. Many extracellular proteins contain CUB domains; the binding of CUB domains to BMP4 suggests a possible general function in binding transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily members. Mathematical modeling indicates that feedback inhibition by BMP ligands acts on the ventral side, while on the dorsal side the main regulator of BMP1/Tolloid enzymatic activity is the binding to its substrate, Chordin. PMID:19884260

  11. CCL18 Exhibits a Regulatory Role through Inhibition of Receptor and Glycosaminoglycan Binding

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Sonja C.; Bonvin, Pauline; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.

    2013-01-01

    CCL18 has been reported to be present constitutively at high levels in the circulation, and is further elevated during inflammatory diseases. Since it is a rather poor chemoattractant, we wondered if it may have a regulatory role. CCL18 has been reported to inhibit cellular recruitment mediated by CCR3, and we have shown that whilst it is a competitive functional antagonist as assessed by Schild plot analysis, it only binds to a subset of CCR3 receptor populations. We have extended this inhibitory activity to other receptors and have shown that CCL18 is able to inhibit CCR1, CCR2, CCR4 and CCR5 mediated chemotaxis, but has no effect on CCR7 and CCR9, nor the CXC receptors that we have tested. Whilst CCL18 is able to bind to CCR3, it does not bind to the other receptors that it inhibits. We therefore tested the hypothesis that it may displace glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chemokines bound either in cis- on the leukocyte, or in trans-presentation on the endothelial surface, thereby inhibiting the recruitment of leukocytes into the site of inflammation. We show that CCL18 selectivity displaces heparin bound chemokines, and that chemokines from all four chemokine sub-classes displace cell bound CCL18. We propose that CCL18 has regulatory properties inhibiting chemokine function when GAG-mediated presentation plays a role in receptor activation. PMID:23951310

  12. Competitive inhibition of LDL binding and uptake by HDL in aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1990-09-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) may inhibit the binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as one means of regulating the delivery of exogenous cholesterol to nonhepatic tissues. This may play an important role in atherogenesis, by altering lipid metabolism in cells of the arterial wall. To verify and better characterize this effect, endothelial cells were harvested from bovine aorta and maintained in tissue culture. Following initial preincubation in lipid-deficient culture media, these cells were incubated for 2 hr at 4 degrees C in media containing 125I-LDL (10 micrograms protein/ml) and varying concentrations of either HDL (0-400 micrograms protein/ml) or comparable amounts of Apoprotein A (Apo A), the major protein component of HDL. Intracellular and trypsin-released counts were assayed separately, as a measurement of cellular uptake and membrane bound LDL, respectively. Results of this study indicated an inhibition of LDL binding and uptake by HDL (P less than 0.005, ANOVA). A similar inhibition was found with Apo A alone (P less than 0.005). When identical studies were performed using 125I-Apoprotein B, the protein component of LDL, and Apo A, the latter was found to inhibit the binding of Apo B to the same extent (P less than 0.0006). These results indicate that HDL does inhibit LDL binding and uptake by bovine aortic endothelial cells and that, because this effect is seen equally with only the protein component of these lipoprotein particles, it is most likely due to competitive binding at the receptor level rather than to stearic hindrance or an alteration of the cell membrane.

  13. Yeast mannans inhibit binding and phagocytosis of zymosan by mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sung, S S; Nelson, R S; Silverstein, S C

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the effects of various mannans, glycoproteins, oligosaccharides, monosaccharides, and sugar phosphates on the binding and phagocytosis of yeast cell walls (zymosan) by mouse peritoneal macrophages. A phosphonomannan (PO(4):mannose ratio = 1:8:6) from kloeckera brevis was the most potent inhibitor tested; it inhibited binding and phagocytosis by 50 percent at concentrations of approximately 3-5 mug/ml and 10 mug/ml, respectively. Removal of the phosphate from this mannan by mild acid and alkaline phosphatase treatment did not appreciably reduce its capacity to inhibit zymosan phagocytosis. The mannan from saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant LB301 inhibits phagocytosis by 50 percent at 0.3 mg/ml, and a neutral exocellular glucomannan from pichia pinus inhibited phagocytosis by 50 percent at 1 mg/ml. Cell wall mannans from wild type S. cervisiae X2180, its mnn2 mutant which contains mannan with predominantly 1(arrow)6- linked mannose residues, yeast exocellular mannans and O-phosphonomannans were less efficient inhibitors requiring concentrations of 1-5 mg/ml to achieve 50 percent reduction in phagocytosis. Horseradish peroxidase, which contains high-mannose type oligosaccharides, was also inhibitory. Mannan is a specific inhibitor of zymosan binding and phagocytosis. The binding and ingestion of zymosan but not of IgG- or complement-coated erythrocytes can be obliterated by plating macrophages on substrates coated with poly-L-lysin (PLL)-mannan. Zymosan uptake was completely abolished by trypsin treatment of the macrophages and reduced by 50-60 percent in the presence of 10 mM EGTA. Pretreatment of the macrophages with chloroquine inhibited zymosan binding and ingestion. These results support the proposal that the macrophage mannose/N-acetylglucosamine receptor (P. Stahl, J.S. Rodman, M.J. Miller, and P.H. Schlesinger, 1978, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75:1399-1403, mediates the phagocytosis of zymosan particles. PMID:6298248

  14. Binding of Galanthus nivalis lectin to Chlamydia trachomatis and inhibition of in vitro infection.

    PubMed

    Amin, K; Beillevaire, D; Mahmoud, E; Hammar, L; Mårdh, P A; Fröman, G

    1995-10-01

    A glycoprotein present in Chlamydia trachomatis, serotype L1, elementary bodies (EBs) was earlier found to bind the lectin from Galanthus nivalis (GNA). In the present paper we investigate the interaction of GNA with chlamydial EBs and its effect on in vitro infectivity. The binding affinity was studied with 125I-GNA lectin. Within 15 min about 80% maximal binding was obtained. The chlamydia-GNA interaction was inhibited by alpha-methylmannoside, causing a decrease of about 50% at 1 mM. Curve fit analyses indicated two types of binding sites for GNA on the EBs. The affinity to these differed by a factor of 15. The influence of the lectin on the ability of C. trachomatis to infect McCoy cells was also investigated. There was a GNA-dependent inhibition with a 50% reduction in the number of intracellular inclusions at 0.2 microM of the lectin. The findings indicate the presence of terminal mannose structures on the chlamydial surface at or in the proximity of the cell-binding domains. Mannose-binding proteins of eukaryotic cells could be important for the initial uptake of EBs.

  15. Inhibition of p53 DNA binding by human papillomavirus E6 proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, M S; Laimins, L A

    1994-01-01

    Transformation by the human papillomavirus (HPV) early gene products, E6 and E7, involves their interaction with cellular proteins p53 and Rb. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins, we found that HPV E6 bound human p53 and that the relative efficiency of binding varied such that the GST-HPV type 16 E6 (16E6) protein bound p53 with highest affinity, followed by GST-31E6, GST-18E6, and GST-11E6. The GST-E6 fusion proteins were sufficient for binding p53 purified from a baculovirus expression system as well as in vitro translation sources, while no association was observed with GST-18E7 or a GST-16E6 mutant bearing a five-amino-acid deletion in E6. When the site-specific DNA binding activity of p53 was examined in the presence of GST-E6 proteins, an inhibition of DNA binding was observed. The degree of inhibition correlated with the relative affinity of different E6 proteins for p53; thus, GST-16E6 was the most potent inhibitor of p53 DNA binding activity, and GST-11E6 was the least effective. Prevention of p53 DNA binding is likely to play a role in the abrogation of the transcriptional activity of p53 by HPV E6 and provides a further mechanism for E6 disruption of p53 growth suppressor function in addition to its role in directing specific degradation of p53 through the ubiquitin-mediated pathway. The variation in inhibition of DNA binding seen with the various E6 proteins may thus contribute to the differences in oncogenic potential seen among the HPV types. Images PMID:8207801

  16. A poxvirus protein that binds to and inactivates IL-18, and inhibits NK cell response.

    PubMed

    Born, T L; Morrison, L A; Esteban, D J; VandenBos, T; Thebeau, L G; Chen, N; Spriggs, M K; Sims, J E; Buller, R M

    2000-03-15

    IL-18 induces IFN-gamma and NK cell cytotoxicity, making it a logical target for viral antagonism of host defense. We demonstrate that the ectromelia poxvirus p13 protein, bearing homology to the mammalian IL-18 binding protein, binds IL-18, and inhibits its activity in vitro. Binding of IL-18 to the viral p13 protein was compared with binding to the cellular IL-18R. The dissociation constant of p13 for murine IL-18 is 5 nM, compared with 0.2 nM for the cellular receptor heterodimer. Mice infected with a p13 deletion mutant of ectromelia virus had elevated cytotoxicity for YAC-1 tumor cell targets compared with control animals. Additionally, the p13 deletion mutant virus exhibited decreased levels of infectivity. Our data suggest that inactivation of IL-18, and subsequent impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity, may be one mechanism by which ectromelia evades the host immune response. PMID:10706717

  17. Binding of dihydroxynaphthyl aryl ketones to tubulin colchicine site inhibits microtubule assembly.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Eunices; Benites, Julio; Valderrama, Jaime A; Calderon, Pedro Buc; Verrax, Julien; Nova, Esteban; Villanelo, Felipe; Maturana, Daniel; Escobar, Cristian; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2015-10-23

    Dihydroxynaphthyl aryl ketones 1-5 have been evaluated for their abilities to inhibit microtubule assembly and the binding to tubulin. Compounds 3, 4 and 5 displayed competitive inhibition against colchicine binding, and docking analysis showed that they bind to the tubulin colchicine-binding pocket inducing sheets instead of microtubules. Remarkable differences in biological activity observed among the assayed compounds seem to be related to the structure and position of the aryl substituent bonded to the carbonyl group. Compounds 2, 3 and 4, which contain a heterocyclic ring, presented higher affinity for tubulin compared to the carbocyclic analogue 5. Compound 4 showed the best affinity of the series, with an IC50 value of 2.1 μM for microtubule polymerization inhibition and a tubulin dissociation constant of 1.0 ± 0.2 μM, as determined by thermophoresis. Compound 4 was more efficacious in disrupting microtubule assembly in vitro than compound 5 although it contains the trimethoxyphenyl ring present in colchicine. Hydrogen bonds with Asn101 of α-tubulin seem to be responsible for the higher affinity of compound 4 respects to the others.

  18. Inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus movement by expression of an actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christina; Niehl, Annette; Sambade, Adrian; Steinmetz, André; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-04-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) required for the cell-to-cell spread of viral RNA interacts with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as with the cytoskeleton during infection. Whereas associations of MP with ER and microtubules have been intensely investigated, research on the role of actin has been rather scarce. We demonstrate that Nicotiana benthamiana plants transgenic for the actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin (AtFIM1) fused to green fluorescent protein (ABD2:GFP) exhibit a dynamic ABD2:GFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton and myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking. These plants also support the movement of TMV. In contrast, both myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking and TMV movement are dominantly inhibited when ABD2:GFP is expressed transiently. Inhibition is mediated through binding of ABD2:GFP to actin filaments, since TMV movement is restored upon disruption of the ABD2:GFP-labeled actin network with latrunculin B. Latrunculin B shows no significant effect on the spread of TMV infection in either wild-type plants or ABD2:GFP transgenic plants under our treatment conditions. We did not observe any binding of MP along the length of actin filaments. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that TMV movement does not require an intact actomyosin system. Nevertheless, actin-binding proteins appear to have the potential to exert control over TMV movement through the inhibition of myosin-associated protein trafficking along the ER membrane.

  19. Frequent inactivation of MCC/CTNNBIP1 and overexpression of phospho-beta-catenin(Y654) are associated with breast carcinoma: Clinical and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Nupur; Dasgupta, Hemantika; Bhattacharya, Rittwika; Pal, Debolina; Roy, Rituparna; Islam, Saimul; Alam, Neyaz; Biswas, Jaydip; Roy, Anup; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Transcriptional activation of β-catenin is a hallmark of Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. The MCC (Mutated in colorectal cancers) and CTNNBIP1 (catenin, beta interacting protein 1) are two candidate genes which inhibit the transcriptional activity of nuclear β-catenin. The importance of MCC and CTNNBIP1 in breast cancer (BC) development has not yet been studied in detail. For this reason, in present study, the alterations (deletion/methylation/mutation/expression) of MCC and CTNNBIP1 were analyzed in BC of Indian patients (N=120) followed by expression/mutation analysis of β-catenin. Then transcriptional activity of β-catenin was checked by expression analysis of its target genes (EGFR, C-MYC and CCND1) in the same set of samples. Frequent methylation (44-45%) than deletion (20-32%) with overall alterations of 52-55% was observed in MCC/CTNNBIP1 in the BC samples. The alterations of MCC/CTNNBIP1 showed significant correlation with increased nuclear β-catenin/p-β-catenin(Y654) expression. Also, a significant correlation was seen between nuclear β-catenin expression and overexpression of its target genes like EGFR, MYC and CCND1 in the BC samples (P<0.0001). An upregulation of MCC and CTNNBIP1 expression by 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines lead to downregulation of β-catenin and its target genes. The expression of nuclear p-β-catenin(Y654), EGFR, MYC and CCND1 were significantly high in TNBC (Triple negative BC) and Her2+ compared to Luminal A/B+ subtypes. The TNBC patients in stage III/IV having reduced expression of MCC in the tumors showed poor prognosis. Thus, our data suggests that inactivation of MCC/CTNNBIP1 could be an important event in activation of β-catenin mediated transcription of target genes in BC. PMID:27208794

  20. Rat and human colonic mucins bind to and inhibit adherence lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K; Petri, W A; Innes, D J; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of adherence by Entamoeba histolytica is mediated by a 170-kD Gal/GalNAc inhibitable lectin and is required for cytolysis and phagocytosis of mammalian target cells. We studied the biochemical mechanisms of the in vitro interaction between rat and human colonic mucins and axenic E. histolytica trophozoites. Crude mucus prevented amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by up to 70%. Purification of the colonic mucins by Sepharose 4B chromatography, nuclease digestion, and cesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in a 1,000-fold enrichment of the inhibitory mucins. Purified rat mucin inhibited amebic adherence to and cytolysis of homologous rat colonic epithelial cells. Oxidation and enzymatic cleavage of rat mucin Gal and GalNAc residues completely abrogated mucin inhibition of amebic adherence. The binding of rat 125I-mucin to amebae was galactose specific, saturable, reversible, and pH dependent. A monoclonal antibody specific for the 170-kD amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin completely inhibited the binding of rat 125I-mucin. Rat mucin bound to Affigel affinity purified the amebic lectin from conditioned medium. Colonic mucin glycoproteins act as an important host defense by binding to the parasite's adherence lectin, thus preventing amebic attachment to and cytolysis of host epithelial cells. Images PMID:2890655

  1. The casein kinase II beta subunit binds to Mos and inhibits Mos activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M; Li, D; Krebs, E G; Cooper, J A

    1997-01-01

    Mos is a germ cell-specific serine/threonine kinase and is required for Xenopus oocyte maturation. Active Mos stimulates a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by directly phosphorylating and activating MAPK kinase (MKK). We report here that the Xenopus homolog of the beta subunit of casein kinase II (CKII beta) binds to and regulates Mos. The Mos-interacting region of CKII beta was mapped to the C terminus. Mos bound to CKII beta in somatic cells ectopically expressing Mos and CKII beta as well as in unfertilized Xenopus eggs. CKII beta inhibited Mos-mediated MAPK activation in rabbit reticulocyte lysates and repressed MKK activation by v-Mos in a coupled kinase assay. In addition, microinjection of CKII beta mRNA into Xenopus oocytes inhibited progesterone-induced meiotic maturation and MAPK activation, presumably by binding of CKII beta to Mos and thereby inhibiting MAPK activation. Moreover, this inhibitory phenotype could be rescued by another protein that binds to CKII beta, CKII alpha. The ability of ectopic CKII beta to inhibit meiotic maturation and the detection of a complex between endogenous Mos and CKII beta suggest that CKII beta may act as an inhibitor of Mos during oocyte maturation, perhaps setting a threshold beyond which Mos protein must accumulate before it can activate the MAPK pathway. PMID:9121438

  2. Lucanthone and Its Derivative Hycanthone Inhibit Apurinic Endonuclease-1 (APE1) by Direct Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, Mamta D.; Agarwal, Rakhi; Pena, Louis A.; Cunha, Luis; Mezei, Mihaly; Shen, Min; Wilson, David M.; Liu, Yuan; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Wilson, Samuel H.; Waring, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC50 values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 µM and 80 nM, respectively. The KD values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e.g., TRIS and DMSO

  3. Lucanthone and its derivative hycanthone inhibit apurinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) by direct protein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, M.; Naidu, M.; Agarwal, R.; Pena, L.A.; Cunha, L.; Mezei, M.; Shen, M.; Wilson, D.M.; Liu, Y.; Sanchez, Z.; Chaudhary, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Waring, M.J.

    2011-09-15

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC{sub 50} values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 {mu}M and 80 nM, respectively. The K{sub D} values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e

  4. Ebselen Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Helicase Binding to Nucleic Acid and Prevents Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is both a protease, which cleaves viral and host proteins, and a helicase that separates nucleic acid strands, using ATP hydrolysis to fuel the reaction. Many antiviral drugs, and compounds in clinical trials, target the NS3 protease, but few helicase inhibitors that function as antivirals have been reported. This study focuses on the analysis of the mechanism by which ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3-one), a compound previously shown to be a HCV antiviral agent, inhibits the NS3 helicase. Ebselen inhibited the abilities of NS3 to unwind nucleic acids, to bind nucleic acids, and to hydrolyze ATP, and about 1 μM ebselen was sufficient to inhibit each of these activities by 50%. However, ebselen had no effect on the activity of the NS3 protease, even at 100 times higher ebselen concentrations. At concentrations below 10 μM, the ability of ebselen to inhibit HCV helicase was reversible, but prolonged incubation of HCV helicase with higher ebselen concentrations led to irreversible inhibition and the formation of covalent adducts between ebselen and all 14 cysteines present in HCV helicase. Ebselen analogues with sulfur replacing the selenium were just as potent HCV helicase inhibitors as ebselen, but the length of the linker between the phenyl and benzisoselenazol rings was critical. Modifications of the phenyl ring also affected compound potency over 30-fold, and ebselen was a far more potent helicase inhibitor than other, structurally unrelated, thiol-modifying agents. Ebselen analogues were also more effective antiviral agents, and they were less toxic to hepatocytes than ebselen. Although the above structure–activity relationship studies suggest that ebselen targets a specific site on NS3, we were unable to confirm binding to either the NS3 ATP binding site or nucleic acid binding cleft by examining the effects of ebselen on NS3 proteins lacking key cysteines. PMID:25126694

  5. Natural product (-)-gossypol inhibits colon cancer cell growth by targeting RNA-binding protein Musashi-1.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lan; Appelman, Carl; Smith, Amber R; Yu, Jia; Larsen, Sarah; Marquez, Rebecca T; Liu, Hao; Wu, Xiaoqing; Gao, Philip; Roy, Anuradha; Anbanandam, Asokan; Gowthaman, Ragul; Karanicolas, John; De Guzman, Roberto N; Rogers, Steven; Aubé, Jeffrey; Ji, Min; Cohen, Robert S; Neufeld, Kristi L; Xu, Liang

    2015-08-01

    Musashi-1 (MSI1) is an RNA-binding protein that acts as a translation activator or repressor of target mRNAs. The best-characterized MSI1 target is Numb mRNA, whose encoded protein negatively regulates Notch signaling. Additional MSI1 targets include the mRNAs for the tumor suppressor protein APC that regulates Wnt signaling and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor P21(WAF-1). We hypothesized that increased expression of NUMB, P21 and APC, through inhibition of MSI1 RNA-binding activity might be an effective way to simultaneously downregulate Wnt and Notch signaling, thus blocking the growth of a broad range of cancer cells. We used a fluorescence polarization assay to screen for small molecules that disrupt the binding of MSI1 to its consensus RNA binding site. One of the top hits was (-)-gossypol (Ki = 476 ± 273 nM), a natural product from cottonseed, known to have potent anti-tumor activity and which has recently completed Phase IIb clinical trials for prostate cancer. Surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance studies demonstrate a direct interaction of (-)-gossypol with the RNA binding pocket of MSI1. We further showed that (-)-gossypol reduces Notch/Wnt signaling in several colon cancer cell lines having high levels of MSI1, with reduced SURVIVIN expression and increased apoptosis/autophagy. Finally, we showed that orally administered (-)-gossypol inhibits colon cancer growth in a mouse xenograft model. Our study identifies (-)-gossypol as a potential small molecule inhibitor of MSI1-RNA interaction, and suggests that inhibition of MSI1's RNA binding activity may be an effective anti-cancer strategy.

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate competitively inhibits phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, A.; Cauhan, V.P.S.; Deshmukh, D.S.; Brokerhoff, H. )

    1989-06-13

    Calcium phospholipid dependent protein kinase C (PKC) is activated by diacylglycerol (DG) and by phorbol esters and is recognized to be the phorbol ester receptor of cells; DG displaces phorbol ester competitively from PKC. A phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), can also activate PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca{sup 2+} with a K{sub PIP{sub 2}} of 0.04 mol %. Preliminary experiments have suggested a common binding site for PIP{sub 2} and DG on PKC. Here, the authors investigate the effect of PIP{sub 2} on phorbol ester binding to PKC in a mixed micellar assay. In the presence of 20 mol % PS, PIP{sub 2} inhibited specific binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) in a dose-dependent fashion up to 85% at 1 mol %. Inhibition of binding was more pronounced with PIP{sub 2} than with DG. Scatchard analysis indicated that the decrease in binding of PDBu in the presence of PIP{sub 2} is the result of an altered affinity for the phorbol ester rather than of a change in maximal binding. The plot of apparent dissociation constants (K{sub d{prime}}) against PIP{sub 2} concentration was linear over a range of 0.01-1 mol % with a K{sub i} of 0.043 mol % and confirmed the competitive nature of inhibition between PDBu and PIP{sub 2}. Competition between PIP{sub 2} and phorbol ester could be determined in a liposomal assay system also. These results indicate that PIP{sub 2}, DG, and phorbol ester all compete for the same activator-receiving region on the regulatory moiety of protein kinase C, and they lend support to the suggestion that PIP{sub 2} is a primary activator of the enzyme.

  7. Molecular modeling studies suggest that zinc ions inhibit HIV-1 protease by binding at catalytic aspartates.

    PubMed Central

    York, D M; Darden, T A; Pedersen, L G; Anderson, M W

    1993-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease is inhibited in vitro by zinc ions at neutral pH. The binding site of these ions is not known; however, experimental data suggest that binding may occur in the active site. To examine the possibility of zinc binding in the active site, molecular dynamics simulations in the presence and absence of zinc have been carried out to 200 psec. The results are compared with the 2.8-A crystallographic structures of a synthetic HIV-1 protease, and a zinc binding site at the catalytic aspartate residues (Asp-25, Asp-25') is proposed. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the zinc ion remains stably bound in this region, coordinating the carboxylate side chains of both aspartate residues. Interaction with zinc does not disrupt the dimeric structure of the protein or significantly alter the structure of the active site. These data are consistent with experimental studies of HIV-1 protease inhibition by zinc and give strong evidence that this is the binding site that leads to inactivation. Images p246-a Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8404763

  8. An Alix fragment potently inhibits HIV-1 budding: characterization of binding to retroviral YPXL late domains.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Utpal M; Kim, Jaewon; Nagashima, Kunio; Hurley, James H; Freed, Eric O

    2007-02-01

    The retroviral structural protein, Gag, contains small peptide motifs known as late domains that promote efficient virus release from the infected cell. In addition to the well characterized PTAP late domain, the p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains a binding site for the host cell protein Alix. To better understand the functional role of the Gag/Alix interaction, we overexpressed an Alix fragment composed of residues 364-716 (Alix 364-716) and examined the effect on release of wild type (WT) and Alix binding site mutant HIV-1. We observed that Alix 364-716 expression significantly inhibited WT virus release and Gag processing and that mutation of the Alix binding site largely relieved this inhibition. Furthermore, Alix 364-716 expression induced a severe defect on WT but not mutant particle morphology. Intriguingly, the impact of Alix 364-716 expression on HIV-1 release and Gag processing was markedly different from that induced by mutation of the Alix binding site in p6. The association of Alix 364-716 with HIV-1 and equine infectious anemia virus late domains was quantitatively evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance techniques, and the effects of mutations in these viral sequences on Alix 364-716 binding was determined. This study identifies a novel Alix-derived dominant negative inhibitor of HIV-1 release and Gag processing and provides quantitative information on the interaction between Alix and viral late domains.

  9. Minimal antizyme peptide fully functioning in the binding and inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase and antizyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Yang, Jung-Yen; Lin, Chih-Li; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Antizyme (AZ) is a protein with 228 amino acid residues that regulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by binding to ODC and dissociating its homodimer, thus inhibiting its enzyme activity. Antizyme inhibitor (AZI) is homologous to ODC, but has a higher affinity than ODC for AZ. In this study, we quantified the biomolecular interactions between AZ and ODC as well as AZ and AZI to identify functional AZ peptides that could bind to ODC and AZI and inhibit their function as efficiently as the full-length AZ protein. For these AZ peptides, the inhibitory ability of AZ_95-228 was similar to that of AZ_WT. Furthermore, AZ_95-176 displayed an inhibition (IC(50): 0.20 µM) similar to that of AZ-95-228 (IC(50): 0.16 µM), even though a large segment spanning residues 177-228 was deleted. However, further deletion of AZ_95-176 from either the N-terminus or the C-terminus decreased its ability to inhibit ODC. The AZ_100-176 and AZ_95-169 peptides displayed a noteworthy decrease in ability to inhibit ODC, with IC(50) values of 0.43 and 0.37 µM, respectively. The AZ_95-228, AZ_100-228 and AZ_95-176 peptides had IC(50) values comparable to that of AZ_WT and formed AZ-ODC complexes with K(d,AZ-ODC) values of 1.5, 5.3 and 5.6 µM, respectively. Importantly, our data also indicate that AZI can rescue AZ peptide-inhibited ODC enzyme activity and that it can bind to AZ peptides with a higher affinity than ODC. Together, these data suggest that these truncated AZ proteins retain their AZI-binding ability. Thus, we suggest that AZ_95-176 is the minimal AZ peptide that is fully functioning in the binding of ODC and AZI and inhibition of their function. PMID:21931692

  10. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible.

  11. Non-specific binding sites help to explain mixed inhibition in mushroom tyrosinase activities.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Sorour; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Fazli, Mostafa

    2016-10-21

    Inhibition and activation studies of tyrosinase could prove beneficial to agricultural, food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Although non-competitive and mixed-inhibition are frequent modes observed in kinetics studies on mushroom tyrosinase (MT) activities, the phenomena are left unexplained. In this study, dual effects of phthalic acid (PA) and cinnamic acid (CA) on MT during mono-phenolase activity were demonstrated. PA activated and inhibited MT at concentrations lower and higher than 150 μM, respectively. In contrast, CA inhibited and activated MT at concentrations lower and higher than 5 μM. The mode of inhibition for both effectors was mixed-type. Complex kinetics of MT in the presence of a modulator could partly be ascribed to its mixed-cooperativity. However, to explain mixed-inhibition mode, it is necessary to demonstrate how the ternary complex of substrate/enzyme/effector is formed. Therefore, we looked for possible non-specific binding sites using MT tropolone-bound PDB (2Y9X) in the computational studies. When tropolone was in MTPa (active site), PA and CA occupied different pockets (named MTPb and MTPc, respectively). The close Moldock scores of PA binding posed in MTPb and MTPa suggested that MTPb could be a secondary binding site for PA. Similar results were obtained for CA. Ensuing results from 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations for 2Y9X-effector complexes indicated that the structures were gradually stabilized during simulation. Tunnel analysis by using CAVER Analyst and CHEXVIS resulted in identifying two distinct channels that assumingly participate in exchanging the effectors when the direct channel to MTPa is not accessible. PMID:27344491

  12. ITRACONAZOLE INHIBITS ENTEROVIRUS REPLICATION BY TARGETING THE OXYSTEROL-BINDING PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Strating, Jeroen R.P.M.; van der Linden, Lonneke; Albulescu, Lucian; Bigay, Joëlle; Arita, Minetaro; Delang, Leen; Leyssen, Pieter; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Lanke, Kjerstin H.W.; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Ulferts, Rachel; Drin, Guillaume; Schlinck, Nina; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Sever, Navdar; Head, Sarah A.; Liu, Jun O.; Beachy, Philip A.; De Matteis, Maria A.; Shair, Matthew D.; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Itraconazole (ITZ) is a well-known antifungal agent that also has anti-cancer activity. In this study, we identified ITZ as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus-71, rhinovirus). We demonstrate that ITZ inhibits viral RNA replication by targeting oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related protein 4 (ORP4). Consistently, OSW-1, a specific OSBP/ORP4 antagonist, also inhibits enterovirus replication. Knockdown of OSBP inhibits virus replication whereas overexpression of OSBP or ORP4 counteracts the antiviral effects of ITZ and OSW-1. ITZ binds OSBP and inhibits its function, i.e. shuttling of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate between membranes, thereby likely perturbing the virus-induced membrane alterations essential for viral replication organelle formation. ITZ also inhibits hepatitis C virus replication, which also relies on OSBP. Together, these data implicate OSBP/ORP4 as novel molecular targets of ITZ and point to an essential role of OSBP/ORP4-mediated lipid exchange in virus replication that can be targeted by antiviral drugs. PMID:25640182

  13. Phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin inhibits protein translocation across the ER membrane.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-05-10

    Secretory and membrane proteins are translocated across and inserted into the endoplasmic reticulum membrane via translocon channels. To investigate the effect of the negatively-charged phospholipid phosphatidylserine on the translocation of nascent polypeptide chains through the translocon, we used the phosphatidylserine-binding protein lactadherin C2-domain. Lactadherin inhibited targeting of nascent chain to the translocon by signal sequence and the initiation of translocation. Moreover, lactadherin inhibited the movement of the translocating polypeptide chain regardless of the presence or absence of positively-charged residues. Phosphatidylserine might be critically involved in translocon function, but it is not a major determinant for translocation arrest of positively-charged residues. PMID:23583395

  14. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  15. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  16. HIV-1 Vif binds to APOBEC3G mRNA and inhibits its translation.

    PubMed

    Mercenne, Gaëlle; Bernacchi, Serena; Richer, Delphine; Bec, Guillaume; Henriet, Simon; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) allows productive infection of non-permissive cells (including most natural HIV-1 targets) by counteracting the cellular cytosine deaminases APOBEC-3G (hA3G) and hA3F. The Vif-induced degradation of these restriction factors by the proteasome has been extensively studied, but little is known about the translational repression of hA3G and hA3F by Vif, which has also been proposed to participate in Vif function. Here, we studied Vif binding to hA3G mRNA and its role in translational repression. Filter binding assays and fluorescence titration curves revealed that Vif tightly binds to hA3G mRNA. Vif overall binding affinity was higher for the 3'UTR than for the 5'UTR, even though this region contained at least one high affinity Vif binding site (apparent K(d) = 27 +/- 6 nM). Several Vif binding sites were identified in 5' and 3'UTRs using RNase footprinting. In vitro translation evidenced that Vif inhibited hA3G translation by two mechanisms: a main time-independent process requiring the 5'UTR and an additional time-dependent, UTR-independent process. Results using a Vif protein mutated in the multimerization domain suggested that the molecular mechanism of translational control is more complicated than a simple physical blockage of scanning ribosomes.

  17. Dicalcin Inhibits Fertilization through Its Binding to a Glycoprotein in the Egg Envelope in Xenopus laevis*

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Naofumi; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Shinmyo, Yukiko; Hiraoka, Yoshiki; Takamatsu, Ken; Kawamura, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Fertilization comprises oligosaccharide-mediated sperm-egg interactions, including sperm binding to an extracellular egg envelope, sperm penetration through the envelope, and fusion with an egg plasma membrane. We show that Xenopus dicalcin, an S100-like Ca2+-binding protein, present in the extracellular egg envelope (vitelline envelope (VE)), is a suppressive mediator of sperm-egg interaction. Preincubation with specific antibody greatly increased the efficiency of in vitro fertilization, whereas prior application of exogenous dicalcin substantially inhibited fertilization as well as sperm binding to an egg and in vitro sperm penetration through the VE protein layer. Dicalcin showed binding to protein cores of gp41 and gp37, constituents of VE, in a Ca2+-dependent manner and increased in vivo reactivity of VE with a lectin, Ricinus communis agglutinin I, which was accounted for by increased binding ability of gp41 to the lectin and greater exposure of gp41 to an external environment. Our findings strongly suggest that dicalcin regulates the distribution of oligosaccharides within the VE through its binding to the protein core of gp41, probably by modulating configuration of oligosaccharides on gp41 and the three-dimensional structure of VE framework, and thereby plays a pivotal role in sperm-egg interactions during fertilization. PMID:20299459

  18. Binding of aflatoxin B1 to DNA inhibited by ajoene and diallyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Tadi, P P; Lau, B H; Teel, R W; Herrmann, C E

    1991-01-01

    Components of garlic have been shown to inhibit a variety of tumors induced by chemical carcinogens. In this study we determined the effects of ajoene and diallyl sulfide (DAS), two organosulfur compounds of garlic, on the metabolism and DNA binding of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) using rat liver 9000Xg supernatant as the metabolic activation system. Organosoluble and water-soluble metabolites of [3H]AFB1 were isolated by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of ajoene and DAS on glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were determined using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the substrate. Ajoene and DAS at 100 mg/ml inhibited [3H]AFB1 binding to calf thymus DNA and adduct formation. They decreased the formation of both organosoluble and water-soluble metabolites of [3H]AFB1. Neither compound significantly affected GST activity. These results indicate that ajoene and DAS affected AFB1 metabolism and DNA binding by inhibiting phase I enzymes and may therefore be considered as potential cancer chemopreventive agents.

  19. Human Cerberus Prevents Nodal-Receptor Binding, Inhibits Nodal Signaling, and Suppresses Nodal-Mediated Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Aykul, Senem; Ni, Wendi; Mutatu, Washington; Martinez-Hackert, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-ß (TGFß) family ligand Nodal is an essential embryonic morphogen that is associated with progression of breast and other cancers. It has therefore been suggested that Nodal inhibitors could be used to treat breast cancers where Nodal plays a defined role. As secreted antagonists, such as Cerberus, tightly regulate Nodal signaling during embryonic development, we undertook to produce human Cerberus, characterize its biochemical activities, and determine its effect on human breast cancer cells. Using quantitative methods, we investigated the mechanism of Nodal signaling, we evaluated binding of human Cerberus to Nodal and other TGFß family ligands, and we characterized the mechanism of Nodal inhibition by Cerberus. Using cancer cell assays, we examined the ability of Cerberus to suppress aggressive breast cancer cell phenotypes. We found that human Cerberus binds Nodal with high affinity and specificity, blocks binding of Nodal to its signaling partners, and inhibits Nodal signaling. Moreover, we showed that Cerberus profoundly suppresses migration, invasion, and colony forming ability of Nodal expressing and Nodal supplemented breast cancer cells. Taken together, our studies provide mechanistic insights into Nodal signaling and Nodal inhibition with Cerberus and highlight the potential value of Cerberus as anti-Nodal therapeutic. PMID:25603319

  20. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  1. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes. PMID:10904405

  2. Trimeresurus venom inhibition of anti-HPA-1a and anti-HPA-1b antibody binding to human platelets.

    PubMed

    Wlodar, S J; Stone, D L; Sinor, L T

    1995-01-01

    A solid-phase red cell adherence assay was used to demonstrate the specific inhibitory effect of seven species of Trimeresurus snake venom on the binding of HPA-1a- and HPA-1b-specific platelet antibodies. Trimeresurus venom did not inhibit the binding of HLA-, HPA-3a-, HPA-3b-, HPA-4a-, HPA-5a-, and HPA-5b-specific platelet antibodies. Venom from other genera of snakes, including representatives from Agkistrodon, Ancistrodon, Bitis, Bothrops, Bungarus, Causus, Crotalus, Dendroaspis, Ecis, Micrurus, Naja, Notechis, Ophiophagus, Pseudechis, Sepedon (Hemachatus), and Vipera, all failed to specifically inhibit anti-HPA-1a and HPA-1b binding. These results may indicate that the component in Trimeresurus snake venom previously reported to bind to the platelet GPIIb-IIIa complex, inhibiting fibrinogen binding, binds close to the HPA-1a and HPA-1b epitopes.

  3. Katanin Severing and Binding Microtubules Are Inhibited by Tubulin Carboxy Tails.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Megan E; Sackett, Dan L; Ross, Jennifer L

    2015-12-15

    Microtubule dynamics in cells are regulated by associated proteins that can be either stabilizers or destabilizers. A class of destabilizers that is important in a large number of cellular activities is the microtubule-severing enzymes, yet little is known about how they function. Katanin p60 was the first ATPase associated with microtubule severing. Here, we investigate the activity of katanin severing using a GFP-labeled human version. We quantify the effect of katanin concentration on katanin binding and severing activity. We find that free tubulin can inhibit severing activity by interfering with katanin binding to microtubules. The inhibition is mediated by the sequence of the tubulin and specifically depends on the carboxy-terminal tails. We directly investigate the inhibition effect of tubulin carboxy-terminal tails using peptide sequences of α-, β-, or detyrosinated α-tubulin tails that have been covalently linked to bovine serum albumin. Our results show that β-tubulin tails are the most effective at inhibiting severing, and that detyrosinated α-tubulin tails are the least effective. These results are distinct from those for other severing enzymes and suggest a scheme for regulation of katanin activity in cells dependent on free tubulin concentration and the modification state of the tubulin.

  4. Identification of an allosteric binding site for RORγt inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Scheepstra, Marcel; Leysen, Seppe; van Almen, Geert C.; Miller, J. Richard; Piesvaux, Jennifer; Kutilek, Victoria; van Eenennaam, Hans; Zhang, Hongjun; Barr, Kenneth; Nagpal, Sunil; Soisson, Stephen M.; Kornienko, Maria; Wiley, Kristen; Elsen, Nathaniel; Sharma, Sujata; Correll, Craig C.; Trotter, B. Wesley; van der Stelt, Mario; Oubrie, Arthur; Ottmann, Christian; Parthasarathy, Gopal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    RORγt is critical for the differentiation and proliferation of Th17 cells associated with several chronic autoimmune diseases. We report the discovery of a novel allosteric binding site on the nuclear receptor RORγt. Co-crystallization of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RORγt with a series of small-molecule antagonists demonstrates occupancy of a previously unreported allosteric binding pocket. Binding at this non-canonical site induces an unprecedented conformational reorientation of helix 12 in the RORγt LBD, which blocks cofactor binding. The functional consequence of this allosteric ligand-mediated conformation is inhibition of function as evidenced by both biochemical and cellular studies. RORγt function is thus antagonized in a manner molecularly distinct from that of previously described orthosteric RORγt ligands. This brings forward an approach to target RORγt for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of an unprecedented modality of pharmacological antagonism establishes a mechanism for modulation of nuclear receptors. PMID:26640126

  5. Septin 9 Exhibits Polymorphic Binding to F-Actin and Inhibits Myosin and Cofilin Activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Clayton; Dolat, Lee; Angelis, Dimitrios; Forgacs, Eva; Spiliotis, Elias T; Galkin, Vitold E

    2015-10-01

    Septins are a highly conserved family of proteins in eukaryotes that is recognized as a novel component of the cytoskeleton. Septin 9 (SEPT9) interacts directly with actin filaments and functions as an actin stress fiber cross-linking protein that promotes the maturation of nascent focal adhesions and cell migration. However, the molecular details of how SEPT9 interacts with F-actin remain unknown. Here, we use electron microscopy and image analysis to show that SEPT9 binds to F-actin in a highly polymorphic fashion. We demonstrate that the basic domain (B-domain) of the N-terminal tail of SEPT9 is responsible for actin cross-linking, while the GTP-binding domain (G-domain) does not bundle F-actin. We show that the B-domain of SEPT9 binds to three sites on F-actin, and the two of these sites overlap with the binding regions of myosin and cofilin. SEPT9 inhibits actin-dependent ATPase activity of myosin and competes with the weakly bound state of myosin for binding to F-actin. At the same time, SEPT9 significantly reduces the extent of F-actin depolymerization by cofilin. Taken together, these data suggest that SEPT9 protects actin filaments from depolymerization by cofilin and myosin and indicate a mechanism by which SEPT9 could maintain the integrity of growing and contracting actin filaments.

  6. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExsA DNA-Binding Activity by N-Hydroxybenzimidazoles

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Anne E.; King, Jessica M.; Spies, M. Ashley; Kim, Oak K.

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS) is a primary virulence determinant and a potential target for antivirulence drugs. One candidate target is ExsA, a member of the AraC family of DNA-binding proteins required for expression of the T3SS. A previous study identified small molecules based on an N-hydroxybenzimidazole scaffold that inhibit the DNA-binding activity of several AraC proteins, including ExsA. In this study, we further characterized a panel of N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the tested N-hydroxybenzimidazoles ranged from 8 to 45 μM in DNA-binding assays. Each of the N-hydroxybenzimidazoles protected mammalian cells from T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity, and protection correlated with reduced T3SS gene expression in a coculture infection model. Binding studies with the purified ExsA DNA-binding domain (i.e., lacking the amino-terminal self-association domain) confirmed that the activity of N-hydroxybenzimidazoles results from interactions with the DNA-binding domain. The interaction is specific, as an unrelated DNA-binding protein (Vfr) was unaffected by N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. ExsA homologs that control T3SS gene expression in Yersinia pestis, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were also sensitive to N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. Although ExsA and Y. pestis LcrF share 79% sequence identity in the DNA-binding domain, differential sensitivities to several of the N-hydroxybenzimidazoles were observed. Site-directed mutagenesis based on in silico docking of inhibitors to the DNA-binding domain, and on amino acid differences between ExsA and LcrF, resulted in the identification of several substitutions that altered the sensitivity of ExsA to N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. Development of second-generation compounds targeted to the same binding pocket could lead to drugs with improved pharmacological properties. PMID:26574012

  7. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  8. Inhibition of corticosteroid-binding globulin gene expression by glucocorticoids involves C/EBPβ.

    PubMed

    Verhoog, Nicolette; Allie-Reid, Fatima; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Smith, Carine; Haegeman, Guy; Hapgood, Janet; Louw, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), a negative acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, is responsible for the transport of glucocorticoids (GCs). It also modulates the bioavailability of GCs, as only free or unbound steroids are biologically active. Fluctuations in CBG levels therefore can directly affect GC bioavailability. This study investigates the molecular mechanism whereby GCs inhibit the expression of CBG. GCs regulate gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which either directly binds to DNA or acts indirectly via tethering to other DNA-bound transcription factors. Although no GC-response elements (GRE) are present in the Cbg promoter, putative binding sites for C/EBPβ, able to tether to the GR, as well as HNF3α involved in GR signaling, are present. C/EBPβ, but not HNF3α, was identified as an important mediator of DEX-mediated inhibition of Cbg promoter activity by using specific deletion and mutant promoter reporter constructs of Cbg. Furthermore, knockdown of C/EBPβ protein expression reduced DEX-induced repression of CBG mRNA, confirming C/EBPβ's involvement in GC-mediated CBG repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) after DEX treatment indicated increased co-recruitment of C/EBPβ and GR to the Cbg promoter, while C/EBPβ knockdown prevented GR recruitment. Together, the results suggest that DEX repression of CBG involves tethering of the GR to C/EBPβ.

  9. FMRFamide: low affinity inhibition of opioid binding to rabbit brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.Z.; Raffa, R.B.

    1986-03-05

    FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH/sub 2/) was first isolated from the ganglia of molluscs by Price and Greenberg in 1977. The peptide was subsequently shown to have diverse actions on various types of molluscan and mammalian tissues. The presence of immunoreactive FMRFamide-like material (irFMRF) in multiple areas of rat brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract suggests that irFMRF may have a physiological role in mammals. Tang, Yang and Costa recently demonstrated that FMRFamide attenuates morphine antinociception in rats and postulated, based on this and several other lines of evidence, that irFMRF might be an endogenous opioid antagonist. In the present study, they tested the ability of FMRFamide to inhibit the binding of opioid receptor ligands to rabbit membrane preparations. FMRFamide inhibited the specific binding of both /sup 3/(H)-dihydromorphine and /sup 3/(H)-ethylketocyclazocine (IC/sub 50/ = 14 ..mu..M and 320 ..mu..M, respectively) in a dose-related manner, suggesting that FMRFamide may affect binding to at least two types of opioid receptors (mu and kappa). These data are consistent with the concept that irFMRF might act as an endogenous opioid antagonist. However, the low affinity of FMRFamide leaves open the possibility of another mechanism of opioid antagonism, such as neuromodulation.

  10. Caspr regulates the processing of contactin and inhibits its binding to neurofascin.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Leora; Salomon, Daniela; Salzer, James L; Peles, Elior

    2003-12-22

    Three cell adhesion molecules are present at the axoglial junctions that form between the axon and myelinating glia on either side of nodes of Ranvier. These include an axonal complex of contacin-associated protein (Caspr) and contactin, which was proposed to bind NF155, an isoform of neurofascin located on the glial paranodal loops. Here, we show that NF155 binds directly to contactin and that surprisingly, coexpression of Caspr inhibits this interaction. This inhibition reflects the association of Caspr with contactin during biosynthesis and the resulting expression of a low molecular weight (LMw), endoglycosidase H-sensitive isoform of contactin at the cell membrane, which remains associated with Caspr but is unable to bind NF155. Accordingly, deletion of Caspr in mice by gene targeting results in a shift from the LMw- to a HMw-contactin glycoform. These results demonstrate that Caspr regulates the intracellular processing and transport of contactin to the cell surface, thereby affecting its ability to interact with other cell adhesion molecules. PMID:14676309

  11. E2A Antagonizes PU.1 Activity through Inhibition of DNA Binding.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jason H; Owens, Kristin S; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Klopfenstein, Nathan; Iyer, Sangeeta R; Simon, M Celeste; Dahl, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Antagonistic interactions between transcription factors contribute to cell fate decisions made by multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells. Concentration of the transcription factor PU.1 affects myeloid/lymphoid development with high levels of PU.1 directing myeloid cell fate acquisition at the expense of B cell differentiation. High levels of PU.1 may be required for myelopoiesis in order to overcome inhibition of its activity by transcription factors that promote B cell development. The B cell transcription factors, E2A and EBF, are necessary for commitment of multipotential progenitors and lymphoid primed multipotential progenitors to lymphocytes. In this report we hypothesized that factors required for early B cell commitment would bind to PU.1 and antagonize its ability to induce myeloid differentiation. We investigated whether E2A and/or EBF associate with PU.1. We observed that the E2A component, E47, but not EBF, directly binds to PU.1. Additionally E47 represses PU.1-dependent transactivation of the MCSFR promoter through antagonizing PU.1's ability to bind to DNA. Exogenous E47 expression in hematopoietic cells inhibits myeloid differentiation. Our data suggest that E2A antagonism of PU.1 activity contributes to its ability to commit multipotential hematopoietic progenitors to the lymphoid lineages.

  12. The ligand binding site of the synaptosomal choline transporter: a provisional model based on inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Tamaru, M

    1992-05-01

    A topographic model of the ligand binding site of the choline transporter was deduced from inhibition studies with the help of CPK molecular models. It is posited that there are two identical or closely similar hydrophilic anionic sites separated from each other by an hinged, essentially planar but conformationally flexible cationic hydrophobic domain. Subsequently to attachment of external choline to either one of the anionic sites, both sites cooperate in enveloping the ligand by a Venus fly-trap mechanism. This leads to rapid configurational changes by which the closed-liganded form of the transporter opens up to the interior to release the bound choline. Intracellular K+, a ligand for the choline-binding site, is proposed to be counter-transported by a reversal of the above mechanism.

  13. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-Ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-Kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies.

  14. Systematic identification of arsenic-binding proteins reveals that hexokinase-2 is inhibited by arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-nan; Yang, Lina; Ling, Jian-ya; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Ge, Feng; Yang, Ming-kun; Xiong, Qian; Guo, Shu-Juan; Le, Huang-Ying; Wu, Song-Fang; Yan, Wei; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Heng; Chen, Zhu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is highly effective for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and has shown significant promise against many other tumors. However, although its mechanistic effects in APL are established, its broader anticancer mode of action is not understood. In this study, using a human proteome microarray, we identified 360 proteins that specifically bind arsenic. Among the most highly enriched proteins in this set are those in the glycolysis pathway, including the rate-limiting enzyme in glycolysis, hexokinase-1. Detailed biochemical and metabolomics analyses of the highly homologous hexokinase-2 (HK2), which is overexpressed in many cancers, revealed significant inhibition by arsenic. Furthermore, overexpression of HK2 rescued cells from arsenic-induced apoptosis. Our results thus strongly implicate glycolysis, and HK2 in particular, as a key target of arsenic. Moreover, the arsenic-binding proteins identified in this work are expected to serve as a valuable resource for the development of synergistic antitumor therapeutic strategies. PMID:26598702

  15. UCH-L1 Inhibition Decreases the Microtubule-Binding Function of Tau Protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min; Han, Yun; Yu, Quntao; Wang, Xia; Wang, Shaohui; Liao, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is critical for protein degradation and free ubiquitin recycling. In Alzheimer's disease brains, UCH-L1 is negatively related to neurofibrillary tangles whose major component is hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the direct action of UCH-L1 on tau has not been reported. In the current study, mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2a (N2a) cells were treated by the different concentrations of UCH-L1 inhibitor LDN (2.5, 5 and 10 μM) to inhibit the hydrolase activity of UCH-L1. In addition, we also used UCH-L1 siRNA to treat the HEK293/tau441 cells to decrease the expression of UCH-L1. After LDN and UCH-L1 siRNA treatment, we used immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and tau-microtubule binding assay to measure the microtubule-binding ability and post-translational modifications of tau protein. All the results presented that both inhibition of the activity and expression of UCH-L1 induced the decreased microtubule-binding ability and increased phosphorylation of tau protein. Abnormal aggregation and ubiquitination of tau protein was also observed after UCH-L1 inhibition. The above results suggested that aggregation of tau protein might be devoted to the abnormal post-translational modifications of tau protein. Our study first indicates that dysfunction of UCH-L1 most likely affected normal biological function of tau protein through decreasing degradation of ubiquitinated and hyperphosphorylated tau. PMID:26444754

  16. Tannic acid inhibited norovirus binding to HBGA receptors, a study of 50 Chinese medicinal herbs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Fu; Dai, Ying-Chun; Zhong, Weiming; Tan, Ming; Lv, Zhi-Ping; Zhou, Ying-Chun; Jiang, Xi

    2012-02-15

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the leading cause of viral acute gastroenteritis affecting people of all ages worldwide. The disease is difficult to control due to its widespread nature and lack of an antiviral or vaccine. NoV infection relies on the interaction of the viruses with histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) as host receptors. Here we investigated inhibition effects of Chinese medicinal herbs against NoVs binding to HBGAs for potential antivirals against NoVs. Blocking assays was performed using the NoV protrusion (P) protein as NoV surrogate and saliva as HBGAs. Among 50 clinically effective Chinese medicinal herbs against gastroenteritis diseases, two herbs were found highly effective. Chinese Gall blocked NoV P dimer binding to type A saliva at IC(50)=5.35 μg/ml and to B saliva at IC(50)=21.7 μg/ml. Similarly, Pomegranate blocked binding of NoV P dimer to type A saliva at IC(50)=15.59 μg/ml and B saliva at IC(50)=66.67 μg/ml. Literature data on preliminary biochemistry analysis showed that tannic acid is a common composition in the extracts of the two herbs, so we speculate that it might be the effective compound and further studies using commercially available, highly purified tannic acid confirmed the tannic acid as a strong inhibitor in the binding of NoV P protein to both A and B saliva (IC(50)≈0.1 μM). In addition, we tested different forms of hydrolysable tannins with different alkyl esters, including gallic acid, ethyl gallate, lauryl gallate, octyl gallate and propyl gallate. However, none of these tannins-derivatives revealed detectable inhibiting activities. Our data suggested that tannic acid is a promising candidate antiviral against NoVs.

  17. Identification of factors in human urine that inhibit the binding of Escherichia coli adhesins.

    PubMed Central

    Parkkinen, J; Virkola, R; Korhonen, T K

    1988-01-01

    Earlier studies on the binding of Escherichia coli adhesins to the human urinary tract have indicated that the ability to recognize binding sites on the urinary tract epithelial cells is not a characteristic for P fimbriae only, but is also shared by some other adhesins that are not associated with pyelonephritis, especially S fimbriae. In the present study we have investigated whether human urine contains inhibitors of the binding of E. coli adhesins. Normal human urine was found to inhibit hemagglutination by S and type 1 fimbriae but not P fimbriae. The major inhibitor of S fimbriae in normal urine was identified as Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, and the interaction with S fimbriae is probably mediated by its sialyloligosaccharide chains. No significant variation was observed in the inhibitory effect of T-H glycoprotein preparations originating from different individuals. In contrast to S fimbriae, the major inhibitors of type 1 fimbriae in urine were identified as low-molecular-weight compounds. Gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography and alpha-mannosidase treatment indicated that they were neutral alpha-mannosides, probably manno-oligosaccharides with three to five saccharides. Studies of urine samples collected from several individuals indicated the common occurrence of these inhibitory alpha-mannosides. Type 1 fimbriae bound to immobilized T-H glycoprotein, but, unlike S fimbriae, their binding was poorly inhibited by soluble T-H glycoprotein. Some urine samples were also found to contain low-molecular-weight inhibitors for the O75X adhesin of E. coli. These results emphasize that to function as a virulence factor in human urinary tract infections, an adhesin must evidently recognize such receptor structures at the infection sites that are not excreted in soluble form in urine. This prerequisite is filled by P fimbriae but not by type 1 or S fimbriae. PMID:2901405

  18. Improved guanide compounds which bind the CXCR4 co-receptor and inhibit HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Royce A; Pincus, Seth H; Song, Kejing; Shepard, Joyce B; Weaver, Alan J; Labib, Mohamed E; Teintze, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4 is a co-receptor for HIV-1 infection and is involved in signaling cell migration and proliferation. In a previous study of non-peptide, guanide-based CXCR4-binding compounds, spermine and spermidine phenylguanides inhibited HIV-1 entry at low micromolar concentrations. Subsequently, crystal structures of CXCR4 were used to dock a series of naphthylguanide derivatives of the polyamines spermidine and spermine. Synthesis and evaluation of the naphthylguanide compounds identified our best compound, spermine tris-1-naphthylguanide, which bound CXCR4 with an IC(50) of 40 nM and inhibited the infection of TZM-bl cells with X4, but not R5, strains of HIV-1 with an IC(50) of 50-100 nM.

  19. Selective chemical binding enhances cesium tolerance in plants through inhibition of cesium uptake.

    PubMed

    Adams, Eri; Chaban, Vitaly; Khandelia, Himanshu; Shin, Ryoung

    2015-03-05

    High concentrations of cesium (Cs(+)) inhibit plant growth but the detailed mechanisms of Cs(+) uptake, transport and response in plants are not well known. In order to identify small molecules with a capacity to enhance plant tolerance to Cs(+), chemical library screening was performed using Arabidopsis. Of 10,000 chemicals tested, five compounds were confirmed as Cs(+) tolerance enhancers. Further investigation and quantum mechanical modelling revealed that one of these compounds reduced Cs(+) concentrations in plants and that the imidazole moiety of this compound bound specifically to Cs(+). Analysis of the analogous compounds indicated that the structure of the identified compound is important for the effect to be conferred. Taken together, Cs(+) tolerance enhancer isolated here renders plants tolerant to Cs(+) by inhibiting Cs(+) entry into roots via specific binding to the ion thus, for instance, providing a basis for phytostabilisation of radiocesium-contaminated farmland.

  20. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-amino acids (D-aas) are reported to bind to IgE antibodies from people with allergy and asthma. The objectives of this study were to determine if D-aas bind or inhibit IgE binding to peanut allergens, and if they are more effective than L-amino acids (L-aas) in this respect. Several D-aa cocktails...

  1. Antipsychotics inhibit glucose transport: Determination of olanzapine binding site in Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose/H(+) symporter.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Petr; George Thompson, Alayna M; Iancu, Cristina V; Walters, D Eric; Choe, Jun-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug olanzapine is widely prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, it often causes unwanted side effects, including diabetes, due to disruption of insulin-dependant glucose metabolism through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. To determine if olanzapine can affect the first step in glucose metabolism - glucose transport inside cells - we investigated the effect of this drug on the transport activity of a model glucose transporter. The glucose transporter from Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcPSe) is specific for glucose, inhibited by various human glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitors, has high sequence and structure homology to GLUTs, and is readily amenable to transport assay, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. We found that olanzapine inhibits glucose transport of GlcPSe with an IC50 0.9 ± 0.1 mM. Computational docking of olanzapine to the GlcPSe structure revealed potential binding sites that were further examined through mutagenesis and transport assay to identify residues important for olanzapine inhibition. These investigations suggest that olanzapine binds in a polar region of the cytosolic part of the transporter, and interacts with residues R129, strictly conserved in all GLUTs, and N136, conserved in only a few GLUTs, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4. We propose that olanzapine inhibits GlcPSe by impeding the alternating opening and closing of the substrate cavity necessary for glucose transport. It accomplishes this by disrupting a key salt bridge formed by conserved residues R129 and E362, that stabilizes the outward-facing conformation of the transporter.

  2. Antipsychotics inhibit glucose transport: Determination of olanzapine binding site in Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose/H+ symporter

    PubMed Central

    Babkin, Petr; George Thompson, Alayna M.; Iancu, Cristina V.; Walters, D. Eric; Choe, Jun-yong

    2015-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug olanzapine is widely prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, it often causes unwanted side effects, including diabetes, due to disruption of insulin-dependant glucose metabolism through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. To determine if olanzapine can affect the first step in glucose metabolism – glucose transport inside cells – we investigated the effect of this drug on the transport activity of a model glucose transporter. The glucose transporter from Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcPSe) is specific for glucose, inhibited by various human glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitors, has high sequence and structure homology to GLUTs, and is readily amenable to transport assay, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. We found that olanzapine inhibits glucose transport of GlcPSe with an IC50 0.9 ± 0.1 mM. Computational docking of olanzapine to the GlcPSe structure revealed potential binding sites that were further examined through mutagenesis and transport assay to identify residues important for olanzapine inhibition. These investigations suggest that olanzapine binds in a polar region of the cytosolic part of the transporter, and interacts with residues R129, strictly conserved in all GLUTs, and N136, conserved in only a few GLUTs, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4. We propose that olanzapine inhibits GlcPSe by impeding the alternating opening and closing of the substrate cavity necessary for glucose transport. It accomplishes this by disrupting a key salt bridge formed by conserved residues R129 and E362, that stabilizes the outward-facing conformation of the transporter. PMID:25941630

  3. Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Alkylpolyamine DS-96 Inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis Infection by Blocking Attachment and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Ichie

    2014-01-01

    Vaginally delivered microbicides are being developed to offer women self-initiated protection against transmission of sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia trachomatis. A small molecule, DS-96, rationally designed for high affinity to Escherichia coli lipid A, was previously demonstrated to bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria (D. Sil et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 51:2811–2819, 2007, doi:10.1128/AAC.00200-07). Aside from the lack of the repeating O antigen, chlamydial lipooligosaccharide (LOS) shares general molecular architecture features with E. coli LPS. Importantly, the portion of lipid A where the interaction with DS-96 is expected to take place is well conserved between the two organisms, leading to the hypothesis that DS-96 inhibits Chlamydia infection by binding to LOS and compromising the function. In this study, antichlamydial activity of DS-96 was examined in cell culture. DS-96 inhibited the intercellular growth of Chlamydia in a dose-dependent manner and offered a high level of inhibition at a relatively low concentration (8 μM). The data also revealed that infectious elementary bodies (EBs) were predominantly blocked at the attachment step, as indicated by the reduced number of EBs associated with the host cell surface following pretreatment. Of those EBs that were capable of attachment, the vast majority was unable to gain entry into the host cell. Inhibition of EB attachment and entry by DS-96 suggests that Chlamydia LOS is critical to these processes during the developmental cycle. Importantly, given the low association of host toxicity previously reported by Sil et al., DS-96 is expected to perform well in animal studies as an active antichlamydial compound in a vaginal microbicide. PMID:24663021

  4. Inhibition of the growth of Neisseria meningitidis by reduced ferritin and other iron-binding agents.

    PubMed Central

    Calver, G A; Kenny, C P; Kushner, D J

    1979-01-01

    Serogroups of N. meningitidis were characterized as virulent or avirulent according to their capacity to establish meningococcal infection in mice. An agar plate diffusion technique demonstrated that iron had a definite growth-supporting role for both of these meningococcal types. The avirulent strains could use ionic or chelated iron as well as the virulent strains. Iron-reversible growth inhibition occurred to the same extent for both bacterial types in the presence of the synthetic iron-chelating agents Desferal and ethylenediamine-di-orthohydroxy phenylacetic acid. A difference in response was demonstrated for these bacterial types when grown in the presence of various iron-binding proteins from animal body fluids and tissues. The growth of the avirulent strain was inhibited to a greater degree by egg white conalbumin. The humoral iron-binding protein transferrin showed a significant inhibitory capacity only when used in conjunction with bicarbonate. Under conditions of increased iron saturation of this protein, the avirulent strain was inhibited to the furthest extent. In the presence of ferritin, the cellular iron-binding protein, which had been reduced, inhibition of the growth of either strain type did not occur on iron-poor media (less than 5 micrograms/100 ml). However, with the incorporation of iron into the media, the inhibitory effect of the protein became evident. As the concentration of iron increased, the inhibition increased to a certain level and subsequently declined. A substantial difference in the ability of the avirulent type to grow in the presence of reduced horse spleen ferritin was observed. For this microorganism, a correlation appears to exist between the capacity to grow by utilizing the available iron in the presence of reduced ferritin and the ability to establish infection. The host protein ferritin, in the reduced state, apart from simply being a storage protein for iron, can prevent the growth of a procaryotic organism. Our

  5. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits ( sup 3 H) dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of ({sup 3}H) dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances ({sup 3}H)DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+){minus} pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine.

  6. Lipoxin A4 inhibits immune cell binding to salivary epithelium and vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Chinthamani, Sreedevi; Odusanwo, Olutayo; Mondal, Nandini; Nelson, Joel; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Lipoxins are formed by leukocytes during cell-cell interactions with epithelial or endothelial cells. Native lipoxin A4 (LXA4) binds to the G protein-coupled lipoxin receptors formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2)/ALX and CysLT1. Furthermore, LXA4 inhibits recruitment of neutrophils, by attenuating chemotaxis, adhesion, and transmigration across vascular endothelial cells. LXA4 thus appears to serve as an endogenous “stop signal” for immune cell-mediated tissue injury (Serhan CN; Annu Rev Immunol 25: 101–137, 2007). The role of LXA4 has not been addressed in salivary epithelium, and little is known about its effects on vascular endothelium. Here, we determined that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) receptor activation in vascular endothelium and salivary epithelium upregulated the expression of adhesion molecules that facilitates the binding of immune cells. We hypothesize that the activation of the ALX/FPR2 and/or CysLT1 receptors by LXA4 decreases this cytokine-mediated upregulation of cell adhesion molecules that enhance lymphocyte binding to both the vascular endothelium and salivary epithelium. In agreement with this hypothesis, we observed that nanomolar concentrations of LXA4 blocked IL-1β- and TNF-α-mediated upregulation of E-selectin and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Binding of Jurkat cells to stimulated HUVECs was abrogated by LXA4. Furthermore, LXA4 preincubation with human submandibular gland cell line (HSG) also blocked TNF-α-mediated upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in these cells, and it reduced lymphocyte adhesion. These findings suggest that ALX/FPR2 and/or CysLT1 receptor activation in endothelial and epithelial cells blocks cytokine-induced adhesion molecule expression and consequent binding of lymphocytes, a critical event in the pathogenesis of Sjögren's syndrome (SS). PMID:22205391

  7. Variola virus E3L Zα domain, but not its Z-DNA binding activity, is required for PKR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Meghna; Seo, Eun Joo; Dever, Thomas E

    2014-02-01

    Responding to viral infection, the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase PKR phosphorylates translation initiation factor eIF2α to inhibit cellular and viral protein synthesis. To overcome this host defense mechanism, many poxviruses express the protein E3L, containing an N-terminal Z-DNA binding (Zα) domain and a C-terminal dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). While E3L is thought to inhibit PKR activation by sequestering dsRNA activators and by directly binding the kinase, the role of the Zα domain in PKR inhibition remains unclear. Here, we show that the E3L Zα domain is required to suppress the growth-inhibitory properties associated with expression of human PKR in yeast, to inhibit PKR kinase activity in vitro, and to reverse the inhibitory effects of PKR on reporter gene expression in mammalian cells treated with dsRNA. Whereas previous studies revealed that the Z-DNA binding activity of E3L is critical for viral pathogenesis, we identified point mutations in E3L that functionally uncouple Z-DNA binding and PKR inhibition. Thus, our studies reveal a molecular distinction between the nucleic acid binding and PKR inhibitory functions of the E3L Zα domain, and they support the notion that E3L contributes to viral pathogenesis by targeting PKR and other components of the cellular anti-viral defense pathway.

  8. Zebrafish CD59 has both bacterial-binding and inhibiting activities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Wu, Jie; Liu, Shousheng; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-01

    CD59, known as protectin, usually plays roles as a regulatory inhibitor of complement, but it also exhibits activities independent of its function as a complement inhibitor. This study reported the identification and characterization of an ortholog of mammalian cd59 from zebrafish Danio rerio, which is similar to known cd59 in terms of both amino acid sequence and genomic structure as well as synteny conservation. We showed that zebrafish cd59 was maternally expressed in early embryos and expressed in a tissue-specific manner, with most abundant expression in the brain. We further showed that recombinant zebrafish CD59 was capable of binding to both the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as the microbial signature molecules LPS and LTA. In addition we demonstrated that recombinant zebrafish CD59 displayed slight antimicrobial activity capable of inhibiting the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. All these data indicate that zebrafish CD59 can not only binds to the bacteria and their signature molecules LPS and LTA but can also inhibit their growth, a novel role assigned to CD59.

  9. Slow tight-binding inhibition of prolyl endopeptidase by benzyloxycarbonyl-prolyl-prolinal.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, A V; Jung, S; Spencer, R W; Vinick, F J; Faraci, W S

    1990-01-01

    Prolyl endopeptidase is a serine proteinase that specifically cleaves peptides on the carboxy side of proline residues. Wilk & Orlowski [(1983) J. Neurochem. 41, 69-75] have shown that benzyloxycarbonyl-prolyl-prolinal (Z-prolyl-prolinal) is a potent inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase. We show that Z-prolyl-prolinal is a slow-binding inhibitor of mouse brain prolyl endopeptidase with Ki 0.35 +/- 0.05 nM. Kinetic analysis indicates that the mechanism is a simple, but slow, reversible equilibrium between free and bound enzyme (E + I in equilibrium EI) with rate constants for association (kon) and dissociation (koff) of 1.6 X 10(5) M-1.s-1 and approx. 4 X 10(-5) s-1 respectively. Slow-binding inhibition is dependent on the presence of the aldehyde group since the alcohol (Z-prolyl-prolinol) is a rapid and 50,000-fold poorer inhibitor (Ki 19 microM). Prolyl endopeptidase from human brain is also inhibited by Z-prolyl-prolinal with kinetics similar to those of the mouse brain enzyme. PMID:2241932

  10. Pentamidine binds to tRNA through non-specific hydrophobic interactions and inhibits aminoacylation and translation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2008-03-01

    The selective and potent inhibition of mitochondrial translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by pentamidine suggests a novel antimicrobial action for this drug. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay, T1 ribonuclease footprinting, hydroxyl radical footprinting and isothermal titration calorimetry collectively demonstrated that pentamidine non-specifically binds to two distinct classes of sites on tRNA. The binding was driven by favorable entropy changes indicative of a large hydrophobic interaction, suggesting that the aromatic rings of pentamidine are inserted into the stacked base pairs of tRNA helices. Pentamidine binding disrupts the tRNA secondary structure and masks the anticodon loop in the tertiary structure. Consistently, we showed that pentamidine specifically inhibits tRNA aminoacylation but not the cognate amino acid adenylation. Pentamidine inhibited protein translation in vitro with an EC(50) equivalent to that binds to tRNA and inhibits tRNA aminoacylation in vitro, but drastically higher than that inhibits translation in vivo, supporting the established notion that the antimicrobial activity of pentamidine is largely due to its selective accumulation by the pathogen rather than by the host cell. Therefore, interrupting tRNA aminoacylation by the entropy-driven non-specific binding is an important mechanism of pentamidine in inhibiting protein translation, providing new insights into the development of antimicrobial drugs.

  11. Heparin binds to murine leukemia virus and inhibits Env-independent attachment and infection.

    PubMed

    Walker, Simon J; Pizzato, Massimo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Devereux, Stephen

    2002-07-01

    Certain glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), including heparin, inhibit infection by murine leukemia virus (MLV). We now show that this is due to inhibition of virus attachment independent of the interaction between viral envelope proteins (Env) and their cellular receptors. Heparin blocked the binding of both Env-deficient and amphotropic MLV (MLV-A) particles to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, CHO cells which lack the amphotropic retroviral receptor Pit-2, and CHO cells transfected with Pit-2 (CHO-Pit-2). Heparin also inhibited the transduction of NIH 3T3 cells by MLV-A over a similar concentration range. This effect was observed within 15 min of exposure to retrovirus. Preloading target cells with heparin had no effect on transduction and both MLV-A and Env-deficient retrovirus bound efficiently to heparin-coated agarose beads, suggesting that heparin interacts with the virus rather than the target cell. This requires both a strong negative charge and a specific structure since GAGs with different charge and carbohydrate composition inhibited virus infection variably. The specificity of GAG-virus interaction also depends on the producer cells, since virus packaged by murine GP+EnvAM12 cells was 1,000-fold more sensitive to inhibition by chondroitin sulfate A than was virus packaged by human FLYA13 packaging cells. No evidence for an interaction between MLV and cell surface proteoglycans was found, however, since the attachment of MLV-A and envelope-defective virus to proteoglycan-deficient CHOpgsA-745 cells was similar to that seen with both wild-type and CHO-Pit-2 cells. Although the molecular mechanism is unclear, this study presents evidence that Env receptor-independent attachment is an important step in MLV infection.

  12. Inhibition of L-selectin binding by polyacrylamide-based conjugates under defined flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Enders, Sven; Bernhard, Gesche; Zakrzewicz, Andreas; Tauber, Rudolf

    2007-10-01

    Selectins mediate tethering and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelium in a shear force-dependent manner. This key step in the cellular immune response is a target for experimental anti-inflammatory therapies. In the present paper we have examined the inhibitory activity of the minimal selectin ligand sialyl Lewis x (SiaLe(x)), its isomer sialyl Lewis a (SiaLe(a)) and sulfated tyrosine (sTyr) residues under dynamic flow reflecting the rheological conditions in the blood stream. The monomeric ligands were compared to multivalent polyacrylamide (PAA)-based conjugates under defined flow conditions on the molecular level, using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology, and on the cellular level, using a parallel-plate flow chamber. SPR measurements showed that a spatial arrangement of binding epitopes mimicking the selectin binding motif of the natural ligand PSGL-1 inhibits L-selectin binding successfully with IC(50) values in the nanomolar range. Using a flow chamber adhesion assay it could be shown that the multivalent inhibitors efficiently blocked rolling and tethering of NALM-6 pre-B cells transfected with human L-selectin to activated endothelium and that the inhibitory activity increased with rising shear stress. While PAA-conjugates were almost not inhibitory at low shear stress, NALM-6 cell rolling was nearly completely inhibited at high shear stress. The results indicate that multimeric conjugates of SiaLe(x), SiaLe(a) and sTyr are highly effective inhibitors of L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion particularly under flow conditions. Consequently, SiaLe(x), SiaLe(a) and/or sTyr on macromolecular carriers may be promising candidates for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  13. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  14. Inhibition of L-selectin binding by polyacrylamide-based conjugates under defined flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Enders, Sven; Bernhard, Gesche; Zakrzewicz, Andreas; Tauber, Rudolf

    2007-10-01

    Selectins mediate tethering and rolling of leukocytes along the endothelium in a shear force-dependent manner. This key step in the cellular immune response is a target for experimental anti-inflammatory therapies. In the present paper we have examined the inhibitory activity of the minimal selectin ligand sialyl Lewis x (SiaLe(x)), its isomer sialyl Lewis a (SiaLe(a)) and sulfated tyrosine (sTyr) residues under dynamic flow reflecting the rheological conditions in the blood stream. The monomeric ligands were compared to multivalent polyacrylamide (PAA)-based conjugates under defined flow conditions on the molecular level, using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology, and on the cellular level, using a parallel-plate flow chamber. SPR measurements showed that a spatial arrangement of binding epitopes mimicking the selectin binding motif of the natural ligand PSGL-1 inhibits L-selectin binding successfully with IC(50) values in the nanomolar range. Using a flow chamber adhesion assay it could be shown that the multivalent inhibitors efficiently blocked rolling and tethering of NALM-6 pre-B cells transfected with human L-selectin to activated endothelium and that the inhibitory activity increased with rising shear stress. While PAA-conjugates were almost not inhibitory at low shear stress, NALM-6 cell rolling was nearly completely inhibited at high shear stress. The results indicate that multimeric conjugates of SiaLe(x), SiaLe(a) and sTyr are highly effective inhibitors of L-selectin-mediated cell adhesion particularly under flow conditions. Consequently, SiaLe(x), SiaLe(a) and/or sTyr on macromolecular carriers may be promising candidates for anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:17707590

  15. Na+ Inhibits the Epithelial Na+ Channel by Binding to a Site in an Extracellular Acidic Cleft*

    PubMed Central

    Kashlan, Ossama B.; Blobner, Brandon M.; Zuzek, Zachary; Tolino, Michael; Kleyman, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) has a key role in the regulation of extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. ENaC belongs to a family of ion channels that sense the external environment. These channels have large extracellular regions that are thought to interact with environmental cues, such as Na+, Cl−, protons, proteases, and shear stress, which modulate gating behavior. We sought to determine the molecular mechanism by which ENaC senses high external Na+ concentrations, resulting in an inhibition of channel activity. Both our structural model of an ENaC α subunit and the resolved structure of an acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC1) have conserved acidic pockets in the periphery of the extracellular region of the channel. We hypothesized that these acidic pockets host inhibitory allosteric Na+ binding sites. Through site-directed mutagenesis targeting the acidic pocket, we modified the inhibitory response to external Na+. Mutations at selected sites altered the cation inhibitory preference to favor Li+ or K+ rather than Na+. Channel activity was reduced in response to restraining movement within this region by cross-linking structures across the acidic pocket. Our results suggest that residues within the acidic pocket form an allosteric effector binding site for Na+. Our study supports the hypothesis that an acidic cleft is a key ligand binding locus for ENaC and perhaps other members of the ENaC/degenerin family. PMID:25389295

  16. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naheed; Baker, Philip N; Robinson, Nicola J; Aplin, John D

    2009-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG), has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P < 0.0001). The distribution of antigen was similar to that observed using a monoclonal antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Staining was reduced by pre-absorption of CD serum with recombinant human tissue transglutaminase. In direct binding assays, autoimmune immunoglobulin A (IgA) from the maternal compartment became associated with antigen at the syncytial surface of the placenta, as a result of which transglutaminase activity at this site was inhibited. Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function. PMID:19228395

  17. Phosphorylation inhibits DNA-binding of alternatively spliced aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator

    SciTech Connect

    Kewley, Robyn J. . E-mail: rkewley@csu.edu.au; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2005-12-09

    The basic helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM homology (bHLH/PAS) transcription factor ARNT (aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator) is a key component of various pathways which induce the transcription of cytochrome P450 and hypoxia response genes. ARNT can be alternatively spliced to express Alt ARNT, containing an additional 15 amino acids immediately N-terminal to the DNA-binding basic region. Here, we show that ARNT and Alt ARNT proteins are differentially phosphorylated by protein kinase CKII in vitro. Phosphorylation had an inhibitory effect on DNA-binding to an E-box probe by Alt ARNT, but not ARNT, homodimers. This inhibitory phosphorylation occurs through Ser77. Moreover, a point mutant, Alt ARNT S77A, shows increased activity on an E-box reporter gene, consistent with Ser77 being a regulatory site in vivo. In contrast, DNA binding by an Alt ARNT/dioxin receptor heterodimer to the xenobiotic response element is not inhibited by phosphorylation with CKII, nor does Alt ARNT S77A behave differently from wild type Alt ARNT in the context of a dioxin receptor heterodimer.

  18. Na+ inhibits the epithelial Na+ channel by binding to a site in an extracellular acidic cleft.

    PubMed

    Kashlan, Ossama B; Blobner, Brandon M; Zuzek, Zachary; Tolino, Michael; Kleyman, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) has a key role in the regulation of extracellular fluid volume and blood pressure. ENaC belongs to a family of ion channels that sense the external environment. These channels have large extracellular regions that are thought to interact with environmental cues, such as Na(+), Cl(-), protons, proteases, and shear stress, which modulate gating behavior. We sought to determine the molecular mechanism by which ENaC senses high external Na(+) concentrations, resulting in an inhibition of channel activity. Both our structural model of an ENaC α subunit and the resolved structure of an acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC1) have conserved acidic pockets in the periphery of the extracellular region of the channel. We hypothesized that these acidic pockets host inhibitory allosteric Na(+) binding sites. Through site-directed mutagenesis targeting the acidic pocket, we modified the inhibitory response to external Na(+). Mutations at selected sites altered the cation inhibitory preference to favor Li(+) or K(+) rather than Na(+). Channel activity was reduced in response to restraining movement within this region by cross-linking structures across the acidic pocket. Our results suggest that residues within the acidic pocket form an allosteric effector binding site for Na(+). Our study supports the hypothesis that an acidic cleft is a key ligand binding locus for ENaC and perhaps other members of the ENaC/degenerin family. PMID:25389295

  19. Macrocycles that inhibit the binding between heat shock protein 90 and TPR-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Ardi, Veronica C; Alexander, Leslie D; Johnson, Victoria A; McAlpine, Shelli R

    2011-12-16

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) accounts for 1-2% of the total proteins in normal cells and functions as a molecular chaperone that folds, assembles, and stabilizes client proteins. Hsp90 is overexpressed (3- to 6-fold increase) in stressed cells, including cancer cells, and regulates over 200 client and co-chaperone proteins. Hsp90 client proteins are involved in a plethora of cellular signaling events including numerous growth and apoptotic pathways. Since pathway-specific inhibitors can be problematic in drug-resistant cancers, shutting down multiple pathways at once is a promising approach when developing new therapeutics. Hsp90's ability to modulate many growth and signaling pathways simultaneously makes this protein an attractive target in the field of cancer therapeutics. Herein we present evidence that a small molecule modulates Hsp90 via binding between the N and middle domain and allosterically inhibiting the binding interaction between Hsp90 and four C-terminal binding client proteins: IP6K2, FKBP38, FKBP52, and HOP. These last three clients contain a tetratricopeptide-repeat (TPR) region, which is known to interact with the MEEVD sequence on the C-terminus of Hsp90. Thus, this small molecule modulates the activity between co-chaperones that contain TPR motifs and Hsp90's MEEVD region. This mechanism of action is unique from that of all Hsp90 inhibitors currently in clinical trials where these molecules have no effect on proteins that bind to the C-terminus of Hsp90. Further, our small molecule induces a Caspase-3 dependent apoptotic event. Thus, we describe the mechanism of a novel scaffold that is a useful tool for studying cell-signaling events that result when blocking the MEEVD-TPR interaction between Hsp90 and co-chaperone proteins.

  20. Study on effects of molecular crowding on G-quadruplex-ligand binding and ligand-mediated telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    The telomere G-quadruplex-binding and telomerase-inhibiting capacity of two cationic (TMPyP4 and PIPER) and two anionic (phthalocyanine and Hemin) G-quadruplex-ligands were examined under conditions of molecular crowding (MC). Osmotic experiments showed that binding of the anionic ligands, which bind to G-quadruplex DNA via π-π stacking interactions, caused some water molecules to be released from the G-quadruplex/ligand complex; in contrast, a substantial number of water molecules were taken up upon electrostatic binding of the cationic ligands to G-quadruplex DNA. These behaviors of water molecules maintained or reduced the binding affinity of the anionic and the cationic ligands, respectively, under MC conditions. Consequently, the anionic ligands (phthalocyanine and Hemin) robustly inhibited telomerase activity even with MC; in contrast, the inhibition of telomerase caused by cationic TMPyP4 was drastically reduced by MC. These results allow us to conclude that the binding of G-quadruplex-ligands to G-quadruplex via non-electrostatic interactions is preferable for telomerase inhibition under physiological conditions.

  1. Study on effects of molecular crowding on G-quadruplex-ligand binding and ligand-mediated telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Tateishi-Karimata, Hisae; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    The telomere G-quadruplex-binding and telomerase-inhibiting capacity of two cationic (TMPyP4 and PIPER) and two anionic (phthalocyanine and Hemin) G-quadruplex-ligands were examined under conditions of molecular crowding (MC). Osmotic experiments showed that binding of the anionic ligands, which bind to G-quadruplex DNA via π-π stacking interactions, caused some water molecules to be released from the G-quadruplex/ligand complex; in contrast, a substantial number of water molecules were taken up upon electrostatic binding of the cationic ligands to G-quadruplex DNA. These behaviors of water molecules maintained or reduced the binding affinity of the anionic and the cationic ligands, respectively, under MC conditions. Consequently, the anionic ligands (phthalocyanine and Hemin) robustly inhibited telomerase activity even with MC; in contrast, the inhibition of telomerase caused by cationic TMPyP4 was drastically reduced by MC. These results allow us to conclude that the binding of G-quadruplex-ligands to G-quadruplex via non-electrostatic interactions is preferable for telomerase inhibition under physiological conditions. PMID:23562626

  2. Cross-class metallo-β-lactamase inhibition by bisthiazolidines reveals multiple binding modes.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; González, Mariano M; Mojica, Maria F; González, Javier M; Castillo, Valerie; Saiz, Cecilia; Kosmopoulou, Magda; Tooke, Catherine L; Llarrull, Leticia I; Mahler, Graciela; Bonomo, Robert A; Vila, Alejandro J; Spencer, James

    2016-06-28

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) hydrolyze almost all β-lactam antibiotics and are unaffected by clinically available β-lactamase inhibitors (βLIs). Active-site architecture divides MBLs into three classes (B1, B2, and B3), complicating development of βLIs effective against all enzymes. Bisthiazolidines (BTZs) are carboxylate-containing, bicyclic compounds, considered as penicillin analogs with an additional free thiol. Here, we show both l- and d-BTZ enantiomers are micromolar competitive βLIs of all MBL classes in vitro, with Kis of 6-15 µM or 36-84 µM for subclass B1 MBLs (IMP-1 and BcII, respectively), and 10-12 µM for the B3 enzyme L1. Against the B2 MBL Sfh-I, the l-BTZ enantiomers exhibit 100-fold lower Kis (0.26-0.36 µM) than d-BTZs (26-29 µM). Importantly, cell-based time-kill assays show BTZs restore β-lactam susceptibility of Escherichia coli-producing MBLs (IMP-1, Sfh-1, BcII, and GOB-18) and, significantly, an extensively drug-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolate expressing L1. BTZs therefore inhibit the full range of MBLs and potentiate β-lactam activity against producer pathogens. X-ray crystal structures reveal insights into diverse BTZ binding modes, varying with orientation of the carboxylate and thiol moieties. BTZs bind the di-zinc centers of B1 (IMP-1; BcII) and B3 (L1) MBLs via the free thiol, but orient differently depending upon stereochemistry. In contrast, the l-BTZ carboxylate dominates interactions with the monozinc B2 MBL Sfh-I, with the thiol uninvolved. d-BTZ complexes most closely resemble β-lactam binding to B1 MBLs, but feature an unprecedented disruption of the D120-zinc interaction. Cross-class MBL inhibition therefore arises from the unexpected versatility of BTZ binding. PMID:27303030

  3. A fibrin antibody binding to fibronectin induces potent inhibition of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    El-Ayoubi, Fida; Amiral, Jean; Pascaud, Juliette; Charrin, Stéphanie; Tassel, Bénédicte; Uzan, Georges; Gurewich, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Antiserum from rabbits immunised with pure human fibrinogen was affinity purified on immobilised fibrin fragment E (FFE). This FFE antibody (Ab) induced significant growth inhibition of a human cancer xenograft in mice and suppression of tumour angiogenesis, leaving no formed vessels and only CD31-staining endothelial fragments in place. Tubule formation of HUVEC on MatrigelTM was also significantly inhibited by FFE Ab. Since MatrigelTM is fibrin-free, this effect implicated a different FFE Ab binding site than FFE. Flow cytometry of HUVEC showed that FFE Ab bound to HUVEC, but with a broad range of 55-98 %. Immunofluorescent staining of HUVEC explained this range, since FFE Ab was seen not to bind to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) directly but instead to a matrix protein variably adherent to HUVEC. This protein was identified as fibronectin (FN) by appearance, staining with FN Ab, and by a FN knockdown study. Neither HUVEC nor matrix reacted with fibrin D-dimer (DD) Ab. Immunofluorescent stains of HUVEC matrix with FFE and FN Ab's showed that these Ab's bound to the same epitopes on FN, as also seen on Western blots of purified FN. These findings indicate the presence of an antigenic determinant in fibrinogen/FFE that is homologous with an epitope(s) in FN recognised by FFE Ab, and critical for angiogenesis in this xenograft. The FN epitope(s) remains to be identified, but the present findings can be used for the selection of the appropriate clones from mice immunised with fibrinogen which can facilitate this identification, and which may also be of clinical use. PMID:25252851

  4. Glycodelin-A interacts with fucosyltransferase on human sperm plasma membrane to inhibit spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Philip C N; Chung, Man-Kin; Koistinen, Riitta; Koistinen, Hannu; Seppala, Markku; Ho, Pak-Chung; Ng, Ernest H Y; Lee, Kai-Fai; Yeung, William S B

    2007-01-01

    Fertilization depends on successful binding of the spermatozoa to the zona pellucida of the oocyte. Glycodelin-A inhibits spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding. Previous data showed that glycodelin-A receptor(s) and zona pellucida protein receptor(s) on human spermatozoa are closely related. Using a chemical cross-linking approach, the glycodelin-A-sperm receptor complex was isolated. The receptor was identified to be fucosyltransferase-5 (FUT5) by mass spectrometry and confirmed with the use of anti-FUT5 antibodies. Sperm FUT5 was an externally oriented integral membrane protein in the acrosomal region of human spermatozoa. Biologically active FUT5 was purified from spermatozoa. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between glycodelin-A and sperm FUT5. Solubilized zona pellucida reduced the binding of glycodelin-A to sperm FUT5. An anti-FUT5 antibody and FUT5 acceptor blocked the binding of glycodelin-A to spermatozoa and the zona binding inhibitory activity of glycodelin-A. Sperm FUT5 bound strongly to intact and solubilized human zona pellucida. The equilibrium dissociation constant of sperm FUT5 binding to solubilized zona pellucida was 42.82 pmol/ml. These observations suggest that human sperm FUT5 is a receptor of glycodelin-A and zona pellucida proteins, and that glycodelin-A inhibits spermatozoa-zona binding by blocking the binding of sperm FUT5 to the zona pellucida.

  5. Novel guanide-substituted compounds bind to CXCR4 and inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Joyce B; Wilkinson, Royce A; Starkey, Jean R; Teintze, Martin

    2014-01-01

    CXCR4 has been shown to be overexpressed on breast cancer cells including the human MDA-MB-231 cell line. Cancer cells overexpressing the CXCR4 receptor are capable of undergoing metastasis to organs expressing high levels of CXCL12. We have synthesized numerous guanide, biguanide, phenylguanide, and naphthylguanide compounds that bind to CXCR4 at the CXCL12-binding site and thus should prevent CXCR4-facilitated cancer metastasis. The novel compounds presented here were tested for CXCR4 affinity, toxicity, receptor activation, and for their ability to prevent breast cancer metastases. Three of the compounds bound to CXCR4 at IC50 values of 0.06-0.2 μmol/l, with no associated cell toxicity or receptor activation at these concentrations. These high CXCR4 affinity compounds also showed inhibition of in-vitro wound migration. They were then tested in an in-vivo mouse breast cancer lung colony model. All of these compounds showed reductions in the number of MDA-MB-231 lung metastases compared with mock-treated control mice without evidence of cardiac, liver, or kidney toxicity in treated mice.

  6. Novel guanide-substituted compounds bind to CXCR4 and inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Joyce B; Wilkinson, Royce A; Starkey, Jean R; Teintze, Martin

    2014-01-01

    CXCR4 has been shown to be overexpressed on breast cancer cells including the human MDA-MB-231 cell line. Cancer cells overexpressing the CXCR4 receptor are capable of undergoing metastasis to organs expressing high levels of CXCL12. We have synthesized numerous guanide, biguanide, phenylguanide, and naphthylguanide compounds that bind to CXCR4 at the CXCL12-binding site and thus should prevent CXCR4-facilitated cancer metastasis. The novel compounds presented here were tested for CXCR4 affinity, toxicity, receptor activation, and for their ability to prevent breast cancer metastases. Three of the compounds bound to CXCR4 at IC50 values of 0.06-0.2 μmol/l, with no associated cell toxicity or receptor activation at these concentrations. These high CXCR4 affinity compounds also showed inhibition of in-vitro wound migration. They were then tested in an in-vivo mouse breast cancer lung colony model. All of these compounds showed reductions in the number of MDA-MB-231 lung metastases compared with mock-treated control mice without evidence of cardiac, liver, or kidney toxicity in treated mice. PMID:24045366

  7. Targeted inhibition of oncogenic miR-21 maturation with designed RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Yang, Fan; Zubovic, Lorena; Pavelitz, Tom; Yang, Wen; Godin, Katherine; Walker, Matthew; Zheng, Suxin; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    The RNA recognition motif (RRM) is the largest family of eukaryotic RNA-binding proteins. Engineered RRMs with well-defined specificity would provide valuable tools and an exacting test of the current understanding of specificity. We have redesigned the specificity of an RRM using rational methods and demonstrated retargeting of its activity in cells. We engineered the conserved RRM of human Rbfox proteins to specifically bind to the terminal loop of a microRNA precursor (pre-miR-21) with high affinity and inhibit its processing by Drosha and Dicer. We further engineered Giardia Dicer by replacing its PAZ domain with the designed RRM. The reprogrammed enzyme degrades pre-miR-21 specifically in vitro and suppresses mature miR-21 levels in cells, which results in increased expression of the tumor suppressor PDCD4 and significantly decreased viability for cancer cells. The results demonstrate the feasibility of rationally engineering the sequence-specificity of RRMs and of using this ubiquitous platform for diverse biological applications. PMID:27428511

  8. Binding and inhibition of human spermidine synthase by decarboxylated S-adenosylhomocysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Še; #269; kut; #279; , Jolita; McCloskey, Diane E.; Thomas, H. Jeanette; Secrist III, John A.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-11-17

    Aminopropyltransferases are essential enzymes that form polyamines in eukaryotic and most prokaryotic cells. Spermidine synthase (SpdS) is one of the most well-studied enzymes in this biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme uses decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine and a short-chain polyamine (putrescine) to make a medium-chain polyamine (spermidine) and 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine as a byproduct. Here, we report a new spermidine synthase inhibitor, decarboxylated S-adenosylhomocysteine (dcSAH). The inhibitor was synthesized, and dose-dependent inhibition of human, Thermatoga maritima, and Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthases, as well as functionally homologous human spermine synthase, was determined. The human SpdS/dcSAH complex structure was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution and showed consistent active site positioning and coordination with previously known structures. Isothermal calorimetry binding assays confirmed inhibitor binding to human SpdS with K{sub d} of 1.1 {+-} 0.3 {mu}M in the absence of putrescine and 3.2 {+-} 0.1 {mu}M in the presence of putrescine. These results indicate a potential for further inhibitor development based on the dcSAH scaffold.

  9. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  10. 1,3-propanediol binds deep inside the channel to inhibit water permeation through aquaporins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lili; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Chen, L Laurie; Chen, Liao Y; Perry, George; McHardy, Stanton F; Yeh, Chih-Ko

    2016-02-01

    Aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins (AQPs) are membrane channel proteins responsible for transport of water and for transport of glycerol in addition to water across the cell membrane, respectively. They are expressed throughout the human body and also in other forms of life. Inhibitors of human AQPs have been sought for therapeutic treatment for various medical conditions including hypertension, refractory edema, neurotoxic brain edema, and so forth. Conducting all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we computed the binding affinity of acetazolamide to human AQP4 that agrees closely with in vitro experiments. Using this validated computational method, we found that 1,3-propanediol (PDO) binds deep inside the AQP4 channel to inhibit that particular aquaporin efficaciously. Furthermore, we used the same method to compute the affinities of PDO binding to four other AQPs and one aquaglyceroporin whose atomic coordinates are available from the protein data bank (PDB). For bovine AQP1, human AQP2, AQP4, AQP5, and Plasmodium falciparum PfAQP whose structures were resolved with high resolution, we obtained definitive predictions on the PDO dissociation constant. For human AQP1 whose PDB coordinates are less accurate, we estimated the dissociation constant with a rather large error bar. Taking into account the fact that PDO is generally recognized as safe by the US FDA, we predict that PDO can be an effective diuretic which directly modulates water flow through the protein channels. It should be free from the serious side effects associated with other diuretics that change the hydro-homeostasis indirectly by altering the osmotic gradients.

  11. DNA binding of the p21 repressor ZBTB2 is inhibited by cytosine hydroxymethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Lafaye, Céline; Barbier, Ewa; Miscioscia, Audrey; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Gasparutto, Didier; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • 5-hmC epigenetic modification is measurable in HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL cell lines. • ZBTB2 binds to DNA probes containing 5-mC but not to sequences containing 5-hmC. • This differential binding is verified with DNA sequences involved in p21 regulation. - Abstract: Recent studies have demonstrated that the modified base 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is detectable at various rates in DNA extracted from human tissues. This oxidative product of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) constitutes a new and important actor of epigenetic mechanisms. We designed a DNA pull down assay to trap and identify nuclear proteins bound to 5-hmC and/or 5-mC. We applied this strategy to three cancerous cell lines (HeLa, SH-SY5Y and UT7-MPL) in which we also measured 5-mC and 5-hmC levels by HPLC-MS/MS. We found that the putative oncoprotein Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 2 (ZBTB2) is associated with methylated DNA sequences and that this interaction is inhibited by the presence of 5-hmC replacing 5-mC. As published data mention ZBTB2 recognition of p21 regulating sequences, we verified that this sequence specific binding was also alleviated by 5-hmC. ZBTB2 being considered as a multifunctional cell proliferation activator, notably through p21 repression, this work points out new epigenetic processes potentially involved in carcinogenesis.

  12. RIG-I inhibits pancreatic β cell proliferation through competitive binding of activated Src

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Li, GuangMing; Zhong, HengGao; Chen, MeiJuan; Chen, TingTing; Gao, LiLi; Wu, HuiWen; Guo, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition is a necessary condition for cell proliferation, including pancreatic β cells; however, over-nutrition, and the resulting obesity and glucolipotoxicity, is a risk factor for the development of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and causes inhibition of pancreatic β-cells proliferation and their loss of compensation for insulin resistance. Here, we showed that Retinoic acid (RA)-inducible gene I (RIG-I) responds to nutrient signals and induces loss of β cell mass through G1 cell cycle arrest. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes (e.g., glucolipotoxicity, TNF-α and LPS) activate Src in pancreatic β cells. Elevated RIG-I modulated the interaction of activated Src and STAT3 by competitive binding to STAT3. Elevated RIG-I downregulated the transcription of SKP2, and increased the stability and abundance of P27 protein in a STAT3-dependent manner, which was associated with inhibition of β cell growth elicited by Src. These results supported a role for RIG-I in β cell mass loss under conditions of metabolic surplus and suggested that RIG-I-induced blocking of Src/STAT3 signalling might be involved in G1 phase cycle arrest through the Skp2/P27 pathway in pancreatic β cells. PMID:27349479

  13. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J; Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (LX) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus LM structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus LE, and also larger complexes with LE:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant LS and LT from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the LE zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on LE must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by LE.

  14. Calreticulin Binds to Fas Ligand and Inhibits Neuronal Cell Apoptosis Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Beilei; Wu, Zhengzheng; Xu, Jun; Xu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background. Calreticulin (CRT) can bind to Fas ligand (FasL) and inhibit Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of Jurkat T cells. However, its effect on neuronal cell apoptosis has not been investigated. Purpose. We aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CRT following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Methods. Mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and SH-SY5Y cells subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) were used as models for IRI. The CRT protein level was detected by Western blotting, and mRNA expression of CRT, caspase-3, and caspase-8 was measured by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence was used to assess the localization of CRT and FasL. The interaction of CRT with FasL was verified by coimmunoprecipitation. SH-SY5Y cell viability was determined by MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The measurement of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity was carried out using caspase activity assay kits. Results. After IRI, CRT was upregulated on the neuron surface and bound to FasL, leading to increased viability of OGD-exposed SH-SY5Y cells and decreased activity of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Conclusions. This study for the first time revealed that increased CRT inhibited Fas/FasL-mediated neuronal cell apoptosis during the early stage of ischemic stroke, suggesting it to be a potential protector activated soon after IRI. PMID:26583143

  15. IgE binding to peanut allergens is inhibited by combined D-aspartic and D-glutamic acids.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if D-amino acids (D-aas) bind and inhibit immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to peanut allergens. D-aas such as D-Asp (aspartic acid), D-Glu (glutamic acid), combined D-[Asp/Glu] and others were each prepared in a cocktail of 9 other D-aas, along with L-amino acids (L-aas) and controls. Each sample was mixed with a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic donors, and tested by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and Western blots for IgE binding to peanut allergens. Results showed that D-[Asp/Glu] (4 mg/ml) inhibited IgE binding (75%) while D-Glu, D-Asp and other D-aas had no inhibitory effect. A higher inhibition was seen with D-[Asp/Glu] than with L-[Asp/Glu]. We concluded that IgE was specific for D-[Asp/Glu], not D-Asp or D-Glu, and that D-[Asp/Glu] was more reactive than was L-[Asp/Glu] in IgE inhibition. The finding indicates that D-[Asp/Glu] may have the potential for removing IgE or reducing IgE binding to peanut allergens in vitro. PMID:25053052

  16. Kinetics of the inhibition of bovine liver dihydrofolate reductase by tea catechins: origin of slow-binding inhibition and pH studies.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Perán, Enma; Cabezas-Herrera, Juan; Hiner, Alexander N P; Sadunishvili, Tinatin; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2005-05-24

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is the subject of intensive investigation since it appears to be the primary target enzyme for "antifolate" drugs, such as methotrexate and trimethoprim. Fluorescence quenching and stopped-flow fluorimetry show that the ester bond-containing tea polyphenols (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) are potent and specific inhibitors of DHFR with inhibition constants (K(I)) of 120 and 82 nM, respectively. Both tea compounds showed the characteristics of slow-binding inhibitors of bovine liver DHFR. In this work, we have determined a complete kinetic scheme to explain the slow-binding inhibition and the pH effects observed during the inhibition of bovine liver DHFR by these tea polyphenols. Experimental data, based on fluorimetric titrations, and transient phase and steady-state kinetic studies confirm that EGCG and ECG are competitive inhibitors with respect to 7,8-dihydrofolate, which bind preferentially to the free form of the enzyme. The origin of their slow-binding inhibition is proposed to be the formation of a slow dissociation ternary complex by the reaction of NADPH with the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The pH controls both the ionization of critical catalytic residues of the enzyme and the protonation state of the inhibitors. At acidic pH, EGCG and ECG are mainly present as protonated species, whereas near neutrality, they evolve toward deprotonated species due to ionization of the ester-bonded gallate moiety (pK = 7.8). Although DHFR exhibits different affinities for the protonated and deprotonated forms of EGCG and ECG, it appears that the ionization state of Glu-30 in DHFR is critical for its inhibition. The physiological implications of these pH dependencies are also discussed. PMID:15895994

  17. Dermatophyte-hormone relationships: characterization of progesterone-binding specificity and growth inhibition in the genera Trichophyton and Microsporum.

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, K V; Schär, G; Stover, E P; Feldman, D; Stevens, D A

    1988-01-01

    We reported previously that Trichophyton mentagrophytes contains a cytoplasmic macromolecule which specifically binds progesterone. Progesterone is also an effective inhibitor of growth of the fungus. We report here studies which characterize more fully the specific binding properties and the functional responses of T. mentagrophytes and taxonomically related fungi to a series of mammalian steroid hormones. Scatchard analysis of [3H]progesterone binding in both the + and - mating types of Arthroderma benhamiae and in Microsporum canis revealed a single class of binding sites with approximately the same affinity as that in T. mentagrophytes (Kd, 1 X 10(-7) to 2 X 10(-7) M). Trichophyton rubrum had a protein with a higher binding affinity (Kd, 1.6 X 10(-8) M). Characterization of the [3H]progesterone-binding sites in T. mentagrophytes showed the binder to be a protein which was destroyed by trypsin and heating to 56 degrees C. Previous examination of the steroid-binding specificity in T. mentagrophytes had demonstrated that deoxycorticosterone (DOC) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were effective competitors for [3H]progesterone binding. Expansion of this study to include other competitors revealed that R5020 (a synthetic progestin), androstenedione, and dehydroepiandosterone possessed relative binding affinities which were 20, 11, and 9% of that of progesterone, respectively. Other ligands tested were less effective. Competition studies for the binder in M. canis resulted in similar findings: DOC and DHT were effective competitors for [3H]progesterone binding. The growth of A. benhamiae + and -, M. canis, and T. rubrum were all inhibited by progesterone in a dose-responsive manner, with 50% inhibition achieved at concentrations of 9.8 x 10(-6), 1.2 x 10(-5), 1.5 x 10(-5), and 2.7 x 10(-6) M. respectively,. PMID:3182998

  18. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Binds to Both Osteoactivin and Integrin αVβ3 and Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Anada, Takahisa; Tawada, Akira; Suzuki, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Integrins and their ligands have been suggested to be associated with osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. The present study was designed to investigate whether chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), which is one of the sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), is involved in osteoactivin (OA) activity, and osteoclast differentiation. The binding affinity of sulfated GAGs to integrin and its ligand was measured using biotin-labeled CS-E, and the osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and a pit formation assay. CS-E as well as CS-B, synthetic chondroitin polysulfate, and heparin inhibited osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages. Pre-coating of OA to synthetic calcium phosphate-coated plates enhanced the osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264 cells, and addition of a neutralizing antibody to OA inhibited its differentiation. CS-E bound not only to OA, fibronectin, and vitronectin, but also to its receptor integrin αVβ3, and inhibited the direct binding of OA to integrin αVβ3. Furthermore, CS-E blocked the binding of OA to cells and inhibited OA-induced osteoclastic differentiation. On the other hand, heparinase treatment of RAW264 cells inhibited osteoclastic differentiation. Since binding of OA to the cells was inhibited by the presence of heparan sulfate or heparinase treatment of cells, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) was also considered to be an OA receptor. Taken together, the present results suggest that CS-E is capable of inhibiting OA-induced osteoclast differentiation by blocking the interaction of OA to integrin αVβ3 and HSPG.

  19. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Binds to Both Osteoactivin and Integrin αVβ3 and Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Anada, Takahisa; Tawada, Akira; Suzuki, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Integrins and their ligands have been suggested to be associated with osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. The present study was designed to investigate whether chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), which is one of the sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), is involved in osteoactivin (OA) activity, and osteoclast differentiation. The binding affinity of sulfated GAGs to integrin and its ligand was measured using biotin-labeled CS-E, and the osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and a pit formation assay. CS-E as well as CS-B, synthetic chondroitin polysulfate, and heparin inhibited osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages. Pre-coating of OA to synthetic calcium phosphate-coated plates enhanced the osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264 cells, and addition of a neutralizing antibody to OA inhibited its differentiation. CS-E bound not only to OA, fibronectin, and vitronectin, but also to its receptor integrin αVβ3, and inhibited the direct binding of OA to integrin αVβ3. Furthermore, CS-E blocked the binding of OA to cells and inhibited OA-induced osteoclastic differentiation. On the other hand, heparinase treatment of RAW264 cells inhibited osteoclastic differentiation. Since binding of OA to the cells was inhibited by the presence of heparan sulfate or heparinase treatment of cells, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) was also considered to be an OA receptor. Taken together, the present results suggest that CS-E is capable of inhibiting OA-induced osteoclast differentiation by blocking the interaction of OA to integrin αVβ3 and HSPG. PMID:25820496

  20. NifI inhibits nitrogenase by competing with Fe protein for binding to the MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Leigh, John A.

    2007-12-14

    Reduction of substrate by nitrogenase requires direct electron transfer from the Fe protein to the MoFe protein. Inhibition of nitrogenase activity in Methanococcus maripaludis occurs when the regulatory protein NifI{sub 1,2} binds the MoFe protein. This inhibition is relieved by 2-oxoglutarate. Here we present evidence that NifI{sub 1,2} binding prevents association of the two nitrogenase components. Increasing amounts of Fe protein competed with NifI{sub 1,2}, decreasing its inhibitory effect. NifI{sub 1,2} prevented the co-purification of MoFe protein with a mutant form of the Fe protein that forms a stable complex with the MoFe protein, and NifI{sub 1,2} was unable to bind to an AlF{sub 4}{sup -}-stabilized Fe protein:MoFe protein complex. NifI{sub 1,2} inhibited ATP- and MoFe protein-dependent oxidation of the Fe protein, and 2OG relieved this inhibition. These results support a model where NifI{sub 1,2} competes with the Fe protein for binding to MoFe protein and prevents electron transfer.

  1. Tumour-promoting phorbol esters increase basal and inhibit insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in rat adipocytes without decreasing insulin binding.

    PubMed Central

    van de Werve, G; Proietto, J; Jeanrenaud, B

    1985-01-01

    In isolated rat adipocytes, tumour-promoting phorbol esters caused (1) dose-dependent stimulation of lipogenesis in the absence of insulin and (2) inhibition of the lipogenic effect of submaximal concentrations of insulin, but without affecting insulin binding. The possible involvement of protein kinase C in insulin action is discussed. PMID:3883992

  2. Binding and segmentation of multiple objects through neural oscillators inhibited by contour information.

    PubMed

    Ursino, Mauro; La Cara, Giuseppe-Emiliano; Sarti, Alessandro

    2003-07-01

    Temporal correlation of neuronal activity has been suggested as a criterion for multiple object recognition. In this work, a two-dimensional network of simplified Wilson-Cowan oscillators is used to manage the binding and segmentation problem of a visual scene according to the connectedness Gestalt criterion. Binding is achieved via original coupling terms that link excitatory units to both excitatory and inhibitory units of adjacent neurons. These local coupling terms are time independent, i.e., they do not require Hebbian learning during the simulations. Segmentation is realized by a two-layer processing of the visual image. The first layer extracts all object contours from the image by means of "retinal cells" with an "on-center" receptive field. Information on contour is used to selectively inhibit Wilson-Cowan oscillators in the second layer, thus realizing a strong separation among neurons in different objects. Accidental synchronism between oscillations in different objects is prevented with the use of a global inhibitor, i.e., a global neuron that computes the overall activity in the Wilson-Cowan network and sends back an inhibitory signal. Simulations performed in a 50 x 50 neural grid with 21 different visual scenes (containing up to eight objects + background) with random initial conditions demonstrate that the network can correctly segment objects in almost 100% of cases using a single set of parameters, i.e., without the need to adjust parameters from one visual scene to the next. The network is robust with reference to dynamical noise superimposed on oscillatory neurons. Moreover, the network can segment both black objects on white background and vice versa and is able to deal with the problem of "fragmentation."The main limitation of the network is its sensitivity to static noise superimposed on the objects. Overcoming this problem requires implementation of more robust mechanisms for contour enhancement in the first layer in agreement with

  3. RNAi-mediated downregulation of DNA binding protein A inhibits tumorigenesis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ting; Wang, Guo-Rong; Liu, Chang; Qiu, Jian; Yan, Li-Kun; Li, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    DNA binding protein A (dbpA) belongs to the Y-box binding protein family and has been reported to play an important role in carcinogenesis. Our previous study demonstrated that the knockdown of dbpA in gastric cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation by modulating the cell cycle. However, the role of dbpA in human colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. In this study, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and clinicopathological parameter analysis were employed to detect dbpA expression in 44 paired CRC samples and 7 CRC cell lines. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to silence dbpA, and the effects of dbpA knockdown on cell proliferation were determined by MTT assay, colony formation assay and flow cytometry. Furthermore, a xenograft model was established to observe tumor growth in vivo. Functional analysis indicated that dbpA was overexpressed in the CRC tissues and cell lines, and a high dbpA expression was associated with the depth of invasion (p<0.001), the degree of differentiation (p<0.001), lymphatic metastasis (p<0.001) and vessel invasion (p<0.001). The suppression of dbpA expression resulted in decreased cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and it induced cell cycle arrest and promoted the apoptosis of the CRC cells. As a whole, our findings illustrate the crucial role of dbpA in colorectal tumorigenesis. Thus, dbpA may be used as a novel and potent therapeutic target in CRC. PMID:27430286

  4. Host APOBEC3G Protein Inhibits HCV Replication through Direct Binding at NS3

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhou-Yi; Li, Jian-Rui; Huang, Meng-Hao; Si, Shu-Yi; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human APOBEC3G (hA3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts replication of certain viruses. We have previously reported that hA3G was a host restriction factor against hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication, and hA3G stabilizers showed a significant inhibitory activity against HCV. However, the molecular mechanism of hA3G against HCV remains unknown. We show in this study that hA3G’s C-terminal directly binds HCV non-structural protein NS3 at its C-terminus, which is responsible for NS3’s helicase and NTPase activity. Binding of hA3G to the C-terminus of NS3 reduced helicase activity, and therefore inhibited HCV replication. The anti-HCV mechanism of hA3G appeared to be independent of its deamination activity. Although early stage HCV infection resulted in an increase in host hA3G as an intracellular response against HCV replication, hA3G was gradually diminished after a long-term incubation, suggesting an unknown mechanism(s) that protects HCV NS3 from inactivation by hA3G. The process represents, at least partially, a cellular defensive mechanism against HCV and the action is mediated through a direct interaction between host hA3G and HCV NS3. We believe that understanding of the antiviral mechanism of hA3G against HCV might open an interesting avenue to explore hA3G stabilizers as a new class of anti-HCV agents. PMID:25811715

  5. RNAi-mediated downregulation of DNA binding protein A inhibits tumorigenesis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui-Ting; Wang, Guo-Rong; Liu, Chang; Qiu, Jian; Yan, Li-Kun; Li, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA binding protein A (dbpA) belongs to the Y-box binding protein family and has been reported to play an important role in carcinogenesis. Our previous study demonstrated that the knockdown of dbpA in gastric cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation by modulating the cell cycle. However, the role of dbpA in human colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. In this study, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and clinicopathological parameter analysis were employed to detect dbpA expression in 44 paired CRC samples and 7 CRC cell lines. Lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to silence dbpA, and the effects of dbpA knockdown on cell proliferation were determined by MTT assay, colony formation assay and flow cytometry. Furthermore, a xenograft model was established to observe tumor growth in vivo. Functional analysis indicated that dbpA was overexpressed in the CRC tissues and cell lines, and a high dbpA expression was associated with the depth of invasion (p<0.001), the degree of differentiation (p<0.001), lymphatic metastasis (p<0.001) and vessel invasion (p<0.001). The suppression of dbpA expression resulted in decreased cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and it induced cell cycle arrest and promoted the apoptosis of the CRC cells. As a whole, our findings illustrate the crucial role of dbpA in colorectal tumorigenesis. Thus, dbpA may be used as a novel and potent therapeutic target in CRC. PMID:27430286

  6. An RNA aptamer possessing a novel monovalent cation-mediated fold inhibits lysozyme catalysis by inhibiting the binding of long natural substrates

    PubMed Central

    Padlan, Camille S.; Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Almo, Steve C.; Levy, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Girvin, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    RNA aptamers are being developed as inhibitors of macromolecular and cellular function, diagnostic tools, and potential therapeutics. Our understanding of the physical nature of this emerging class of nucleic acid–protein complexes is limited; few atomic resolution structures have been reported for aptamers bound to their protein target. Guided by chemical mapping, we systematically minimized an RNA aptamer (Lys1) selected against hen egg white lysozyme. The resultant 59-nucleotide compact aptamer (Lys1.2minE) retains nanomolar binding affinity and the ability to inhibit lysozyme's catalytic activity. Our 2.0-Å crystal structure of the aptamer–protein complex reveals a helical stem stabilizing two loops to form a protein binding platform that binds lysozyme distal to the catalytic cleft. This structure along with complementary solution analyses illuminate a novel protein–nucleic acid interface; (1) only 410 Å2 of solvent accessible surface are buried by aptamer binding; (2) an unusually small fraction (∼18%) of the RNA-protein interaction is electrostatic, consistent with the limited protein phosphate backbone contacts observed in the structure; (3) a single Na+ stabilizes the loops that constitute the protein-binding platform, and consistent with this observation, Lys1.2minE–lysozyme complex formation takes up rather than displaces cations at low ionic strength; (4) Lys1.2minE inhibits catalysis of large cell wall substrates but not catalysis of small model substrates; and (5) the helical stem of Lys1.2minE can be shortened to four base pairs (Lys1.2minF) without compromising binding affinity, yielding a 45-nucleotide aptamer whose structure may be an adaptable protein binding platform. PMID:24570482

  7. An RNA aptamer possessing a novel monovalent cation-mediated fold inhibits lysozyme catalysis by inhibiting the binding of long natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Padlan, Camille S; Malashkevich, Vladimir N; Almo, Steve C; Levy, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Girvin, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    RNA aptamers are being developed as inhibitors of macromolecular and cellular function, diagnostic tools, and potential therapeutics. Our understanding of the physical nature of this emerging class of nucleic acid-protein complexes is limited; few atomic resolution structures have been reported for aptamers bound to their protein target. Guided by chemical mapping, we systematically minimized an RNA aptamer (Lys1) selected against hen egg white lysozyme. The resultant 59-nucleotide compact aptamer (Lys1.2minE) retains nanomolar binding affinity and the ability to inhibit lysozyme's catalytic activity. Our 2.0-Å crystal structure of the aptamer-protein complex reveals a helical stem stabilizing two loops to form a protein binding platform that binds lysozyme distal to the catalytic cleft. This structure along with complementary solution analyses illuminate a novel protein-nucleic acid interface; (1) only 410 Å(2) of solvent accessible surface are buried by aptamer binding; (2) an unusually small fraction (∼18%) of the RNA-protein interaction is electrostatic, consistent with the limited protein phosphate backbone contacts observed in the structure; (3) a single Na(+) stabilizes the loops that constitute the protein-binding platform, and consistent with this observation, Lys1.2minE-lysozyme complex formation takes up rather than displaces cations at low ionic strength; (4) Lys1.2minE inhibits catalysis of large cell wall substrates but not catalysis of small model substrates; and (5) the helical stem of Lys1.2minE can be shortened to four base pairs (Lys1.2minF) without compromising binding affinity, yielding a 45-nucleotide aptamer whose structure may be an adaptable protein binding platform.

  8. Ferrocene-based guanidine derivatives: in vitro antimicrobial, DNA binding and docking supported urease inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Gul, Rukhsana; Rauf, Muhammad Khawar; Badshah, Amin; Azam, Syed Sikander; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Khan, Azim

    2014-10-01

    Some novel ferrocenyl guanidines 1-8 were synthesized and characterized by different spectroscopic methods, elemental analysis and single crystal X-rays diffraction techniques. The crystallographic studies revealed that the existence of the strong non-bonding interactions facilitate these molecules to interact with biological macro-molecules like DNA that described to inherit good biological activities. The DNA interaction studies carried out by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-visible spectroscopy are in close agreement with the binding constants (K) (0.79-5.4) × 10(5) (CV) and (0.72-5.1) × 10(5) (UV-vis). The shift in peak potential, current and absorption maxima of the studied ferrocenyl guanidines in the presence of DNA revealed that CV coupled with UV-vis spectroscopy could provide an opportune to characterize metal-based compounds-DNA interaction mechanism, a prerequisite for the design of new anticancer agents and understanding the molecular basis of their action. The compounds 1-8 have been screened for their antibacterial, antifungal and urease inhibition potency. A concurrent in silico study has also been applied on ferrocene moiety impregnated guanidines 1-8 to identify most active compounds having for inhibiting the activity of urease (pdb id 3LA4). Most of the compounds were found as potent inhibitors of urease and the compound 1 was found to be the most active with an IC50 of 16.83 ± 0.03 μM. The docking scores are in close agreement with the in vitro obtained IC50 values of inhibitors 1-8.

  9. BS69/ZMYND11 C-Terminal Domains Bind and Inhibit EBNA2

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Lung; Gonzalez-Hurtado, Elsie; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Xu, Muyu; Martinez, Ernest; Peng, Chih-Wen; Song, Jikui

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) plays an important role in driving immortalization of EBV-infected B cells through regulating the expression of many viral and cellular genes. We report a structural study of the tumor suppressor BS69/ZMYND11 C-terminal region, comprised of tandem coiled-coil-MYND domains (BS69CC-MYND), in complex with an EBNA2 peptide containing a PXLXP motif. The coiled-coil domain of BS69 self-associates to bring two separate MYND domains in close proximity, thereby enhancing the BS69 MYND-EBNA2 interaction. ITC analysis of BS69CC-MYND with a C-terminal fragment of EBNA2 further suggests that the BS69CC-MYND homodimer synergistically binds to the two EBNA2 PXLXP motifs that are respectively located in the conserved regions CR7 and CR8. Furthermore, we showed that EBNA2 interacts with BS69 and down-regulates its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in EBV-infected B cells. Ectopic BS69CC-MYND is recruited to viral target promoters through interactions with EBNA2, inhibits EBNA2-mediated transcription activation, and impairs proliferation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Substitution of critical residues in the MYND domain impairs the BS69-EBNA2 interaction and abolishes the BS69 inhibition of the EBNA2-mediated transactivation and LCL proliferation. This study identifies the BS69 C-terminal domains as an inhibitor of EBNA2, which may have important implications in development of novel therapeutic strategies against EBV infection. PMID:26845565

  10. Human CRB2 Inhibits γ-Secretase Cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein by Binding to the Presenilin Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuishi, Yachiyo; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Akinori; Araki, Wataru; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Tagami, Shinji; Okochi, Masayasu; Takeda, Masatoshi; Roepman, Ronald; Nishimura, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila Crumbs has been reported to attenuate Notch signaling by inhibition of γ-secretase cleavage at the wing margins. γ-Secretase is an intramembrane protease that is responsible for the generation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides from the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). Here, we re-examined γ-secretase inhibition by human CRB2, which is the most abundant Crumbs ortholog in the brain. Transfected CRB2 inhibited proteolytic production of Aβ and APP intracellular domains from APP C-terminal fragments in HEK293 and SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous CRB2 increased γ-secretase cleavage products in SH-SY5Y cells. CRB2 inhibition of γ-cleavage was also detected in cell-free assays. CRB2 interacted with the γ-secretase complex, but was not a competitive substrate for γ-cleavage. The transmembrane domain of CRB2 was indispensable for inhibition of Aβ generation and mediated CRB2 binding with the γ-secretase complex. In addition, the cytoplasmic domain appeared to play a supportive role in γ-secretase inhibition, whereas mutational disruption of the two protein-binding motifs involved in the formation of cell adhesion complexes did not affect γ-secretase inhibition. Co-overexpression of presenilin-1 or APH-1 abrogated γ-secretase inhibition probably through prevention of the incorporation of CRB2 into the γ-secretase complex. Our results suggest that CRB2 functions as an inhibitory binding protein that is involved in the formation of a mature but inactive pool of the γ-secretase complex. PMID:20299451

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition by lithium and beryllium suggests the presence of two magnesium binding sites.

    PubMed

    Ryves, W Jonathan; Dajani, Rana; Pearl, Laurence; Harwood, Adrian J

    2002-01-25

    Lithium inhibits (Li(+)) glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) by competition for magnesium (Mg(2+)), but not ATP or substrate. Here, we show that the group II metal ion beryllium (Be(2+)) is a potent inhibitor of GSK-3 and competes for both Mg(2+) and ATP. Be(2+) also inhibits the related protein kinase cdc2 at similar potency, but not MAP kinase 2. To compare the actions of Li(+) and Be(2+) on GSK-3, we have devised a novel dual inhibition analysis. When Be(2+) and ADP are present together each interferes with the action of the other, indicating that both agents inhibit GSK-3 at the ATP binding site. In contrast, Li(+) exerts no interference with ADP inhibition or vice versa. We find, however, that Li(+) and Be(2+) do interfere with each other. These results suggest that Be(2+) competes for two distinct Mg(2+) binding sites: one is Li(+)-sensitive and the other, which is Li(+)-insensitive, binds the Mg:ATP complex.

  12. The p53 activation domain binds the TATA box-binding polypeptide in Holo-TFIID, and a neighboring p53 domain inhibits transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Miller, C W; Koeffler, P H; Berk, A J

    1993-01-01

    Antioncogene product p53 is a transcriptional transactivator. To investigate how p53 stimulates transcription, we examined the interaction of p53 with general transcription factors in vitro. We found that p53 binds directly to the human TATA box-binding polypeptide (TBP). We also observed a direct interaction between p53 and purified holo-TFIID, a complex composed of TBP and a group of TBP-associated polypeptides known as TAFs. The p53 binding domain on TBP was mapped to the conserved region of TBP, including residues 220 to 271. The TBP binding domain on p53 was mapped to the p53 activation domain between residues 20 and 57. To analyze the significance of the p53-TBP interaction in p53 transactivation, we compared the ability of Gal4-p53 fusion proteins to bind to TBP in vitro and to activate transcription in transient transfection assays. Fusion proteins which bound to TBP activated transcription, and those that did not bind to TBP did not activate transcription to a detectable level, suggesting that a direct interaction between TBP and p53 is required for p53 transactivation. We also found that inclusion of residues 93 to 160 of p53 in a Gal4-p53 fusion repressed transcriptional activation 100-fold. Consequently, this region of p53 inhibits transcriptional activation by the minimal p53 activation domain. Highest levels of activation were observed with sequences 1 to 92 of p53 fused to Gal4, even though this construct bound to TBP in vitro with an affinity similar to that of other Gal4-p53 fusion proteins. We conclude that TBP binding is necessary for p53 transcriptional activation and that p53 sequences outside the TBP binding domain modulate the level of activation. Images PMID:8497252

  13. Colorectal mucus binds DC-SIGN and inhibits HIV-1 trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Stax, Martijn J; Mouser, Emily E I M; van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W; de Vries, Henry J C; Dekker, Henk L; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1-3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa.

  14. Colorectal Mucus Binds DC-SIGN and Inhibits HIV-1 Trans-Infection of CD4+ T-Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Sanders, Rogier W.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Dekker, Henk L.; Herrera, Carolina; Speijer, Dave; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Bodily secretions, including breast milk and semen, contain factors that modulate HIV-1 infection. Since anal intercourse caries one of the highest risks for HIV-1 transmission, our aim was to determine whether colorectal mucus (CM) also contains factors interfering with HIV-1 infection and replication. CM from a number of individuals was collected and tested for the capacity to bind DC-SIGN and inhibit HIV-1 cis- or trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes. To this end, a DC-SIGN binding ELISA, a gp140 trimer competition ELISA and HIV-1 capture/ transfer assays were utilized. Subsequently we aimed to identify the DC-SIGN binding component through biochemical characterization and mass spectrometry analysis. CM was shown to bind DC-SIGN and competes with HIV-1 gp140 trimer for binding. Pre-incubation of Raji-DC-SIGN cells or immature dendritic cells (iDCs) with CM potently inhibits DC-SIGN mediated trans-infection of CD4+ T-lymphocytes with CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains, while no effect on direct infection is observed. Preliminary biochemical characterization demonstrates that the component seems to be large (>100kDa), heat and proteinase K resistant, binds in a α1–3 mannose independent manner and is highly variant between individuals. Immunoprecipitation using DC-SIGN-Fc coated agarose beads followed by mass spectrometry indicated lactoferrin (fragments) and its receptor (intelectin-1) as candidates. Using ELISA we showed that lactoferrin levels within CM correlate with DC-SIGN binding capacity. In conclusion, CM can bind the C-type lectin DC-SIGN and block HIV-1 trans-infection of both CCR5 and CXCR4 using HIV-1 strains. Furthermore, our data indicate that lactoferrin is a DC-SIGN binding component of CM. These results indicate that CM has the potential to interfere with pathogen transmission and modulate immune responses at the colorectal mucosa. PMID:25793526

  15. Executive Resources and Item-Context Binding: Exploring the Influence of Concurrent Inhibition, Updating, and Shifting Tasks on Context Memory

    PubMed Central

    Nieznański, Marek; Obidziński, Michał; Zyskowska, Emilia; Niedziałkowska, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that context memory performance decreases as a result of cognitive load. However, the role of specific executive resources availability has not been specified yet. In a dual-task experiment, participants performed three kinds of concurrent task engaging: inhibition, updating, or shifting operations. In comparison with a no-load single-task condition, a significant decrease in item and context memory was observed, regardless of the kind of executive task. When executive load conditions were compared with non-specific cognitive load conditions, a significant interference effect was observed in the case of the inhibition task. The inhibition process appears to be an aspect of executive control, which relies on the same resource as item-context binding does, especially when binding refers to associations retrieved from long-term memory. PMID:26435761

  16. Divalent cations enhance fluoride binding to Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis cells and subsequently inhibit bacterial acid production.

    PubMed

    Domon-Tawaraya, H; Nakajo, K; Washio, J; Ashizawa, T; Ichino, T; Sugawara, H; Fukumoto, S; Takahashi, N

    2013-01-01

    One preventive effect of topical fluoride application is derived from the fact that fluoride can inhibit bacterial acid production. Furthermore, divalent cations such as Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) increase the binding of fluoride to bacterial cells. These findings suggest that exposure of oral bacteria to fluoride in the presence of divalent cations increases fluoride binding to bacterial cells and subsequently enhances fluoride-induced inhibition of bacterial acid production. This study investigated the effects of fluoride exposure (0-20,000 ppm F) in the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) prior to glucose challenge on pH fall ability by bacterial sugar fermentation, as well as fluoride binding to bacterial cells by exposure to fluoride, and fluoride release from bacterial cells during bacterial sugar fermentation, using caries-related bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis. The pH fall by both streptococci was inhibited by exposure to over 250 ppm F in the presence of Ca(2+) (p < 0.01), whereas in the presence of Mg(2+), the pH fall by S. mutans and S. sanguinis was inhibited after exposure to over 250 and 950 ppm F, respectively (p < 0.05). The amounts of fluoride binding to and released from streptococcal cells increased with the concentration of fluoride the cells were exposed to in the presence of Mg(2+), but were high enough even after 250 ppm F exposure in the presence of Ca(2+). The enhanced inhibition of acid production in the presence of divalent cations is probably due to the improved efficiency of fluoride binding to bacterial cells being improved via these divalent cations.

  17. Identification of approved drugs that inhibit the binding of amyloid β oligomers to ephrin type-B receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichiro; Aimi, Takahiro; Ishihara, Tomoaki; Mizushima, Tohru

    2016-05-01

    Ephrin type-B receptor 2 (EphB2) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family and plays an important role in learning and memory functions. In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in mouse models of AD, a reduction in the hippocampal EphB2 level is observed. It was recently reported that normalization of the EphB2 level in the dentate gyrus rescues memory function in a mouse model of AD, suggesting that drugs that restore EphB2 levels may be beneficial in the treatment of AD. Amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers, which are believed to be key molecules involved in the pathogenesis of AD, induce EphB2 degradation through their direct binding to EphB2. Thus, compounds that inhibit the binding of Aβ oligomers to EphB2 may be beneficial. Here, we screened for such compounds from drugs already approved for clinical use in humans. Utilizing a cell-free screening assay, we determined that dihydroergotamine mesilate, bromocriptine mesilate, cepharanthine, and levonorgestrel inhibited the binding of Aβ oligomers to EphB2 but not to cellular prion protein, another endogenous receptor for Aβ oligomers. Additionally, these four compounds did not affect the binding between EphB2 and ephrinB2, an endogenous ligand for EphB2, suggesting that the compounds selectively inhibited the binding of Aβ oligomers to EphB2. This is the first identification of compounds that selectively inhibit the binding of Aβ oligomers to EphB2. These results suggest that these four compounds may be safe and effective drugs for treatment of AD. PMID:27419051

  18. Differentiating a Ligand's Chemical Requirements for Allosteric Interactions from Those for Protein Binding. Phenylalanine Inhibition of Pyruvate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Williams,R.; Holyoak, T.; McDonald, G.; Gui, C.; Fenton, A.

    2006-01-01

    The isoform of pyruvate kinase from brain and muscle of mammals (M1-PYK) is allosterically inhibited by phenylalanine. Initial observations in this model allosteric system indicate that Ala binds competitively with Phe, but elicits a minimal allosteric response. Thus, the allosteric ligand of this system must have requirements for eliciting an allosteric response in addition to the requirements for binding. Phe analogues have been used to dissect what chemical properties of Phe are responsible for eliciting the allosteric response. We first demonstrate that the L-2-aminopropanaldehyde substructure of the amino acid ligand is primarily responsible for binding to M1-PYK. Since the allosteric response to Ala is minimal and linear addition of methyl groups beyond the -carbon increase the magnitude of the allosteric response, we conclude that moieties beyond the -carbon are primarily responsible for allostery. Instead of an all-or-none mechanism of allostery, these findings support the idea that the bulk of the hydrophobic side chain, but not the aromatic nature, is the primary determinant of the magnitude of the observed allosteric inhibition. The use of these results to direct structural studies has resulted in a 1.65 Angstroms structure of M1-PYK with Ala bound. The coordination of Ala in the allosteric amino acid binding site confirms the binding role of the L-2-aminopropanaldehyde substructure of the ligand. Collectively, this study confirms that a ligand can have chemical regions specific for eliciting the allosteric signal in addition to the chemical regions necessary for binding.

  19. Synaptic scaffolding molecule interacts with axin.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Susumu; Nishimura, Wataru; Iida, Junko; Kansaku, Ai; Kishida, Shosei; Kikuchi, Akira; Tanaka, Noriaki; Hata, Yutaka

    2004-07-01

    Synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) is a synaptic protein that consists of PDZ domains, a guanylate kinase domain, and WW domains. It interacts with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits, neuroligin, and beta-catenin. Here, we identified Axin as a novel binding partner of S-SCAM. Axin was co-immunoprecipitated with S-SCAM from rat brain, detected in the post-synaptic density fraction in rat brain subcellular fractionation, and partially co-localized with S-SCAM in neurons. The guanylate kinase domain of S-SCAM directly bound to the GSK3beta-binding region of Axin. S-SCAM formed a complex with beta-catenin and Axin, but competed with GSK3beta for Axin-binding. Thereby, S-SCAM inhibited the Axin-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin by GSK3beta.

  20. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Pietrantoni, Agostina; Fortuna, Claudia; Remoli, Maria Elena; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Superti, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin. PMID:25643293

  1. Troponin I binds polycystin-L and inhibits its calcium-induced channel activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Liu, Yan; Shen, Patrick Y; Dai, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Shaohua; Smillie, Lawrence B; Sandford, Richard; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2003-06-24

    Polycystin-L (PCL) is an isoform of polycystin-2, the product of the second gene associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and functions as a Ca(2+)-regulated nonselective cation channel. We recently demonstrated that polycystin-2 interacts with troponin I, an important regulatory component of the actin microfilament complex in striated muscle cells and an angiogenesis inhibitor. In this study, using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique and Xenopus oocyte expression system, we showed that the calcium-induced PCL channel activation is substantially inhibited by the skeletal and cardiac troponin I (60% and 31% reduction, respectively). Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that PCL physically associates with the skeletal and cardiac troponin I isoforms in overexpressed Xenopus oocytes and mouse fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, both native PCL and cardiac troponin I were present in human heart tissues where they indeed associate with each other. GST pull-down and microtiter binding assays showed that the C-terminus of PCL interacts with the troponin I proteins. The yeast two-hybrid assay further verified this interaction and defined the corresponding interacting domains of the PCL C-terminus and troponin I. Taken together, this study suggests that troponin I acts as a regulatory subunit of the PCL channel complex and provides the first direct evidence that PCL is associated with the actin cytoskeleton through troponin I. PMID:12809519

  2. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum RhopH3 protein peptides that specifically bind to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón, Carlos Giovanni; Curtidor, Hernando; Reyes, Claudia; Méndez, David; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2008-01-01

    The identification of sequences involved in binding to erythrocytes is an important step for understanding the molecular basis of merozoite–erythrocyte interactions that take place during invasion of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite into host cells. Several molecules located in the apical organelles (micronemes, rhoptry, dense granules) of the invasive-stage parasite are essential for erythrocyte recognition, invasion, and establishment of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole. Particularly, it has been demonstrated that rhoptry proteins play an important role in binding to erythrocyte surface receptors, among which is the PfRhopH3 protein, which triggers important immune responses in patients from endemic regions. It has also been reported that anti-RhopH3 antibodies inhibit in vitro invasion of erythrocytes, further supporting its direct involvement in erythrocyte invasion processes. In this study, PfRhopH3 consecutive peptides were synthesized and tested in erythrocyte binding assays for identifying those regions mediating binding to erythrocytes. Fourteen PfRhopH3 peptides presenting high specific binding activity were found, whose bindings were saturable and presented nanomolar dissociation constants. These high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) were characterized by having α-helical structural elements, as determined by circular dichroism, and having receptors of a possible sialic acid-dependent and/or glycoprotein-dependent nature, as evidenced in enzyme-treated erythrocyte binding assays and further corroborated by cross-linking assay results. Furthermore, these HABPs inhibited merozoite in vitro invasion of normal erythrocytes at 200 μM by up to 60% and 90%, suggesting that some RhopH3 protein regions are involved in the P. falciparum erythrocyte invasion. PMID:18593818

  3. Inhibition of the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of bromodomain and extraterminal domain proteins interferes with adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goupille, Olivier; Penglong, Tipparat; Kadri, Zahra; Granger-Locatelli, Marine; Fucharoen, Suthat; Maouche-Chrétien, Leila; Prost, Stéphane; Leboulch, Philippe; Chrétien, Stany

    2016-04-15

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family proteins are epigenetic modulators involved in the reading of acetylated lysine residues. The first BET protein inhibitor to be identified, (+)-JQ1, a thienotriazolo-1, 4-diazapine, binds selectively to the acetyl lysine-binding pocket of BET proteins. We evaluated the impact on adipogenesis of this druggable targeting of chromatin epigenetic readers, by investigating the physiological consequences of epigenetic modifications through targeting proteins binding to chromatin. JQ1 significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes into white and brown adipocytes by down-regulating the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis, particularly those encoding the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ), the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBPα) and, STAT5A and B. The expression of a constitutively activated STAT5B mutant did not prevent inhibition by JQ1. Thus, the association of BET/STAT5 is required for adipogenesis but STAT5 transcription activity is not the only target of JQ1. Treatment with JQ1 did not lead to the conversion of white adipose tissue into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BET protein inhibition thus interferes with generation of adipose tissue from progenitors, confirming the importance of the connections between epigenetic mechanisms and specific adipogenic transcription factors. PMID:26972250

  4. Direct Pore Binding as a Mechanism for Isoflurane Inhibition of the Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channel ELIC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Kinde, Monica N.; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wells, Marta M.; Cohen, Aina E.; Xu, Yan; Tang, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are targets of general anesthetics, but molecular mechanisms underlying anesthetic action remain debatable. We found that ELIC, a pLGIC from Erwinia chrysanthemi, can be functionally inhibited by isoflurane and other anesthetics. Structures of ELIC co-crystallized with isoflurane in the absence or presence of an agonist revealed double isoflurane occupancies inside the pore near T237(6′) and A244(13′). A pore-radius contraction near the extracellular entrance was observed upon isoflurane binding. Electrophysiology measurements with a single-point mutation at position 6′ or 13′ support the notion that binding at these sites renders isoflurane inhibition. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that isoflurane binding was more stable in the resting than in a desensitized pore conformation. This study presents compelling evidence for a direct pore-binding mechanism of isoflurane inhibition, which has a general implication for inhibitory action of general anesthetics on pLGICs. PMID:26346220

  5. Timcodar (VX-853) Is a Non-FKBP12 Binding Macrolide Derivative That Inhibits PPARγ and Suppresses Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Lucien; Sanchez, Edwin R.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient overload and genetic factors have led to a worldwide epidemic of obesity that is the underlying cause of diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we used macrolide drugs such as FK506, rapamycin, and macrolide derived, timcodar (VX-853), to determine their effects on lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. Rapamycin and FK506 bind to FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs), such as FKBP12, which causes suppression of the immune system and inhibition of mTOR. Rapamycin has been previously reported to inhibit the adipogenic process and lipid accumulation. However, rapamycin treatment in rodents caused immune suppression and glucose resistance, even though the mice lost weight. Here we show that timcodar (1 μM), a non-FKBP12-binding drug, significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. A comparison of the same concentration of timcodar (1 μM) and rapamycin (1 μM) showed that both are inhibitors of lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. Importantly, timcodar potently (p < 0.01) suppressed transcriptional regulators of adipogenesis, PPARγ and C/EBPα, resulting in the inhibition of genes involved in lipid accumulation. These studies set the stage for timcodar as a possible antiobesity therapy, which is rapidly emerging as a pandemic. PMID:27190501

  6. Timcodar (VX-853) Is a Non-FKBP12 Binding Macrolide Derivative That Inhibits PPARγ and Suppresses Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Terry D; John, Kezia; McBeth, Lucien; Trabbic, Christopher J; Sanchez, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient overload and genetic factors have led to a worldwide epidemic of obesity that is the underlying cause of diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we used macrolide drugs such as FK506, rapamycin, and macrolide derived, timcodar (VX-853), to determine their effects on lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. Rapamycin and FK506 bind to FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs), such as FKBP12, which causes suppression of the immune system and inhibition of mTOR. Rapamycin has been previously reported to inhibit the adipogenic process and lipid accumulation. However, rapamycin treatment in rodents caused immune suppression and glucose resistance, even though the mice lost weight. Here we show that timcodar (1 μM), a non-FKBP12-binding drug, significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. A comparison of the same concentration of timcodar (1 μM) and rapamycin (1 μM) showed that both are inhibitors of lipid accumulation during adipogenesis. Importantly, timcodar potently (p < 0.01) suppressed transcriptional regulators of adipogenesis, PPARγ and C/EBPα, resulting in the inhibition of genes involved in lipid accumulation. These studies set the stage for timcodar as a possible antiobesity therapy, which is rapidly emerging as a pandemic. PMID:27190501

  7. An interspecies comparison of mercury inhibition on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Niladri; Stamler, Christopher J.; Loua, Kovana Marcel; Chan, H.M. . E-mail: laurie.chan@mcgill.ca

    2005-05-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous pollutant that can disrupt neurochemical signaling pathways in mammals. It is well documented that inorganic Hg (HgCl{sub 2}) and methyl Hg (MeHg) can inhibit the binding of radioligands to the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor in rat brains. However, little is known concerning this relationship in specific anatomical regions of the brain or in other species, including humans. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HgCl{sub 2} and MeHg on [{sup 3}H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([{sup 3}H]-QNB) binding to the mACh receptor in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex regions from human, rat, mouse, mink, and river otter brain tissues. Saturation binding curves were obtained from each sample to calculate receptor density (B {sub max}) and ligand affinity (K {sub d}). Subsequently, samples were exposed to HgCl{sub 2} or MeHg to derive IC50 values and inhibition constants (K {sub i}). Results demonstrate that HgCl{sub 2} is a more potent inhibitor of mACh receptor binding than MeHg, and the receptors in the cerebellum are more sensitive to Hg-mediated mACh receptor inhibition than those in the cerebral cortex. Species sensitivities, irrespective of Hg type and brain region, can be ranked from most to least sensitive: river otter > rat > mink > mouse > humans. In summary, our data demonstrate that Hg can inhibit the binding [{sup 3}H]-QNB to the mACh receptor in a range of mammalian species. This comparative study provides data on interspecies differences and a framework for interpreting results from human, murine, and wildlife studies.

  8. Competitive Inhibition of High-Affinity Oryzalin Binding to Plant Tubulin by the Phosphoric Amide Herbicide Amiprophos-Methyl.

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, J. V.; Kim, H. H.; Hanesworth, V. R.; Hugdahl, J. D.; Morejohn, L. C.

    1994-01-01

    Amiprophos-methyl (APM), a phosphoric amide herbicide, was previously reported to inhibit the in vitro polymerization of isolated plant tubulin (L.C. Morejohn, D.E. Fosket [1984] Science 224: 874-876), yet little other biochemical information exists concerning this compound. To characterize further the mechanism of action of APM, its interactions with tubulin and microtubules purified from cultured cells of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Bright Yellow-2) were investigated. Low micromolar concentrations of APM depolymerized preformed, taxol-stabilized tobacco microtubules. Remarkably, at the lowest APM concentration examined, many short microtubules were redistributed into fewer but 2.7-fold longer microtubules without a substantial decrease in total polymer mass, a result consistent with an end-to-end annealing of microtubules with enhanced kinetic properties. Quasi-equilibrium binding measurements showed that tobacco tubulin binds [14C]oryzalin with high affinity to produce a tubulin-oryzalin complex having a dissociation constant (Kd) = 117 nM (pH 6.9; 23[deg]C). Also, an estimated maximum molar binding stoichiometry of 0.32 indicates pharamacological heterogeneity of tobacco dimers and may be related to structural heterogeneity of tobacco tubulin subunits. APM inhibits competitively the binding of [14C]oryzalin to tubulin with an inhibition constant (Ki) = 5 [mu]M, indicating the formation of a moderate affinity tubulin-APM complex that may interact with the ends of microtubules. APM concentrations inhibiting tobacco cell growth were within the threshold range of APM concentrations that depolymerized cellular microtubules, indicating that growth inhibition is caused by microtubules depolymerization. APM had no apparent effect on microtubules in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. Because cellular microtubules were depolymerized at APM and oryzalin concentrations below their respective Ki and Kd values, both herbicides are proposed to depolymerize microtubules by a

  9. Interaction of hirudin with thrombin: Identification of a minimal binding domain of hirudin that inhibits clotting activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S.J.T.; Yates, M.T.; Owen, T.J.; Krstenansky, J.L. )

    1988-10-18

    Hirudin, isolated from the European leech Hirudo medicinalis, is a potent inhibitor of thrombin, forming an almost irreversible thrombin-hirudin complex. Previously, the authors have shown that the carboxyl terminus of hirudin (residues 45-65) inhibits clotting activity and without binding to the catalytic site of thrombin. In the present study, a series of peptides corresponding to this carboxyl-terminal region of hirudin have been synthesized, and their anticoagulant activity and binding properties to thrombin were examined. Binding was assessed by their ability to displace {sup 125}I-hirudin 45-65 from Sepharose-immobilized thrombin and by isolation of peptide-thrombin complexes. They show that the carboxyl-terminal 10 amino acid residues 56-65 (Phe-Glu-Glu-Ile-Pro-Glu-Glu-Tyr-Leu-Gln) are minimally required for binding to thrombin and inhibition of clotting. Phe-56 was critical for maintaining anticoagulant activity as demonstrated by the loss of activity when Phe-56 was substituted with D-Phe, Glu, or Leu. In addition, they found that the binding of the carboxyl-terminal peptide of hirudin with thrombin was associated with a significant conformational change of thrombin as judged by circular dichroism. This conformational change might be responsible for the loss of clotting activity of thrombin.

  10. The human papillomavirus18 E7 protein inhibits CENP-C binding to α-satellite DNA.

    PubMed

    Yaginuma, Yuji; Yoshimoto, Masafumi; Eguchi, Ayami; Tokuda, Aoi; Takahashi, Shoko

    2015-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection leads to aneuploidy, a numerical chromosomal aberration that is caused by dysregulation of chromosomal segregation. We previously found that the E7 proteins of high-risk HPVs, but not of low-risk HPVs, could bind to centromere protein-C (CENP-C). In this study, we first found that CENP-C could bind centromere α-satellite DNAs using ChIP analysis and HA-tagged CENP-C/nuc transfected 293T cells. We then investigated if HA-CENP-C/nuc binding to α-satellite DNAs was affected by the E7 proteins of high- or low-risk HPVs. We found that transfection of the FLAG tagged HPV18 E7 inhibited the binding of HA-CENP-C/nuc to α-satellite DNAs. This finding was confirmed in HeLa S3 cells transfected with siRNA targeted to HPV18 E7 expression. We therefore speculate that altered function of kinetochores as a result of inhibition of CENP-C and α-satellite DNAs binding may be associated with the chromosomal abnormalities observed in HPV18-positive cancers.

  11. Secreted glypican binds to the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease (APP) and inhibits APP-induced neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Williamson, T G; Mok, S S; Henry, A; Cappai, R; Lander, A D; Nurcombe, V; Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L; Small, D H

    1996-12-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease has been shown to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro. The effect of APP on neurite outgrowth can be enhanced if APP is presented to neurons in substrate-bound form, in the presence of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. To identify specific heparan sulfate proteoglycans that bind to APP, conditioned medium from neonatal mouse brain cells was subjected to affinity chromatography with recombinant APP695 as a ligand. Glypican bound strongly to the APP affinity column. Purified glypican bound to APP with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.8 nM and inhibited APP-induced neurite outgrowth from chick sympathetic neurons. The effect of glypican was specific for APP, as glypican did not inhibit laminin-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, treatment of cultures with 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-xyloside, a competitive inhibitor of proteoglycan glycanation, inhibited APP-induced neurite outgrowth but did not inhibit laminin-induced neurite outgrowth. This result suggests that endogenous proteoglycans are required for substrate-bound APP to stimulate neurite outgrowth. Secreted glypican may act to inhibit APP-induced neurite outgrowth in vivo by competing with endogenous proteoglycans for binding to APP.

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester downregulates phospholipase D1 via direct binding and inhibition of NFκB transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi Hee; Kang, Dong Woo; Jung, Yunjin; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •We found CAFÉ, a natural product that suppresses expression and activity of PLD1. •CAPE decreased PLD1 expression by inhibiting NFκB transactivation. •CAPE rapidly inhibited PLD activity via its binding to a Cys837 of PLD1. •PLD1 downregulation by CAPE inhibited invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. -- Abstract: Upregulation of phospholipase D (PLD) is functionally linked with oncogenic signals and tumorigenesis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active compound of propolis extract that exhibits anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and antineoplastic properties. In this study, we demonstrated that CAPE suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level via inhibition of binding of NFκB to PLD1 promoter. Moreover, CAPE, but not its analogs, bound to a Cys837 residue of PLD1 and inhibited enzymatic activity of PLD. CAPE also decreased activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 induced by phosphatidic acid, a product of PLD activity. Ultimately, CAPE-induced downregulation of PLD1 suppressed invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that CAPE might contribute to anti-neoplastic effect by targeting PLD1.

  13. Comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analysis of human neutrophil elastase inhibition by pyridone-containing trifluoromethylketones.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, C; Pastor, M; Pérez, C; Gago, F

    2001-12-01

    The complexes of human neutrophil elastase with a series of 40 N3-substituted trifluoromethylketone-based pyridone inhibitors have been modelled. The series spans three orders of magnitude in inhibition constants despite the fact that it was originally developed in an attempt to improve the oral activity of a lead compound. Ligand-receptor interaction energies calculated using molecular mechanics did not correlate well with the experimental activities. A good correlation with activity was found, however, when a COMBINE analysis of the same data was carried out, which allowed a quantitative interpretation of the modelled complexes. The essence of this method is to partition the ligand-receptor interaction energies into individual residue-based van der Waals and electrostatic contributions, and to subject the resulting energy matrix to partial least squares analysis. Incorporation of two additional descriptors representing the electrostatic energy contributions to the partial desolvation of both the receptor and the ligands improved the QSAR model, as did the replacement of the distance-dependent electrostatic contributions with solvent-screened electrostatic interactions calculated by numerically solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The model was validated both internally (cross-validation) and externally, using a set of twelve 6-phenyl-pyridopyrimidine analogs. The analysis reveals the subtle interplay of binding forces which occurs within the enzyme active site and provides objective information that can be interpreted in the light of the receptor structure. This information, gained from a series of real compounds, can be easily translated into 3D real or virtual database queries in the search for more active derivatives.

  14. Dynamin Binding Protein (Tuba) Deficiency Inhibits Ciliogenesis and Nephrogenesis in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jeong-In; Kwon, Sang-Ho; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2016-04-15

    Dysfunction of renal primary cilia leads to polycystic kidney disease. We previously showed that the exocyst, a protein trafficking complex, is essential for ciliogenesis and regulated by multiple Rho and Rab family GTPases, such as Cdc42. Cdc42 deficiency resulted in a disruption of renal ciliogenesis and a polycystic kidney disease phenotype in zebrafish and mice. Here we investigate the role of Dynamin binding protein (also known as Tuba), a Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, in ciliogenesis and nephrogenesis using Tuba knockdown Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and tuba knockdown in zebrafish. Tuba depletion resulted in an absence of cilia, with impaired apical polarization and inhibition of hepatocyte growth factor-induced tubulogenesis in Tuba knockdown Madin-Darby canine kidney cell cysts cultured in a collagen gel. In zebrafish, tuba was expressed in multiple ciliated organs, and, accordingly, tuba start and splice site morphants showed various ciliary mutant phenotypes in these organs. Co-injection of tuba and cdc42 morpholinos at low doses, which alone had no effect, resulted in genetic synergy and led to abnormal kidney development with highly disorganized pronephric duct cilia. Morpholinos targeting two other guanine nucleotide exchange factors not known to be in the Cdc42/ciliogenesis pathway and a scrambled control morpholino showed no phenotypic effect. Given the molecular nature of Cdc42 and Tuba, our data strongly suggest that tuba and cdc42 act in the same ciliogenesis pathway. Our study demonstrates that Tuba deficiency causes an abnormal renal ciliary and morphogenetic phenotype. Tuba most likely plays a critical role in ciliogenesis and nephrogenesis by regulating Cdc42 activity.

  15. Galactooligosaccharides (GOS) inhibit Vibrio cholerae toxin binding to its GM1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Haydn R; de Slegte, Jaap; Gibson, Glenn R; Rastall, Robert A

    2009-04-22

    It is widely reported that cholera toxin (Ctx) remains a significant cause of gastrointestinal disease globally, particularly in developing countries where access to clean drinking water is at a premium. Vaccines are prohibitively expensive and have shown only short-term protection. Consequently, there is scope for continued development of novel treatment strategies. One example is the use of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) as functional mimics for the cell-surface toxin receptor (GM1). In this study, GOS fractions were fractionated using cation exchange chromatography followed by structural characterization using a combination of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) such that their molecular weight profiles were known. Each profile was correlated against biological activity measured using a competitive inhibitory GM1-linked ELISA. GOS fractions containing >5% hexasaccharides (DP(6)) exhibited >90% binding, with EC(50) values between 29.27 and 56.04 mg/mL. Inhibition by GOS DP(6) was dose dependent, with an EC(50) value of 5.10 mg/mL (5.15 microM MW of 990 Da). In removing low molecular weight carbohydrates that do possess prebiotic, nutraceutical, and/or biological properties and concentrating GOS DP(5) and/or DP(6), Ctx antiadhesive activity per unit of (dry) weight was improved. This could be advantageous in the manufacture of pharmaceutical or nutraceutical formulations for the treatment or prevention of an acute or chronic disease associated with or caused by the adhesion and/or uptake of a Ctx or HLT.

  16. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein inhibits neuron apoptosis through the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Xue, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Kong, Hai-Bo; Liu, Ai-Jun; Li, Shou-Chun; Xu, Dong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is induced by mild hypothermia in several mammals, but the precise mechanism by which CIRP mediates hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which CIRP protects the nervous system during mild hypothermia. Rat cortical neurons were isolated and cultured in vitro under mild hypothermia (32°C). Apoptosis was measured by annexin V and propidium iodide staining, visualized by flow cytometry. Neuron ultrastructure was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. CIRP overexpression and knockdown were achieved via infection with pL/IRES/GFP-CIRP and pL/shRNA/F-CIRP-A lentivirus. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis and western blotting were used to evaluate the effects of CIRP overexpresion/knockdown on the neurons׳ transcriptome. Neuron late apoptosis was significantly reduced at day 7 of culture by 12h hypothermia, but neuron ultrastructure remained relatively intact. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis of 84 apoptosis pathway-associated factors revealed that mild hypothermia and CIRP overexpression induce similar gene expression profiles, specifically alterations of genes implicated in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Mild hypothermia-treated neurons up-regulated 12 and down-regulated 38 apoptosis pathway-associated genes. CIRP-overexpressing neurons up-regulated 15 and down-regulated 46 genes. CIRP-knocked-down hypothermia-treated cells up-regulated 9 and down-regulated 40 genes. Similar results were obtained at the protein level. In conclusion, CIRP may inhibit neuron apoptosis through the suppression of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway during mild hypothermia.

  17. MicroRNA binding to the HIV-1 Gag protein inhibits Gag assembly and virus production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antony K.; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Waki, Kayoko; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ochiya, Takahiro; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Freed, Eric O.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, 18–22 nt long, noncoding RNAs that act as potent negative gene regulators in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. To repress gene expression, miRNAs are packaged into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) that target mRNAs for degradation and/or translational repression in a sequence-specific manner. Recently, miRNAs have been shown to also interact with proteins outside RISCs, impacting cellular processes through mechanisms not involving gene silencing. Here, we define a previously unappreciated activity of miRNAs in inhibiting RNA–protein interactions that in the context of HIV-1 biology blocks HIV virus budding and reduces virus infectivity. This occurs by miRNA binding to the nucleocapsid domain of the Gag protein, the main structural component of HIV-1 virions. The resulting miRNA–Gag complexes interfere with viral–RNA-mediated Gag assembly and viral budding at the plasma membrane, with imperfectly assembled Gag complexes endocytosed and delivered to lysosomes. The blockade of virus production by miRNA is reversed by adding the miRNA’s target mRNA and stimulated by depleting Argonaute-2, suggesting that when miRNAs are not mediating gene silencing, they can block HIV-1 production through disruption of Gag assembly on membranes. Overall, our findings have significant implications for understanding how cells modulate HIV-1 infection by miRNA expression and raise the possibility that miRNAs can function to disrupt RNA-mediated protein assembly processes in other cellular contexts. PMID:24938790

  18. Anacardic acid inhibits estrogen receptor alpha-DNA binding and reduces target gene transcription and breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, David J.; Wickramasinghe, Nalinie S.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Isaacs, Susan M.; Dougherty, Susan M.; Imbert-Fernandez, Yoannis; Cunningham, Albert R.; Chen, Chunyuan; Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2010-01-01

    Anacardic acid (2-hydroxy-6-alkylbenzoic acid) is a dietary and medicinal phytochemical with established anticancer activity in cell and animal models. The mechanisms by which anacardic acid inhibits cancer cell proliferation remain undefined. Anacardic acid 24:1ω5 (AnAc 24:1ω5) was purified from geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum) and shown to inhibit the proliferation of estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive MCF-7 and endocrine-resistant LCC9 and LY2 breast cancer cells with greater efficacy than ERα-negative primary human breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells, and MDA-MB-231 basal-like breast cancer cells. AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis in a cell-specific manner. AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited estradiol (E2)-induced estrogen response element (ERE) reporter activity and transcription of the endogenous E2-target genes: pS2, cyclin D1, and cathepsin D in MCF-7 cells. AnAc 24:1ω5 did not compete with E2 for ERα or ERβ binding, nor did AnAc 24:1ω5 reduce ERα or ERβ steady state protein levels in MCF-7 cells; rather, AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited ER-ERE binding in vitro. Virtual Screening with the molecular docking software Surflex evaluated AnAc 24:1ω5 interaction with ERα ligand binding and DNA binding domains (LBD and DBD) in conjunction with experimental validation. Molecular modeling revealed AnAc 24:1ω5 interaction with the ERα DBD but not the LBD. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments revealed that AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibited E2-ERα interaction with the endogenous pS2 gene promoter region containing an ERE. These data indicate that AnAc 24:1ω5 inhibits cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in an ER-dependent manner by reducing ER-DNA interaction and inhibiting ER-mediated transcriptional responses. PMID:20197399

  19. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate inhibits plasma thrombin generation via targeting of the factor IXa heparin-binding exosite.

    PubMed

    Buyue, Yang; Sheehan, John P

    2009-10-01

    Depolymerized holothurian glycosaminoglycan (DHG) is a fucosylated chondroitin sulfate with antithrombin-independent antithrombotic properties. Heparin cofactor II (HCII)-dependent and -independent mechanisms for DHG inhibition of plasma thrombin generation were evaluated. When thrombin generation was initiated with 0.2 pM tissue factor (TF), the half maximal effective concentration (EC(50)) for DHG inhibition was identical in mock- or HCII-depleted plasma, suggesting a serpin-independent mechanism. In the presence of excess TF, the EC(50) for DHG was increased 13- to 27-fold, suggesting inhibition was dependent on intrinsic tenase (factor IXa-factor VIIIa) components. In factor VIII-deficient plasma supplemented with 700 pM factor VIII or VIIIa, and factor IX-deficient plasma supplemented with plasma-derived factor IX or 100 pM factor IXa, the EC(50) for DHG was similar. Thus, cofactor and zymogen activation did not contribute to DHG inhibition of thrombin generation. Factor IX-deficient plasma supplemented with mutant factor IX(a) proteins demonstrated resistance to DHG inhibition of thrombin generation [factor IX(a) R233A > R170A > WT] that inversely correlated with protease-heparin affinity. These results replicate the effect of these mutations with purified intrinsic tenase components, and establish the factor IXa heparin-binding exosite as the relevant molecular target for inhibition by DHG. Glycosaminoglycan-mediated intrinsic tenase inhibition is a novel antithrombotic mechanism with physiologic and therapeutic applications.

  20. Simultaneous inhibition of GSK3alpha and GSK3beta using hairpin siRNA expression vectors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jenn-Yah; Taylor, Jennifer; DeRuiter, Stacy L; Vojtek, Anne B; Turner, David L

    2003-02-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can mediate sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression in mammalian cells. We and others have recently developed expression vector-based systems for synthesizing siRNAs or hairpin siRNAs in mammalian cells. Expression vector-based RNA interference (RNAi) effectively suppresses expression of target genes and is likely to be a powerful tool for analysis of gene function. Here we compare inhibition by vectors expressing hairpin siRNA designs either with different loop sequences connecting the two siRNA strands, or with duplex regions of different lengths. Our results suggest that lengthening the 19-nucleotide duplex region of a relatively ineffective hairpin siRNA can increase inhibition, but increasing the length of an effective 19-nt hairpin siRNA does not increase inhibition. We also demonstrate that hairpin siRNA vectors can be used to inhibit two target genes simultaneously. We have targeted glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha (GSK-3alpha) and GSK-3beta, two related kinases involved in the regulation of a variety of cellular processes and also implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. Inhibition of either GSK-3alpha or GSK-3beta by transfection of hairpin siRNA vectors leads to elevated expression of the GSK-3 target beta-catenin, whereas inhibition of both kinases further increases beta-catenin expression. Our results suggest that vector-based siRNA inhibition may be useful for dissecting the functional roles of GSK-3alpha and GSK-3beta in somatic cells. The ability to inhibit two or more genes simultaneously with hairpin siRNA expression vectors should facilitate studies of gene function in mammalian cells.

  1. Nonimmunoglobulin fraction of human milk inhibits bacterial adhesion (hemagglutination) and enterotoxin binding of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed Central

    Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A M; Ahrén, C

    1981-01-01

    Human milk and colostrum samples were divided into an immunoglobulin and a nonimmunoglobulin fraction by immunosorbent chromatography. The ability of these fractions to inhibit bacterial cell adhesion and enterotoxin receptor binding of Vibrio cholerae and various Escherichia coli isolates was then tested by in vitro assays. The strongest effect was generally seen with the nonimmunoglobulin fractions, which were shown to significantly inhibit E. coli cell adhesion (hemagglutination) mediated by CFA/I, CFA/II, or K88 fimbriae (but not type 1 pili) and V. cholerae hemagglutination, as well as the binding of cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin to GM1 ganglioside. Also, the immunoglobulin fractions had significant inhibitory activity in some of these systems. The results are interpreted to suggest that human milk and colostrum may contain secreted structure analogs of the cell receptors for some bacterial adhesions and enterotoxins; this might contribute to the protective effect of milk against enteric infections. PMID:7021421

  2. GBR-12909 and fluspirilene potently inhibited binding of ( sup 3 H) (+) 3-PPP to sigma receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, P.C.; Bremer, M.E.; Rao, T.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Fluspirilene and GBR-12909, two compounds structurally similar to BMY-14802 and haloperidol, were assessed for their ability to interact with sigma receptors. Fluspirilene, an antipsychotic agent that interacts potently with dopamine receptors, inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(+)3-PPP (IC{sub 50} = 380 nM) more potently than rimcazole, a putative sigma antagonist that was tested clinically for antipsychotic activity. GBR-12909, a potent dopamine uptake blocker, also inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(+)3-PPP with an IC{sub 50} of 48 nM. However, other compounds that block the re-uptake of catecholamines, such as nomifensine, desipramine, imipramine, xylamine, benztropine and cocaine, were much weaker than GBR-12909as sigma ligands. Thus, GBR-12909 and fluspirilene, compounds structurally similar to BMY-14802, are potent sigma ligands.

  3. Elucidation of different inhibition mechanism of small chemicals on PtdInsP-binding domains using in silico docking experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Yoon, Youngdae

    2014-05-15

    Phosphatidylinositides, most negatively charged lipids in cellular membranes, regulate diverse effector proteins through the interaction with their lipid binding domains. We have previously reported inhibitory effect of small chemicals on the interaction between PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and Btk PH domain. Here, we report that the inhibitory effects of same sets of chemicals on Grp1 PH domain and epsin1 ENTH domain to elucidate diversity of inhibitory mechanisms upon different lipid binding domains. Among the chemicals, chemical 8 showed best inhibition in vitro assay for Grp1 PH domain and epsin1 ENTH domain, and then the interaction between small chemicals and lipid binding domains was further investigated by in silico docking experiments. As a result, it was concluded that the diverse inhibitory effects on different lipid binding domains were dependent on not only the number of interactions between small chemical and domain, but also additional interaction with positively charged surfaces as the secondary binding sites. This finding will help to develop lipid binding inhibitors as antagonists for lipid-protein interactions, and these inhibitors would be novel therapeutic drug candidates via regulating effector proteins involved in severe human diseases.

  4. Heparin (GAG-hed) inhibits LCR activity of Human Papillomavirus type 18 by decreasing AP1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Rita; Morales-Peza, Néstor; Castelán-Sánchez, Irma; García-Villa, Enrique; Tapia, Rocio; Cid-Arregui, Ángel; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; López-Bayghen, Esther; Gariglio, Patricio

    2006-01-01

    Background High risk HPVs are causative agents of anogenital cancers. Viral E6 and E7 genes are continuously expressed and are largely responsible for the oncogenic activity of these viruses. Transcription of the E6 and E7 genes is controlled by the viral Long Control Region (LCR), plus several cellular transcription factors including AP1 and the viral protein E2. Within the LCR, the binding and activity of the transcription factor AP1 represents a key regulatory event in maintaining E6/E7 gene expression and uncontrolled cell proliferation. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin, can inhibit tumour growth; they have also shown antiviral effects and inhibition of AP1 transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study was to test the heparinoid GAG-hed, as a possible antiviral and antitumoral agent in an HPV18 positive HeLa cell line. Methods Using in vivo and in vitro approaches we tested GAG-hed effects on HeLa tumour cell growth, cell proliferation and on the expression of HPV18 E6/E7 oncogenes. GAG-hed effects on AP1 binding to HPV18-LCR-DNA were tested by EMSA. Results We were able to record the antitumoral effect of GAG-hed in vivo by using as a model tumours induced by injection of HeLa cells into athymic female mice. The antiviral effect of GAG-hed resulted in the inhibition of LCR activity and, consequently, the inhibition of E6 and E7 transcription. A specific diminishing of cell proliferation rates was observed in HeLa but not in HPV-free colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Treated HeLa cells did not undergo apoptosis but the percentage of cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle was increased. We also detected that GAG-hed prevents the binding of the transcription factor AP1 to the LCR. Conclusion Direct interaction of GAG-hed with the components of the AP1 complex and subsequent interference with its ability to correctly bind specific sites within the viral LCR may contribute to the inhibition of E6/E7 transcription and cell proliferation. Our data

  5. Inhibition and Larvicidal Activity of Phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum on Acetylcholinesterase against Mosquito Vectors and Their Binding Mode of Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hematpoor, Arshia; Liew, Sook Yee; Chong, Wei Lim; Azirun, Mohd Sofian; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus are vectors of dengue fever and West Nile virus diseases. This study was conducted to determine the toxicity, mechanism of action and the binding interaction of three active phenylpropanoids from Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) toward late 3rd or early 4th larvae of above vectors. A bioassay guided-fractionation on the hexane extract from the roots of Piper sarmentosum led to the isolation and identification of three active phenylpropanoids; asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3. The current study involved evaluation of the toxicity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition of these compounds against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were highly potent against Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae causing up to 100% mortality at ≤ 15 μg/mL concentration. The ovicidal activity of asaricin 1, isoasarone 2 and trans-asarone 3 were evaluated through egg hatching. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed potent ovicidal activity. Ovicidal activity for both compounds was up to 95% at 25μg/mL. Asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 showed strong inhibition on acetylcholinesterase with relative IC50 values of 0.73 to 1.87 μg/mL respectively. These findings coupled with the high AChE inhibition may suggest that asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 are neuron toxic compounds toward Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus. Further computational docking with Autodock Vina elaborates the possible interaction of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 with three possible binding sites of AChE which includes catalytic triads (CAS: S238, E367, H480), the peripheral sites (PAS: E72, W271) and anionic binding site (W83). The binding affinity of asaricin 1 and isoasarone 2 were relatively strong with asaricin 1 showed a higher binding affinity in the anionic pocket. PMID:27152416

  6. The RCAN carboxyl end mediates calcineurin docking-dependent inhibition via a site that dictates binding to substrates and regulators

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Genescà, Lali; Rodríguez, Antonio; Raya, Alicia; Salichs, Eulàlia; Were, Felipe; López-Maderuelo, María Dolores; Redondo, Juan Miguel; de la Luna, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Specificity of signaling kinases and phosphatases toward their targets is usually mediated by docking interactions with substrates and regulatory proteins. Here, we characterize the motifs involved in the physical and functional interaction of the phosphatase calcineurin with a group of modulators, the RCAN protein family. Mutation of key residues within the hydrophobic docking-cleft of the calcineurin catalytic domain impairs binding to all human RCAN proteins and to the calcineurin interacting proteins Cabin1 and AKAP79. A valine-rich region within the RCAN carboxyl region is essential for binding to the docking site in calcineurin. Although a peptide containing this sequence compromises NFAT signaling in living cells, it does not inhibit calcineurin catalytic activity directly. Instead, calcineurin catalytic activity is inhibited by a motif at the extreme C-terminal region of RCAN, which acts in cis with the docking motif. Our results therefore indicate that the inhibitory action of RCAN on calcineurin-NFAT signaling results not only from the inhibition of phosphatase activity but also from competition between NFAT and RCAN for binding to the same docking site in calcineurin. Thus, competition by substrates and modulators for a common docking site appears to be an essential mechanism in the regulation of Ca2+-calcineurin signaling. PMID:19332797

  7. SEROTONIN BINDING TO NERVE-ENDING PARTICLES OF THE RAT BRAIN AND ITS INHIBITION BY LYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE.

    PubMed

    MARCHBANKS, R M; ROSENBLATT, F; O'BRIEN, R D

    1964-05-29

    The binding of serotonin to nerve-ending particles and other preparations from rat brain has been examined. By investigating the amount bound as a function of serotonin concentration from 10(-7)M to 1O(-2)M, it was possible to identify three major components having K(assoc) (association constant) values of 2 x 10(6), 5 x 10(4), and 5 x 10(2). The component having the highest binding constant was not present in liver and appeared to be confined to the cortex and midbrain regions. This component is inhibited by d-lysergic acid diethylamide at low concentrations. Solubilization of this binding component has been achieved.

  8. A novel injection strategy of flurbiprofen axetil by inhibiting protein binding with 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kenji; Takamura, Norito; Tokunaga, Jin; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Setoguchi, Nao; Tanda, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Tetsuo; Nishio, Toyotaka; Kawai, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Flurbiprofen axetil (FPA) is an injection product and a prodrug of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). After injection, it is rapidly hydrolyzed to the active form, flurbiprofen (FP). Since frequent injections of FPA can lead to abnormal physiology, an administration strategy is necessary to ensure there is enhancement of the analgesic efficiency of FP after a single dose and to reduce the total number of doses. FP strongly binds to site II of albumin, and thus the free (unbound) FP concentration is low. This study focused on 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6-MNA), the active metabolite of nabumetone (a prodrug of NSAID). We performed ultrafiltration experiments and pharmacokinetics analysis in rats to investigate whether the inhibitory effect of 6-MNA on FP binding to albumin increased the free FP concentration in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that 6-MNA inhibited the binding of FP to albumin competitively. When 6-MNA was injected in rats, there was a significant increase in the free FP concentration and the area under concentration-time curve (AUC) calculated from the free FP concentration, while there was a significant decrease in the total (bound + free) FP concentration and the AUC calculated from the total FP concentration. These findings indicate that 6-MNA inhibits the protein binding of FP in vivo. This suggests that the frequency of FPA injections can be reduced when administered with nabumetone, as there is increase in the free FP concentration associated with pharmacological effect.

  9. ATP hydrolysis is essential for Bag-1M-mediated inhibition of the DNA binding by the glucocorticoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wei; Chen, Linfeng; Liu, Yunde; Gao, Weizhen

    2009-12-04

    The 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) is involved in providing the appropriate conformation of various nuclear hormone receptors, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The Bcl-2 associated athanogene 1M (Bag-1M) is known to downregulate the DNA binding by the GR. Also, Bag-1M interacts with the ATPase domain of Hsp70 to modulate the release of the substrate from Hsp70. In this study, we demonstrate that ATP hydrolysis enhances Bag-1M-mediated inhibition of the DNA binding by the GR. However, the inhibitory effect of Bag-1M was abolished when the intracellular ATP was depleted. In addition, a Bag-1M mutant lacking the interaction with Hsp70 did not influence the GR to bind DNA, suggesting the interaction of Bag-1M with Hsp70 in needed for its negative effect. These results indicate that ATP hydrolysis is essential for Bag-1M-mediated inhibition of the DNA binding by the GR and Hsp70 is a mediator for this process.

  10. Specific binding and inhibition of 6-benzylaminopurine to catalase: multiple spectroscopic methods combined with molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Lu, Yanni; Jing, Longyun; Cai, Lijuan; Zhu, Xinfeng; Xie, Ju; Hu, Xiaoya

    2014-04-01

    6-Benzylaminopurine (6-BA) is a kind of cytokinin which could regulate the activities of the antioxidant defense system of plants. In this work, its interaction with and inhibition of beef liver catalase have been systematically investigated using spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetric and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching of beef liver catalase (BLC) by 6-BA is due to the formation of 6-BA-BLC complex. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions play major roles in stabilizing the complex. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant, binding constant, the corresponding thermodynamic parameters and binding numbers were measured. The results of UV-vis absorption, three-dimensional fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results demonstrate that the binding of 6-BA results in the micro-environment change around tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) residues of BLC. The BLC-mediated conversion of H2O2 to H2O and O2, in the presence and absence of 6-BA, was also studied. Lineweaver-Burk plot indicates a noncompetitive type of inhibition. Molecular docking study was used to find the binding sites. PMID:24412785

  11. Inhibition of human spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding by a combinatorially derived peptide from a synthetic target.

    PubMed

    Pieczenik, George; Garrisi, John; Cohen, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    Intact zona-free human oocytes were screened using a combinatorial peptide library selection protocol. Pieczenik Peptide Sequence 1 (PPS1) HEHRKRG binds human spermatozoa. A complementary and unique binding sequence HNSSLSPLATPA (PPS2) was developed from the first PPS1 ligand that binds to the human zona pellucida or oolemma. Cytoplasm-free zonae from unfertilized eggs were obtained and used as an assay system to test the effects of exposure to these two ligands. Spermatozoa were inserted into evacuated zonae and their behaviour and binding activity were assessed at regular intervals. The behaviour of spermatozoa exposed to PPS1 and unlabelled spermatozoa injected into unexposed zonae was similar as far as binding was concerned (50 and 54% binding), but PPS1 exposed spermatozoa had higher motility and displacement, marked by their escape from the zona pellucida. Zonae exposed to PPS2 inhibited the interaction between injected spermatozoa and the inside of the zona when compared with controls (8.3 and 53.8% attached respectively, P < 0.001). The sperm-zona pellucida interaction described in this paper is applied as a functional assay for molecular interactions of sperm binding and can be used to assess function for potential surface markers on gametes. It is shown here that a unique binding ligand (PPS2) can be synthesized from another complimentary ligand (PPS1) without the need for a known intermediate substrate. PPS1 and PPS2 may have properties that can be used to target processes involved in conception and assisted reproduction. A movie sequence taken approximately 30 min after injection of spermatozoa into empty human zonae pellucidae shows behaviour of non-manipulated spermatozoa into zonae not exposed or exposed to ligand. This may be purchased for viewing on the Internet at www.rbmonline.com/Article/2159 (free to web subscribers).

  12. Glycyrrhizic acid prevents astrocyte death by neuromyelitis optica-specific IgG via inhibition of C1q binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Cheon, Soyoung; Kim, Seung Woo; Kim, Boram; Kim, Heejaung; Park, Ki Duk; Kim, Sung-Min

    2016-09-16

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of NMO-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies (NMO-IgG). Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) has numerous pharmacological effects including inhibition of the complement pathway. We aimed to study the influence of GA on NMO-IgG-induced CDC. NMO-IgG samples from 7 patients with NMO, together with human complement, induced CDC in an aquaporin 4 M23-overexpressing glial cell line, an in vitro NMO model. GA attenuated NMO-IgG-induced CDC in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism of the GA-related CDC inhibition was sequentially dissected and found to involve inhibition of C1q binding to NMO-IgG. Consequently, GA attenuates NMO-IgG-induced CDC and may be a promising novel therapeutic agent against NMO. PMID:27462020

  13. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates.

    PubMed

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A; Clifton, Ian J; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W G; Schofield, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as 'transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs. PMID:27499424

  14. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    PubMed Central

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as ‘transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs. PMID:27499424

  15. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  16. Generation and characterization of a tetraspanin CD151/integrin α6β1-binding domain competitively binding monoclonal antibody for inhibition of tumor progression in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jia-Bin; Huang, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Lu; Kang, Qiang; Liu, Li-Xin; Xie, Nan; Shen, Zao-Zhuo; Hu, Mei-Yu; Cao, Ya; Qiu, Shuang-Jian; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Shi, Guo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that tetraspanin CD151 plays multiple roles in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by forming a functional complex with integrin α6β1. Herein, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that dissociates the CD151/integrin α6β1 complex, and we evaluated its bioactivity in HCCs. A murine mAb, tetraspanin CD151 (IgG1, called CD151 mAb 9B), was successfully generated against the CD151-integrin α6β1 binding site of CD151 extracellular domains. Co-immunoprecipitation using CD151 mAb 9B followed by Western blotting detected a 28 kDa protein. Both immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical staining showed a good reactivity of CD151 mAb 9B in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm of HCC cells, as well as in liver cells. In vitro assays demonstrated that CD151 mAb 9B could inhibit neoangiogenesis and both the mobility and the invasiveness of HCC cells. An in vivo assay showed that CD151 mAb 9B inhibited tumor growth potential and HCC cells metastasis. We successfully produced a CD151 mAb 9B targeting the CD151/integrin α6β1-binding domain, which not only can displayed good reactivity to the CD151 antigen but also prevented tumor progression in HCC. PMID:26756217

  17. Binding of Nickel to Testicular Glutamate–Ammonia Ligase Inhibits Its Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YINGBIAO; OU, YOUNG; CHENG, MIN; RUAN, YIBING; VAN DER HOORN, FRANS A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Exposure to nickel has been shown to cause damage to the testis in several animal models. It is not known if the testis expresses protein(s) that can bind nickel. To test this, we used a nickel-binding assay to isolate testicular nickel-binding proteins. We identified glutamate–ammonia ligase (GLUL) as a prominent nickel-binding protein by mass spectrometry. Protein analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that GLUL is expressed in the testis, predominantly in interstitial cells. We determined that GLUL has a higher affinity for nickel than for its regular co-factor manganese. We produced an enzymatically active, recombinant GLUL protein. Upon binding, nickel interferes with the manganese-catalyzed enzymatic activity of recombinant GLUL protein. We also determined that GLUL activity in testes of animals exposed to nickel sulfate is reduced. Our results identify testicular GLUL as the first testicular protein shown to be affected by nickel exposure. PMID:21254280

  18. Chemically modified, non-anticoagulant heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors and inhibit circulating galectin-3-promoted metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sindrewicz, Paulina; Hughes, Ashley J.; French, Neil S.; Lian, Lu-Yun; Yates, Edwin A.; Pritchard, D. Mark; Rhodes, Jonathan M.; Turnbull, Jeremy E.; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of circulating galectin-3, a metastasis promoter, are greatly increased in cancer patients. Here we show that 2- or 6-de-O-sulfated, N-acetylated heparin derivatives are galectin-3 binding inhibitors. These chemically modified heparin derivatives inhibited galectin-3-ligand binding and abolished galectin-3-mediated cancer cell-endothelial adhesion and angiogenesis. Unlike standard heparin, these modified heparin derivatives and their ultra-low molecular weight sub-fractions had neither anticoagulant activity nor effects on E-, L- or P-selectin binding to their ligands nor detectable cytotoxicity. Intravenous injection of such heparin derivatives (with cancer cells pre-treated with galectin-3 followed by 3 subcutaneous injections of the derivatives) abolished the circulating galectin-3-mediated increase in lung metastasis of human melanoma and colon cancer cells in nude mice. Structural analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopies showed that the modified heparin derivatives bind to the galectin-3 carbohydrate-recognition domain. Thus, these chemically modified, non-anticoagulant, low-sulfated heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors with substantial potential as anti-metastasis/cancer drugs. PMID:26160844

  19. Chemically modified, non-anticoagulant heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors and inhibit circulating galectin-3-promoted metastasis.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Carrie A; Guimond, Scott E; Sindrewicz, Paulina; Hughes, Ashley J; French, Neil S; Lian, Lu-Yun; Yates, Edwin A; Pritchard, D Mark; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2015-09-15

    Concentrations of circulating galectin-3, a metastasis promoter, are greatly increased in cancer patients. Here we show that 2- or 6-de-O-sulfated, N-acetylated heparin derivatives are galectin-3 binding inhibitors. These chemically modified heparin derivatives inhibited galectin-3-ligand binding and abolished galectin-3-mediated cancer cell-endothelial adhesion and angiogenesis. Unlike standard heparin, these modified heparin derivatives and their ultra-low molecular weight sub-fractions had neither anticoagulant activity nor effects on E-, L- or P-selectin binding to their ligands nor detectable cytotoxicity. Intravenous injection of such heparin derivatives (with cancer cells pre-treated with galectin-3 followed by 3 subcutaneous injections of the derivatives) abolished the circulating galectin-3-mediated increase in lung metastasis of human melanoma and colon cancer cells in nude mice. Structural analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopies showed that the modified heparin derivatives bind to the galectin-3 carbohydrate-recognition domain. Thus, these chemically modified, non-anticoagulant, low-sulfated heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors with substantial potential as anti-metastasis/cancer drugs. PMID:26160844

  20. Chemically modified, non-anticoagulant heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors and inhibit circulating galectin-3-promoted metastasis.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Carrie A; Guimond, Scott E; Sindrewicz, Paulina; Hughes, Ashley J; French, Neil S; Lian, Lu-Yun; Yates, Edwin A; Pritchard, D Mark; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Turnbull, Jeremy E; Yu, Lu-Gang

    2015-09-15

    Concentrations of circulating galectin-3, a metastasis promoter, are greatly increased in cancer patients. Here we show that 2- or 6-de-O-sulfated, N-acetylated heparin derivatives are galectin-3 binding inhibitors. These chemically modified heparin derivatives inhibited galectin-3-ligand binding and abolished galectin-3-mediated cancer cell-endothelial adhesion and angiogenesis. Unlike standard heparin, these modified heparin derivatives and their ultra-low molecular weight sub-fractions had neither anticoagulant activity nor effects on E-, L- or P-selectin binding to their ligands nor detectable cytotoxicity. Intravenous injection of such heparin derivatives (with cancer cells pre-treated with galectin-3 followed by 3 subcutaneous injections of the derivatives) abolished the circulating galectin-3-mediated increase in lung metastasis of human melanoma and colon cancer cells in nude mice. Structural analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopies showed that the modified heparin derivatives bind to the galectin-3 carbohydrate-recognition domain. Thus, these chemically modified, non-anticoagulant, low-sulfated heparin derivatives are potent galectin-3 binding inhibitors with substantial potential as anti-metastasis/cancer drugs.

  1. Inhibition of angiogenesis by vitamin D-binding protein: characterization of anti-endothelial activity of DBP-maf.

    PubMed

    Kalkunte, Satyan; Brard, Laurent; Granai, Cornelius O; Swamy, Narasimha

    2005-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process involving coordinated steps of endothelial cell activation, proliferation, migration, tube formation and capillary sprouting with participation of intracellular signaling pathways. Regulation of angiogenesis carries tremendous potential for cancer therapy. Our earlier studies showed that vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) acts as a potent anti-angiogenic factor and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. The goal of this investigation was to understand the effect of DBP-maf on human endothelial cell (HEC) and the mechanism of angiogenesis inhibition. DBP-maf inhibited human endothelial cell (HEC) proliferation by inhibiting DNA synthesis (IC(50) = 7.8 +/- 0.15 microg/ml). DBP-maf significantly induced S- and G0/G1-phase arrest in HEC in 72 h. DBP-maf potently blocked VEGF-induced migration, tube-formation of HEC in a dose dependent manner. In addition, DBP-maf inhibited growth factor-induced microvessel sprouting in rat aortic ring assay. Moreover, DBP-maf inhibited VEGF signaling by decreasing VEGF-mediated phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and ERK1/2, a downstream target of VEGF signaling cascade. However, Akt activation was not affected. These studies collectively demonstrate that DBP-maf inhibits angiogenesis by blocking critical steps such as HEC proliferation, migration, tube formation and microvessel sprouting. DBP-maf exerts its effect by inhibiting VEGR-2 and ERK1/2 signaling cascades. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of anti-endothelial activity of DBP-maf will allow us to develop it as an angiogenesis targeting novel drug for tumor therapy. PMID:16400520

  2. Breathing Stimulant Compounds Inhibit TASK-3 Potassium Channel Function Likely by Binding at a Common Site in the Channel Pore

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Rikki H.; Larsen, Aaron T.; Bhayana, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    Compounds PKTHPP (1-{1-[6-(biphenyl-4-ylcarbonyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]-pyrimidin-4-yl]piperidin-4-yl}propan-1-one), A1899 (2ʹ′-[(4-methoxybenzoylamino)methyl]biphenyl-2-carboxylic acid 2,4-difluorobenzylamide), and doxapram inhibit TASK-1 (KCNK3) and TASK-3 (KCNK9) tandem pore (K2P) potassium channel function and stimulate breathing. To better understand the molecular mechanism(s) of action of these drugs, we undertook studies to identify amino acid residues in the TASK-3 protein that mediate this inhibition. Guided by homology modeling and molecular docking, we hypothesized that PKTHPP and A1899 bind in the TASK-3 intracellular pore. To test our hypothesis, we mutated each residue in or near the predicted PKTHPP and A1899 binding site (residues 118–128 and 228–248), individually, to a negatively charged aspartate. We quantified each mutation's effect on TASK-3 potassium channel concentration response to PKTHPP. Studies were conducted on TASK-3 transiently expressed in Fischer rat thyroid epithelial monolayers; channel function was measured in an Ussing chamber. TASK-3 pore mutations at residues 122 (L122D, E, or K) and 236 (G236D) caused the IC50 of PKTHPP to increase more than 1000-fold. TASK-3 mutants L122D, G236D, L239D, and V242D were resistant to block by PKTHPP, A1899, and doxapram. Our data are consistent with a model in which breathing stimulant compounds PKTHPP, A1899, and doxapram inhibit TASK-3 function by binding at a common site within the channel intracellular pore region, although binding outside the channel pore cannot yet be excluded. PMID:26268529

  3. Identification of a Small Peptide That Inhibits PCSK9 Protein Binding to the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingnan; Eigenbrot, Charles; Zhou, Lijuan; Shia, Steven; Li, Wei; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Moran, Paul; Di Lello, Paola; Skelton, Nicholas J.; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Peterson, Andrew; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) is a negative regulator of the hepatic LDL receptor, and clinical studies with PCSK9-inhibiting antibodies have demonstrated strong LDL-c-lowering effects. Here we screened phage-displayed peptide libraries and identified the 13-amino acid linear peptide Pep2-8 as the smallest PCSK9 inhibitor with a clearly defined mechanism of inhibition that has been described. Pep2-8 bound to PCSK9 with a KD of 0.7 μm but did not bind to other proprotein convertases. It fully restored LDL receptor surface levels and LDL particle uptake in PCSK9-treated HepG2 cells. The crystal structure of Pep2-8 bound to C-terminally truncated PCSK9 at 1.85 Å resolution showed that the peptide adopted a strand-turn-helix conformation, which is remarkably similar to its solution structure determined by NMR. Consistent with the functional binding site identified by an Ala scan of PCSK9, the structural Pep2-8 contact region of about 400 Å2 largely overlapped with that contacted by the EGF(A) domain of the LDL receptor, suggesting a competitive inhibition mechanism. Consistent with this, Pep2-8 inhibited LDL receptor and EGF(A) domain binding to PCSK9 with IC50 values of 0.8 and 0.4 μm, respectively. Remarkably, Pep2-8 mimicked secondary structural elements of the EGF(A) domain that interact with PCSK9, notably the β-strand and a discontinuous short α-helix, and it engaged in the same β-sheet hydrogen bonds as EGF(A) does. Although Pep2-8 itself may not be amenable to therapeutic applications, this study demonstrates the feasibility of developing peptidic inhibitors to functionally relevant sites on PCSK9. PMID:24225950

  4. +TIP EB1 downregulates paclitaxel‑induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer cells through inhibition of paclitaxel binding on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Geethu Emily; Sreeja, Jamuna S; Gireesh, K K; Gupta, Hindol; Manna, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule plus‑end‑binding protein (+TIP) EB1 has been shown to be upregulated in breast cancer cells and promote breast tumor growth in vivo. However, its effect on the cellular actions of microtubule‑targeted drugs in breast cancer cells has remained poorly understood. By using cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrate that EB1 plays a critical role in regulating the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to anti‑microtubule drug, paclitaxel (PTX). Cell viability assays revealed that EB1 expression in the breast cancer cell lines correlated with the reduction of their sensitivity to PTX. Knockdown of EB1 by enzymatically‑prepared siRNA pools (esiRNAs) increased PTX‑induced cytotoxicity and sensitized cells to PTX‑induced apoptosis in three breast cancer cell lines, MCF‑7, MDA MB‑231 and T47D. Apoptosis was associated with activation of caspase‑9 and an increase in the cleavage of poly(ADP‑ribose) polymerase (PARP). p53 and Bax were upregulated and Bcl2 was downregulated in the EB1‑depleted PTX‑treated MCF‑7 cells, indicating that the apoptosis occurs via a p53‑dependent pathway. Following its upregulation, the nuclear accumulation of p53 and its association with cellular microtubules were increased. EB1 depletion increased PTX‑induced microtubule bundling in the interphase cells and induced formation of multiple spindle foci with abnormally elongated spindles in the mitotic MCF‑7 cells, indicating that loss of EB1 promotes PTX‑induced stabilization of microtubules. EB1 inhibited PTX‑induced microtubule polymerization and diminished PTX binding to microtubules in vitro, suggesting that it modulates the binding sites of PTX at the growing microtubule ends. Results demonstrate that EB1 downregulates inhibition of PTX‑induced proliferation and apoptosis in breast cancer cells through a mechanism in which it impairs PTX‑mediated stabilization of microtubule polymerization and inhibits PTX binding on microtubules

  5. Analysis of the role of autophagy inhibition by two complementary human cytomegalovirus BECN1/Beclin 1-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Mouna, Lina; Hernandez, Eva; Bonte, Dorine; Brost, Rebekka; Amazit, Larbi; Delgui, Laura R; Brune, Wolfram; Geballe, Adam P; Beau, Isabelle; Esclatine, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is activated early after human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection but, later on, the virus blocks autophagy. Here we characterized 2 HCMV proteins, TRS1 and IRS1, which inhibit autophagy during infection. Expression of either TRS1 or IRS1 was able to block autophagy in different cell lines, independently of the EIF2S1 kinase, EIF2AK2/PKR. Instead, TRS1 and IRS1 interacted with the autophagy protein BECN1/Beclin 1. We mapped the BECN1-binding domain (BBD) of IRS1 and TRS1 and found it to be essential for autophagy inhibition. Mutant viruses that express only IRS1 or TRS1 partially controlled autophagy, whereas a double mutant virus expressing neither protein stimulated autophagy. A mutant virus that did not express IRS1 and expressed a truncated form of TRS1 in which the BBD was deleted, failed to control autophagy. However, this mutant virus had similar replication kinetics as wild-type virus, suggesting that autophagy inhibition is not critical for viral replication. In fact, using pharmacological modulators of autophagy and inhibition of autophagy by shRNA knockdown, we discovered that stimulating autophagy enhanced viral replication. Conversely, inhibiting autophagy decreased HCMV infection. Thus, our results demonstrate a new proviral role of autophagy for a DNA virus. PMID:26654401

  6. Comparison of Chlorpyrifos-Oxon and Paraoxon Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Dynamics: Potential role of a peripheral binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Kousba, Ahmed A.; Sultatos, L G.; Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-08-02

    The primary mechanism of action for organophosphorus (OP) insecticides involves the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by oxygenated metabolites (oxons). This inhibition has been attributed to the phosphorylation of the serine hydroxyl group located in the active site of the AChE molecule. The rate of phosphorylation is described by the bimolecular inhibitory rate constant (ki), which has been utilized for quantification of OP inhibitory capacity. It has been previously proposed that a peripheral binding site exists on the AChE molecule, which when occupied, reduces the capacity of additional oxon molecules to phosphorylate the active site. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the interaction of chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) and paraoxon (PO) with rat brain AChE using a modified Ellman assay in conjunction with a pharmacodynamic model to further assess the dynamics of AChE inhibition and the potential role of a peripheral binding site. The ki for AChE inhibition determined at oxon concentrations of 5 x 10{sup -4} 100 nM were 0.212 and 0.0216 nM-1h-1 for CPO and PO, respectively. The spontaneous reactivation rates of the inhibited AChE for CPO and PO were 0.087 and 0.078 h-1, respectively. In contrast, the ki estimated at a low oxon concentration (1 pM) were {approx} 1,000 and 10,000 -fold higher than those determined at high CPO and PO concentrations, respectively. At these low concentrations, the ki estimates were approximately similar for both CPO and PO (180 and 250 nM-1h-1, respectively). This implies that at low exposure concentrations, both oxons exhibited similar inhibitory potency in contrast to the marked difference exhibited at higher concentrations, which is consistent with the presence of a peripheral binding site on the AChE enzyme. These results support the potential importance of a secondary binding site associated with AChE kinetics, particularly at low environmentally relevant concentrations.

  7. Thyroid hormone receptor binding to DNA and T3-dependent transcriptional activation are inhibited by uremic toxins

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Guilherme M; Pantoja, Carlos J; Costa e Silva, Aluízio; Rodrigues, Maria C; Ribeiro, Ralff C; Simeoni, Luiz A; Lomri, Noureddine; Neves, Francisco AR

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a substantial clinical overlap between chronic renal failure (CRF) and hypothyroidism, suggesting the presence of hypothyroidism in uremic patients. Although CRF patients have low T3 and T4 levels with normal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), they show a higher prevalence of goiter and evidence for blunted tissue responsiveness to T3 action. However, there are no studies examining whether thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) play a role in thyroid hormone dysfunction in CRF patients. To evaluate the effects of an uremic environment on TR function, we investigated the effect of uremic plasma on TRβ1 binding to DNA as heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα) and on T3-dependent transcriptional activity. Results We demonstrated that uremic plasma collected prior to hemodialysis (Pre-HD) significantly reduced TRβ1-RXRα binding to DNA. Such inhibition was also observed with a vitamin D receptor (VDR) but not with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). A cell-based assay confirmed this effect where uremic pre-HD ultrafiltrate inhibited the transcriptional activation induced by T3 in U937 cells. In both cases, the inhibitory effects were reversed when the uremic plasma and the uremic ultrafiltrate were collected and used after hemodialysis (Post-HD). Conclusion These results suggest that dialyzable toxins in uremic plasma selectively block the binding of TRβ1-RXRα to DNA and impair T3 transcriptional activity. These findings may explain some features of hypothyroidism and thyroid hormone resistance observed in CRF patients. PMID:15807894

  8. RNA-binding motif protein 47 inhibits Nrf2 activity to suppress tumor growth in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, T; Isogaya, K; Sakai, S; Morikawa, M; Morishita, Y; Ehata, S; Miyazono, K; Koinuma, D

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins provide a new layer of posttranscriptional regulation of RNA during cancer progression. We identified RNA-binding motif protein 47 (RBM47) as a target gene of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mammary gland epithelial cells (NMuMG cells) that have undergone the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. TGF-β repressed RBM47 expression in NMuMG cells and lung cancer cell lines. Expression of RBM47 correlated with good prognosis in patients with lung, breast and gastric cancer. RBM47 suppressed the expression of cell metabolism-related genes, which were the direct targets of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2; also known as NFE2L2). RBM47 bound to KEAP1 and Cullin 3 mRNAs, and knockdown of RBM47 inhibited their protein expression, which led to enhanced binding of Nrf2 to target genomic regions. Knockdown of RBM47 also enhanced the expression of some Nrf2 activators, p21/CDKN1A and MafK induced by TGF-β. Both mitochondrial respiration rates and the side population cells in lung cancer cells increased in the absence of RBM47. Our findings, together with the enhanced tumor formation and metastasis of xenografted mice by knockdown of the RBM47 expression, suggested tumor-suppressive roles for RBM47 through the inhibition of Nrf2 activity. PMID:26923328

  9. Naphthalenedisulfonic acid derivatives inhibit HIV-1-induced cytopathogenesis, syncytia formation and virus-cell binding by interaction with the viral envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, P.; Schols, D.; De Clercq, E.; Shigeta, S.; Baba, M.

    1993-12-31

    Bis naphthalenedisulfonic acid analogs with biphenyl spacers have exhibited potent and selective inhibition of HIV-1 replication and giant cell formation. FACS analysis has revealed that these agents also inhibit viral binding to the target cell. Further mechanism of action studies by the FACA method demonstrate that the sulfonic acid analogs inhibit binding of anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody to the viral envelope of glycoprotein, gp120. Binding of OKT4A/Leu3a monoclonal antibody to the target cell CD4 receptor is not affected by these compounds. This investigation suggests that these naphthalenedisulfonic acid derivatives exert their anti-HIV-1 activity by inhibiting the gp120-CD4 interaction through binding of these agents to the viral gp120 antigen.

  10. Inhibition of thrombin-mediated cellular effects by triabin, a highly potent anion-binding exosite thrombin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glusa, E; Bretschneider, E; Daum, J; Noeske-Jungblut, C

    1997-06-01

    Triabin, a 17 kDa protein from the saliva of the assassin bug Triatoma pallidipennis is a potent thrombin inhibitor interfering with the anion-binding exosite of the enzyme. The recombinant protein, produced by the baculovirus/insect cell system, was used to study the inhibitory effect on thrombin-mediated cellular responses. The thrombin (1 nM)-stimulated aggregation of washed human platelets and the rise in cytoplasmic calcium in platelets were inhibited by triabin at nanomolar concentrations. In contrast, the rise in calcium induced by the thrombin receptor-activating peptide (10 microM) was not suppressed by triabin. In isolated porcine pulmonary arteries, preconstricted with PGF 2 alpha thrombin (2 nM) elicited an endothelium-dependent relaxation which was inhibited by triabin in the same concentration range as found for the inhibition of platelet aggregation. Higher concentrations of triabin were required to diminish the contractile response of endotheliumdenuded pulmonary vessels to thrombin (10 nM). In cultured bovine coronary smooth muscle cells, the mitogenic activity of thrombin (3 nM), measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation, was also suppressed by triabin. In all these assays, the inhibitory effect of triabin was dependent on the thrombin concentration used. These studies suggest that the new anion-binding exosite thrombin inhibitor triabin is one of the most potent inhibitors of thrombin-mediated cellular effects. PMID:9241757

  11. A galactose-binding lectin isolated from Aplysia kurodai (sea hare) eggs inhibits streptolysin-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Watanabe, Miharu; Ishizaki, Naoto; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Yasushi; Suzuki, Jun; Dogasaki, Chikaku; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujii, Yuki; Iriko, Hideyuki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A specific galactose-binding lectin was shown to inhibit the hemolytic effect of streptolysin O (SLO), an exotoxin produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Commercially available lectins that recognize N-acetyllactosamine (ECA), T-antigen (PNA), and Tn-antigen (ABA) agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, but had no effect on SLO-induced hemolysis. In contrast, SLO-induced hemolysis was inhibited by AKL, a lectin purified from sea hare (Aplysia kurodai) eggs that recognizes α-galactoside oligosaccharides. This inhibitory effect was blocked by the co-presence of d-galactose, which binds to AKL. A possible explanation for these findings is that cholesterol-enriched microdomains containing glycosphingolipids in the erythrocyte membrane become occupied by tightly stacked lectin molecules, blocking the interaction between cholesterol and SLO that would otherwise result in penetration of the membrane. Growth of S. pyogenes was inhibited by lectins from a marine invertebrate (AKL) and a mushroom (ABA), but was promoted by a plant lectin (ECA). Both these inhibitory and promoting effects were blocked by co-presence of galactose in the culture medium. Our findings demonstrate the importance of glycans and lectins in regulating mechanisms of toxicity, creation of pores in the target cell membrane, and bacterial growth. PMID:25197935

  12. Angiostatin directly inhibits human prostate tumor cell invasion by blocking plasminogen binding to its cellular receptor, CD26

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario . E-mail: gonza002@mc.duke.edu; Grenett, Hernan E.; Gawdi, Govind; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    2005-02-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that one of the six plasminogen type 2 glycoforms, plasminogen 2{epsilon}, enhances invasiveness of the 1-LN human prostate tumor cell line in an in vitro model. Binding of plasminogen 2{epsilon} to CD26 on the cell surface induces a Ca{sup 2+} signaling cascade which stimulates the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9, required by these cells to invade Matrigel registered . We now report that angiostatin, a fragment derived from plasminogen which prevents endothelial cell proliferation, is also a potent, direct inhibitor of 1-LN tumor cell invasiveness. We studied the effect of individual plasminogen 2 glycoform-derived angiostatins and found that only angiostatin 2{epsilon} binds to CD26 on the surface of 1-LN cells at a site also recognized by plasminogen 2{epsilon}. As a result, the plasminogen 2{epsilon}-induced Ca{sup 2+} signaling cascade is inhibited, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 is suppressed, and invasion of Matrigel registered by 1-LN cells is blocked. Angiostatin 2{epsilon} is also the only angiostatin glycoform which is able to inhibit in vitro endothelial cell proliferation and tubule formation. These studies suggest that, in addition to its ability to inhibit tumor vascularization, angiostatin 2{epsilon} may also directly block tumor metastasis.

  13. Binding of monoclonal antibody to CD16 causes calcium mobilization in large granular lymphocytes but inhibits NK killing.

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, E A; Wallace, D W; O'Flynn, K; Abdul-Gaffar, R; Tetteroo, P A; Morgan, G; Linch, D C

    1989-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb), CLB/FcR gran I, reactive with the CD16 Fc receptor (FcRlo/FcRIII) of human cells, leads to calcium mobilization in large granular lymphocytes (LGL) but not in granulocytes. Identical responses are obtained with F(ab')2 fragments of this antibody, indicating that the response is independent of Fc-FcR binding, and that bivalent cross-linking of this receptor is adequate for optimal calcium mobilization. The calcium response was greater in CD3- LGL compared to CD3+ LGL, although the response was augmented in the latter cells by prior rosetting with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Calcium mobilization in CD3- LGL induced by CLB/FcR gran I is associated with inhibition of natural killer cell (NK) killing, and inhibition of the enhanced NK killing induced by the anti-CD2 low-density monoclonal antibody, 9.1. This supports the view that the NK-enhancing activity of 9.1 is due to simultaneous binding to CD2 and CD16, and may in fact be transduced through the CD16 molecule. The variable reported effects of anti-CD16 antibodies on NK killing are likely to reflect the epitope bound rather than the isotype of antibody used, since F(ab')2 fragments of CLB/FcR gran I also inhibit NK killing. PMID:2564843

  14. Small molecule binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex can be exploited for inhibition of Ras activation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jon J G; Anderson, Malcolm; Blades, Kevin; Brassington, Claire; Breeze, Alexander L; Chresta, Christine; Embrey, Kevin; Fairley, Gary; Faulder, Paul; Finlay, M Raymond V; Kettle, Jason G; Nowak, Thorsten; Overman, Ross; Patel, S Joe; Perkins, Paula; Spadola, Loredana; Tart, Jonathan; Tucker, Julie A; Wrigley, Gail

    2015-03-12

    Constitutively active mutant KRas displays a reduced rate of GTP hydrolysis via both intrinsic and GTPase-activating protein-catalyzed mechanisms, resulting in the perpetual activation of Ras pathways. We describe a fragment screening campaign using X-ray crystallography that led to the discovery of three fragment binding sites on the Ras:SOS complex. The identification of tool compounds binding at each of these sites allowed exploration of two new approaches to Ras pathway inhibition by stabilizing or covalently modifying the Ras:SOS complex to prevent the reloading of Ras with GTP. Initially, we identified ligands that bound reversibly to the Ras:SOS complex in two distinct sites, but these compounds were not sufficiently potent inhibitors to validate our stabilization hypothesis. We conclude by demonstrating that covalent modification of Cys118 on Ras leads to a novel mechanism of inhibition of the SOS-mediated interaction between Ras and Raf and is effective at inhibiting the exchange of labeled GDP in both mutant (G12C and G12V) and wild type Ras.

  15. Role of V protein RNA binding in inhibition of measles virus minigenome replication.

    PubMed

    Parks, Christopher L; Witko, Susan E; Kotash, Cheryl; Lin, Shuo L; Sidhu, Mohinder S; Udem, Stephen A

    2006-04-25

    Measles virus V protein represses genome replication through a poorly understood mechanism, which led us to investigate whether V protein might be an RNA-binding modulatory factor. Recombinant V protein, expressed from transfected HEp-2 cells or E. coli, formed protein-RNA complexes with poly-guanosine (poly-G) or poly-U linked to agarose beads. RNA binding was not exclusive to ribonucleotide homopolymers as complex formation between V protein and an RNA molecule equivalent to the 3' terminal 107 bases of the measles virus genome was observed with an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The interaction with poly-G was used to further examine the RNA binding properties of V demonstrating that protein-RNA complex formation was dependent upon the unique Cys-rich carboxy terminus, a region also required to induce maximal repression of minireplicon-encoded reporter gene expression in transient assays. Surprisingly, two mutant proteins that contained Cys-to-Ala substitutions in the C-terminus were found to retain their ability to bind poly-G binding and repress minireplicon reporter gene expression indicating that neither activity was dependent on the integrity of all 7 C-terminal Cys residues. Additional genetic analysis revealed that amino acids 238-266 were necessary for efficient RNA binding and overlapped with residues (238-278) required for maximal repression induced by the C-terminal domain. In addition, a 10 amino acid deletion was identified (residues 238-247) that blocked RNA binding and repression indicating that these two activities were related.

  16. Identification of an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that binds to tomato mosaic virus genomic RNA and inhibits its multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisaki, Koki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2008-10-25

    The genomic RNAs of positive-strand RNA viruses carry RNA elements that play positive, or in some cases, negative roles in virus multiplication by interacting with viral and cellular proteins. In this study, we purified Arabidopsis thaliana proteins that specifically bind to 5' or 3' terminal regions of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) genomic RNA, which contain important regulatory elements for translation and RNA replication, and identified these proteins by mass spectrometry analyses. One of these host proteins, named BTR1, harbored three heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology RNA-binding domains and preferentially bound to RNA fragments that contained a sequence around the initiation codon of the 130K and 180K replication protein genes. The knockout and overexpression of BTR1 specifically enhanced and inhibited, respectively, ToMV multiplication in inoculated A. thaliana leaves, while such effect was hardly detectable in protoplasts. These results suggest that BTR1 negatively regulates the local spread of ToMV.

  17. Dimerization of FIR Upon FUSE DNA Binding Suggests Mechanism of c-myc Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow,G.; Zhou, H.; Hsiao, H.; Frederick, K.; Debrosse, M.; Yang, Y.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Chung, H.; Fan, C.; et al

    2008-01-01

    c-myc is essential for cell homeostasis and growth but lethal if improperly regulated. Transcription of this oncogene is governed by the counterbalancing forces of two proteins on TFIIH--the FUSE binding protein (FBP) and the FBP-interacting repressor (FIR). FBP and FIR recognize single-stranded DNA upstream of the P1 promoter, known as FUSE, and influence transcription by oppositely regulating TFIIH at the promoter site. Size exclusion chromatography coupled with light scattering reveals that an FIR dimer binds one molecule of single-stranded DNA. The crystal structure confirms that FIR binds FUSE as a dimer, and only the N-terminal RRM domain participates in nucleic acid recognition. Site-directed mutations of conserved residues in the first RRM domain reduce FIR's affinity for FUSE, while analogous mutations in the second RRM domain either destabilize the protein or have no effect on DNA binding. Oppositely oriented DNA on parallel binding sites of the FIR dimer results in spooling of a single strand of bound DNA, and suggests a mechanism for c-myc transcriptional control.

  18. Mixed Inhibition of cPEPCK by Genistein, Using an Extended Binding Site Located Adjacent to Its Catalytic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Sundar, Durai

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (cPEPCK) is a critical enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis, glyceroneogenesis and cataplerosis. cPEPCK converts oxaloacetic acid (OAA) into phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) in the presence of GTP. cPEPCK is known to be associated with type 2 diabetes. Genistein is an isoflavone compound that shows anti-diabetic and anti-obesitic properties. Experimental studies have shown a decrease in the blood glucose level in the presence of genistein by lowering the functional activity of cPEPCK, an enzyme of gluconeogenesis. Using computational techniques such as molecular modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation and binding free energy calculations, we identified cPEPCK as a direct target of genistein. We studied the molecular interactions of genistein with three possible conformations of cPEPCK—unbound cPEPCK (u_cPEPCK), GTP bound cPEPCK (GTP_cPEPCK) and GDP bound cPEPCK (GDP_cPEPCK). Binding of genistein was also compared with an already known cPEPCK inhibitor. We analyzed the interactions of genistein with cPEPCK enzyme and compared them with its natural substrate (OAA), product (PEP) and known inhibitor (3-MPA). Our results demonstrate that genistein uses the mechanism of mixed inhibition to block the functional activity of cPEPCK and thus can serve as a potential anti-diabetic and anti-obesity drug candidate. We also identified an extended binding site in the catalytic cleft of cPEPCK which is used by 3-MPA to inhibit cPEPCK non-competitively. We demonstrate that extended binding site of cPEPCK can further be exploited for designing new drugs against cPEPCK. PMID:26528723

  19. Inhibition of /sup 22/Na influx by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine in bovine adrenal medullary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arita, M.; Wada, A.; Takara, H.; Izumi, F.

    1987-10-01

    In bovine adrenal medullary cells we investigated the effects of antidepressants on ionic channels and secretion of catecholamines. Tricyclic (imipramine, amitriptyline and nortriptyline) and tetracyclic (maprotiline and mianserin) antidepressants inhibited carbachol-induced influx of /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca and secretion of catecholamines (IC50, 14-96 microM). Influx of /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca and secretion of catecholamines due to veratridine also were inhibited by these drugs (IC50, 10-17 microM). However, antidepressants did not suppress high concentration of K-induced 45Ca influx and catecholamine secretion, suggesting that antidepressants do not inhibit voltage-dependent Ca channels. (/sup 3/H)Imipramine bound specifically to adrenal medullary cells. Binding was saturable, reversible and with two different equilibrium dissociation constants (13.3 and 165.0 microM). Tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants competed for the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine at the same concentrations as they inhibited /sup 22/Na influx caused by carbachol or veratridine. Carbachol, d-tubocurarine, hexamethonium, tetrodotoxin, veratridine and scorpion venom did not inhibit the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine. These results suggest that tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants bind to two populations of binding sites which are functionally associated with nicotinic receptor-associated ionic channels and with voltage-dependent Na channels, and inhibit Na influx. Inhibition of Na influx leads to the reduction of Ca influx and catecholamine secretion caused by carbachol or veratridine.

  20. Characterization of [3H]-nitrendipine binding to uterine smooth muscle plasma membrane and its relevance to inhibition of calcium entry.

    PubMed Central

    Batra, S.

    1985-01-01

    Specific, high affinity (KD = 164 pM) binding of the Ca channel inhibitor [3H]-nitrendipine was identified in plasma membrane-enriched fractions from the rat myometrium. Although dihydropyridines effectively competed for [3H]-nitrendipine binding sites, both verapamil and D600 were poor competitors. Diltiazem (10 microM) increased [3H]-nitrendipine binding by about 40%, but had no effect on binding affinity. Among several other drugs tested, diethylstilboestrol (DES) caused a considerable inhibition of binding, with an IC50 value of 4 microM. Both La3+ and EDTA (or EGTA) inhibited binding. The inhibition by the latter could be overcome by the addition of Ca2+ or Mg2+. A clear relationship was found between [3H]-nitrendipine binding and 5-nucleotidase activity in the various subcellular fractions. Data on K+-stimulated Ca2+ influx in the intact uterine strips showed a good agreement between the inhibition by both nitrendipine and DES of stimulated Ca influx and their inhibitory effect on [3H]-nitrendipine binding to plasma membrane. This type of correlation was lacking in the case of D600. These results suggest that Ca channels in the myometrial membrane possess multiple sites at which different drugs can act to block these channels. PMID:2412621

  1. Ebselen and congeners inhibit NADPH-oxidase 2 (Nox2)-dependent superoxide generation by interrupting the binding of regulatory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Susan M.E.; Min, Jaeki; Ganesh, Thota; Diebold, Becky; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Zhu, Yerun; McCoy, James; Sun, Aiming; Snyder, James P.; Fu, Haian; Du, Yuhong; Lewis, Iestyn; Lambeth, J. David

    2012-01-01

    Summary NADPH-oxidases are a primary source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which function in normal physiology and, when overproduced, in pathophysiology. Recent studies using mice deficient in Nox2 identify this isoform as a novel target against Nox2-implicated inflammatory diseases. Nox2 activation depends on the binding of the proline rich domain of its heterodimeric partner p22phox to p47phox. A high-throughput screen that monitored this interaction via fluorescence polarization identified ebselen and several of its analogs as inhibitors. Medicinal chemistry was performed to explore structure-activity relationships and to optimize potency. Ebselen and analogs potently inhibited Nox1 and Nox2 activity but were less effective against other isoforms. Ebselen also blocked translocation of p47phox to neutrophil membranes. Thus, ebselen and its analogs represent a class of compounds that inhibit ROS generation by interrupting the assembly of Nox2-activating regulatory subunits. PMID:22726689

  2. PTD-mediated intracellular delivery of mutant NFAT minimum DNA binding domain inhibited the proliferation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Qianqian; Peng, Xin; Xia, Sheng; Shen, Weihong; Zong, Yangyong; Cheng, Jing; Wu, Weijiang; Zhang, Miaomiao; Du, Fengyi; Xu, Wenrong; Qian, Hui; Shao, Qixiang

    2014-03-01

    The nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) family of calcium-regulated transcription factors plays a key role in the development and function of the immune system. Calcineurin, a protein phosphatase, activates NFAT by dephosphorylation. The activated NFAT is translocated into the nucleus, where it up-regulates the expression of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and other target genes. Calcineurin inhibitors such as cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK506 are effective immunosuppressant drugs and dramatically increase the success rate of organ transplantation procedures. However, since calcineurin is expressed in most tissues in the body and calcineurin inhibition alters many cellular processes besides immune cell activation, the therapeutic use of calcineurin inhibitors is limited by serious side effects. Thus inhibiting NFAT by other mechanisms such as blocking its binding to DNA could be a more selective and safer approach to target NFAT for therapeutic applications. In peripheral T cells, productive immune responses are dependent upon the cooperative binding of the NFAT/AP-1 transcriptional complex to the promoter regions of genes such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), while NFAT in the absence of AP-1 leads to T cell anergy. Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are able to penetrate cell membranes and can be used to transport exogenous proteins across the cell and nuclear membranes. In this study, we constructed a fusion protein of PTD and a minimum DNA binding domain of human NFAT1 (PTD-ΔNFATminiDBD), which contains two mutations (R466A and T533G) in the AP-1 binding sites. The delivery and functions of this fusion protein in T cells were investigated. The results indicated that PTD-ΔNFATminiDBD could be effectively delivered into T cells and transported into the nucleus. PTD-ΔNFATminiDBD attenuated IL-2 production in T cells and then inhibited T cell proliferation, likely through competing against endogenous NFAT for binding to the IL-2 gene promoter. These results demonstrated that

  3. A competitive nucleotide binding inhibitor: in vitro characterization of Rab7 GTPase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Agola, Jacob O; Hong, Lin; Surviladze, Zurab; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J Jacob; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Oprea, Tudor I; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2012-06-15

    Mapping the functionality of GTPases through small molecule inhibitors represents an underexplored area in large part due to the lack of suitable compounds. Here we report on the small chemical molecule 2-(benzoylcarbamothioylamino)-5,5-dimethyl-4,7-dihydrothieno[2,3-c]pyran-3-carboxylic acid (PubChem CID 1067700) as an inhibitor of nucleotide binding by Ras-related GTPases. The mechanism of action of this pan-GTPase inhibitor was characterized in the context of the Rab7 GTPase as there are no known inhibitors of Rab GTPases. Bead-based flow cytometry established that CID 1067700 has significant inhibitory potency on Rab7 nucleotide binding with nanomolar inhibitor (K(i)) values and an inhibitory response of ≥97% for BODIPY-GTP and BODIPY-GDP binding. Other tested GTPases exhibited significantly lower responses. The compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Rab7 nucleotide binding based on both equilibrium binding and dissociation assays. Molecular docking analyses are compatible with CID 1067700 fitting into the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTP-conformer of Rab7. On the GDP-conformer, the molecule has greater solvent exposure and significantly less protein interaction relative to GDP, offering a molecular rationale for the experimental results. Structural features pertinent to CID 1067700 inhibitory activity have been identified through initial structure-activity analyses and identified a molecular scaffold that may serve in the generation of more selective probes for Rab7 and other GTPases. Taken together, our study has identified the first competitive GTPase inhibitor and demonstrated the potential utility of the compound for dissecting the enzymology of the Rab7 GTPase, as well as serving as a model for other small molecular weight GTPase inhibitors.

  4. Mechanical Strength and Inhibition of the Staphylococcus aureus Collagen-Binding Protein Cna

    PubMed Central

    Herman-Bausier, Philippe; Valotteau, Claire; Pietrocola, Giampiero; Rindi, Simonetta; Alsteens, David; Foster, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus expresses a variety of cell surface adhesion proteins that bind to host extracellular matrix proteins. Among these, the collagen (Cn)-binding protein Cna plays important roles in bacterium-host adherence and in immune evasion. While it is well established that the A region of Cna mediates ligand binding, whether the repetitive B region has a dedicated function is not known. Here, we report the direct measurement of the mechanical strength of Cna-Cn bonds on living bacteria, and we quantify the antiadhesion activity of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeting this interaction. We demonstrate that the strength of Cna-Cn bonds in vivo is very strong (~1.2 nN), consistent with the high-affinity “collagen hug” mechanism. The B region is required for strong ligand binding and has been found to function as a spring capable of sustaining high forces. This previously undescribed mechanical response of the B region is of biological significance as it provides a means to project the A region away from the bacterial surface and to maintain bacterial adhesion under conditions of high forces. We further quantified the antiadhesion activity of MAbs raised against the A region of Cna directly on living bacteria without the need for labeling or purification. Some MAbs are more efficient in blocking single-cell adhesion, suggesting that they act as competitive inhibitors that bind Cna residues directly involved in ligand binding. This report highlights the role of protein mechanics in activating the function of staphylococcal adhesion proteins and emphasizes the potential of antibodies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and biofilm formation. PMID:27795393

  5. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  6. [Methoxyflurane and ethanol do not inhibit the neuronal uptake of noradrenaline (uptake 1) at the desipramine binding site].

    PubMed

    Kress, H G; Schömig, E

    1990-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that the net accumulation of 3H-norepinephrine in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 was reduced by anesthetic concentrations of n-alkanols and the volatile anesthetics halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, and methoxyflurane. In PC12 cells, as in adrenergic neurons, norepinephrine is transported across the plasma membrane by a saturable, high-affinity, carrier-mediated mechanism (uptake1), which follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, is energy- and sodium-dependent, and is inhibited by low concentrations of cocaine and the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine. Although uptake1 is the most important process for the removal of norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft, the net accumulation of norepinephrine within the neuron also depends on other factors including its vesicular uptake and storage within the granules, its metabolism by monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and the efflux of its more lipophilic metabolites. In our previous report we could not exclude the contribution of any of these factors to the observed inhibitory effects of volatile substances. Therefore, the aim of the present study with ethanol and methoxyflurane was: (1) to elucidate further the exact mechanism responsible for the reduction of the norepinephrine accumulation; and (2) to investigate the anesthetics' interaction with the substrate recognition site, which is identical with the desipramine binding site on the norepinephrine carrier. METHODS. For 3H-norepinephrine uptake experiments, PC12 cells were cultured on dishes (60 mm, Nunc) coated with polyornithine. Reserpine (10 microM) was added to the culture 24 h before the experiment to deplete endogenous norepinephrine. The initial carrier-mediated transport rate (60 s) was measured as previously described. 3H-desipramine equilibrium binding was determined with isolated plasma membranes prepared from PC12 cells grown in suspension culture. The carrier-mediated uptake of 3H

  7. A new subgroup of lectin-bound biliary proteins binds to cholesterol crystals, modifies crystal morphology, and inhibits cholesterol crystallization.

    PubMed Central

    Busch, N; Lammert, F; Marschall, H U; Matern, S

    1995-01-01

    Biliary proteins inhibiting or promoting cholesterol crystallization are assumed to play a major role in cholesterol gallstone pathogenesis. We now report a new group of biliary proteins that bind to cholesterol crystals, modify crystal morphology, and inhibit cholesterol crystallization. Various glycoprotein mixtures were extracted from abnormal human gallbladder bile using lectin affinity chromatography on concanavalin A, lentil, and Helix pomatia columns and were added to supersaturated model bile. Independent of the protein mixtures added, from the cholesterol crystals harvested, the same four GPs were isolated having molecular masses of 16, 28, 63, and 74 kD, respectively. Each protein was purified using preparative SDS-PAGE, and influence on cholesterol crystallization in model bile was tested at 10 microg/ml. Crystal growth was reduced by 76% (GP63), 65% (GP16), 55% (GP74), and 40% (GP28), respectively. Thus, these glycoproteins are the most potent biliary inhibitors of cholesterol crystallization known so far. Evidence that the inhibiting effect on cholesterol crystallization is mediated via protein-crystal interaction was further provided from scanning electron microscopy studies. Crystals grown in presence of inhibiting proteins showed significantly more ordered structures. Incidence of triclinic crystals and regular aggregates was shifted from 30 to 70% compared with controls. These observations may have important implications for understanding the role of biliary proteins in cholesterol crystallization and gallstone pathogenesis. Images PMID:8675674

  8. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP)-response Element-binding Protein (CREB)-binding Protein (CBP)/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yosuke; Oboki, Keisuke; Imamura, Jun; Kojika, Ekumi; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Saibara, Toshiji; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Kohara, Michinori; Kimura, Kiminori

    2015-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP)/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)- or bile duct ligation (BDL)-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80(+) CD11b(+) and Ly6C(low) CD11b(+) macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26870800

  9. The ryanodine receptor pore blocker neomycin also inhibits channel activity via a previously undescribed high-affinity Ca(2+) binding site.

    PubMed

    Laver, Derek R; Hamada, Tomoyo; Fessenden, James D; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we present evidence for the mechanism of neomycin inhibition of skeletal ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In single-channel recordings, neomycin produced monophasic inhibition of RyR open probability and biphasic inhibition of [(3)H]ryanodine binding. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) for channel blockade by neomycin was dependent on membrane potential and cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)], suggesting that neomycin acts both as a pore plug and as a competitive antagonist at a cytoplasmic Ca(2+) binding site that causes allosteric inhibition. This novel Ca(2+)/neomycin binding site had a neomycin affinity of 100 nM: and a Ca(2+) affinity of 35 nM,: which is 30-fold higher than that of the well-described cytoplasmic Ca(2+) activation site. Therefore, a new high-affinity class of Ca(2+) binding site(s) on the RyR exists that mediates neomycin inhibition. Neomycin plugging of the channel pore induced brief (1-2 ms) conductance substates at 30% of the fully open conductance, whereas allosteric inhibition caused complete channel closure with durations that depended on the neomycin concentration. We quantitatively account for these results using a dual inhibition model for neomycin that incorporates voltage-dependent pore plugging and Ca(2+)-dependent allosteric inhibition.

  10. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  11. Serum Albumin Binding Inhibits Nuclear Uptake of Luminescent Metal-Complex-Based DNA Imaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley; Gill, Martin R; McKenzie, Luke; Glover, Caroline; Mowll, Rachel; Weinstein, Julia A; Su, Xiaodi; Smythe, Carl; Thomas, Jim A

    2015-08-10

    The DNA binding and cellular localization properties of a new luminescent heterobimetallic Ir(III) Ru(II) tetrapyridophenazine complex are reported. Surprisingly, in standard cell media, in which its tetracationic, isostructural Ru(II) Ru(II) analogue is localized in the nucleus, the new tricationic complex is poorly taken up by live cells and demonstrates no nuclear staining. Consequent cell-free studies reveal that the Ir(III) Ru(II) complex binds bovine serum albumin, BSA, in Sudlow's Site I with a similar increase in emission and binding affinity to that observed with DNA. Contrastingly, in serum-free conditions the complex is rapidly internalized by live cells, where it localizes in cell nuclei and functions as a DNA imaging agent. The absence of serum proteins also greatly alters the cytotoxicity of the complex, where high levels of oncosis/necrosis are observed due to this enhanced uptake. This suggests that simply increasing the lipophilicity of a DNA imaging probe to enhance cellular uptake can be counterproductive as, due to increased binding to serum albumin protein, this strategy can actually disrupt nuclear targeting.

  12. Synthesis, antioxidant, enzyme inhibition and DNA binding studies of novel N-benzylated derivatives of sulfonamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Aadil; Murtaza, Shahzad; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Shamim, Saima; Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Rana, Usman Ali; Naseem, Khadija; Rafique, Hummera

    2016-08-01

    A series of novel N-benzylated derivatives of sulfonamide were synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, NMR and XRD analysis. The synthesized compounds were assayed for their biological potential. The biological studies involved antioxidant, enzyme inhibition, and DNA interaction studies. Antioxidant potential was investigated by Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay (FRAP) and DPPH free radical scavenging method, the capacity of synthesized compounds to inhibit the enzyme's activity was assayed by using the well-known Elman method whereas DNA interaction studies were carried out with the help UV-Vis absorption titration method. Moreover, a direct correlation between enzyme inhibition activity and concentration of the compounds was observed both in experimental and molecular docking studies. DNA interaction studies of the synthesized compounds showed weak interaction.

  13. A single-domain llama antibody potently inhibits the enzymatic activity of botulinum neurotoxin by binding to the non-catalytic alpha-exosite binding region.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianbo; Thompson, Aaron A; Fan, Yongfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A; Stevens, Raymond C; Marks, James D

    2010-04-01

    Ingestion or inhalation of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) results in botulism, a severe and frequently fatal disease. Current treatments rely on antitoxins, which, while effective, cannot reverse symptoms once BoNT has entered the neuron. For treatments that can reverse intoxication, interest has focused on developing inhibitors of the enzymatic BoNT light chain (BoNT Lc). Such inhibitors typically mimic substrate and bind in or around the substrate cleavage pocket. To explore the full range of binding sites for serotype A light chain (BoNT/A Lc) inhibitors, we created a library of non-immune llama single-domain VHH (camelid heavy-chain variable region derived from heavy-chain-only antibody) antibodies displayed on the surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Library selection on BoNT/A Lc yielded 15 yeast-displayed VHH with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(d)) from 230 to 0.03 nM measured by flow cytometry. Eight of 15 VHH inhibited the cleavage of substrate SNAP25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25,000 Da) by BoNT/A Lc. The most potent VHH (Aa1) had a solution K(d) for BoNT/A Lc of 1.47 x 10(-)(10) M and an IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.7 x 10(-)(10) M and was resistant to heat denaturation and reducing conditions. To understand the mechanism by which Aa1 inhibited catalysis, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the BoNT/A Lc-Aa1 VHH complex at 2.6 A resolution. The structure reveals that the Aa1 VHH binds in the alpha-exosite of the BoNT/A Lc, far from the active site for catalysis. The study validates the utility of non-immune llama VHH libraries as a source of enzyme inhibitors and identifies the BoNT/A Lc alpha-exosite as a target for inhibitor development.

  14. A Single-Domain Llama Antibody Potently Inhibits the Enzymatic Activity of Botulinum Neurotoxin by Binding to the Non-Catalytic [alpha]-Exosite Binding Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianbo; Thompson, Aaron A.; Fan, Yongfeng; Lou, Jianlong; Conrad, Fraser; Ho, Mengfei; Pires-Alves, Melissa; Wilson, Brenda A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Marks, James D.

    2010-08-13

    Ingestion or inhalation of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) results in botulism, a severe and frequently fatal disease. Current treatments rely on antitoxins, which, while effective, cannot reverse symptoms once BoNT has entered the neuron. For treatments that can reverse intoxication, interest has focused on developing inhibitors of the enzymatic BoNT light chain (BoNT Lc). Such inhibitors typically mimic substrate and bind in or around the substrate cleavage pocket. To explore the full range of binding sites for serotype A light chain (BoNT/A Lc) inhibitors, we created a library of non-immune llama single-domain VHH (camelid heavy-chain variable region derived from heavy-chain-only antibody) antibodies displayed on the surface of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Library selection on BoNT/A Lc yielded 15 yeast-displayed VHH with equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub d}) from 230 to 0.03 nM measured by flow cytometry. Eight of 15 VHH inhibited the cleavage of substrate SNAP25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25,000 Da) by BoNT/A Lc. The most potent VHH (Aa1) had a solution K{sub d} for BoNT/A Lc of 1.47 x 10{sup -10} M and an IC{sub 50} (50% inhibitory concentration) of 4.7 x 10{sup -10} M and was resistant to heat denaturation and reducing conditions. To understand the mechanism by which Aa1 inhibited catalysis, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of the BoNT/A Lc-Aa1 VHH complex at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals that the Aa1 VHH binds in the {alpha}-exosite of the BoNT/A Lc, far from the active site for catalysis. The study validates the utility of non-immune llama VHH libraries as a source of enzyme inhibitors and identifies the BoNT/A Lc {alpha}-exosite as a target for inhibitor development.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef binds directly to Lck and mitogen-activated protein kinase, inhibiting kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, A; Azad, A; Mills, J; McPhee, D

    1996-01-01

    It is now well established that human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) Nef contributes substantially to disease pathogenesis by augmenting virus replication and markedly perturbing T-cell function. The effect of Nef on host cell activation could be explained in part by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in signal transduction, including at least a member of the src family kinase, Lck, and the serine/threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Recombinant Nef directly interacted with purified Lck and MAPK in coprecipitation experiments and binding assays. A proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] in Nef occurring between amino acid residues 69 to 78 is highly conserved and bears strong resemblance to a defined consensus sequence identified as an SH3 binding domain present in several proteins which can interact with the SH3 domain of various signalling and cytoskeletal proteins. Binding and coprecipitation assays with short synthetic peptides corresponding to the proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] of Nef and the SH2, SH3, or SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck revealed that the interaction between these two proteins is at least in part mediated by the proline repeat sequence of Nef and the SH3 domain of Lck. In addition to direct binding to full-length Nef, MAPK was also shown to bind the same proline repeat motif. Nef protein significantly decreased the in vitro kinase activity of Lck and MAPK. Inhibition of key members of signalling cascades, including those emanating from the T-cell receptor, by the HIV-1 Nef protein undoubtedly alters the ability of the infected T cell to respond to antigens or cytokines, facilitating HIV-1 replication and contributing to HIV-1-induced disease pathogenesis. PMID:8794306

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity by binding to TNFR1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jae Ryoung; Huh, Jae Ho; Lee, Yoonna; Lee, Sang Il; Rho, Seung Bae; Lee, Je-Ho

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Binding assays demonstrated that secreted- and cellular-IGFBP-5 interacted with TNFR1. {yields} The interaction between IGFBP-5 and TNFR1 was inhibited by TNF-{alpha} and was blocked TNF-{alpha}-activated NF-{kappa}B activity. {yields} IGFBP-5 interacted with TNFR1 through its N- and L-domains but the binding of L-domain to TNFR1 was blocked by TNF-{alpha}. {yields} Competition between the L-domain of IGFBP-5 and TNF-{alpha} blocked TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. {yields} This study suggests that the L-domain of IGFBP-5 is a novel TNFR1 ligand that functions as a competitive TNF-{alpha} inhibitor. -- Abstract: IGFBP-5 is known to be involved in various cell phenomena such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the exact mechanisms by which IGFBP-5 exerts its functions are unclear. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that IGFBP-5 is a TNFR1-interacting protein. We found that ectopic expression of IGFBP-5 induced TNFR1 gene expression, and that IGFBP-5 interacted with TNFR1 in both an in vivo and an in vitro system. Secreted IGFBP-5 interacted with GST-TNFR1 and this interaction was blocked by TNF-{alpha}, demonstrating that IGFBP-5 might be a TNFR1 ligand. Furthermore, conditioned media containing secreted IGFBP-5 inhibited PMA-induced NF-{kappa}B activity and IL-6 expression in U-937 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation assays of TNFR1 and IGFBP-5 wild-type and truncation mutants revealed that IGFBP-5 interacts with TNFR1 through its N- and L-domains. However, only the interaction between the L-domain of IGFBP-5 and TNFR1 was blocked by TNF-{alpha} in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the L-domain of IGFBP-5 can function as a TNFR1 ligand. Competition between the L-domain of IGFBP-5 and TNF-{alpha} resulted in inhibition of TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}{Beta} activity. Taken together, our results suggest that the L-domain of IGFBP-5 is a novel TNFR1 ligand that functions as a competitive TNF

  17. A urokinase-type plasminogen activator-inhibiting cyclic peptide with an unusual P2 residue and an extended protease binding surface demonstrates new modalities for enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Martin; Wind, Troels; Blouse, Grant E; Christensen, Anni; Petersen, Helle H; Kjelgaard, Signe; Mathiasen, Lisa; Holtet, Thor L; Andreasen, Peter A

    2005-11-18

    To find new principles for inhibiting serine proteases, we screened phage-displayed random peptide repertoires with urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) as the target. The most frequent of the isolated phage clones contained the disulfide bridge-constrained sequence CSWRGLENHRMC, which we designated upain-1. When expressed recombinantly with a protein fusion partner, upain-1 inhibited the enzymatic activity of uPA competitively with a temperature and pH-dependent K(i), which at 25 degrees C and pH 7.4 was approximately 500 nm. At the same conditions, the equilibrium dissociation constant K(D), monitored by displacement of p-aminobenzamidine from the specificity pocket of uPA, was approximately 400 nm. By an inhibitory screen against other serine proteases, including trypsin, upain-1 was found to be highly selective for uPA. The cyclical structure of upain-1 was indispensable for uPA binding. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis identified Arg(4) of upain-1 as the P(1) residue and indicated an extended binding interaction including the specificity pocket and the 37-, 60-, and 97-loops of uPA and the P(1), P(2), P(3)', P(4)', and the P(5)' residues of upain-1. Substitution with alanine of the P(2) residue, Trp(3), converted upain-1 into a distinct, although poor, uPA substrate. Upain-1 represents a new type of uPA inhibitor that achieves selectivity by targeting uPA-specific surface loops. Most likely, the inhibitory activity depends on its cyclical structure and the unusual P(2) residue preventing the scissile bond from assuming a tetrahedral geometry and thus from undergoing hydrolysis. Peptide-derived inhibitors such as upain-1 may provide novel mechanistic information about enzyme-inhibitor interactions and alternative methodologies for designing effective protease inhibitors. PMID:16141208

  18. Human α-Defensins Inhibit BK Virus Infection by Aggregating Virions and Blocking Binding to Host Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Aisling S.; Maginnis, Melissa S.; Jordan, Joslynn A.; Gasparovic, Megan L.; Manley, Kate; Page, Rebecca; Williams, Geoffrey; Porter, Edith; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) is a polyomavirus that establishes a lifelong persistence in most humans and is a major impediment to success of kidney grafts. The function of the innate immune system in BKV infection and pathology has not been investigated. Here we examine the role of antimicrobial defensins in BKV infection of Vero cells. Our data show that α-defensin human neutrophil protein 1 (HNP1) and human α-defensin 5 (HD5) inhibit BKV infection by targeting an early event in the viral lifecycle. HD5 treatment of BKV reduced viral attachment to cells, whereas cellular treatment with HD5 did not. Colocalization studies indicated that HD5 interacts directly with BKV. Ultrastructural analysis revealed HD5-induced aggregation of virions. HD5 also inhibited infection of cells by other related polyomaviruses. This is the first study to demonstrate polyomavirus sensitivity to defensins. We also show a novel mechanism whereby HD5 binds to BKV leading to aggregation of virion particles preventing normal virus binding to the cell surface and uptake into cells. PMID:18782756

  19. Small molecule inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) binding to pleckstrin homology domains

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Benchun; Skidan, Igor; Yang, Jinsheng; Lugovskoy, Alexey; Reibarkh, Mikhail; Long, Kai; Brazell, Tres; Durugkar, Kulbhushan A.; Maki, Jenny; Ramana, C. V.; Schaffhausen, Brian; Wagner, Gerhard; Torchilin, Vladimir; Yuan, Junying; Degterev, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    The PI3-kinase (PI3K) pathway regulates many cellular processes, especially cell metabolism, cell survival, and apoptosis. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3), the product of PI3K activity and a key signaling molecule, acts by recruiting pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain-containing proteins to cell membranes. Here, we describe a new structural class of nonphosphoinositide small molecule antagonists (PITenins, PITs) of PIP3–PH domain interactions (IC50 ranges from 13.4 to 31 μM in PIP3/Akt PH domain binding assay). PITs inhibit interactions of a number of PIP3-binding PH domains, including those of Akt and PDK1, without affecting several PIP2-selective PH domains. As a result, PITs suppress the PI3K-PDK1-Akt pathway and trigger metabolic stress and apoptosis. A PIT-1 analog displayed significant antitumor activity in vivo, including inhibition of tumor growth and induction of apoptosis. Overall, our studies demonstrate the feasibility of developing specific small molecule antagonists of PIP3 signaling. PMID:21041639

  20. Dax1 binds to Oct3/4 and inhibits its transcriptional activity in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuanhai; Nakatake, Yuhki; Akagi, Tadayuki; Ura, Hiroki; Matsuda, Takahiko; Nishiyama, Akira; Koide, Hiroshi; Ko, Minoru S H; Niwa, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takashi

    2009-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Transcription factor Oct3/4 is an indispensable factor in the self-renewal of ES cells. In this study, we searched for a protein that would interact with Oct3/4 in ES cells and identified an orphan nuclear hormone receptor, Dax1. The association of Dax1 with Oct3/4 was mediated through the POU-specific domain of Oct3/4. Ectopic expression of Dax1 inhibited Oct3/4-mediated activation of an artificial Oct3/4-responsive promoter. Expression of Dax1 in ES cells also reduced the activities of Nanog and Rex1 promoters, while knockdown of Dax1 increased these activities. Pulldown and gel shift assays revealed that the interaction of Dax1 with Oct3/4 abolished the DNA binding activity of Oct3/4. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay results showed that Dax1 inhibited Oct3/4 binding to the promoter/enhancer regions of Oct3/4 and Nanog. Furthermore, overexpression of Dax1 resulted in ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these data suggest that Dax1, a novel molecule interacting with Oct3/4, functions as a negative regulator of Oct3/4 in ES cells. PMID:19528230

  1. Halide binding and inhibition of laccase copper clusters: the role of reorganization energy.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-01-20

    Laccase-like proteins are multicopper oxidases involved in several biological and industrial processes. Their application is commonly limited due to inhibition by fluoride and chloride, and as-isolated proteins are often substantially activated by heat, suggesting that multiple redox states can complicate characterization. Understanding these processes at the molecular level is thus desirable but theoretically unexplored. This paper reports systematic calculations of geometries, reorganization energies, and ionization energies for all partly oxidized states of the trinuclear copper clusters in realistic models with ∼200 atoms. Corrections for scalar-relativistic effects, dispersion, and thermal effects were estimated. Fluoride, chloride, hydroxide, or water was bound to the T2 copper site of the oxidized resting state, and the peroxo intermediate was also computed for reference. Antiferromagnetic coupling, assigned oxidation states, and general structures were consistent with known spectroscopic data. The computations show that (i) ligands bound to the T2 site substantially increase the reorganization energy of the second reduction of the resting state and reduce the redox potentials, providing a possible mechanism for inhibition; (ii) the reorganization energy is particularly large for F(-) but also high for Cl(-), consistent with the experimental tendency of inhibition; (iii) reduction leads to release of Cl(-) from the T2 site, suggesting a mechanism for heat/reduction activation of laccases by dissociation of inhibiting halides or hydroxide from T2. PMID:25532722

  2. Halide binding and inhibition of laccase copper clusters: the role of reorganization energy.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2015-01-20

    Laccase-like proteins are multicopper oxidases involved in several biological and industrial processes. Their application is commonly limited due to inhibition by fluoride and chloride, and as-isolated proteins are often substantially activated by heat, suggesting that multiple redox states can complicate characterization. Understanding these processes at the molecular level is thus desirable but theoretically unexplored. This paper reports systematic calculations of geometries, reorganization energies, and ionization energies for all partly oxidized states of the trinuclear copper clusters in realistic models with ∼200 atoms. Corrections for scalar-relativistic effects, dispersion, and thermal effects were estimated. Fluoride, chloride, hydroxide, or water was bound to the T2 copper site of the oxidized resting state, and the peroxo intermediate was also computed for reference. Antiferromagnetic coupling, assigned oxidation states, and general structures were consistent with known spectroscopic data. The computations show that (i) ligands bound to the T2 site substantially increase the reorganization energy of the second reduction of the resting state and reduce the redox potentials, providing a possible mechanism for inhibition; (ii) the reorganization energy is particularly large for F(-) but also high for Cl(-), consistent with the experimental tendency of inhibition; (iii) reduction leads to release of Cl(-) from the T2 site, suggesting a mechanism for heat/reduction activation of laccases by dissociation of inhibiting halides or hydroxide from T2.

  3. A NONSTEADY STATE MODEL FOR THE TIGHT-BINDING INHIBITION OF THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE BY 5-FLUOROURACIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    5-Fluorouracil (5_FU) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug and tratogen that was chosen as a prototypic toxicant to contruct a biologically based dose-resonse (BBDR) model (Setzer et. al., 2001). Part of the BBDR model simulates the inhibition of thymidylate synthetase (TS), a...

  4. Illuminating the binding interactions of galactonoamidines during the inhibition of β-galactosidase (E. coli).

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiu-Hua; Pickens, Jessica B; Striegler, Susanne; Gervaise, Cédric D

    2016-02-15

    Several galactonoamidines were previously identified as very potent competitive inhibitors that exhibit stabilizing hydrophobic interactions of the aglycon in the active site of β-galactosidase (Aspergillus oryzae). To elucidate the contributions of the glycon to the overall inhibition ability of the compounds, three glyconoamidine derivatives with alteration in the glycon at C-2 and C-4 were synthesized and evaluated herein. All amidines are competitive inhibitors of β-galactosidase (Escherichia coli) and show significantly reduced inhibition ability when compared to the parent. The results highlight strong hydrogen-bonding interactions between the hydroxyl group at C-2 of the amidine glycon and the active site of the enzyme. Slightly weaker H-bonds are promoted through the hydroxyl group at C-4. The inhibition constants were determined to be picomolar for the parent galactonoamidine, and nanomolar for the designed derivatives rendering all glyconoamidines very potent inhibitors of glycosidases albeit the derivatized amidines show up to 700-fold lower inhibition activity than the parent.

  5. Effects of an oxidative agent and lectins on the binding inhibition of recombinant hepatitis a virus proteins to oyster digestive tissues.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Mu; Kim, Jong-Oh; Oh, Myung-Joo; Kim, Duwoon

    2011-01-01

    While the exact mechanism of hepatitis A virus (HAV) accumulation remains unclear, it has been demonstrated that viruses related to shellfish-borne gastroenteritis can bind to carbohydrates of oyster tissues. We investigated carbohydrate-binding sites to determine if they were related to the binding of HAV to carbohydrate moieties on oyster digestive tissues (DTs) using recombinant HAV proteins (rHAVPs). In addition, we evaluated lectins to determine if they influenced the inhibition of binding of rHAVPs to carbohydrates present in DT. DT that was treated with 0.5% potassium periodate allowed only 23% ± 3.6% and 33% ± 7.8% binding of VP1-P2A and VP1 rHAVPs, respectively, when compared with a control group (100%) treated with distilled water, indicating that carbohydrate-binding sites are strongly related to the binding of HAV. Soybean agglutinin (SBA) led to the greatest decrease in the binding affinity among six lectins (Helix pomatia, Dolichos biflorus, Ulex europaeus, SBA, Triticum vulgaris, and Arachis hypogaea) tested for inhibition of the binding of rHAVPs to DT, indicating that exposing the virus-contaminated DT to SBA might have the potential to depurate viral contaminants found in shellfish food products by high-affinity binding between SBA and rHAVPs, thus improving food safety.

  6. Effects of an oxidative agent and lectins on the binding inhibition of recombinant hepatitis a virus proteins to oyster digestive tissues.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Mu; Kim, Jong-Oh; Oh, Myung-Joo; Kim, Duwoon

    2011-01-01

    While the exact mechanism of hepatitis A virus (HAV) accumulation remains unclear, it has been demonstrated that viruses related to shellfish-borne gastroenteritis can bind to carbohydrates of oyster tissues. We investigated carbohydrate-binding sites to determine if they were related to the binding of HAV to carbohydrate moieties on oyster digestive tissues (DTs) using recombinant HAV proteins (rHAVPs). In addition, we evaluated lectins to determine if they influenced the inhibition of binding of rHAVPs to carbohydrates present in DT. DT that was treated with 0.5% potassium periodate allowed only 23% ± 3.6% and 33% ± 7.8% binding of VP1-P2A and VP1 rHAVPs, respectively, when compared with a control group (100%) treated with distilled water, indicating that carbohydrate-binding sites are strongly related to the binding of HAV. Soybean agglutinin (SBA) led to the greatest decrease in the binding affinity among six lectins (Helix pomatia, Dolichos biflorus, Ulex europaeus, SBA, Triticum vulgaris, and Arachis hypogaea) tested for inhibition of the binding of rHAVPs to DT, indicating that exposing the virus-contaminated DT to SBA might have the potential to depurate viral contaminants found in shellfish food products by high-affinity binding between SBA and rHAVPs, thus improving food safety. PMID:21219781

  7. Avibactam and Class C β-Lactamases: Mechanism of Inhibition, Conservation of the Binding Pocket, and Implications for Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, M. R.; Ross, P. L.; McLaughlin, R. E.; Olivier, N. B.

    2014-01-01

    Avibactam is a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor that inhibits a wide range of β-lactamases. These include class A, class C, and some class D enzymes, which erode the activity of β-lactam drugs in multidrug-resistant pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae spp. Avibactam is currently in clinical development in combination with the β-lactam antibiotics ceftazidime, ceftaroline fosamil, and aztreonam. Avibactam has the potential to be the first β-lactamase inhibitor that might provide activity against class C-mediated resistance, which represents a growing concern in both hospital- and community-acquired infections. Avibactam has an unusual mechanism of action: it is a covalent inhibitor that acts via ring opening, but in contrast to other currently used β-lactamase inhibitors, this reaction is reversible. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of avibactam bound to a class C β-lactamase, AmpC, from P. aeruginosa that provided insight into the mechanism of both acylation and recyclization in this enzyme class and highlighted the differences observed between class A and class C inhibition. Furthermore, variants resistant to avibactam that identified the residues important for inhibition were isolated. Finally, the structural information was used to predict effective inhibition by sequence analysis and functional studies of class C β-lactamases from a large and diverse set of contemporary clinical isolates (P. aeruginosa and several Enterobacteriaceae spp.) obtained from recent infections to understand any preexisting variability in the binding pocket that might affect inhibition by avibactam. PMID:25022578

  8. Diacylglycerol pyrophosphate binds and inhibits the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in barley aleurone.

    PubMed

    Astorquiza, Paula Luján; Usorach, Javier; Racagni, Graciela; Villasuso, Ana Laura

    2016-04-01

    The aleurona cell is a model that allows the study of the antagonistic effect of gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Previous results of our laboratory demonstrated the involvement of phospholipids during the response to ABA and GA. ABA modulates the levels of diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DAG, PA, DGPP) through the activities of phosphatidate phosphatases, phospholipase D, diacylglycerol kinase and phosphatidate kinase (PAP, PLD, DGK and PAK). PA and DGPP are key phospholipids in the response to ABA, since both are capable of modifying the hydrolitic activity of the aleurona. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanism of action of these phospholipids during the ABA signal. DGPP is an anionic phospholipid with a pyrophosphate group attached to diacylglycerol. The ionization of the pyrophosphate group may be important to allow electrostatic interactions between DGPP and proteins. To understand how DGPP mediates cell functions in barley aleurone, we used a DGPP affinity membrane assay to isolate DGPP-binding proteins from Hordeum vulgare, followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12) was identified for being bound to DGPP. To validate our method, the relatively abundant GAPDH was characterized with respect to its lipid-binding properties, by fat western blot. GAPDH antibody interacts with proteins that only bind to DGPP and PA. We also observed that ABA treatment increased GAPDH abundance and enzyme activity. The presence of phospholipids during GAPDH reaction modulated the GAPDH activity in ABA treated aleurone. These data suggest that DGPP binds to GAPDH and this DGPP and GAPDH interaction provides new evidences in the study of DGPP-mediated ABA responses in barley aleurone.

  9. Diacylglycerol pyrophosphate binds and inhibits the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in barley aleurone.

    PubMed

    Astorquiza, Paula Luján; Usorach, Javier; Racagni, Graciela; Villasuso, Ana Laura

    2016-04-01

    The aleurona cell is a model that allows the study of the antagonistic effect of gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Previous results of our laboratory demonstrated the involvement of phospholipids during the response to ABA and GA. ABA modulates the levels of diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DAG, PA, DGPP) through the activities of phosphatidate phosphatases, phospholipase D, diacylglycerol kinase and phosphatidate kinase (PAP, PLD, DGK and PAK). PA and DGPP are key phospholipids in the response to ABA, since both are capable of modifying the hydrolitic activity of the aleurona. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanism of action of these phospholipids during the ABA signal. DGPP is an anionic phospholipid with a pyrophosphate group attached to diacylglycerol. The ionization of the pyrophosphate group may be important to allow electrostatic interactions between DGPP and proteins. To understand how DGPP mediates cell functions in barley aleurone, we used a DGPP affinity membrane assay to isolate DGPP-binding proteins from Hordeum vulgare, followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12) was identified for being bound to DGPP. To validate our method, the relatively abundant GAPDH was characterized with respect to its lipid-binding properties, by fat western blot. GAPDH antibody interacts with proteins that only bind to DGPP and PA. We also observed that ABA treatment increased GAPDH abundance and enzyme activity. The presence of phospholipids during GAPDH reaction modulated the GAPDH activity in ABA treated aleurone. These data suggest that DGPP binds to GAPDH and this DGPP and GAPDH interaction provides new evidences in the study of DGPP-mediated ABA responses in barley aleurone. PMID:26866974

  10. Disarming bacterial virulence through chemical inhibition of the DNA binding domain of an AraC-like transcriptional activator protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji; Hocking, Dianna M; Cheng, Catherine; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Tauschek, Marija; Robins-Browne, Roy M

    2013-10-25

    The misuse of antibiotics during past decades has led to pervasive antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Hence, there is an urgent need for the development of new and alternative approaches to combat bacterial infections. In most bacterial pathogens the expression of virulence is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level. Therefore, targeting pathogens with drugs that interfere with virulence gene expression offers an effective alternative to conventional antimicrobial chemotherapy. Many Gram-negative intestinal pathogens produce AraC-like proteins that control the expression of genes required for infection. In this study we investigated the prototypical AraC-like virulence regulator, RegA, from the mouse attaching and effacing pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium, as a potential drug target. By screening a small molecule chemical library and chemical optimization, we identified two compounds that specifically inhibited the ability of RegA to activate its target promoters and thus reduced expression of a number of proteins required for virulence. Biophysical, biochemical, genetic, and computational analyses indicated that the more potent of these two compounds, which we named regacin, disrupts the DNA binding capacity of RegA by interacting with amino acid residues within a conserved region of the DNA binding domain. Oral administration of regacin to mice, commencing 15 min before or 12 h after oral inoculation with C. rodentium, caused highly significant attenuation of intestinal colonization by the mouse pathogen comparable to that of an isogenic regA-deletion mutant. These findings demonstrate that chemical inhibition of the DNA binding domains of transcriptional regulators is a viable strategy for the development of antimicrobial agents that target bacterial pathogens.

  11. Disarming Bacterial Virulence through Chemical Inhibition of the DNA Binding Domain of an AraC-like Transcriptional Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ji; Hocking, Dianna M.; Cheng, Catherine; Dogovski, Con; Perugini, Matthew A.; Holien, Jessica K.; Parker, Michael W.; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Tauschek, Marija; Robins-Browne, Roy M.

    2013-01-01

    The misuse of antibiotics during past decades has led to pervasive antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Hence, there is an urgent need for the development of new and alternative approaches to combat bacterial infections. In most bacterial pathogens the expression of virulence is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level. Therefore, targeting pathogens with drugs that interfere with virulence gene expression offers an effective alternative to conventional antimicrobial chemotherapy. Many Gram-negative intestinal pathogens produce AraC-like proteins that control the expression of genes required for infection. In this study we investigated the prototypical AraC-like virulence regulator, RegA, from the mouse attaching and effacing pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium, as a potential drug target. By screening a small molecule chemical library and chemical optimization, we identified two compounds that specifically inhibited the ability of RegA to activate its target promoters and thus reduced expression of a number of proteins required for virulence. Biophysical, biochemical, genetic, and computational analyses indicated that the more potent of these two compounds, which we named regacin, disrupts the DNA binding capacity of RegA by interacting with amino acid residues within a conserved region of the DNA binding domain. Oral administration of regacin to mice, commencing 15 min before or 12 h after oral inoculation with C. rodentium, caused highly significant attenuation of intestinal colonization by the mouse pathogen comparable to that of an isogenic regA-deletion mutant. These findings demonstrate that chemical inhibition of the DNA binding domains of transcriptional regulators is a viable strategy for the development of antimicrobial agents that target bacterial pathogens. PMID:24019519

  12. Isoform-selective inhibition of facilitative glucose transporters: elucidation of the molecular mechanism of HIV protease inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Tzekov, Anatoly; Wildman, Scott A; Hruz, Paul W

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacologic HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and structurally related oligopeptides are known to reversibly bind and inactivate the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Several PIs exhibit isoform selectivity with little effect on GLUT1. The ability to target individual GLUT isoforms in an acute and reversible manner provides novel means both to investigate the contribution of individual GLUTs to health and disease and to develop targeted treatment of glucose-dependent diseases. To determine the molecular basis of transport inhibition, a series of chimeric proteins containing transmembrane and cytosolic domains from GLUT1 and GLUT4 and/or point mutations were generated and expressed in HEK293 cells. Structural integrity was confirmed via measurement of N-[2-[2-[2-[(N-biotinylcaproylamino)ethoxy)ethoxyl]-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzoyl]-1,3-bis(mannopyranosyl-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA) labeling of the chimeric proteins in low density microsome fractions isolated from stably transfected 293 cells. Functional integrity was assessed via measurement of zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) uptake. ATB-BMPA labeling studies and 2-DOG uptake revealed that transmembrane helices 1 and 5 contain amino acid residues that influence inhibitor access to the transporter binding domain. Substitution of Thr-30 and His-160 in GLUT1 to the corresponding positions in GLUT4 is sufficient to completely transform GLUT1 into GLUT4 with respect to indinavir inhibition of 2-DOG uptake and ATB-BMPA binding. These data provide a structural basis for the selectivity of PIs toward GLUT4 over GLUT1 that can be used in ongoing novel drug design. PMID:24706759

  13. A small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the HIV-1 envelope and inhibits CD4 receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Fang; Blair, Wade; Wang, Tao; Spicer, Timothy; Guo, Qi; Zhou, Nannan; Gong, Yi-Fei; Wang, H.-G. Heidi; Rose, Ronald; Yamanaka, Gregory; Robinson, Brett; Li, Chang-Ben; Fridell, Robert; Deminie, Carol; Demers, Gwendeline; Yang, Zheng; Zadjura, Lisa; Meanwell, Nicholas; Colonno, Richard

    2003-01-01

    BMS-378806 is a recently discovered small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that blocks viral entrance to cells. The compound exhibits potent inhibitory activity against a panel of R5-(virus using the CCR5 coreceptor), X4-(virus using the CXCR4 coreceptor), and R5/X4 HIV-1 laboratory and clinical isolates of the B subtype (median EC50 of 0.04 μM) in culture assays. BMS-378806 is selective for HIV-1 and inactive against HIV-2, SIV and a panel of other viruses, and exhibits no significant cytotoxicity in the 14 cell types tested (concentration for 50% reduction of cell growth, >225 μM). Mechanism of action studies demonstrated that BMS-378806 binds to gp120 and inhibits the interactions of the HIV-1 envelope protein to cellular CD4 receptors. Further confirmation that BMS-378806 targets the envelope in infected cells was obtained through the isolation of resistant variants and the mapping of resistance substitutions to the HIV-1 envelope. In particular, two substitutions, M426L and M475I, are situated in the CD4 binding pocket of gp120. Recombinant HIV-1 carrying these two substitutions demonstrated significantly reduced susceptibility to compound inhibition. BMS-378806 displays many favorable pharmacological traits, such as low protein binding, minimal human serum effect on anti-HIV-1 potency, good oral bioavailability in animal species, and a clean safety profile in initial animal toxicology studies. Together, the data show that BMS-378806 is a representative of a new class of HIV inhibitors that has the potential to become a valued addition to our current armamentarium of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:12930892

  14. Human p53 is Inhibited by Glutathionylation of Cysteines Present in the Proximal DNA-Binding Domain During Oxidative Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Velu, Chinavenmeni S.; Niture, Suryakant K.; Doneanu, Catalin E.; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.

    2008-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms that modulate the redox state of p53 tumor suppressor remain unclear, although its DNA-binding function is known to be strongly inhibited by oxidative and nitrosative stresses. We show that human p53 is subjected to a new and reversible posttranslational modification, namely, S-glutathionylation in stressed states including DNA damage. First, a rapid and direct incorporation of biotinylated GSH or GSSG into the purified recombinant p53 protein was observed. The modified p53 had significantly decreased ability to bind its consensus DNA sequence. Reciprocal immunoprecipitations and a GST-overlay assay showed that p53 in tumor cells was marginally glutathionylated, however, the modification increased greatly after oxidant and DNA-damaging treatments. GSH-modification coexisted with the serine phophorylations in activated p53, and the thiol-conjugated protein was present in nuclei. When tumor cells treated with camptothecin or cisplatin were subsequently exposed to glutathione-enhancing agents, p53 underwent dethiolation accompanied by detectable increases in p21waf1 expression, relative to the DNA damaging drugs alone. Mass spectrometry of GSH-modified p53 protein identified the cysteines 124, 141 and 182, all present in the proximal DNA-binding domain, as the sites of glutathionylation. Biotinylated maleimide also reacted rapidly with Cys141, implying this to be the most reactive cysteine on p53 surface. The glutathionylatable cysteines were found to exist in a negatively-charged microenvironment in cellular p53. Molecular modeling studies located Cys124 and 141 to the dimer interface of p53 and showed glutathionylation of either residue would inhibit p53-DNA association, and also interfere with protein dimerization. These results show for the first time that shielding of reactive cysteines contributes to a negative regulation for human p53, and imply that such an inactivation of the transcription factor may represent an acute defensive

  15. Blocking CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding inhibits sprouting angiogenesis and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    PJ, Noy; P, Lodhia; K, Khan; X, Zhuang; DG, Ward; AR, Verissimo; A, Bacon; R, Bicknell

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified CLEC14A as a tumour endothelial marker. Here we show CLEC14A is a regulator of sprouting angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Using a HUVEC spheroid sprouting assay we found CLEC14A to be a regulator of sprout initiation. Analysis of endothelial sprouting in aortic ring and in vivo subcutaneous sponge assays from clec14a+/+ and clec14a−/− mice revealed defects in sprouting angiogenesis in CLEC14A deficient animals. Tumour growth was retarded and vascularity reduced in clec14a−/− mice. Pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed MMRN2 binds to the extracellular region of CLEC14A. The CLEC14A-MMRN2 interaction was interrogated using mouse monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies were screened for their ability to block this interaction. Clone C4 but not C2 blocked CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding. C4 antibody perturbed tube formation and endothelial sprouting in vitro and in vivo, with a similar phenotype to loss of CLEC14A. Significantly, tumour growth was impaired in C4 treated animals and vascular density was also reduced in the C4 treated group. We conclude that CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding has a role in inducing sprouting angiogenesis during tumour growth, that has the potential to be manipulated in future anti-angiogenic therapy design. PMID:25745997

  16. Blocking CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding inhibits sprouting angiogenesis and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Noy, P J; Lodhia, P; Khan, K; Zhuang, X; Ward, D G; Verissimo, A R; Bacon, A; Bicknell, R

    2015-11-19

    We previously identified CLEC14A as a tumour endothelial marker. Here we show that CLEC14A is a regulator of sprouting angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Using a human umbilical vein endothelial cell spheroid-sprouting assay, we found CLEC14A to be a regulator of sprout initiation. Analysis of endothelial sprouting in aortic ring and in vivo subcutaneous sponge assays from clec14a(+/+) and clec14a(-/-) mice revealed defects in sprouting angiogenesis in CLEC14A-deficient animals. Tumour growth was retarded and vascularity reduced in clec14a(-/-) mice. Pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that MMRN2 binds to the extracellular region of CLEC14A. The CLEC14A-MMRN2 interaction was interrogated using mouse monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies were screened for their ability to block this interaction. Clone C4, but not C2, blocked CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding. C4 antibody perturbed tube formation and endothelial sprouting in vitro and in vivo, with a similar phenotype to loss of CLEC14A. Significantly, tumour growth was impaired in C4-treated animals and vascular density was also reduced in the C4-treated group. We conclude that CLEC14A-MMRN2 binding has a role in inducing sprouting angiogenesis during tumour growth, which has the potential to be manipulated in future antiangiogenic therapy design. PMID:25745997

  17. A Novel, ;Double-Clamp; Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-08-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be {approx}15 times more potent (IC{sub 50} = 0.27{+-}0.07 {mu}M) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC{sub 50} = 4.0{+-}1.8 {mu}M). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This 'double-clamp' binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  18. A Novel, “Double-Clamp” Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC50 = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC50 = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This “double-clamp” binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  19. Nerve growth factor inhibits the synthesis of a single-stranded DNA binding protein in pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12).

    PubMed Central

    Biocca, S; Cattaneo, A; Calissano, P

    1984-01-01

    Arrest of mitosis and neurite outgrowth induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) in rat pheochromocytoma cells (clone PC12) is accompanied by a progressive inhibition of the synthesis of a protein that binds to single-stranded but not to double-stranded DNA. Time course experiments show that this inhibition is already apparent after a 2-day incubation with NGF and is maximum (85-95%) upon achievement of complete PC12 cell differentiation. Inhibition of the synthesis of this single-stranded DNA binding protein after 48 hr of incubation with NGF is potentiated by concomitant treatment of PC12 cells with antimitotic drugs acting at different levels of DNA replication. Purification on a preparative scale of this protein and analysis of its major physicochemical properties show that: (i) it constitutes 0.5% of total soluble proteins of naive PC12 cells; (ii) its molecular weight measured by NaDodSO4/PAGE is Mr 34,000 (sucrose gradient centrifugation under nondenaturing conditions yields a sedimentation coefficient s20,w of 8.1 S, indicating that the native protein is an oligomer); (iii) amino acid analysis demonstrates a preponderance of acidic over basic residues, while electrofocusing experiments show that it has an isoelectric point around 8.0; (iv) approximately 15% of the protein is phosphorylated in vivo. It is postulated that control of the synthesis of this protein is connected with activation of a differentiative program triggered by NGF in the PC12 neoplastic cell line at some step(s) of DNA activity. Images PMID:6585787

  20. miR-382 inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis and relapse by targeting Y box-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Jin, Hua; Xu, Cheng-Xiong; Sun, Bo; Song, Zhi-Gang; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasis and relapse in osteosarcoma (OS) patients indicate poor prognosis. Here, we identified significantly decreased expression of miR-382 in highly metastatic OS cell lines and relapsed OS samples compared to their parental cell lines and primary OS samples, respectively. In addition, our clinical data showed that the miR-382 expression level was inversely associated with relapse and positively associated with metastasis-free survival in OS patients. The overexpression of miR-382 suppressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. This overexpression also decreased the cancer stem cell (CSC) population and function in OS cells. In contrast, inhibition of miR-382 stimulated EMT and metastasis and increased CSC population in OS cells. In addition, our in vivo experiments showed that the overexpression of miR-382 inhibited CSC-induced tumor formation, and the combination of miR-382 with doxorubicin prevented disease relapse in OS patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-382 exerted its tumor-suppressing potential by directly targeting Y box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) in OS. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-382 functions as a tumor suppressor function and that the overexpression of miR-382 is a novel strategy to inhibit tumor metastasis and prevent CSC-induced relapse in OS.

  1. miR-382 inhibits osteosarcoma metastasis and relapse by targeting Y box-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Jin, Hua; Xu, Cheng-Xiong; Sun, Bo; Song, Zhi-Gang; Bi, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Lung metastasis and relapse in osteosarcoma (OS) patients indicate poor prognosis. Here, we identified significantly decreased expression of miR-382 in highly metastatic OS cell lines and relapsed OS samples compared to their parental cell lines and primary OS samples, respectively. In addition, our clinical data showed that the miR-382 expression level was inversely associated with relapse and positively associated with metastasis-free survival in OS patients. The overexpression of miR-382 suppressed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. This overexpression also decreased the cancer stem cell (CSC) population and function in OS cells. In contrast, inhibition of miR-382 stimulated EMT and metastasis and increased CSC population in OS cells. In addition, our in vivo experiments showed that the overexpression of miR-382 inhibited CSC-induced tumor formation, and the combination of miR-382 with doxorubicin prevented disease relapse in OS patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-382 exerted its tumor-suppressing potential by directly targeting Y box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) in OS. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-382 functions as a tumor suppressor function and that the overexpression of miR-382 is a novel strategy to inhibit tumor metastasis and prevent CSC-induced relapse in OS. PMID:25292190

  2. Slow-Binding Inhibition: A Theoretical and Practical Course for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golicnik, Marko; Stojan, Jure

    2004-01-01

    Tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) catalyzes the oxidation of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) to 2,3,5,6-tetrahydro-5,6-dioxo-1H-indole-2-carboxylate (dopachrome), according to the classical Michaelis-Menten kinetic mechanism. The enzyme is strongly but slowly inhibited by alpha-amino-beta-[N-(3-hydroxy-4-pyridone)] propionic acid (L-mimosine), a…

  3. Merlin inhibits growth hormone-regulated Raf-ERKs pathways by binding to Grb2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hongtae; Jeun, Sin-Soo . E-mail: ssjeun@catholic.ac.kr; Kang, Seok-Gu; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2006-02-24

    Numerous studies have suggested that the NF2 protein merlin is involved in the regulation of abnormal cell growth and proliferation. In this study, to better understand the merlin's mechanisms that contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis, we examined the potential action of merlin on the cell proliferative signaling pathways in response to growth hormone (GH). Merlin effectively attenuated the GH-induced serum response element (SRE) and Elk-1-mediated transcriptional activation, as well as the endogenous SRE-regulated gene c-fos expression in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, merlin prevented the Raf-1 complex activation process, which resulted in the suppression of MAP kinase/ERK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs), and Elk-1 phosphorylation, which are the downstream signals of Raf-1. Moreover, it was shown that merlin interacted with endogenous growth factor receptor bound 2 (Grb2) protein and inhibited its expression. These results suggest that merlin contributes, via its protein-to-protein interaction with Grb2 and consequent inhibition of the MAPK pathways, to the regulation of the abnormal cell proliferation, and this provides a further mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor function of merlin.

  4. Nuclear Factor 90, a cellular dsRNA binding protein inhibits the HIV Rev-export function

    PubMed Central

    Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Castaño, Maria Eugenia; Hernandez-Verdun, Danièle; St-Laurent, Georges; Kumar, Ajit

    2006-01-01

    Background The HIV Rev protein is known to facilitate export of incompletely spliced and unspliced viral transcripts to the cytoplasm, a necessary step in virus life cycle. The Rev-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of nascent viral transcripts, dependents on interaction of Rev with the RRE RNA structural element present in the target RNAs. The C-terminal variant of dsRNA-binding nuclear protein 90 (NF90ctv) has been shown to markedly attenuate viral replication in stably transduced HIV-1 target cell line. Here we examined a mechanism of interference of viral life cycle involving Rev-NF90ctv interaction. Results Since Rev:RRE complex formations depend on protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions, we investigated whether the expression of NF90ctv might interfere with Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing transcripts. When HeLa cells expressed both NF90ctv and Rev protein, we observed that NF90ctv inhibited the Rev-mediated RNA transport. In particular, three regions of NF90ctv protein are involved in blocking Rev function. Moreover, interaction of NF90ctv with the RRE RNA resulted in the expression of a reporter protein coding sequences linked to the RRE structure. Moreover, Rev influenced the subcellular localization of NF90ctv, and this process is leptomycin B sensitive. Conclusion The dsRNA binding protein, NF90ctv competes with HIV Rev function at two levels, by competitive protein:protein interaction involving Rev binding to specific domains of NF90ctv, as well as by its binding to the RRE-RNA structure. Our results are consistent with a model of Rev-mediated HIV-1 RNA export that envisions Rev-multimerization, a process interrupted by NF90ctv. PMID:17125513

  5. Identification of the sAPRIL Binding Peptide and Its Growth Inhibition Effects in the Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Jing; He, Mei-rong

    2015-01-01

    Background A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) super family. It binds to its specific receptors and is involved in multiple processes during tumorigenesis and tumor cells proliferation. High levels of APRIL expression are closely correlated to the growth, metastasis, and 5-FU drug resistance of colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to identify a specific APRIL binding peptide (BP) able to block APRIL activity that could be used as a potential treatment for colorectal cancer. Methods A phage display library was used to identify peptides that bound selectively to soluble recombinant human APRIL (sAPRIL). The peptides with the highest binding affinity for sAPRIL were identified using ELISA. The effects of sAPRIL-BP on cell proliferation and cell cycle/apoptosis in vitro were evaluated using the CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. An in vivo mouse model of colorectal cancer was used to determine the anti-tumor efficacy of the sAPRIL-BP. Results Three candidate peptides were characterized from eight phage clones with high binding affinity for sAPRIL. The peptide with the highest affinity was selected for further characterization. The identified sAPRIL-BP suppressed tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in LOVO cells in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo in a mouse colorectal challenge model, the sAPRIL-BP reduced the growth of tumor xenografts in nude mice by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis intratumorally. Moreover, in an in vivo metastasis model, sAPRIL-BP reduced liver metastasis of colorectal cancer cells. Conclusions sAPRIL-BP significantly suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo and might be a candidate for treating colorectal cancers that express high levels of APRIL. PMID:25826583

  6. /sup 3/H-PAF-acether displacement and inhibition of binding in intact human platelets by BN 52021

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, R.; Le Couedic, J.P.; Benveniste, J.

    1986-03-05

    Intact washed human platelets incubated at 20/sup 0/C in Tyrode's buffer containing 0.25% (w/v) bovine serum albumin bound /sup 3/H paf-acether in a concentration (0-6.5 nM) and time (0-60 min) dependent manner (n=3). BN 52021 (60 ..mu..M) a chemically defined extract from Ginkgo biloba inhibited the binding of increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H paf-acether. Calculated differences between /sup 3/H paf-acether binding in the presence or absence of BN 52021 (60 ..mu..M) reached nearly a plateau in concentrations higher than 0.65 nM /sup 3/H paf-acether. Increasing concentrations of BN 52021 (0-60 ..mu..M) as well as of unlabelled paf-acether (0-50 nM) prevented within 15 min /sup 3/H paf-acether binding (0.65 nM) to platelets in a concentration-dependent way. Increasing BN 52021 concentrations (0-60 ..mu..M) also displaced platelet-bound /sup 3/H paf-acether (0.65 nM) in a concentration-dependent way. Displacement increased with the time length of platelet incubation with BN 52021 and reached a plateau at 15 min. Platelet-bound /sup 3/H paf-acether displacement of 28.3 +/- 6.3%, 31.1 +/- 4.0% and 26.7 +/- 5.6% was observed using 50 nM unlabelled paf-acether, 60 ..mu..M BN 52021 or both substances together (vs 4.3 +/- 7.2% for vehicle alone). No degradation of /sup 3/H paf-acether occurred as assessed by high pressure liquid chromatography. These results demonstrate that BN 52021 competes directly with paf-acether binding sites on human platelets.

  7. Binding to and Inhibition of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase by Macrocyclic Disulfides Enhances Spine Density.

    PubMed

    Diwakarla, Shanti; Nylander, Erik; Grönbladh, Alfhild; Vanga, Sudarsana Reddy; Khan, Yasmin Shamsudin; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Ng, Leelee; Pham, Vi; Sävmarker, Jonas; Lundbäck, Thomas; Jenmalm-Jensen, Annika; Andersson, Hanna; Engen, Karin; Rosenström, Ulrika; Larhed, Mats; Åqvist, Johan; Chai, Siew Yeen; Hallberg, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    Angiotensin IV (Ang IV) and related peptide analogs, as well as nonpeptide inhibitors of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), have previously been shown to enhance memory and cognition in animal models. Furthermore, the endogenous IRAP substrates oxytocin and vasopressin are known to facilitate learning and memory. In this study, the two recently synthesized 13-membered macrocyclic competitive IRAP inhibitors HA08 and HA09, which were designed to mimic the N terminus of oxytocin and vasopressin, were assessed and compared based on their ability to bind to the IRAP active site, and alter dendritic spine density in rat hippocampal primary cultures. The binding modes of the IRAP inhibitors HA08, HA09, and of Ang IV in either the extended or γ-turn conformation at the C terminus to human IRAP were predicted by docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding free energies calculated with the linear interaction energy method, which are in excellent agreement with experimental data and simulations, have been used to explain the differences in activities of the IRAP inhibitors, both of which are structurally very similar, but differ only with regard to one stereogenic center. In addition, we show that HA08, which is 100-fold more potent than the epimer HA09, can enhance dendritic spine number and alter morphology, a process associated with memory facilitation. Therefore, HA08, one of the most potent IRAP inhibitors known today, may serve as a suitable starting point for medicinal chemistry programs aided by MD simulations aimed at discovering more drug-like cognitive enhancers acting via augmenting synaptic plasticity.

  8. Binding and Inhibition of Spermidine Synthase from Plasmodium falciparum and Implications for In Vitro Inhibitor Testing

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Janina; Carey, Jannette; Svensson, Bo; Wengel, Verena

    2016-01-01

    The aminopropyltransferase spermidine synthase (SpdS) is a promising drug target in cancer and in protozoan diseases including malaria. Plasmodium falciparum SpdS (PfSpdS) transfers the aminopropyl group of decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcAdoMet) to putrescine or to spermidine to form spermidine or spermine, respectively. In an effort to understand why efficient inhibitors of PfSpdS have been elusive, the present study uses enzyme activity assays and isothermal titration calorimetry with verified or predicted inhibitors of PfSpdS to analyze the relationship between binding affinity as assessed by KD and inhibitory activity as assessed by IC50. The results show that some predicted inhibitors bind to the enzyme with high affinity but are poor inhibitors. Binding studies with PfSpdS substrates and products strongly support an ordered sequential mechanism in which the aminopropyl donor (dcAdoMet) site must be occupied before the aminopropyl acceptor (putrescine) site can be occupied. Analysis of the results also shows that the ordered sequential mechanism adequately accounts for the complex relationship between IC50 and KD and may explain the limited success of previous efforts at structure-based inhibitor design for PfSpdS. Based on PfSpdS active-site occupancy, we suggest a classification of ligands that can help to predict the KD−IC50 relations in future design of new inhibitors. The present findings may be relevant for other drug targets that follow an ordered sequential mechanism. PMID:27661085

  9. Isolation from bovine brain of substances inhibiting specific binding of imipramine and serotonin uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhin, A.G.; Kladnitskii, A.V.; Kovaleva, E.S.; Kudryakova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors search for endogenous ligands of the ''imipramine receptor'' in brain tissue. Binding of tritium-imipramine with the fraction of unpruified bovine brain synaptic membranes was carried out by the method of Raisman et'al. Uptake of tritium-serotonin by synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was estimated. The results do not give a final anser to the question of the existence of an endogenous ligand of the ''imipramine receptor'' but they can serve as the basis for research aimed at purifying the active fractions already obtained and identifying the compounds containined in them.

  10. Selective Inhibition of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) via Disruption of a Metal Binding Network by an Allosteric Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gejing; Shen, Junqing; Yin, Ming; McManus, Jessica; Mathieu, Magali; Gee, Patricia; He, Timothy; Shi, Chaomei; Bedel, Olivier; McLean, Larry R.; Le-Strat, Frank; Zhang, Ying; Marquette, Jean-Pierre; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Bailin; Rak, Alexey; Hoffmann, Dietmar; Rooney, Eamonn; Vassort, Aurelie; Englaro, Walter; Li, Yi; Patel, Vinod; Adrian, Francisco; Gross, Stefan; Wiederschain, Dmitri; Cheng, Hong; Licht, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated point mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) confer a neomorphic enzymatic activity: the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid, which is proposed to act as an oncogenic metabolite by inducing hypermethylation of histones and DNA. Although selective inhibitors of mutant IDH1 and IDH2 have been identified and are currently under investigation as potential cancer therapeutics, the mechanistic basis for their selectivity is not yet well understood. A high throughput screen for selective inhibitors of IDH1 bearing the oncogenic mutation R132H identified compound 1, a bis-imidazole phenol that inhibits d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid production in cells. We investigated the mode of inhibition of compound 1 and a previously published IDH1 mutant inhibitor with a different chemical scaffold. Steady-state kinetics and biophysical studies show that both of these compounds selectively inhibit mutant IDH1 by binding to an allosteric site and that inhibition is competitive with respect to Mg2+. A crystal structure of compound 1 complexed with R132H IDH1 indicates that the inhibitor binds at the dimer interface and makes direct contact with a residue involved in binding of the catalytically essential divalent cation. These results show that targeting a divalent cation binding residue can enable selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 and suggest that differences in magnesium binding between wild-type and mutant enzymes may contribute to the inhibitors' selectivity for the mutant enzyme. PMID:25391653

  11. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress.

    PubMed

    Fox, Julie M; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Fong, Rachel H; Kahle, Kristen M; Smit, Jolanda M; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Fremont, Daved H; Rossmann, Michael G; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-11-19

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphaviruses. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis, loss-of-function recombinant proteins and viruses, and multiple functional assays, we determined that broadly neutralizing MAbs block multiple steps in the viral lifecycle, including entry and egress, and bind to a conserved epitope on the B domain of the E2 glycoprotein. A 16 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of a Fab fragment bound to CHIKV E2 B domain provided an explanation for its neutralizing activity. Binding to the B domain was associated with repositioning of the A domain of E2 that enabled cross-linking of neighboring spikes. Our results suggest that B domain antigenic determinants could be targeted for vaccine or antibody therapeutic development against multiple alphaviruses of global concern.

  12. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  13. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress.

    PubMed

    Fox, Julie M; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Fong, Rachel H; Kahle, Kristen M; Smit, Jolanda M; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Fremont, Daved H; Rossmann, Michael G; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-11-19

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphaviruses. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis, loss-of-function recombinant proteins and viruses, and multiple functional assays, we determined that broadly neutralizing MAbs block multiple steps in the viral lifecycle, including entry and egress, and bind to a conserved epitope on the B domain of the E2 glycoprotein. A 16 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of a Fab fragment bound to CHIKV E2 B domain provided an explanation for its neutralizing activity. Binding to the B domain was associated with repositioning of the A domain of E2 that enabled cross-linking of neighboring spikes. Our results suggest that B domain antigenic determinants could be targeted for vaccine or antibody therapeutic development against multiple alphaviruses of global concern. PMID:26553503

  14. Lactoperoxidase: structural insights into the function,ligand binding and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Amit Kumar; Kaushik, Sanket; Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Sharma, Pradeep; Sirohi, Harshverdhan; Kaur, Punit; Singh, Tej P

    2013-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is a member of a large group of mammalian heme peroxidases that include myeloperoxidase (MPO), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO). The LPO is found in exocrine secretions including milk. It is responsible for the inactivation of a wide range of micro-organisms and hence, is an important component of defense mechanism in the body. With the help of hydrogen peroxide, it catalyzes the oxidation of halides, pseudohalides and organic aromatic molecules. Historically, LPO was isolated in 1943, nearly seventy years ago but its three-dimensional crystal structure has been elucidated only recently. This review provides various details of this protein from its discovery to understanding its structure, function and applications. In order to highlight species dependent variations in the structure and function of LPO, a detailed comparison of sequence, structure and function of LPO from various species have been made. The structural basis of ligand binding and distinctions in the modes of binding of substrates and inhibitors have been analyzed extensively. PMID:24049667

  15. Bifunctional Ligands for Inhibition of Tight-Binding Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Taavi; Enkvist, Erki; Viira, Birgit; Manoharan, Ganesh Babu; Raidaru, Gerda; Pflug, Alexander; Alam, Kazi Asraful; Zaccolo, Manuela; Engh, Richard Alan; Uri, Asko

    2016-08-17

    The acknowledged potential of small-molecule therapeutics targeting disease-related protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has promoted active research in this field. The strategy of using small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) to fight strong (tight-binding) PPIs tends to fall short due to the flat and wide interfaces of PPIs. Here we propose a biligand approach for disruption of strong PPIs. The potential of this approach was realized for disruption of the tight-binding (KD = 100 pM) tetrameric holoenzyme of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Supported by X-ray analysis of cocrystals, bifunctional inhibitors (ARC-inhibitors) were constructed that simultaneously associated with both the ATP-pocket and the PPI interface area of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc). Bifunctional inhibitor ARC-1411, possessing a KD value of 3 pM toward PKAc, induced the dissociation of the PKA holoenzyme with a low-nanomolar IC50, whereas the ATP-competitive inhibitor H89 bound to the PKA holoenzyme without disruption of the protein tetramer. PMID:27389935

  16. Soluble Prion Protein Binds Isolated Low Molecular Weight Amyloid-β Oligomers Causing Cytotoxicity Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas L; Choi, Jin-Kyu; Surewicz, Krystyna; Surewicz, Witold K

    2015-12-16

    A growing number of observations indicate that soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers play a major role in Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies strongly suggest that at least some of the neurotoxic effects of these oligomers are mediated by cellular, membrane-anchored prion protein and that Aβ neurotoxicity can be inhibited by soluble recombinant prion protein (rPrP) and its fragments. However, the mechanism by which rPrP