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Sample records for inhibits cell motility

  1. Bisphenol A Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Reduces the Motile Potential of Murine LM8 Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kidani, Teruki; Yasuda, Rie; Miyawaki, Joji; Oshima, Yusuke; Miura, Hiromasa; Masuno, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of bisphenol A (BPA) on the proliferation and motility potential of murine LM8 osteosarcoma cells. LM8 cells were treated for 3 days with or without 80 μM BPA. The effect of BPA on cell proliferation was determined by DNA measurement in the cultures and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation study. Ethanol-fixed cells were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) to visualize cell morphology. Cell motility was assayed using inserts with uncoated membranes in invasion chambers. Expression of cell division cycle 42 (CDC42) was determined by immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. BPA reduced the DNA content of cultures and the number of BrdU-positive cells. BPA induced a change in morphology from cuboidal with multiple filopodia on the cell surface to spindle-shaped with a smooth cell surface. BPA-treated cells expressed less CDC42 and were less motile than untreated cells. BPA inhibited DNA replication and cell proliferation. BPA inhibited filopodia formation and motile potential by inhibiting CDC42 expression in LM8 cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. Polarized cell motility induces hydrogen peroxide to inhibit cofilin via cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jenifer M; Gabrielsen, Mads; Chim, Ya Hua; Munro, June; McGhee, Ewan J; Sumpton, David; Eaton, Philip; Anderson, Kurt I; Yin, Huabing; Olson, Michael F

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal cell motility is driven by polarized actin polymerization [1]. Signals at the leading edge recruit actin polymerization machinery to promote membrane protrusion, while matrix adhesion generates tractive force to propel forward movement. To work effectively, cell motility is regulated by a complex network of signaling events that affect protein activity and localization. H2O2 has an important role as a diffusible second messenger [2], and mediates its effects through oxidation of cysteine thiols. One cell activity influenced by H2O2 is motility [3]. However, a lack of sensitive and H2O2-specific probes for measurements in live cells has not allowed for direct observation of H2O2 accumulation in migrating cells or protrusions. In addition, the identities of proteins oxidized by H2O2 that contribute to actin dynamics and cell motility have not been characterized. We now show, as determined by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, that motile cells generate H2O2 at membranes and cell protrusions and that H2O2 inhibits cofilin activity through oxidation of cysteines 139 (C139) and 147 (C147). Molecular modeling suggests that C139 oxidation would sterically hinder actin association, while the increased negative charge of oxidized C147 would lead to electrostatic repulsion of the opposite negatively charged surface. Expression of oxidation-resistant cofilin impairs cell spreading, adhesion, and directional migration. These findings indicate that H2O2 production contributes to polarized cell motility through localized cofilin inhibition and that there are additional proteins oxidized during cell migration that might have similar roles.

  3. ROS accumulation and IGF-IR inhibition contribute to fenofibrate/PPARα -mediated inhibition of Glioma cell motility in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas are characterized by rapid cell growth, aggressive CNS infiltration, and are resistant to all known anticancer regimens. Recent studies indicate that fibrates and statins possess anticancer potential. Fenofibrate is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) that can switch energy metabolism from glycolysis to fatty acid β-oxidation, and has low systemic toxicity. Fenofibrate also attenuates IGF-I-mediated cellular responses, which could be relevant in the process of glioblastoma cell dispersal. Methods The effects of fenofibrate on Glioma cell motility, IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) signaling, PPARα activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism, mitochondrial potential, and ATP production were analyzed in human glioma cell lines. Results Fenofibrate treatment attenuated IGF-I signaling responses and repressed cell motility of LN-229 and T98G Glioma cell lines. In the absence of fenofibrate, specific inhibition of the IGF-IR had only modest effects on Glioma cell motility. Further experiments revealed that PPARα-dependent accumulation of ROS is a strong contributing factor in Glioma cell lines responses to fenofibrate. The ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), restored cell motility, improved mitochondrial potential, and increased ATP levels in fenofibrate treated Glioma cell lines. Conclusions Our results indicate that although fenofibrate-mediated inhibition of the IGF-IR may not be sufficient in counteracting Glioma cell dispersal, PPARα-dependent metabolic switch and the resulting ROS accumulation strongly contribute to the inhibition of these devastating brain tumor cells. PMID:20569465

  4. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Zhang, Zi-Jian; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expressions of genes associated with cell migration and cytoskeleton assembly in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). Here, we measured the HMF-induced changes on cell morphology, adhesion, motility and actin cytoskeleton in SH-SY5Y cells. The HMF inhibited cell adhesion and migration accompanied with a reduction in cellular F-actin amount. Moreover, following exposure to the HMF, the number of cell processes was reduced and cells were smaller in size and more round in shape. Furthermore, disordered kinetics of actin assembly in vitro were observed during exposure to the HMF, as evidenced by the presence of granule and meshed products. These results indicate that elimination of the GMF affects assembly of the motility-related actin cytoskeleton, and suggest that F-actin is a target of HMF exposure and probably a mediator of GMF sensation. PMID:27029216

  5. Knockdown of Golgi phosphoprotein 2 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiming; Zhang, Xiaodi; Sun, Ting; Jiang, Junchang; Li, Ying; Chen, Mingliang; Wei, Zhen; Jiang, Weiqin; Zhou, Linfu

    2016-01-01

    Golgi phosphoprotein 2 (GP73) is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, where it serves as a biomarker and indicator of disease progression. We used MTS assays, anchorage-independent cell colony formation assays and a xenograft tumor model to show that GP73-specific siRNAs inhibit HCC proliferation in HepG2, SMMC-7721, and Huh7 cell lines and in vivo. Following GP73 silencing, levels of p-Rb, a factor related to metastasis, were reduced, but cell cycle progression was unaffected. Our results suggest that GP73 silencing may not directly suppress proliferation, but may instead inhibit cell motility. Results from proliferation assays suggest GP73 reduces expression of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related factors and promotes cell motility, while transwell migration and invasion assays indicated a possible role in metastasis. Immunofluorescence co-localization microscopy and immunoblotting showed that GP73 decreases expression of N-cadherin and E-cadherin, two key factors in EMT, which may in turn decrease intracellular adhesive forces and promote cell motility. This study confirmed that GP73 expression leads to increased expression of EMT-related proteins and that GP73 silencing reduces HCC cell migration in vitro. These findings suggest that GP73 silencing through siRNA delivery may provide a novel low-toxicity therapy for the inhibition of tumor proliferation and metastasis. PMID:26870893

  6. Maspin acts at the cell membrane to inhibit invasion and motility of mammary and prostatic cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, S; Carey, J; Seftor, E A; Dias, L; Hendrix, M J; Sager, R

    1996-01-01

    Maspin, a novel serine protease inhibitor (serpin), inhibits tumor invasion and metastasis of mammary carcinoma. We show here that recombinant maspin protein blocks the motility of these carcinoma cells in culture over 12 h, as demonstrated by time-lapse video microscopy. Lamellopodia are withdrawn but ruffling continues. Both exogenous recombinant maspin and maspin expressed by tumor transfectants exhibit inhibitory effects on cell motility and cell invasion as shown in modified Boyden chamber assays. In addition, three prostatic cancer cell lines treated with recombinant maspin exhibited similar inhibition of both invasion and motility, suggesting a similar mode of maspin action in these two glandular epithelial cancers. When mammary carcinoma cells were treated with recombinant maspin, the protein was shown by immunostaining to bind specifically to the cell surface, suggesting that maspin activity is membrane associated. When pretreated with antimaspin antibody, maspin loses its inhibitory effects on both invasion and motility. However, when maspin is added to these cells preceding antibody treatment, the activity of maspin is no longer inhibited by subsequent addition of the antibody. It is concluded therefore that the inhibition of invasion and motility by maspin is initially localized to the cell surface. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8876194

  7. A bacterial extracellular DNA inhibits settling of motile progeny cells within a biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Berne, Cécile; Kysela, David T.; Brun, Yves V.

    2010-01-01

    In natural systems, bacteria form complex, surface-attached communities known as biofilms. This lifestyle presents numerous advantages compared to unattached or planktonic life, such as exchange of nutrients, protection from environmental stresses and increased tolerance to biocides. Despite such benefits, dispersal also plays an important role in escaping deteriorating environments and in successfully colonizing favorable, unoccupied habitat patches. The α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus produces a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell at each cell division. We show here that C. crescentus extracellular DNA (eDNA) inhibits the ability of its motile cell type to settle in a biofilm. eDNA binds to the polar holdfast, an adhesive structure required for permanent surface attachment and biofilm formation, thereby inhibiting cell attachment. Since stalked cells associate tightly with the biofilm through their holdfast, we hypothesize that this novel mechanism acts on swarmer cells born in a biofilm, where eDNA can accumulate to a sufficient concentration to inhibit their ability to settle. By targeting a specific cell type in a biofilm, this mechanism modulates biofilm development and promotes dispersal without causing a potentially undesirable dissolution of the existing biofilm. PMID:20598083

  8. MYBPH inhibits NM IIA assembly via direct interaction with NMHC IIA and reduces cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, Yasuyuki; Usukura, Jiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH inhibits NMHC IIA assembly and cell motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH interacts to assembly-competent NM IIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA. -- Abstract: Actomyosin filament assembly is a critical step in tumor cell migration. We previously found that myosin binding protein H (MYBPH) is directly transactivated by the TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene in lung adenocarcinomas and inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) of non-muscle myosin IIA (NM IIA) via direct interaction with Rho kinase 1 (ROCK1). Here, we report that MYBPH also directly interacts with an additional molecule, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC IIA), which was found to occur between MYBPH and the rod portion of NMHC IIA. MYBPH inhibited NMHC IIA assembly and reduced cell motility. Conversely, siMYBPH-induced increased motility was partially, yet significantly, suppressed by blebbistatin, a non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, while more profound effects were attained by combined treatment with siROCK1 and blebbistatin. Electron microscopy observations showed well-ordered paracrystals of NMHC IIA reflecting an assembled state, which were significantly less frequently observed in the presence of MYBPH. Furthermore, an in vitro sedimentation assay showed that a greater amount of NMHC IIA was in an unassembled state in the presence of MYBPH. Interestingly, treatment with a ROCK inhibitor that impairs transition of NM IIA from an assembly-incompetent to assembly-competent state reduced the interaction between MYBPH and NMHC IIA, suggesting that MYBPH has higher affinity to assembly-competent NM IIA. These results suggest that MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA, and negatively regulates actomyosin organization at 2 distinct steps, resulting in firm inhibition of NM IIA assembly.

  9. miR-17 regulates melanoma cell motility by inhibiting the translation of ETV1.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ronit; Greenberg, Eyal; Nemlich, Yael; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2015-08-07

    Melanoma is an aggressive malignancy with a high metastatic potential. microRNA-17 (miR-17) is a member of the oncogenic miR-17/92 cluster. Here we study the effect of miR-17 on melanoma cell motility. Over expression of the mature or pri-microRNA form of miR-17 in WM-266-4 and 624mel melanoma lines enhances cell motility, evident in both wound healing and transwell migration assays. TargetScan algorithm predicts the PEA3-subfamily member ETV1 as a direct target of miR-17. Indeed, a 3-4-fold decrease of ETV1 protein levels are observed following miR-17 transfection into the various melanoma lines, with no significant change in ETV1 mRNA expression. Dual luciferase experiments demonstrate direct binding of miR-17 to the 3'-untranslated region of ETV1, confirmed by abolishing point mutations in the putative binding site. These combined results suggest regulation of ETV1 by miR-17 by a direct translational repression. Further, in both melanoma cell lines ETV1 knockdown by selective siRNA successfully pheno-copies the facilitated cell migration, while overexpression of ETV1 inhibits cell motility and migration. Altered ETV1 expression does not affect melanoma net-proliferation. In conclusion, we show a new role for miR-17 in melanoma, facilitating cell motility, by targeting the translation of ETV1 protein, which may support the development of metastasis.

  10. A20 inhibits the motility of HCC cells induced by TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianteng; Ma, Chao; Zong, Zhaoyun; Xiao, Ying; Li, Na; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Shi, Yongyu

    2016-03-22

    Metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be facilitated by TNF-α, a prototypical inflammatory cytokine in the HCC microenvironment. A20 is a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling pathway. In the present study we ask whether A20 plays a role in HCC metastasis. We found that A20 expression was downregulated in the invasive cells of microvascular invasions (MVI) compared with the noninvasive cells in 89 tissue samples from patients with HCC by immunochemistry methods. Overexpression of A20 in HCC cell lines inhibited their motility induced by TNF-α. Furthermore, the overexpression of A20 inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), FAK activation and RAC1 activity. By contrast, knockdown of A20 in one HCC cell line results in the converse. In addition, the overexpression of A20 restrained the formation of MVI in HCC xenograft in nude mice treated with TNF-α. All the results suggested that A20 functioned as a negative regulator in motility of HCC cells induced by TNF-α.

  11. Piperine inhibits the growth and motility of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Greenshields, Anna L; Doucette, Carolyn D; Sutton, Kimberly M; Madera, Laurence; Annan, Henry; Yaffe, Paul B; Knickle, Allison F; Dong, Zhongmin; Hoskin, David W

    2015-02-01

    Piperine, an alkaloid from black pepper, is reported to have anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated the effect of piperine on the growth and motility of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Piperine inhibited the in vitro growth of TNBC cells, as well as hormone-dependent breast cancer cells, without affecting normal mammary epithelial cell growth. Exposure to piperine decreased the percentage of TNBC cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. In addition, G1- and G2-associated protein expression was decreased and p21(Waf1/Cip1) expression was increased in piperine-treated TNBC cells. Piperine also inhibited survival-promoting Akt activation in TNBC cells and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Interestingly, combined treatment with piperine and γ radiation was more cytotoxic for TNBC cells than γ radiation alone. The in vitro migration of piperine-treated TNBC cells was impaired and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 mRNA was decreased, suggesting an antimetastatic effect by piperine. Finally, intratumoral administration of piperine inhibited the growth of TNBC xenografts in immune-deficient mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that piperine may be useful in the treatment of TNBC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. NCAM regulates cell motility.

    PubMed

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Kawa, Anna; Walmod, Peter S; Belman, Vadym; Gallagher, Helen C; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Nina

    2002-01-15

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine inhibitor of NCAM-negative cell locomotion through a heterophilic interaction with a cell-surface receptor. As we showed that the two N-terminal immunoglobulin modules of NCAM, which are known to bind to heparin, were responsible for this inhibition, we presume that this receptor is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. A model for the inhibitory effect of NCAM is proposed, which involves competition between NCAM and extracellular components for the binding to membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan.

  13. Silibinin inhibits triple negative breast cancer cell motility by suppressing TGF-β2 expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmin; Han, Jeonghun; Jeon, Myeongjin; You, Daeun; Lee, Jeongmin; Kim, Hee Jung; Bae, Sarang; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon

    2016-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates many biological events including cell motility and angiogenesis. Here, we investigated the role of elevated TGF-β2 level in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells and the inhibitory effect of silibinin on TGF-β2 action in TNBC cells. Breast cancer patients with high TGF-β2 expression have a poor prognosis. The levels of TGF-β2 expression increased significantly in TNBC cells compared with those in non-TNBC cells. In addition, cell motility-related genes such as fibronectin (FN) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression also increased in TNBC cells. Basal FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression levels decreased in response to LY2109761, a dual TGF-β receptor I/II inhibitor, in TNBC cells. TNBC cell migration also decreased in response to LY2109761. Furthermore, we observed that TGF-β2 augmented the FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, TGF-β2-induced FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression levels decreased significantly in response to LY2109761. Interestingly, we found that silibinin decreased TGF-β2 mRNA expression level but not that of TGF-β1 in TNBC cells. Cell migration as well as basal FN and MMP-2 expression levels decreased in response to silibinin. Furthermore, silibinin significantly decreased TGF-β2-induced FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression levels and suppressed the lung metastasis of TNBC cells. Taken together, these results suggest that silibinin suppresses metastatic potential of TNBC cells by inhibiting TGF-β2 expression in TNBC cells. Thus, silibinin may be a promising therapeutic drug to treat TNBC.

  14. Daucus carota Pentane/Diethyl Ether Fraction Inhibits Motility and Reduces Invasion of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Perla; Daher, Costantine F; Mroueh, Mohamad; Nasrallah, Anita; Taleb, Robin I; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2014-01-01

    Daucus carota (DC) is a herb used in folklore medicine in Lebanon to treat numerous diseases including cancer. Recent studies in our laboratory on DC oil and its fractions revealed potent anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the most potent DC fraction, pentane/diethyl ether (50:50), on lung, skin, breast and glioblastoma cancer cell motility and invasion. Upon treatment, a pronounced decrease in cancer cell motility was observed in the 4 cell lines. The treatment also led to a decrease in cancer cell invasion and an increased cell adhesion. Additionally, the DC fraction caused a decrease in the activation of the ρ-GTPases Rac and CDC42, a finding that may partially explain the treatment-induced decrease in cell motility. The current study demonstrates a crucial effect of the DC pentane/diethyl ether fraction on cancer cell motility and metastasis, making it a potential candidate for cancer therapy specifically targeting cancer motility and metastasis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Claudin-18 inhibits cell proliferation and motility mediated by inhibition of phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Shun; Taga, Saeko; Akizuki, Risa; Hichino, Asami; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Sugatani, Junko; Ikari, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal expression of claudin subtypes has been reported in various cancers. However, the pathological role of each claudin has not been clarified in detail. Claudin-18 was absent in human non-small cell and small cell lung cancers, although it is expressed in normal lung tissues. Here, we examined the effect of claudin-18 expression on the expression of junctional proteins, cell proliferation, and cell motility using human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Real-time PCR and western blotting showed that exogenous expression of claudin-18 had no effect on the expression of junctional proteins including claudin-1, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin, and E-cadherin. Claudin-18 was mainly distributed in cell-cell contact areas concomitant with ZO-1. Cell proliferation was significantly decreased at 48 and 72h after seeding of claudin 18-expressing cells. Claudin-18 suppressed cell motility, whereas it increased cell death in anoikis. Claudin-18 decreased phosphorylated (p)-3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) and p-Akt levels without affecting p-epidermal growth factor receptor and p-phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) levels. Furthermore, claudin-18 was bound with PDK1 and suppressed the nuclear localization of PDK1. We suggest that claudin-18 suppresses the abnormal proliferation and motility of lung epithelial cells mediated by inhibition of the PI3K/PDK1/Akt signaling pathway.

  16. The effects of cell compressibility, motility and contact inhibition on the growth of tumor cell clusters using the Cellular Potts Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jonathan F; Lowengrub, John

    2014-02-21

    There are numerous biological examples where genes associated with migratory ability of cells also confer the cells with an increased fitness even though these genes may not have any known effect on the cell mitosis rates. Here, we provide insight into these observations by analyzing the effects of cell migration, compression, and contact inhibition on the growth of tumor cell clusters using the Cellular Potts Model (CPM) in a monolayer geometry. This is a follow-up of a previous study (Thalhauser et al. 2010) in which a Moran-type model was used to study the interaction of cell proliferation, migratory potential and death on the emergence of invasive phenotypes. Here, we extend the study to include the effects of cell size and shape. In particular, we investigate the interplay between cell motility and compressibility within the CPM and find that the CPM predicts that increased cell motility leads to smaller cells. This is an artifact in the CPM. An analysis of the CPM reveals an explicit inverse-relationship between the cell stiffness and motility parameters. We use this relationship to compensate for motility-induced changes in cell size in the CPM so that in the corrected CPM, cell size is independent of the cell motility. We find that subject to comparable levels of compression, clusters of motile cells grow faster than clusters of less motile cells, in qualitative agreement with biological observations and our previous study. Increasing compression tends to reduce growth rates. Contact inhibition penalizes clumped cells by halting their growth and gives motile cells an even greater advantage. Finally, our model predicts cell size distributions that are consistent with those observed in clusters of neuroblastoma cells cultured in low and high density conditions. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. α-TEA inhibits the growth and motility of human colon cancer cells via targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jialin; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yang; Li, Zhaozhu

    2016-01-01

    Colon or colorectal cancer is a common type of human cancer, which originates in the intestine crassum or the rectum. In the United States, colorectal cancer has one of the highest rates of cancer-related mortality. Investigating novel chemotherapeutic approaches is significant in the treatment of cancers, such as colorectal cancer. α-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) is a potent anticancer agent in multiple types of human cancer. However, its effect remains to be determined in colon cancer. In this study, HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells were used to investigate the anticancer role of α-TEA. It was demonstrated that α-TEA inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, it was shown that α-TEA downregulated the activity of RhoA and phosphorylated Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) substrate myosin light chain (MLC) using a pull-down assay and western blotting, respectively, implying that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is involved in α-TEA-mediated cell growth and motility inhibition. In order to confirm this hypothesis a RhoA inhibitor (clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme), a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) and RhoA small interfering (si)RNA were applied to block RhoA/ROCK signaling. This resulted in the attenuation of MLC phosphorylation, and augmentation of α-TEA-mediated growth and motility inhibition in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that α-TEA inhibits growth and motility in colon cancer cells possibly by targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling. Moreover, combined with RhoA or ROCK inhibitors, α-TEA may exhibit a more effective inhibitory role in colon cancer. PMID:27432222

  18. α-TEA inhibits the growth and motility of human colon cancer cells via targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jialin; Gao, Peng; Xu, Yang; Li, Zhaozhu

    2016-09-01

    Colon or colorectal cancer is a common type of human cancer, which originates in the intestine crassum or the rectum. In the United States, colorectal cancer has one of the highest rates of cancer‑related mortality. Investigating novel chemotherapeutic approaches is significant in the treatment of cancers, such as colorectal cancer. α-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid (α-TEA) is a potent anticancer agent in multiple types of human cancer. However, its effect remains to be determined in colon cancer. In this study, HCT116 and SW480 human colon cancer cells were used to investigate the anticancer role of α-TEA. It was demonstrated that α-TEA inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion in colon cancer cells. Furthermore, it was shown that α-TEA downregulated the activity of RhoA and phosphorylated Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) substrate myosin light chain (MLC) using a pull-down assay and western blotting, respectively, implying that the RhoA/ROCK pathway is involved in α-TEA-mediated cell growth and motility inhibition. In order to confirm this hypothesis a RhoA inhibitor (clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme), a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) and RhoA small interfering (si)RNA were applied to block RhoA/ROCK signaling. This resulted in the attenuation of MLC phosphorylation, and augmentation of α-TEA-mediated growth and motility inhibition in colon cancer cells. In conclusion, these results indicate that α-TEA inhibits growth and motility in colon cancer cells possibly by targeting RhoA/ROCK signaling. Moreover, combined with RhoA or ROCK inhibitors, α-TEA may exhibit a more effective inhibitory role in colon cancer.

  19. Modeling collective cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    Eukaryotic cells often move in groups, a critical aspect of many biological and medical processes including wound healing, morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Modeling can provide useful insights into the fundamental mechanisms of collective cell motility. Constructing models that incorporate the physical properties of the cells, however, is challenging. Here, I discuss our efforts to build a comprehensive cell motility model that includes cell membrane properties, cell-substrate interactions, cell polarity, and cell-cell interaction. The model will be applied to a variety of systems, including motion on micropatterned substrates and the migration of border cells in Drosophila. This work was supported by NIH Grant No. P01 GM078586 and NSF Grant No. 1068869.

  20. Vanillin Suppresses Cell Motility by Inhibiting STAT3-Mediated HIF-1α mRNA Expression in Malignant Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Ji; Lee, Yoon-Mi; Oh, Taek-In; Kim, Byeong Mo; Lim, Beong-Ou; Lim, Ji-Hong

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that vanillin has anti-cancer, anti-mutagenic, and anti-metastatic activity; however, the precise molecular mechanism whereby vanillin inhibits metastasis and cancer progression is not fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether vanillin has anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activities via inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in A2058 and A375 human malignant melanoma cells. Immunoblotting and quantitative real time (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that vanillin down-regulates HIF-1α protein accumulation and the transcripts of HIF-1α target genes related to cancer metastasis including fibronectin 1 (FN1), lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). It was also found that vanillin significantly suppresses HIF-1α mRNA expression and de novo HIF-1α protein synthesis. To understand the suppressive mechanism of vanillin on HIF-1α expression, chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed. Consequently, it was found that vanillin causes inhibition of promoter occupancy by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), on HIF1A. Furthermore, an in vitro migration assay revealed that the motility of melanoma cells stimulated by hypoxia was attenuated by vanillin treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrate that vanillin might be a potential anti-metastatic agent that suppresses metastatic gene expression and migration activity under hypoxia via the STAT3-HIF-1α signaling pathway.

  1. Vanillin Suppresses Cell Motility by Inhibiting STAT3-Mediated HIF-1α mRNA Expression in Malignant Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Ji; Lee, Yoon-Mi; Oh, Taek-In; Kim, Byeong Mo; Lim, Beong-Ou; Lim, Ji-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that vanillin has anti-cancer, anti-mutagenic, and anti-metastatic activity; however, the precise molecular mechanism whereby vanillin inhibits metastasis and cancer progression is not fully elucidated. In this study, we examined whether vanillin has anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activities via inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in A2058 and A375 human malignant melanoma cells. Immunoblotting and quantitative real time (RT)-PCR analysis revealed that vanillin down-regulates HIF-1α protein accumulation and the transcripts of HIF-1α target genes related to cancer metastasis including fibronectin 1 (FN1), lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). It was also found that vanillin significantly suppresses HIF-1α mRNA expression and de novo HIF-1α protein synthesis. To understand the suppressive mechanism of vanillin on HIF-1α expression, chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed. Consequently, it was found that vanillin causes inhibition of promoter occupancy by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), but not nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), on HIF1A. Furthermore, an in vitro migration assay revealed that the motility of melanoma cells stimulated by hypoxia was attenuated by vanillin treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrate that vanillin might be a potential anti-metastatic agent that suppresses metastatic gene expression and migration activity under hypoxia via the STAT3-HIF-1α signaling pathway. PMID:28257048

  2. Huaier Aqueous Extract Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Cell Motility via the AKT/GSK3β/β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Nan; Yu, Yinhua; Hua, Keqin; Feng, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine has gained popularity due to its ability to kill tumor cells. Recently, the apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of Trametes robiniophila murr (Huaier) have been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate its effect on cell mobility and tumor growth in ovarian cancer. Cell viability and motility were measured using SRB, scratch and migration assays. Cell apoptosis was analysed by annexin V/PI staining. Using a reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) assay, we analyzed the levels of 153 proteins and/or phosphorylations in Huaier-treated and untreated cells. Huaier inhibited cell viability and induced both early and late apoptosis in SKOV3, SKOV3.ip1 and Hey cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell invasiveness and migration were also suppressed significantly. The RPPA results showed significant differences (of at least 30%; P <0.05) in the levels of 7 molecules in SKOV3 cells and 10 in SKOV3.ip1 cells between the untreated and treated cells. Most of the molecules identified play roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis or cell adhesion/invasion. Western blot analysis further validated that Huaier treatment resulted in decreased AKT phosphorylation, enhanced expression of total GSK3β, inhibition of the phosphorylation of GSK3β on S9, reduction of both cytoplasmic β-catenin expression and nuclear β-catenin translocation, and transcriptional repression of several Wnt/β-catenin target genes (DIXDC1, LRP6, WNT5A, and cyclin D1). After knocking down GSK3β, β-catenin expression could not be inhibited by Huaier. Finally, Huaier inhibited the growth of ovarian tumor xenografts in vivo. These studies indicate that Huaier inhibits tumor cell mobility in ovarian cancer via the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:23667667

  3. GuaLou GuiZhi decoction inhibits LPS-induced microglial cell motility through the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haixia; Li, Zuanfang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Lin, Ruhui; Peng, Jun; Tao, Jing; Chen, Lidian

    2013-12-01

    Microglial activation plays an important role in neroinflammation following ischemic stroke. Activated microglial cells can then migrate to the site of injury to proliferate and release substances which induce secondary brain damage. It has been shown that microglial migration is associated with the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. The Chinese formula, GuaLou GuiZhi decoction (GLGZD), has long been administered in clinical practice for the treatment of post-stroke disabilities, such as muscular spasticity. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the anti-inflammtory effects of GLGZD were mediated by the TLR4/NF-κB pathway in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cells. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the role of GLGZD in microglial migration by performing scratch wound assays and migration assays. We wished to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms elicited by this TCM formula in microglial-induced inflammation by evaluating the release and expression of chemotactic cytokines [monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and interleukin (IL)-8] by ELISA and quantitative PCR. Our results revealed that the migration of microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of LPS (100 ng/ml); however, GLGZD (100 µg/ml) significantly inhibited cell motility and the production of chemokines through the inhibition of the activation of the p38 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) signaling pathway. We demonstrate the potential of GLGZD in the modulation of microglial motility by investigating the effects of GLGZD on microglial migration induced by LPS. Taken together, our data suggest that GLGZD per se cannot trigger microglial motility, whereas GLGZD impedes LPS-induced microglial migration through the activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. These results provide further evidence of the anti-inflammatory effects of GLGZD and its potential for use in

  4. Anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-19 inhibits smooth muscle cell migration and activation of cytoskeletal regulators of VSMC motility

    PubMed Central

    Gabunia, Khatuna; Jain, Surbhi; England, Ross N.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is an important cellular event in multiple vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and transplant vasculopathy. Little is known regarding the effects of anti-inflammatory interleukins on VSMC migration. This study tested the hypothesis that an anti-inflammatory Th2 interleukin, interleukin-19 (IL-19), could decrease VSMC motility. IL-19 significantly decreased platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated VSMC chemotaxis in Boyden chambers and migration in scratch wound assays. IL-19 significantly decreased VSMC spreading in response to PDGF. To determine the molecular mechanism(s) for these cellular effects, we examined the effect of IL-19 on activation of proteins that regulate VSMC cytoskeletal dynamics and locomotion. IL-19 decreased PDGF-driven activation of several cytoskeletal regulatory proteins that play an important role in smooth muscle cell motility, including heat shock protein-27 (HSP27), myosin light chain (MLC), and cofilin. IL-19 decreased PDGF activation of the Rac1 and RhoA GTPases, important integrators of migratory signals. IL-19 was unable to inhibit VSMC migration nor was able to inhibit activation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins in VSMC transduced with a constitutively active Rac1 mutant (RacV14), suggesting that IL-19 inhibits events proximal to Rac1 activation. Together, these data are the first to indicate that IL-19 can have important inhibitory effects on VSMC motility and activation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. This has important implications for the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the treatment of vascular occlusive disease. PMID:21209363

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone inhibits the proliferation and motility of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    TENG, LOONG HUNG; AHMAD, MUNIRAH; NG, WAYNE TIONG WENG; SABARATNAM, SUBATHRA; RASAN, MARIA ITHAYA; PARHAR, ISHWAR; KHOO, ALAN SOO BENG

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), or its analogues have been demonstrated to exhibit anti-proliferative effects on tumour cells in ovarian, endometrial and breast cancer through GnRH-receptors (GnRH-R). However, the role of GnRH in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains to be elucidated. In order to investigate the effects of GnRH in NPC, the present study examined the expression of the GnRH-R transcript in NPC and investigated the phenotypic changes in HK1 cells, a recurrent NPC-derived cell line, upon receiving GnRH treatment. Firstly, the GnRH-R transcript was demonstrated in the NPC cell lines and four snap frozen biopsies using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed the expression of GnRH-R in two of the eight (25%) NPC specimens. Treatment with GnRH induced a rapid increase in intracellular ionised calcium concentration in the NPC cells. GnRH and its agonists, triptorelin and leuprolide, exerted anti-proliferative effects on the NPC cells, as determined using an MTS assay. GnRH did not induce any cell cycle arrest in the HK1 cells under the conditions assessed in the present study. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated a reduction in cell motility in the GnRH-treated cells. In conclusion, GnRH, or its analogues may have antitumour effects on NPC cells. The consequences of alterations in the levels of GnRH on the progression of NPC require further examination. PMID:26151677

  6. Gonadotropin‑releasing hormone inhibits the proliferation and motility of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Teng, Loong Hung; Ahmad, Munirah; Ng, Wayne Tiong Weng; Sabaratnam, Subathra; Rasan, Maria Ithaya; Parhar, Ishwar; Khoo, Alan Soo Beng

    2015-10-01

    Gonadotropin‑releasing hormone (GnRH), or its analogues have been demonstrated to exhibit anti‑proliferative effects on tumour cells in ovarian, endometrial and breast cancer through GnRH‑receptors (GnRH‑R). However, the role of GnRH in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains to be elucidated. In order to investigate the effects of GnRH in NPC, the present study examined the expression of the GnRH‑R transcript in NPC and investigated the phenotypic changes in HK1 cells, a recurrent NPC‑derived cell line, upon receiving GnRH treatment. Firstly, the GnRH‑R transcript was demonstrated in the NPC cell lines and four snap frozen biopsies using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed the expression of GnRH‑R in two of the eight (25%) NPC specimens. Treatment with GnRH induced a rapid increase in intracellular ionised calcium concentration in the NPC cells. GnRH and its agonists, triptorelin and leuprolide, exerted anti‑proliferative effects on the NPC cells, as determined using an MTS assay. GnRH did not induce any cell cycle arrest in the HK1 cells under the conditions assessed in the present study. Time‑lapse imaging demonstrated a reduction in cell motility in the GnRH‑treated cells. In conclusion, GnRH, or its analogues may have antitumour effects on NPC cells. The consequences of alterations in the levels of GnRH on the progression of NPC require further examination.

  7. Downregulation of VANGL1 Inhibits Cellular Invasion Rather than Cell Motility in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Without Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Toylu, Asli; Atabey, Nese; Sercan, Zeynep; Sakizli, Meral

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is one of the Wnt pathways which plays a critical role in cell proliferation and fate. The VANGL1 protein is one of Wnt-PCP pathway components. It is known that Wnt-PCP pathway has major roles in cell motility but its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression through invasion and metastasis needs to be clarified. Methods: We silenced VANGL1 gene expression in the HepG2 HCC cell line by stable transfection with a vector containing siRNA template for VANGL1 and investigated the change in cell invasion and motility. Results: Transfected cells with the siRNA template showed significantly suppressed invasive capacity when compared to controls although cellular motility was only slightly affected. Conclusion: Our study showed a basal role for VANGL1 with respect to the invasive capacity of HCC cells. This suggests that the Wnt-PCP pathway may play a role in progression of HCC through cellular invasion but further studies are needed to clarify its role in cell motility. PMID:25874746

  8. Inhibition of melanoma cell motility by the snake venom disintegrin eristostatin

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Paquette-Straub, Carrie; Sage, E. Helene; Funk, Sarah E.; Patel, Vivek; Galileo, Deni; McLane, Mary Ann

    2007-01-01

    Eristostatin, an RGD-containing disintegrin isolated from the venom of Eristicophis macmahoni, inhibits lung or liver colonization of melanoma cells in a mouse model. In this study, transwell migration and in vitro wound closure assays were used to determine the effect of eristostatin on the migration of melanoma cells. Eristostatin significantly impaired the migration of 5 human melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, it specifically inhibited cell migration on fibronectin in a concentration-dependent manner, but not that on collagen IV or laminin. In contrast, eristostatin was found to have no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis. These results indicate that the interaction between eristostatin and melanoma cells may involve fibronectin-binding integrins that mediate cell migration. Mutations to alanine of seven residues within the RGD loop of eristostatin and four residues outside the RGD loop of eristostatin resulted in significantly less potency in both platelet aggregation and wound closure assays. For six of the mutations, however, decreased activity was found only in the latter assay. We conclude that a different mechanism and/or integrin is involved in these two cell activities. PMID:17316731

  9. A novel small-molecule compound targeting CD147 inhibits the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhi-guang; Wang, Li; Cui, Hong-yong; Peng, Jian-long; Wang, Shi-jie; Geng, Jie-jie; Liu, Ji-de; Feng, Fei; Song, Fei; Li, Ling; Zhu, Ping; Jiang, Jian-li; Chen, Zhi-nan

    2016-02-23

    CD147, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is highly expressed in various cancer types and plays important roles in tumor progression, especially by promoting the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. These crucial roles make CD147 an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in HCC, but no small-molecule inhibitors of CD147 have been developed to date. To identify a candidate inhibitor, we used a pharmacophore model derived from the structure of CD147 to virtually screen over 300,000 compounds. The 100 highest-ranked compounds were subjected to biological assays, and the most potent one, dubbed AC-73 (ID number: AN-465/42834501), was studied further. We confirmed that AC-73 targeted CD147 and further demonstrated it can specifically disrupt CD147 dimerization. Moreover, molecular docking and mutagenesis experiments showed that the possible binding sites of AC-73 on CD147 included Glu64 and Glu73 in the N-terminal IgC2 domain, which two residues are located in the dimer interface of CD147. Functional assays revealed that AC-73 inhibited the motility and invasion of typical HCC cells, but not HCC cells that lacked the CD147 gene, demonstrating on-target action. Further, AC-73 reduced HCC metastasis by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 via down-regulation of the CD147/ERK1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Finally, AC-73 attenuated progression in an orthotopic nude mouse model of liver metastasis, suggesting that AC-73 or its derivatives have potential for use in HCC intervention. We conclude that the novel small-molecule inhibitor AC-73 inhibits HCC mobility and invasion, probably by disrupting CD147 dimerization and thereby mainly suppressing the CD147/ERK1/2/STAT3/MMP-2 pathways, which are crucial for cancer progression.

  10. A novel small-molecule compound targeting CD147 inhibits the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jian-long; Wang, Shi-jie; Geng, Jie-jie; Liu, Ji-de; Feng, Fei; Song, Fei; Li, Ling; Zhu, Ping; Jiang, Jian-li; Chen, Zhi-nan

    2016-01-01

    CD147, a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is highly expressed in various cancer types and plays important roles in tumor progression, especially by promoting the motility and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. These crucial roles make CD147 an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in HCC, but no small-molecule inhibitors of CD147 have been developed to date. To identify a candidate inhibitor, we used a pharmacophore model derived from the structure of CD147 to virtually screen over 300,000 compounds. The 100 highest-ranked compounds were subjected to biological assays, and the most potent one, dubbed AC-73 (ID number: AN-465/42834501), was studied further. We confirmed that AC-73 targeted CD147 and further demonstrated it can specifically disrupt CD147 dimerization. Moreover, molecular docking and mutagenesis experiments showed that the possible binding sites of AC-73 on CD147 included Glu64 and Glu73 in the N-terminal IgC2 domain, which two residues are located in the dimer interface of CD147. Functional assays revealed that AC-73 inhibited the motility and invasion of typical HCC cells, but not HCC cells that lacked the CD147 gene, demonstrating on-target action. Further, AC-73 reduced HCC metastasis by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 via down-regulation of the CD147/ERK1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. Finally, AC-73 attenuated progression in an orthotopic nude mouse model of liver metastasis, suggesting that AC-73 or its derivatives have potential for use in HCC intervention. We conclude that the novel small-molecule inhibitor AC-73 inhibits HCC mobility and invasion, probably by disrupting CD147 dimerization and thereby mainly suppressing the CD147/ERK1/2/STAT3/MMP-2 pathways, which are crucial for cancer progression. PMID:26882566

  11. Heparin Inhibits Hepatocyte Growth Factor Induced Motility and Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells through Early Growth Response Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Evin; Gozukizil, Aysim; Erdal, Esra; Uren, Aykut; Bottaro, Donald P.; Atabey, Nese

    2012-01-01

    The Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF)/c-Met signaling pathway regulates hepatocyte proliferation, and pathway aberrations are implicated in the invasive and metastatic behaviors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In addition to c-Met, heparin acts as a co-receptor to modulate pathway activity. Recently, anti-metastatic and anti-cancer effects of heparin have been reported. However, the role of heparin in the regulation of HGF signaling remains controversial and the effects of heparin on HGF-induced biological responses during hepatocarcinogenesis is not yet defined. In this study we determined the effects of heparin on HGF-induced activities of HCC cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we report for the first time that heparin inhibits HGF-induced adhesion, motility and invasion of HCC cells. In addition, heparin reduced HGF-induced activation of c-Met and MAPK in a dose-dependent manner, as well as decreased transcriptional activation and expression of Early growth response factor 1 (Egr1). HGF-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation, and MT1-MMP expression, also were inhibited by heparin. Stable knockdown of Egr1 caused a significant decrease in HGF-induced invasion, as well as the activation and expression of MMPs. Parallel to these findings, the overexpression of Egr1 increased the invasiveness of HCC cells. Our results suggest that Egr1 activates HGF-induced cell invasion through the regulation of MMPs in HCC cells and heparin inhibits HGF-induced cellular invasion via the downregulation of Egr1. Therefore, heparin treatment might be a therapeutic approach to inhibit invasion and metastasis of HCC, especially for patients with active HGF/c-Met signaling. PMID:22912725

  12. The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits mouse MC-26 colorectal cancer cell liver metastasis via inhibition of PGE2-dependent cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Hawcroft, G; Volpato, M; Marston, G; Ingram, N; Perry, SL; Cockbain, AJ; Race, AD; Munarini, A; Belluzzi, A; Loadman, PM; Coletta, PL; Hull, MA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) has antineoplastic activity at early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, relevant to chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). We tested the hypothesis that EPA also has anti-CRC activity at later stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, relevant to treatment of metastatic CRC, via modulation of E-type PG synthesis. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH A BALB/c mouse model, in which intrasplenic injection of syngeneic MC-26 mouse CRC cells leads to development of liver metastases, was used. Dietary EPA was administered in the free fatty acid (FFA) form for 2 weeks before and after ultrasound-guided intrasplenic injection of 1 × 106 MC-26 cells (n= 16 each group). KEY RESULTS Treatment with 5% (w w-1) EPA-FFA was associated with a reduced MC-26 mouse CRC cell liver tumour burden compared with control animals (median liver weight 1.03 g vs. 1.62 g; P < 0.034). Administration of 5% EPA-FFA was also linked to a significant increase in tumour EPA incorporation and lower intratumoural PGE2 levels (with concomitant increased production of PGE3). Liver tumours from 5% EPA-FFA- treated mice demonstrated decreased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive CRC cell proliferation and reduced phosphorylated ERK 1/2 expression at the invasive edge of tumours. A concentration-dependent reduction in MC-26 CRC cell Transwell® migration following EPA-FFA treatment (50–200 µM) in vitro was rescued by exogenous PGE2 (10 µM) and PGE1-alcohol (1 µM). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS EPA-FFA inhibits MC-26 CRC cell liver metastasis. EPA incorporation is associated with a ‘PGE2 to PGE3 switch’ in liver tumours. Inhibition of PGE2-EP4 receptor-dependent CRC cell motility probably contributes to the antineoplastic activity of EPA. PMID:22300262

  13. Role of lysophosphatidylcholine in the inhibition of endothelial cell motility by oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Murugesan, G; Fox, P L

    1996-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) movement is required for the development and repair of blood vessels. We have previously shown that LDL oxidized by transition metals almost completely suppressed the wound-healing migratory response of vascular EC in vitro. We now report that lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), a lipid component of oxidized LDL, has an important role in the antimigratory activity of the lipoprotein. Purified 1-palmitoyl lysoPC inhibited movement with a half-maximal activity at 12-15 micrometers, and near complete inhibition at 20 micrometers; the inhibitory concentration of lysoPC was consistent with its abundance in oxidized LDL. The inhibition was not due to cytotoxicity since protein synthesis was unaffected and since EC movement was restored after removal of lysoPC. Lysophospholipid activity was dependent on lipid structure. LysoPC's containing 1-position C16 or C18 saturated fatty acids were antimigratory, but those containing C < or = 14 saturated fatty acids or polyunsaturated fatty acids were not. The activity of 1-palmitoyl lysolipids with various head groups was examined. Lysophosphatidylinositol was more antimigratory than lysophosphatidylglycerol and lysophosphatidylcholine, which were more potent than lysophosphatidylserine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine. Monoglyceride was inactive while lysophosphatidate had promigratory activity. These results are consistent with head group size rather than charge as a critical determinant of activity. To show that lysophospholipids within an intact lipoprotein were active, LDL was treated with bee venom phospholipase A2 (PLA2). The modified lipoprotein inhibited EC movement to the same extent as iron-oxidized LDL and antimigratory activity correlated with the amount of lysoPC formed. To determine antimigratory activity of lysoPC present in oxidized LDL, lipid extracts from oxidized LDL were fractionated by normal phase HPLC. The fraction comigrating with lysoPC had nearly the same activity as the total extract

  14. Nitric oxide inhibition of human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J B; Doty, E; Bonaventura, J; Haney, A F

    1995-08-01

    To determine the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on sperm motility in vitro. Normal human sperm separated by centrifugation through a discontinuous Percoll gradient and subsequent swim-up were incubated for up to 24 hours with NO donors, with and without the known NO quencher hemoglobin, as well as with agents that raise intracellular cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Sperm respiration was determined by a tetrazolium-formazan spectrophotometric assay. Andrology laboratory. Absolute sperm motility and respiration. Sperm incubated with the NO donors 1 mM nitroprusside, 100 to 125 microM 3-morpholinosydnonimine, and 25 to 125 microM pure nitric oxide gas dissolved in buffer were inhibited in motility in a dose-dependent fashion. The inhibition could be reversed by the NO quencher hemoglobin. Agents that raise cellular cGMP (dibutyryl cGMP or 8-bromo-cGMP) did not inhibit motility. Nitric oxide inhibited sperm respiration, as measured by the tetrazolium-formazan assay. Nitric oxide reduces sperm motility, possibly by a mechanism involving inhibition of cellular respiration independent of an elevation of intracellular cGMP. Nitric oxide elaborated in the female or male genital tract in vivo could adversely influence sperm function and fertility.

  15. MicroRNA-181b is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer and inhibits cell motility by directly targeting HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Hu, Xu; Xia, Daokui; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    The expression of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) has been investigated in various human cancers. However, the expression and functions of miR-181b in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are yet to be studied. In the present study, miR-181b expression in NSCLC tissues and cell lines was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was shown to be recurrently downregulated. Following transfection of the H23 and H522 NSCLC cells lines with miR-181b, cell migration and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of miR-181b overexpression on the cell motility. It was demonstrated that overexpression of miR-181b inhibited the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Subsequently, bioinformatics analysis, western blotting and luciferase reporter assays were conducted to investigate the mechanism underlying the miR-181b-mediated inhibition of NSCLC cell motility. It was found that miR-181b directly targeted high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in NSCLC cells. These results reveal a novel therapeutic target, the miR-181b/HMGB1 axis, in NSCLC. Treatment approaches targeting this axis will be beneficial to prevent NSCLC from becoming invasive. PMID:27895789

  16. MicroRNA-181b is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer and inhibits cell motility by directly targeting HMGB1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Hu, Xu; Xia, Daokui; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-11-01

    The expression of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) has been investigated in various human cancers. However, the expression and functions of miR-181b in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are yet to be studied. In the present study, miR-181b expression in NSCLC tissues and cell lines was analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and was shown to be recurrently downregulated. Following transfection of the H23 and H522 NSCLC cells lines with miR-181b, cell migration and cell invasion assays were performed to evaluate the effect of miR-181b overexpression on the cell motility. It was demonstrated that overexpression of miR-181b inhibited the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Subsequently, bioinformatics analysis, western blotting and luciferase reporter assays were conducted to investigate the mechanism underlying the miR-181b-mediated inhibition of NSCLC cell motility. It was found that miR-181b directly targeted high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in NSCLC cells. These results reveal a novel therapeutic target, the miR-181b/HMGB1 axis, in NSCLC. Treatment approaches targeting this axis will be beneficial to prevent NSCLC from becoming invasive.

  17. Shape determination in motile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilner, Alex

    2010-03-01

    Flat, simple shaped, rapidly gliding fish keratocyte cell is the model system of choice to study cell motility. The cell motile appendage, lamellipod, has a characteristic bent-rectangular shape. Recent experiments showed that the lamellipodial geometry is tightly correlated with cell speed and with actin dynamics. These quantitative data combined with computational modeling suggest that a model for robust actin treadmill inside the 'unstretchable membrane bag'. According to this model, a force balance between membrane tension and growing and pushing actin network distributed unevenly along the cell periphery can explain the cell shape and motility. However, when adhesion of the cell to the surface weakens, the actin dynamics become less regular, and myosin-powered contraction starts playing crucial role in stabilizing the cell shape. I will illustrate how the combination of theoretical and experimental approaches helped to unravel the keratocyte motile behavior.

  18. Neuropeptide Y inhibits interleukin-1 beta-induced microglia motility.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Raquel; Santos, Tiago; Cortes, Luísa; Cochaud, Stéphanie; Agasse, Fabienne; Silva, Ana Paula; Xapelli, Sara; Malva, João O

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may act as a key modulator of the cross-talk between the brain and the immune system in health and disease. In the present study, we dissected the possible inhibitory role of NPY upon inflammation-associated microglial cell motility. NPY, through activation of Y(1) receptors, was found to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglia (N9 cell line) motility. Moreover, stimulation of microglia with LPS was inhibited by IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), suggesting the involvement of endogenous interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) in this process. Direct stimulation with IL-1β promoted downstream p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mobilization and increased microglia motility. Moreover, consistently, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibition decreased the extent of actin filament reorganization occurring during plasma membrane ruffling and p38 phosphorylation was inhibited by NPY, involving Y(1) receptors. Significantly, the key inhibitory role of NPY on LPS-induced motility of CD11b-positive cells was further confirmed in mouse brain cortex explants. In summary, we revealed a novel functional role for NPY in the regulation of microglial function that may have important implications in the modulation of CNS injuries/diseases where microglia migration/motility might play a role.

  19. Cadmium inhibits motility factor-dependent migration of human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Manuel M; Chakraborty, Chandan

    2011-12-01

    The occurrence of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is higher in infants born to mothers exposed to cadmium (Cd2+) through environmental sources such as smoking and industrial work. A contributing factor of IUGR is improper placentation. The human placenta is established through the function of a specialized group of cells known as extravillous trophoblast (EVT). Paramount among the abilities of these cells is the capacity to migrate and invade into the endometrial wall of the uterus in order to anchor the placenta and access the maternal blood supply. EVT cell migration is regulated by interactions of a number of autocrine and paracrine factors with their respective receptors on the trophoblast. In order to investigate potential involvement of environmental exposure relevant concentrations of Cd2+ exposure on placental function, we measured the effects of 0.5-1 μmol/L CdCl2 on cellular migration in an immortalized human trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. We found that these concentrations of CdCl2 kept the cells viable until at least 48 h and didn't affect basal migratory capacity but eliminated cell migration induced by IGF-II, or PGE2 or uPA-ATF. In addition, the presence of CdCl2 resulted in filamentous actin disorganization of the trophoblast cells. However, pre-incubations of the cells with zinc-chloride (ZnCl2), or caspase inhibitor (CI-1) resulted in reversal of ligand-dependent cellular migration and actin disorganization. These findings suggest that low concentrations of Cd2+, though do not affect trophoblast cell survival can interfere with ligand-induced trophoblast cell migration by affecting actin cytoskeletal organization possibly through activation of caspase(s). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of breast cancer cell motility with a non-cyclooxygenase inhibitory derivative of sulindac by suppressing TGFβ/miR-21 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ruixia; Feng, Xiangling; Li, Wei; Piazza, Gary A.; Xi, Yaguang

    2016-01-01

    Compelling efficacy on intervention of tumorigenesis by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been documented intensively. However, the toxicities related to cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition resulting in suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limit their clinical use for human cancer chemoprevention. A novel derivative of the NSAID sulindac sulfide (SS), referred as sulindac sulfide amide (SSA), was recently developed, which lacks COX inhibitory activity, yet shows greater suppressive effect than SS on growth of various cancer cells. In this study, we focus on the inhibitory activity of SSA on breast tumor cell motility, which has not been studied previously. Our results show that SSA treatment at non-cytotoxic concentrations can specifically reduce breast tumor cell motility without influencing tumor cell growth, and the mechanism of action involves the suppression of TGFβ signaling by directly blocking Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Moreover, miR-21, a well-documented oncogenic miRNA for promoting tumor cell metastasis, was also found to be involved in inhibitory activity of SSA in breast tumor cell motility through the modulation of TGFβ pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a non-COX inhibitory derivative of sulindac can inhibit breast tumor metastasis by a mechanism involving the TGFβ/miR-21 signaling axis. PMID:26769851

  1. Inhibition of breast cancer cell motility with a non-cyclooxygenase inhibitory derivative of sulindac by suppressing TGFβ/miR-21 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bin; Chang, Hong; Ma, Ruixia; Feng, Xiangling; Li, Wei; Piazza, Gary A; Xi, Yaguang

    2016-02-16

    Compelling efficacy on intervention of tumorigenesis by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been documented intensively. However, the toxicities related to cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition resulting in suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limit their clinical use for human cancer chemoprevention. A novel derivative of the NSAID sulindac sulfide (SS), referred as sulindac sulfide amide (SSA), was recently developed, which lacks COX inhibitory activity, yet shows greater suppressive effect than SS on growth of various cancer cells. In this study, we focus on the inhibitory activity of SSA on breast tumor cell motility, which has not been studied previously. Our results show that SSA treatment at non-cytotoxic concentrations can specifically reduce breast tumor cell motility without influencing tumor cell growth, and the mechanism of action involves the suppression of TGFβ signaling by directly blocking Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Moreover, miR-21, a well-documented oncogenic miRNA for promoting tumor cell metastasis, was also found to be involved in inhibitory activity of SSA in breast tumor cell motility through the modulation of TGFβ pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a non-COX inhibitory derivative of sulindac can inhibit breast tumor metastasis by a mechanism involving the TGFβ/miR-21 signaling axis.

  2. Honokiol inhibits EMT-mediated motility and migration of human non-small cell lung cancer cells in vitro by targeting c-FLIP.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiao-Qin; Qiao, Xin-Ran; Su, Ling; Chen, Shu-Zhen

    2016-12-01

    Honokiol (HNK) is a natural compound isolated from the magnolia plant with numerous pharmacological activities, including inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which has been proposed as an attractive target for anti-tumor drugs to prevent tumor migration. In this study we investigated the effects of HNK on EMT in human NSCLC cells in vitro and the related signaling mechanisms. TNF-α (25 ng/mL) in combination with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) was used to stimulate EMT of human NSCLC A549 and H460 cells. Cell proliferation was analyzed using a sulforhodamine B assay. A wound-healing assay and a transwell assay were performed to examine cell motility. Western blotting was used to detect the expression levels of relevant proteins. siRNAs were used to knock down the gene expression of c-FLIP and N-cadherin. Stable overexpression of c-FLIP L (H157-FLIP L) or Lac Z (H157-Lac Z) was also performed. Treatment with TNF-α+TGF-β1 significantly enhanced the migration of A549 and H460 cells, increased c-FLIP, N-cadherin (a mesenchymal marker), snail (a transcriptional modulator) and p-Smad2/3 expression, and decreased IκB levels in the cells; these changes were abrogated by co-treatment with HNK (30 μmol/L). Further studies demonstrated that expression level of c-FLIP was highly correlated with the movement and migration of NSCLC cells, and the downstream effectors of c-FLIP signaling were NF-κB signaling and N-cadherin/snail signaling, while Smad signaling might lie upstream of c-FLIP. HNK inhibits EMT-mediated motility and migration of human NSCLC cells in vitro by targeting c-FLIP, which can be utilized as a promising target for cancer therapy, while HNK may become a potential anti-metastasis drug or lead compound.

  3. Mechanics of motility initiation and motility arrest in crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Putelat, Thibaut; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-11-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires transformation of a symmetric state into a polarized state. In contrast, motility arrest is associated with re-symmetrization of the internal configuration of a cell. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by the increased contractility of motor proteins but the conditions of re-symmetrization remain unknown. In this paper we show that if adhesion with the extra-cellular substrate is sufficiently low, the progressive intensification of motor-induced contraction may be responsible for both transitions: from static (symmetric) to motile (polarized) at a lower contractility threshold and from motile (polarized) back to static (symmetric) at a higher contractility threshold. Our model of lamellipodial cell motility is based on a 1D projection of the complex intra-cellular dynamics on the direction of locomotion. In the interest of analytical transparency we also neglect active protrusion and view adhesion as passive. Despite the unavoidable oversimplifications associated with these assumptions, the model reproduces quantitatively the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and reveals a crucial role played in cell motility by the nonlocal feedback between the mechanics and the transport of active agents. A prediction of the model that a crawling cell can stop and re-symmetrize when contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold still awaits experimental verification.

  4. Activation of β2-adrenergic receptor by (R,R')-4'-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol inhibits proliferation and motility of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wnorowski, Artur; Sadowska, Mariola; Paul, Rajib K; Singh, Nagendra S; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Jimenez, Lucita; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Toll, Lawrence; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W

    2015-05-01

    (R,R')-4'-methoxy-1-naphthylfenoterol [(R,R')-MNF] is a highly-selective β2 adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) agonist. Incubation of a panel of human-derived melanoma cell lines with (R,R')-MNF resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of motility as assessed by in vitro wound healing and xCELLigence migration and invasion assays. Activity of (R,R')-MNF positively correlated with the β2-AR expression levels across tested cell lines. The anti-motility activity of (R,R')-MNF was inhibited by the β2-AR antagonist ICI-118,551 and the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor Ro 20-1724 mimicked the ability of (R,R')-MNF to inhibit migration of melanoma cell lines in culture, highlighting the importance of cAMP for this phenomenon. (R,R')-MNF caused significant inhibition of cell growth in β2-AR-expressing cells as monitored by radiolabeled thymidine incorporation and xCELLigence system. The MEK/ERK cascade functions in cellular proliferation, and constitutive phosphorylation of MEK and ERK at their active sites was significantly reduced upon β2-AR activation with (R,R')-MNF. Protein synthesis was inhibited concomitantly both with increased eEF2 phosphorylation and lower expression of tumor cell regulators, EGF receptors, cyclin A and MMP-9. Taken together, these results identified β2-AR as a novel potential target for melanoma management, and (R,R')-MNF as an efficient trigger of anti-tumorigenic cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling in β2-AR-expressing lesions.

  5. Hyaluronan stimulates pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Kohi, Shiro; Koga, Atsuhiro; Hirata, Keiji; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but functional significance of HA in the aggressive phenotype remains unknown. We used different models to investigate the effect of HA on PDAC cell motility by wound healing and transwell migration assay. Changes in cell motility were examined in 8 PDAC cell lines in response to inhibition of HA production by treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) and to promotion by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or by co-culture with tumor-derived stromal fibroblasts. We also investigated changes in cell motility by adding exogenous HA. Additionally, mRNA expressions of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases were examined using real time RT-PCR. Inhibition of HA by 4-MU significantly decreased the migration, whereas promotion of HA by TPA or co-culture with tumor-derived fibroblasts significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. The changes in HA production by these treatments tended to be associated with changes in HAS3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous HA, especially low-molecular-weight HA, significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. These findings suggest that HA stimulates PDAC cell migration and thus represents an ideal therapeutic target to prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:26684359

  6. Procyanidin B2 3,3″-di-O-gallate inhibits endothelial cells growth and motility by targeting VEGFR2 and integrin signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Deep, Gagan; Wempe, Michael F; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2015-01-01

    Targeting angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of carcinogenesis, using non-toxic phytochemicals has emerged as a translational opportunity for angioprevention and to control advanced stages of malignancy. Herein, we investigated the inhibitory effects and associated mechanism/s of action of Procyanidin B2-3,3″-di- O-gallate (B2G2), a major component of grape seed extract, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human prostate microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Our results showed that B2G2 (10-40 μM) inhibits growth and induces death in both HUVECs and HPMECs. Additional studies revealed that B2G2 causes a G1 arrest in cell cycle progression of HUVECs by down-regulating cyclins (D1 and A), CDKs (Cdk2 and Cdc2) and Cdc25c phosphatase and up-regulating CDK inhibitors (p21 and p27) expression. B2G2 also induced strong apoptotic death in HUVECs through increasing p53, Bax and Smac/Diablo expression while decreasing Bcl-2 and survivin levels. Additionally, B2G2 inhibited the growth factors-induced capillary tube formation in HUVECs and HPMECs. Interestingly, conditioned media (CCM) from prostate cancer (PCA) cells (LNCaP and PC3) grown under normoxic (~21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions significantly enhanced the tube formation in HUVECs, which was compromised in presence of conditioned media from B2G2-treated PCA cells. B2G2 also inhibited the motility and invasiveness of both HUVECs and HPMECs. Mechanistic studies showed that B2G2 targets VEGFR2/PI3K/Akt and integrin signaling molecules which are important for endothelial cells survival, proliferation, tube formation and motility. Overall, we report that B2G2 inhibits several attributes of angiogenesis in cell culture; therefore, it warrants further investigation for efficacy for angioprevention and cancer control.

  7. Honokiol inhibits EMT-mediated motility and migration of human non-small cell lung cancer cells in vitro by targeting c-FLIP

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiao-qin; Qiao, Xin-ran; Su, Ling; Chen, Shu-zhen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Honokiol (HNK) is a natural compound isolated from the magnolia plant with numerous pharmacological activities, including inhibiting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which has been proposed as an attractive target for anti-tumor drugs to prevent tumor migration. In this study we investigated the effects of HNK on EMT in human NSCLC cells in vitro and the related signaling mechanisms. Methods: TNF-α (25 ng/mL) in combination with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) was used to stimulate EMT of human NSCLC A549 and H460 cells. Cell proliferation was analyzed using a sulforhodamine B assay. A wound-healing assay and a transwell assay were performed to examine cell motility. Western blotting was used to detect the expression levels of relevant proteins. siRNAs were used to knock down the gene expression of c-FLIP and N-cadherin. Stable overexpression of c-FLIP L (H157-FLIP L) or Lac Z (H157-Lac Z) was also performed. Results: Treatment with TNF-α+TGF-β1 significantly enhanced the migration of A549 and H460 cells, increased c-FLIP, N-cadherin (a mesenchymal marker), snail (a transcriptional modulator) and p-Smad2/3 expression, and decreased IκB levels in the cells; these changes were abrogated by co-treatment with HNK (30 μmol/L). Further studies demonstrated that expression level of c-FLIP was highly correlated with the movement and migration of NSCLC cells, and the downstream effectors of c-FLIP signaling were NF-κB signaling and N-cadherin/snail signaling, while Smad signaling might lie upstream of c-FLIP. Conclusion: HNK inhibits EMT-mediated motility and migration of human NSCLC cells in vitro by targeting c-FLIP, which can be utilized as a promising target for cancer therapy, while HNK may become a potential anti-metastasis drug or lead compound. PMID:27593221

  8. Ganglioside GM3 inhibits hepatoma cell motility via down-regulating activity of EGFR and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Li, Y; Zhang, J; Xu, Y; Tian, Y; Ma, K

    2013-07-01

    Two related sublines derived from murine ascites hepatoma cell lines Hca-F25, which were selected for their markedly different metastatic potential to lymph nodes, were found to be distinct in their ganglioside patterns. The low metastatic cell line (HcaP) contained a major ganglioside GM3, whereas the high metastatic cell line (HcaF) contained a major ganglioside GM2. Suppression of GM3 by P4 enhanced the mobility and migration of the low metastatic HcaP cells in vitro. Increase in GM3 content in high metastatic HcaF cells by addition of exogenous GM3 inhibited the mobility and migration. These results suggested that the differences in lymphatic metastasis potential between these two cell lines could be attributed to the differences in their ganglioside compositions, and GM3 could suppress the motility and migration of these cells. Further, we investigated the mechanism by which GM3 suppressed the cell mobility and migration. The results showed that suppression of GM3 synthesis by P4 in low metastatic HcaP cells promoted PKB/Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 and Thr308, and phosphorylation of EGFR at the Tyr1173. In contrast, increase in GM3 content in high metastatic HcaF cells by addition of exogenous GM3 into the culture medium suppressed phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and EGFR at the same residues. Taken together, these results suggested that the mechanism of GM3-suppressed cell motility and migration may involve the inhibition of phosphorylation of EGFR and the activity of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. MiR-128 up-regulation inhibits Reelin and DCX expression and reduces neuroblastoma cell motility and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Cristina; Florian, Maria Carolina; Massimi, Isabella; Dominici, Carlo; Giannini, Giuseppe; Galardi, Silvia; Buè, Maria Cristina; Massalini, Simone; McDowell, Heather P; Messi, Elio; Gulino, Alberto; Farace, Maria Giulia; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna

    2009-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of sophisticated regulators of gene expression, acting as post-transcriptional inhibitors that recognize their target mRNAs through base pairing with short regions along the 3'UTRs. Several microRNAs are tissue specific, suggesting a specialized role in tissue differentiation or maintenance, and quite a few are critically involved in tumorigenesis. We studied miR-128, a brain-enriched microRNA, in retinoic acid-differentiated neuroblastoma cells, and we found that this microRNA is up-regulated in treated cells, where it down-modulates the expression of two proteins involved in the migratory potential of neural cells: Reelin and DCX. Consistently, miR-128 ectopic overexpression suppressed Reelin and DCX, whereas the LNA antisense-mediated miR-128 knockdown caused the two proteins to increase. Ectopic miR-128 overexpression reduced neuroblastoma cell motility and invasiveness, and impaired cell growth. Finally, the analysis of a small series of primary human neuroblastomas showed an association between high levels of miR-128 expression and favorable features, such as favorable Shimada category or very young age at diagnosis. Thus, we provide evidence for a role for miR-128 in the molecular events modulating neuroblastoma progression and aggressiveness.

  10. Self-organized cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xinxin; Doubrovinski, Konstantin

    2011-03-01

    Cell migration plays a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena, such as morphogenesis, chemotaxis, and wound healing. Cell locomotion relies on the cytoskeleton, a meshwork of filamentous proteins, intrinsically out of thermodynamic equilibrium and cross-linked by molecular motors, proteins that turn chemical energy into mechanical work. In the course of locomotion, cells remain polarized, i.e. they retain a single direction of motion in the absence of external cues. Traditionally, polarization has been attributed to intracellular signaling. However, recent experiments show that polarization may be a consequence of self-organized cytoskeletal dynamics. Our aim is to elucidate the mechanisms by which persistent unidirectional locomotion may arise through simple mechanical interactions of the cytoskeletal proteins. To this end, we develop a simple physical description of cytoskeletal dynamics. We find that the proposed description accounts for a range of phenomena associated with cell motility, including spontaneous polarization, persistent unidirectional motion, and the co-existence of motile and non-motile states.

  11. Exopolysaccharides promote Myxococcus xanthus social motility by inhibiting cellular reversals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyi; Nan, Beiyan

    2017-02-01

    The biofilm-forming bacterium Myxococcus xanthus moves on surfaces as structured swarms utilizing type IV pili-dependent social (S) motility. In contrast to isolated cells that reverse their moving direction frequently, individual cells within swarms rarely reverse. The regulatory mechanisms that inhibit cellular reversal and promote the formation of swarms are not well understood. Here we show that exopolysaccharides (EPS), the major extracellular components of M. xanthus swarms, inhibit cellular reversal in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, individual wild-type cells reverse less frequently in swarms due to high local EPS concentrations. In contrast, cells defective in EPS production hyper-reverse their moving direction and show severe defects in S-motility. Surprisingly, S-motility and wild-type reversal frequency are restored in double mutants that are defective in both EPS production and the Frz chemosensory system, indicating that EPS regulates cellular reversal in parallel to the Frz pathway. Here we clarify that besides functioning as the structural scaffold in biofilms, EPS is a self-produced signal that coordinates the group motion of the social bacterium M. xanthus.

  12. Zerumbone suppresses the motility and tumorigenecity of triple negative breast cancer cells via the inhibition of TGF-β1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmin; Lee, Jeongmin; Jeon, Myeongjin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2016-01-12

    Aberrant transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays an important role in the development of cancer such as tumor metastasis and invasion. TGF-β-responsive gene signature is highly activated in chemotherapy-treated triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Here, we investigated the effect of zerumbone (ZER) on TGF-β1 signaling pathway and tumorigenecity of TNBC cells. Our results showed that the level of TGF-β1 mRNA expression and cell invasiveness were higher in TNBC cells than in non-TNBC cells. On the other hand, the cell motility of TNBC cells was completely suppressed by LY2109761, a novel selective TGF-β receptor type I/II (TβRI/II) dual inhibitor. In addition, FN and MMP-2 expression, which play an important role on cell motility in various cancer cells, were dose-dependently decreased by LY2109761. TGF-β1 increased FN, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in HCC1806 TNBC cells. TGF-β1-induced MMP-9 expression was decreased by both a MEK inhibitor, UO126, and a smad3 inhibitor, SIS3. Induction of FN and MMP-2 by TGF-β1 was just decreased by SIS3. Overexpression of smad3 significantly increased FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression. Interestingly, ZER significantly suppressed TGF-β1-induced FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression in HCC1806 cells. In addition, ZER completely decreased TGF-β1-induced the phosphorylation of smad3. Finally, we observed that ZER suppressed the tumorigenecity such as tumor volume, weight, Ki67 expression, and metastasis in TNBC cells xenograft models. Taken together, we demonstrated that ZER suppresses TGF-β1-induced FN, MMP-2, and MMP-9 expression through the inactivation of smad3 and inhibits the tumorigenecity of TNBC cells. Therefore, we suggest that ZER may act as a promising drug for treatment of TNBC.

  13. Cobalt inhibits motility of axonal mitochondria and induces axonal degeneration in cultured dorsal root ganglion cells of rat.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Shin; Ninomiya, Takafumi; Kohno, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Tatsumi, Haruyuki

    2017-06-27

    Cobalt is a trace element that localizes in the human body as cobalamin, also known as vitamin B12. Excessive cobalt exposure induces a peripheral neuropathy, the mechanisms of which are yet to be elucidated. We investigated how cobalt may affect mitochondrial motility in primary cultures of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We observed mitochondrial motility by time-lapse imaging after DsRed2 tagging via lentivirus, mitochondrial structure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and axonal swelling using immunocytochemical staining. The concentration of cobaltous ion (Co(2+)) required to significantly suppress mitochondrial motility is lower than that required to induce axonal swelling following a 24-h treatment. Exposure to relatively low concentrations of Co(2+) for 48 h suppressed mitochondrial motility without leading to axonal swelling. TEM images indicated that Co(2+) induces mitochondrial destruction. Our results show that destruction of the axonal mitochondria precedes the axonal degeneration induced by Co(2+) exposure.

  14. miR-22 inhibits the proliferation, motility, and invasion of human glioblastoma cells by directly targeting SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanchun; Lu, Qiong; Fei, Xifeng; Shen, Likui; Jiang, Dongyi; Dai, Dongwei

    2016-05-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), a kind of small and non-coding RNA, can target the downstream molecules. Increasing evidence demonstrates that miRNAs meditate the onset and progression of a variety of tumors. In the present study, we carried out gene transfection, western blot, and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) to explore the role of miR-22 in glioblastoma tissues and cell lines. Here, we verified that the expression of miR-22 was downregulated in glioblastoma tissues and cells rather than matched non-tumor tissues and normal human astrocyte (NHA) cells (p < 0.001). By contrast, SIRT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were upregulated in glioblastoma tissues and cells (p < 0.001). In vitro miR-22 mimics interfered with cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of U87 and U251 cells. Mechanically, the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) of SIRT1 were a direct target of miR-22, leading to the decreased expression of SIRT1 protein in U87 and U251 cells. Meanwhile, miR-22 mimics also inhibited the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9). In conclusion, miR-22 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion via targeting the 3'-UTR of SIRT1 in the progression of glioblastoma and miR-22-SIRT1 pathway can be recommended as a potential target for treatment of glioblastoma.

  15. Deoxyelephantopin impedes mammary adenocarcinoma cell motility by inhibiting calpain-mediated adhesion dynamics and inducing reactive oxygen species and aggresome formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Leng; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2012-04-15

    We previously showed that deoxyelephantopin (DET), a plant sesquiterpene lactone, exhibits more profound suppression than paclitaxel (PTX) of lung metastasis of mammary adenocarcinoma TS/A cells in mice. Proteomics studies suggest that DET affects actin cytoskeletal protein networks and downregulates calpain-mediated proteolysis of several actin-associated proteins, whereas PTX mainly interferes with microtubule proteins. Here, DET was observed to significantly deregulate adhesion formation in TS/A cells, probably through inhibition of m-calpain activity. Epithelial growth factor (EGF)-mediated activation of Rho GTPase Rac1 and formation of lamellipodia in TS/A cells were remarkably suppressed by DET treatment. Further, DET impaired vesicular trafficking of EGF and induced protein carbonylation and formation of centrosomal aggregates in TS/A cells. DET-induced reactive oxygen species were observed to be the upstream stimulus for the formation of centrosomal ubiquitinated protein aggregates that might subsequently restrict cancer cell motility. PTX, however, caused dramatic morphological changes, interfered with microtubule networking, and moderately inhibited calpain-mediated cytoskeletal and focal adhesion protein cleavage in TS/A cells. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into the pharmacological action of DET against metastatic mammary cell migration and suggests that modulation of oxidative stress might be a potential strategy for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  16. Deterministic patterns in cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavi, Ido; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-12-01

    Cell migration paths are generally described as random walks, associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. However, complex cell locomotion is not merely related to such fluctuations, but is often determined by the underlying machinery. Cell motility is driven mechanically by actin and myosin, two molecular components that generate contractile forces. Other cell functions make use of the same components and, therefore, will compete with the migratory apparatus. Here, we propose a physical model of such a competitive system, namely dendritic cells whose antigen capture function and migratory ability are coupled by myosin II. The model predicts that this coupling gives rise to a dynamic instability, whereby cells switch from persistent migration to unidirectional self-oscillation, through a Hopf bifurcation. Cells can then switch to periodic polarity reversals through a homoclinic bifurcation. These predicted dynamic regimes are characterized by robust features that we identify through in vitro trajectories of dendritic cells over long timescales and distances. We expect that competition for limited resources in other migrating cell types can lead to similar deterministic migration modes.

  17. Active gel model of amoeboid cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Voituriez, R.

    2013-02-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-substrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  18. Overexpression of HepaCAM inhibits cell viability and motility through suppressing nucleus translocation of androgen receptor and ERK signaling in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuedong; Wang, Yin; Du, Hongfei; Fan, Yanru; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xiaorong; Wu, Xiaohou; Luo, Chunli

    2014-07-01

    HepaCAM is suppressed in a variety of human cancers, and involved in cell adhesion, growth, migration, invasion, and survival. However, the expression and function of HepaCAM in prostate cancer are still unknown. HepaCAM expression has been detected by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry staining in prostate cell lines RWPE-1, LNCap, DU145, PC3, and in 75 human prostate tissue specimens, respectively. Meanwhile, the cell proliferation ability was detected by WST-8 assay. The role of HepaCAM in prostate cancer cell migration and invasion was examined by wound healing and transwell assay. And flow cytometry was used to observe the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. Then we detected changes of Androgen Receptor translocation and ERK signaling using immunofluorescence staining and western blot after overexpression of HepaCAM. The HepaCAM expression was significantly down-regulated in prostate cancer tissues and undetected in prostate cancer cells. However, the low HepaCAM expression was not statistically associated with clinicopathological characteristics of prostate cancer. Overexpression of HepaCAM in prostate cancer cells decreased the cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced the cell apoptosis. Meanwhile, HepaCAM prevented the androgen receptor translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and down-regulated the MAPK/ERK signaling. Our results suggested that HepaCAM acted as a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer. HepaCAM inhibited cell viability and motility which might be through suppressing the nuclear translocation of Androgen Receptor and down-regulating the ERK signaling. Therefore, it was indicated that HepaCAM may be a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The α-tocopherol derivative ESeroS-GS induces cell death and inhibits cell motility of breast cancer cells through the regulation of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijing; Zhao, Xingyu; Zhao, Kai; Wei, Peng; Fang, Yi; Zhang, Fenglin; Zhang, Bo; Ogata, Kazumi; Mori, Akitane; Wei, Taotao

    2014-12-15

    Cancer cells are known to exhibit different hallmarks compared with normal cells. Therefore, targeting these features may improve the response to cancer therapy. In this study, we provided direct evidence that the α-tocopherol derivative ESeroS-GS inhibited the viability, migration, and invasion of breast cancer cells. ESeroS-GS induced cell death in different cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner but showed no significant effects on MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells. Although the ESeroS-GS-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells was accompanied with the generation of reactive oxygen species and the down regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), no such effect on reactive oxygen species and MMP was seen in MCF-10A cells. Further studies indicated that ESeroS-GS down-regulated the expression of hexokinase II, SDH B, UQCRC2 and COX II in MDA-MB-231 cells but not in MCF-10A cells. The down-regulation of these enzymes accounts for the decreased oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolysis in MDA-MB-231 cells upon ESeroS-GS treatment. We also found that sub-toxic concentration of ESeroS-GS treatment resulted in the impairment of F-actin cytoskeleton assembly and the consequently decreased migratory and invasive ability of MDA-MB-231 cells, which might be due to the inhibition of cellular energy metabolism. These results indicate that ESeroS-GS shows potential to become a novel anti-cancer agent by targeting the energy metabolism of cancer cells.

  20. Toward the reconstitution of synthetic cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Siton-Mendelson, Orit; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellular motility is a fundamental process essential for embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and tissues development. Cells are mostly moving by crawling on external, or inside, substrates which can differ in their surface composition, geometry, and dimensionality. Cells can adopt different migration phenotypes, e.g., bleb-based and protrusion-based, depending on myosin contractility, surface adhesion, and cell confinement. In the few past decades, research on cell motility has focused on uncovering the major molecular players and their order of events. Despite major progresses, our ability to infer on the collective behavior from the molecular properties remains a major challenge, especially because cell migration integrates numerous chemical and mechanical processes that are coupled via feedbacks that span over large range of time and length scales. For this reason, reconstituted model systems were developed. These systems allow for full control of the molecular constituents and various system parameters, thereby providing insight into their individual roles and functions. In this review we describe the various reconstituted model systems that were developed in the past decades. Because of the multiple steps involved in cell motility and the complexity of the overall process, most of the model systems focus on very specific aspects of the individual steps of cell motility. Here we describe the main advancement in cell motility reconstitution and discuss the main challenges toward the realization of a synthetic motile cell. PMID:27019160

  1. Toward the reconstitution of synthetic cell motility.

    PubMed

    Siton-Mendelson, Orit; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne

    2016-09-02

    Cellular motility is a fundamental process essential for embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and tissues development. Cells are mostly moving by crawling on external, or inside, substrates which can differ in their surface composition, geometry, and dimensionality. Cells can adopt different migration phenotypes, e.g., bleb-based and protrusion-based, depending on myosin contractility, surface adhesion, and cell confinement. In the few past decades, research on cell motility has focused on uncovering the major molecular players and their order of events. Despite major progresses, our ability to infer on the collective behavior from the molecular properties remains a major challenge, especially because cell migration integrates numerous chemical and mechanical processes that are coupled via feedbacks that span over large range of time and length scales. For this reason, reconstituted model systems were developed. These systems allow for full control of the molecular constituents and various system parameters, thereby providing insight into their individual roles and functions. In this review we describe the various reconstituted model systems that were developed in the past decades. Because of the multiple steps involved in cell motility and the complexity of the overall process, most of the model systems focus on very specific aspects of the individual steps of cell motility. Here we describe the main advancement in cell motility reconstitution and discuss the main challenges toward the realization of a synthetic motile cell.

  2. Coordination of glioblastoma cell motility by PKCι

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, in part because of its highly invasive nature. The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently mutated in glioblastoma and is known to contribute to the invasive phenotype. However the downstream events that promote invasion are not fully understood. PTEN loss leads to activation of the atypical protein kinase C, PKCι. We have previously shown that PKCι is required for glioblastoma cell invasion, primarily by enhancing cell motility. Here we have used time-lapse videomicroscopy to more precisely define the role of PKCι in glioblastoma. Results Glioblastoma cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically were unable to coordinate the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod. Instead, some cells generated multiple small, short-lived protrusions while others generated a diffuse leading edge that formed around the entire circumference of the cell. Confocal microscopy showed that this behavior was associated with altered behavior of the cytoskeletal protein Lgl, which is known to be inactivated by PKCι phosphorylation. Lgl in control cells localized to the lamellipod leading edge and did not associate with its binding partner non-muscle myosin II, consistent with it being in an inactive state. In PKCι-depleted cells, Lgl was concentrated at multiple sites at the periphery of the cell and remained in association with non-muscle myosin II. Videomicroscopy also identified a novel role for PKCι in the cell cycle. Cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically entered mitosis normally, but showed marked delays in completing mitosis. Conclusions PKCι promotes glioblastoma motility by coordinating the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod and has a role in remodeling the cytoskeleton at the lamellipod leading edge, promoting the dissociation of Lgl from non-muscle myosin II. In addition PKCι is required for the transition of

  3. Tumor invasion as dysregulated cell motility.

    PubMed

    Kassis, J; Lauffenburger, D A; Turner, T; Wells, A

    2001-04-01

    Investigations across a range of disciplines over the past decade have brought the study of cell motility and its role in invasion to an exciting threshold. The biophysical forces proximally involved in generating cell locomotion, as well as the underlying signaling and genomic regulatory processes, are gradually becoming elucidated. We now appreciate the intricacies of the many cellular and extracellular events that modulate cell migration. This has enabled the demonstration of a causal role of cell motility in tumor progression, with various points of 'dysregulation' of motility being responsible for promoting invasion. In this paper, we describe key fundamental principles governing cell motility and branch out to describe the essence of the data that describe these principles. It has become evident that many proposed models may indeed be converging into a tightly-woven tapestry of coordinated events which employ various growth factors and their receptors, adhesion receptors (integrins), downstream molecules, cytoskeletal components, and altered genomic regulation to accomplish cell motility. Tumor invasion occurs in response to dysregulation of many of these modulatory points; specific examples include increased signaling from the EGF receptor and through PLC gamma, altered localization and expression of integrins, changes in actin modifying proteins and increased transcription from specific promoter sites. This diversity of alterations all leading to tumor invasion point to the difficulty of correcting causal events leading to tumor invasion and rather suggest that the underlying common processes required for motility be targeted for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Characterizing motility dynamics in human RPE cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Furu; Miller, Donald T.

    2017-02-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, however, are often compromised in ageing and ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, but while in vivo biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. Recently we addressed this problem by using organelle motility as a novel contrast agent to enhance the RPE cell in conjunction with 3D resolution of adaptive optics-optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) to section the RPE layer. In this study, we expand on the central novelty of our method - organelle motility - by characterizing the dynamics of the motility in individual RPE cells, important because of its direct link to RPE physiology. To do this, AO-OCT videos of the same retinal patch were acquired at approximately 1 min intervals or less, time stamped, and registered in 3D with sub-cellular accuracy. Motility was quantified by an exponential decay time constant, the time for motility to decorrelate the speckle field across an RPE cell. In two normal subjects, we found the decay time constant to be just 3 seconds, thus indicating rapid motility in normal RPE cells.

  5. Corticotropin Releasing Factor promotes breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Androulidaki, Ariadne; Dermitzaki, Erini; Venihaki, Maria; Karagianni, Effie; Rassouli, Olga; Andreakou, Erini; Stournaras, Christos; Margioris, Andrew N; Tsatsanis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Cancer cells secrete bioactive peptides that act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion affecting tumor growth and metastasis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a hypothalamic neuropeptide that controls the response to stress, has been detected in breast cancer tissues and cell lines. CRF can affect breast cancer cells in an autocrine or paracrine manner via its production from innervating sympathetic neurons or immune cells. Methods In the present study we report our findings regarding the impact of CRF on breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. For this purpose we used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and evaluated the effect of CRF on motility and invasiveness using the wound-healing and boyden-chamber assays. In addition, we measured the effect of CRF on molecules that mediate motility by western blot, immunofluorescence, ELISA and RT-PCR. Results Our findings show that: 1. CRF transiently inhibited the apoptosis of MCF7 cells. 2. CRF enhanced MCF7 cell motility in a wound healing assay and their invasiveness through extracellular matrix. 3. CRF increased actin polymerization, phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), providing a potential mechanism for the observed induction of MCF7 motility. 4. CRF induced the expression of Cox-1 but not Cox-2 in MCF7 cells as well as the production of prostaglandins, factors known to promote invasiveness and metastasis. Conclusion Overall, our data suggest that CRF stimulates cell motility and invasiveness of MCF7 cells most probably via induction of FAK phosphorylation and actin filament reorganization and production of prostaglandins via Cox1. Based on these findings we postulate that the stress neuropeptide CRF present in the vicinity of tumors (either produced locally by the tumor cells themselves or by nearby normal cells or secreted from the innervations of surrounding tissues) may play an important role on breast tumor growth and metastatic capacity, providing a potential link between stress

  6. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  7. [Sodium houttuyfonate inhibits virulence related motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Wu, Da-qiang; Huang, Wei-feng; Duan, Qiang-jun; Cheng, Hui-juan; Wang, Chang-zhong

    2015-04-01

    Sodium houttuyfonate (SH) is a derivative of effective component of a Chinese material medica, Houttuynia cordata, which is applied in anti-infection of microorganism. But, the antimicrobial mechanisms of SH still remain unclear. Here, we firstly discovered that SH effectively inhibits the three types of virulence related motility of.Pseudomonas aeruginosa, i.e., swimming, twitching and swarming. The plate assay results showed that the inhibitory action of SH against swimming and twitching in 24 h and swarming in 48 h is dose-dependent; and bacteria nearly lost all of the motile activities under the concentration of 1 x minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (512 mg x L(-1) same as azithromycin positive group (1 x MIC, 16 mg x L(-1)). Furthermore, we found that the expression of structural gene flgB and pilG is down-regulated by SH, which implies that inhibitory mechanism of SH against motility of P. aeruginosa may be due to the inhibition of flagella and pili bioformation of P. aeruginosa by SR Therefore, our presented results firstly demonstrate that SH effectively inhibits the motility activities of P. aeruginosa, and suggest that SH could be a promising antipseudomonas agents in clinic.

  8. Gadolinium, a mechano-sensitive channel blocker, inhibits osmosis-initiated motility of sea- and freshwater fish sperm, but does not affect human or ascidian sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Krasznai, Zoltán; Morisawa, Masaaki; Krasznai, Zoárd Tibor; Morisawa, Sachiko; Inaba, Kazuo; Bazsáné, Zsuzsa Kassai; Rubovszky, Bálint; Bodnár, Béla; Borsos, Antal; Márián, Teréz

    2003-08-01

    Exposure to hypo-osmotic or hyperosmotic environment triggers the initiation of fish sperm motility. In this article, we report that calcium and potassium channel blockers do not influence motility of puffer fish sperm but calmodulin antagonists reversibly decrease it, suggesting that calmodulin-Ca(2+) interactions are prerequisite for the initiation of sperm motility in this species. Gadolinium (a stretch activated ion channel blocker) decreased the motility of puffer fish sperm from 92 +/- 3% to 6 +/- 3% and that of carp sperm from 91 +/- 7% to 3.5 +/- 4.3% in a dose-dependent manner (10-40 micro M). The effect of gadolinium was reversible, suggesting that stretch activated ion channels participate in the initiation of sperm motility of the two species. Gadolinium inhibits changes in the isoelectric point of certain proteins of puffer fish sperm, which occur when sperm motility is initiated in a hypertonic solution. Anisotropy measurements showed that hypo-osmotic treatment, which initiates carp sperm motility, increased membrane fluidity. When hypo-osmotic treatment was given in the presence of gadolinium, the sperm membrane remained as rigid as in quiescent cells, while motility was blocked. By contrast, gadolinium did not influence the motility parameters of Ciona or human sperm. Based on these lines of evidence, we suggest that conformational changes of mechanosensitive membrane proteins are involved in osmolality-dependent but not osmolality-independent sperm.

  9. Function of liprins in cell motility.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Liprins have been known for years to play an essential role in setting up functional synapses in the nervous system. On the other hand, these proteins had been first identified in non-neuronal cells as multivalent proteins that may affect the integrin-mediated interactions of the cells with extracellular matrix ligands. Although the research on the function of liprins in non-neuronal cells has been quiescent for several years, a number of recent findings are putting them back on stage again as important players also in the regulation of non-neuronal cell motility, and possibly of tumor cell behavior. The aim of this review is to highlight the findings supporting the importance of liprins as central regulators of cell adhesion and motility, making them an interesting family of proteins to be considered for future studies on the mechanisms regulating cell migration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell motility: Combining experiments with modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2013-03-01

    Cell migration and motility is a pervasive process in many biology systems. It involves intra-cellular signal transduction pathways that eventually lead to membrane extension and contraction. Here we describe our efforts to combine quantitative experiments with theoretical and computational modeling to gain fundamental insights into eukaryotic cell motion. In particular, we will focus on the amoeboid motion of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (P01 GM078586)

  11. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility by 1-naphthol and other bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Swarming Motility by 1-Naphthol and Other Bicyclic Compounds Bearing Hydroxyl Groups

    PubMed Central

    Oura, Hiromu; Tashiro, Yosuke; Toyofuku, Masanori; Ueda, Kousetsu; Kiyokawa, Tatsunori; Ito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yurika; Lee, Seunguk; Nojiri, Hideaki; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria convert bicyclic compounds, such as indole and naphthalene, to oxidized compounds, including hydroxyindoles and naphthols. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacterium that inhabits diverse environments, shows pathogenicity against animals, plants, and other microorganisms, and increasing evidence has shown that several bicyclic compounds alter the virulence-related phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. Here, we revealed that hydroxyindoles (4- and 5-hydroxyindoles) and naphthalene derivatives bearing hydroxyl groups specifically inhibit swarming motility but have minor effects on other motilities, including swimming and twitching, in P. aeruginosa. Further analyses using 1-naphthol showed that this effect is also associated with clinically isolated hyperswarming P. aeruginosa cells. Swarming motility is associated with the dispersion of cells from biofilms, and the addition of 1-naphthol maintained biofilm biomass without cell dispersion. We showed that this 1-naphthol-dependent swarming inhibition is independent of changes of rhamnolipid production and the intracellular level of signaling molecule cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Transcriptome analyses revealed that 1-naphthol increases gene expression associated with multidrug efflux and represses gene expression associated with aerotaxis and with pyochelin, flagellar, and pilus synthesis. In the present study, we showed that several bicyclic compounds bearing hydroxyl groups inhibit the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa, and these results provide new insight into the chemical structures that inhibit the specific phenotypes of P. aeruginosa. PMID:25681177

  13. α-Bisabolol Inhibits Invasiveness and Motility in Pancreatic Cancer Through KISS1R Activation.

    PubMed

    Uno, Masanori; Kokuryo, Toshio; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Senga, Takeshi; Nagino, Masato

    2016-02-01

    α-Bisabolol is a plant-derived, oily sesquiterpene alcohol that induces apoptosis of various cancer cells. We previously reported the antiproliferative effects of α-bisabolol on pancreatic cancer cell lines using in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, the effects of α-bisabolol on tumor invasiveness and motility are still unknown. In this study, demonstrated that α-bisabolol suppressed the invasiveness and motility of a pancreatic cancer cell line. Although Early growth response 1 (EGR1) was involved in antiproliferative effects of α-bisabolol, it had no relationship with the inhibitory effect of α-bisabolol on cellular invasiveness and motility. Polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that α-bisabolol induced Kisspeptin 1 receptor (KISS1R) in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The inhibition of KISS1R weakened the inhibitory effect of α-bisabolol on invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells. The results also implied that the inhibitory effects of α-bisabolol on tumor invasiveness and motility are at least partly associated with the activation of KISS1R. However, there is a possibility that other molecular mechanisms of α-bisabolol regulate invasiveness and motility in pancreatic cancer cells. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the precise mechanisms of α-bisabolol activity for clinical application as a novel treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Fourier analysis of cell motility: correlation of motility with metastatic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Partin, A W; Schoeniger, J S; Mohler, J L; Coffey, D S

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a computerized, mathematical system for quantitating the various types of cell motility. This Fourier analysis method simultaneously quantifies for individual cells (i) temporal changes in cell shape represented by cell ruffling, undulation, and pseudopodal extension, (ii) cell translation, and (iii) average cell size and shape. This spatial-temporal Fourier analysis was tested on a series of well-characterized animal tumor cell lines of rat prostatic cancer to study in a quantitative manner the correlation of cell motility with increasing in vivo metastatic potential. Fourier motility coefficients measuring pseudopodal extension correlated best with metastatic potential in the cell lines studied. This study demonstrated that Fourier analysis provides quantitative measurement of cell motility that may be applied to the study of biological processes. This analysis should aid in the study of the motility of individual cells in various areas of cellular and tumor biology. Images PMID:2919174

  15. Targeting the Sheddase Activity of ADAM17 by an Anti-ADAM17 Antibody D1(A12) Inhibits Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Proliferation and Motility via Blockage of Bradykinin Induced HERs Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanchao; Benaich, Nathan; Tape, Christopher; Kwok, Hang Fai; Murphy, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) regulates key cellular processes including proliferation and migration through the shedding of a diverse array of substrates such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands. ADAM17 is implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and cancers such as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). As a central mediator of cellular events, overexpressed EGFR is a validated molecular target in HNSCC. However, EGFR inhibition constantly leads to tumour resistance. One possible mechanism of resistance is the activation of alternative EGFR family receptors and downstream pathways via the release of their ligands. Here, we report that treating human HNSCC cells in vitro with a human anti-ADAM17 inhibitory antibody, D1(A12), suppresses proliferation and motility in the absence or presence of the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) gefitinib. Treatment with D1(A12) decreases both the endogenous and the bradykinin (BK)-stimulated shedding of HER ligands, accompanied by a reduction in the phosphorylation of HER receptors and downstream signalling pathways including STAT3, AKT and ERK. Knockdown of ADAM17, but not ADAM10, also suppresses HNSCC cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, we show that heregulin (HRG) and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor like growth factor (HB-EGF) predominantly participate in proliferation and migration, respectively. Taken together, these results demonstrate that D1(A12)-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation, motility, phosphorylation of HER receptors and downstream signalling is achieved via reduced shedding of ADAM17 ligands. These findings underscore the importance of ADAM17 and suggest that D1(A12) might be an effective targeted agent for treating EGFR TKI-resistant HNSCC. PMID:25013379

  16. Cell Motility in Tumor Invasion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    lines ( Dondi et al. 1994; Dondi et al. 1998; Limonta et al. 2001). In line with these observations, the LHRH analog Cetrorelix has been shown to have...Stone et al. 1978); it retains the androgen independence of the original tumor and does not express a functional androgen receptor ( Dondi et al. 1998...goserelin ( Dondi et al. 1994; Jungwirth et al. 1997A; Jungwirth et al. 1997B; Limonta et al. 1998; Wells et al. 2002), and one that inhibits DU-145 WT

  17. Two-Dimensional Motility of a Macrophage Cell Line on Microcontact-Printed Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Hind, Laurel E.; MacKay, Joanna L.; Cox, Dianne; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of macrophages to migrate to sites of infection and inflammation is critical for their role in the innate immune response. Macrophage cell lines have made it possible to study the roles of individual proteins responsible for migration using molecular biology, but it has not been possible to reliably elicit the motility of macrophage cell lines in two-dimensions. In the past, measurements of the motility of macrophage cell lines have been largely limited to transwell assays which provide limited quantitative information on motility and limited ability to visualize cell morphology. We used microcontact printing to create polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces functionalized with fibronectin that otherwise support little macrophage adhesion. We used these surfaces to measure macrophage migration in two-dimensions and found that these cells migrate efficiently in a uniform field of colony-stimulating factor-1, CSF-1. Knockdown of Cdc42 led to a non-statistically significant reduction in motility, whereas chemical inhibition of PI3K activity led to a complete loss of motility. Inhibition of the RhoA kinase, ROCK, did not abolish the motility of these cells but caused a quantitative change in motility, reducing motility significantly on high concentrations of fibronectin but not on low concentrations. This study illustrates the importance of studying cell motility on well controlled materials to better understand the exact roles of specific proteins on macrophage migration. PMID:25186818

  18. Quantification of Cell Edge Velocities and Traction Forces Reveals Distinct Motility Modules during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yunfei; Xenias, Harry; Spielman, Ingrid; Shneidman, Anna V.; David, Lawrence A.; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Wiggins, Chris H.; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Actin-based cell motility and force generation are central to immune response, tissue development, and cancer metastasis, and understanding actin cytoskeleton regulation is a major goal of cell biologists. Cell spreading is a commonly used model system for motility experiments – spreading fibroblasts exhibit stereotypic, spatially-isotropic edge dynamics during a reproducible sequence of functional phases: 1) During early spreading, cells form initial contacts with the surface. 2) The middle spreading phase exhibits rapidly increasing attachment area. 3) Late spreading is characterized by periodic contractions and stable adhesions formation. While differences in cytoskeletal regulation between phases are known, a global analysis of the spatial and temporal coordination of motility and force generation is missing. Implementing improved algorithms for analyzing edge dynamics over the entire cell periphery, we observed that a single domain of homogeneous cytoskeletal dynamics dominated each of the three phases of spreading. These domains exhibited a unique combination of biophysical and biochemical parameters – a motility module. Biophysical characterization of the motility modules revealed that the early phase was dominated by periodic, rapid membrane blebbing; the middle phase exhibited continuous protrusion with very low traction force generation; and the late phase was characterized by global periodic contractions and high force generation. Biochemically, each motility module exhibited a different distribution of the actin-related protein VASP, while inhibition of actin polymerization revealed different dependencies on barbed-end polymerization. In addition, our whole-cell analysis revealed that many cells exhibited heterogeneous combinations of motility modules in neighboring regions of the cell edge. Together, these observations support a model of motility in which regions of the cell edge exhibit one of a limited number of motility modules that, together

  19. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 1 (CB1) Activation Inhibits Small GTPase RhoA Activity and Regulates Motility of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Granados, Ana Doris; Tang, Alan T.; Pfeiffer, Adam W.; Williams, Carol L.; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated in an autocrine fashion by the endocannabinoids (EC), N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). The CB1 and its endogenous and synthetic agonists are emerging as therapeutic targets in several cancers due to their ability to suppress carcinoma cell invasion and migration. However, the mechanisms that the CB1 regulates cell motility are not well understood. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms that diminish cell migration upon the CB1 activation in prostate carcinoma cells. The CB1 activation with the agonist WIN55212 significantly diminishes the small GTPase RhoA activity but modestly increases the Rac1 and Cdc42 activity. The diminished RhoA activity is accompanied by the loss of actin/myosin microfilaments, cell spreading, and cell migration. Interestingly, the CB1 inactivation with the selective CB1 antagonist AM251 significantly increases RhoA activity, enhances microfilament formation and cell spreading, and promotes cell migration. This finding suggests that endogenously produced EC activate the CB1, resulting in chronic repression of RhoA activity and cell migration. Consistent with this possibility, RhoA activity is significantly diminished by the exogenous application of AEA but not by 2-AG in PC-3 cells (cells with very low AEA hydrolysis). Pretreatment of cells with a monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, JZL184, which blocks 2-AG hydrolysis, decreases the RhoA activity. These results indicate the unique CB1 signaling and support the model that EC, through their autocrine activation of CB1 and subsequent repression of RhoA activity, suppress migration in prostate carcinoma cells. PMID:22087025

  20. Quercetin suppresses intracellular ROS formation, MMP activation, and cell motility in human fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Eun; Chung, Min-Yu; Lim, Tae Gyu; Huh, Won Bum; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won

    2013-09-01

    Cell metastasis is a major cause of death from cancer and can arise from excessive levels of oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the natural flavonoid quercetin can inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 activities through the attenuation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, an event expected to lead to the inhibition of cell motility. To induce sustained ROS formation, cells were treated with phenazine methosulfate (PMS; 1 μM). Noncytotoxic concentrations of quercetin inhibited PMS-induced increases in cell motility in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) cells. While nearly 100% of cells were observed to migrate after 24 h of PMS treatment, quercetin significantly (P < 0.01) suppressed this effect. We also found that quercetin, up to 10 μg/mL, attenuated PMS-induced MMP-2 activation. We then investigated whether the decreased levels of MMP-2 activation could be attributable to lower levels of ROS formation by quercetin. We found that quercetin treatments significantly attenuated PMS-induced ROS formation (P < 0.01) and resulted in decreased cell motility associated with a reduction in MMP-2 and -9 activitiy in HT1080 cells, even in the absence of PMS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits cell motility via the inhibition of MMP activation in HT1080 cells in the presence and absence of PMS. This is likely to be a result of the suppression of intracellular ROS formation by quercetin. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Optogenetic engineering: light-directed cell motility.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Robert M; Lawrence, David S

    2014-10-06

    Genetically encoded, light-activatable proteins provide the means to probe biochemical pathways at specific subcellular locations with exquisite temporal control. However, engineering these systems in order to provide a dramatic jump in localized activity, while retaining a low dark-state background remains a significant challenge. When placed within the framework of a genetically encodable, light-activatable heterodimerizer system, the actin-remodelling protein cofilin induces dramatic changes in the F-actin network and consequent cell motility upon illumination. We demonstrate that the use of a partially impaired mutant of cofilin is critical for maintaining low background activity in the dark. We also show that light-directed recruitment of the reduced activity cofilin mutants to the cytoskeleton is sufficient to induce F-actin remodeling, formation of filopodia, and directed cell motility. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use both analytic and computational models to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. In both models, of we are specifically interested in stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which act in the direction of cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, low waves and locomotive forces, and attempt characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  3. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use a simply analytic model in conjuction with computational experiments to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. Of particlar interest are stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which may be used to aid in cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, flow waves, adhesion, and locomotive forces in an attempt to characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  4. Quantum-dot-based cell motility assay.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weiwei; Pellegrino, Teresa; Parak, Wolfgang J; Boudreau, Rosanne; Le Gros, Mark A; Gerion, Daniele; Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2005-06-28

    Because of their favorable physical and photochemical properties, colloidal CdSe/ZnS-semiconductor nanocrystals (commonly known as quantum dots) have enormous potential for use in biological imaging. In this report, we present an assay that uses quantum dots as markers to quantify cell motility. Cells that are seeded onto a homogeneous layer of quantum dots engulf and absorb the nanocrystals and, as a consequence, leave behind a fluorescence-free trail. By subsequently determining the ratio of cell area to fluorescence-free track area, we show that it is possible to differentiate between invasive and noninvasive cancer cells. Because this assay uses simple fluorescence detection, requires no significant data processing, and can be used in live-cell studies, it has the potential to be a powerful new tool for discriminating between invasive and noninvasive cancer cell lines or for studying cell signaling events involved in migration.

  5. Cell motility and local viscoelasticity of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Koch, D; Cardenas, R; Käs, J; Shih, C K

    2005-12-01

    Viscoelastic changes of the lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton are a fundamental element of cell motility. Thus, the correlation between the local viscoelastic properties of the lamellipodium (including the transitional region to the cell body) and the speed of lamellipodial extension is studied for normal and malignantly transformed fibroblasts. Using our atomic force microscopy-based microrheology technique, we found different mechanical properties between the lamellipodia of malignantly transformed fibroblasts (H-ras transformed and SV-T2 fibroblasts) and normal fibroblasts (BALB 3T3 fibroblasts). The average elastic constants, K, in the leading edge of SV-T2 fibroblasts (0.48 +/- 0.51 kPa) and of H-ras transformed fibroblasts (0.42 +/- 0.35 kPa) are significantly lower than that of BALB 3T3 fibroblasts (1.01 +/- 0.40 kPa). The analysis of time-lapse phase contrast images shows that the decrease in the elastic constant, K, for malignantly transformed fibroblasts is correlated with the enhanced motility of the lamellipodium. The measured mean speeds are 6.1 +/- 4.5 microm/h for BALB 3T3 fibroblasts, 13.1 +/- 5.2 microm/h for SV-T2 fibroblasts, and 26.2 +/- 11.5 microm/h for H-ras fibroblasts. Furthermore, the elastic constant, K, increases toward the cell body in many instances which coincide with an increase in actin filament density toward the cell body. The correlation between the enhanced motility and the decrease in viscoelastic moduli supports the Elastic Brownian Ratchet model for driving lamellipodia extension.

  6. Cell Motility and Local Viscoelasticity of Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Park, S.; Koch, D.; Cardenas, R.; Käs, J.; Shih, C. K.

    2005-01-01

    Viscoelastic changes of the lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton are a fundamental element of cell motility. Thus, the correlation between the local viscoelastic properties of the lamellipodium (including the transitional region to the cell body) and the speed of lamellipodial extension is studied for normal and malignantly transformed fibroblasts. Using our atomic force microscopy-based microrheology technique, we found different mechanical properties between the lamellipodia of malignantly transformed fibroblasts (H-ras transformed and SV-T2 fibroblasts) and normal fibroblasts (BALB 3T3 fibroblasts). The average elastic constants, K, in the leading edge of SV-T2 fibroblasts (0.48 ± 0.51 kPa) and of H-ras transformed fibroblasts (0.42 ± 0.35 kPa) are significantly lower than that of BALB 3T3 fibroblasts (1.01 ± 0.40 kPa). The analysis of time-lapse phase contrast images shows that the decrease in the elastic constant, K, for malignantly transformed fibroblasts is correlated with the enhanced motility of the lamellipodium. The measured mean speeds are 6.1 ± 4.5 μ m/h for BALB 3T3 fibroblasts, 13.1 ± 5.2 μm/h for SV-T2 fibroblasts, and 26.2 ± 11.5 μm/h for H-ras fibroblasts. Furthermore, the elastic constant, K, increases toward the cell body in many instances which coincide with an increase in actin filament density toward the cell body. The correlation between the enhanced motility and the decrease in viscoelastic moduli supports the Elastic Brownian Ratchet model for driving lamellipodia extension. PMID:16199496

  7. A cell number-counting factor regulates the cytoskeleton and cell motility in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lei; Gao, Tong; McCollum, Catherine; Jang, Wonhee; Vicker, Michael G; Ammann, Robin R; Gomer, Richard H

    2002-02-05

    Little is known about how a morphogenetic rearrangement of a tissue is affected by individual cells. Starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells aggregate to form dendritic streams, which then break up into groups of approximately 2 x 10(4) cells. Cell number is sensed at this developmental stage by using counting factor (CF), a secreted complex of polypeptides. A high extracellular concentration of CF indicates that there is a large number of cells, which then causes the aggregation stream to break up. Computer simulations indicated that stream breakup could be caused by CF decreasing cell-cell adhesion and/or increasing cell motility, and we observed that CF does indeed decrease cell-cell adhesion. We find here that CF increases cell motility. In Dictyostelium, motility is mediated by actin and myosin. CF increases the amounts of polymerized actin and the ABP-120 actin-crosslinking protein. Partially inhibiting motility by using drugs that interfere with actin polymerization reduces stream dissipation, resulting in fewer stream breaks and thus larger groups. CF also potentiates the phosphorylation and redistribution of myosin while repressing its basal level of assembly. The computer simulations indicated that a narrower distribution of group sizes results when a secreted factor modulates both adhesion and motility. CF thus seems to induce the morphogenesis of streams into evenly sized groups by increasing actin polymerization, ABP-120 levels, and myosin phosphorylation and decreasing adhesion and myosin polymerization.

  8. Aquaporin inhibition changes protein phosphorylation pattern following sperm motility activation in fish.

    PubMed

    Zilli, Loredana; Beirão, José; Schiavone, Roberta; Herraez, Maria Paz; Cabrita, Elsa; Storelli, Carlo; Vilella, Sebastiano

    2011-09-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that osmolality is the key signal in sperm motility activation in Sparus aurata spermatozoa. In particular, we have proposed that the hyper-osmotic shock triggers water efflux from spermatozoa via aquaporins. This water efflux determines the cell volume reduction and, in turn, the rise in the intracellular concentration of ions. This increase could lead to the activation of adenylyl cyclase and of the cAMP-signaling pathway, causing the phosphorylation of sperm proteins and then the initiation of sperm motility. This study confirms the important role of sea bream AQPs (Aqp1a and Aqp10b) in the beginning of sperm motility. In fact, when these proteins are inhibited by HgCl(2), the phosphorylation of some proteins (174 kDa protein of head; 147, 97 and 33 kDa proteins of flagella), following the hyper-osmotic shock, was inhibited (totally or partially). However, our results also suggest that more than one transduction pathways could be activated when sea bream spermatozoa were ejaculated in seawater, since numerous proteins showed an HgCl(2)(AQPs)-independent phosphorylation state after motility activation. The role played by each different signal transduction pathways need to be clarified.

  9. Correlation of cell membrane dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Essential events of cell development and homeostasis are revealed by the associated changes of cell morphology and therefore have been widely used as a key indicator of physiological states and molecular pathways affecting various cellular functions via cytoskeleton. Cell motility is a complex phenomenon primarily driven by the actin network, which plays an important role in shaping the morphology of the cells. Most of the morphology based features are approximated from cell periphery but its dynamics have received none to scant attention. We aim to bridge the gap between membrane dynamics and cell states from the perspective of whole cell movement by identifying cell edge patterns and its correlation with cell dynamics. Results We present a systematic study to extract, classify, and compare cell dynamics in terms of cell motility and edge activity. Cell motility features extracted by fitting a persistent random walk were used to identify the initial set of cell subpopulations. We propose algorithms to extract edge features along the entire cell periphery such as protrusion and retraction velocity. These constitute a unique set of multivariate time-lapse edge features that are then used to profile subclasses of cell dynamics by unsupervised clustering. Conclusions By comparing membrane dynamic patterns exhibited by each subclass of cells, correlated trends of edge and cell movements were identified. Our findings are consistent with published literature and we also identified that motility patterns are influenced by edge features from initial time points compared to later sampling intervals. PMID:22372978

  10. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher’s equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase–a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics. PMID:27362260

  11. Magnolol inhibits colonic motility through down-regulation of voltage-sensitive L-type Ca2+ channels of colonic smooth muscle cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Zang, Kai-Hong; Luo, Jia-Lie; Leung, Fung-Ping; Huang, Yu; Lin, Cheng-Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Lu, Ai-Ping; Tang, Xu-Dong; Xu, Hong-Xi; Sung, Joseph Jao-yiu; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2013-11-15

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of magnolol (5,5'-diallyl-2,2'-biphenyldiol) on contraction in distal colonic segments of rats and the underlying mechanisms. Colonic segments were mounted in organ baths for isometric force measurement. Whole-cell voltage-sensitive L-type Ca(2+) currents were recorded on isolated single colonic smooth muscle cells using patch-clamp technique. The spontaneous contractions and acetylcholine (ACh)- and Bay K 8644-induced contractions were inhibited by magnolol (3-100 μM). In the presence of Bay K8644 (100 nM), magnolol (10-100 μM) inhibited the contraction induced by 10 μM ACh. By contrast, tetrodotoxin (100 nM) and Nώ-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME 100 μM) did not change the inhibitory effect of magnolol (10 μM). In addition, magnolol (3-100 μM) inhibited the L-type Ca(2+) currents. The present results suggest that magnolol inhibits colonic smooth muscle contraction through downregulating L-type Ca(2+) channel activity.

  12. Traveling waves in actin dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jun; Mogilner, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Much of current understanding of cell motility arose from studying steady treadmilling of actin arrays. Recently, there have been a growing number of observations of a more complex, non-steady, actin behavior, including self-organized waves. It is becoming clear that these waves result from activation and inhibition feedbacks in actin dynamics acting on different scales, but the exact molecular nature of these feedbacks and respective roles of biomechanics and biochemistry are still unclear. Here, we review recent advances achieved in experimental and theoretical studies of actin waves and discuss mechanisms and physiological significance of wavy protrusions. PMID:22985541

  13. A cell number-counting factor regulates the cytoskeleton and cell motility in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lei; Gao, Tong; McCollum, Catherine; Jang, Wonhee; Vicker, Michael G.; Ammann, Robin R.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about how a morphogenetic rearrangement of a tissue is affected by individual cells. Starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells aggregate to form dendritic streams, which then break up into groups of ≈2 × 104 cells. Cell number is sensed at this developmental stage by using counting factor (CF), a secreted complex of polypeptides. A high extracellular concentration of CF indicates that there is a large number of cells, which then causes the aggregation stream to break up. Computer simulations indicated that stream breakup could be caused by CF decreasing cell–cell adhesion and/or increasing cell motility, and we observed that CF does indeed decrease cell–cell adhesion. We find here that CF increases cell motility. In Dictyostelium, motility is mediated by actin and myosin. CF increases the amounts of polymerized actin and the ABP-120 actin-crosslinking protein. Partially inhibiting motility by using drugs that interfere with actin polymerization reduces stream dissipation, resulting in fewer stream breaks and thus larger groups. CF also potentiates the phosphorylation and redistribution of myosin while repressing its basal level of assembly. The computer simulations indicated that a narrower distribution of group sizes results when a secreted factor modulates both adhesion and motility. CF thus seems to induce the morphogenesis of streams into evenly sized groups by increasing actin polymerization, ABP-120 levels, and myosin phosphorylation and decreasing adhesion and myosin polymerization. PMID:11818526

  14. Activated Membrane Patches Guide Chemotactic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Inbal; Skoge, Monica L.; Charest, Pascale G.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Firtel, Richard A.; Loomis, William F.; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells are able to crawl on surfaces and guide their motility based on environmental cues. These cues are interpreted by signaling systems which couple to cell mechanics; indeed membrane protrusions in crawling cells are often accompanied by activated membrane patches, which are localized areas of increased concentration of one or more signaling components. To determine how these patches are related to cell motion, we examine the spatial localization of RasGTP in chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells under conditions where the vertical extent of the cell was restricted. Quantitative analyses of the data reveal a high degree of spatial correlation between patches of activated Ras and membrane protrusions. Based on these findings, we formulate a model for amoeboid cell motion that consists of two coupled modules. The first module utilizes a recently developed two-component reaction diffusion model that generates transient and localized areas of elevated concentration of one of the components along the membrane. The activated patches determine the location of membrane protrusions (and overall cell motion) that are computed in the second module, which also takes into account the cortical tension and the availability of protrusion resources. We show that our model is able to produce realistic amoeboid-like motion and that our numerical results are consistent with experimentally observed pseudopod dynamics. Specifically, we show that the commonly observed splitting of pseudopods can result directly from the dynamics of the signaling patches. PMID:21738453

  15. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2016-07-01

    Substrate-based crawling motility of eukaryotic cells is essential for many biological functions, both in developing and mature organisms. Motility dysfunctions are involved in several life-threatening pathologies such as cancer and metastasis. Motile cells are also a natural realisation of active, self-propelled 'particles', a popular research topic in nonequilibrium physics. Finally, from the materials perspective, assemblies of motile cells and evolving tissues constitute a class of adaptive self-healing materials that respond to the topography, elasticity and surface chemistry of the environment and react to external stimuli. Although a comprehensive understanding of substrate-based cell motility remains elusive, progress has been achieved recently in its modelling on the whole-cell level. Here we survey the most recent advances in computational approaches to cell movement and demonstrate how these models improve our understanding of complex self-organised systems such as living cells.

  17. Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility

    DOE PAGES

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2016-07-15

    Substrate-based crawling motility of eukaryotic cells is essential for many biological functions, both in developing and mature organisms. Motility dysfunctions are involved in several life-threatening pathologies such as cancer and metastasis. Motile cells are also a natural realization of active, self-propelled ‘particles’, a popular research topic in nonequilibrium physics. Finally, from the materials perspective, assemblies of motile cells and evolving tissues constitute a class of adaptive self-healing materials that respond to the topography, elasticity, and surface chemistry of the environment and react to external stimuli. Although a comprehensive understanding of substrate-based cell motility remains elusive, progress has been achieved recentlymore » in its modeling on the whole cell level. Furthermore we survey the most recent advances in computational approaches to cell movement and demonstrate how these models improve our understanding of complex self-organized systems such as living cells.« less

  18. Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2016-07-15

    Substrate-based crawling motility of eukaryotic cells is essential for many biological functions, both in developing and mature organisms. Motility dysfunctions are involved in several life-threatening pathologies such as cancer and metastasis. Motile cells are also a natural realization of active, self-propelled ‘particles’, a popular research topic in nonequilibrium physics. Finally, from the materials perspective, assemblies of motile cells and evolving tissues constitute a class of adaptive self-healing materials that respond to the topography, elasticity, and surface chemistry of the environment and react to external stimuli. Although a comprehensive understanding of substrate-based cell motility remains elusive, progress has been achieved recently in its modeling on the whole cell level. Furthermore we survey the most recent advances in computational approaches to cell movement and demonstrate how these models improve our understanding of complex self-organized systems such as living cells.

  19. Physical models of collective cell motility: from cell to tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camley, B. A.; Rappel, W.-J.

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we review physics-based models of collective cell motility. We discuss a range of techniques at different scales, ranging from models that represent cells as simple self-propelled particles to phase field models that can represent a cell’s shape and dynamics in great detail. We also extensively review the ways in which cells within a tissue choose their direction, the statistics of cell motion, and some simple examples of how cell–cell signaling can interact with collective cell motility. This review also covers in more detail selected recent works on collective cell motion of small numbers of cells on micropatterns, in wound healing, and the chemotaxis of clusters of cells.

  20. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone inhibit gallbladder motility through multiple signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kline, Loren W; Karpinski, Edward

    2008-10-01

    Testosterone (T) has been shown to cause vasodilation in rabbit coronary arteries through a nongenomic pathway. Part of this T-induced relaxation was shown to be mediated by opening voltage dependent K(+) channels. T infusion also reduces peripheral resistance in human males with heart failure. The effects of T or its active metabolite 5-alpha dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are not well studied. This study investigates the effect of T and DHT on contraction in guinea pig gallbladder strips. T or DHT induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK)-induced tension. Pretreatment of the strips with PKA inhibitor 14-22 amide myristolated had no significant effect on the relaxation induced by either T or DHT. Pretreatment of strips with 2-APB, an inhibitor of IP(3) induced Ca(2+) release, produced a significant (p<0.001) reduction in the T- or DHT-induced relaxation. Bisindolymaleimide IV and chelerythrine Cl(-) when used in combination had no significant effect on the amount of CCK-induced tension, but significantly (p<0.01) decreased the amount of T- or DHT-induced relaxation. The flavone chrysin, an aromatase inhibitor, and genistein, an isoflavone, each produced a significant (p<0.01) reduction in CCK-induced tension. Chrysin significantly (p<0.05) increased T-induced relaxation; however, genistein had no effect on T-induced relaxation. It is concluded that T and DHT inhibits gallbladder motility rapidly by nongenomic actions of the hormones. Multiple pathways that include inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release, inhibition of extracellular Ca(2+) entry, and the actions of PKC may mediate this effect.

  1. Computational and Modeling Strategies for Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Adalsteinsson, David; Elston, Timothy C.; Jacobson, Ken; Kapustina, Maryna; Forest, M. Gregory

    A predictive simulation of the dynamics of a living cell remains a fundamental modeling and computational challenge. The challenge does not even make sense unless one specifies the level of detail and the phenomena of interest, whether the focus is on near-equilibrium or strongly nonequilibrium behavior, and on localized, subcellular, or global cell behavior. Therefore, choices have to be made clear at the outset, ranging from distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, specificity within each of these types, whether the cell is "normal," whether one wants to model mitosis, blebs, migration, division, deformation due to confined flow as with red blood cells, and the level of microscopic detail for any of these processes. The review article by Hoffman and Crocker [48] is both an excellent overview of cell mechanics and an inspiration for our approach. One might be interested, for example, in duplicating the intricate experimental details reported in [43]: "actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process," or to duplicate experimental evidence of traveling waves in cells recovering from actin depolymerization [42, 35]. Modeling studies of lamellipodial structure, protrusion, and retraction behavior range from early mechanistic models [84] to more recent deterministic [112, 97] and stochastic [51] approaches with significant biochemical and structural detail. Recent microscopic-macroscopic models and algorithms for cell blebbing have been developed by Young and Mitran [116], which update cytoskeletal microstructure via statistical sampling techniques together with fluid variables. Alternatively, whole cell compartment models (without spatial details) of oscillations in spreading cells have been proposed [35, 92, 109] which show positive and negative feedback

  2. Intracellular Theileria annulata Promote Invasive Cell Motility through Kinase Regulation of the Host Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Min; Baumgartner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular, protozoan Theileria species parasites are the only eukaryotes known to transform another eukaryotic cell. One consequence of this parasite-dependent transformation is the acquisition of motile and invasive properties of parasitized cells in vitro and their metastatic dissemination in the animal, which causes East Coast Fever (T. parva) or Tropical Theileriosis (T. annulata). These motile and invasive properties of infected host cells are enabled by parasite-dependent, poorly understood F-actin dynamics that control host cell membrane protrusions. Herein, we dissected functional and structural alterations that cause acquired motility and invasiveness of T. annulata-infected cells, to understand the molecular basis driving cell dissemination in Tropical Theileriosis. We found that chronic induction of TNFα by the parasite contributes to motility and invasiveness of parasitized host cells. We show that TNFα does so by specifically targeting expression and function of the host proto-oncogenic ser/thr kinase MAP4K4. Blocking either TNFα secretion or MAP4K4 expression dampens the formation of polar, F-actin-rich invasion structures and impairs cell motility in 3D. We identified the F-actin binding ERM family proteins as MAP4K4 downstream effectors in this process because TNFα-induced ERM activation and cell invasiveness are sensitive to MAP4K4 depletion. MAP4K4 expression in infected cells is induced by TNFα-JNK signalling and maintained by the inhibition of translational repression, whereby both effects are parasite dependent. Thus, parasite-induced TNFα promotes invasive motility of infected cells through the activation of MAP4K4, an evolutionary conserved kinase that controls cytoskeleton dynamics and cell motility. Hence, MAP4K4 couples inflammatory signaling to morphodynamic processes and cell motility, a process exploited by the intracellular Theileria parasite to increase its host cell's dissemination capabilities. PMID:24626571

  3. Cell Motility as Persistent Random Motion: Theories from Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Selmeczi, David; Mosler, Stephan; Hagedorn, Peter H.; Larsen, Niels B.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Experimental time series for trajectories of motile cells may contain so much information that a systematic analysis will yield cell-type-specific motility models. Here we demonstrate how, using human keratinocytes and fibroblasts as examples. The two resulting models reflect the cells' different roles in the organism, it seems, and show that a cell has a memory of past velocities. They also suggest how to distinguish quantitatively between various surfaces' compatibility with the two cell types. PMID:15951372

  4. A mechanism for cell motility by active polar gels

    PubMed Central

    Marth, W.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse a generic motility model, with the motility mechanism arising by contractile stress due to the interaction of myosin and actin. A hydrodynamic active polar gel theory is used to model the cytoplasm of a cell and is combined with a Helfrich-type model to account for membrane properties. The overall model allows consideration of the motility without the necessity for local adhesion. Besides a detailed numerical approach together with convergence studies for the highly nonlinear free boundary problem, we also compare the induced flow field of the motile cell with that of classical squirmer models and identify the motile cell as a puller or pusher, depending on the strength of the myosin–actin interactions. PMID:25926698

  5. Progesterone inhibits gallbladder motility through multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kline, L W; Karpinski, E

    2005-08-01

    Progesterone (P) has an inhibitory effect on the contractility of gastrointestinal smooth muscle, including the gallbladder. Since P levels are elevated during pregnancy, a biliary stasis may develop during pregnancy that is characterized by an increase in the fasting and residual volumes and by a decrease in emptying capacity. This study investigates the effect of P and two metabolites on contraction in guinea pig gallbladder strips. P induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in guinea pig gallbladder strips precontracted with cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK). Pretreatment of gallbladder strips with P (50 microM) also reduced the amount of CCK-induced tension. Nifedipine (1 microM) produced a similar effect. Pretreatment of the strips with PKA inhibitor 14--22 amide myristolated (180 nM) or the PKG inhibitor KT5823 (1.2 microM) either separately or in combination significantly reduced the amount of P-induced relaxation. Rp-cAMPs (0.1mM) or H-89 (10 microM) separately or in combination significantly reduced the P-effect; however, the combination of agents produced the largest reduction. Genistein (1 microM), an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, significantly (p<0.01) reduced the amount of P-induced relaxation. The use of strontium in the Kreb's solution as a substitute for Ca(2+) significantly (p<0.01) reduced the amount of CCK-induced tension. Pretreatment of the strips with 2-APB (26 microM), an inhibitor of IP(3,) induced Ca(2+) release, produced a significant (p<0.01) reduction in P-induced relaxation. We conclude that P inhibits gallbladder motility rapidly by nongenomic actions of the hormone. Several pathways that include tyrosine kinase and PKA/cAMP activity may mediate this effect.

  6. Cross-Phosphorylation and Interaction between Src/FAK and MAPKAP5/PRAK in Early Focal Adhesions Controls Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Sheila Figel; Gelman, Irwin H

    2015-01-01

    P38-regulated and activated kinase (PRAK/MAPKAPK5) is a serine/threonine kinase which lies downstream of the p38 and ERK3/4 MAP kinase pathways. PRAK plays diverse roles in the processes of cell growth, nutrient starvation response, programmed cell death, senescence and motility. PRAK has been shown to both promote and inhibit cell motility in different contexts. The pro-motility functions of PRAK are attributed mainly to cytoskeletal rearrangement occurring downstream of its phosphorylated substrate HSP27; however, it was recently shown that PRAK is required for motility in endothelial cells upstream of Focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Along with Src, FAK functions as a mediator of motility signaling through the phosphorylation of substrates in focal adhesions. Here, we show that PRAK, initially identified as a FAK substrate in an in situ/ kinase overlay assay, is a Src substrate, the phosphorylation of which directs PRAK to focal adhesions. Focal adhesion localization of PRAK was not found to affect cell motility, however transient over expression of PRAK inhibited motility in HeLa cells. This effect requires PRAK kinase activity and proceeds through an impairment of FAK activation via phosphorylation on Y861. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that PRAK is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, localizes to focal adhesions, and interacts physically with and can phosphorylate FAK/Src. Further we provide a novel mechanism for the inhibition of motility downstream of PRAK. PMID:26042227

  7. 3D timelapse analysis of muscle satellite cell motility.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Ashley L; Atchison, Kevin; Fisher, Kevin E; Davis, George E; Cornelison, D D W

    2009-10-01

    Skeletal muscle repair and regeneration requires the activity of satellite cells, a population of myogenic stem cells scattered throughout the tissue and activated to proliferate and differentiate in response to myotrauma or disease. While it seems likely that satellite cells would need to navigate local muscle tissue to reach damaged areas, relatively little data on such motility exist, and most studies have been with immortalized cell lines. We find that primary satellite cells are significantly more motile than myoblast cell lines, and that adhesion to laminin promotes primary cell motility more than fourfold over other substrates. Using timelapse videomicroscopy to assess satellite cell motility on single living myofibers, we have identified a requirement for the laminin-binding integrin alpha 7 beta 1 in satellite cell motility, as well as a role for hepatocyte growth factor in promoting directional persistence. The extensive migratory behavior of satellite cells resident on muscle fibers suggests caution when determining, based on fixed specimens, whether adjacent cells are daughters from the same mother cell. We also observed more persistent long-term contact between individual satellite cells than has been previously supposed, potential cell-cell attractive and repulsive interactions, and migration between host myofibers. Based on such activity, we assayed for expression of "pathfinding" cues, and found that satellite cells express multiple guidance ligands and receptors. Together, these data suggest that satellite cell migration in vivo may be more extensive than currently thought, and could be regulated by combinations of signals, including adhesive haptotaxis, soluble factors, and guidance cues.

  8. Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibits the Motility of Pathogenic Salmonella by Affecting the Driving Forces of Motility and the Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Guo, Yijie; Ihara, Kohei; Tomioka, Rintaro; Masuda, Mizuki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key pattern recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system, an important component of innate immunity. MBL functions as an opsonin which enhances the sequential immune process such as phagocytosis. We here report an inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of pathogenic bacteria, which occurs by affecting the energy source required for motility and the signaling pathway of chemotaxis. When Salmonella cells were treated with a physiological concentration of MBL, their motile fraction and free-swimming speed decreased. Rotation assays of a single flagellum showed that the flagellar rotation rate was significantly reduced by the addition of MBL. Measurements of the intracellular pH and membrane potential revealed that MBL affected a driving force for the Salmonella flagellum, the electrochemical potential difference of protons. We also found that MBL treatment increased the reversal frequency of Salmonella flagellar rotation, which interfered with the relative positive chemotaxis toward an attractive substrate. We thus propose that the motility inhibition effect of MBL may be secondarily involved in the attack against pathogens, potentially facilitating the primary role of MBL in the complement system. PMID:27104738

  9. Glycolysis is the primary bioenergetic pathway for cell motility and cytoskeletal remodeling in human prostate and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Takumi; Verdone, James E.; Huang, Jessie; Kahlert, Ulf D.; Hernandez, James R.; Torga, Gonzalo; Zarif, Jelani C.; Epstein, Tamir; Gatenby, Robert; McCartney, Annemarie; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Mooney, Steven M.; An, Steven S.; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a cancer cell to detach from the primary tumor and move to distant sites is fundamental to a lethal cancer phenotype. Metabolic transformations are associated with highly motile aggressive cellular phenotypes in tumor progression. Here, we report that cancer cell motility requires increased utilization of the glycolytic pathway. Mesenchymal cancer cells exhibited higher aerobic glycolysis compared to epithelial cancer cells while no significant change was observed in mitochondrial ATP production rate. Higher glycolysis was associated with increased rates of cytoskeletal remodeling, greater cell traction forces and faster cell migration, all of which were blocked by inhibition of glycolysis, but not by inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Thus, our results demonstrate that cancer cell motility and cytoskeleton rearrangement is energetically dependent on aerobic glycolysis and not oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial derived ATP is insufficient to compensate for inhibition of the glycolytic pathway with regard to cellular motility and CSK rearrangement, implying that localization of ATP derived from glycolytic enzymes near sites of active CSK rearrangement is more important for cell motility than total cellular ATP production rate. These results extend our understanding of cancer cell metabolism, potentially providing a target metabolic pathway associated with aggressive disease. PMID:25426557

  10. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination. PMID:20822528

  11. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control.

    PubMed

    Parri, Matteo; Chiarugi, Paola

    2010-09-07

    Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  12. Purification and Characterization of a Sperm Motility Inhibiting Factor from Caprine Epididymal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sujoy; Saha, Sudipta; Majumder, Gopal Chandra; Dungdung, Sandhya Rekha

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have been reported on the occurrence of sperm motility inhibiting factors in the male reproductive fluids of different mammalian species, but these proteins have not been adequately purified and characterized. A novel sperm motility inhibiting factor (MIF-II) has been purified from caprine epididymal plasma (EP) by Hydroxylapatite gel adsorption chromatography, DEAE-Cellulose ion-exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing. The MIF-II has been purified to apparent homogeneity and the molecular weight estimated by Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration is 160 kDa. MIF-II is a dimeric protein, made up of two subunits each having a molecular mass of 80 kDa as shown by SDS-PAGE. The isoelectric point of MIF-II is 5.1 as determined by chromatofocusing and isoelectric focusing. It is a heat labile protein and maximal active at the pH 6.9 to 7.5. The sperm motility inhibiting protein factor at 2 µg/ml (12.5 nM) level showed maximal motility-inhibiting activity. The observation that the epididymal plasma factor lowered the intracellular cAMP level of spermatozoa in a concentration-dependent manner suggests that it may block the motility of caprine cauda spermatozoa by interfering the cAMP dependent motility function. The results revealed that the purified protein factor has the potential of sperm motility inhibition and may serve as a vaginal contraceptive. The antibody raised against the MIF-II has the potential for enhancement of forward motility of cauda-spermatozoa. This antibody may thus be useful for solving some of the problems of male infertility due to low sperm motility. PMID:20706623

  13. Arginine Vasopressin Injected into the Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus Inhibits Gastric Motility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianping; Chang, Lanlan; Xie, Jinlu; Ai, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Until now, the effect of arginine vasopressin (AVP) in the DMV on gastric motility and the possible modulating pathway between the DMV and the gastrointestinal system remain poorly understood. Objectives. We aimed to explore the role of AVP in the DMV in regulating gastric motility and the possible central and peripheral pathways. Material and Methods. Firstly, we microinjected different doses of AVP into the DMV and investigated its effects on gastric motility in rats. Then, the possible central and peripheral pathways that regulate gastric motility were also discussed by microinjecting SR49059 (a specific AVP receptor antagonist) into the DMV and intravenous injection of hexamethonium (a specific neuronal nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonist) before AVP microinjection. Results. Following microinjection of AVP (180 pmol and 18 pmol) into the DMV, the gastric motility (including total amplitude, total duration, and motility index of gastric contraction) was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05). Moreover, the inhibitory effect of AVP (180 pmol) on gastric motility could be blocked completely by both SR49059 (320 pmol) and hexamethonium (8 μmol). Conclusions. It is concluded that AVP inhibits the gastric motility by acting on the specific AVP receptor in the DMV, with the potential involvement of the parasympathetic preganglionic cholinergic fibers. PMID:26843857

  14. Self-Organized Cell Motility from Motor-Filament Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Du, XinXin; Doubrovinski, Konstantin; Osterfield, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Cell motility is driven primarily by the dynamics of the cell cytoskeleton, a system of filamentous proteins and molecular motors. It has been proposed that cell motility is a self-organized process, that is, local short-range interactions determine much of the dynamics that are required for the whole-cell organization that leads to polarization and directional motion. Here we present a mesoscopic mean-field description of filaments, motors, and cell boundaries. This description gives rise to a dynamical system that exhibits multiple self-organized states. We discuss several qualitative aspects of the asymptotic states and compare them with those of living cells. PMID:22768929

  15. Trichomonas vaginalis: preliminary characterization of a sperm motility inhibiting factor.

    PubMed

    Jarecki-Black, J C; Lushbaugh, W B; Golosov, L; Glassman, A B

    1988-01-01

    This study determined the effects of Trichomonas vaginalis trophozoites, subcellular fractions, and medium from axenic T. vaginalis cultures on human sperm motility and viability. Spent medium (pH 7.0) caused complete cessation of sperm motility after 15 minutes incubation. Trophozoite soluble fraction or formalin-killed trophozoites caused a 50 percent reduction in sperm motility, compared to 25 percent reduction caused by the trophozoite particulate fraction or the sterile medium and three percent by saline (control). Spent medium from T. vaginalis cultures reaching stationary growth phase produced the greatest reduction in sperm motility, suggesting that potency was related to time in culture and trophozoites per ml. The T. vaginalis spermicidal activity was heat-stable, trypsin-sensitive, and had a molecular weight of 12-15,000 by gel filtration. This proteinaceous substance was present in and secreted by T. vaginalis trophozoites during normal growth in axenic culture. Since this T. vaginalis byproduct rapidly killed sperm in vitro, its effects in humans may contribute to infertility in infected couples.

  16. Characterization of ciliobrevin A mediated dynein ATPase inhibition on flagellar motility of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Srinivas; Mukhopadhyay, Aakash Gautam; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2017-04-05

    Axonemal dyneins are members of AAA+ proteins involved in force generation and are responsible for flagellar motility in eukaryotes. In this study, we characterized the effects of ciliobrevin A (CbA), a dynein ATPase inhibitor, on flagella driven motility of the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani. Using fast-capture video microscopy, we observed that CbA decreased flagellar beat frequency of swimming parasites in a concentration-dependent manner. Beat frequency of live and reactivated L. donovani decreased by approximately 89% and 41% respectively in the presence of 250μM CbA. This inhibition was lost when CbA was removed, suggesting its effects were reversible. CbA also altered wavelength and amplitude of the flagellum of live parasites. Waveform analysis of live and reactivated L. donovani revealed that CbA significantly affected flagellar waveform by inducing non-uniform bends with the flagellum beating away from the cell axis. These results suggest that CbA sensitive dynein ATPases possibly are responsible for power generation and waveform maintenance of the flagellum of L. donovani. This ability to inhibit axonemal dyneins also emphasizes the use of dynein inhibitors as valuable tools in studying functional roles of axonemal dyneins of flagellated eukaryotes.

  17. Effects of Hedera helix L. extracts on rat prostate cancer cell proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    Gumushan-Aktas, Hatice; Altun, Seyhan

    2016-01-01

    Hedera helix L., a member of Araliaceae family, has antiproliferative, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal and anti-inflammatory effects, and is used in cosmetics. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of treatment with extracts of leaves and unripened fruits of H. helix on rat prostate cancer cell lines with markedly different metastatic potentials: Mat-LyLu cells (strongly metastatic) and AT-2 cells (weakly metastatic). The effects of the extracts on cell kinetics and migration were determined. Tetrodotoxin was used to block the voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) associated specifically with Mat-LyLu cells. Cell proliferation was detected spectrophotometrically using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. The mitotic index was determined using the Feulgen staining method. Lateral motility was quantified by wound-healing assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that cell kinetics (proliferation and mitotic activity) and motility were inhibited by ethanolic leaf extract of H. helix. The ethanolic extract of H. helix fruit suppressed Mat-LyLu cell migration, with no effect on proliferation. The opposite effects were observed in AT-2 cells; migration was not affected but proliferation was inhibited. In conclusion, the ethanolic fruit extract of H. helix may inhibit the cell migration of Mat-LyLu cells by blocking VGSCs. However, the effect of ethanolic leaf extract of H. helix treatment on the lateral motility of the cancer cells is unclear. PMID:27698887

  18. Bladder cancer cell growth and motility implicate cannabinoid 2 receptor-mediated modifications of sphingolipids metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bettiga, Arianna; Aureli, Massimo; Colciago, Giorgia; Murdica, Valentina; Moschini, Marco; Lucianò, Roberta; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf; Hedlund, Petter; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Colombo, Renzo; Bassi, Rosaria; Samarani, Maura; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Benigni, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory effects demonstrated by activation of cannabinoid receptors (CB) on cancer proliferation and migration may also play critical roles in controlling bladder cancer (BC). CB expression on human normal and BC specimens was tested by immunohistochemistry. Human BC cells RT4 and RT112 were challenged with CB agonists and assessed for proliferation, apoptosis, and motility. Cellular sphingolipids (SL) constitution and metabolism were evaluated after metabolic labelling. CB1-2 were detected in BC specimens, but only CB2 was more expressed in the tumour. Both cell lines expressed similar CB2. Exposure to CB2 agonists inhibited BC growth, down-modulated Akt, induced caspase 3-activation and modified SL metabolism. Baseline SL analysis in cell lines showed differences linked to unique migratory behaviours and cytoskeletal re-arrangements. CB2 activation changed the SL composition of more aggressive RT112 cells by reducing (p < 0.01) Gb3 ganglioside (−50 ± 3%) and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, −40 ± 4%), which ended up to reduction in cell motility (−46 ± 5%) with inhibition of p-SRC. CB2-selective antagonists, gene silencing and an inhibitor of SL biosynthesis partially prevented CB2 agonist-induced effects on cell viability and motility. CB2 activation led to ceramide-mediated BC cell apoptosis independently of SL constitutive composition, which instead was modulated by CB2 agonists to reduce cell motility. PMID:28191815

  19. Inhibitory effects of LPA1 on cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone in fibroblast 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Dong, Yan; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-11-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to mediate a variety of biological responses, including cell motility. Recently, we indicated that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor-3 (LPA3) increased cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, we assessed the role of LPA1 in the cell motile activity mediated by ROS in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. 3T3 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ) at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3 cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ were significantly higher than those of untreated cells. 3T3 cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ showed elevated expression levels of the Lpar3 gene, but not the Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. To investigate the effects of LPA1 on the cell motile activity induced by hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ, Lpar1-overexpressing (3T3-a1) cells were generated from 3T3 cells and treated with hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ. The cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ were markedly suppressed in 3T3-a1 cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA1 inhibits the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ in 3T3 cells.

  20. Geometry-Driven Polarity in Motile Amoeboid Cells.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Oliver; Guven, Can; Theves, Matthias; Driscoll, Meghan; Losert, Wolfgang; Beta, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Motile eukaryotic cells, such as leukocytes, cancer cells, and amoeba, typically move inside the narrow interstitial spacings of tissue or soil. While most of our knowledge of actin-driven eukaryotic motility was obtained from cells that move on planar open surfaces, recent work has demonstrated that confinement can lead to strongly altered motile behavior. Here, we report experimental evidence that motile amoeboid cells undergo a spontaneous symmetry breaking in confined interstitial spaces. Inside narrow channels, the cells switch to a highly persistent, unidirectional mode of motion, moving at a constant speed along the channel. They remain in contact with the two opposing channel side walls and alternate protrusions of their leading edge near each wall. Their actin cytoskeleton exhibits a characteristic arrangement that is dominated by dense, stationary actin foci at the side walls, in conjunction with less dense dynamic regions at the leading edge. Our experimental findings can be explained based on an excitable network model that accounts for the confinement-induced symmetry breaking and correctly recovers the spatio-temporal pattern of protrusions at the leading edge. Since motile cells typically live in the narrow interstitial spacings of tissue or soil, we expect that the geometry-driven polarity we report here plays an important role for movement of cells in their natural environment.

  1. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  2. Form and Function in Cell Motility: From Fibroblasts to Keratocytes

    PubMed Central

    Herant, Marc; Dembo, Micah

    2010-01-01

    Abstract It is plain enough that a horse is made for running, but similar statements about motile cells are not so obvious. Here the basis for structure-function relations in cell motility is explored by application of a new computational technique that allows realistic three-dimensional simulations of cells migrating on flat substrata. With this approach, some cyber cells spontaneously display the classic irregular protrusion cycles and handmirror morphology of a crawling fibroblast, and others the steady gliding motility and crescent morphology of a fish keratocyte. The keratocyte motif is caused by optimal recycling of the cytoskeleton from the back to the front so that more of the periphery can be devoted to protrusion. These calculations are a step toward bridging the gap between the integrated mechanics and biophysics of whole cells and the microscopic molecular biology of cytoskeletal components. PMID:20409459

  3. In vitro inhibition of sperm motility by some local mineral water drinks.

    PubMed

    Oyelola, O O; Ayangade, S O; Amole, F

    1987-10-01

    The effect of eight common local mineral water drinks in Ile-Ife, Nigeria (seven cola and one lemon-based) on sperm motility in vitro was carried out. There was no significant difference in the pH values of all the drinks, the pH ranged between 2.30-2.50. After one minute, Pepsi-Cola had the least inhibitory effect on sperm motility, Bitter-lemon had the strongest effect, while the other brands had varying effects between the two extremes. The percentage motility inhibition by the mineral water drinks is also a function of the initial total sperm count in the semen.

  4. Flagellum density regulates Proteus mirabilis swarmer cell motility in viscous environments.

    PubMed

    Tuson, Hannah H; Copeland, Matthew F; Carey, Sonia; Sacotte, Ryan; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an opportunistic pathogen that is frequently associated with urinary tract infections. In the lab, P. mirabilis cells become long and multinucleate and increase their number of flagella as they colonize agar surfaces during swarming. Swarming has been implicated in pathogenesis; however, it is unclear how energetically costly changes in P. mirabilis cell morphology translate into an advantage for adapting to environmental changes. We investigated two morphological changes that occur during swarming--increases in cell length and flagellum density--and discovered that an increase in the surface density of flagella enabled cells to translate rapidly through fluids of increasing viscosity; in contrast, cell length had a small effect on motility. We found that swarm cells had a surface density of flagella that was ∼5 times larger than that of vegetative cells and were motile in fluids with a viscosity that inhibits vegetative cell motility. To test the relationship between flagellum density and velocity, we overexpressed FlhD(4)C(2), the master regulator of the flagellar operon, in vegetative cells of P. mirabilis and found that increased flagellum density produced an increase in cell velocity. Our results establish a relationship between P. mirabilis flagellum density and cell motility in viscous environments that may be relevant to its adaptation during the infection of mammalian urinary tracts and movement in contact with indwelling catheters.

  5. Melanoma Proteoglycan Modifies Gene Expression to Stimulate Tumor Cell Motility, Growth and Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Price, Matthew A.; Li, GuiYuan; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Salgia, Ravi; Jagedeeswaran, Ramasamy; Carlson, Jennifer H.; Ferrone, Soldano; Turley, Eva A.; McCarthy, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Melanoma chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (MCSP) is a plasma membrane-associated proteoglycan that facilitates the growth, motility and invasion of tumor cells. MCSP expression in melanoma cells enhances integrin function and constitutive activation of Erk 1,2. The current studies were performed to determine the mechanism by which MCSP expression promotes tumor growth and motility. The results demonstrate that MCSP expression in radial growth phase (RGP), vertical growth phase (VGP) or metastatic cell lines causes sustained activation of Erk 1,2, enhanced growth and motility which all require the cytoplasmic domain of the MCSP core protein. MCSP expression in an RGP cell line also promotes an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) based on changes in cell morphology and the expression of several EMT markers. Finally MCSP enhances the expression of c-Met and HGF, and inhibiting c-Met expression or activation limits the increased growth and motility of multiple melanoma cell lines. The studies collectively demonstrate an importance for MCSP in promoting progression by an epigenetic mechanism and they indicate that MCSP could be targeted to delay or inhibit tumor progression in patients. PMID:19738072

  6. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ashley J; Doscas, Michelle E; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-03-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT.

  7. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ashley J.; Doscas, Michelle E.; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B.; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A.; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT. PMID:26859575

  8. TUTORIAL: An introduction to cell motility for the physical scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Theriot, Julie A.

    2004-03-01

    Directed, purposeful movement is one of the qualities that we most closely associate with living organisms, and essentially all known forms of life on this planet exhibit some type of self-generated movement or motility. Even organisms that remain sessile most of the time, like flowering plants and trees, are quite busy at the cellular level, with large organelles, including chloroplasts, constantly racing around within cellular boundaries. Directed biological movement requires that the cell be able to convert its abundant stores of chemical energy into mechanical energy. Understanding how this mechanochemical energy transduction takes place and understanding how small biological forces generated at the molecular level are marshaled and organized for large-scale cellular or organismal movements are the focus of the field of cell motility. This tutorial, aimed at readers with a background in physical sciences, surveys the state of current knowledge and recent advances in modeling cell motility.

  9. An introduction to cell motility for the physical scientist.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Daniel A; Theriot, Julie A

    2004-06-01

    Directed, purposeful movement is one of the qualities that we most closely associate with living organisms, and essentially all known forms of life on this planet exhibit some type of self-generated movement or motility. Even organisms that remain sessile most of the time, like flowering plants and trees, are quite busy at the cellular level, with large organelles, including chloroplasts, constantly racing around within cellular boundaries. Directed biological movement requires that the cell be able to convert its abundant stores of chemical energy into mechanical energy. Understanding how this mechanochemical energy transduction takes place and understanding how small biological forces generated at the molecular level are marshaled and organized for large-scale cellular or organismal movements are the focus of the field of cell motility. This tutorial, aimed at readers with a background in physical sciences, surveys the state of current knowledge and recent advances in modeling cell motility.

  10. Cooperative cell motility during tandem locomotion of amoeboid cells

    PubMed Central

    Bastounis, Effie; Álvarez-González, Begoña; del Álamo, Juan C.; Lasheras, Juan C.; Firtel, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Streams of migratory cells are initiated by the formation of tandem pairs of cells connected head to tail to which other cells subsequently adhere. The mechanisms regulating the transition from single to streaming cell migration remain elusive, although several molecules have been suggested to be involved. In this work, we investigate the mechanics of the locomotion of Dictyostelium tandem pairs by analyzing the spatiotemporal evolution of their traction adhesions (TAs). We find that in migrating wild-type tandem pairs, each cell exerts traction forces on stationary sites (∼80% of the time), and the trailing cell reuses the location of the TAs of the leading cell. Both leading and trailing cells form contractile dipoles and synchronize the formation of new frontal TAs with ∼54-s time delay. Cells not expressing the lectin discoidin I or moving on discoidin I–coated substrata form fewer tandems, but the trailing cell still reuses the locations of the TAs of the leading cell, suggesting that discoidin I is not responsible for a possible chemically driven synchronization process. The migration dynamics of the tandems indicate that their TAs’ reuse results from the mechanical synchronization of the leading and trailing cells’ protrusions and retractions (motility cycles) aided by the cell–cell adhesions. PMID:26912787

  11. SPAG9 controls the cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis of human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIAORONG; ZHOU, WENLAI; LIU, SHIQING

    2016-01-01

    Sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) is an oncoprotein involved in the progression of various human malignancies; however, its role in osteosarcoma (OS) remains poorly evaluated. The present study used Matrigel™ cell migration and invasion assays, tube formation assay, Cell Counting kit-8, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to investigate the role of SPAG9 in OS cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis. The results of the present study demonstrated that SPAG9 expression was upregulated in OS tissues, as compared with adjacent normal tissues, and knockdown of SPAG9 in an OS cell line inhibited cell motility and invasion via inactivation of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that silencing of SPAG9 in OS cells inhibited tube formation, the proliferation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion, contributing to a reduction in angiogenesis. The results of the present study indicated that SPAG9 may be an important regulator in OS and may be involved in metastasis. Therefore SPAG9 may be a promising target for the treatment of metastatic OS. PMID:26893659

  12. Inhibition of bacterial motility and spreading via release of cranberry derived materials from silicone substrates.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michelle; Hidalgo, Gabriela; Asadishad, Bahareh; Almeida, Sergio; Muja, Naser; Mohammadi, Maziar Shah; Nazhat, Showan N; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-10-01

    The motility of bacteria plays a key role in their colonization of surfaces during infection. Derivatives of cranberry fruit have been shown to interfere with bacterial motility. Herein, we report on the incorporation of cranberry derived materials (CDMs) into silicone substrates with the aim of impairing bacterial pathogen motility and spreading on the substrate surface. The release of CDMs from the silicone substrates when soaking in an aqueous medium was quantified for a period of 24h. Next, we showed that CDMs released from two silicone substrates remain bioactive as they downregulate the expression of the flagellin gene of two key uropathogens - Escherichia coli CFT073 and Proteus mirabilis HI4320. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CDM-modified silicone inhibits the swarming motility of P. mirabilis, an aggressive swarmer. The bioactive, CDM-modified substrates can find broad applications in the medical device and food industries where the impairment of bacterial colonization of surfaces is of paramount importance.

  13. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Complex I Leads to Decreased Motility and Membrane Integrity Related to Increased Hydrogen Peroxide and Reduced ATP Production, while the Inhibition of Glycolysis Has Less Impact on Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Plaza Davila, María; Martin Muñoz, Patricia; Tapia, Jose A.; Ortega Ferrusola, Cristina; Balao da Silva C, Carolina; Peña, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have been proposed as the major source of reactive oxygen species in somatic cells and human spermatozoa. However, no data regarding the role of mitochondrial ROS production in stallion spermatozoa are available. To shed light on the role of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in the origin of oxidative stress in stallion spermatozoa, specific inhibitors of complex I (rotenone) and III (antimycin-A) were used. Ejaculates from seven Andalusian stallions were collected and incubated in BWW media at 37°C in the presence of rotenone, antimycin-A or control vehicle. Incubation in the presence of these inhibitors reduced sperm motility and velocity (CASA analysis) (p<0.01), but the effect was more evident in the presence of rotenone (a complex I inhibitor). These inhibitors also decreased ATP content. The inhibition of complexes I and III decreased the production of reactive oxygen species (p<0.01) as assessed by flow cytometry after staining with CellRox deep red. This observation suggests that the CellRox probe mainly identifies superoxide and that superoxide production may reflect intense mitochondrial activity rather than oxidative stress. The inhibition of complex I resulted in increased hydrogen peroxide production (p<0.01). The inhibition of glycolysis resulted in reduced sperm velocities (p<0.01) without an effect on the percentage of total motile sperm. Weak and moderate (but statistically significant) positive correlations were observed between sperm motility, velocity and membrane integrity and the production of reactive oxygen species. These results indicate that stallion sperm rely heavily on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for the production of ATP for motility but also require glycolysis to maintain high velocities. These data also indicate that increased hydrogen peroxide originating in the mitochondria is a mechanism involved in stallion sperm senescence. PMID:26407142

  14. Cellular Scale Anisotropic Topography Guides Schwann Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Hoffman-Kim, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Directed migration of Schwann cells (SC) is critical for development and repair of the peripheral nervous system. Understanding aspects of motility specific to SC, along with SC response to engineered biomaterials, may inform strategies to enhance nerve regeneration. Rat SC were cultured on laminin-coated microgrooved poly(dimethyl siloxane) platforms that were flat or presented repeating cellular scale anisotropic topographical cues, 30 or 60 µm in width, and observed with timelapse microscopy. SC motion was directed parallel to the long axis of the topography on both the groove floor and the plateau, with accompanying differences in velocity and directional persistence in comparison to SC motion on flat substrates. In addition, feature dimension affected SC morphology, alignment, and directional persistence. Plateaus and groove floors presented distinct cues which promoted differential motility and variable interaction with the topographical features. SC on the plateau surfaces tended to have persistent interactions with the edge topography, while SC on the groove floors tended to have infrequent contact with the corners and walls. Our observations suggest the capacity of SC to be guided without continuous contact with a topographical cue. SC exhibited a range of distinct motile morphologies, characterized by their symmetry and number of extensions. Across all conditions, SC with a single extension traveled significantly faster than cells with more or no extensions. We conclude that SC motility is complex, where persistent motion requires cellular asymmetry, and that anisotropic topography with cellular scale features can direct SC motility. PMID:21949703

  15. L1CAM stimulates glioma cell motility and proliferation through the fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Vishnu; Temburni, Murali K; Kappes, John C; Galileo, Deni S

    2013-04-01

    The L1CAM cell adhesion/recognition molecule (L1, CD171) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) both are expressed by human high-grade glioma cells, but their potential actions in controlling cell behavior have not been linked. L1 actions in cancer cells have been attributed mainly to integrin receptors, and we demonstrated previously that L1-stimulated glioma cell migration correlates with integrin expression, increased focal adhesion kinase activation and focal complex turnover. Our analyses of datasets revealed FGFR is overexpressed in glioma regardless of grade, while ADAM10 metalloprotease expression increases with glioma grade. Here, we used dominant-negative and short hairpin RNA approaches to inhibit the activation of FGFR1 and expression of L1, respectively. An L1 peptide that inhibits L1-FGFR interaction and PD173074, a chemical inhibitor of FGFR1 activity, also were used to elucidate the involvement of L1-FGFR interactions on glioma cell behavior. Time-lapse cell motility studies and flow cytometry cell cycle analyses showed that L1 operates to increase glioma cell motility and proliferation through FGFR activation. Shutdown of both L1 expression and FGFR activity in glioma cells resulted in a complete termination of cell migration in vitro. These studies show for the first time that soluble L1 ectodomain (L1LE) acts on glioma cells through FGFRs, and that FGFRs are used by glioma cells for increasing motility as well as proliferation in response to activation by L1LE ligand. Thus, effective treatment of high-grade glioma may require simultaneous targeting of L1, FGFRs, and integrin receptors, which would reduce glioma cell motility as well as proliferation.

  16. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action.

  17. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  18. Gastric electrical stimulation optimized to inhibit gastric motility reduces food intake in dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, Geng-Qing; Zhu, Hongbing; Lei, Yong; Yuan, Charlene; Starkebaum, Warren; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande D Z

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that that a method of gastric electrical stimulation (GES) optimized to inhibit gastric motility was effective in reducing food intake in dogs. Female dogs with a gastric cannula and gastric serosal electrodes were studied in three experiments: (1) to determine the best parameters and locations of GES in inhibiting gastric tone, slow waves, and contractions in dogs;( 2) to investigate the reproducibility of the inhibitory effects of GES; and (3) to study the effect of the GES method on food intake in dogs. (1) For GES to exert significant effects on gastric motility, a pulse width of ≥2 ms was required, and with other appropriate inhibitory parameters, GES was able to increase gastric volume by 190.4 %, reduce antral contractions by 39.7 %, and decrease the percentage of normal slow waves by 47.6 %. In addition, the inhibitory effect of GES was more potent with the stimulation electrodes placed along the lesser or greater curvature than placed in the middle, and more potent with the electrodes placed in the distal stomach than in the proximal stomach; (2) the inhibitory effects of GES on gastric motility were reproducible; (3) the GES method optimized to inhibit gastric motility produced a 20 % reduction in food intakes in non-obese dogs. GES with appropriate parameters inhibits gastric motility, and the effects are reproducible. The GES method optimized to inhibit gastric motility reduces food intake in healthy dogs and may have a therapeutic potential for treating obesity.

  19. Roles of ion transport in control of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christian; Ludwig, Florian T; Hanley, Peter J; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Cell motility is an essential feature of life. It is essential for reproduction, propagation, embryonic development, and healing processes such as wound closure and a successful immune defense. If out of control, cell motility can become life-threatening as, for example, in metastasis or autoimmune diseases. Regardless of whether ciliary/flagellar or amoeboid movement, controlled motility always requires a concerted action of ion channels and transporters, cytoskeletal elements, and signaling cascades. Ion transport across the plasma membrane contributes to cell motility by affecting the membrane potential and voltage-sensitive ion channels, by inducing local volume changes with the help of aquaporins and by modulating cytosolic Ca(2+) and H(+) concentrations. Voltage-sensitive ion channels serve as voltage detectors in electric fields thus enabling galvanotaxis; local swelling facilitates the outgrowth of protrusions at the leading edge while local shrinkage accompanies the retraction of the cell rear; the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration exerts its main effect on cytoskeletal dynamics via motor proteins such as myosin or dynein; and both, the intracellular and the extracellular H(+) concentration modulate cell migration and adhesion by tuning the activity of enzymes and signaling molecules in the cytosol as well as the activation state of adhesion molecules at the cell surface. In addition to the actual process of ion transport, both, channels and transporters contribute to cell migration by being part of focal adhesion complexes and/or physically interacting with components of the cytoskeleton. The present article provides an overview of how the numerous ion-transport mechanisms contribute to the various modes of cell motility.

  20. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramasinghe, Caroline M; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Williamson, Daniel; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Shipley, Janet; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H

    2013-01-01

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  1. SUSCEPTIBILITY AND PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS OF MOTILE AND NON MOTILE CELLS OF HAEMATOCOCCUS PLUVIALIS (CHLOROPHYCEAE) TO PHOTOOXIDATIVE STRESS(1).

    PubMed

    Han, Danxiang; Wang, Junfeng; Sommerfeld, Milton; Hu, Qiang

    2012-06-01

    The life cycle of the unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis consists of motile and nonmotile stages under typical growing conditions. In this study, we observed that motile cells were more susceptible than nonmotile cells to high light, resulting in a decrease in population density and photo-bleaching. Using two Haematococcus strains, CCAP 34/12 (a motile cell dominated strain) and SAG 34/1b (a nonmotile cell dominated strain), as model systems we investigated the cause of cell death and the protective mechanisms of the cells that survived high light. The death of motile cells under high light was attributed to the generation of excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), which caused severe damage to the photosynthetic components and the membrane system. Motile cells were able to dissipate excess light energy by nonphotochemical quenching and to relax ROS production by a partially up-regulated scavenging enzyme system. However, these strategies were not sufficient to protect the motile cells from high light stress. In contrast, nonmotile cells were able to cope with and survive under high light by (i) relaxing the over-reduced photosynthetic electron transport chain (PETC), thereby effectively utilizing PETC-generated NADPH to produce storage starch, neutral lipid, and astaxanthin, and thus preventing formation of excess ROS; (ii) down-regulating the linear electron transport by decreasing the level of cytochrome f; and (iii) consuming excess electrons produced by PSII via a significantly enhanced plastid terminal oxidase pathway.

  2. Inhibition of reticulo-ruminal motility by volatile fatty acids and lactic acid in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, P C

    1987-01-01

    1. A study was made of the influence on reticulo-ruminal motility, recorded by electromyography, of ruminal infusions of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and lactic acid in twenty-four sheep maintained by intragastric infusion of a complete liquid diet, in three sheep fed grass pellets, and in nine chronically vagotomized sheep; abomasal and duodenal infusions of VFA and lactic acid were tested in five sheep fed grass pellets. 2. Ruminal infusions of VFAs and lactic acid progressively inhibited the amplitude of the reticulo-ruminal contractions. In many experiments there was no effect on contraction frequency until the cessation of all reticulo-ruminal contractions at which point the maximal concentration of VFA recorded in the abomasum was 28 mM, and that of lactic acid was 20 mM. 3. The concentrations of undissociated VFAs causing cessation of reticulo-ruminal contractions in the vagus-intact sheep were very similar to the concentrations causing abolition of the organized intrinsic motility of the chronically vagotomized sheep. 4. The inhibition of reticulo-ruminal motility with ruminal infusions of mixtures of VFAs and of lactic acid together with VFAs could largely be explained by the sum of the effects of the individual acids present. 5. Abomasal infusion of VFA or lactic acid inhibited the amplitude of ruminal, especially primary ruminal, contractions at concentrations of undissociated acid of 60 mM and above and increased the frequency of reticulum and primary ruminal contractions at about 80 mM. 6. Duodenal infusion of VFAs and lactic acid (100 mM, 5 ml/min) strongly inhibited abomasal motility without affecting reticulo-ruminal motility, and at a higher rate (100 mM, 10 ml/min) abolished motility and inhibited both the amplitude and frequency of reticulo-ruminal contractions. 7. It is concluded that the initial inhibition of reticulo-ruminal motility in ruminal acidosis is unlikely to involve any significant influence from duodenal, or abomasal receptors. The

  3. Effect of Boswellia serrata on intestinal motility in rodents: inhibition of diarrhoea without constipation

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Francesca; Capasso, Francesco; Capasso, Raffaele; Ascione, Valeria; Aviello, Gabriella; Longo, Rocco; Izzo, Angelo A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that the Ayurvedic plant Boswellia serrata may be effective in reducing diarrhoea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) on intestinal motility and diarrhoea in rodents. BSE depressed electrically-, acetylcholine-, and barium chloride-induced contractions in the isolated guinea-pig ileum, being more potent in inhibiting the contractions induced by acetylcholine and barium chloride. The inhibitory effect of BSE on acetylcholine-induced contractions was reduced by the L-type Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine, but not by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid, by the phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitor rolipram or by the lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid, one of the main active ingredients of B. serrata, inhibited acetylcholine-induced contractions. BSE inhibited upper gastrointestinal transit in croton oil-treated mice as well as castor oil-induced diarrhoea. However, BSE did not affect intestinal motility in control mice, both in the small and in the large intestine. It is concluded that BSE directly inhibits intestinal motility with a mechanism involving L-type Ca2+ channels. BSE prevents diarrhoea and normalizes intestinal motility in pathophysiological states without slowing the rate of transit in control animals. These results could explain, at least in part, the clinical efficacy of this Ayurvedic remedy in reducing diarrhoea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16633355

  4. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    PubMed

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Rab coupling protein mediated endosomal recycling of N-cadherin influences cell motility.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2016-07-09

    Rab coupling protein (RCP) is a Rab GTPase effector that functions in endosomal recycling. The RCP gene is frequently amplified in breast cancer, leading to increased cancer aggressiveness. Furthermore, RCP enhances the motility of ovarian cancer cells by coordinating the recycling of α5β1 integrin and EGF receptor to the leading edge of migrating cells. Here we report that RCP also influences the motility of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Knockdown of RCP inhibits the motility of A549 cells in 2D and 3D migration assays, while its overexpression enhances migration in these assays. Depletion of RCP leads to a reduction in N-cadherin protein levels, which could be restored with lysosomal inhibitors. Trafficking assays revealed that RCP knockdown inhibits the return of endocytosed N-cadherin to the cell surface. We propose that RCP regulates the endosomal recycling of N-cadherin, and in its absence N-cadherin is diverted to the degradative pathway. The increased aggressiveness of tumour cells that overexpress RCP may be due to biased recycling of N-cadherin in metastatic cancer cells.

  6. Chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and diisopropylfluorophosphate inhibit kinesin-dependent microtubule motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, Debra A. . E-mail: dgearhar@mcg.edu; Sickles, Dale W.; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Prendergast, Mark A.; Terry, Alvin V.

    2007-01-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate, originally developed as a chemical warfare agent, is structurally similar to nerve agents, and chlorpyrifos has extensive worldwide use as an agricultural pesticide. While inhibition of cholinesterases underlies the acute toxicity of these organophosphates, we previously reported impaired axonal transport in the sciatic nerves from rats treated chronically with subthreshold doses of chlorpyrifos. Those data indicate that chlorpyrifos (and/or its active metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon) might directly affect the function of kinesin and/or microtubules-the principal proteins that mediate anterograde axonal transport. The current report describes in vitro assays to assess the concentration-dependent effects of chlorpyrifos (0-10 {mu}M), chlorpyrifos-oxon (0-10 {mu}M), and diisopropylfluorophosphate (0-0.59 nM) on kinesin-dependent microtubule motility. Preincubating bovine brain microtubules with the organophosphates did not alter kinesin-mediated microtubule motility. In contrast, preincubation of bovine brain kinesin with diisopropylfluorophosphate, chlorpyrifos, or chlorpyrifos-oxon produced a concentration-dependent increase in the number of locomoting microtubules that detached from the kinesin-coated glass cover slip. Our data suggest that the organophosphates-chlorpyrifos-oxon, chlorpyrifos, and diisopropylfluorophosphate-directly affect kinesin, thereby disrupting kinesin-dependent transport on microtubules. Kinesin-dependent movement of vesicles, organelles, and other cellular components along microtubules is fundamental to the organization of all eukaryotic cells, especially in neurons where organelles and proteins synthesized in the cell body must move down long axons to pre-synaptic sites in nerve terminals. We postulate that disruption of kinesin-dependent intracellular transport could account for some of the long-term effects of organophosphates on the peripheral and central nervous system.

  7. Differential effects on cell motility, embryonic stem cell self-renewal and senescence by diverse Src kinase family inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tamm, Christoffer Galito, Sara Pijuan Anneren, Cecilia

    2012-02-15

    The Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (SFKs) has been shown to play an intricate role in embryonic stem (ES) cell maintenance. In the present study we have focused on the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the vastly different effects induced by various commonly used SFK inhibitors. We show that several diverse cell types, including fibroblasts completely lacking SFKs, cannot undergo mitosis in response to SU6656 and that this is caused by an unselective inhibition of Aurora kinases. In contrast, PP2 and PD173952 block motility immediately upon exposure and forces cells to grow in dense colonies. The subsequent halt in proliferation of fibroblast and epithelial cells in the center of the colonies approximately 24 h post-treatment appears to be caused by cell-to-cell contact inhibition rather than a direct effect of SFK kinase inhibition. Interestingly, in addition to generating more homogenous and dense ES cell cultures, without any diverse effect on proliferation, PP2 and PD173652 also promote ES cell self-renewal by reducing the small amount of spontaneous differentiation typically observed under standard ES cell culture conditions. These effects could not be mirrored by the use of Gleevec, a potent inhibitor of c-Abl and PDGFR kinases that are also inhibited by PP2. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor SU6656 induces senescence in mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SU6656 inhibits mitosis in a SFK-independent manner via cross-selectivity for Aurora kinases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitor PP2 impairs cell motility in various cell lines, including mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ensuing impeded motility, PP2 inhibits proliferation of various cells lines except for mouse ES cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SFK inhibitors PP2 and PD173952 impede spontaneous differentiation in standard mouse ES culture maintenance.

  8. Hyperswarming adaptations in a bacterium improve collective motility without enhancing single cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Deforet, Maxime; van Ditmarsch, Dave; Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Xavier, Joao B.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a monoflagellated bacterium that can use its single polar flagellum to swim through liquids and move collectively over semisolid surfaces, a behavior called swarming. Previous studies have shown that experimental evolution in swarming colonies leads to the selection of hyperswarming bacteria with multiple flagella. Here we show that the advantage of such hyperswarmer mutants cannot be explained simply by an increase in the raw swimming speed of individual bacteria in liquids. Cell tracking of time-lapse microscopy to quantify single-cell swimming patterns reveals that both wild-type and hyperswarmers alternate between forward and backward runs, rather than doing the run-and-tumble characteristic of enteric bacteria such as E. coli. High-throughput measurement of swimming speeds reveals that hyperswarmers do not swim faster than wild-type in liquid. Wild-type reverses swimming direction in sharp turns without a significant impact on its speed, whereas multiflagellated hyperswarmers tend to alternate fast and slow runs and have wider turning angles. Nonetheless, macroscopic measurement of swimming and swarming speed in colonies shows that hyperswarmers expand faster than wild-type on surfaces and through soft agar matrices. A mathematical model explains how wider turning angles lead to faster spreading when swimming through agar. Our study describes for the first time the swimming patterns in multiflagellated P. aeruginosa mutants and reveals that collective and individual motility in bacteria are not necessarily correlated. Understanding bacterial adaptations to surface motility, such as hyperswarming, requires a collective behavior approach. PMID:24622509

  9. Cell Motility Resulting form Spontaneous Polymerization Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Karsten

    2014-03-01

    The crawling of living cells on solid substrates is often driven by the actin cytoskeleton, a network of structurally polar filamentous proteins that is intrinsically driven by the hydrolysis of ATP. How cells organize their actin network during crawling is still poorly understood. A possible general mechanism underlying actin organization has been offered by the observation of spontaneous actin polymerization waves in various different cell types. We use a theoretical approach to investigate the possible role of spontaneous actin waves on cell crawling. To this end, we develop a meanfield framework for studying spatiotemporal aspects of actin assembly dynamics, which helped to identify possible origins of self-organized actin waves. The impact of these waves on cell crawling is then investigated by using a phase-field approach to confine the actin network to a cellular domain. We find that spontaneous actin waves can lead to directional or amoeboidal crawling. In the latter case, the cell performs a random walk. Within our deterministic framework, this behavior is due to complex spiral waves inside the cell. Finally, we compare the seemingly random motion of our model cells to the dynamics of cells of the human immune system. These cells patrol the body in search for infected cells and we discuss possible implications of our theory for the search process' efficiency. Work was funded by the DFG through KR3430/1, GK1276, and SFB 1027.

  10. A lactose fermentation product produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, acetate, inhibits the motility of flagellated pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Morimoto, Yusuke V; Kudo, Seishi

    2015-04-01

    Many strains of lactic acid bacteria have been used for the production of probiotics. Some metabolites produced by lactic acid bacteria impair the motilities of pathogenic bacteria. Because bacterial motility is strongly associated with virulence, the metabolic activities of lactic acid bacteria are effective for suppressing bacterial infections. Here we show that lactose fermentation by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis inhibits the motility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. A single-cell tracking and rotation assay for a single flagellum showed that the swimming behaviour of Salmonella was severely but transiently impaired through disruption of flagellar rotation on exposure to media cultivated with Lac. lactis. Using a pH-sensitive fluorescent protein, we observed that the intracellular pH of Salmonella was decreased because of some fermentation products of Lac. lactis. We identified acetate as the lactose fermentation product of Lac. lactis triggering the paralysis of Salmonella flagella. The motilities of Pseudomonas, Vibrio and Leptospira strains were also severely disrupted by lactose utilization by Lac. lactis. These results highlight the potential use of Lac. lactis for preventing infections by multiple bacterial species.

  11. Memo mediates ErbB2-driven cell motility.

    PubMed

    Marone, Romina; Hess, Daniel; Dankort, David; Muller, William J; Hynes, Nancy E; Badache, Ali

    2004-06-01

    Clinical studies have revealed that cancer patients whose tumours have increased ErbB2 expression tend to have more aggressive, metastatic disease, which is associated with parameters predicting a poor outcome. The molecular basis underlying ErbB2-dependent cell motility and metastases formation, however, still remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that activation of a set of signalling molecules, including MAPK, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) and Src, is required for Neu/ErbB2-dependent lamellipodia formation and for motility of breast carcinoma cells. Stimulation of these molecules, however, failed to induce efficient cell migration in the absence of Neu/ErbB2 phosphorylation at Tyr 1201 or Tyr 1227. We describe a novel molecule, Memo (mediator of ErbB2-driven cell motility), that interacts with a phospho-Tyr 1227-containing peptide, most probably through the Shc adaptor protein. After Neu/ErbB2 activation, Memo-defective cells form actin fibres and grow lamellipodia, but fail to extend microtubules towards the cell cortex. Our data suggest that Memo controls cell migration by relaying extracellular chemotactic signals to the microtubule cytoskeleton.

  12. The shed ectodomain of Nr-CAM stimulates cell proliferation and motility, and confers cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Kaplan, Anna; Raveh, Shani; Gavert, Nancy; Sakurai, Takeshi; Ben-Ze'ev, Avri

    2005-12-15

    Nr-CAM, a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule family, known for its function in neuronal outgrowth and guidance, was recently identified as a target gene of beta-catenin signaling in human melanoma and colon carcinoma cells and tissue. Retrovirally mediated transduction of Nr-CAM into fibroblasts induces cell motility and tumorigenesis. We investigated the mechanisms by which Nr-CAM can confer properties related to tumor cell behavior and found that Nr-CAM expression in NIH3T3 cells protects cells from apoptosis in the absence of serum by constitutively activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT signaling pathways. We detected a metalloprotease-mediated shedding of Nr-CAM into the culture medium of cells transfected with Nr-CAM, and of endogenous Nr-CAM in B16 melanoma cells. Conditioned medium and purified Nr-CAM-Fc fusion protein both enhanced cell motility, proliferation, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AKT activation. Moreover, Nr-CAM was found in complex with alpha4beta1 integrins in melanoma cells, indicating that it can mediate, in addition to homophilic cell-cell adhesion, heterophilic adhesion with extracellular matrix receptors. Suppression of Nr-CAM levels by small interfering RNA in B16 melanoma inhibited the adhesive and tumorigenic capacities of these cells. Stable expression of the Nr-CAM ectodomain in NIH3T3 cells conferred cell transformation and tumorigenesis in mice, suggesting that the metalloprotease-mediated shedding of Nr-CAM is a principal route for promoting oncogenesis by Nr-CAM.

  13. Involvement of rho p21 and its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (rho GDI) in cell motility.

    PubMed Central

    Takaishi, K; Kikuchi, A; Kuroda, S; Kotani, K; Sasaki, T; Takai, Y

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that rho p21, a ras p21-related small GTP-binding protein (G protein), regulates the actomyosin system. The actomyosin system is known to be essential for cell motility. In the present study, we examined the action of rho p21, its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (named rho GDI), its stimulatory GDP/GTP exchange protein (named smg GDS), and Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function, in cell motility (chemokinesis) of Swiss 3T3 cells. We quantitated the capacity of cell motility by measuring cell tracks by phagokinesis. Microinjection of the GTP gamma S-bound active form of rhoA p21 or smg GDS into Swiss 3T3 cells did not affect cell motility, but microinjection of rho GDI into the cells did inhibit cell motility. This rho GDI action was prevented by comicroinjection of rho GDI with the GTP gamma S-bound form of rhoA p21 but not with the same form of rhoA p21 lacking the C-terminal three amino acids which was not posttranslationally modified with lipids. The rho GDI action was not prevented by Ki-rasVal-12 p21 or any of the GTP gamma S-bound form of other small GTP-binding proteins including rac1 p21, G25K, and smg p21B. Among these small G proteins, rhoA p21, rac1 p21, and G25K are known to be substrates for rho GDI. The rho GDI action was not prevented by comicroinjection of rho GDI with smg GDS. Microinjection of C3 into Swiss 3T3 cells also inhibited cell motility. These results indicate that the rho GDI-rho p21 system regulates cell motility, presumably through the actomyosin system. Images PMID:8417362

  14. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the “molecular clutch” description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of Major Sperm Protein (MSP), which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton. PMID:25383039

  15. Extending the molecular clutch beyond actin-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havrylenko, Svitlana; Mezanges, Xavier; Batchelder, Ellen; Plastino, Julie

    2014-10-01

    Many cell movements occur via polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton beneath the plasma membrane at the front of the cell, forming a protrusion called a lamellipodium, while myosin contraction squeezes forward the back of the cell. In what is known as the ‘molecular clutch’ description of cell motility, forward movement results from the engagement of the acto-myosin motor with cell-matrix adhesions, thus transmitting force to the substrate and producing movement. However during cell translocation, clutch engagement is not perfect, and as a result, the cytoskeleton slips with respect to the substrate, undergoing backward (retrograde) flow in the direction of the cell body. Retrograde flow is therefore inversely proportional to cell speed and depends on adhesion and acto-myosin dynamics. Here we asked whether the molecular clutch was a general mechanism by measuring motility and retrograde flow for the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell in different adhesive conditions. These cells move by adhering to the substrate and emitting a dynamic lamellipodium, but the sperm cell does not contain an acto-myosin cytoskeleton. Instead the lamellipodium is formed by the assembly of major sperm protein, which has no biochemical or structural similarity to actin. We find that these cells display the same molecular clutch characteristics as acto-myosin containing cells. We further show that retrograde flow is produced both by cytoskeletal assembly and contractility in these cells. Overall this study shows that the molecular clutch hypothesis of how polymerization is transduced into motility via adhesions is a general description of cell movement regardless of the composition of the cytoskeleton.

  16. Wild-type p53 controls cell motility and invasion by dual regulation of MET expression

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Matoso, Andres; Corney, David C.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Körner, Stefanie; Wang, Wei; Boccaccio, Carla; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Hermeking, Heiko; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that p53 mutations are responsible not only for growth of primary tumors but also for their dissemination. However, mechanisms involved in p53-mediated control of cell motility and invasion remain poorly understood. By using the primary ovarian surface epithelium cell culture, we show that conditional inactivation of p53 or expression of its mutant forms results in overexpression of MET receptor tyrosine kinase, a crucial regulator of invasive growth. At the same time, cells acquire increased MET-dependent motility and invasion. Wild-type p53 negatively regulates MET expression by two mechanisms: (i) transactivation of MET-targeting miR-34, and (ii) inhibition of SP1 binding to MET promoter. Both mechanisms are not functional in p53 absence, but mutant p53 proteins retain partial MET promoter suppression. Accordingly, MET overexpression, cell motility, and invasion are particularly high in p53-null cells. These results identify MET as a critical effector of p53 and suggest that inhibition of MET may be an effective antimetastatic approach to treat cancers with p53 mutations. These results also show that the extent of advanced cancer traits, such as invasion, may be determined by alterations in individual components of p53/MET regulatory network. PMID:21831840

  17. Where to Go: Breaking the Symmetry in Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration in the “correct” direction is pivotal for many biological processes. Although most work is devoted to its molecular mechanisms, the cell’s preference for one direction over others, thus overcoming intrinsic random motility, epitomizes a profound principle that underlies all complex systems: the choice of one axis, in structure or motion, from a uniform or symmetric set of options. Explaining directional motility by an external chemo-attractant gradient does not solve but only shifts the problem of causation: whence the gradient? A new study in PLOS Biology shows cell migration in a self-generated gradient, offering an opportunity to take a broader look at the old dualism of extrinsic instruction versus intrinsic symmetry-breaking in cell biology. PMID:27196433

  18. Diversification of caldesmon-linked actin cytoskeleton in cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Mayanagi, Taira

    2011-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton plays a key role in regulating cell motility. Caldesmon (CaD) is an actin-linked regulatory protein found in smooth muscle and non-muscle cells that is conserved among a variety of vertebrates. It binds and stabilizes actin filaments, as well as regulating actin-myosin interaction in a calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM)- and/or phosphorylation-dependent manner. CaD function is regulated qualitatively by Ca2+/CaM and by its phosphorylation state and quantitatively at the mRNA level, by three different transcriptional regulation of the CALD1 gene. CaD has numerous functions in cell motility, such as migration, invasion and proliferation, exerted via the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Here we will outline recent findings regarding CaD's structural features and functions. PMID:21350330

  19. An increase or a decrease in myosin II phosphorylation inhibits macrophage motility

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Myosin II purified from mammalian non-muscle cells is phosphorylated on the 20-kD light chain subunit (MLC20) by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). The importance of MLC20 phosphorylation in regulating cell motility was investigated by introducing either antibodies to MLCK (MK-Ab) or a Ca2+/calmodulin- independent, constitutively active form of MLCK (MK-) into macrophages. The effects of these proteins on cell motility were then determined using a quantitative chemotaxis assay. Chemotaxis is significantly diminished in macrophages containing MK-Ab compared to macrophages containing control antibodies. Moreover, there is an inverse relationship between the number of cells that migrate and the amount of MK-Ab introduced into cells. Interestingly, there is also an inverse relationship between the number of cells that migrate and the amount of MK- introduced into cells. Other experiments demonstrated that MK-Ab decreased intracellular MLC20 phosphorylation while MK- increased MLC20 phosphorylation. MK- also increased the amount of myosin associated with the cytoskeleton. These data demonstrate that the regulation of MLCK is an important aspect of cell motility and suggest that MLC20 phosphorylation must be maintained within narrow limits during translational motility by mammalian cells. PMID:2071674

  20. Fifty ways to inhibit motility via cyclic di-GMP: the emerging Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming story.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Linda L; Gomelsky, Mark

    2015-02-01

    There are numerous ways by which cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) inhibits motility. Kuchma et al. (S. L. Kuchma, N. J. Delalez, L. M. Filkins, E. A. Snavely, J. P. Armitage, and G. A. O'Toole, J. Bacteriol. 197:420-430, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02130-14) offer a new, previously unseen way of swarming motility inhibition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. This bacterium possesses a single flagellum with one rotor and two sets of stators, only one of which can provide torque for swarming. The researchers discovered that elevated levels of c-di-GMP inhibit swarming by skewing stator selection in favor of the nonfunctional, "bad" stators. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Different effects of G-protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) and GPR40 on cell motile activity of highly migratory osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kaede; Fukushima, Kaori; Onishi, Yuka; Node, Yusuke; Inui, Karin; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2017-03-11

    G-protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) and GPR40 are members of free fatty acid (FFA) receptors and mediate a variety of biological responses through binding of medium- and long-chain FFAs. Recently, it has been reported that GPR120 and GPR40 regulated cellular functions of cancer cells. In the present study, to assess whether GPR120 and GPR40 are involved in the enhancement of cell motile activity of osteosarcoma cells, we established highly migratory (MG63-R7) cells from osteosarcoma MG-63 cells. The expression level of GPR120 gene was significantly higher in MG63-R7 cells than in MG-63 cells, while no change of GPR40 expression was observed. In cell motility assay, the cell motile activity of MG63-R7 cells was approximately 200 times higher than that of MG-63 cells. The cell motile activity of MG63-R7 cells was stimulated by GW9508, which is an agonist of GPR120 and GPR40. Moreover, a GPR40 antagonist GW1100 elevated the cell motile activity of MG63-R7 cells in the presence of GW9508. To confirm the effects of GPR120 and GPR40 on the cell motile activity of MG63-R7 cells, GPR120 knockdown cells were generated from MG63-R7 cells. The cell motile activity of MG63-R7 cells was markedly suppressed by GPR120 knockdown. These results indicated that GPR120 enhanced and GPR40 inhibited the cell motile activity of highly migratory osteosarcoma cells.

  2. Prediction of traction forces of motile cells

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Clément; Laurent, Valérie M.; Michel, Richard; Peschetola, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    When crawling on a flat substrate, living cells exert forces on it via adhesive contacts, enabling them to build up tension within their cytoskeleton and to change shape. The measurement of these forces has been made possible by traction force microscopy (TFM), a technique which has allowed us to obtain time-resolved traction force maps during cell migration. This cell ‘footprint’ is, however, not sufficient to understand the details of the mechanics of migration, that is how cytoskeletal elements (respectively, adhesion complexes) are put under tension and reinforce or deform (respectively, mature and/or unbind) as a result. In a recent paper, we have validated a rheological model of actomyosin linking tension, deformation and myosin activity. Here, we complement this model with tentative models of the mechanics of adhesion and explore how closely these models can predict the traction forces that we recover from experimental measurements during cell migration. The resulting mathematical problem is a PDE set on the experimentally observed domain, which we solve using a finite-element approach. The four parameters of the model can then be adjusted by comparison with experimental results on a single frame of an experiment, and then used to test the predictive power of the model for following frames and other experiments. It is found that the basic pattern of traction forces is robustly predicted by the model and fixed parameters as a function of current geometry only. PMID:27708765

  3. miR-155 regulates HGAL expression and increases lymphoma cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Liat Nadav; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Bhatt, Shruti; Cubedo, Elena; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    HGAL, a prognostic biomarker in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classic Hodgkin lymphoma, inhibits lymphocyte and lymphoma cell motility by activating the RhoA signaling cascade and interacting with actin and myosin proteins. Although HGAL expression is limited to germinal center (GC) lymphocytes and GC-derived lymphomas, little is known about its regulation. miR-155 is implicated in control of GC reaction and lymphomagenesis. We demonstrate that miR-155 directly down-regulates HGAL expression by binding to its 3′-untranslated region, leading to decreased RhoA activation and increased spontaneous and chemoattractant-induced lymphoma cell motility. The effects of miR-155 on RhoA activation and cell motility can be rescued by transfection of HGAL lacking the miR-155 binding site. This inhibitory effect of miR-155 suggests that it may have a key role in the loss of HGAL expression on differentiation of human GC B cells to plasma cell. Furthermore, this effect may contribute to lymphoma cell dissemination and aggressiveness, characteristic of activated B cell–like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma typically expressing high levels of miR-155 and lacking HGAL expression. PMID:22096245

  4. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis. PMID:27909339

  5. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Paul, Colin D; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis.

  6. Biochemistry of actomyosin-dependent cell motility (a review).

    PubMed Central

    Korn, E D

    1978-01-01

    Actins and myosins similar to the major proteins of muscle are the major molecular components of intricate mechanochemical systems that perform numerous vital motility and structural functions in all eukaryotic cells. In this article, after a brief summary of the morphological distribution and ultrastructure of actin, myosin, and interrelated proteins of nonmuscle cells, our present knowledge of their biochemistry is critically appraised from the perspective that understanding complex cellular processes depends ultimately on the identification, purification, and biochemical characterization of the proteins involved. Although few conclusions are reached, possible molecular mechanisms for cellular regulation of actin polymerization, filament association, actomyosin ATPase activity, and mechanochemical coupling are discussed and a number of potentially fruitful directions for further research are suggested. These include comparative biochemical investigations and the study of the interaction of heterologous proteins, but particular emphasis is given to the need for quantitative studies at the molecular level of motility proteins purified from a single cellular source. PMID:147464

  7. The influence of electric field and confinement on cell motility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Samorajski, Justin; Kreimer, Rachel; Searson, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense and respond to endogenous electric fields is important in processes such as wound healing, development, and nerve regeneration. In cell culture, many epithelial and endothelial cell types respond to an electric field of magnitude similar to endogenous electric fields by moving preferentially either parallel or antiparallel to the field vector, a process known as galvanotaxis. Here we report on the influence of dc electric field and confinement on the motility of fibroblast cells using a chip-based platform. From analysis of cell paths we show that the influence of electric field on motility is much more complex than simply imposing a directional bias towards the cathode or anode. The cell velocity, directedness, as well as the parallel and perpendicular components of the segments along the cell path are dependent on the magnitude of the electric field. Forces in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the electric field are in competition with one another in a voltage-dependent manner, which ultimately govern the trajectories of the cells in the presence of an electric field. To further investigate the effects of cell reorientation in the presence of a field, cells are confined within microchannels to physically prohibit the alignment seen in 2D environment. Interestingly, we found that confinement results in an increase in cell velocity both in the absence and presence of an electric field compared to migration in 2D.

  8. The Influence of Electric Field and Confinement on Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Samorajski, Justin; Kreimer, Rachel; Searson, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of cells to sense and respond to endogenous electric fields is important in processes such as wound healing, development, and nerve regeneration. In cell culture, many epithelial and endothelial cell types respond to an electric field of magnitude similar to endogenous electric fields by moving preferentially either parallel or antiparallel to the field vector, a process known as galvanotaxis. Here we report on the influence of dc electric field and confinement on the motility of fibroblast cells using a chip-based platform. From analysis of cell paths we show that the influence of electric field on motility is much more complex than simply imposing a directional bias towards the cathode or anode. The cell velocity, directedness, as well as the parallel and perpendicular components of the segments along the cell path are dependent on the magnitude of the electric field. Forces in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the electric field are in competition with one another in a voltage-dependent manner, which ultimately govern the trajectories of the cells in the presence of an electric field. To further investigate the effects of cell reorientation in the presence of a field, cells are confined within microchannels to physically prohibit the alignment seen in 2D environment. Interestingly, we found that confinement results in an increase in cell velocity both in the absence and presence of an electric field compared to migration in 2D. PMID:23555674

  9. Automated real-time measurement of chemotactic cell motility.

    PubMed

    Hadjout, N; Laevsky, G; Knecht, D A; Lynes, M A

    2001-11-01

    We have developed a novel method, (ECIS/taxis), for monitoring cell movement in response to chemotactic and chemokinetic factors. In this system, cells migrate in an under-agarose environment, and their positions are monitored using the electric cell-substrate impedance sensor technology to measure the impedance change at a target electrode, that is lithographed onto the substrate, as the cells arrive at the target. In the studies reported here, Dictyostelium discoideum was used as a prototypical, motile eukaryotic cell. Using the ECIS/taxis system, the arrival of cells at the target electrode was proportional to the dose offolate used to stimulate the cells and could be assessed by changes in resistance at the electrode. ECIS/taxis was readily able to distinguish between wild-type cells and a mutant that is deficient in its chemotactic response. Finally, we have shown that an agent that interferes with chemotactic motility leads to the delayed arrival of cells at the target electrode. The multi-well assay configuration allows for simultaneous automated screening of many samples for chemotactic or anti-chemotactic activity. This assay system is compatible with measurements of mammalian cell movement and should be valuable in the assessment of both agonists and antagonists of cell movement.

  10. Oncofetal Chondroitin Sulfate Glycosaminoglycans are Key Players in Integrin Signaling and Tumor Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Thomas Mandel; Pereira, Marina Ayres; Al Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Lee, Sherry; Ørum-Madsen, Maj Sofie; Christensen, Anders Riis; El-Naggar, Amal; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Grem, Jean L.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Holst, Peter J.; Theander, Thor; Sorensen, Poul H.; Daugaard, Mads; Salanti, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Many tumors express proteoglycans modified with oncofetal chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains (ofCS), which are normally restricted to the placenta. However, the role of ofCS in cancer is largely unknown. The function of ofCS in cancer was analyzed using the recombinant ofCS-binding VAR2CSA protein (rVAR2) derived from the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate that ofCS plays a key role in tumor cell motility by affecting canonical integrin signaling pathways. Binding of rVAR2 to tumor cells inhibited the interaction of cells with extracellular matrix (ECM) components, which correlated with decreased phosphorylation of Src kinase. Moreover, rVAR2 binding decreased migration, invasion and anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells in vitro. Mass spectrometry of ofCS-modified proteoglycan complexes affinity purified from tumor cell lines on rVAR2 columns, revealed an overrepresentation of proteins involved in cell motility and integrin signaling, such as integrin β1 (ITGB1) and integrin α4 (ITGA4). Saturating concentrations of rVAR2 inhibited downstream integrin signaling, which was mimicked by knockdown of the core CS synthesis enzymes Beta-1,3-Glucuronyltransferase 1 (B3GAT1) and Chondroitin Sulfate N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 (CSGALNACT1). The ofCS modification was highly expressed in both human and murine metastatic lesions in situ and pre-incubation or early intravenous treatment of tumor cells with rVAR2 inhibited seeding and spreading of tumor cells in mice. This was associated with a significant increase in survival of the animals. These data functionally link ofCS modifications with cancer cell motility and further highlights ofCS as a novel therapeutic cancer target. Implications The cancer specific expression of oncofetal chondroitin sulfate aids in metastatic phenotypes and is a candidate target for therapy. PMID:27655130

  11. Thrombospondin-1 Modulates Actin Filament Remodeling and Cell Motility in Mouse Mammary Tumor cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ndishabandi, Dorothy; Duquette, Cameron; Billah, Ghita El-Moatassim; Reyes, Millys; Duquette, Mark; Lawler, Jack; Kazerounian, Shideh

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the secretion of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) by activated stromal cells and its accumulation in the tumor microenvironment during dysplasia inhibits primary tumor growth through inhibition of angiogenesis. This inhibitory function of TSP-1 is actuated either by inhibiting MMP9 activation and the release of VEGF from extracellular matrix or by an interaction with CD36 on the surface of endothelial cells resulting in an increase in apoptosis. In contrast, several published articles have also shown that as tumor cells become more invasive and enter the early stage of carcinoma, they up-regulate TSP-1 expression, which may promote invasion and migration. In our in vivo studies using the polyoma middle T antigen (PyT) transgenic mouse model of breast cancer, we observed that the absence of TSP-1 significantly increased the growth of primary tumors, but delayed metastasis to the lungs. In this study, we propose a mechanism for the promigratory function of TSP-1 in mouse mammary tumor cells in vitro. We demonstrate the correlations between expression of TSP-1 and its receptor integrin α3β1, which is considered a promigratory protein in cancer cells. In addition we propose that binding of TSP-1 to integrin α3β1 is important for mediating actin filament polymerization and therefore, cell motility. These findings can help explain the dual functionality of TSP-1 in cancer progression.

  12. Thrombospondin-1 Modulates Actin Filament Remodeling and Cell Motility in Mouse Mammary Tumor cells in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ndishabandi, Dorothy; Duquette, Cameron; Billah, Ghita El-Moatassim; Reyes, Millys; Duquette, Mark; Lawler, Jack; Kazerounian, Shideh

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the secretion of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) by activated stromal cells and its accumulation in the tumor microenvironment during dysplasia inhibits primary tumor growth through inhibition of angiogenesis. This inhibitory function of TSP-1 is actuated either by inhibiting MMP9 activation and the release of VEGF from extracellular matrix or by an interaction with CD36 on the surface of endothelial cells resulting in an increase in apoptosis. In contrast, several published articles have also shown that as tumor cells become more invasive and enter the early stage of carcinoma, they up-regulate TSP-1 expression, which may promote invasion and migration. In our in vivo studies using the polyoma middle T antigen (PyT) transgenic mouse model of breast cancer, we observed that the absence of TSP-1 significantly increased the growth of primary tumors, but delayed metastasis to the lungs. In this study, we propose a mechanism for the promigratory function of TSP-1 in mouse mammary tumor cells in vitro. We demonstrate the correlations between expression of TSP-1 and its receptor integrin α3β1, which is considered a promigratory protein in cancer cells. In addition we propose that binding of TSP-1 to integrin α3β1 is important for mediating actin filament polymerization and therefore, cell motility. These findings can help explain the dual functionality of TSP-1 in cancer progression. PMID:26273699

  13. Membrane tension and cytoskeleton organization in cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens, Pierre; Plastino, Julie

    2015-07-01

    Cell membrane shape changes are important for many aspects of normal biological function, such as tissue development, wound healing and cell division and motility. Various disease states are associated with deregulation of how cells move and change shape, including notably tumor initiation and cancer cell metastasis. Cell motility is powered, in large part, by the controlled assembly and disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Much of this dynamic happens in close proximity to the plasma membrane due to the fact that actin assembly factors are membrane-bound, and thus actin filaments are generally oriented such that their growth occurs against or near the membrane. For a long time, the membrane was viewed as a relatively passive scaffold for signaling. However, results from the last five years show that this is not the whole picture, and that the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately linked to the mechanics of the cell membrane. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the role of plasma membrane mechanics in cell cytoskeleton dynamics and architecture, showing that the cell membrane is not just an envelope or a barrier for actin assembly, but is a master regulator controlling cytoskeleton dynamics and cell polarity.

  14. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  15. Acidosis Promotes Metastasis Formation by Enhancing Tumor Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Riemann, A; Schneider, B; Gündel, D; Stock, C; Gekle, M; Thews, O

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by hypoxia, acidosis as well as other metabolic and biochemical alterations. Its role in cancer progression is increasingly appreciated especially on invasive capacity and the formation of metastasis. The effect of acidosis on metastasis formation of two rat carcinoma cell lines was studied in the animal model. In order to analyze the pH dependency of different steps of metastasis formation, invasiveness, cell adhesion and migration of AT-1 prostate cancer cells as well as possible underlying cell signaling pathways were studied in vitro. Acidosis significantly increased the formation of lung metastases of both tumor cell lines in vivo. In vitro, extracellular acidosis neither enhanced invasiveness nor affected cell adhesion to a plastic or to an endothelial layer. However, cellular motility was markedly elevated at pH 6.6 and this effect was sustained even when extracellular pH was switched back to pH 7.4. When analyzing the underlying mechanism, a prominent role of ROS in the induction of migration was observed. Signaling through the MAP kinases ERK1/2 and p38 as well as Src family kinases was not involved. Thus, cancer cells in an acidic microenvironment can acquire enhanced motility, which is sustained even if the tumor cells leave their acidic microenvironment e.g. by entering the blood stream. This increase depended on elevated ROS production and may contribute to the augmented formation of metastases of acidosis-primed tumor cells in vivo.

  16. Membrane tension and cytoskeleton organization in cell motility.

    PubMed

    Sens, Pierre; Plastino, Julie

    2015-07-15

    Cell membrane shape changes are important for many aspects of normal biological function, such as tissue development, wound healing and cell division and motility. Various disease states are associated with deregulation of how cells move and change shape, including notably tumor initiation and cancer cell metastasis. Cell motility is powered, in large part, by the controlled assembly and disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Much of this dynamic happens in close proximity to the plasma membrane due to the fact that actin assembly factors are membrane-bound, and thus actin filaments are generally oriented such that their growth occurs against or near the membrane. For a long time, the membrane was viewed as a relatively passive scaffold for signaling. However, results from the last five years show that this is not the whole picture, and that the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately linked to the mechanics of the cell membrane. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the role of plasma membrane mechanics in cell cytoskeleton dynamics and architecture, showing that the cell membrane is not just an envelope or a barrier for actin assembly, but is a master regulator controlling cytoskeleton dynamics and cell polarity.

  17. Vimentin as a Marker of Early Differentiating, Highly Motile Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Castro-Muñozledo, Federico; Meza-Aguilar, Diana G; Domínguez-Castillo, Rocío; Hernández-Zequinely, Veremundo; Sánchez-Guzmán, Erika

    2017-04-01

    Vimentin (Vim), a cytoskeletal intermediate filament, is part of a naturally occurring reversible program, the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), which converts epithelial cells into mesenchymal-like derivatives. Based on previous results showing that epithelial cells co-express Vim and keratin (Krt) as part of a cytoskeletal network which confers them a highly motile phenotype, we explored the role of Vim in rabbit corneal epithelial cells or RCE1(5T5) cells, an established model of corneal epithelial differentiation. Vim and keratin filaments were co-expressed in cells localized at the proliferative/migratory rim of the growing colonies, but not in basal cells from the center of the colonies nor at suprabasal cell layers. Flow cytometry and qPCR demonstrated that there was a decrease in Krt(+) /Vim(+) cell number and ΔNp63α expression when cells reached confluence and formed a 4-5 layered epithelium, while there was a concomitant increase of both Pax-6 expression and Krt(+) /Vim(-) cells. Inhibition of cell proliferation with mitomycin C did not modify cell motility nor the expression of Vim. We studied the distribution and expression of α6 integrin, a protein also involved in cell migration. The results demonstrated that α6 integrin had a distribution which was, in part, co-linear with Vim at the proliferative/migratory rim of cell colonies, suggesting an indirect interaction between these proteins. Immunoprecipitation and immunostaining assays indicated that plectin might be mediating such interaction. These data suggest that Vim expression in corneal epithelium is found in a cell population composed of highly motile cells with a Vim(+) /Krt(+) /ΔNp63α(+) /Pax-6(low) /α6 integrin(+) phenotype. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 818-830, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell's two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane's bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables - the cell's velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  19. Polymorphonuclear cell motility, ankylosing spondylitis, and HLA B27.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fordham, J N; Currey, H L

    1984-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function was studied in 29 subjects with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Of these, 20 were HLA B27+ve and 9 B27-ve. There were 30 controls and, of these, 15 were B27+ve. Random and directed cell migration was measured by 2 techniques: migration through a micropore filter and migration under an agar film. The chemo-attractant was either case in-activated serum or zymosan-activated serum. By both techniques directed motility was increased in subjects with B27 or with AS when compared to the B27-ve controls. This suggests that the disease AS and the possession of B27 are both associated with increased PMN motility. PMID:6608924

  20. Polymorphonuclear cell motility, ankylosing spondylitis, and HLA B27.

    PubMed

    Pease, C T; Fordham, J N; Currey, H L

    1984-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function was studied in 29 subjects with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Of these, 20 were HLA B27+ve and 9 B27-ve. There were 30 controls and, of these, 15 were B27+ve. Random and directed cell migration was measured by 2 techniques: migration through a micropore filter and migration under an agar film. The chemo-attractant was either case in-activated serum or zymosan-activated serum. By both techniques directed motility was increased in subjects with B27 or with AS when compared to the B27-ve controls. This suggests that the disease AS and the possession of B27 are both associated with increased PMN motility.

  1. Viscumins functionally modulate cell motility-associated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Schötterl, Sonja; Hübner, Miriam; Armento, Angela; Veninga, Vivien; Wirsik, Naita Maren; Bernatz, Simon; Lentzen, Hans; Mittelbronn, Michel; Naumann, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    In Europe extracts from Viscum album L., the European white-berry mistletoe, are widely used as a complementary cancer therapy. Viscumins (mistletoe lectins, ML) have been scrutinized as important active components of mistletoe and exhibit a variety of anticancer effects such as stimulation of the immune system, induction of cytotoxicity, reduction of tumor cell motility as well as changes in the expression of genes associated with cancer development and progression. By microarray expression analysis, quantitative RT-PCR and RT-PCR based validation of microarray data we demonstrate for the Viscum album extract Iscador Qu and for the lectins Aviscumine and ML-1 that in glioma cells these drugs differentially modulate the expression of genes involved in the regulation of cell migration and invasion, including processes modulating cell architecture and cell adhesion. A variety of differentially expressed genes in ML treated cells are associated with the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway or are targets of TGF-β. ML treatment downregulated the expression of TGF-β itself, of the TGF-β receptor II (TGFBR2), of the TGF-β intracellular signal transducer protein SMAD2, and of matrix-metalloproteinases (MMP) MMP-2 and MMP-14. Even if the changes in gene expression differ between Aviscumine, Iscador Qu and ML-1, the overall regulation of motility associated gene expression by all drugs showed functional effects since tumor cell motility was reduced in a ML-dependent manner. Therefore, ML containing compounds might provide clinical benefit as adjuvant therapeutics in the treatment of patients with invasively growing tumors such as glioblastomas.

  2. Control of cell motility by interaction of gangliosides, tetraspanins, and epidermal growth factor receptor in A431 versus KB epidermoid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Yeol; Yoon, Seon-Joo; Freire-de-Lima, Leonardo; Kim, Jung-Hoe; Hakomori, Sen-itiroh

    2009-08-17

    Growth of epidermoid carcinoma cell lines, A431 and KB, has been known to be controlled by the interaction of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EGFR) with tyrosine kinase. Ganglioside GM3 was previously found to interact with EGFR and to inhibit EGFR tyrosine kinase. However, motility of these cells, controlled by EGFR and ganglioside, was not studied. The present study is focused on the control mechanism of the motility of these cells through interaction of ganglioside, tetraspanin (TSP), and EGFR. Key results are as follows: (i) The level of EGFR expressed in A431 cells is approximately 6 times higher than that expressed in KB cells, and motility of A431 cells is also much higher than that of KB cells, yet growth of A431 cells is either not affected or is inhibited by EGF. In contrast, growth of KB cells is enhanced by EGF. (ii) Levels of TSPs (CD9, CD82, and CD81) expressed in A431 cells are much higher than those expressed in KB cells, and TSPs expressed in A431 cells are reduced by treatment of cells with EtDO-P4, which inhibits the synthesis of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) and gangliosides. (iii) These TSPs are co-immunoprecipitated with EGFR in both A431 and KB cells, indicating that TSPs are closely associated with EGFR. (iv) High motility of A431 cells is greatly reduced, while low motility of KB cells is not affected, by treatment of cells with EtDO-P4. These results, taken together, suggest that there is a close correlation between high motility of A431 cells and high expression of EGFR and TSPs, and between ganglioside GM3/GM2 and TSP. A similar correlation was suggested between the low motility of KB cells and low levels of EGFR and TSP. The correlation between high motility and high level of EGFR with the ganglioside-TSP complex in A431 cells is unique. This is in contrast to our previous studies that indicate that motility of many types of tumor cells is inhibited by a high level of CD9 or CD82, together with growth factor receptors and

  3. Immobilization of motile bacterial cells via dip-pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamjav, Dorjderem; Rozhok, Sergey; Holz, Richard C.

    2010-06-01

    A strategy to bind bacterial cells to surfaces in a directed fashion via dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is presented. Cellular attachment to pre-designed DPN generated microarrays was found to be dependent on the shape and size of the surface feature. While this observation is likely due in part to a dense, well formed mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHA) monolayer generated via DPN, it may also simply be due to the physical shape of the surface structure. Motile Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial cells were observed to bind to DPN generated mercaptohexadecanoic acid/poly-L-lysine (MHA/PLL) line patterns, 'blocks' made up of eight lines with 100 nm spacings, with ~ 80% occupancy. Cellular binding to these 'block' surface structures occurs via an electrostatic interaction between negatively charged groups on the bacterial cell surface and positively charged poly-L-lysine (PLL) assemblies. These data indicate that these DPN generated 'block' surface structures provide a promising footprint for the attachment of motile bacterial cells that may find utility in cell based biosensors or single cell studies.

  4. Disruption of the Rickettsia rickettsii Sca2 autotransporter inhibits actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Kleba, Betsy; Clark, Tina R; Lutter, Erika I; Ellison, Damon W; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-05-01

    Rickettsii rickettsii, the etiologic agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, replicates within the cytosol of infected cells and uses actin-based motility to spread inter- and intracellularly. Although the ultrastructure of the actin tail and host proteins associated with it are distinct from those of Listeria or Shigella, comparatively little is known regarding the rickettsial proteins involved in its organization. Here, we have used random transposon mutagenesis of R. rickettsii to generate a small-plaque mutant that is defective in actin-based motility and does not spread directly from cell to cell as is characteristic of spotted fever group rickettsiae. The transposon insertion site of this mutant strain was within Sca2, a member of a family of large autotransporter proteins. Sca2 exhibits several features suggestive of its apparent role in actin-based motility. It displays an N-terminal secretory signal peptide, a C-terminal predicted autotransporter domain, up to four predicted Wasp homology 2 (WH2) domains, and two proline-rich domains, one with similarity to eukaryotic formins. In a guinea pig model of infection, the Sca2 mutant did not elicit fever, suggesting that Sca2 and actin-based motility are virulence factors of spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  5. MiR-25 promotes gastric cancer cells growth and motility by targeting RECK.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongying; Wang, Yu; Yang, Liu; Jiang, Rongke; Li, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Recently, accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) play prominent roles in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, we confirmed that miR-25 was significantly increased in human GC tissues and cell lines. Forced expression of miR-25 remarkably enhanced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in GC cells, whereas inhibition of miR-25 by inhibitor caused significant suppression of proliferation and significant increase of apoptosis. Moreover, inhibition of miR-25 significantly decreased migration and invasion of GC cells. Finally, reversion-inducing-cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK) was found to be a target of miR-25. Overexpression of RECK could significantly reverse the oncogenic effect of miR-25. Taken together, miR-25 might promote GC cells growth and motility partially by targeting RECK.

  6. Swarm motility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is inhibited by compounds from fruit peel extracts.

    PubMed

    Mahadwar, G; Chauhan, K R; Bhagavathy, G V; Murphy, C; Smith, A D; Bhagwat, A A

    2015-04-01

    Controlling spread of human pathogens on fresh produce is a top priority for public health reasons. Isolation of compounds from agricultural waste that would control spread of human pathogens was explored using Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. In the environment, micro-organisms migrate as a 'community' especially when they move on moist surfaces. This type of motility is characterized as swarming motility. We examined extracts from agricultural waste such as soya bean husk, peels of orange, pineapple, avocado and pomegranate for antiswarming activity. Avocado and pineapple peels showed moderate (~40%) inhibition of swarming motility while pomegranate peel extract had high antiswarming activity (~85% inhibition) and was examined in further detail. Although the pomegranate peel extract was acidic, swarm-inhibitory activity was not due to low pH and the peel extract did not inhibit growth of Salmonella. Among the key swarm motility regulatory genes, class II (fliF, fliA, fliT and fliZ) and class III (fliC and fliM) regulators were downregulated upon exposure to pomegranate peel extract. Pomegranate peels offer great potential as a bioactive repellent for pathogenic micro-organisms on moist surfaces. Controlling the spread of food-borne pathogens in moist environments is an important microbial food safety issue. Isolation of compounds from agricultural waste (such as fruit peels) that would control spread of human pathogens was explored using Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as a model organism. Pomegranate peels offer great potential as a bioactive repellent for pathogenic micro-organisms. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. ZF21 protein regulates cell adhesion and motility.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Makoto; Hoshino, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Takeharu; Kawasaki, Noritaka; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu

    2010-07-02

    Cell migration on an extracellular matrix (ECM) requires continuous formation and turnover of focal adhesions (FAs) along the direction of cell movement. However, our knowledge of the components of FAs and the mechanism of their regulation remains limited. Here, we identify ZF21, a member of a protein family characterized by the presence of a phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate-binding FYVE domain, to be a new regulator of FAs and cell movement. Knockdown of ZF21 expression in cells increased the number of FAs and suppressed cell migration. Knockdown of ZF21 expression also led to a significant delay in FA disassembly following induction of synchronous disassembly of FAs by nocodazole treatment. ZF21 bound to focal adhesion kinase, localized to FAs, and was necessary for dephosphorylation of FAK at Tyr(397), which is important for disassembly of FAs. Thus, ZF21 represents a new component of FAs, mediates disassembly of FAs, and thereby regulates cell motility.

  8. Learning and memory: an emergent property of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Michel; Bi, Xiaoning

    2013-09-01

    In this review, we develop the argument that the molecular/cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory are an adaptation of the mechanisms used by all cells to regulate cell motility. Neuronal plasticity and more specifically synaptic plasticity are widely recognized as the processes by which information is stored in neuronal networks engaged during the acquisition of information. Evidence accumulated over the last 25 years regarding the molecular events underlying synaptic plasticity at excitatory synapses has shown the remarkable convergence between those events and those taking place in cells undergoing migration in response to extracellular signals. We further develop the thesis that the calcium-dependent protease, calpain, which we postulated over 25 years ago to play a critical role in learning and memory, plays a central role in the regulation of both cell motility and synaptic plasticity. The findings discussed in this review illustrate the general principle that fundamental cell biological processes are used for a wide range of functions at the level of organisms.

  9. Lattice-free models of directed cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Carolyn; Plank, Michael J.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Directed cell migration often occurs when individual cells move in response to an external chemical stimulus. Cells can respond by moving in either the direction of increasing (chemoattraction) or decreasing (chemorepulsion) concentration. Many previous models of directed cell migration use a lattice-based framework where agents undergo a lattice-based random walk and the direction of nearest-neighbour motility events is biased in a preferred direction. Such lattice-based models can lead to unrealistic configurations of agents, since the agents always move on an artificial lattice structure which is never observed experimentally. We present a lattice-free model of directed cell migration that incorporates two key features. First, agents move on a continuous domain, with the possibility that there is some preferred direction of motion. Second, to be consistent with experimental observations, we enforce a crowding mechanism so that motility events that would lead to agent overlap are not permitted. We compare simulation data from the new lattice-free model with a more traditional lattice-based model. To provide additional insight into the lattice-free model, we construct an approximate conservation statement which corresponds to a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation in the continuum limit. The solution of this mean-field model compares well with averaged data from the individual-based model.

  10. Loss of SNAP29 Impairs Endocytic Recycling and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Debora; Lugassy, Yevgenia; Sprecher, Eli; Horowitz, Mia

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking depends on the ordered formation and consumption of transport intermediates and requires that membranes fuse with each other in a tightly regulated and highly specific manner. Membrane anchored SNAREs assemble into SNARE complexes that bring membranes together to promote fusion. SNAP29 is a ubiquitous synaptosomal-associated SNARE protein. It interacts with several syntaxins and with the EH domain containing protein EHD1. Loss of functional SNAP29 results in CEDNIK syndrome (Cerebral Dysgenesis, Neuropathy, Ichthyosis and Keratoderma). Using fibroblast cell lines derived from CEDNIK patients, we show that SNAP29 mediates endocytic recycling of transferrin and β1-integrin. Impaired β1-integrin recycling affected cell motility, as reflected by changes in cell spreading and wound healing. No major changes were detected in exocytosis of VSVG protein from the Golgi apparatus, although the Golgi system acquired a dispersed morphology in SNAP29 deficient cells. Our results emphasize the importance of SNAP29 mediated membrane fusion in endocytic recycling and consequently, in cell motility. PMID:20305790

  11. Guttiferone K suppresses cell motility and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma by restoring aberrantly reduced profilin 1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wang, Hua; Xie, Chanlu; Lee, C.Soon; Fahey, Paul; Dong, Qihan; Xu, Hongxi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive malignancy and the 5-year survival rate of advanced HCC is < 10%. Guttiferone K (GUTK) isolated from the Garcinia genus inhibited HCC cells migration and invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo without apparent toxicity. Proteomic analysis revealed that actin-binding protein profilin 1 (PFN1) was markedly increased in the presence of GUTK. Over-expression of PFN1 mimicked the effect of GUTK on HCC cell motility and metastasis. The effect of GUTK on cell motility was diminished when PFN1 was over-expressed or silenced. Over-expression of PFN1 or incubation with GUTK decreased F-actin levels and the expression of proteins involved in actin nucleation, branching and polymerization. Moreover, a reduction of PFN1 protein levels was common in advanced human HCC and associated with poor survival rate. In conclusion, GUTK effectively suppresses the motility and metastasis of HCC cells mainly by restoration of aberrantly reduced PFN1 protein expression. PMID:27494863

  12. RHAMM, a receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, on normal human lymphocytes, thymocytes and malignant B cells: a mediator in B cell malignancy?

    PubMed

    Pilarski, L M; Masellis-Smith, A; Belch, A R; Yang, B; Savani, R C; Turley, E A

    1994-08-01

    RHAMM (Receptor for HA Mediated Motility) is a novel HA receptor that has been linked to regulating cell locomotion and density dependent contact inhibition of fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, astrocytes and sperm. The ubiquitous expression of RHAMM suggests the existence of multiple isoforms, and indeed, RHAMM is found in various cellular compartments, namely nuclear, cytosolic, membrane-bound and extracellular. In this review, we emphasize the evolving role of RHAMM in B cell malignancies, and examine the function of RHAMM in T cell development in the thymic microenvironment. Both the motile behaviour of progenitor thymocytes (CD3-CD4-CD8-) and malignant B cells from multiple myeloma (MM), plasma cell leukemia, and hairy cell leukemia was blocked by monoclonal antibodies to RHAMM, suggesting that motility may correlate with increased expression of RHAMM at the cell surface. Interestingly, the soluble form of RHAMM is able to inhibit fibroblast locomotion, and it is likely that a balance between expression of both forms determines, in part the motility of cells. RHAMM appears to play a fundamental role in the immune system and the ability of RHAMM to function as a motility receptor is likely to be due to complex variables including the extent to which soluble RHAMM is secreted. RHAMM expression characterizes circulating monoclonal B cells as abnormal. potentially invasive and/or metastatic components of myeloma and may underlie the malignant behavior of these cells.

  13. Simultaneous optical measurements of cell motility and growth.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    It has recently been shown that spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) developed in our laboratory can be used to quantify the dry mass growth of single cells with femtogram sensitivity [M. Mir et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 108, 32 (2011)]. Here we show that it is possible to measure the motility of single cells in conjunction with the dry mass measurements. Specifically the effect of poly-L-lysine substrate on the dry mass growth of Drosophila S2 cells is studied. By measuring the mean square displacement of single cells and clusters it is shown that cells that adhere better to the surface are unable to grow. Using such a technique it is possible to measure both growth and morphogenesis, two of the cornerstones of developmental biology.

  14. Cadmium inhibits motility, activities of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase and axonemal dynein-ATPase of human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, R; Botana, D; Piñero, S; Proverbio, F; Marín, R

    2016-05-01

    Cd(2+) has been associated with decreased sperm motility in individuals exposed to this element, such as smokers. Among other factors, this lowered motility could be the result of inhibition exerted by Cd(2+) on the activity of the sperm ATPases associated with sperm motility. In this study, we evaluated the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase and the axonemal dynein-ATPase activities as well as sperm motility, in the presence of different free Cd(2+) concentrations in the assay media. It was found that spermatozoa incubated for 5 h in a medium containing 25 nm free Cd(2+) showed a significant inhibition of progressive motility, reaching values even lower at higher Cd(2+) concentrations. In addition, it was found that the activity of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase reached maximal inhibition at 50 nm free Cd(2+), with a K50% inhibition of 18.3 nm free Cd(2+). The dynein-ATPase activity was maximally inhibited by 25 nm free Cd(2+) in the assay medium, with a K50% inhibition of 11.3 nm Cd(2+). Our results indicate that the decreased activity of the sperm ATPases might have a critical importance in the biochemical mechanisms underlying the decreased sperm motility of individuals exposed to Cd(2+). © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Extracellular Vesicles from Vascular Endothelial Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation and Motility of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurachi, Masashi; Mikuni, Masahiko; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    We previously examined the effect of brain microvascular endothelial cell (MVEC) transplantation on rat white matter infarction, and found that MVEC transplantation promoted remyelination of demyelinated axons in the infarct region and reduced apoptotic death of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). We also found that the conditioned medium (CM) from cultured MVECs inhibited apoptosis of cultured OPCs. In this study, we examined contribution of extracellular vesicles (EVs) contained in the CM to its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. Removal of EVs from the CM by ultracentrifugation reduced its inhibitory effect on OPC apoptosis. To confirm whether EVs derived from MVECs are taken up by cultured OPCs, we labeled EVs with PKH67, a fluorescent dye, and added them to OPC cultures. Many vesicular structures labeled with PKH67 were found within OPCs immediately after their addition. Next we examined the effect of MVEC-derived EVs on OPC behaviors. After 2 days in culture with EVs, there was significantly less pyknotic and more BrdU-positive OPCs when compared to control. We also examined the effect of EVs on motility of OPCs. OPCs migrated longer in the presence of EVs when compared to control. To examine whether these effects on cultured OPCs are shared by EVs from endothelial cells, we prepared EVs from conditioned media of several types of endothelial cells, and tested their effects on cultured OPCs. EVs from all types of endothelial cells we examined reduced apoptosis of OPCs and promoted their motility. Identification of the molecules contained in EVs from endothelial cells may prove helpful for establishment of effective therapies for demyelinating diseases. PMID:27403742

  16. Rock `N' Rho in Outer Hair Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Kalinec, G.; Kalinec, F.; Billadeau, D. D.; Urrutia, R.

    2003-02-01

    RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1, small GTPases of the Rho family, are crucial regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and mediate different types of cell motility. They also help to maintain cellular homeostasis, actively regulating the structure and mechanical properties of the cells. We investigated the expression in the guinea-pig cochlea of the serine/threonine kinase ROCK, a well-known effector of RhoA, and measured electromotile amplitude in outer hair cells (OHCs) internally perfused with C3 and Y-27632, pharmacological inhibitors of RhoA and ROCK respectively, and dominant-negative mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42. We found that a RhoA/ROCK-mediated signaling pathway is important for mechanical homeostasis of cochlear OHCs, and identified ROCK as a potential target to selectively modulate outer hair cell electromotility.

  17. CAGE, a novel cancer/testis antigen gene, promotes cell motility by activation ERK and p38 MAPK and downregulating ROS.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyeeun; Shim, Eunsook; Lee, Hansoo; Hahn, Janghee; Kang, Dongmin; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jeoung, Dooil

    2006-06-30

    We previously identified a novel cancer/testis antigen gene CAGE by screening cDNA expression libraries of human testis and gastric cancer cell lines with sera of gastric cancer patients. CAGE is expressed in many cancers and cancer cell lines, but not in normal tissues apart from the testis. In the present study, we investigated its role in the motility of cells of two human cancer cell lines: HeLa and the human hepatic cancer cell line, SNU387. Induction of CAGE by tetracycline or transient transfection enhanced the migration and invasiveness of HeLa cells, but not the adhesiveness of either cell line. Overexpression of CAGE led to activation of ERK and p38 MAPK but not Akt, and inhibition of ERK by PD98059 or p38 MAPK by SB203580 counteracted the CAGE-promoted increase in motility in both cell lines. Overexpression of CAGE also resulted in a reduction of ROS and an increase of ROS scavenging, associated with induction of catalase activity. Inhibition of ERK and p38 MAPK increased ROS levels in cells transfected with CAGE, suggesting that ROS reduce the motility of both cell lines. Inhibition of ERK and p38 MAPK reduced the induction of catalase activity resulting from overexpression of CAGE, and inhibition of catalase reduced CAGE-promoted motility. We conclude that CAGE enhances the motility of cancer cells by activating ERK and p38 MAPK, inducing catalase activity, and reducing ROS levels.

  18. Mathematics of cell motility: have we got its number?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical and computational modeling is rapidly becoming an essential research technique complementing traditional experimental biological methods. However, lack of standard modeling methods, difficulties of translating biological phenomena into mathematical language, and differences in biological and mathematical mentalities continue to hinder the scientific progress. Here we focus on one area—cell motility—characterized by an unusually high modeling activity, largely due to a vast amount of quantitative, biophysical data, ‘modular’ character of motility, and pioneering vision of the area’s experimental leaders. In this review, after brief introduction to biology of cell movements, we discuss quantitative models of actin dynamics, protrusion, adhesion, contraction, and cell shape and movement that made an impact on the process of biological discovery. We also comment on modeling approaches and open questions. PMID:18461331

  19. Motile activities of Dictyostelium discoideum differ from those in Protista or vertebrate animal cells.

    PubMed

    Waligórska, Agnieszka; Wianecka-Skoczeń, Magdalena; Korohoda, Włodzimierz

    2007-01-01

    Cell movement in the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum has been examined in media differing in monovalent cation concentration (i.e. Na+ and K+). Under isotonic or even slightly hypertonic conditions, the cells move equally well in solutions in which either potassium or sodium ions dominate. However, in strongly hypertonic solutions the amoebae showed motility in a 2% potassium chloride solution, but remained motionless in a hypertonic 2% sodium chloride solution. This inhibition of D. discoideum amoebae movement in a hypertonic sodium chloride solution was fully reversible. Such behaviour corresponds to that of plant, fungi, and some invertebrate animal cells rather than protozoan or vertebrate cells. These observations suggest that studies using D. discoideum as a model for cell motility in vertebrate animal tissue cells should be considered with caution, and would seem to confirm the classification of cellular slime moulds as related rather to Fungi than to Protista. This also shows that the cell membrane models should consider the asymmetry in sodium/potassium ion concentrations found in vertebrate animal cells as one of various possibilities.

  20. Extracellular matrix composition and interstitial pH modulate NHE1-mediated melanoma cell motility.

    PubMed

    Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Domikowsky, Britta; Schwöppe, Christian; Krähling, Hermann; Mally, Sabine; Schäfers, Michael; Hermann, Sven; Shahin, Victor; Haier, Jörg; Schwab, Albrecht; Stock, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is required for human melanoma cell adhesion and migration. The goal of the present study was to suppress mouse melanoma (B16V) cell invasion in vivo by inhibiting NHE1. Intravital observations in mobilized left liver lobes of laparotomized male Sprague-Dawley rats disclosed that five minutes after intra-arterial administration of the B16V cell suspension, cells adhered to the endothelia of liver sinusoidal capillaries and started to migrate into the surrounding liver tissue. In the presence of the NHE1-specific inhibitor cariporide, migration/invasion was reduced by about 50% while adhesion was not lowered. Time-lapse video microscopy and adhesion/invasion assays revealed that in vitro, blockade of NHE1 by cariporide i) significantly decreased the migratory speed of the cells and ii) completely inhibited the invasive behavior of both an artificial, basement membrane-like and a dermis-like matrix. Cells were more motile on the basement membrane and more invasive on the dermis-like matrix. Small-animal PET (positron-emission tomography) analyses of B16V metastasis in female C57BL/6 mice showed that, although NHE1 inhibition hardly affected the percentage of animals developing metastases or relapses, metastases seem to get directed to the lungs in cariporide-treated animals while animals feeding on the standard diet show metastases spread all over the body. We conclude that i) B16V cells prefer to invade a dermis-like rather than a basement membrane-like matrix; ii) the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition strongly impacts on NHE1-dependent in vitro cell motility and invasion; and iii) the lungs are metastasis‑prone and impair the efficiency of cariporide due to their ECM composition and the pulmonary interstitial (extravascular) pH.

  1. Regulation of vesicle transport and cell motility by Golgi-localized Dbs

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Ethan R; Hu, Tinghui; Ciccarelli, Bryan T; Whitehead, Ian P

    2014-01-01

    DBS/MCF2L has been recently identified as a risk locus for osteoarthritis. It encodes a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Dbs) that has been shown to regulate both normal and tumor cell motility. In the current study, we have determined that endogenous Dbs is predominantly expressed as 2 isoforms, a 130 kDa form (Dbs-130) that is localized to the Golgi complex, and an 80 kDa form (Dbs-80) that is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously described an inhibitor that binds to the RhoGEF domain of Dbs and blocks its transforming activity. Here we show that the inhibitor localizes to the Golgi, where it specifically interacts with Dbs-130. Inhibition of endogenous Dbs-130 activity is associated with reduced levels of activated Cdc42, enlarged Golgi, and resistance to Brefeldin A-mediated Golgi dispersal, suggesting a role for Dbs in vesicle transport. Cells treated with the inhibitor exhibit normal protein transport from the ER to the Golgi, but are defective in transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of Dbs-130 in MDA-MB-231 human breast tumor cells limits motility in both transwell and wound healing assays, but appears to have no effect on the organization of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The reduced motility is associated with a failure to reorient the Golgi toward the leading edge. This is consistent with the Golgi localization, and suggests that the Dbs-130 regulates aspects of the secretory pathway that are required to support cell polarization during directed migration. PMID:25483302

  2. Bacterial spread from cell to cell: beyond actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Carole J; Dragoi, Ana-Maria; Talman, Arthur; Agaisse, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    Several intracellular pathogens display the ability to propagate within host tissues by displaying actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells. As motile bacteria reach cell-cell contacts they form plasma membrane protrusions that project into adjacent cells and resolve into vacuoles from which the pathogen escapes, thereby achieving spread from cell to cell. Seminal studies have defined the bacterial and cellular factors that support actin-based motility. By contrast, the mechanisms supporting the formation of protrusions and their resolution into vacuoles have remained elusive. Here, we review recent advances in the field showing that Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri have evolved pathogen-specific mechanisms of bacterial spread from cell to cell.

  3. Synchronization of Spontaneous Active Motility of Hair Cell Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tracy-Ying; Ji, Seung; Bozovic, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear exhibit an active process, believed to be crucial for achieving the sensitivity of auditory and vestibular detection. One of the manifestations of the active process is the occurrence of spontaneous hair bundle oscillations in vitro. Hair bundles are coupled by overlying membranes in vivo; hence, explaining the potential role of innate bundle motility in the generation of otoacoustic emissions requires an understanding of the effects of coupling on the active bundle dynamics. We used microbeads to connect small groups of hair cell bundles, using in vitro preparations that maintain their innate oscillations. Our experiments demonstrate robust synchronization of spontaneous oscillations, with either 1:1 or multi-mode phase-locking. The frequency of synchronized oscillation was found to be near the mean of the innate frequencies of individual bundles. Coupling also led to an improved regularity of entrained oscillations, demonstrated by an increase in the quality factor. PMID:26540409

  4. erythro-9-[3-(2-Hydroxynonyl)]adenine is an effective inhibitor of cell motility and actin assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Schliwa, M; Ezzell, R M; Euteneuer, U

    1984-01-01

    erythro-9-[3-(2-Hydroxynonyl)]adenine (EHNA) has been reported previously to be an agent that arrests sperm motility by inhibiting the axonemal dynein ATPase activity and has been used to probe the involvement of putative cytoplasmic dyneins in mitosis and intracellular organelle transport. We report here that EHNA profoundly and reversibly affects several actin-dependent processes, both in vivo and in vitro. It induces dramatic changes in actin organization in cultured cells, inhibits cell translocation, blocks actin-dependent cytoplasmic streaming, interferes with actin-dependent gelation of cytoplasmic extracts, and inhibits actin assembly. Just as the cytochalasins, EHNA appears to be a highly effective inhibitor of actin-based motility, whose effects in complex biological systems should be interpreted with caution. Images PMID:6385006

  5. The interplay between cell motility and tissue architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2013-03-01

    Glandular tissue form arboreal networks comprised of acini and tubes. Loss of structure is concomitant with the in vivo pathologic state. In vitro models have been shown to recapitulate the functional units of the mammary gland and other organs. Despite our much improved understanding gleaned from both in vitro and in vivo interrogation, the mechanisms by which cells are able to achieve the correct tissue organization remain elusive. How do single mammary epithelial cells form polarized acini when cultured in a surrogate basement membrane gel but not on 2D surfaces? Simply put, how does a cell know which way is up? Why do malignant breast cells show a differential response in that they form non-polarized aggregates? Recently, it was determined that non-malignant cells undergo multiple rotations to establish acini while tumor cells are randomly motile during tumor formation. Can it be that a tumor cell has simply lost its way. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, National Cancer Institute.

  6. Motility, viability, and calcium in the sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Sperm cells are complicated in vitro models. Their viability is limited, and physiology is complex. The study of their properties is of great application in the animal production as viable and functional gametes are essential. It has been shown that the decrease of sperm cell viability parallels an increase of the reactive oxygen species (ROS). Reactive oxygen species is secondary to normal metabolic processes of the cell-like flagellar movement. There is evidence of strategies that reduce ROS levels by using exogenous or endogenous antioxidants with the intention that seminal plasma protects the sperm cells and increases viability. Perhaps viability can increase by reducing that flagellar movement which is regulated by calcium. The phenomenon has not been fully characterized, but it is established that in certain mammalian models, the entrance of calcium via specific channels such as CATsper or voltage-dependent channels, signals flagellar movement. Previous reports have indicated that a change in the concentration of calcium or if the temperature is altered, the function of mammal sperm cells is reduced or blocked and viability prolonged. Fish sperm can remain immobile for several weeks but when activated the number of mobile and viable sperm is reduced at a faster rate. However, if the cells are not mobilized the semen can be preserved for longer periods. As presented in this paper, this supports the notion that by modulating calcium channels to reduce motility the viability of these cells can increase.

  7. DAMTC regulates cytoskeletal reorganization and cell motility in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line: an integrated proteomics and transcriptomics approach.

    PubMed

    Goel, A; Chhabra, R; Ahmad, S; Prasad, A K; Parmar, V S; Ghosh, B; Saini, N

    2012-10-11

    DAMTC (7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarin) is a thioderivative of 4-methyl coumarin, and previously we have shown that DAMTC is a potent inhibitor of cell growth and an inducer of apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer (A549) cells. It induces apoptosis through mitochondrial pathway by modulating NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p53 pathways. Herein, we explored the genome-wide effects of DAMTC in A549 cells using the concerted approach of transcriptomics and proteomics. In addition to apoptotic pathways, which have been validated earlier, the bioinformatic analysis of microarray data identified small GTPase-mediated signal transduction among the significantly altered biological processes. Interestingly, we observed significant downregulation of some members of the Rho family GTPases in the proteomics data too. Downregulation of Rho GTPases (RhoGDIα (Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor-α, also known as ARHGDIA), Ras homolog family member A, Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 and cell division cycle 42) was validated by western blotting. The Rho protein family is implicated in maintaining the actin filament assembly and cell motility, and we also observed that DAMTC treatment causes actin cytoskeletal reorganization, promotes filopodia formation and inhibits cell motility in A549 cells. The effect of DAMTC treatment on cytoskeleton was reversed after the overexpression of RhoGDIα. In addition, DAMTC augmented the apoptotic effect of etoposide, a proapoptotic chemotherapeutic drug. This elucidation of the mechanism behind DAMTC-induced apoptosis and inhibition of cell motility in A549 cells may make it a potential therapeutic for lung cancer.

  8. The contribution of cell-cell signaling and motility to bacterial biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Shrout, Joshua D.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria grow attached to a surface as biofilms. Several factors dictate biofilm formation, including responses by the colonizing bacteria to their environment. Here we review how bacteria use cell-cell signaling (also called quorum sensing) and motility during biofilm formation. Specifically, we describe quorum sensing and surface motility exhibited by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous environmental organism that acts as an opportunistic human pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. P. aeruginosa uses acyl-homoserine lactone signals during quorum sensing to synchronize gene expression important to the production of polysaccharides, rhamnolipid, and other virulence factors. Surface motility affects the assembly and architecture of biofilms, and some aspects of motility are also influenced by quorum sensing. While some genes and their function are specific to P. aeruginosa, many aspects of biofilm development can be used as a model system to understand how bacteria differentially colonize surfaces. PMID:22053126

  9. Inhibition of kinesin-driven microtubule motility by monoclonal antibodies to kinesin heavy chains

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have prepared and characterized seven mouse monoclonal antibodies (SUK 1-7) to the 130-kD heavy chain of sea urchin egg kinesin. On immunoblots, SUK 3 and SUK 4 cross-reacted with Drosophila embryo 116- kD heavy chains, and SUK 4, SUK 5, SUK 6, and SUK 7 bound to the 120-kD heavy chains of bovine brain kinesin. Three out of seven monoclonal antikinesins (SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of sea urchin egg kinesin-induced microtubule translocation, whereas the other four monoclonal antibodies had no detectable effect on this motility. The inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7) appear to bind to spatially related sites on an ATP- sensitive microtubule binding 45-kD chymotryptic fragment of the 130-kD heavy chain, whereas SUK 2 binds to a spatially distinct site. None of the monoclonal antikinesins inhibited the microtubule activated MgATPase activity of kinesin, suggesting that SUK 4, SUK 6, and SUK 7 uncouple this MgATPase activity from motility. PMID:2974459

  10. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell’s two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane’s bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables — the cell’s velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  11. Immunity Provided by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Cholera Vaccine Is Due to O-Antigen-Specific Antibodies Inhibiting Bacterial Motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-based cholera vaccine is highly efficacious in preventing intestinal colonization in the suckling mouse model. Immunity from OMVs comes from immunoglobulin (Ig), particularly IgG, in the milk of mucosally immunized dams. Anti-OMV IgG renders Vibrio cholerae organisms immotile, thus they pass through the small intestine without colonizing. However, the importance of motility inhibition for protection and the mechanism by which motility is inhibited remain unclear. By using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we found that IgG inhibits motility by specifically binding to the O-antigen of V. cholerae We demonstrate that the bivalent structure of IgG, although not required for binding to the O-antigen, is required for motility inhibition. Finally, we show using competition assays in suckling mice that inhibition of motility appears to be responsible for most, if not all, of the protection engendered by OMV vaccination, thus providing insight into the mechanism of immune protection. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Cell motility and thermodynamic fluctuations tailoring quantum mechanics for biology.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, K

    2001-01-01

    Cell motility underlying muscle contraction is an instance of thermodynamics tailoring quantum mechanics for biology. Thermodynamics is intrinsically multi-agential in admitting energy consumers in the form of energy-deficient thermodynamic fluctuations. The onset of sliding movement of an actin filament on myosin molecules in the presence of ATP molecules to be hydrolyzed demonstrates that thermodynamic fluctuations transform their nature so as to accommodate themselves to energy transduction subject to the first law of thermodynamics. The transition from transversal to longitudinal fluctuations of an actin filament with the increase of ATP concentration coincides with the change in the nature of energy consumers acting upon thermal energy in the light of the first law, eventually embodying a uniform sliding movement of an actin filament.

  13. Automated cell tracking tools for quantitative motility studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Christophe; Zhang, Bo; Blazquez, Samantha; Labruyère, Elisabeth; Frischknecht, Freddy; Ménard, Robert; Guillén, Nancy; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Optical microscopy in 2 or 3 dimensions allows extensive observations of the motility and morphology of living cells, in culture or in tissue. This leads to an exploding accumulation of imaging data and shifts the bottleneck from data acquisition to data analysis. Manual image analysis is often either impossible or exceedingly time-consuming and subject to uncontrollable user bias and errors. Computerized methods promise to ensure fast, accurate and reproducible processing, but the basic image analysis functions available in standard commercial software are generally not adapted to the complexity of biological images. For this reason, we develop methods based on active contours, a powerful and flexible technique to segment and track objects, that has become very popular in computer vision research. Here, we describe the main benefits and limitations of active contours for our application, and our efforts to adapt and improve these methods for the analysis of cellular dynamics.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-induced epididymitis disrupts epididymal beta-defensin expression and inhibits sperm motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongmei; Li, Yidong; Yang, Rui; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Yuchuan; Diao, Hua; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yonglian; Lu, Jian

    2010-12-01

    Although more than 40 beta-defensins have been identified in rat epididymis, little is known about their regulation or their relation to male infertility caused by inflammation. Using a rat model of epididymitis induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we examined expression of SPAG11E (also known as Bin1b), a caput epididymis-specific beta-defensin in rat. Unlike the expression of other beta-defensins in various epithelial cells with upregulated expression after LPS stimulation, expression of SPAG11E was significantly decreased by LPS at the mRNA and protein levels. LPS treatment also significantly decreased both sperm binding to SPAG11E and sperm motility, and supplementation of the spermatozoa with recombinant SPAG11E in vitro remarkably increased both SPAG11E binding and motility of sperm. To clarify whether decreased expression is a common pattern of epididymal beta-defensins after LPS stimulation, we examined the expression of another 12 epididymal beta-defensins expressed in the caput epididymis. For nine of these beta-defensins, expression was decreased, but for the other three, expression remained unaffected. These findings demonstrate that LPS-induced epididymitis can decrease the expression of epididymal beta-defensins and that disruption of SPAG11E expression is involved in the impairment of sperm motility.

  15. Resveratrol Impairs Glioma Stem Cells Proliferation and Motility by Modulating the Wnt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Gabriele; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Bazzoni, Riccardo; Butta, Valentina; Paoletta, Laura; Dalprà, Leda; Strazzabosco, Mario; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Giovannoni, Roberto; Bentivegna, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a grade IV astrocytoma and the most common form of malignant brain tumor in adults. GBM remains one of the most fatal and least successfully treated solid tumors: current therapies provide a median survival of 12–15 months after diagnosis, due to the high recurrence rate. Glioma Stem Cells (GSCs) are believed to be the real driving force of tumor initiation, progression and relapse. Therefore, better therapeutic strategies GSCs-targeted are needed. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in fruits and vegetables displaying pleiotropic health benefits. Many studies have highlighted its chemo-preventive and chemotherapeutic activities in a wide range of solid tumors. In this work, we analyzed the effects of Resveratrol exposure on cell viability, proliferation and motility in seven GSC lines isolated from GBM patients. For the first time in our knowledge, we investigated Resveratrol impact on Wnt signaling pathway in GSCs, evaluating the expression of seven Wnt signaling pathway-related genes and the protein levels of c-Myc and β-catenin. Finally, we analyzed Twist1 and Snail1 protein levels, two pivotal activators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program. Results showed that although response to Resveratrol exposure was highly heterogeneous among GSC lines, generally it was able to inhibit cell proliferation, increase cell mortality, and strongly decrease cell motility, modulating the Wnt signaling pathway and the EMT activators. Treatment with Resveratrol may represent a new interesting therapeutic approach, in order to affect GSCs proliferation and motility, even if further investigations are needed to deeply understand the GSCs heterogeneous response. PMID:28081224

  16. Resveratrol Impairs Glioma Stem Cells Proliferation and Motility by Modulating the Wnt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cilibrasi, Chiara; Riva, Gabriele; Romano, Gabriele; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Bazzoni, Riccardo; Butta, Valentina; Paoletta, Laura; Dalprà, Leda; Strazzabosco, Mario; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Giovannoni, Roberto; Bentivegna, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a grade IV astrocytoma and the most common form of malignant brain tumor in adults. GBM remains one of the most fatal and least successfully treated solid tumors: current therapies provide a median survival of 12-15 months after diagnosis, due to the high recurrence rate. Glioma Stem Cells (GSCs) are believed to be the real driving force of tumor initiation, progression and relapse. Therefore, better therapeutic strategies GSCs-targeted are needed. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic phytoalexin found in fruits and vegetables displaying pleiotropic health benefits. Many studies have highlighted its chemo-preventive and chemotherapeutic activities in a wide range of solid tumors. In this work, we analyzed the effects of Resveratrol exposure on cell viability, proliferation and motility in seven GSC lines isolated from GBM patients. For the first time in our knowledge, we investigated Resveratrol impact on Wnt signaling pathway in GSCs, evaluating the expression of seven Wnt signaling pathway-related genes and the protein levels of c-Myc and β-catenin. Finally, we analyzed Twist1 and Snail1 protein levels, two pivotal activators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program. Results showed that although response to Resveratrol exposure was highly heterogeneous among GSC lines, generally it was able to inhibit cell proliferation, increase cell mortality, and strongly decrease cell motility, modulating the Wnt signaling pathway and the EMT activators. Treatment with Resveratrol may represent a new interesting therapeutic approach, in order to affect GSCs proliferation and motility, even if further investigations are needed to deeply understand the GSCs heterogeneous response.

  17. Paxillin controls directional cell motility in response to physical cues.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; German, Alexandra E; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E

    2012-01-01

    Physical cues from the extracellular environment that influence cell shape and directional migration are transduced into changes in cytoskeletal organization and biochemistry through integrin-based cell adhesions to extracellular matrix (ECM). Paxillin is a focal adhesion (FA) scaffold protein that mediates integrin anchorage to the cytoskeleton, and has been implicated in regulation of FA assembly and cell migration. To determine whether paxillin is involved in coupling mechanical distortion with directional movement, cell shape was physically constrained by culturing cells on square-shaped fibronectin-coated adhesive islands surrounded by non-adhesive barrier regions that were created with a microcontact printing technique. Square-shaped cells preferentially formed FAs and extended lamellipodia from their corner regions when stimulated with PDGF, and loss of paxillin resulted in loss of this polarized response. Selective expression of the N- and C-terminal domains of paxillin produced opposite, but complementary, effects on suppressing or promoting lamellipodia formation in different regions of square cells, which corresponded to directional motility defects in vitro. Paxillin loss or mutation was also shown to affect the formation of circular dorsal ruffles, and this corresponded to changes in cell invasive behavior in 3D. This commentary addresses the implications of these findings in terms of how a multifunctional FA scaffold protein can link physical cues to cell adhesion, protrusion and membrane trafficking so as to control directional migration in 2D and 3D. We also discuss how microengineered ECM islands and in vivo model systems can be used to further elucidate the functions of paxillin in directional migration.

  18. Correlating single cell motility with population growth dynamics for flagellated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sucheta; Bhat, Vidya; Mittal, Aditya

    2007-08-15

    Many bacteria used for biotechnological applications are naturally motile. Their "bio-nanopropeller" driven movement allows searching for better environments in a process called chemotaxis. Since bacteria are extremely small in size compared to the bulk fluid volumes in bioreactors, single cell motility is not considered to influence bioreactor operations. However, with increasing interest in localized fluid flow inside reactors, it is important to ask whether individual motility characteristics of bacteria are important in bioreactor operations. The first step in this direction is to try to correlate single cell measurements with population data of motile bacteria in a bioreactor. Thus, we observed the motility behavior of individual bacterial cells, using video microscopy with 33 ms time resolution, as a function of population growth dynamics of batch cultures in shake flasks. While observing the motility behavior of the most intensively studied bacteria, Escherichia coli, we find that overall bacterial motility decreases with progression of the growth curve. Remarkably, this is due to a decrease in a specific motility behavior called "running". Our results not only have direct implications on biofilm formations, but also provide a new direction in bioprocess design research highlighting the role of individual bacterial cell motility as an important parameter.

  19. Specific maltose derivatives modulate the swarming motility of nonswarming mutant and inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Shetye, Gauri S; Singh, Nischal; Jia, Changqing; Nguyen, Chan D K; Wang, Guirong; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2014-07-07

    We have demonstrated that specific synthetic maltose derivatives activate the swarming motility of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nonswarming mutant (rhlA) at low concentration, but inhibit it at high concentration. Although these molecules are not microbicidal, active maltose derivatives with bulky hydrocarbon groups inhibited bacterial adhesion, and exhibited biofilm inhibition and dispersion (IC50 ~20 μM and DC50 ~30 μM, respectively). Because the swarming motility of the rhlA mutant is abolished by the lack natural rhamnolipids, the swarming activation suggests that maltose derivatives are analogues of rhamnolipids. Together, these results suggest a new approach of controlling multiple bacterial activities (bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation, and swarming motility) by a set of disaccharide-based molecules.

  20. Hemidesmosomal linker proteins regulate cell motility, invasion and tumorigenicity in oral squamous cell carcinoma derived cells.

    PubMed

    Rajeev Chaudhari, Pratik; Emlit Charles, Silvania; D'Souza, Zinia Charlotte; Murlidhar Vaidya, Milind

    2017-08-31

    BPAG1e and Plectin are hemidesmosomal linker proteins which anchor intermediate filament proteins to the cell surface through β4 integrin. Recent reports indicate that these proteins play a role in various cellular processes apart from their known anchoring function. However, the available literature is inconsistent. Further, the previous study from our laboratory suggested that Keratin8/18 pair promotes cell motility and tumor progression by deregulating β4 integrin signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) derived cells. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that linker proteins may have a role in neoplastic progression of OSCC. Downregulation of hemidesmosomal linker proteins in OSCC derived cells resulted in reduced cell migration accompanied by alterations in actin organization. Further, decreased MMP9 activity led to reduced cell invasion in linker proteins knockdown cells. Moreover, loss of these proteins resulted in reduced tumorigenic potential. SWATH analysis demonstrated upregulation of N-Myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in linker proteins downregulated cells as compared to vector control cells. Further, the defects in phenotype upon linker proteins ablation were rescued upon loss of NDRG1 in linker proteins knockdown background. These data together indicate that hemidesmosomal linker proteins regulate cell motility, invasion and tumorigenicity possibly through NDRG1 in OSCC derived cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Transposon insertions in the Flavobacterium johnsoniae ftsX gene disrupt gliding motility and cell division.

    PubMed

    Kempf, M J; McBride, M J

    2000-03-01

    Flavobacterium johnsoniae is a gram-negative bacterium that exhibits gliding motility. To determine the mechanism of flavobacterial gliding motility, we isolated 33 nongliding mutants by Tn4351 mutagenesis. Seventeen of these mutants exhibited filamentous cell morphology. The region of DNA surrounding the transposon insertion in the filamentous mutant CJ101-207 was cloned and sequenced. The transposon was inserted in a gene that was similar to Escherichia coli ftsX. Two of the remaining 16 filamentous mutants also carried insertions in ftsX. Introduction of the wild-type F. johnsoniae ftsX gene restored motility and normal cell morphology to each of the three ftsX mutants. CJ101-207 appears to be blocked at a late stage of cell division, since the filaments produced cross walls but cells failed to separate. In E. coli, FtsX is thought to function with FtsE in translocating proteins involved in potassium transport, and perhaps proteins involved in cell division, into the cytoplasmic membrane. Mutations in F. johnsoniae ftsX may prevent translocation of proteins involved in cell division and proteins involved in gliding motility into the cytoplasmic membrane, thus resulting in defects in both processes. Alternatively, the loss of gliding motility may be an indirect result of the defect in cell division. The inability to complete cell division may alter the cell architecture and disrupt gliding motility by preventing the synthesis, assembly, or functioning of the motility apparatus.

  2. The ileal brake--inhibition of jejunal motility after ileal fat perfusion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R C; Trotman, I F; Higgins, B E; Ghatei, M A; Grimble, G K; Lee, Y C; Bloom, S R; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1984-01-01

    The possibility that malabsorbed fat passing through the human ileum exerts an inhibitory feedback control on jejunal motility has been investigated in 24 normal subjects by perfusing the ileum with a fat containing solution designed to produce ileal luminal fat concentrations similar to those in steatorrhoea (30-40 mg/ml). Mean transit times through a 30 cm saline perfused jejunal segment were measured by a dye dilution technique. Thirty minutes after ileal fat perfusion, mean transit times rose markedly to 18.9 +/- 2.5 minutes from a control value of 7.5 +/- 0.9 minutes (n = 5; p less than 0.05). This was associated with an increase in volume of the perfused segment which rose to 175.1 +/- 22.9 ml (control 97.6 +/- 10.3 ml, n = 5; p less than 0.05). Transit times and segmental volumes had returned towards basal values 90 minutes after completing the fat perfusion. Further studies showed that ileal fat perfusion produced a pronounced inhibition of jejunal pressure wave activity, percentage duration of activity falling from a control level of 40.3 +/- 5.0% to 14.9 +/- 2.8% in the hour after ileal perfusion (p less than 0.01). Ileal fat perfusion was associated with marked rises in plasma enteroglucagon and neurotensin, the peak values (218 +/- 37 and 68 +/- 13.1 pmol/l) being comparable with those observed postprandially in coeliac disease. These observations show the existence in man of an inhibitory intestinal control mechanism, whereby ileal fat perfusion inhibits jejunal motility and delays caudal transit of jejunal contents. PMID:6706215

  3. Functions of LIM proteins in cell polarity and chemotactic motility.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Bharat; Khurana, Taruna; Khaire, Nandkumar; Noegel, Angelika A

    2002-10-15

    LimC and LimD are two novel LIM proteins of Dictyostelium, which are comprised of double and single LIM domains, respectively. Green fluorescent protein-fused LimC and LimD proteins preferentially accumulate at areas of the cell cortex where they co-localize with actin and associate transiently with cytoskeleton-dependent dynamic structures like phagosomes, macropinosomes and pseudopods. Furthermore, both LimC and LimD interact directly with F-actin in vitro. Mutant cells that lack either LimC or LimD, or both, exhibit normal growth. They are, however, significantly impaired in growth under stress conditions and are highly sensitive to osmotic shock, suggesting that LimC and LimD contribute towards the maintenance of cortical strength. Moreover, we noted an altered morphology and F-actin distribution in LimD(-) and LimC(-)/D(-) mutants, and changes in chemotactic motility associated with an increased pseudopod formation. Our results reveal both unique and overlapping roles for LimC and LimD, and suggest that both act directly on the actin cytoskeleton and provide rigidity to the cortex.

  4. Functions of LIM proteins in cell polarity and chemotactic motility

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Bharat; Khurana, Taruna; Khaire, Nandkumar; Noegel, Angelika A.

    2002-01-01

    LimC and LimD are two novel LIM proteins of Dictyostelium, which are comprised of double and single LIM domains, respectively. Green fluorescent protein-fused LimC and LimD proteins preferentially accumulate at areas of the cell cortex where they co-localize with actin and associate transiently with cytoskeleton-dependent dynamic structures like phagosomes, macropinosomes and pseudopods. Furthermore, both LimC and LimD interact directly with F-actin in vitro. Mutant cells that lack either LimC or LimD, or both, exhibit normal growth. They are, however, significantly impaired in growth under stress conditions and are highly sensitive to osmotic shock, suggesting that LimC and LimD contribute towards the maintenance of cortical strength. Moreover, we noted an altered morphology and F-actin distribution in LimD– and LimC–/D– mutants, and changes in chemotactic motility associated with an increased pseudopod formation. Our results reveal both unique and overlapping roles for LimC and LimD, and suggest that both act directly on the actin cytoskeleton and provide rigidity to the cortex. PMID:12374734

  5. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  6. Asynchrony in the growth and motility responses to environmental changes by individual bacterial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Umehara, Senkei; Hattori, Akihiro; Inoue, Ippei; Yasuda, Kenji . E-mail: yasuda.bmi@tmd.ac.jp

    2007-05-04

    Knowing how individual cells respond to environmental changes helps one understand phenotypic diversity in a bacterial cell population, so we simultaneously monitored the growth and motility of isolated motile Escherichia coli cells over several generations by using a method called on-chip single-cell cultivation. Starved cells quickly stopped growing but remained motile for several hours before gradually becoming immotile. When nutrients were restored the cells soon resumed their growth and proliferation but remained immotile for up to six generations. A flagella visualization assay suggested that deflagellation underlies the observed loss of motility. This set of results demonstrates that single-cell transgenerational study under well-characterized environmental conditions can provide information that will help us understand distinct functions within individual cells.

  7. OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SPERM MOTILITY IN THE LAKE STURGEON, ACIPENSER FULVESCENS: ACTIVATION AND INHIBITION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective analysis of the duration of motility of sperm from the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, has been performed using computer-assisted sperm motion analysis at 200 frames/s. Motility was measured in both 1993 and 1994. The percentage of activated motile sperm and the...

  8. OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SPERM MOTILITY IN THE LAKE STURGEON, ACIPENSER FULVESCENS: ACTIVATION AND INHIBITION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective analysis of the duration of motility of sperm from the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, has been performed using computer-assisted sperm motion analysis at 200 frames/s. Motility was measured in both 1993 and 1994. The percentage of activated motile sperm and the...

  9. THE HYALURONAN RECEPTORS CD44 AND RHAMM (CD168) FORM COMPLEXES WITH ERK1,2, WHICH SUSTAIN HIGH BASAL MOTILITY IN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Sara R.; Fard, Shireen F.; Paiwand, Frouz F.; Tolg, Cornelia; Veiseh, Mandana; Wang, Chao; McCarthy, James B.; Bissell, Mina J.; Koropatnick, James; Turley, Eva A.

    2010-01-01

    CD44 is an integral hyaluronan receptor that can promote or inhibit motogenic signaling in tumor cells. Rhamm is a non-integral cell surface hyaluronan receptor (CD168) and intracellular protein that promotes cell motility in culture and its expression is strongly upregulated in diseases like arthritis and aggressive cancers. Here we describe an autocrine mechanism utilizing cell surface Rhamm/CD44 interactions to sustain rapid basal motility in invasive breast cancer cell lines. This mechanism requires endogenous hyaluronan synthesis and the formation of Rhamm/CD44/ERK1,2 complexes. Motile/ invasive MDA-MB-231 and Ras-MCF10A cells produce more endogenous hyaluronan, cell surface CD44 and Rhamm, an oncogenic Rhamm isoform, and exhibit elevated basal activation of ERK1,2 than less invasive MCF7 and MCF10A breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CD44, Rhamm and ERK1,2 uniquely co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize in MDA-MB-231 and Ras-MCF10A cells. Rapid motility of the invasive cell lines requires interaction of hyaluronan with cells, activation of ERK1,2 and the participation of both cell surface CD44 and Rhamm. Combinations of anti-CD44, anti-Rhamm antibodies and a MEK1 inhibitor (PD098059) have less-than-additive blocking effects, suggesting action of all three proteins on a common motogenic signaling pathway. Collectively, these results show that cell surface Rhamm and CD44 act together in a hyaluronan-dependent, autocrine mechanism to coordinate sustained signaling through ERK1,2 leading to high basal motility of invasive breast cancer cells. Since CD44/Rhamm complexes are not evident in less motile cells, an effect of CD44 on tumor cell motility may depend in part on its ability to partner with additional proteins, in this case cell surface Rhamm. PMID:17392272

  10. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA3 on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA3 may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Multiple scale model for cell migration in monolayers: Elastic mismatch between cells enhances motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Bresler, Yony; Wirtz, Denis; Grant, Martin

    2015-07-01

    We propose a multiscale model for monolayer of motile cells that comprise normal and cancer cells. In the model, the two types of cells have identical properties except for their elasticity; cancer cells are softer and normal cells are stiffer. The goal is to isolate the role of elasticity mismatch on the migration potential of cancer cells in the absence of other contributions that are present in real cells. The methodology is based on a phase-field description where each cell is modeled as a highly-deformable self-propelled droplet. We simulated two types of nearly confluent monolayers. One contains a single cancer cell in a layer of normal cells and the other contains normal cells only. The simulation results demonstrate that elasticity mismatch alone is sufficient to increase the motility of the cancer cell significantly. Further, the trajectory of the cancer cell is decorated by several speed “bursts” where the cancer cell quickly relaxes from a largely deformed shape and consequently increases its translational motion. The increased motility and the amplitude and frequency of the bursts are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments.

  13. FIBULIN-3 IS UNIQUELY UPREGULATED IN MALIGNANT GLIOMAS AND PROMOTES TUMOR CELL MOTILITY AND INVASION

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bin; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi K.; Sim, Hosung; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly invasive tumors with an almost invariably rapid and lethal outcome. Surgery and chemoradiotherapy fail to remove resistant tumor cells that disperse within normal tissue, which are a major cause for disease progression and therapy failure. Infiltration of the neural parenchyma is a distinctive property of malignant gliomas compared to other solid tumors. Thus, glioma cells are thought to produce unique molecular changes that remodel the neural extracellular matrix and form a microenvironment permissive for their motility. Here we describe the unique expression and pro-invasive role of fibulin-3, a mesenchymal matrix protein specifically upregulated in gliomas. Fibulin-3 is downregulated in peripheral tumors and thought to inhibit tumor growth. However, we found fibulin-3 highly upregulated in gliomas and cultured glioma cells, although the protein was undetectable in normal brain or cultured astrocytes. Overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that fibulin-3 did not seem to affect glioma cell morphology or proliferation, but enhanced substrate-specific cell adhesion and promoted cell motility and dispersion in organotypic cultures. Moreover, orthotopic implantation of fibulin-3-overexpressing glioma cells resulted in diffuse tumors with increased volume and rostrocaudal extension compared to controls. Tumors and cultured cells overexpressing fibulin-3 also showed elevated expression and activity of matrix metalloproteases, such as MMP-2/9 and ADAMTS-5. Taken together, our results suggest that fibulin-3 has a unique expression and pro-tumoral role in gliomas, and could be a potential target against tumor progression. Strategies against this glioma-specific matrix component could disrupt invasive mechanisms and restrict dissemination of these tumors. PMID:19887559

  14. Galectin-3-induced cell spreading and motility relies on distinct signaling mechanisms compared to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    More, Shyam K; Chiplunkar, Shubhada V; Kalraiya, Rajiv D

    2016-05-01

    Secreted galectin-3 often gets incorporated into extracellular matrix and is utilized by cancer cells for spreading, movement, and metastatic dissemination. Here we investigate molecular mechanisms by which galectin-3 brings about these effects and compare it with fibronectin. Imaging of cells spread on fibronectin showed stress fibers throughout cell body, however, galectin-3-induced formation of parallel actin bundles in the lamellipodial region resulting in unique morphological features. FRAP analysis showed that the actin turnover in the lamellipodial region was much higher in cells spread on galectin-3 as compared to that on fibronectin. Rac1 activation is correlated with lamellipodial organization on both the substrates. Activation of Akt and Rac1, the regulators of actin dynamics, show inverse correlation with each other on both galectin-3 and fibronectin. Activation of Erk however, remained similar. Further, inhibition of activation of Akt and Erk inhibited spreading and motility of cells on galectin-3 but not on fibronectin. The results very comprehensively demonstrate distinct signaling pathways that regulate microfilament organization, lamellipodial structures, spreading, and movement of cells plated on galectin-3 as opposed to fibronectin.

  15. Theory of deformable substrates for cell motility studies.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, M A

    1996-01-01

    Linear theory is used to relate the tractions F applied by a cell to the resulting deformation of fluid, viscoelastic, or solid substrates. The theory is used to fit data in which the motion of a fluid surface in the neighborhood of a motile keratocyte is visualized with the aid of embedded beads. The data are best fit by modeling the surface layer as a two-dimensional, nearly incompressible fluid. The data favor this model over another plausible model, the planar free boundary of a three-dimensional fluid. In the resulting diagrams for the distribution of F, it is found that both curl F and div F are concentrated in the lateral extrema of the lamellipodium. In a second investigation, a nonlinear theory of weak wrinkles in a solid substrate is proposed. The in-plane stress tensor plays the role of a metric. Compression wrinkles are found in regions where this metric is negative definite. Tension wrinkles arise, in linear approximation, at points on the boundary between positive definite and indefinite regions, and are conjectured to be stabilized by nonlinear effects. Data for the wrinkles that would be produced by keratocyte traction are computed, and these agree qualitatively with observed keratocyte wrinkles. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8842205

  16. Effects of enteral feedback inhibition on motility, luminal flow, and absorption of nutrients in proximal gut of minipigs.

    PubMed

    Huge, A; Weber, E; Ehrlein, H J

    1995-05-01

    We wanted to clarify whether the postprandial intestinal feedback control activated by nutrients in the distal gut exerts different effects on motility, transit of digesta, and absorption of nutrients in the proximal gut. Additionally, interrelationships among motility, transit, and absorption were to be elucidated because these relationships have only been investigated in the fasted state. In five minipigs, a 150-cm segment of the proximal jejunum was isolated by two cannulas. Motility of the jejunal segment was recorded by multiple strain gauges and analyzed by computerized methods. Markers (Cr- and Cu-EDTA) were used for the measurement of the flow rate, transit time, and absorption of nutrients. After a meal, the test segment was perfused with 2 kcal/min of an elemental diet over a period of 90 min. A feedback inhibition was activated by infusion of nutrients into the midgut at rates of 1-4 kcal/min. Saline was infused as control. With increasing energy loads infused into the midgut, the motility index and the length of contraction waves decreased, whereas the incidence of stationary contractions increased, ie, the motility changed from a propulsive to a segmenting pattern. These modulations of motility were associated with a linear decrease in the flow rate and a linear increase in transit time. Flow and transit were linearly correlated with each other. Additionally, the reduction in flow rate and the delay in luminal transit were associated with a linear increase in the absorption of nutrients. However, the increase in absorption induced by the feedback mechanism was small (7.3-13.4%) compared to the marked inhibition of the motility parameters (54-64%), the flow rate (59%), and the delay of transit (5.8-fold). Feedback control primarily modulated motor patterns and luminal flow, whereas the small increase in absorption was only a side effect due to the longer contact time of the nutrients with the mucosa.

  17. Multi-factorial modulation of colorectal carcinoma cells motility – partial coordination by the tetraspanin Co-029/tspan8

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Valdés, Monica; Haghighi-Rad, Farhad; Billard, Martine; Nguyen, Viet; Saffroy, Raphael; Lemoine, Antoinette; Rubinstein, Eric; Boucheix, Claude; Greco, Céline

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma cells Isreco1 display an ability to migrate controlled by a complex set of signals issued from the membrane. By comparing cells infected by mycoplasmas and mycoplasmas free cells, we have established that basal 2D migration is dependent on a double signal mediated by the collagen receptors integrins alpha1/2 and the Toll-Like receptor TLR2. The signal issued from mycoplasmas can be replaced by a TLR2 ligand and the functional effect is neutralized by silencing of MyD88. Following previous observation that downregulation of E-cadherin/p120 catenin increases cell motility, we now report that EGFR or CD44 inhibition have a similar effect on cell motility that is restricted to tetraspanin Co-029/tspan8 transduced IsrecoI cells (Is1-Co029). The modulation of cell migration linked to EGFR or CD44 can be neutralized by antagonizing Co-029 with the mAb Ts29.1 or by RNA interference. Altogether these data point to a crucial role of Co-029 in the modulation of colon cancer cell motility which could be related to the protumoral effect reported for this tetraspanin. Among surface molecules able to mediate Co-029 function, E-cadherin, EGFR and CD44 appear as likely candidates. PMID:28418857

  18. Actin-based motility drives baculovirus transit to the nucleus and cell surface.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Taro; Volkman, Loy E; Welch, Matthew D

    2010-07-26

    Most viruses move intracellularly to and from their sites of replication using microtubule-based mechanisms. In this study, we show that nucleocapsids of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus undergo intracellular motility driven by actin polymerization. Motility requires the viral P78/83 capsid protein and the host Arp2/3 complex. Surprisingly, the virus directs two sequential and coordinated phases of actin-based motility. Immediately after cell entry, motility enables exploration of the cytoplasm and collision with the nuclear periphery, speeding nuclear entry and the initiation of viral gene expression. Nuclear entry itself requires transit through nuclear pore complexes. Later, after the onset of early gene expression, motility is required for accumulation of a subpopulation of nucleocapsids in the tips of actin-rich surface spikes. Temporal coordination of actin-based nuclear and surface translocation likely enables rapid transmission to neighboring cells during infection in insects and represents a distinctive evolutionary strategy for overcoming host defenses.

  19. Identification of channels promoting calcium spikes and waves in HT1080 tumor cells: their apparent roles in cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ji-Biao; Kindzelskii, Andrei L; Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signals have been associated with cell polarization and locomotion. As cell motility underlies metastasis, we have sought to better characterize the Ca(2+) signaling events in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. We have tested the hypothesis that low voltage-activated (LVA) and nonvoltage-gated (NVG) channels of HT1080 cells participate in dynamic Ca(2+)-signaling events leading to cell migration and invasion. Immunofluorescence microscopy has shown that HT1080 cells express LVA T-type Ca(2+) channels uniformly about the cell periphery, whereas the transient receptor potential-1 (a NVG cation channel) protein appears as punctate spots about a cell's periphery. HT1080 cells exhibit periodic intracellular Ca(2+) spikes. High-speed imaging revealed that the Ca(2+) spikes were composed of a single Ca(2+) wave traveling unidirectionally about the periphery of the cytoplasm in a clockwise fashion (as viewed from basal to apical surfaces). The T-type Ca(2+) channel blocker mibefradil inhibited Ca(2+) spikes and waves on cells and, in parallel, inhibited cell motility and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. Similar changes were noted with the NVG cation channel blockers Gd(3+) and carboxyamido-triazole. The combination of LVA and NVG blockers further reduced Matrigel invasiveness. However, the Ca(2+) channel blockers nicardipine, SKF96365, diltiazem, and verapamil had no effect at appropriate doses. These results indicate that certain LVA and NVG channels regulate HT1080 cell motility. In addition to providing novel information regarding cancer cell motility, we suggest that it may be possible to design drugs that inhibit a key Ca(2+) wave, thereby enhancing the efficacy of emerging therapeutic protocols.

  20. Methods for Observing and Quantifying Muscle Satellite Cell Motility and Invasion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lund, Dane K; McAnulty, Patrick; Siegel, Ashley L; Cornelison, Ddw

    2017-01-01

    Motility and/or chemotaxis of satellite cells has been suggested or observed in multiple in vitro and in vivo contexts. Satellite cell motility also affects the efficiency of muscle regeneration, particularly in the context of engrafted exogenous cells. Consequently, there is keen interest in determining what cell-autonomous and environmental factors influence satellite cell motility and chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the ability of activated satellite cells to relocate in vivo would suggest that they must be able to invade and transit through the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is supported by studies in which alteration or addition of matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity enhanced the spread of engrafted satellite cells. However, despite its potential importance, analysis of satellite cell motility or invasion quantitatively even in an in vitro setting can be difficult; one of the most powerful techniques for overcoming these difficulties is timelapse microscopy. Identification and longitudinal evaluation of individual cells over time permits not only quantification of variations in motility due to intrinsic or extrinsic factors, it permits observation and analysis of other (frequently unsuspected) cellular activities as well. We describe here three protocols developed in our group for quantitatively analyzing satellite cell motility over time in two dimensions on purified ECM substrates, in three dimensions on a living myofiber, and in three dimensions through an artificial matrix.

  1. Interstitial flows promote an amoeboid cell phenotype and motility of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Huang, Yu Ling; Zheng, Angela; Wu, Mingming

    2015-03-01

    Lymph nodes, the drainage systems for interstitial flows, are clinically known to be the first metastatic sites of many cancer types including breast and prostate cancers. Here, we demonstrate that breast cancer cell morphology and motility is modulated by interstitial flows in a cell-ECM adhesion dependent manner. The average aspect ratios of the cells are significantly lower (or are more amoeboid like) in the presence of the flow in comparison to the case when the flow is absent. The addition of exogenous adhesion molecules within the extracellular matrix (type I collagen) enhances the overall aspect ratio (or are more mesenchymal like) of the cell population. Using measured cell trajectories, we find that the persistence of the amoeboid cells (aspect ratio less than 2.0) is shorter than that of mesenchymal cells. However, the maximum speed of the amoeboid cells is larger than that of mesenchymal cells. Together these findings provide the novel insight that interstitial flows promote amoeboid cell morphology and motility and highlight the plasticity of tumor cell motility in response to its biophysical environment. Supported by NIH Grant R21CA138366.

  2. Spirochete periplasmic flagella and motility.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Motaleb, A; Sal, M; Goldstein, S F; Charon, N W

    2000-10-01

    Spirochetes have a unique structure, and as a result their motility is different from that of other bacteria. They also have a special attribute: spirochetes can swim in a highly viscous, gel-like medium, such as that found in connective tissue, that inhibits the motility of most other bacteria. In spirochetes, the organelles for motility, the periplasmic flagella, reside inside the cell within the periplasmic space. A given periplasmic flagellum is attached only at one end of the cell, and depending on the species, may or may not overlap in the center of the cell with those attached at the other end. The number of periplasmic flagella varies from species to species. These structures have been shown to be directly involved in spirochete motility, and they function by rotating within the periplasmic space. The mechanics of motility also vary among the spirochetes. In Leptospira, a motility model developed several years ago has been extensively tested, and the evidence supporting this model is convincing. Borrelia burgdorferi swims differently, and a model of its motility has been recently put forward. This model is based on analyzing the motion of swimming cells, high voltage electron microscopy of fixed cells, and mutant analysis. To better understand spirochete motility on a more molecular level, the proteins and genes involved in motility are being analyzed. Spirochete periplasmic flagellar filaments are among the most complex of bacterial flagella. They are composed of the FlaA sheath proteins, and in many species, multiple FlaB core proteins. Allelic exchange mutagenesis of the genes which encode these proteins is beginning to yield important information with respect to periplasmic flagellar structure and function. Although we are at an early stage with respect to analyzing the function, organization, and regulation of many of the genes involved in spirochete motility, unique aspects have already become evident. Future studies on spirochete motility should be

  3. Tiam1/Rac1 signals contribute to the proliferation and chemoresistance, but not motility, of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Sebastian W; Krenn, Peter W; Ganghammer, Sylvia; Asslaber, Daniela; Pichler, Ulrike; Oberascher, Karin; Henschler, Reinhard; Wallner, Michael; Kerschbaum, Hubert; Greil, Richard; Hartmann, Tanja N

    2014-04-03

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment promote the migration, survival, and proliferation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Rho GTPases control various signaling pathways downstream of microenvironmental cues. Here, we analyze the function of Rac1 in the motility and proliferation of CLL cells. We found decreased transcription of the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors Tiam1 and Vav1 in unstimulated peripheral blood CLL cells with almost complete loss of Tiam1 but increased transcription of the potential Rac antagonist RhoH. Consistently, stimulation of CLL cells with the chemokine CXCL12 induced RhoA but not Rac1 activation, whereas chemokine-induced CLL cell motility was Rac1-independent. Coculture of CLL cells with activated T cells induced their activation and subsequent proliferation. Here, Tiam1 expression was induced in the malignant cells in line with increased Ki-67 and c-Myc expression. Rac1 or Tiam1 knockdown using siRNA or treatment with the Tiam1/Rac inhibitor NSC-23766 attenuated c-Myc transcription. Furthermore, treatment of CLL cells with NSC-23766 reduced their proliferation. Rac inhibition also antagonized the chemoresistance of activated CLL cells toward fludarabine. Collectively, our data suggest a dynamic regulation of Rac1 function in the CLL microenvironment. Rac inhibition could be of clinical use by selectively interfering with CLL cell proliferation and chemoresistance.

  4. Olanzapine May Inhibit Colonic Motility Associated with the 5-HT Receptor and Myosin Light Chain Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiarui; Qiao, Ying; Le, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study whether the effects of olanzapine on gastrointestinal motility is related to the serotonin antagonism and myosin light chain kinase. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. Olanzapine gavage was performed for each treatment group during the course of 30 continuous days, while the same volume of saline was given to the rats in the control group. Defecation of the rats was observed on days 7 and 30 after olanzapine gavage. The effects of olanzapine on contraction of colonic smooth muscles were observed in ex vivo experiments. A Western blot was used to evaluate expression levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT) and MLCK in colon segments of the rats. Results ResultsaaCompared to the control group, 5-160 µ M of olanzapine could inhibit dose-dependently the contraction of colonic smooth muscle ex vivo experiments. The maximum smooth muscle contraction effects of 5-HT and acetylcholine significantly decreased after treatment with 40-160 µ M of olanzapine. Constipation was found in the olanzapine-treated rats on day 7 and have sustained day 30 after gavage. Expression of MLCK in olanzapine-treated rats was significantly decreased, whereas the expression of SERT significantly increased on the day 7, then significantly decreased on the day 30 after olanzapine gavage. Conclusion SERT and MLCK may involve in the inhibition of colonic contraction induced by olanzapine. PMID:27081386

  5. Effects of cochlear loading on the motility of active outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Ó Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHCs) power the amplification of sound-induced vibrations in the mammalian inner ear through an active process that involves hair-bundle motility and somatic motility. It is unclear, though, how either mechanism can be effective at high frequencies, especially when OHCs are mechanically loaded by other structures in the cochlea. We address this issue by developing a model of an active OHC on the basis of observations from isolated cells, then we use the model to predict the response of an active OHC in the intact cochlea. We find that active hair-bundle motility amplifies the receptor potential that drives somatic motility. Inertial loading of a hair bundle by the tectorial membrane reduces the bundle’s reactive load, allowing the OHC’s active motility to influence the motion of the cochlear partition. The system exhibits enhanced sensitivity and tuning only when it operates near a dynamical instability, a Hopf bifurcation. This analysis clarifies the roles of cochlear structures and shows how the two mechanisms of motility function synergistically to create the cochlear amplifier. The results suggest that somatic motility evolved to enhance a preexisting amplifier based on active hair-bundle motility, thus allowing mammals to hear high-frequency sounds. PMID:23509256

  6. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  7. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  8. Nuclear accumulation of seven in absentia homologue-2 supports motility and proliferation of liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Malz, Mona; Aulmann, Antje; Samarin, Jana; Bissinger, Michaela; Longerich, Thomas; Schmitt, Sabrina; Schirmacher, Peter; Breuhahn, Kai

    2012-11-01

    Stability of many tumor-relevant proteins is partly mediated by E3 ligases, which determine substrate specificity within the ubiquitin system. Recent data demonstrated that increased nuclear expression of the E3 ligase seven in absentia homologue (SIAH)-1 in human hepatocarcinogenesis supports tumor cell proliferation and migration. To define whether closely related SIAH-2 synergizes with protumorigenic SIAH-1, we systematically analyzed expression, localization and functional relevance of SIAH-2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Nuclear accumulation of SIAH-2 is detectable in more than 60% of all HCCs and correlates with tumor progression, cell proliferation and distant metastasis. An inverse correlation between nuclear SIAH-1 and SIAH-2 was detected, suggesting independent mechanisms for nuclear enrichment. Inhibition of nuclear SIAH-2 by RNAi in HCC cell lines reduced proliferation as well as lateral tumor cell motility and transmigration; however, combined knock down of both SIAH-1 and SIAH-2 did not further amplify biological effects compared to single gene inhibition. Reduction of SIAH-2 expression sensitizes HCC cells to the treatment with different cytostatic drugs, demonstrating that SIAH-2-targeting approaches may increase the response of HCC cells to conventional chemotherapy. Together, these data show that SIAH-2--as described for SIAH-1--accumulates in nuclei of HCC cells where it supports tumor growth and tumor cell dissemination. Because the nuclear pattern of SIAH-2 differs in HCC tissues from the SIAH-1 pattern and because the inactivation of SIAH-2 is not compensated by SIAH-1, the specific inhibition of SIAH-2 (especially in combination with other drugs) represents a promising therapeutic strategy for HCC.

  9. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (II. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile Inhibition of Motility and Stalk Production in the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y.; Lu, J.; Mollet, J. C.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-04-01

    The cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and the DCB analogs 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-amino-2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, and 5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonyl-(3-cyano-2, 4-dichloro)aniline (DCBF) inhibited extracellular adhesive production in the marine diatom Achnanthes longipes, resulting in a loss of motility and a lack of permanent adhesion. The effect was fully reversible upon removal of the inhibitor, and cell growth was not affected at concentrations of inhibitors adequate to effectively interrupt the adhesion sequence. Video microscopy revealed that the adhesion sequence was mediated by the export and assembly of polymers, and consisted of initial attachment followed by cell motility and eventual production of permanent adhesive structures in the form of stalks that elevated the diatom above the substratum. A. longipes adhesive polymers are primarily composed of noncellulosic polysaccharides (B.A. Wustman, M.R. Gretz, and K.D. Hoagland [1997] Plant Physiol 113: 1059-1069). These results, together with the discovery of DCB inhibition of extracellular matrix assembly in noncellulosic red algal unicells (S.M. Arad, O. Dubinsky, and B. Simon [1994] Phycologia 33: 158-162), indicate that DCB inhibits synthesis of noncellulosic extracellular polysaccharides. A fluorescent probe, DCBF, was synthesized and shown to inhibit adhesive polymer production in the same manner as DCB. DCBF specifically labeled an 18-kD polypeptide isolated from a membrane fraction. Inhibition of adhesion by DCB and its analogs provides evidence of a direct relationship between polysaccharide synthesis and motility and permanent adhesion.

  10. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (II. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile Inhibition of Motility and Stalk Production in the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes).

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Lu, J.; Mollet, J. C.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    The cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and the DCB analogs 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-amino-2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, and 5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonyl-(3-cyano-2, 4-dichloro)aniline (DCBF) inhibited extracellular adhesive production in the marine diatom Achnanthes longipes, resulting in a loss of motility and a lack of permanent adhesion. The effect was fully reversible upon removal of the inhibitor, and cell growth was not affected at concentrations of inhibitors adequate to effectively interrupt the adhesion sequence. Video microscopy revealed that the adhesion sequence was mediated by the export and assembly of polymers, and consisted of initial attachment followed by cell motility and eventual production of permanent adhesive structures in the form of stalks that elevated the diatom above the substratum. A. longipes adhesive polymers are primarily composed of noncellulosic polysaccharides (B.A. Wustman, M.R. Gretz, and K.D. Hoagland [1997] Plant Physiol 113: 1059-1069). These results, together with the discovery of DCB inhibition of extracellular matrix assembly in noncellulosic red algal unicells (S.M. Arad, O. Dubinsky, and B. Simon [1994] Phycologia 33: 158-162), indicate that DCB inhibits synthesis of noncellulosic extracellular polysaccharides. A fluorescent probe, DCBF, was synthesized and shown to inhibit adhesive polymer production in the same manner as DCB. DCBF specifically labeled an 18-kD polypeptide isolated from a membrane fraction. Inhibition of adhesion by DCB and its analogs provides evidence of a direct relationship between polysaccharide synthesis and motility and permanent adhesion. PMID:12223661

  11. A nanoscale characterization of the interaction of a novel alginate oligomer with the cell surface and motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Powell, Lydia C; Pritchard, Manon F; Emanuel, Charlotte; Onsøyen, Edvar; Rye, Philip D; Wright, Chris J; Hill, Katja E; Thomas, David W

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilm-associated infections are a common cause of morbidity in chronic respiratory disease and represent a therapeutic challenge. Recently, the ability of a novel alginate oligomer (OligoG) to potentiate the effect of antibiotics against gram-negative, multi-drug-resistant bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation in vitro has been described. Interaction of OligoG with the cell surface of PA was characterized at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential measurement (surface charge), and sizing measurements (dynamic light scattering). The ability of OligoG to modify motility was studied in motility assays. AFM demonstrated binding of OligoG to the bacterial cell surface, which was irreversible after exposure to hydrodynamic shear (5,500 × g). Zeta potential analysis (pH 5-9; 0.1-0.001 M NaCl) demonstrated that binding was associated with marked changes in the bacterial surface charge (-30.9 ± 0.8 to -47.0 ± 2.3 mV; 0.01 M NaCl [pH 5]; P < 0.001). Sizing analysis demonstrated that alteration of surface charge was associated with cell aggregation with a 2- to 3-fold increase in mean particle size at OligoG concentrations greater than 2% (914 ± 284 to 2599 ± 472 nm; 0.01 M NaCl [pH 5]; P < 0.001). These changes were associated with marked dose-dependent inhibition in bacterial swarming motility in PA and Burkholderia spp. The ability of OligoG to bind to a bacterial surface, modulate surface charge, induce microbial aggregation, and inhibit motility represents important direct mechanisms by which antibiotic potentiation and biofilm disruption is affected. These results highlight the value of combining multiple nanoscale technologies to further our understanding of the mechanisms of action of novel antibacterial therapies.

  12. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, PD 169316, inhibits flagellar motility in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Srinivas; Mukhopadhyay, Aakash Gautam; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2017-09-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been demonstrated to regulate flagellar/ciliary motility of spermatozoa and miracidia of Schistosoma mansoni. However, the role of MAPKs in mediating flagella-driven motility of Leishmania donovani is unexplored. We investigated the function of MAPKs in motility regulation of L. donovani using pharmacological inhibitors and activators of various MAPKs and fast-capture videomicroscopy. Our studies have revealed that the inhibitor of p38 MAPK, PD 169316, significantly affected various motility parameters such as flagellar beat frequency, parasite swimming speed, waveform of the flagellum and resulted in reduced parasite motility. Together, our results suggest that a MAPK, similar to human p38 MAPK, is implicated in flagellar motility regulation of L. donovani. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Daclatasvir inhibits hepatitis C virus NS5A motility and hyper-accumulation of phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Chukkapalli, Vineela; Berger, Kristi L.; Kelly, Sean M.; Thomas, Meryl; Deiters, Alexander; Randall, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have the potential to revolutionize the HCV therapeutic regime. An integral component of DAA combination therapies are HCV NS5A inhibitors. It has previously been proposed that NS5A DAAs inhibit two functions of NS5A: RNA replication and virion assembly. In this study, we characterize the impact of a prototype NS5A DAA, daclatasvir (DCV), on HCV replication compartment formation. DCV impaired HCV replicase localization and NS5A motility. In order to characterize the mechanism behind altered HCV replicase localization, we examined the impact of DCV on the interaction of NS5A with its essential cellular cofactor, phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase III α (PI4KA). We observed that DCV does not inhibit PI4KA directly, nor does it impair early events of the NS5A-PI4KA interaction that can occur when NS5A is expressed alone. NS5A functions that are unaffected by DCV include PI4KA binding, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation, and a basal accumulation of the PI4KA product, PI4P. However, DCV impairs late steps in PI4KA activation that requires NS5A expressed in the context of the HCV polyprotein. These NS5A functions include hyper-stimulation of PI4P levels and appropriate replication compartment formation. The data are most consistent with a model wherein DCV inhibits conformational changes in the NS5A protein or protein complex formations that occur in the context of HCV polyprotein expression and stimulate PI4P hyper-accumulation and replication compartment formation. PMID:25546252

  14. Matriptase-2 inhibits HECV motility and tubule formation in vitro and tumour angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Webb, Siobhan L; Sanders, Andrew J; Mason, Malcolm D; Jiang, Wen G

    2013-03-01

    The type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSP) are cell surface proteolytic enzymes that mediate a diverse range of cellular functions, including tumour invasion and metastasis. Matriptase-2 is a member of the TTSP family and has been shown to have a key role in cancer progression. The role of matriptase-2 in angiogenesis and angiogenesis-related cancer progression is currently poorly understood. This study aims to elucidate the role of matriptase-2 in tumour angiogenesis. Matriptase-2 was over-expressed in human vascular endothelial cells, HECV, using a mammalian expression plasmid. The altered cells were used in a number of in vitro and in vivo assays designed to investigate the involvement of matriptase-2 in angiogenesis. Over-expression had no significant effect on the growth and adhesion of HECV cells. However, there was a significant reduction in the motility of the cells and their ability to form tubules in an artificial basement membrane (p < 0.01 for both). HECV(mat2 exp) cells inoculated into CD-1 athymic mice along with either PC-3 prostate cancer cells or MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells showed a dramatic decrease in tumour development and growth in the prostate tumours (p < 0.01) and a lesser, non-significant, decrease in the breast tumours (p = 0.08). Over-expression of matriptase-2 also decreased urokinase type plasminogen activator total protein levels in HECV and prostate cells. The study concludes that matriptase-2 has the ability to suppress the angiogenic nature of HECV cells in vitro and in vivo. It also suggests that matriptase-2 could have a potential role in prostate and breast tumour suppression through its anti-angiogenic properties.

  15. Cell division resets polarity and motility for the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Cameron W; Madukoma, Chinedu S; Mahserejian, Shant; Alber, Mark S; Shrout, Joshua D

    2014-11-01

    Links between cell division and other cellular processes are poorly understood. It is difficult to simultaneously examine division and function in most cell types. Most of the research probing aspects of cell division has experimented with stationary or immobilized cells or distinctly asymmetrical cells. Here we took an alternative approach by examining cell division events within motile groups of cells growing on solid medium by time-lapse microscopy. A total of 558 cell divisions were identified among approximately 12,000 cells. We found an interconnection of division, motility, and polarity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. For every division event, motile cells stop moving to divide. Progeny cells of binary fission subsequently move in opposing directions. This behavior involves M. xanthus Frz proteins that regulate M. xanthus motility reversals but is independent of type IV pilus "S motility." The inheritance of opposing polarity is correlated with the distribution of the G protein RomR within these dividing cells. The constriction at the point of division limits the intracellular distribution of RomR. Thus, the asymmetric distribution of RomR at the parent cell poles becomes mirrored at new poles initiated at the site of division.

  16. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on Kupffer cell phagosomal motility, bacterial clearance, and liver function

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christa Y; Molina, Ramon M; Louzada, Andressa; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Background Zinc oxide engineered nanoparticles (ZnO ENPs) have potential as nanomedicines due to their inherent properties. Studies have described their pulmonary impact, but less is known about the consequences of ZnO ENP interactions with the liver. This study was designed to describe the effects of ZnO ENPs on the liver and Kupffer cells after intravenous (IV) administration. Materials and methods First, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted to determine the tissue distribution of neutron-activated 65ZnO ENPs post-IV injection in Wistar Han rats. Then, a noninvasive in vivo method to assess Kupffer cell phagosomal motility was employed using ferromagnetic iron particles and magnetometry. We also examined whether prior IV injection of ZnO ENPs altered Kupffer cell bactericidal activity on circulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Serum and liver tissues were collected to assess liver-injury biomarkers and histological changes, respectively. Results We found that the liver was the major site of initial uptake of 65ZnO ENPs. There was a time-dependent decrease in tissue levels of 65Zn in all organs examined, refecting particle dissolution. In vivo magnetometry showed a time-dependent and transient reduction in Kupffer cell phagosomal motility. Animals challenged with P. aeruginosa 24 hours post-ZnO ENP injection showed an initial (30 minutes) delay in vascular bacterial clearance. However, by 4 hours, IV-injected bacteria were cleared from the blood, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys. Seven days post-ZnO ENP injection, creatine phosphokinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in serum were significantly increased. Histological evidence of hepatocyte damage and marginated neutrophils were observed in the liver. Conclusion Administration of ZnO ENPs transiently inhibited Kupffer cell phagosomal motility and later induced hepatocyte injury, but did not alter bacterial clearance from the blood or killing in the liver, spleen, lungs, or kidneys. Our data show that

  17. Galectin-3 inhibition suppresses drug resistance, motility, invasion and angiogenic potential in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Leonardo; Yu, Yuefei; Cannon, Martin J; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Rahman, Rakhshanda L; Nguyen, Diane D; Grizzi, Fabio; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecologic malignancy worldwide. Since the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is incompletely understood, and there are no available screening techniques for early detection, most patients are diagnosed with advanced, incurable disease. In an effort to develop innovative and effective therapies for ovarian cancer, we tested the effectiveness of Galecti-3C in vitro. This is a truncated, dominant negative form of Galectin-3, which is thought to act by blocking endogenous Galectin-3. We produced a truncated, dominant-negative form of Galectin-3, namely Galetic-3C. Ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cells from ovarian cancer patients were treated with Galectin-3C, and growth, drug sensitivity, and angiogenesis were tested. We show, for the first time, that Galectin-3C significantly reduces the growth, motility, invasion, and angiogenic potential of cultured OC cell lines and primary cells established from OC patients. Our findings indicate that Galectin-3C is a promising new compound for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Swimming motility plays a key role in the stochastic dynamics of cell clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xianghong; Nellas, Ricky B.; Byrn, Matthew W.; Russell, Matthew H.; Bible, Amber N.; Alexandre, Gladys; Shen, Tongye

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic cell-to-cell interactions are a prerequisite to many biological processes, including development and biofilm formation. Flagellum induced motility has been shown to modulate the initial cell-cell or cell-surface interaction and to contribute to the emergence of macroscopic patterns. While the role of swimming motility in surface colonization has been analyzed in some detail, a quantitative physical analysis of transient interactions between motile cells is lacking. We examined the Brownian dynamics of swimming cells in a crowded environment using a model of motorized adhesive tandem particles. Focusing on the motility and geometry of an exemplary motile bacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which is capable of transient cell-cell association (clumping), we constructed a physical model with proper parameters for the computer simulation of the clumping dynamics. By modulating mechanical interaction (‘stickiness’) between cells and swimming speed, we investigated how equilibrium and active features affect the clumping dynamics. We found that the modulation of active motion is required for the initial aggregation of cells to occur at a realistic time scale. Slowing down the rotation of flagellar motors (and thus swimming speeds) is correlated to the degree of clumping, which is consistent with the experimental results obtained for A. brasilense.

  19. Postprandial water intake inhibits gastric antral motility with increase of cholecystokinin in humans.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Minashi, Keiko; Maeda, Masaki; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Shikou; Higuchi, Tatsuya; Sugimoto, Sayaka; Kawamura, Osamu; Mori, Masatomo

    2005-10-01

    The effects of postprandial water intake on the gastrointestinal tract have not been systematically investigated in humans. In 8 healthy volunteers, the gastric antral pressure was measured with a strain gauge transducer, while the esophageal and lower esophageal sphincter pressures were measured with an infused catheter with a Dent sleeve. The esophageal pH at 5 cm above the lower sphincter was measured with a microglass electrode. A standard test meal (560 kcal) was eaten and 500 ml water was ingested 1 h later. The plasma cholecystokinin level was assessed at 4-min intervals. As a control, the same study was done on another day with sham water intake. At 4 min after water intake, there was a significant decrease in gastric antral motility and a significant increase in the plasma cholecystokinin level. Water intake also significantly increased the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux. The rapid increase in cholecystokinin after water intake may be initiated by a feedback mechanism related to inflow of fatty chyme into the duodenum that inhibits gastric antral activity.

  20. The shift in GH3 cell shape and cell motility is dependent on MLCK and ROCK.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Rodríguez, Dulce; Solano Agama, Carmen; González-Pozos, Sirenia; Vicente Méndez-Méndez, Juan; Ortiz Plata, Alma; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Mendoza-Garrido, María E

    2017-05-01

    Cytoskeletal organization, actin-myosin contractility and the cell membrane together regulate cell morphology in response to the cell environment, wherein the extracellular matrix (ECM) is an indispensable component. Plasticity in cell shape enables cells to adapt their migration mode to their surroundings. GH3 endocrine cells respond to different ECM proteins, acquiring different morphologies: a rounded on collagen I-III (C I-III) and an elongated on collagen IV (C IV). However, the identities of the molecules that participate in these responses remain unknown. Considering that actin-myosin contractility is crucial to maintaining cell shape, we analyzed the participation of MLCK and ROCK in the acquisition of cell shape, the generation of cellular tension and the cell motility mode. We found that a rounded shape with high cortical tension depends on MLCK and ROCK, whereas in cells with an elongated shape, MLCK is the primary protein responsible for cell spreading. Further, in cells with a slow and directionally persistent motility, MLCK predominates, while rapid and erratic movement is ROCK-dependent. This behavior also correlates with GTPase activation. Cells on C I-III exhibited higher Rho-GTPase activity than cells on C IV and vice versa with Rac-GTPase activity, showing a plastic response of GH3 cells to their environment, leading to the generation of different cytoskeleton and membrane organizations and resulting in two movement strategies, rounded and fibroblastoid-like. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphorylation of Helicobacter pylori CagA by c-Abl leads to cell motility.

    PubMed

    Poppe, M; Feller, S M; Römer, G; Wessler, S

    2007-05-24

    Helicobacter pylori induces a strong motogenic response in infected gastric epithelial host cells, which is enhanced by translocation of the pathogenic factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) into host cells via a specialized type IV secretion system. Once injected into the cytosol CagA is rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated by Src family kinases followed by Src inactivation. Hence, it remained unknown why CagA is constantly phosphorylated in sustained H. pylori infections to induce cell migration, whereas other substrates of Src kinases are dephosphorylated. Here, we identify the non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl as a crucial mediator of H. pylori-induced migration and novel CagA kinase in epithelial cells. Upon H. pylori infection c-Abl directly interacts with CagA and localizes in focal adhesion complexes and membrane ruffles, which are highly dynamic cytoskeletal structures necessary for cell motility. Selective inhibition of c-Abl kinase activity by STI571 or shRNA abrogates sustained CagA phosphorylation and epithelial cell migration, indicating a pivotal role of c-Abl in H. pylori infection and pathogenicity. These results implicate c-Abl as a novel molecular target for therapeutic intervention in H. pylori-related gastric diseases.

  2. Automated detection of whole-cell mitochondrial motility and its dependence on cytoarchitectural integrity.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Judith; Chou, Philip; Eckmann, David M

    2015-07-01

    Current methodologies used for mitochondrial motility analysis tend to either overlook individual mitochondrial tracks or analyze only peripheral mitochondria instead of mitochondria in all regions of the cell. Furthermore, motility analysis of an individual mitochondrion is usually quantified by establishing an arbitrary threshold for "directed" motion. In this work, we created a custom, publicly available computational algorithm based on a previously published approach (Giedt et al., 2012. Ann Biomed Eng 40:1903-1916) in order to characterize the distribution of mitochondrial movements at the whole-cell level, while still preserving information about single mitochondria. Our technique is easy to use, robust, and computationally inexpensive. Images are first pre-processed for increased resolution, and then individual mitochondria are tracked based on object connectivity in space and time. When our method is applied to microscopy fields encompassing entire cells, we reveal that the mitochondrial net distances in fibroblasts follow a lognormal distribution within a given cell or group of cells. The ability to model whole-cell mitochondrial motility as a lognormal distribution provides a new quantitative paradigm for comparing mitochondrial motility in naïve and treated cells. We further demonstrate that microtubule and microfilament depolymerization shift the lognormal distribution in directions which indicate decreased and increased mitochondrial movement, respectively. These findings advance earlier work on neuronal axons (Morris and Hollenbeck, 1993. J Cell Sci 104:917-927) by relating them to a different cell type, applying them on a global scale, and automating measurement of mitochondrial motility in general.

  3. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is essential for GTPase subcellular localization and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Michelle; Kelvin, Alyson A.; Dunican, Dara J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Burrows, James F.; Jaworski, Jakub; Stevenson, Nigel J.; Dib, Karim; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Scott, Christopher J.; Long, Aideen; Johnston, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes are now emerging as potential therapeutic targets that control many cellular processes, but few have been demonstrated to control cell motility. Here, we show that ubiquitin-specific protease 17 (USP17) is rapidly and transiently induced in response to chemokines SDF-1/CXCL12 and IL-8/CXCL8 in both primary cells and cell lines, and that its depletion completely blocks chemokine-induced cell migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate that USP17 is required for both elongated and amoeboid motility, in addition to chemotaxis. USP17 has previously been reported to disrupt Ras localization and we now find that USP17 depletion blocks chemokine-induced subcellular relocalization of GTPases Cdc42, Rac and RhoA, which are GTPases essential for cell motility. Collectively, these results demonstrate that USP17 has a critical role in cell migration and may be a useful drug target for both inflammatory and metastatic disease. PMID:21448158

  4. Cell Shapes and Traction Forces Determine Stress in Motile Confluent Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Bi, Dapeng; Czajkowski, Michael; Manning, Lisa; Marchetti, Cristina

    Collective cell migration is a highly regulated process involved in wound healing, cancer metastasis and morphogenesis. The understanding of the regulatory mechanism requires the study of mechanical interactions among cells that coordinate their active motion. To this end, we develop a method that determines cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces. This approach allows us for the first time to calculate membrane tensions and hydrostatic pressures at a cellular level in collective migrating cell layers out of equilibrium. It helps us understand the mechanical origin of tissue stresses as previous inferred using Traction Force Microscopy (TFM). We test this approach on a new model of motile confluent tissue, which we term Self-propelled Voronoi Model (SPV) that incorporates cell elasticity, Contractility and motility. With the model, we explore the mechanical properties of confluent motile tissue as a function of cell activities and cell shapes in various geometries.

  5. Automated single-cell motility analysis on a chip using lensfree microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarsky, Ivan; Lyb, Yunbo; Weaver, Westbrook; Su, Ting-Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; di Carlo, Dino

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative cell motility studies are necessary for understanding biophysical processes, developing models for cell locomotion and for drug discovery. Such studies are typically performed by controlling environmental conditions around a lens-based microscope, requiring costly instruments while still remaining limited in field-of-view. Here we present a compact cell monitoring platform utilizing a wide-field (24 mm2) lensless holographic microscope that enables automated single-cell tracking of large populations that is compatible with a standard laboratory incubator. We used this platform to track NIH 3T3 cells on polyacrylamide gels over 20 hrs. We report that, over an order of magnitude of stiffness values, collagen IV surfaces lead to enhanced motility compared to fibronectin, in agreement with biological uses of these structural proteins. The increased throughput associated with lensfree on-chip imaging enables higher statistical significance in observed cell behavior and may facilitate rapid screening of drugs and genes that affect cell motility.

  6. Bidirectional Bacterial Gliding Motility Powered by the Collective Transport of Cell Surface Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hirofumi; Nakane, Daisuke; Chen, Hsuan-Yi

    2013-12-01

    The gliding motility of Flavobacterium johnsoniae is driven by moving surface adhesive proteins. Recently, these motility components were observed to travel along a closed loop on the cell surface. The mechanism by which such moving surface adhesins give rise to cell motion remains unknown. On the basis of the unique motility properties of F. johnsoniae, we present a generic model for bidirectional motion of rigidly coupled adhesins, which are propelled in opposite directions. Using analytical and numerical methods, we demonstrate that, for a sufficiently large adhesin speed, bidirectional motion arises from spontaneous symmetry breaking. The model also predicts that, close to the bifurcation point, a weak asymmetry in the binding dynamics is sufficient to facilitate directed motility, indicating that the direction of motion could be sensitively regulated internally in response to inhomogeneity of the environment.

  7. Nuclear actin modulates cell motility via transcriptional regulation of adhesive and cytoskeletal genes

    PubMed Central

    Sharili, Amir S.; Kenny, Fiona N.; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Connelly, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a classic biomechanical mediator of cell migration. While it is known that actin also shuttles in and out of the nucleus, its functions within this compartment remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how nuclear actin regulates keratinocyte gene expression and cell behavior. Gene expression profiling of normal HaCaT keratinocytes compared to HaCaTs over-expressing wild-type β-actin or β-actin tagged with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS-actin), identified multiple adhesive and cytoskeletal genes, such as MYL9, ITGB1, and VCL, which were significantly down-regulated in keratinocytes with high levels of nuclear actin. In addition, genes associated with transcriptional regulation and apoptosis were up-regulated in cells over expressing NLS-actin. Functionally, accumulation of actin in the nucleus altered cytoskeletal and focal adhesion organization and inhibited cell motility. Exclusion of endogenous actin from the nucleus by knocking down Importin 9 reversed this phenotype and enhanced cell migration. Based on these findings, we conclude that the level of actin in the nucleus is a transcriptional regulator for tuning keratinocyte migration. PMID:27650314

  8. Increased aerobic glycolysis is important for the motility of activated VSMC and inhibited by indirubin-3'-monoxime.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Elke H; Schachner, Daniel; Donati, Maddalena; Grojer, Christoph S; Dirsch, Verena M

    2016-08-01

    Increased aerobic glycolysis is a recognized feature of multiple cellular phenotypes and offers a potential point for drug interference, as pursued by anti-tumor agents targeting the Warburg effect. This study aimed at examining the role of aerobic glycolysis for migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and its susceptibility to the small molecule indirubin-3'-monoxime (I3MO). Activation of VSMC with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) resulted in migration and increased glycolytic activity which was accompanied by an increased glucose uptake and hexokinase (HK) 2 expression. Inhibition of glycolysis or hexokinase by pharmacological agents or siRNA-mediated knockdown significantly reduced the migratory behavior in VSMC without affecting cell viability or early actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. I3MO, previously recognized as inhibitor of VSMC migration, was able to counteract the PDGF-activated increase in glycolysis and HK2 abundance. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 could be identified as crucial event in upregulation of HK2 and glycolytic activity in PDGF-stimulated VSMC and as point of interference for I3MO. I3MO did not inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α-dependent transcription nor influence miRNA 143 levels, other potential regulators of HK2 levels. Overall, we demonstrate that increased aerobic glycolysis is an important factor for the motility of activated VSMC and that the anti-migratory property of I3MO may partly depend on impairment of glycolysis via a compromised STAT3/HK2 signaling axis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased aerobic glycolysis is important for the motility of activated VSMC and inhibited by indirubin-3′-monoxime

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Elke H.; Schachner, Daniel; Donati, Maddalena; Grojer, Christoph S.; Dirsch, Verena M.

    2016-01-01

    Increased aerobic glycolysis is a recognized feature of multiple cellular phenotypes and offers a potential point for drug interference, as pursued by anti-tumor agents targeting the Warburg effect. This study aimed at examining the role of aerobic glycolysis for migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and its susceptibility to the small molecule indirubin-3′-monoxime (I3MO). Activation of VSMC with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) resulted in migration and increased glycolytic activity which was accompanied by an increased glucose uptake and hexokinase (HK) 2 expression. Inhibition of glycolysis or hexokinase by pharmacological agents or siRNA-mediated knockdown significantly reduced the migratory behavior in VSMC without affecting cell viability or early actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. I3MO, previously recognized as inhibitor of VSMC migration, was able to counteract the PDGF-activated increase in glycolysis and HK2 abundance. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 could be identified as crucial event in upregulation of HK2 and glycolytic activity in PDGF-stimulated VSMC and as point of interference for I3MO. I3MO did not inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α-dependent transcription nor influence miRNA 143 levels, other potential regulators of HK2 levels. Overall, we demonstrate that increased aerobic glycolysis is an important factor for the motility of activated VSMC and that the anti-migratory property of I3MO may partly depend on impairment of glycolysis via a compromised STAT3/HK2 signaling axis. PMID:27185663

  10. Motile hepatocellular carcinoma cells preferentially secret sugar metabolism regulatory proteins via exosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lu, Shaohua; Zhou, Ye; Meng, Kun; Chen, Zhipeng; Cui, Yizhi; Shi, Yunfeng; Wang, Tong; He, Qing-Yu

    2017-07-01

    Exosomes are deliverers of critically functional proteins, capable of transforming target cells in numerous cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We hypothesize that the motility of HCC cells can be featured by comparative proteome of exosomes. Hence, we performed the super-SILAC-based MS analysis on the exosomes secreted by three human HCC cell lines, including the non-motile Hep3B cell, and the motile 97H and LM3 cells. More than 1400 exosomal proteins were confidently quantified in each MS analysis with highly biological reproducibility. We justified that 469 and 443 exosomal proteins represented differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) in the 97H/Hep3B and LM3/Hep3B comparisons, respectively. These DEPs focused on sugar metabolism-centric canonical pathways per ingenuity pathway analysis, which was consistent with the gene ontology analysis on biological process enrichment. These pathways included glycolysis I, gluconeogenesis I and pentose phosphate pathways; and the DEPs enriched in these pathways could form a tightly connected network. By analyzing the relative abundance of proteins and translating mRNAs, we found significantly positive correlation between exosomes and cells. The involved exosomal proteins were again focusing on sugar metabolism. In conclusion, motile HCC cells tend to preferentially export more sugar metabolism-associated proteins via exosomes that differentiate them from non-motile HCC cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Computer-assisted quantification of motile and invasive capabilities of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Karthiga Santhana; Pillong, Max; Kunze, Jens; Burghardt, Isabel; Weller, Michael; Grotzer, Michael A.; Schneider, Gisbert; Baumgartner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput analysis of cancer cell dissemination and its control by extrinsic and intrinsic cellular factors is hampered by the lack of adequate and efficient analytical tools for quantifying cell motility. Oncology research would greatly benefit from such a methodology that allows to rapidly determine the motile behaviour of cancer cells under different environmental conditions, including inside three-dimensional matrices. We combined automated microscopy imaging of two- and three-dimensional cell cultures with computational image analysis into a single assay platform for studying cell dissemination in high-throughput. We have validated this new approach for medulloblastoma, a metastatic paediatric brain tumour, in combination with the activation of growth factor signalling pathways with established pro-migratory functions. The platform enabled the detection of primary tumour and patient-derived xenograft cell sensitivity to growth factor-dependent motility and dissemination and identified tumour subgroup-specific responses to selected growth factors of excellent diagnostic value. PMID:26486848

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates cell motility in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ssu-Ming; Lin, Chingju; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Chiu, Chien-Ming; Fang, Chia-Wei; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Dar-Ren; Yeh, Wei-Lan

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has been shown to affect cancer cell metastasis and migration. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of BDNF-induced cell migration in colon cancer cells. The migratory activities of two colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and SW480, were found to be increased in the presence of human BDNF. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO)-1 is known to be involved in the development and progression of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie HO-1 in the regulation of colon cancer cell migration remain unclear. Expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA increased in response to BDNF stimulation. The BDNF-induced increase in cell migration was antagonized by a HO-1 inhibitor and HO-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also increased in response to BDNF stimulation, as did VEGF mRNA expression and transcriptional activity. The increase in BDNF-induced cancer cell migration was antagonized by a VEGF-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, transfection with HO-1 siRNA effectively reduced the increased VEGF expression induced by BDNF. The BDNF-induced cell migration was regulated by the ERK, p38, and Akt signaling pathways. Furthermore, BDNF-increased HO-1 and VEGF promoter transcriptional activity were inhibited by ERK, p38, and AKT pharmacological inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants in colon cancer cells. These results indicate that BDNF increases the migration of colon cancer cells by regulating VEGF/HO-1 activation through the ERK, p38, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. The results of this study may provide a relevant contribution to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which BDNF promotes colon cancer cell motility.

  13. Activation of the complement cascade enhances motility of leukemic cells by downregulating expression of HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Borkowska-Rzeszotek, S; Kubis, E; Bujko, K; Brzeźniakiewicz-Janus, K; Bolkun, L; Kloczko, J; Moniuszko, M; Basak, G W; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ratajczak, M Z

    2017-01-01

    As a crucial arm of innate immunity, the complement cascade (ComC) is involved both in mobilization of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow (BM) into peripheral blood and in their homing to BM. Despite the fact that ComC cleavage fragments alone do not chemoattract normal HSPCs, we found that leukemia cell lines as well as clonogenic blasts from chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients respond robustly to C3 and C5 cleavage fragments by chemotaxis and increased adhesion. This finding was supported by the detection of C3a and C5a receptors in cells from human malignant hematopoietic cell lines and patient blasts at the mRNA (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and protein level (fluorescence-activated cell sorting), and by the demonstration that these receptors respond to stimulation by C3a and C5a by phosphorylation of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and protein kinase B (PKB/AKT). We also found that inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a negative regulator of ComC-mediated trafficking of leukemic cells, and that stimulation of leukemic cells by C3 or C5 cleavage fragments activates p38 MAPK, which downregulates HO-1 expression, rendering cells more mobile. We conclude that activation of the ComC in leukemia/lymphoma patients (for example, as a result of accompanying infections) enhances the motility of malignant cells and contributes to their spread in a p38 MAPK–HO-1-dependent manner. Therefore, inhibition of p38 MAPK or upregulation of HO-1 by small-molecule modulators would have a beneficial effect on ameliorating cell migration-mediated expansion of leukemia/lymphoma cells when the ComC becomes activated. PMID:27451975

  14. Activation of the complement cascade enhances motility of leukemic cells by downregulating expression of HO-1.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Borkowska-Rzeszotek, S; Kubis, E; Bujko, K; Brzeźniakiewicz-Janus, K; Bolkun, L; Kloczko, J; Moniuszko, M; Basak, G W; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ratajczak, M Z

    2017-02-01

    As a crucial arm of innate immunity, the complement cascade (ComC) is involved both in mobilization of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow (BM) into peripheral blood and in their homing to BM. Despite the fact that ComC cleavage fragments alone do not chemoattract normal HSPCs, we found that leukemia cell lines as well as clonogenic blasts from chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients respond robustly to C3 and C5 cleavage fragments by chemotaxis and increased adhesion. This finding was supported by the detection of C3a and C5a receptors in cells from human malignant hematopoietic cell lines and patient blasts at the mRNA (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and protein level (fluorescence-activated cell sorting), and by the demonstration that these receptors respond to stimulation by C3a and C5a by phosphorylation of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and protein kinase B (PKB/AKT). We also found that inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a negative regulator of ComC-mediated trafficking of leukemic cells, and that stimulation of leukemic cells by C3 or C5 cleavage fragments activates p38 MAPK, which downregulates HO-1 expression, rendering cells more mobile. We conclude that activation of the ComC in leukemia/lymphoma patients (for example, as a result of accompanying infections) enhances the motility of malignant cells and contributes to their spread in a p38 MAPK-HO-1-dependent manner. Therefore, inhibition of p38 MAPK or upregulation of HO-1 by small-molecule modulators would have a beneficial effect on ameliorating cell migration-mediated expansion of leukemia/lymphoma cells when the ComC becomes activated.

  15. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via LPA4 and LPA6 negatively regulates cell motile activities of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kaede; Fukushima, Kaori; Onishi, Yuka; Inui, Karin; Node, Yusuke; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2017-01-29

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an extracellular biological lipid and interacts with six subtypes of G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA1 to LPA6). LPA receptors exhibit a variety of cellular functions, depending on types of cancer cells. In this study, to assess the roles of LPA4 and LPA6 in cell growth and motile activities of colon cancer cells, LPA4 and LPA6 knockdown cells were established from DLD1 and HCT116 cells. LPA treatment increased the cell growth activities of LPA4 and LPA6 knockdown cells, compared with control cells. The cell motile activities of LPA4 and LPA6 knockdown cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. To evaluate the effects of LPA4 and LPA6 on cell motile activity induced by anticancer drug, long-term fluorouracil (5-FU) treated (DLD-5FU) cells were generated. The expression levels of LPAR1, LPAR4 and LPAR6 genes were significantly increased in DLD-5FU cells. DLD-5FU cells showed the high cell motile activity, compared with DLD1 cells. The increased cell motile activity was markedly stimulated by LPA4 and LPA6 knockdown. In contrast, the cell motile activity enhanced by 5-FU treatment was suppressed by LPA1 knockdown. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA4 and LPA6 negatively regulates the cell motile activities of DLD1 and HCT116 cells as well as long-term 5-FU treated cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The MIG-2/integrin interaction strengthens cell-matrix adhesion and modulates cell motility.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaohua; Ma, Yan-Qing; Tu, Yizeng; Chen, Ka; Wu, Shan; Fukuda, Koichi; Qin, Jun; Plow, Edward F; Wu, Chuanyue

    2007-07-13

    Integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion plays an important role in control of cell behavior. We report here that MIG-2, a widely expressed focal adhesion protein, interacts with beta1 and beta3 integrin cytoplasmic domains. Integrin binding is mediated by a single site within the MIG-2 FERM domain. Functionally, the MIG-2/integrin interaction recruits MIG-2 to focal adhesions. Furthermore, using alphaIIbbeta3 integrin-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells, a well described model system for integrin activation, we show that MIG-2 promotes integrin activation and enhances cell-extracellular matrix adhesion. Although MIG-2 is expressed in many cell types, it is deficient in certain colon cancer cells. Expression of MIG-2, but not of an integrin binding-defective MIG-2 mutant, in MIG-2-null colon cancer cells strengthened cell-matrix adhesion, promoted focal adhesion formation, and reduced cell motility. These results suggest that the MIG-2/integrin interaction is an important element in the cellular control of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion and that loss of this interaction likely contributes to high motility of colon cancer cells.

  17. Effects of Synbiotic2000™ Forte on the Intestinal Motility and Interstitial Cells of Cajal in TBI Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limei; Zeng, Jing; Ma, Yuanyuan; Tan, Min; Zhou, Min; Fang, Huan; Bengmark, Stig; Zhu, Jingci

    2017-03-16

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Synbiotic2000™ Forte on the intestinal motility and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in traumatic brain injury (TBI) mouse model. Kunming mice were randomly divided into sham operation group (S group), enteral nutrition group with TBI (E group), and Synbiotic2000™ Forte group with TBI (P group). The contractile activity of the intestinal smooth muscle, densities and ultrastructure of the ICC, kit protein concentration, weight, and defecation of mice were monitored and analyzed. TBI markedly suppressed contractile activity of the intestinal smooth muscle (P < 0.01), which led to a reduction of defecation (P < 0.01) and weight (P < 0.01). However, application of Synbiotic2000™ Forte significantly improved contractile activity of the small intestine (P < 0.01), which may be related to protective effects to the interstitial cells of Cajal, smooth muscle cells, and enteric neurons. TBI impaired ICC networks and densities (P < 0.01), events that were protected by the application of Synbiotic2000™ Forte. Synbiotic2000™ Forte may attenuate TBI-mediated inhibition of the kit protein pathway. Synbiotic2000™ Forte may improve intestinal motility and protect the ICC in the TBI mouse. These findings provide a novel support for the application of Synbiotic2000™ Forte in intestinal motility disturbance after TBI.

  18. Putrescine importer PlaP contributes to swarming motility and urothelial cell invasion in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Shin; Sakai, Yumi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Muth, Aaron; Phanstiel, Otto; Rather, Philip N

    2013-05-31

    Previously, we reported that the speA gene, encoding arginine decarboxylase, is required for swarming in the urinary tract pathogen Proteus mirabilis. In addition, this previous study suggested that putrescine may act as a cell-to-cell signaling molecule (Sturgill, G., and Rather, P. N. (2004) Mol. Microbiol. 51, 437-446). In this new study, PlaP, a putative putrescine importer, was characterized in P. mirabilis. In a wild-type background, a plaP null mutation resulted in a modest swarming defect and slightly decreased levels of intracellular putrescine. In a P. mirabilis speA mutant with greatly reduced levels of intracellular putrescine, plaP was required for the putrescine-dependent rescue of swarming motility. When a speA/plaP double mutant was grown in the presence of extracellular putrescine, the intracellular levels of putrescine were greatly reduced compared with the speA mutant alone, indicating that PlaP functioned as the primary putrescine importer. In urothelial cell invasion assays, a speA mutant exhibited a 50% reduction in invasion when compared with wild type, and this defect could be restored by putrescine in a PlaP-dependent manner. The putrescine analog Triamide-44 partially inhibited the uptake of putrescine by PlaP and decreased both putrescine stimulated swarming and urothelial cell invasion in a speA mutant.

  19. KPNB1-mediated nuclear import is required for motility and inflammatory transcription factor activity in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Stelma, Tamara; Leaner, Virna D.

    2017-01-01

    Karyopherin β1 is a nuclear import protein involved in the transport of proteins containing a nuclear localisation sequence. Elevated Karyopherin β1 expression has been reported in cancer and transformed cells and is essential for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Transcription factors such as NFĸB and AP-1 contain a nuclear localisation sequence and initiate the expression of multiple factors associated with inflammation and cancer cell biology. Our study investigated the effect of inhibiting nuclear import via Karyopherin β1 on cancer cell motility and inflammatory signaling using siRNA and the novel small molecule, Inhibitor of Nuclear Import-43, INI-43. Inhibition of Karyopherin β1 led to reduced migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells. Karyopherin β1 is essential for the translocation of NFĸB into the nucleus as nuclear import inhibition caused its cytoplasmic retention and decreased transcriptional activity. A similar decrease was seen in AP-1 transcriptional activity upon Karyopherin β1 inhibition. Consequently reduced interleukin-6, interleukin-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor alpha and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor expression, target genes of NFkB and AP-1, was observed. Migration studies inhibiting individual transcription factors suggested that INI-43 may affect a combination of signaling events. Our study provides further evidence that inhibiting KPNB1 has anti-cancer effects and shows promise as a chemotherapeutic target. PMID:28427184

  20. Silencing GFAP isoforms in astrocytoma cells disturbs laminin-dependent motility and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Moeton, Martina; Kanski, Regina; Stassen, Oscar M J A; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Geerts, Dirk; van Tijn, Paula; Wiche, Gerhard; van Strien, Miriam E; Hol, Elly M

    2014-07-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate filament protein expressed in astrocytes and neural stem cells. The GFAP gene is alternatively spliced, and expression of GFAP is highly regulated during development, on brain damage, and in neurodegenerative diseases. GFAPα is the canonical splice variant and is expressed in all GFAP-positive cells. In the human brain, the alternatively spliced transcript GFAPδ marks specialized astrocyte populations, such as subpial astrocytes and the neurogenic astrocytes in the human subventricular zone. We here show that shifting the GFAP isoform ratio in favor of GFAPδ in astrocytoma cells, by selectively silencing the canonical isoform GFAPα with short hairpin RNAs, induced a change in integrins, a decrease in plectin, and an increase in expression of the extracellular matrix component laminin. Together, this did not affect cell proliferation but resulted in a significantly decreased motility of astrocytoma cells. In contrast, a down-regulation of all GFAP isoforms led to less cell spreading, increased integrin expression, and a >100-fold difference in the adhesion of astrocytoma cells to laminin. In summary, isoform-specific silencing of GFAP revealed distinct roles of a specialized GFAP network in regulating the interaction of astrocytoma cells with the extracellular matrix through laminin.-Moeton, M., Kanski, R., Stassen, O. M. J. A., Sluijs, J. A., Geerts, D., van Tijn, P., Wiche, G., van Strien, M. E., Hol, E. M. Silencing GFAP isoforms in astrocytoma cells disturbs laminin dependent motility and cell adhesion. © FASEB.

  1. The integrin inhibitor cilengitide affects meningioma cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wilisch-Neumann, Annette; Kliese, Nadine; Pachow, Doreen; Schneider, Thomas; Warnke, Jan-Peter; Braunsdorf, Werner Ek; Böhmer, Frank-Dietmar; Hass, Peter; Pasemann, Diana; Helbing, Cornelia; Kirches, Elmar; Mawrin, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Meningiomas are frequent intracranial or spinal neoplasms, which recur frequently and can show aggressive clinical behaviour. We elucidated the impact of the integrin inhibitor cilengitide on migration, proliferation, and radiosensitization of meningioma cells. We analyzed integrin expression in tissue microarrays of human meningiomas and the antimeningioma properties of cilengitide in cell cultures, subcutaneous and intracranial nude mouse models by measuring tumor volumes and survival times. αvβ5 was the predominantly expressed integrin heterodimer in meningiomas, whereas αvβ3 was mainly detected in tumor blood vessels. Application of up to 100 μg/mL cilengitide resulted in only mildly reduced proliferation/survival of meningioma cell lines. Effects on cell survival could be enhanced by irradiation. One μg/mL cilengitide was sufficient to significantly inhibit meningioma cell migration and invasion in vitro. A daily dosage of 75 mg/kg did neither affect tumor volumes nor overall survival (P = 0.813, log-rank test), but suppressed brain invasion in a significant fraction of treated animals. A combination of 75 mg/kg cilengitide daily and irradiation (2 × 5 Gy) led to a 67% reduction of MRI-estimated tumor volumes in the intracranial model (P < 0.01), whereas the corresponding reduction reached by irradiation alone was only 55% (P < 0.05). These data show that a monotherapy with cilengitide is not likely to achieve major responses in rapidly growing malignant meningiomas, although brain invasion may be reduced because of the strong antimigratory properties of the drug. The combination with radiotherapy warrants further attention. ©2013 AACR.

  2. Human NK cell development requires CD56-mediated motility and formation of the developmental synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Gunesch, Justin T.; Dixon, Amera; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    While distinct stages of natural killer (NK) cell development have been defined, the molecular interactions that shape human NK cell maturation are poorly understood. Here we define intercellular interactions between developing NK cells and stromal cells which, through contact-dependent mechanisms, promote the generation of mature, functional human NK cells from CD34+ precursors. We show that developing NK cells undergo unique, developmental stage-specific sustained and transient interactions with developmentally supportive stromal cells, and that the relative motility of NK cells increases as they move through development in vitro and ex vivo. These interactions include the formation of a synapse between developing NK cells and stromal cells, which we term the developmental synapse. Finally, we identify a role for CD56 in developmental synapse structure, NK cell motility and NK cell development. Thus, we define the developmental synapse leading to human NK cell functional maturation. PMID:27435370

  3. A novel role for BRCA1 in regulating breast cancer cell spreading and motility

    PubMed Central

    Coene, Elisabeth D.; Gadelha, Catarina; White, Nicholas; Malhas, Ashraf; Thomas, Benjamin; Shaw, Michael

    2011-01-01

    BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains in BRCA1 are essential for tumor suppressor function, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We identified ezrin, radixin, and moesin as BRCA1 BRCT domain–interacting proteins. Ezrin–radixin–moesin (ERM) and F-actin colocalized with BRCA1 at the plasma membrane (PM) of cancer cells, especially at leading edges and focal adhesion sites. In stably expressing cancer cells, high levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-BRCA11634–1863 acted as a dominant-negative factor, displacing endogenous BRCA1 from the PM. This led to delayed cell spreading, increased spontaneous motility, and irregular monolayer wound healing. MCF-7 cells (intact BRCA1) showed lower motility than HCC1937 cells (truncated BRCA1), but expression of EGFP-BRCA11634–1863 in MCF-7 increased motility. Conversely, full-length BRCA1 expression in HCC1937 decreased motility but only if the protein retained ubiquitin ligase activity. We conclude that full-length BRCA1 is important for complete tumor suppressor activity via interaction of its BRCT domains with ERM at the PM, controlling spreading and motility of cancer cells via ubiquitin ligase activity. PMID:21282464

  4. GLP-1 and GLP-2 act in concert to inhibit fasted, but not fed, small bowel motility in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Ayhan; Näslund, Erik; Holst, Jens Juul; Hellström, Per M

    2002-07-15

    Small bowel motility was studied in rats at increasing (1-20 pmol/kg/min) intravenous doses of either glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) alone, or in combination in the fasted and fed state. There was a dose-dependent inhibitory action of GLP-1 on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC), where the dose of 5 pmol/kg/min induced an increased MMC cycle length. No effect was seen with GLP-2 alone, but the combination of GLP-1 and GLP-2 induced a more pronounced inhibitory effect, with significant increase of the MMC cycle length from a dose of 2 pmol/kg/min. During fed motility, infusion of GLP-1 resulted in an inhibition of spiking activity compared to control. In contrast, infusion of GLP-2 only numerically increased spiking activity compared to control, while the combination of GLP-1 and GLP-2 resulted in no change compared to control. In summary, this study demonstrates an additive effect of peripheral administration of GLP-1 and GLP-2 on fasted small bowel motility. In the fed state, GLP-1 and GLP-2 seem to display counter-balancing effects on motility of the small intestine.

  5. Microinjection of l-glutamate into the nucleus ambiguus partially inhibits gastric motility through the NMDA receptor - nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Zhao; Zhao, Shu-Zhen; Ai, Hong-Bin

    2014-06-01

    We have previously reported that both l-glutamate (l-Glu) and nitric oxide (NO) modulate gastric motility in the nucleus ambiguus (NA). The aim of this study is to explore the potential correlation between the l-Glu and NO. A latex balloon connected to a pressure transducer was inserted into the pylorus through the fundus of anesthetized male Wistar rats to continuously record changes in gastric smooth muscle contractile curves. Pretreatment with the NO-synthase inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methylester (l-NAME) did not completely abolish the inhibitory effect of l-Glu on gastric motility, but intravenous injection of the ganglionic blocker hexamethonium bromide (Hb) did. By using a specific N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, we blocked the inhibitory effect of the NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on gastric motility. These results suggest that microinjections of l-Glu into the NA inhibits gastric motility by activating the cholinergic preganglionic neurons, partially through the NMDA receptor - NO pathway.

  6. PDE8 controls CD4(+) T cell motility through the PDE8A-Raf-1 kinase signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Basole, Chaitali P; Nguyen, Rebecca K; Lamothe, Katie; Vang, Amanda; Clark, Robert; Baillie, George S; Epstein, Paul M; Brocke, Stefan

    2017-08-26

    The levels of cAMP are regulated by phosphodiesterase enzymes (PDEs), which are targets for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. We have previously shown that PDE8 regulates T cell motility. Here, for the first time, we report that PDE8A exerts part of its control of T cell function through the V-raf-1 murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog 1 (Raf-1) kinase signaling pathway. To examine T cell motility under physiologic conditions, we analyzed T cell interactions with endothelial cells and ligands in flow assays. The highly PDE8-selective enzymatic inhibitor PF-04957325 suppresses adhesion of in vivo myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) activated inflammatory CD4(+) T effector (Teff) cells to brain endothelial cells under shear stress. Recently, PDE8A was shown to associate with Raf-1 creating a compartment of low cAMP levels around Raf-1 thereby protecting it from protein kinase A (PKA) mediated inhibitory phosphorylation. To test the function of this complex in Teff cells, we used a cell permeable peptide that selectively disrupts the PDE8A-Raf-1 interaction. The disruptor peptide inhibits the Teff-endothelial cell interaction more potently than the enzymatic inhibitor. Furthermore, the LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction was identified as a target of disruptor peptide mediated reduction of adhesion, spreading and locomotion of Teff cells under flow. Mechanistically, we observed that disruption of the PDE8A-Raf-1 complex profoundly alters Raf-1 signaling in Teff cells. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that PDE8A inhibition by enzymatic inhibitors or PDE8A-Raf-1 kinase complex disruptors decreases Teff cell adhesion and migration under flow, and represents a novel approach to target T cells in inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Sabil; Pilans, Didzis; Makurath, Monika; Hermans, Thomas M.; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2014-08-28

    Cell motions are driven by coordinated actions of the intracellular cytoskeleton – actin, microtubules (MTs) and substrate/focal adhesions (FAs). This coordination is altered in metastatic cancer cells resulting in deregulated and increased cellular motility. Microfabrication tools, including photolithography, micromolding, microcontact printing, wet stamping and microfluidic devices have emerged as a powerful set of experimental tools with which to probe and define the differences in cytoskeleton organization/dynamics and cell motility patterns in non-metastatic and metastatic cancer cells. In this paper, we discuss four categories of microfabricated systems: (i) micropatterned substrates for studying of cell motility sub-processes (for example, MT targeting of FAs or cell polarization); (ii) systems for studying cell mechanical properties, (iii) systems for probing overall cell motility patterns within challenging geometric confines relevant to metastasis (for example, linear and ratchet geometries), and (iv) microfluidic devices that incorporate co-cultures of multiple cell types and chemical gradients to mimic in vivo intravasation/extravasation steps of metastasis. Finally, together, these systems allow for creating controlled microenvironments that not only mimic complex soft tissues, but are also compatible with live cell high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of single cell behavior.

  8. Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells

    DOE PAGES

    Huda, Sabil; Pilans, Didzis; Makurath, Monika; ...

    2014-08-28

    Cell motions are driven by coordinated actions of the intracellular cytoskeleton – actin, microtubules (MTs) and substrate/focal adhesions (FAs). This coordination is altered in metastatic cancer cells resulting in deregulated and increased cellular motility. Microfabrication tools, including photolithography, micromolding, microcontact printing, wet stamping and microfluidic devices have emerged as a powerful set of experimental tools with which to probe and define the differences in cytoskeleton organization/dynamics and cell motility patterns in non-metastatic and metastatic cancer cells. In this paper, we discuss four categories of microfabricated systems: (i) micropatterned substrates for studying of cell motility sub-processes (for example, MT targeting ofmore » FAs or cell polarization); (ii) systems for studying cell mechanical properties, (iii) systems for probing overall cell motility patterns within challenging geometric confines relevant to metastasis (for example, linear and ratchet geometries), and (iv) microfluidic devices that incorporate co-cultures of multiple cell types and chemical gradients to mimic in vivo intravasation/extravasation steps of metastasis. Finally, together, these systems allow for creating controlled microenvironments that not only mimic complex soft tissues, but are also compatible with live cell high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of single cell behavior.« less

  9. Microfabricated Systems and Assays for Studying the Cytoskeletal Organization, Micromechanics, and Motility Patterns of Cancerous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Sabil; Pilans, Didzis; Makurath, Monika; Hermans, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cell motions are driven by coordinated actions of the intracellular cytoskeleton – actin, microtubules (MTs) and substrate/focal adhesions (FAs). This coordination is altered in metastatic cancer cells resulting in deregulated and increased cellular motility. Microfabrication tools, including photolithography, micromolding, microcontact printing, wet stamping and microfluidic devices have emerged as a powerful set of experimental tools with which to probe and define the differences in cytoskeleton organization/dynamics and cell motility patterns in non-metastatic and metastatic cancer cells. In this review, we discuss four categories of microfabricated systems: (i) micropatterned substrates for studying of cell motility sub-processes (for example, MT targeting of FAs or cell polarization); (ii) systems for studying cell mechanical properties, (iii) systems for probing overall cell motility patterns within challenging geometric confines relevant to metastasis (for example, linear and ratchet geometries), and (iv) microfluidic devices that incorporate co-cultures of multiple cells types and chemical gradients to mimic in vivo intravasation/extravasation steps of metastasis. Together, these systems allow for creating controlled microenvironments that not only mimic complex soft tissues, but are also compatible with live cell high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of single cell behavior. PMID:26900544

  10. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3a (eIF3a) Promotes Cell Proliferation and Motility in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Qian; Liu, Yu; Yao, Min Ya; Jin, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Identifying a target molecule that is crucially involved in pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis is necessary in developing an effective treatment. The study aimed to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) in the cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that the expression of eIF3a was upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as compared with its expression in normal pancreatic tissues. Knockdown of eIF3a by a specific shRNA caused significant decreases in cell proliferation and clonogenic abilities in pancreatic cancer SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Consistently, the pancreatic cancer cell growth rates were also impaired in xenotransplanted mice. Moreover, wound-healing assay showed that depletion of eIF3a significantly slowed down the wound recovery processes in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Transwell migration and invasion assays further showed that cell migration and invasion abilities were significantly inhibited by knockdown of eIF3a in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Statistical analysis of eIF3a expression in 140 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma samples revealed that eIF3a expression was significantly associated with tumor metastasis and TNM staging. These analyses suggest that eIF3a contributes to cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  11. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3a (eIF3a) Promotes Cell Proliferation and Motility in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Identifying a target molecule that is crucially involved in pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis is necessary in developing an effective treatment. The study aimed to investigate the role of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) in the cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic cancer. Our data showed that the expression of eIF3a was upregulated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma as compared with its expression in normal pancreatic tissues. Knockdown of eIF3a by a specific shRNA caused significant decreases in cell proliferation and clonogenic abilities in pancreatic cancer SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Consistently, the pancreatic cancer cell growth rates were also impaired in xenotransplanted mice. Moreover, wound-healing assay showed that depletion of eIF3a significantly slowed down the wound recovery processes in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Transwell migration and invasion assays further showed that cell migration and invasion abilities were significantly inhibited by knockdown of eIF3a in SW1990 and Capan-1 cells. Statistical analysis of eIF3a expression in 140 cases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma samples revealed that eIF3a expression was significantly associated with tumor metastasis and TNM staging. These analyses suggest that eIF3a contributes to cell proliferation and motility in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:27550487

  12. Autocrine motility factor promotes HER2 cleavage and signaling in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Dhong Hyo; Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Balan, Vitaly; Hogan, Victor; Tait, Larry; Wang, Yi; Raz, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin®) is an effective targeted therapy in HER2 overexpressing human breast carcinoma. However, many HER2-positive patients initially or eventually become resistant to this treatment, so elucidating mechanisms of trastuzumab resistance that emerge in breast carcinoma cells is clinically important. Here we show that autocrine motility factor (AMF) binds to HER2 and induces cleavage to the ectodomain-deleted and constitutively active form p95HER2. Mechanistic investigations indicated that interaction of AMF with HER2 triggers HER2 phosphorylation and metalloprotease-mediated ectodomain shedding, activating PI3K and MAPK signaling and ablating the ability of trastuzumab to inhibit breast carcinoma cell growth. Further, we found that HER2 expression and AMF secretion were inversely related in breast carcinoma cells. Based on this evidence that AMF may contribute to HER2-mediated breast cancer progression, our findings suggest that AMF-HER2 interaction might be a novel target for therapeutic management of breast cancer patients whose disease is resistant to trastuzumab. PMID:23248119

  13. Dispersal evolution in neoplasms: The role of disregulated metabolism in the evolution of cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Aktipis, C. Athena; Maley, Carlo C.; Pepper, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Here we apply the theoretical framework of dispersal evolution to understand the emergence of invasive and metastatic cells. We investigate whether the disregulated metabolism characteristic of cancer cells may play a causal role in selection for cell motility, and thus to the tissue invasion and metastasis that define cancer. Using an agent-based computational model, we demonstrate that cells with higher metabolism evolve to have higher rates of movement and that ‘neoplastic’ cells with higher metabolism rates are able to persist in a population of ‘normal’ cells with low metabolic rates, but only if increased metabolism is accompanied by increased motility. This is true even when the cost of motility is high. These findings suggest that higher rates of cell metabolism lead to selection for motile cells in pre-malignant neoplasms, which may pre-adapt cells for subsequent invasion and metastasis. This has important implications for understanding the progression of cancer from less invasive to more invasive cell types. PMID:21930797

  14. Suppressive effects of 3-bromopyruvate on the proliferation and the motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The compound 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) is an analogue of pyruvate, which is the final product of glycolysis that enters the citric acid cycle. The present study aimed to investigate the suppressive effects of 3BP on the proliferation and motility of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. HLF and PLC/PRF/5 cells were cultured with 3BP and subjected to an MTS assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Cell motility was analyzed using a scratch assay. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to determine the expression levels of cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9. Proliferation of both cell lines was significantly suppressed by 3BP at 100 µM (P<0.05). The expression level of cyclin D1 was decreased after 3BP treatment at 100 µM in both cell lines (P<0.05). Pyknotic nuclei were observed in the cells cultured with 3BP at 100 µM. These results revealed that 3BP suppressed cell proliferation, decreased the expression of cyclin D1, and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. 3BP significantly suppressed motility in both cell lines (P<0.05). The expression level of MMP9 was significantly decreased (P<0.05). 3BP suppressed the proliferation and motility of HCC cells by decreasing the expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9.

  15. Regulation of breast cancer cell motility by T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis-inducing protein

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis-inducing protein (Tiam1) is an Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac)-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor that was isolated based on its ability to induce a metastatic phenotype. In polarized migrating keratinocytes, Tiam1 is found at the leading edge, where it cooperates with the protease-activated receptor 1 (Par1) complex to establish front-to-rear polarity. Although a positive correlation has been observed between Tiam1 expression and tumor grade in a variety of human malignancies, including breast, its role in breast cancer cells has not yet been examined. Methods Tiam1 expression and Rac activity were examined in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines that exhibit different degrees of cell motility. The contribution of Tiam1 to cell motility was directly examined by using transwell motility and wound-healing assays. Results Although we observed a striking, positive correlation between Tiam1 expression and cell motility in the panel of breast cancer cell lines, we did not observe a correlation between Tiam1 expression and overall levels of Rac activity. Consistent with this, small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA)-mediated suppression of Tiam1 expression limits the motility of cell lines in which Tiam1 expression is high (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453) but does not substantially alter the overall levels of activated Rac. Tiam1 overexpression is also not sufficient to increase the motility of more poorly motile cells (T-47D) or to increase Rac activity. Immunofluorescence and cellular fractionations indicate that Tiam1 is found predominantly in the Golgi of breast cancer cells, and in the latter case, Tiam1 was shown to co-fractionate with a limited pool of Rac1. Consistent with this Golgi localization, Tiam1 supports cell motility and Golgi reorientation in response to serum in a wound-healing assay using MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435S cells. Conclusions Tiam1 expression correlates with cell

  16. Regulation of Motility, Invasion and Metastatic Potential of Squamous Cell Carcinoma by 1,25D3

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Su, Bing; Seshadri, Mukund; Luo, Wei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND 1,25D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, has been shown to exhibit broad spectrum anti-tumor activity in xenograft animal models. However, its activity against metastatic disease has not been extensively investigated. METHODS Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or 1,25D3-resistant variant SCC-DR cells were treated with 1,25D3. Actin organization was examined by immunofluorescence assay. Cell migration was assessed by “wound” healing and chemotactic migration assay. Cell invasion was assessed by Matrigel-based invasion assay and in situ zymography. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and secretion was examined by immunoblot analysis and ELISA, respectively. E-cadherin expression was assessed by flow cytometry, immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of E-cadherin was achieved by siRNA. Experimental metastasis mouse model was done by intravenous injection of tumor cells. Lung tumor development was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, gross observation and histology. RESULTS SCC cellular morphology and actin organization were altered by 10 nM of 1,25D3. 1,25D3 inhibited SCC cell motility and invasion, which was associated with reduced expression and secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. 1,25D3 promoted the expression of E-cadherin. These findings were not observed in SCC-DR cells. Knock down of E-cadherin rescued 1,25D3-inhibited cell migration. Intravenous injection of SCC or SCC-DR cells resulted in the establishment of extensive pulmonary lesions in saline-treated C3H mice. Treatment with 1,25D3 resulted in a marked reduction in the formation of lung tumor colonies in animals injected with SCC but not SCC-DR cells. CONCLUSIONS 1,25D3 suppresses SCC cell motility, invasion and metastasis, partially through the promotion of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22833444

  17. The Influence of Non Polar and Polar Molecules in Mouse Motile Cells Membranes and Pure Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Valdez, Francisco J.; Forero-Quintero, Linda S.; Zapata-Morin, Patricio A.; Costas, Miguel; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Ruiz-Suárez, Jesús C.

    2013-01-01

    We report an experimental study of mouse sperm motility that shows chief aspects characteristic of neurons: the anesthetic (produced by tetracaine) and excitatory (produced by either caffeine or calcium) effects and their antagonic action. While tetracaine inhibits sperm motility and caffeine has an excitatory action, the combination of these two substances balance the effects, producing a motility quite similar to that of control cells. We also study the effects of these agents (anesthetic and excitatory) on the melting points of pure lipid liposomes constituted by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA). Tetracaine induces a large fluidization of the membrane, shifting the liposomes melting transition temperature to much lower values. The effect of caffeine is null, but its addition to tetracaine-doped liposomes greatly screen the fluidization effect. A high calcium concentration stiffens pure lipid membranes and strongly reduces the effect of tetracaine. Molecular Dynamics Simulations are performed to further understand our experimental findings at the molecular level. We find a strong correlation between the effect of antagonic molecules that could explain how the mechanical properties suitable for normal cell functioning are affected and recovered. PMID:23565149

  18. The influence of non polar and polar molecules in mouse motile cells membranes and pure lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Valdez, Francisco J; Forero-Quintero, Linda S; Zapata-Morin, Patricio A; Costas, Miguel; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Ruiz-Suárez, Jesús C

    2013-01-01

    We report an experimental study of mouse sperm motility that shows chief aspects characteristic of neurons: the anesthetic (produced by tetracaine) and excitatory (produced by either caffeine or calcium) effects and their antagonic action. While tetracaine inhibits sperm motility and caffeine has an excitatory action, the combination of these two substances balance the effects, producing a motility quite similar to that of control cells. We also study the effects of these agents (anesthetic and excitatory) on the melting points of pure lipid liposomes constituted by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA). Tetracaine induces a large fluidization of the membrane, shifting the liposomes melting transition temperature to much lower values. The effect of caffeine is null, but its addition to tetracaine-doped liposomes greatly screen the fluidization effect. A high calcium concentration stiffens pure lipid membranes and strongly reduces the effect of tetracaine. Molecular Dynamics Simulations are performed to further understand our experimental findings at the molecular level. We find a strong correlation between the effect of antagonic molecules that could explain how the mechanical properties suitable for normal cell functioning are affected and recovered.

  19. Role of Liprins in the Regulation of Tumor Cell Motility and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Chiaretti, Sara; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Invasion leading to the formation of metastasis is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Analysis of different human cancers has led to the identification of the PPFIA1 gene encoding the protein liprin-α1, a possible player in cancer. The PPFIA1 gene is amplified in malignant tumors, including about 20% of breast cancers. Also the liprin-α1 protein is found overexpressed in tumors. Liprin-α1 belongs to the liprin family of cytosolic scaffold proteins that includes four liprin-α, two liprin-β members, and liprin-γ/kazrinE. In this review we will discuss the available evidence on the role of different members of the liprin family in distinct aspects of tumor cell migration and invasion. Evidence from in vitro studies indicates that the widely expressed liprin-α1 protein regulates the migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. Liprin-α1 affects cell migration and invasion by regulating the organization of lamellipodia and invadopodia, two structures relevant to cell invasion. In the cell liprin-α1 forms a complex with liprin-β1, ERC1/ELKS and LL5 proteins, which localizes at the front of migrating cells and positively regulates lamellipodia stability, and integrin-mediated focal adhesions. On the other hand, liprin-β2 appears to play a role as tumor suppressor by inhibiting breast cancer cell motility and invasion. The available data indicate that liprins are central players in the regulation of tumor cell invasion, therefore representing interesting targets for anti-metastatic therapy.

  20. L1 stimulation of human glioma cell motility correlates with FAK activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Muhua; Li, Yupei; Chilukuri, Kalyani; Brady, Owen A; Boulos, Magdy I; Kappes, John C; Galileo, Deni S

    2011-10-01

    The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been shown or implicated to function in stimulation of cell motility in several cancer types, including high-grade gliomas. Our previous work demonstrated the expression and function of L1 protein in stimulation of cell motility in rat glioma cells. However, the mechanism of this stimulation is still unclear. This study further investigated the function of L1 and L1 proteolysis in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell migration and invasion, as well as the mechanism of this stimulation. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human T98G GBM cell line but not in U-118 MG grade III human glioma cell line. L1 protein expression, proteolysis, and release were found in T98G cells and human surgical GBM cells by Western blotting. Exosome-like vesicles released by T98G cells were purified and contained full-length L1. In a scratch assay, T98G cells that migrated into the denuded scratch area exhibited upregulation of ADAM10 protease expression coincident with loss of surface L1. GBM surgical specimen cells exhibited a similar loss of cell surface L1 when xenografted into the chick embryo brain. When lentivirally introduced shRNA was used to attenuate L1 expression, such T98G/shL1 cells exhibited significantly decreased cell motility by time lapse microscopy in our quantitative Super Scratch assay. These cells also showed a decrease in FAK activity and exhibited increased focal complexes. L1 binding integrins which activate FAK were found in T98G and U-118 MG cells. Addition of L1 ectodomain-containing media (1) rescued the decreased cell motility of T98G/shL1 cells and (2) increased cell motility of U-118 MG cells but (3) did not further increase T98G cell motility. Injection of L1-attenuated T98G/shL1 cells into embryonic chick brains resulted in the absence of detectable invasion compared to control cells which invaded brain tissue. These studies support a mechanism where glioma cells at the edge of a cell mass

  1. L1 stimulation of human glioma cell motility correlates with FAK activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muhua; Li, Yupei; Chilukuri, Kalyani; Brady, Owen A.; Boulos, Magdy I.; Kappes, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been shown or implicated to function in stimulation of cell motility in several cancer types, including high-grade gliomas. Our previous work demonstrated the expression and function of L1 protein in stimulation of cell motility in rat glioma cells. However, the mechanism of this stimulation is still unclear. This study further investigated the function of L1 and L1 proteolysis in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell migration and invasion, as well as the mechanism of this stimulation. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human T98G GBM cell line but not in U-118 MG grade III human glioma cell line. L1 protein expression, proteolysis, and release were found in T98G cells and human surgical GBM cells by Western blotting. Exosome-like vesicles released by T98G cells were purified and contained full-length L1. In a scratch assay, T98G cells that migrated into the denuded scratch area exhibited upregulation of ADAM10 protease expression coincident with loss of surface L1. GBM surgical specimen cells exhibited a similar loss of cell surface L1 when xenografted into the chick embryo brain. When lentivirally introduced shRNA was used to attenuate L1 expression, such T98G/shL1 cells exhibited significantly decreased cell motility by time lapse microscopy in our quantitative Super Scratch assay. These cells also showed a decrease in FAK activity and exhibited increased focal complexes. L1 binding integrins which activate FAK were found in T98G and U-118 MG cells. Addition of L1 ectodomain-containing media (1) rescued the decreased cell motility of T98G/shL1 cells and (2) increased cell motility of U-118 MG cells but (3) did not further increase T98G cell motility. Injection of L1-attenuated T98G/shL1 cells into embryonic chick brains resulted in the absence of detectable invasion compared to control cells which invaded brain tissue. These studies support a mechanism where glioma cells at the edge of a cell mass

  2. The role of calcium and Ca2+-ATPase in maintaining motility in ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, H; Rubinstein, S; Nass-Arden, L

    1985-09-25

    Extracellular calcium at millimolar concentrations inhibits collective motility of ejaculated ram spermatozoa. In untreated cells, or when motility was made dependent upon glycolytic activity, there is very small inhibition, but when motility was made dependent upon mitochondrial respiration there is very high inhibition in motility by increasing extracellular Ca2+ concentration. Quercetin, which inhibits (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase activity in isolated plasma membranes, also inhibits motility mainly in cells that have been made dependent upon glycolytic activity, but there is also inhibition in untreated cells. When motility was made dependent upon mitochondrial activity, there is no inhibition but rather some stimulation in motility by quercetin. The inhibitory effect of quercetin is enhanced by increasing Ca2+ concentration in the medium. Quercetin also inhibits uptake of calcium into the cells, in a mechanism by which a calcium channel is involved. This inhibition is high only when the glycolysis is inhibited in the cells. The rate of glycolysis is decreased by quercetin or ouabain, but their effects on motility are quite different. Based on these data, it appears that the plasma membrane (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase or the Ca2+ pump have a functional role in the regulation of spermatozoa motility. This motility regulation is functioning through mechanisms which include glycolytic activity and maintenance of intracellular calcium concentrations.

  3. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling is critical for ErbB3-driven breast cancer cell motility and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Tatiana; Zhou, Zhen Ni; Flinn, Rory J.; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Boimel, Pamela J.; Pozzuto, Maria; Coniglio, Salvatore J.; Backer, Jonathan M.; Bresnick, Anne R.; Condeelis, John S.; Hynes, Nancy E.; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    Many malignancies show increased expression of the EGF receptor family member ErbB3 (HER3). ErbB3 binds beta-1 (HRGβ1), and forms a heterodimer with other ErbB family members, such as ErbB2 (HER2) or EGFR (HER1), enhancing phosphorylation of specific C terminal tyrosine residues and activation of downstream signaling pathways. ErbB3 contains six YXXM motifs that bind the p85 subunit of PI3-kinase. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of ErbB3 in mammary tumor cells can significantly enhance chemotaxis to HRGβ1 and overall metastatic potential. We tested the hypothesis that ErbB3-mediated PI3-kinase signaling is critical for heregulin-induced motility, and therefore crucial for ErbB3-mediated invasion, intravasation and metastasis. The tyrosines in the six YXXM motifs on the ErbB3 C-terminus were replaced with phenylalanine. In contrast to overexpression of the wild-type ErbB3, overexpression of the mutant ErbB3 did not enhance chemotaxis towards HRGβ1 in vitro or in vivo. We also observed reduced tumor cell motility in the primary tumor by multiphoton microscopy, as well as a dramatically reduced ability of these cells to cross the endothelium and intravasate into the circulation. Moreover, while mutation of the ErbB3 C-terminus had no effect on tumor growth, it had a dramatic effect on spontaneous metastatic potential. Treatment with the PI3-kinase inhibitor PIK-75 similarly inhibited motility and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that stimulation of the early metastatic steps of motility and invasion by ErbB3 requires activation of the PI3-kinase pathway by the ErbB3 receptor. PMID:21725367

  4. A random cell motility gradient downstream of FGF controls elongation of an amniote embryo

    PubMed Central

    Bénazéraf, Bertrand; Francois, Paul; Baker, Ruth E.; Denans, Nicolas; Little, Charles D.; Pourquie, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate embryos are characterized by an elongated antero-posterior (AP) body axis, which forms by progressive cell deposition from a posterior growth zone in the embryo. Here, we used tissue ablation in the chicken embryo to demonstrate that the caudal presomitic mesoderm (PSM) plays a key role in axis elongation. Using time-lapse microscopy, we analysed the movements of fluorescently labelled cells in the PSM during embryo elongation which revealed a clear posterior-to-anterior gradient of cell motility and directionality in the PSM. We tracked the movement of the PSM extracellular matrix in parallel with the labelled cells and subtracted the extracellular matrix movement from the global motion of cells. After subtraction, cell motility remained graded but lacked directionality, indicating that the posterior cell movements associated with axis elongation in the PSM are not intrinsic but reflect tissue deformation. The gradient of cell motion along the PSM parallels the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) gradient 1, which has been implicated in the control of cell motility in this tissue2. Both FGF signalling gain- and loss-of-function experiments lead to disruption of the motility gradient and a slowing down of axis elongation. Furthermore, embryos treated with cell movement inhibitors (Blebbistatin or RhoK inhibitor), but not cell cycle inhibitors, show a slower axis elongation rate. We propose that the gradient of random cell motility downstream of FGF signalling in the PSM controls posterior elongation in the amniote embryo. Our data suggest that tissue elongation is an emergent property that arises from the collective regulation of graded, random cell motion rather than by the regulation of directionality of individual cellular movements. PMID:20613841

  5. Quantifying the roles of random motility and directed motility using advection-diffusion theory for a 3T3 fibroblast cell migration assay stimulated with an electric field.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Matthew J; Lo, Kai-Yin; Sun, Yung-Shin

    2017-03-17

    Directed cell migration can be driven by a range of external stimuli, such as spatial gradients of: chemical signals (chemotaxis); adhesion sites (haptotaxis); or temperature (thermotaxis). Continuum models of cell migration typically include a diffusion term to capture the undirected component of cell motility and an advection term to capture the directed component of cell motility. However, there is no consensus in the literature about the form that the advection term takes. Some theoretical studies suggest that the advection term ought to include receptor saturation effects. However, others adopt a much simpler constant coefficient. One of the limitations of including receptor saturation effects is that it introduces several additional unknown parameters into the model. Therefore, a relevant research question is to investigate whether directed cell migration is best described by a simple constant tactic coefficient or a more complicated model incorporating saturation effects. We study directed cell migration using an experimental device in which the directed component of the cell motility is driven by a spatial gradient of electric potential, which is known as electrotaxis. The electric field (EF) is proportional to the spatial gradient of the electric potential. The spatial variation of electric potential across the experimental device varies in such a way that there are several subregions on the device in which the EF takes on different values that are approximately constant within those subregions. We use cell trajectory data to quantify the motion of 3T3 fibroblast cells at different locations on the device to examine how different values of the EF influences cell motility. The undirected (random) motility of the cells is quantified in terms of the cell diffusivity, D, and the directed motility is quantified in terms of a cell drift velocity, v. Estimates D and v are obtained under a range of four different EF conditions, which correspond to normal

  6. Hypoxic stellate cells of pancreatic cancer stroma regulate extracellular matrix fiber organization and cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Sada, Masafumi; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Horioka, Kohei; Okumura, Takashi; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-03-28

    Desmoplasia and hypoxia in pancreatic cancer mutually affect each other and create a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Here, we show that microenvironment remodeling by hypoxic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promotes cancer cell motility through alteration of extracellular matrix (ECM) fiber architecture. Three-dimensional (3-D) matrices derived from PSCs under hypoxia exhibited highly organized parallel-patterned matrix fibers compared with 3-D matrices derived from PSCs under normoxia, and promoted cancer cell motility by inducing directional migration of cancer cells due to the parallel fiber architecture. Microarray analysis revealed that procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) in PSCs was the gene that potentially regulates ECM fiber architecture under hypoxia. Stromal PLOD2 expression in surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PLOD2 in PSCs blocked parallel fiber architecture of 3-D matrices, leading to decreased directional migration of cancer cells within the matrices. In conclusion, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced PLOD2 expression in PSCs creates a permissive microenvironment for migration of cancer cells through architectural regulation of stromal ECM in pancreatic cancer.

  7. Metabolic activity of sperm cells: correlation with sperm cell concentration, viability and motility in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sabés-Alsina, Maria; Planell, Núria; Gil, Sílvia; Tallo-Parra, Oriol; Maya-Soriano, Maria José; Taberner, Ester; Piles, Miriam; Sabés, Manel; Lopez-Bejar, Manel

    2016-10-01

    The resazurin reduction test (RRT) is a useful technique to assess the metabolic rate of sperm cells. RRT depends on the ability of metabolically active cells to reduce the non-fluorescent dye resazurin to the fluorescent resorufin. The aim of this study was to develop a vital fluorometric method to evaluate metabolic activity of rabbit sperm cells. Twenty-five rabbit males were included in the study. Viability and morphology, motility and metabolic activity were evaluated using an eosin-nigrosin staining, a computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and the RRT, respectively. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between RRT and semen parameters. After evaluation, a concentration of 10 × 106 sperm cells/ml was selected for further experiments with RRT. No significant correlation was found between the RRT results and the motility parameters. However, after RRT a significant positive correlation between relative fluorescence units and the percentage of alive spermatozoa (r = 0.62; P = 0.001) and a negative one with the percentage of sperm cells with acrosomic abnormalities (r = -0.45; P < 0.05) were detected. The vital assessment of metabolic rate of sperm cells by RRT could provide more information about semen quality than other routine semen analysis, correlating with sperm viability and acrosome status information.

  8. The Interplay between Signaling and Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cell Motility and Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2013-03-01

    The initiation and growth of tumor metastases require tumor cells go through a transition between collective-to-individual cell migration. Understanding the molecular, cellular and physical mechanisms of these different migration modes is limited. We focus on the tumor cell migration induced by Hepatocyte Growth Factor / Scatter Factor (HGF/SF) - Met-signaling, a master regulator of cell motility in normal and malignant processes. Met has been implicated in tumorigenesis and metastasis and several Met targeting agents have been introduced into the clinic, and are currently in all phases of clinical trials Our analysis demonstrates that Met signaling dramatically alter the morpho-kinetic dynamics of collective migration of tumor cells. It induce a ``wave'' of increasing velocities that propagates back from the leading edge, increases cells' orientation and cooperation capabilities. In parallel Met signaling induces amoeboid cell motility that increased cell individuality. The decision making regarding the motility mode is dependent on the extent of activation of unique signal and metabolic cues. We present a combination of molecular imaging, conceptual and modeling framework for the analysis and assessment of the collective mesenchymal to epithelial versus amoeboid motility. Combined together our analysis can contribute to the understanding of metastasis and personalizing anti Met targeted therapy.

  9. p85 beta-PIX is required for cell motility through phosphorylations of focal adhesion kinase and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangsoon; Jung, In Duk; Chang, Won Keun; Park, Chang Gyo; Cho, Do Yeun; Shin, Eun-Young; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Yong Kee; Lee, Hyang Woo; Han, Jeung-Whan; Lee, Hoi Young

    2005-07-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediates diverse biological responses, including cell migration, through the activation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Recently, we have shown that LPA stimulates p21-activated kinase (PAK) that is critical for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and cell motility. Here, we provide the direct evidence that p85 beta-PIX is required for cell motility of NIH-3T3 cells by LPA through FAK and p38 MAP kinase phosphorylations. LPA induced p85 beta-PIX binding to FAK in NIH-3T3 cells that was inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, the similar inhibition of the complex formation was also observed, when the cells were transfected with either p85 beta-PIX mutant that cannot bind GIT or dominant negative mutants of Rac1 (N17Rac1) and PAK (PAK-PID). Transfection of the cells with specific p85 beta-PIX siRNA led to drastic inhibition of LPA-induced FAK phosphorylation, peripheral redistribution of p85 beta-PIX with FAK and GIT1, and cell motility. p85 beta-PIX was also required for p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation induced by LPA. Finally, dominant negative mutant of Rho (N19Rho)-transfected cells did not affect PAK activation, while the cells stably transfected with p85 beta-PIX siRNA or N17Rac1 showed the reduction of LPA-induced PAK activation. Taken together, the present data suggest that p85 beta-PIX, located downstream of Rac1, is a key regulator for the activations of FAK or p38 MAP kinase and plays a pivotal role in focal complex formation and cell motility induced by LPA.

  10. A quantitative evaluation of cell migration by the phagokinetic track motility assay.

    PubMed

    Nogalski, Maciej T; Chan, Gary C T; Stevenson, Emily V; Collins-McMillen, Donna K; Yurochko, Andrew D

    2012-12-04

    Cellular motility is an important biological process for both unicellular and multicellular organisms. It is essential for movement of unicellular organisms towards a source of nutrients or away from unsuitable conditions, as well as in multicellular organisms for tissue development, immune surveillance and wound healing, just to mention a few roles(1,2,3). Deregulation of this process can lead to serious neurological, cardiovascular and immunological diseases, as well as exacerbated tumor formation and spread(4,5). Molecularly, actin polymerization and receptor recycling have been shown to play important roles in creating cellular extensions (lamellipodia), that drive the forward movement of the cell(6,7,8). However, many biological questions about cell migration remain unanswered. The central role for cellular motility in human health and disease underlines the importance of understanding the specific mechanisms involved in this process and makes accurate methods for evaluating cell motility particularly important. Microscopes are usually used to visualize the movement of cells. However, cells move rather slowly, making the quantitative measurement of cell migration a resource-consuming process requiring expensive cameras and software to create quantitative time-lapsed movies of motile cells. Therefore, the ability to perform a quantitative measurement of cell migration that is cost-effective, non-laborious, and that utilizes common laboratory equipment is a great need for many researchers. The phagokinetic track motility assay utilizes the ability of a moving cell to clear gold particles from its path to create a measurable track on a colloidal gold-coated glass coverslip(9,10). With the use of freely available software, multiple tracks can be evaluated for each treatment to accomplish statistical requirements. The assay can be utilized to assess motility of many cell types, such as cancer cells(11,12), fibroblasts(9), neutrophils(13), skeletal muscle cells(14

  11. Fascin, an Actin-bundling Protein, Induces Membrane Protrusions and Increases Cell Motility of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Shigeko; Yamakita, Yoshihiko; Ono, Shoichiro; Matsumura, Fumio

    1998-01-01

    Fascin is an actin-bundling protein that is found in membrane ruffles, microspikes, and stress fibers. The expression of fascin is greatly increased in many transformed cells, as well as in specialized normal cells including neuronal cells and antigen-presenting dendritic cells. A morphological characteristic common to these cells expressing high levels of fascin is the development of many membrane protrusions in which fascin is predominantly present. To examine whether fascin contributes to the alterations in microfilament organization at the cell periphery, we have expressed fascin in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells to levels as high as those found in transformed cells and in specialized normal cells. Expression of fascin results in large changes in morphology, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell motility: fascin-transfected cells form an increased number of longer and thicker microvilli on apical surfaces, extend lamellipodia-like structures at basolateral surfaces, and show disorganization of cell–cell contacts. Cell migration activity is increased by 8–17 times when assayed by modified Boyden chamber. Microinjection of a fascin protein into LLC-PK1 cells causes similar morphological alterations including the induction of lamellipodia at basolateral surfaces and formation of an increased number of microvilli on apical surfaces. Furthermore, microinjection of fascin into REF-52 cells, normal fibroblasts, induces the formation of many lamellipodia at all regions of cell periphery. These results together suggest that fascin is directly responsible for membrane protrusions through reorganization of the microfilament cytoskeleton at the cell periphery. PMID:9571235

  12. A Comparison of Computational Models for Eukaryotic Cell Shape and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell motility involves complex interactions of signalling molecules, cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and mechanics interacting in space and time. Collectively, these components are used by the cell to interpret and respond to external stimuli, leading to polarization, protrusion, adhesion formation, and myosin-facilitated retraction. When these processes are choreographed correctly, shape change and motility results. A wealth of experimental data have identified numerous molecular constituents involved in these processes, but the complexity of their interactions and spatial organization make this a challenging problem to understand. This has motivated theoretical and computational approaches with simplified caricatures of cell structure and behaviour, each aiming to gain better understanding of certain kinds of cells and/or repertoire of behaviour. Reaction–diffusion (RD) equations as well as equations of viscoelastic flows have been used to describe the motility machinery. In this review, we describe some of the recent computational models for cell motility, concentrating on simulations of cell shape changes (mainly in two but also three dimensions). The problem is challenging not only due to the difficulty of abstracting and simplifying biological complexity but also because computing RD or fluid flow equations in deforming regions, known as a “free-boundary” problem, is an extremely challenging problem in applied mathematics. Here we describe the distinct approaches, comparing their strengths and weaknesses, and the kinds of biological questions that they have been able to address. PMID:23300403

  13. Sphingolipids inhibit vimentin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Claire L; Kemppainen, Kati; Isoniemi, Kimmo O; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-06-01

    The sphingolipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), can induce or inhibit cellular migration. The intermediate filament protein vimentin is an inducer of migration and a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Given that keratin intermediate filaments are regulated by SPC, with consequences for cell motility, we wanted to determine whether vimentin is also regulated by sphingolipid signalling and whether it is a determinant for sphingolipid-mediated functions. In cancer cells where S1P and SPC inhibited migration, we observed that S1P and SPC induced phosphorylation of vimentin on S71, leading to a corresponding reorganization of vimentin filaments. These effects were sphingolipid-signalling-dependent, because inhibition of either the S1P2 receptor (also known as S1PR2) or its downstream effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) nullified the sphingolipid-induced effects on vimentin organization and S71 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the anti-migratory effect of S1P and SPC could be prevented by expressing S71-phosphorylation-deficient vimentin. In addition, we demonstrated, by using wild-type and vimentin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, that the sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of migration is dependent on vimentin. These results imply that this newly discovered sphingolipid-vimentin signalling axis exerts brake-and-throttle functions in the regulation of cell migration.

  14. Human fibronectin contains distinct adhesion- and motility-promoting domains for metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The active migration of tumor cells through extracellular matrices has been proposed to play a role in certain aspects of metastasis. Metastatic tumor cells migrate in vitro in response to substratum-bound adhesive glycoproteins such as fibronectin. The present studies use affinity-purified proteolytic fragments of fibronectin to determine the nature of adhesion- and/or motility-promoting domains within the protein. Two distinct fragments were identified with cell adhesion- promoting activities. By a number of criteria, the adhesive activity promoted by these two fragments was distinct. One fragment, a 75-kD tryptic fragment purified by monoclonal antibody chromatography, promoted the adhesion, spreading, and haptotactic motility of melanoma cells. Experiments using a synthetic cell attachment peptide in solution indicated that at least part of the attachment activity exhibited by the 75-kD fragment is mediated by the sequence arg-gly-asp- ser. It was not possible to demonstrate migration-stimulating activity using a small (11.5 kD) peptic fragment containing this sequence (Pierschbacher, M.D., E. G. Hayman, and E. Ruoslahti, 1981, Cell, 26:259-267) suggesting that another cell-binding activity within the 75 kD fragment distinct from arg-gly-asp-ser might be required for motility. The second fragment that stimulated melanoma adhesion was a 33-kD tryptic/catheptic carboxyl-terminal heparin-binding fragment, which is localized to the A chain of fibronectin. This fragment promotes adhesion and spreading but not the motility of these cells. Melanoma adhesion to this heparin-binding fragment was sensitive to the effects of cycloheximide, which contrasted adhesion to the haptotaxis- promoting fragment. Importantly, these studies illustrate that haptotaxis in response to fibronectin is not due to simple adhesion gradients of this protein. The results are discussed in light of a model for multiple distinct cell surface constituents mediating cell adhesion and motility on

  15. Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) plays a key role in ovarian cancer cell adhesion and motility

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Renquan; Sun, Xinghui; Xiao, Ran; Zhou, Lei; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated stable transduced HE4 overexpression and knockdown cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 was associated with EOC cell adhesion and motility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 might have some effects on activation of EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HE4 play an important role in EOC tumorigenicity. -- Abstract: Human epididymis protein 4 (HE4) is a novel and specific biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We previously demonstrated that serum HE4 levels were significantly elevated in the majority of EOC patients but not in subjects with benign disease or healthy controls. However, the precise mechanism of HE4 protein function is unknown. In this study, we generated HE4-overexpressing SKOV3 cells and found that stably transduced cells promoted cell adhesion and migration. Knockdown of HE4 expression was achieved by stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a construct encoding a short hairpin DNA directed against the HE4 gene. Correspondingly, the proliferation and spreading ability of HE4-expressed cells were inhibited by HE4 suppression. Mechanistically, impaired EGFR and Erk1/2 phosphorylation were observed in cells with HE4 knockdown. The phosphorylation was restored when the knockdown cells were cultured in conditioned medium containing HE4. Moreover, in vivo tumorigenicity showed that HE4 suppression markedly inhibited the growth of tumors. This suggests that expression of HE4 is associated with cancer cell adhesion, migration and tumor growth, which can be related to its effects on the EGFR-MAPK signaling pathway. Our results provide evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may underlie the motility-promoting role of HE4 in EOC progression. The role of HE4 as a target for gene-based therapy might be considered in future studies.

  16. Cortical Contractility Triggers a Stochastic Switch to Fast Amoeboid Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, Verena; Wieser, Stefan; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Smutny, Michael; Morita, Hitoshi; Sako, Keisuke; Barone, Vanessa; Ritsch-Marte, Monika; Sixt, Michael; Voituriez, Raphaël; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Summary 3D amoeboid cell migration is central to many developmental and disease-related processes such as cancer metastasis. Here, we identify a unique prototypic amoeboid cell migration mode in early zebrafish embryos, termed stable-bleb migration. Stable-bleb cells display an invariant polarized balloon-like shape with exceptional migration speed and persistence. Progenitor cells can be reversibly transformed into stable-bleb cells irrespective of their primary fate and motile characteristics by increasing myosin II activity through biochemical or mechanical stimuli. Using a combination of theory and experiments, we show that, in stable-bleb cells, cortical contractility fluctuations trigger a stochastic switch into amoeboid motility, and a positive feedback between cortical flows and gradients in contractility maintains stable-bleb cell polarization. We further show that rearward cortical flows drive stable-bleb cell migration in various adhesive and non-adhesive environments, unraveling a highly versatile amoeboid migration phenotype. PMID:25679761

  17. Coordinated cell motility is regulated by a combination of LKB1 farnesylation and kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, S.; Hou, Y.; Zoine, J. T.; Saltz, J.; Zhang, C.; Chen, Z.; Cooper, L. A. D.; Marcus, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    Cell motility requires the precise coordination of cell polarization, lamellipodia formation, adhesion, and force generation. LKB1 is a multi-functional serine/threonine kinase that associates with actin at the cellular leading edge of motile cells and suppresses FAK. We sought to understand how LKB1 coordinates these multiple events by systematically dissecting LKB1 protein domain function in combination with live cell imaging and computational approaches. We show that LKB1-actin colocalization is dependent upon LKB1 farnesylation leading to RhoA-ROCK-mediated stress fiber formation, but membrane dynamics is reliant on LKB1 kinase activity. We propose that LKB1 kinase activity controls membrane dynamics through FAK since loss of LKB1 kinase activity results in morphologically defective nascent adhesion sites. In contrast, defective farnesylation mislocalizes nascent adhesion sites, suggesting that LKB1 farnesylation serves as a targeting mechanism for properly localizing adhesion sites during cell motility. Together, we propose a model where coordination of LKB1 farnesylation and kinase activity serve as a multi-step mechanism to coordinate cell motility during migration. PMID:28102310

  18. MDM2 promotes cell motility and invasiveness through a RING-finger independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Polański, Radosław; Warburton, Hazel E; Ray-Sinha, Arpita; Devling, Timothy; Pakula, Hubert; Rubbi, Carlos P; Vlatković, Nikolina; Boyd, Mark T

    2010-11-19

    Recent studies connect MDM2 with increased cell motility, invasion and/or metastasis proposing an MDM2-mediated ubiquitylation-dependent mechanism. Interestingly, in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) p53/MDM2 co-expression is associated with reduced survival which is independently linked with metastasis. We therefore investigated whether expression of p53 and/or MDM2 promotes aggressive cell phenotypes. Our data demonstrate that MDM2 promotes increased motility and invasiveness in RCC cells (N.B. similar results are obtained in non-RCC cells). This study shows for the first time both that endogenous MDM2 significantly contributes to cell motility and that this does not depend upon the MDM2 RING-finger, i.e. is independent of ubiquitylation (and NEDDylation). Our data suggest that protein-protein interactions provide a likely mechanistic basis for MDM2-promoted motility which may constitute future therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Actin-based motility drives baculovirus transit to the nucleus and cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, Taro; Volkman, Loy E.

    2010-01-01

    Most viruses move intracellularly to and from their sites of replication using microtubule-based mechanisms. In this study, we show that nucleocapsids of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus undergo intracellular motility driven by actin polymerization. Motility requires the viral P78/83 capsid protein and the host Arp2/3 complex. Surprisingly, the virus directs two sequential and coordinated phases of actin-based motility. Immediately after cell entry, motility enables exploration of the cytoplasm and collision with the nuclear periphery, speeding nuclear entry and the initiation of viral gene expression. Nuclear entry itself requires transit through nuclear pore complexes. Later, after the onset of early gene expression, motility is required for accumulation of a subpopulation of nucleocapsids in the tips of actin-rich surface spikes. Temporal coordination of actin-based nuclear and surface translocation likely enables rapid transmission to neighboring cells during infection in insects and represents a distinctive evolutionary strategy for overcoming host defenses. PMID:20660627

  20. Signaling Pathways Used by Ergot Alkaloids to Inhibit Bovine Sperm Motility

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ergot alkaloids exert their toxic or pharmaceutical effects through membrane receptor-mediated activities. This study investigated the signaling pathways involved in the in vitro inhibitory effects of both ergotamine (ET) and dihydroergotamine (DEHT) on bovine sperm motility using specific inhibitor...

  1. CHRNA5 as negative regulator of nicotine signaling in normal and cancer bronchial cells: effects on motility, migration and p63 expression.

    PubMed

    Krais, Annette M; Hautefeuille, Agnès H; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Krutovskikh, Vladimir; Tournier, Jean-Marie; Birembaut, Philippe; Thépot, Amélie; Paliwal, Anupam; Herceg, Zdenko; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Hainaut, Pierre L

    2011-09-01

    Genome-wide association studies have linked lung cancer risk with a region of chromosome 15q25.1 containing CHRNA3, CHRNA5 and CHRNB4 encoding α3, α5 and β4 subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), respectively. One of the strongest associations was observed for a non-silent single-nucleotide polymorphism at codon 398 in CHRNA5. Here, we have used pharmacological (antagonists) or genetic (RNA interference) interventions to modulate the activity of CHRNA5 in non-transformed bronchial cells and in lung cancer cell lines. In both cell types, silencing CHRNA5 or inhibiting receptors containing nAChR α5 with α-conotoxin MII exerted a nicotine-like effect, with increased motility and invasiveness in vitro and increasing calcium influx. The effects on motility were enhanced by addition of nicotine but blocked by inhibiting CHRNA7, which encodes the homopentameric receptor α7 subunit. Silencing CHRNA5 also decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules P120 and ZO-1 in lung cancer cells as well as the expression of DeltaNp63α in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. These results demonstrate a role for CHRNA5 in modulating adhesion and motility in bronchial cells, as well as in regulating p63, a potential oncogene in squamous cell carcinoma.

  2. LAP2 Is Widely Overexpressed in Diverse Digestive Tract Cancers and Regulates Motility of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Baek, Sungmin; Sim, Hey-Eun; Yoon, Sik; Baek, Sun-Yong; Kim, Bong-Seon; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Seon-Young; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2012-01-01

    Background Lamina-associated polypeptides 2 (LAP2) is a nuclear protein that connects the nuclear lamina with chromatin. Although its critical roles in genetic disorders and hematopoietic malignancies have been described, its expression and roles in digestive tract cancers have been poorly characterized. Methods To examine the expression of LAP2 in patient tissues, we performed immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. To examine motility of cancer cells, we employed Boyden chamber, wound healing and Matrigel invasion assays. To reveal its roles in metastasis in vivo, we used a liver metastasis xenograft model. To investigate the underlying mechanism, a cDNA microarray was conducted. Results Immunohistochemistry in patient tissues showed widespread expression of LAP2 in diverse digestive tract cancers including stomach, pancreas, liver, and bile duct cancers. Real-time PCR confirmed that LAP2β is over-expressed in gastric cancer tissues. Knockdown of LAP2β did not affect proliferation of most digestive tract cancer cells except pancreatic cancer cells. However, knockdown of LAP2β decreased motility of all tested cancer cells. Moreover, overexpression of LAP2β increased motility of gastric and pancreatic cancer cells. In the liver metastasis xenograft model, LAP2β increased metastatic efficacy of gastric cancer cells and mortality in tested mice. cDNA microarrays showed the possibility that myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) and interleukin6 (IL6) may mediate LAP2β-regulated motility of cancer cells. Conclusions From the above results, we conclude that LAP2 is widely overexpressed in diverse digestive tract cancers and LAP2β regulates motility of cancer cells and suggest that LAP2β may have utility for diagnostics and therapeutics in digestive tract cancers. PMID:22745766

  3. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Increased count, motility, and total motile sperm cells collected across three consecutive ejaculations within 24 h of oocyte retrieval: implications for management of men presenting with low numbers of motile sperm for assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Said, Al-Hasen; Reed, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate changes in seminal volume, sperm count, motility, qualitative forward progression, and total motile sperm cells per ejaculate, across three consecutive ejaculates collected from individuals within 24 h preceding an IVF cycle. Men presenting with oligoasthenozoospermia or asthenozoospemia attempted three ejaculates within 24 h preceding IVF. Ejaculate 1 was produced the afternoon prior to oocyte retrieval, and ejaculates 2 and 3 were produced the morning of oocyte retrieval with 2-3 h between collections. Ejaculates 1 and 2 were extended 1:1 v/v with room temperature rTYBS. Test tubes were placed into a beaker of room temperature water, then placed at 4 °C for gradual cooling. Ejaculate 3 was not extended, but pooled with ejaculates 1 and 2 and processed for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Out of 109 oocyte retrievals, 28 men were asked to attempt multiple consecutive ejaculations. Among this population, 25/28 (89.3 %) were successful, and 3/28 men (10.7 %) could only produce two ejaculates. Mean volumes for ejaculates 1, 2, and 3 were significantly different from each other (p < 0.01); the volume decreased for each ejaculate. Mean sperm counts, motility, qualitative forward progression, and total motile cells per ejaculate for the ejaculates1, 2, and 3 demonstrated the following: ejaculates 2 and 3 were not significantly different, but counts, motility, and total motile sperm were improved over ejaculate 1 (p < 0.01). Pooling three consecutive ejaculates within 24 h increased the numbers of available motile sperm in this population by 8-fold compared to the first ejaculate alone, facilitating avoidance of sperm cryopreservation and additional centrifugation steps that could affect sperm viability and/or function.

  5. Modulation of mammalian sperm motility by quercetin.

    PubMed

    Nass-Arden, L; Breitbart, H

    1990-04-01

    The flavonoid quercetin inhibits collective motility of ejaculated ram spermatozoa in the first 2 hr of incubation; during the next 3-4 hr motility is stimulated. To explain this interesting effect, we followed the influence of quercetin on sperm glycolysis, extracellular pH, ATP content, mitochondrial respiration, and lipid peroxidation. The collective motility of untreated cells is decreased to about 40% of the original motility during two hours of incubation. During this time, the rate of glycolysis is constant, respiration rate is increasing, there is no change in ATP content, the rate of lipid peroxidation is very slow, and the extracellular pH became very acidic (pH 5.5). It is concluded that motility is decreased due to this acidification. This acidification is prevented to some extent by quercetin, which indirectly inhibits glycolysis. Quercetin inhibits motility due to the inhibition of the plasma membrane calcium pump, as we showed previously (Breitbart et al., J Biol Chem 260:11548-11553, 1985). The motility of untreated cells is arrested after 3.5 hr of incubation, whereas quercetin-treated cells show high motility, which continues for additional 2-3 hr. After 3.5 hr, the control cells show no glycolytic activity, ATP content and respiration rates are decreased, and rate of lipid peroxidation is highly increased. At this time, quercetin-treated cells show no glycolytic activity, only a small decrease in ATP content and respiratory rate, and a very low rate of lipid peroxidation. Based on these data it is concluded that sperm motility after 3.5 hr of incubation is dependent mainly on mitochondrial respiration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Potential anthelmintic: D-psicose inhibits motility, growth and reproductive maturity of L1 larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masashi; Kurose, Hiroyuki; Yamasaki, Toru; Izumori, Ken

    2008-04-01

    No anthelmintic sugars have yet been identified. Eight ketohexose stereoisomers (D- and L-forms of psicose, fructose, tagatose and sorbose), along with D-galactose and D-glucose, were examined for potency against L1 stage Caenorhabditis elegans fed Escherichia coli. Of the sugars, D-psicose specifically inhibited the motility, growth and reproductive maturity of the L1 stage. D-Psicose probably interferes with the nematode nutrition. The present results suggest that D-psicose, one of the rare sugars, is a potential anthelmintic.

  7. Paxillin mediates sensing of physical cues and regulates directional cell motility by controlling lamellipodia positioning.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Thodeti, Charles K; Mammoto, Akiko; Bakal, Chris; Thomas, Sheila; Ingber, Donald E

    2011-01-01

    Physical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) guide directional migration by spatially controlling where cells form focal adhesions (FAs), which in turn regulate the extension of motile processes. Here we show that physical control of directional migration requires the FA scaffold protein paxillin. Using single-cell sized ECM islands to constrain cell shape, we found that fibroblasts cultured on square islands preferentially activated Rac and extended lamellipodia from corner, rather than side regions after 30 min stimulation with PDGF, but that cells lacking paxillin failed to restrict Rac activity to corners and formed small lamellipodia along their entire peripheries. This spatial preference was preceded by non-spatially constrained formation of both dorsal and lateral membrane ruffles from 5-10 min. Expression of paxillin N-terminal (paxN) or C-terminal (paxC) truncation mutants produced opposite, but complementary, effects on lamellipodia formation. Surprisingly, pax-/- and paxN cells also formed more circular dorsal ruffles (CDRs) than pax+ cells, while paxC cells formed fewer CDRs and extended larger lamellipodia even in the absence of PDGF. In a two-dimensional (2D) wound assay, pax-/- cells migrated at similar speeds to controls but lost directional persistence. Directional motility was rescued by expressing full-length paxillin or the N-terminus alone, but paxN cells migrated more slowly. In contrast, pax-/- and paxN cells exhibited increased migration in a three-dimensional (3D) invasion assay, with paxN cells invading Matrigel even in the absence of PDGF. These studies indicate that paxillin integrates physical and chemical motility signals by spatially constraining where cells will form motile processes, and thereby regulates directional migration both in 2D and 3D. These findings also suggest that CDRs may correspond to invasive protrusions that drive cell migration through 3D extracellular matrices.

  8. PTP-PEST controls motility, adherens junction assembly, and Rho GTPase activity in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, Rosario; Rengifo-Cam, William; Schaller, Michael D.; Evers, B. Mark

    2010-01-01

    An important step in carcinoma progression is loss of cell-cell adhesion leading to increased invasion and metastasis. We show here that the protein tyrosine phosphatase, PTP-PEST, is a critical regulator of cell-cell junction integrity and epithelial cell motility. Using colon carcinoma cells, we show that the expression level of PTP-PEST regulates cell motility. Either transient small interfering RNA or stable short hairpin RNA knockdown of PTP-PEST enhances haptotactic and chemotactic migration of KM12C colon carcinoma cells. Furthermore, KM12C cells with stably knocked down PTP-PEST exhibit a mesenchymal-like phenotype with prominent membrane ruffles and lamellae. In contrast, ectopic expression of PTP-PEST in KM20 or DLD-1 cells, which lack detectable endogenous PTP-PEST expression, suppresses haptotactic migration. Importantly, we find that PTP-PEST localizes in adherens junctions. Concomitant with enhanced motility, stable knockdown of PTP-PEST causes a disruption of cell-cell junctions. These effects are due to a defect in junctional assembly and not to a loss of E-cadherin expression. Adherens junction assembly is impaired following calcium switch in KM12C cells with stably knocked down PTP-PEST and is accompanied by an increase in the activity of Rac1 and a suppression of RhoA activity in response to cadherin engagement. Taken together, these results suggest that PTP-PEST functions as a suppressor of epithelial cell motility by controlling Rho GTPase activity and the assembly of adherens junctions. PMID:20519451

  9. Paxillin Mediates Sensing of Physical Cues and Regulates Directional Cell Motility by Controlling Lamellipodia Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Sero, Julia E.; Thodeti, Charles K.; Mammoto, Akiko; Bakal, Chris; Thomas, Sheila; Ingber, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Physical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) guide directional migration by spatially controlling where cells form focal adhesions (FAs), which in turn regulate the extension of motile processes. Here we show that physical control of directional migration requires the FA scaffold protein paxillin. Using single-cell sized ECM islands to constrain cell shape, we found that fibroblasts cultured on square islands preferentially activated Rac and extended lamellipodia from corner, rather than side regions after 30 min stimulation with PDGF, but that cells lacking paxillin failed to restrict Rac activity to corners and formed small lamellipodia along their entire peripheries. This spatial preference was preceded by non-spatially constrained formation of both dorsal and lateral membrane ruffles from 5–10 min. Expression of paxillin N-terminal (paxN) or C-terminal (paxC) truncation mutants produced opposite, but complementary, effects on lamellipodia formation. Surprisingly, pax−/− and paxN cells also formed more circular dorsal ruffles (CDRs) than pax+ cells, while paxC cells formed fewer CDRs and extended larger lamellipodia even in the absence of PDGF. In a two-dimensional (2D) wound assay, pax−/− cells migrated at similar speeds to controls but lost directional persistence. Directional motility was rescued by expressing full-length paxillin or the N-terminus alone, but paxN cells migrated more slowly. In contrast, pax−/− and paxN cells exhibited increased migration in a three-dimensional (3D) invasion assay, with paxN cells invading Matrigel even in the absence of PDGF. These studies indicate that paxillin integrates physical and chemical motility signals by spatially constraining where cells will form motile processes, and thereby regulates directional migration both in 2D and 3D. These findings also suggest that CDRs may correspond to invasive protrusions that drive cell migration through 3D extracellular matrices. PMID

  10. The dynein cortical anchor Num1 activates dynein motility by relieving Pac1/LIS1-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Lindsay G.

    2015-01-01

    Cortically anchored dynein orients the spindle through interactions with astral microtubules. In budding yeast, dynein is offloaded to Num1 receptors from microtubule plus ends. Rather than walking toward minus ends, dynein remains associated with plus ends due in part to its association with Pac1/LIS1, an inhibitor of dynein motility. The mechanism by which dynein is switched from “off” at the plus ends to “on” at the cell cortex remains unknown. Here, we show that overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1 specifically depletes dynein–dynactin–Pac1/LIS1 complexes from microtubule plus ends and reduces dynein-Pac1/LIS1 colocalization. Depletion of dynein from plus ends requires its microtubule-binding domain, suggesting that motility is required. An enhanced Pac1/LIS1 affinity mutant of dynein or overexpression of Pac1/LIS1 rescues dynein plus end depletion. Live-cell imaging reveals minus end–directed dynein–dynactin motility along microtubules upon overexpression of the coiled-coil domain of Num1, an event that is not observed in wild-type cells. Our findings indicate that dynein activity is directly switched “on” by Num1, which induces Pac1/LIS1 removal. PMID:26483554

  11. Down-regulation of phosphoglucose isomerase/autocrine motility factor results in mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition of human lung fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Hu, Huankai; Yanagawa, Takashi; Hogan, Victor; Raz, Avraham

    2007-05-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) is one of the glycolytic enzymes and is a multifunctional enzyme that functions in glucose metabolism inside the cell while acting as a cytokine outside the cell, with properties that include autocrine motility factor (AMF) regulating tumor cell motility. Although there are many studies indicating that PGI/AMF has been implicated in progression of metastasis, no direct studies of the significance of exogenous PGI/AMF on tumor progression have been reported. Here, we report on the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET), which is the reverse phenomenon of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition that is associated with loss of cell polarity, loss of epithelia markers, and enhancement of cell motility essential for tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Mesenchymal human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells, which have naturally high levels of endogenous and exogenous PGI/AMF, were stably transfected with PGI/AMF small interfering RNA (siRNA). The siRNA targeting human PGI/AMF down-regulated the endogenous PGI/AMF expression and completely extinguished the secretion of PGI/AMF in a human fibrosarcoma HT1080, whereas the control siRNA showed no effects. The PGI/AMF siRNA caused cells to change shape dramatically and inhibited cell motility and invasion markedly. Suppression of PGI/AMF led to a contact-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Those PGI/AMF siRNA-transfected cells showed epithelial phenotype. Furthermore, tumor cells with PGI/AMF deficiency lost their abilities to form tumor mass. This study identifies that MET in HT1080 human lung fibrosarcoma cells was initiated by down-regulation of the housekeeping gene product/cytokine PGI/AMF, and the results depicted here suggest a novel therapeutic target/modality for mesenchymal cancers.

  12. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  13. Regulation of Breast Cancer Cell Motility by Golgi-Mediated Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    localized to the Golgi apparatus (Figure 4A) where it interfered with Dbs function, and limited Cdc42 activation. Next we determined whether this was...in the Golgi apparatus is required to support directed migration, but not overall cell movement, per se. Since Golgi reorientation is thought to be...Motility by Golgi -Mediated Signaling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ian Paul Whitehead, Ph.D

  14. Characterisation of chicken TES and its role in cell spreading and motility.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Elen; Coutts, Amanda S; Black, Donald M

    2004-03-01

    Previously we identified TES as a candidate tumour suppressor gene that is located at human chromosome 7q31.1. More recently, we and others have shown TES to encode a novel LIM domain protein that localises to focal adhesions. Here, we present the cloning and functional analysis of the chicken orthologue of TES, cTES. The TES proteins are highly conserved between chicken and human, showing 89% identity at the amino acid level. We show that the cTES protein localised at focal adhesions, actin stress fibres, and sites of cell-cell contact, and GST-cTES can pull-down zyxin and actin. To investigate a functional role for cTES, we looked at the effect of its overexpression on cell spreading and cell motility. Cells overexpressing cTES showed increased cell spreading on fibronectin, and decreased cell motility, compared to RCAS vector transfected control cells. The data from our studies with cTES support our previous findings with human TES and further implicate TES as a member of a complex of proteins that function together to regulate cell adhesion and additionally demonstrate a role for TES in cell motility. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Colonic smooth muscle cells and colonic motility patterns as a target for irritable bowel syndrome therapy: mechanisms of action of otilonium bromide

    PubMed Central

    Rychter, Jakub; Espín, Francisco; Gallego, Diana; Vergara, Patri; Jiménez, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a spasmolytic compound of the family of quaternary ammonium derivatives and has been successfully used in the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) due to its specific pharmacodynamic effects on motility patterns in the human colon and the contractility of colonic smooth muscle cells. This article examines how. OB inhibits the main patterns of human sigmoid motility in vitro, which are spontaneous rhythmic phasic contractions, smooth muscle tone, contractions induced by stimulation of excitatory motor neurons and contractions induced by direct effect of excitatory neurotransmitters. It does this mainly by blocking calcium influx through L-type calcium channels and interfering with mobilization of cellular calcium required for smooth muscle contraction, thereby limiting excessive intestinal contractility and abdominal cramping. OB also inhibits T-type calcium channels and muscarinic responses. Finally, OB inhibits tachykinin receptors on smooth muscle and primary afferent neurons which may have the joint effect of reducing motility and abdominal pain. All these mechanisms mediate the therapeutic effects of OB in patients with IBS and might be useful in patients with other spastic colonic motility disorders such as diverticular disease. PMID:25057296

  16. Colonic smooth muscle cells and colonic motility patterns as a target for irritable bowel syndrome therapy: mechanisms of action of otilonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Rychter, Jakub; Espín, Francisco; Gallego, Diana; Vergara, Patri; Jiménez, Marcel; Clavé, Pere

    2014-07-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is a spasmolytic compound of the family of quaternary ammonium derivatives and has been successfully used in the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) due to its specific pharmacodynamic effects on motility patterns in the human colon and the contractility of colonic smooth muscle cells. This article examines how. OB inhibits the main patterns of human sigmoid motility in vitro, which are spontaneous rhythmic phasic contractions, smooth muscle tone, contractions induced by stimulation of excitatory motor neurons and contractions induced by direct effect of excitatory neurotransmitters. It does this mainly by blocking calcium influx through L-type calcium channels and interfering with mobilization of cellular calcium required for smooth muscle contraction, thereby limiting excessive intestinal contractility and abdominal cramping. OB also inhibits T-type calcium channels and muscarinic responses. Finally, OB inhibits tachykinin receptors on smooth muscle and primary afferent neurons which may have the joint effect of reducing motility and abdominal pain. All these mechanisms mediate the therapeutic effects of OB in patients with IBS and might be useful in patients with other spastic colonic motility disorders such as diverticular disease.

  17. Regulation of Chlamydomonas flagella and ependymal cell motile cilia by ceramide-mediated translocation of GSK3.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ji Na; Hardin, Kara; Dinkins, Michael; Wang, Guanghu; He, Qian; Mujadzic, Tarik; Zhu, Gu; Bielawski, Jacek; Spassieva, Stefka; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-12-01

    Cilia are important organelles formed by cell membrane protrusions; however, little is known about their regulation by membrane lipids. We characterize a novel activation mechanism for glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) by the sphingolipids phytoceramide and ceramide that is critical for ciliogenesis in Chlamydomonas and murine ependymal cells, respectively. We show for the first time that Chlamydomonas expresses serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT), the first enzyme in (phyto)ceramide biosynthesis. Inhibition of SPT in Chlamydomonas by myriocin led to loss of flagella and reduced tubulin acetylation, which was prevented by supplementation with the precursor dihydrosphingosine. Immunocytochemistry showed that (phyto)ceramide was colocalized with phospho-Tyr-216-GSK3 (pYGSK3) at the base and tip of Chlamydomonas flagella and motile cilia in ependymal cells. The (phyto)ceramide distribution was consistent with that of a bifunctional ceramide analogue UV cross-linked and visualized by click-chemistry-mediated fluorescent labeling. Ceramide depletion, by myriocin or neutral sphingomyelinase deficiency (fro/fro mouse), led to GSK3 dephosphorylation and defective flagella and cilia. Motile cilia were rescued and pYGSK3 localization restored by incubation of fro/fro ependymal cells with exogenous C24:1 ceramide, which directly bound to pYGSK3. Our findings suggest that (phyto)ceramide-mediated translocation of pYGSK into flagella and cilia is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism fundamental to the regulation of ciliogenesis.

  18. Cell migration in schizophrenia: Patient-derived cells do not regulate motility in response to extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2017-03-09

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable psychiatric disorder linked to a large number of risk genes. The function of these genes in disease etiology is not fully understood but pathway analyses of genomic data suggest developmental dysregulation of cellular processes such as neuronal migration and axon guidance. Previous studies of patient-derived olfactory cells show them to be more motile than control-derived cells when grown on a fibronectin substrate, motility that is dependent on focal adhesion kinase signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate whether schizophrenia patient-derived cells are responsive to other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that bind integrin receptors. Olfactory neurosphere-derived cells from nine patients and nine matched controls were grown on ECM protein substrates at increasing concentrations and their movement was tracked for 24h using automated high-throughput imaging. Control-derived cells increased their motility as the ECM substrate concentration increased, whereas patient-derived cell motility was little affected by ECM proteins. Patient and control cells had appropriate integrin receptors for these ECM substrates and detected them as shown by increases in focal adhesion number and size in response to ECM proteins, which also induced changes in cell morphology and cytoskeleton. These observations indicate that patient cells failed to translate the detection of ECM proteins into appropriate changes in cell motility. In a sense, patient cells act like a moving car whose accelerator is jammed, moving at the same speed without regard to the external environment. This focuses attention on cell motility regulation rather than speed as key to impairment of neuronal migration in the developing brain in schizophrenia.

  19. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Mediates Microtubule Destabilization To Promote Cell Motility and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Laura M.; Stakaityte, Gabriele; Wood, Jennifer, J.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Griffiths, David A.; Howell, Gareth J.; Wheat, Rachel; Blair, G. Eric; Steven, Neil M.; Macdonald, Andrew; Blackbourn, David J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive skin cancer of neuroendocrine origin with a high propensity for recurrence and metastasis. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) causes the majority of MCC cases due to the expression of the MCPyV small and large tumor antigens (ST and LT, respectively). Although a number of molecular mechanisms have been attributed to MCPyV tumor antigen-mediated cellular transformation or replication, to date, no studies have investigated any potential link between MCPyV T antigen expression and the highly metastatic nature of MCC. Here we use a quantitative proteomic approach to show that MCPyV ST promotes differential expression of cellular proteins implicated in microtubule-associated cytoskeletal organization and dynamics. Intriguingly, we demonstrate that MCPyV ST expression promotes microtubule destabilization, leading to a motile and migratory phenotype. We further highlight the essential role of the microtubule-associated protein stathmin in MCPyV ST-mediated microtubule destabilization and cell motility and implicate the cellular phosphatase catalytic subunit protein phosphatase 4C (PP4C) in the regulation of this process. These findings suggest a possible molecular mechanism for the highly metastatic phenotype associated with MCC. IMPORTANCE Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) causes the majority of cases of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), an aggressive skin cancer with a high metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to virally induced cancer development have yet to be fully elucidated. In particular, no studies have investigated any potential link between the virus and the highly metastatic nature of MCC. We demonstrate that the MCPyV small tumor antigen (ST) promotes the destabilization of the host cell microtubule network, which leads to a more motile and migratory cell phenotype. We further show that MCPyV ST induces this process by regulating the phosphorylation status of the cellular microtubule

  20. Improved method for the quantification of motility in glia and other morphologically complex cells.

    PubMed

    Sild, Mari; Chatelain, Robert P; Ruthazer, Edward S

    2013-01-01

    Cells such as astrocytes and radial glia with many densely ramified, fine processes pose particular challenges for the quantification of structural motility. Here we report the development of a method to calculate a motility index for individual cells with complex, dynamic morphologies. This motility index relies on boxcar averaging of the difference images generated by subtraction of images collected at consecutive time points. An image preprocessing step involving 2D projection, edge detection, and dilation of the raw images is first applied in order to binarize the images. The boxcar averaging of difference images diminishes the impact of artifactual pixel fluctuations while accentuating the group-wise changes in pixel values which are more likely to represent real biological movement. Importantly, this provides a value that correlates with mean process elongation and retraction rates without requiring detailed reconstructions of very complex cells. We also demonstrate that additional increases in the sensitivity of the method can be obtained by denoising images using the temporal frequency power spectra, based on the fact that rapid intensity fluctuations over time are mainly due to imaging artifact. The MATLAB programs implementing these motility analysis methods, complete with user-friendly graphical interfaces, have been made publicly available for download.

  1. Role of the RNA-binding protein IMP-2 in muscle cell motility.

    PubMed

    Boudoukha, Selim; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Polesskaya, Anna

    2010-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs) are a family of posttranscriptional regulatory factors with well-understood roles in embryonic development and cancer but with poorly characterized functions in normal adult cells and tissues. We now show that IMP-2, the most ubiquitously expressed member of the family, is abundant in human and mouse adult skeletal myoblasts, where it is indispensable for cell motility and for stabilization of microtubules. To explore the functions of IMP-2, we analyzed the transcripts that were differentially regulated in IMP-2-depleted myoblasts and bound to IMP-2 in normal myoblasts. Among them were the mRNAs of PINCH-2, an important mediator of cell adhesion and motility, and MURF-3, a microtubule-stabilizing protein. By gain- and loss-of-function assays and gel shift experiments, we show that IMP-2 regulates the expression of PINCH-2 and MURF-3 proteins via direct binding to their mRNAs. Upregulation of PINCH-2 in IMP-2-depleted myoblasts is the key event responsible for their decreased motility. Our data reveal how the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by IMP-2 contributes to the control of adhesion structures and stable microtubules and demonstrate an important function for IMP-2 in cellular motility.

  2. Novel Roles of Formin mDia2 in Lamellipodia and Filopodia Formation in Motile Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changsong; Czech, Lubov; Gerboth, Silke; Kojima, Shin-ichiro; Scita, Giorgio; Svitkina, Tatyana

    2007-01-01

    Actin polymerization-driven protrusion of the leading edge is a key element of cell motility. The important actin nucleators formins and the Arp2/3 complex are believed to have nonoverlapping functions in inducing actin filament bundles in filopodia and dendritic networks in lamellipodia, respectively. We tested this idea by investigating the role of mDia2 formin in leading-edge protrusion by loss-of-function and gain-of-function approaches. Unexpectedly, mDia2 depletion by short interfering RNA (siRNA) severely inhibited lamellipodia. Structural analysis of the actin network in the few remaining lamellipodia suggested an mDia2 role in generation of long filaments. Consistently, constitutively active mDia2 (ΔGBD-mDia2) induced accumulation of long actin filaments in lamellipodia and increased persistence of lamellipodial protrusion. Depletion of mDia2 also inhibited filopodia, whereas expression of ΔGBD-mDia2 promoted their formation. Correlative light and electron microscopy showed that ΔGBD-mDia2–induced filopodia were formed from lamellipodial network through gradual convergence of long lamellipodial filaments into bundles. Efficient filopodia induction required mDia2 targeting to the membrane, likely through a scaffolding protein Abi1. Furthermore, mDia2 and Abi1 interacted through the N-terminal regulatory sequences of mDia2 and the SH3-containing Abi1 sequences. We propose that mDia2 plays an important role in formation of lamellipodia by nucleating and/or protecting from capping lamellipodial actin filaments, which subsequently exhibit high tendency to converge into filopodia. PMID:18044991

  3. Detection of rare antigen-presenting cells through T cell-intrinsic meandering motility, mediated by Myo1g.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Audrey; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Beemiller, Peter; Nambiar, Rajalakshmi; Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Liu, Yin; Totah, Fadi J; Tyska, Matthew J; Shaw, Stephen; Krummel, Matthew F

    2014-07-31

    To mount an immune response, T lymphocytes must successfully search for foreign material bound to the surface of antigen-presenting cells. How T cells optimize their chances of encountering and responding to these antigens is unknown. T cell motility in tissues resembles a random or Levy walk and is regulated in part by external factors including chemokines and lymph-node topology, but motility parameters such as speed and propensity to turn may also be cell intrinsic. Here we found that the unconventional myosin 1g (Myo1g) motor generates membrane tension, enforces cell-intrinsic meandering search, and enhances T-DC interactions during lymph-node surveillance. Increased turning and meandering motility, as opposed to ballistic motility, is enhanced by Myo1g. Myo1g acts as a "turning motor" and generates a form of cellular "flânerie." Modeling and antigen challenges show that these intrinsically programmed elements of motility search are critical for the detection of rare cognate antigen-presenting cells.

  4. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure

    PubMed Central

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; Sayad, Sara El; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W.; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β−/− Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β−/− cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β−/− cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β–actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β–microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β–EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. PMID:26564797

  5. Oriented cell motility and division underlie early limb bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wyngaarden, Laurie A; Vogeli, Kevin M; Ciruna, Brian G; Wells, Mathew; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Hopyan, Sevan

    2010-08-01

    The vertebrate limb bud arises from lateral plate mesoderm and its overlying ectoderm. Despite progress regarding the genetic requirements for limb development, morphogenetic mechanisms that generate early outgrowth remain relatively undefined. We show by live imaging and lineage tracing in different vertebrate models that the lateral plate contributes mesoderm to the early limb bud through directional cell movement. The direction of cell motion, longitudinal cell axes and bias in cell division planes lie largely parallel to one another along the rostrocaudal (head-tail) axis in lateral plate mesoderm. Transition of these parameters from a rostrocaudal to a mediolateral (outward from the body wall) orientation accompanies early limb bud outgrowth. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Wnt5a acts as a chemoattractant in the emerging limb bud where it contributes to the establishment of cell polarity that is likely to underlie the oriented cell behaviours.

  6. Both contractile axial and lateral traction force dynamics drive amoeboid cell motility.

    PubMed

    Bastounis, Effie; Meili, Ruedi; Álvarez-González, Begoña; Francois, Joshua; del Álamo, Juan C; Firtel, Richard A; Lasheras, Juan C

    2014-03-17

    Chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells adapt their morphology and migration speed in response to intrinsic and extrinsic cues. Using Fourier traction force microscopy, we measured the spatiotemporal evolution of shape and traction stresses and constructed traction tension kymographs to analyze cell motility as a function of the dynamics of the cell's mechanically active traction adhesions. We show that wild-type cells migrate in a step-wise fashion, mainly forming stationary traction adhesions along their anterior-posterior axes and exerting strong contractile axial forces. We demonstrate that lateral forces are also important for motility, especially for migration on highly adhesive substrates. Analysis of two mutant strains lacking distinct actin cross-linkers (mhcA(-) and abp120(-) cells) on normal and highly adhesive substrates supports a key role for lateral contractions in amoeboid cell motility, whereas the differences in their traction adhesion dynamics suggest that these two strains use distinct mechanisms to achieve migration. Finally, we provide evidence that the above patterns of migration may be conserved in mammalian amoeboid cells.

  7. Cell motility and drug gradients in the emergence of resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Amy; Loutherback, Kevin; Lambert, Guillaume; Estévez-Salmerón, Luis; Tlsty, Thea D.; Austin, Robert H.; Sturm, James C.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to chemotherapy by cancer cells, when combined with metastasis, is the primary driver of mortality in cancer and has proven to be refractory to many efforts. Theory and computer modeling suggest that the rate of emergence of resistance is driven by the strong selective pressure of mutagenic chemotherapy and enhanced by the motility of mutant cells in a chemotherapy gradient to areas of higher drug concentration and lower population competition. To test these models, we constructed a synthetic microecology which superposed a mutagenic doxorubicin gradient across a population of motile, metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). We observed the emergence of MDA-MB-231 cancer cells capable of proliferation at 200 nM doxorubicin in this complex microecology. Individual cell tracking showed both movement of the MDA-MB-231 cancer cells toward higher drug concentrations and proliferation of the cells at the highest doxorubicin concentrations within 72 h, showing the importance of both motility and drug gradients in the emergence of resistance. PMID:24046372

  8. Automated single-cell motility analysis on a chip using lensfree microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pushkarsky, Ivan; Liu, Yunbo; Lyb, Yunbo; Weaver, Westbrook; Su, Ting-Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-04-17

    Quantitative cell motility studies are necessary for understanding biophysical processes, developing models for cell locomotion and for drug discovery. Such studies are typically performed by controlling environmental conditions around a lens-based microscope, requiring costly instruments while still remaining limited in field-of-view. Here we present a compact cell monitoring platform utilizing a wide-field (24 mm(2)) lensless holographic microscope that enables automated single-cell tracking of large populations that is compatible with a standard laboratory incubator. We used this platform to track NIH 3T3 cells on polyacrylamide gels over 20 hrs. We report that, over an order of magnitude of stiffness values, collagen IV surfaces lead to enhanced motility compared to fibronectin, in agreement with biological uses of these structural proteins. The increased throughput associated with lensfree on-chip imaging enables higher statistical significance in observed cell behavior and may facilitate rapid screening of drugs and genes that affect cell motility.

  9. Automated single-cell motility analysis on a chip using lensfree microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pushkarsky, Ivan; Lyb, Yunbo; Weaver, Westbrook; Su, Ting-Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative cell motility studies are necessary for understanding biophysical processes, developing models for cell locomotion and for drug discovery. Such studies are typically performed by controlling environmental conditions around a lens-based microscope, requiring costly instruments while still remaining limited in field-of-view. Here we present a compact cell monitoring platform utilizing a wide-field (24 mm2) lensless holographic microscope that enables automated single-cell tracking of large populations that is compatible with a standard laboratory incubator. We used this platform to track NIH 3T3 cells on polyacrylamide gels over 20 hrs. We report that, over an order of magnitude of stiffness values, collagen IV surfaces lead to enhanced motility compared to fibronectin, in agreement with biological uses of these structural proteins. The increased throughput associated with lensfree on-chip imaging enables higher statistical significance in observed cell behavior and may facilitate rapid screening of drugs and genes that affect cell motility. PMID:24739819

  10. Stimulation of glioma cell motility by expression, proteolysis, and release of the L1 neural cell recognition molecule.

    PubMed

    Yang, Muhua; Adla, Shalini; Temburni, Murali K; Patel, Vivek P; Lagow, Errin L; Brady, Owen A; Tian, Jing; Boulos, Magdy I; Galileo, Deni S

    2009-10-29

    Malignant glioma cells are particularly motile and can travel diffusely through the brain parenchyma, apparently without following anatomical structures to guide their migration. The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been implicated in contributing to stimulation of motility and metastasis of several non-neural cancer types. We explored the expression and function of L1 protein as a stimulator of glioma cell motility using human high-grade glioma surgical specimens and established rat and human glioma cell lines. L1 protein expression was found in 17 out of 18 human high-grade glioma surgical specimens by western blotting. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human U-87/LacZ and rat C6 and 9L glioma cell lines. The glioma cell lines were negative for surface full length L1 by flow cytometry and high resolution immunocytochemistry of live cells. However, fixed and permeablized cells exhibited positive staining as numerous intracellular puncta. Western blots of cell line extracts revealed L1 proteolysis into a large soluble ectodomain (~180 kDa) and a smaller transmembrane proteolytic fragment (~32 kDa). Exosomal vesicles released by the glioma cell lines were purified and contained both full-length L1 and the proteolyzed transmembrane fragment. Glioma cell lines expressed L1-binding alphavbeta5 integrin cell surface receptors. Quantitative time-lapse analyses showed that motility was reduced significantly in glioma cell lines by 1) infection with an antisense-L1 retroviral vector and 2) L1 ectodomain-binding antibodies. Our novel results support a model of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of cell motility in glioma cells by a cleaved L1 ectodomain and/or released exosomal vesicles containing L1. This mechanism could explain the diffuse migratory behavior of high-grade glioma cancer cells within the brain.

  11. Stimulation of glioma cell motility by expression, proteolysis, and release of the L1 neural cell recognition molecule

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muhua; Adla, Shalini; Temburni, Murali K; Patel, Vivek P; Lagow, Errin L; Brady, Owen A; Tian, Jing; Boulos, Magdy I; Galileo, Deni S

    2009-01-01

    Background Malignant glioma cells are particularly motile and can travel diffusely through the brain parenchyma, apparently without following anatomical structures to guide their migration. The neural adhesion/recognition protein L1 (L1CAM; CD171) has been implicated in contributing to stimulation of motility and metastasis of several non-neural cancer types. We explored the expression and function of L1 protein as a stimulator of glioma cell motility using human high-grade glioma surgical specimens and established rat and human glioma cell lines. Results L1 protein expression was found in 17 out of 18 human high-grade glioma surgical specimens by western blotting. L1 mRNA was found to be present in human U-87/LacZ and rat C6 and 9L glioma cell lines. The glioma cell lines were negative for surface full length L1 by flow cytometry and high resolution immunocytochemistry of live cells. However, fixed and permeablized cells exhibited positive staining as numerous intracellular puncta. Western blots of cell line extracts revealed L1 proteolysis into a large soluble ectodomain (~180 kDa) and a smaller transmembrane proteolytic fragment (~32 kDa). Exosomal vesicles released by the glioma cell lines were purified and contained both full-length L1 and the proteolyzed transmembrane fragment. Glioma cell lines expressed L1-binding αvβ5 integrin cell surface receptors. Quantitative time-lapse analyses showed that motility was reduced significantly in glioma cell lines by 1) infection with an antisense-L1 retroviral vector and 2) L1 ectodomain-binding antibodies. Conclusion Our novel results support a model of autocrine/paracrine stimulation of cell motility in glioma cells by a cleaved L1 ectodomain and/or released exosomal vesicles containing L1. This mechanism could explain the diffuse migratory behavior of high-grade glioma cancer cells within the brain. PMID:19874583

  12. Morphed and moving: TNFα-driven motility promotes cell dissemination through MAP4K4-induced cytoskeleton remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Min; Baumgartner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cell dissemination from an initial site of growth is a highly coordinated and controlled process that depends on cell motility. The mechanistic principles that orchestrate cell motility, namely cell shape control, traction and force generation, are highly conserved between cells of different origins. Correspondingly, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these critical aspects of migrating cells are likely functionally conserved too. Thus, cell motility deregulation of unrelated pathogenesis could be caused and maintained by similar mechanistic principles. One such motility deregulation disorder is the leukoproliferative cattle disease Tropical Theileriosis, which is caused by the intracellular, protozoan parasite Theileria annulata. T. annulata transforms its host cell and promotes the dissemination of parasite-infected cells throughout the body of the host. An analogous condition with a fundamentally different pathogenesis is metastatic cancer, where oncogenically transformed cells disseminate from the primary tumor to form distant metastases. Common to both diseases is the dissemination of motile cells from the original site. However, unlike metastatic cancer, host cell transformation by Theileria parasites can be reverted by drug treatment and cell signaling be analyzed under transformed and non-transformed conditions. We have used this reversible transformation model and investigated parasite control of host cell motile properties in the context of inflammatory signaling in Ma M. et al. [PLoS Pathog (2014) 10: e1004003]. We found that parasite infection promotes the production of the inflammatory cytokine TNFα in the host macrophage. We demonstrated that increased TNFα triggers motile and invasive properties by enhancing actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell motility through the ser/thr kinase MAP4K4. We concluded that inflammatory conditions resulting in increased TNFα could facilitate cell dissemination by activating the actin cytoskeleton regulatory

  13. Control of human endometrial stromal cell motility by PDGF-BB, HB-EGF and trophoblast-secreted factors.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, Maren; Knöfler, Martin; Velicky, Philipp; Weimar, Charlotte H E; Kruse, Michelle; Samalecos, Annemarie; Wolf, Anja; Macklon, Nick S; Bamberger, Ana-Maria; Gellersen, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Human implantation involves extensive tissue remodeling at the fetal-maternal interface. It is becoming increasingly evident that not only trophoblast, but also decidualizing endometrial stromal cells are inherently motile and invasive, and likely contribute to the highly dynamic processes at the implantation site. The present study was undertaken to further characterize the mechanisms involved in the regulation of endometrial stromal cell motility and to identify trophoblast-derived factors that modulate migration. Among local growth factors known to be present at the time of implantation, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) triggered chemotaxis (directed locomotion), whereas platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB elicited both chemotaxis and chemokinesis (non-directed locomotion) of endometrial stromal cells. Supernatants of the trophoblast cell line AC-1M88 and of first trimester villous explant cultures stimulated chemotaxis but not chemokinesis. Proteome profiling for cytokines and angiogenesis factors revealed neither PDGF-BB nor HB-EGF in conditioned media from trophoblast cells or villous explants, while placental growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and PDGF-AA were identified as prominent secretory products. Among these, only PDGF-AA triggered endometrial stromal cell chemotaxis. Neutralization of PDGF-AA in trophoblast conditioned media, however, did not diminish chemoattractant activity, suggesting the presence of additional trophoblast-derived chemotactic factors. Pathway inhibitor studies revealed ERK1/2, PI3 kinase/Akt and p38 signaling as relevant for chemotactic motility, whereas chemokinesis depended primarily on PI3 kinase/Akt activation. Both chemotaxis and chemokinesis were stimulated upon inhibition of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase. The chemotactic response to trophoblast secretions was not blunted by inhibition of isolated signaling cascades, indicating activation of

  14. Both contractile axial and lateral traction force dynamics drive amoeboid cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Bastounis, Effie; Meili, Ruedi; Álvarez-González, Begoña; Francois, Joshua; del Álamo, Juan C.; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells adapt their morphology and migration speed in response to intrinsic and extrinsic cues. Using Fourier traction force microscopy, we measured the spatiotemporal evolution of shape and traction stresses and constructed traction tension kymographs to analyze cell motility as a function of the dynamics of the cell’s mechanically active traction adhesions. We show that wild-type cells migrate in a step-wise fashion, mainly forming stationary traction adhesions along their anterior–posterior axes and exerting strong contractile axial forces. We demonstrate that lateral forces are also important for motility, especially for migration on highly adhesive substrates. Analysis of two mutant strains lacking distinct actin cross-linkers (mhcA− and abp120− cells) on normal and highly adhesive substrates supports a key role for lateral contractions in amoeboid cell motility, whereas the differences in their traction adhesion dynamics suggest that these two strains use distinct mechanisms to achieve migration. Finally, we provide evidence that the above patterns of migration may be conserved in mammalian amoeboid cells. PMID:24637328

  15. Effects of micropatterned curvature on the motility and mechanical properties of airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimin; Chen, Cheng; Jiang, Xuemei; Xu, Rong; Tambe, Dhananjay; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Lina; Lan, Bo; Cai, Kaiyong; Deng, Linhong

    2011-12-02

    Geometric features such as size and shape of the microenvironment are known to alter cell behaviors such as growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. Little is known, however, about the effect of curvature on cell behaviors despite that many cells reside in curved space of tubular organs such as the bronchial airways. To address this question, we fabricated micropatterned strips that mimic airway walls with varying curvature. Then, we cultured airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) on these strips and investigated the cells' motility and mechanical properties using time-lapse imaging microscopy and optical magnetic twisting cytometry (OMTC). We found that both motility and mechanical properties of the ASMCs were influenced by the curvature. In particular, when the curvature increased from 0 to 1/150 μm(-1), the velocity of cell migration first decreased (0-1/750 μm(-1)), and then increased (1/750-1/150 μm(-1)). In contrast, the cell stiffness increased and then decreased. Thus, at the intermediate curvature (1/750 μm(-1)) the ASMCs were the least motile, but most stiff. The contractility instead decreased consistently as the curvature increased. The level of F-actin, and vinculin expression within the ASMCs appeared to correlate with the contractility and motility, respectively, in relation to the curvature. These results may provide valuable insights to understanding the heterogeneity of airway constrictions in asthma as well as the developing and functioning of other tubular organs and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Complex patterns formed by motile cells of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrene, Elena O.; Berg, Howard C.

    1991-02-01

    WHEN chemotactic strains of the bacterium Escherichia coli are inoculated on semi-solid agar containing mixtures of amino acids or sugars, the cells swarm outwards in a series of concentric rings: they respond to spatial gradients of attractants generated by uptake and catabolism1-3. Cells also drift up gradients generated artificially, for example by diffusion from the tip of a capillary tube4 or by mixing5. Here we describe conditions under which cells aggregate in response to gradients of attractant which they excrete themselves. When cells are grown in semi-solid agar on intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, they form symmetrical arrays of spots or stripes that arise sequentially. When cells in a thin layer of liquid culture are exposed to these compounds, spots appear synchronously, more randomly arrayed. In either case, the patterns are stationary. The attractant is a chemical sensed by the aspartate receptor. Its excretion can be triggered by oxidative stress. As oxygen is limiting at high cell densities, aggregation might serve as a mechanism for collective defence.

  17. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing for the quantification of endothelial proliferation, barrier function, and motility.

    PubMed

    Szulcek, Robert; Bogaard, Harm Jan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P

    2014-03-28

    Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) is an in vitro impedance measuring system to quantify the behavior of cells within adherent cell layers. To this end, cells are grown in special culture chambers on top of opposing, circular gold electrodes. A constant small alternating current is applied between the electrodes and the potential across is measured. The insulating properties of the cell membrane create a resistance towards the electrical current flow resulting in an increased electrical potential between the electrodes. Measuring cellular impedance in this manner allows the automated study of cell attachment, growth, morphology, function, and motility. Although the ECIS measurement itself is straightforward and easy to learn, the underlying theory is complex and selection of the right settings and correct analysis and interpretation of the data is not self-evident. Yet, a clear protocol describing the individual steps from the experimental design to preparation, realization, and analysis of the experiment is not available. In this article the basic measurement principle as well as possible applications, experimental considerations, advantages and limitations of the ECIS system are discussed. A guide is provided for the study of cell attachment, spreading and proliferation; quantification of cell behavior in a confluent layer, with regard to barrier function, cell motility, quality of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions; and quantification of wound healing and cellular responses to vasoactive stimuli. Representative results are discussed based on human microvascular (MVEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but are applicable to all adherent growing cells.

  18. Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for the Quantification of Endothelial Proliferation, Barrier Function, and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Szulcek, Robert; Bogaard, Harm Jan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.

    2014-01-01

    Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) is an in vitro impedance measuring system to quantify the behavior of cells within adherent cell layers. To this end, cells are grown in special culture chambers on top of opposing, circular gold electrodes. A constant small alternating current is applied between the electrodes and the potential across is measured. The insulating properties of the cell membrane create a resistance towards the electrical current flow resulting in an increased electrical potential between the electrodes. Measuring cellular impedance in this manner allows the automated study of cell attachment, growth, morphology, function, and motility. Although the ECIS measurement itself is straightforward and easy to learn, the underlying theory is complex and selection of the right settings and correct analysis and interpretation of the data is not self-evident. Yet, a clear protocol describing the individual steps from the experimental design to preparation, realization, and analysis of the experiment is not available. In this article the basic measurement principle as well as possible applications, experimental considerations, advantages and limitations of the ECIS system are discussed. A guide is provided for the study of cell attachment, spreading and proliferation; quantification of cell behavior in a confluent layer, with regard to barrier function, cell motility, quality of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions; and quantification of wound healing and cellular responses to vasoactive stimuli. Representative results are discussed based on human microvascular (MVEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but are applicable to all adherent growing cells. PMID:24747269

  19. Orientation of actin filaments in teleost retinal pigment epithelial cells, and the effect of the lectin, Concanavalin A, on melanosome motility.

    PubMed

    King-Smith, Christina; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Fischer, Nicole E; Gannon, Patrick; Gunnam, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial cells of teleosts contain numerous melanosomes (pigment granules) that exhibit light-dependent motility. In light, melanosomes disperse out of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell body (CB) into long apical projections that interdigitate with rod photoreceptors, thus shielding the photoreceptors from bleaching. In darkness, melanosomes aggregate through the apical projections back into the CB. Previous research has demonstrated that melanosome motility in the RPE CB requires microtubules, but in the RPE apical projections, actin filaments are necessary and sufficient for motility. We used myosin S1 labeling and platinum replica shadowing of dissociated RPE cells to determine actin filament polarity in apical projections. Actin filament bundles within RPE apical projections are uniformly oriented with barbed ends toward the distal tips. Treatment of RPE cells with the tetravalent lectin, Concanavalin A, which has been shown to suppress cortical actin flow by crosslinking of cell-surface proteins, inhibited melanosome aggregation and stimulated ectopic filopodia formation but did not block melanosome dispersion. The polarity orientation of F-actin in apical projections suggests that a barbed-end directed myosin motor could effect dispersion of melanosomes from the CB into apical projections. Inhibition of aggregation, but not dispersion, by ConA confirms that different actin-dependent mechanisms control these two processes and suggests that melanosome aggregation is sensitive to treatments previously shown to disrupt actin cortical flow.

  20. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning.

    PubMed

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C; Fernandes, Ninoshka R J; Fowell, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell's antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function.

  1. Cell motility: an interplay between local and non-local measurement.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, K

    1989-01-01

    The bending motions of an ATP-activated actin filament and a flagellar axoneme of starfish spermatozoon exhibit a one-to-many correspondence between the displacement of the medium and the force actualized in the medium, demonstrating sharp contrast to the one-to-one correspondence in classical mechanics. Uniqueness of the actualized forces is lacking. Cell motility suggests the absence of a completely specifiable boundary condition that would unambiguously control the dynamics of generating mechanical forces in motile cells. The one-to-many relationship between the displacement of the medium and the force actualized in the medium necessitates a materialistic capacity for making choices on the part of molecules and cells in transforming future possibilities into actualized reality, the latter of which again serves as the source of the further future possibilities.

  2. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  3. Archaeal signal transduction: impact of protein phosphatase deletions on cell size, motility, and energy metabolism in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Julia; Esser, Dominik; Orell, Alvaro; Amman, Fabian; Pham, Trong Khoa; Noirel, Josselin; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Bernander, Rolf; Wright, Phillip C; Siebers, Bettina; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the in vitro and in vivo functions of the only two identified protein phosphatases, Saci-PTP and Saci-PP2A, in the crenarchaeal model organism Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were investigated. Biochemical characterization revealed that Saci-PTP is a dual-specific phosphatase (against pSer/pThr and pTyr), whereas Saci-PP2A exhibited specific pSer/pThr activity and inhibition by okadaic acid. Deletion of saci_pp2a resulted in pronounced alterations in growth, cell shape and cell size, which could be partially complemented. Transcriptome analysis of the three strains (Δsaci_ptp, Δsaci_pp2a and the MW001 parental strain) revealed 155 genes that were differentially expressed in the deletion mutants, and showed significant changes in expression of genes encoding the archaella (archaeal motility structure), components of the respiratory chain and transcriptional regulators. Phosphoproteome studies revealed 801 unique phosphoproteins in total, with an increase in identified phosphopeptides in the deletion mutants. Proteins from most functional categories were affected by phosphorylation, including components of the motility system, the respiratory chain, and regulatory proteins. In the saci_pp2a deletion mutant the up-regulation at the transcript level, as well as the observed phosphorylation pattern, resembled starvation stress responses. Hypermotility was also observed in the saci_pp2a deletion mutant. The results highlight the importance of protein phosphorylation in regulating essential cellular processes in the crenarchaeon S. acidocaldarius.

  4. Biophysical Properties and Motility of Human Mature Dendritic Cells Deteriorated by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor through Cytoskeleton Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Hui; Long, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yun; Jia, Yi; Qiu, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Wen, Zong-Yao; Yao, Wei-Juan; Zeng, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells, play a central role in the initiation, regulation, and maintenance of the immune responses. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the important cytokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) and can inhibit the differentiation and functional maturation of DCs. To elucidate the potential mechanisms of DC dysfunction induced by VEGF, the effects of VEGF on the biophysical characteristics and motility of human mature DCs (mDCs) were investigated. The results showed that VEGF had a negative influence on the biophysical properties, including electrophoretic mobility, osmotic fragility, viscoelasticity, and transmigration. Further cytoskeleton structure analysis by confocal microscope and gene expression profile analyses by gene microarray and real-time PCR indicated that the abnormal remodeling of F-actin cytoskeleton may be the main reason for the deterioration of biophysical properties, motility, and stimulatory capability of VEGF-treated mDCs. This is significant for understanding the biological behavior of DCs and the immune escape mechanism of tumors. Simultaneously, the therapeutic efficacies may be improved by blocking the signaling pathway of VEGF in an appropriate manner before the deployment of DC-based vaccinations against tumors. PMID:27809226

  5. Biophysical Properties and Motility of Human Mature Dendritic Cells Deteriorated by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor through Cytoskeleton Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Hui; Long, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yun; Jia, Yi; Qiu, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Wen, Zong-Yao; Yao, Wei-Juan; Zeng, Zhu

    2016-10-31

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells, play a central role in the initiation, regulation, and maintenance of the immune responses. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the important cytokines in the tumor microenvironment (TME) and can inhibit the differentiation and functional maturation of DCs. To elucidate the potential mechanisms of DC dysfunction induced by VEGF, the effects of VEGF on the biophysical characteristics and motility of human mature DCs (mDCs) were investigated. The results showed that VEGF had a negative influence on the biophysical properties, including electrophoretic mobility, osmotic fragility, viscoelasticity, and transmigration. Further cytoskeleton structure analysis by confocal microscope and gene expression profile analyses by gene microarray and real-time PCR indicated that the abnormal remodeling of F-actin cytoskeleton may be the main reason for the deterioration of biophysical properties, motility, and stimulatory capability of VEGF-treated mDCs. This is significant for understanding the biological behavior of DCs and the immune escape mechanism of tumors. Simultaneously, the therapeutic efficacies may be improved by blocking the signaling pathway of VEGF in an appropriate manner before the deployment of DC-based vaccinations against tumors.

  6. Mechanochemical symmetric breaking in cell motility of slime mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert; Zhang, Shun; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2016-11-01

    The cytoplasm of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum exhibits regular rhythmic periodic shuttle streaming though the cell in the direction of motion. The fluid motion is driven by the periodic contraction of an actin-myosin gel that is regulated by a calcium oscillation. When the organism is small (< 100 microns) there is no shuttle streaming, but beyond this size, regular back-and-forth streaming appears and the cell begins to migrate. In this talk we analyze a mechanochemical model of the cell which includes the intracellular fluid, the active contractile cytoskeleton, the adhesion to the substrate, and the dynamics of a chemical oscillator. We use this analysis along with experimental data to identify the instability related to the onset of streaming in order to bring insight into how contraction, flow, and adhesion are coordinated during locomotion.

  7. The actin gene ACT1 is required for phagocytosis, motility, and cell separation of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, Norman E; Tsao, Che-Chia; Bowen, Josephine; Hehman, Gery L; Williams, Ruth J; Frankel, Joseph

    2006-03-01

    A previously identified Tetrahymena thermophila actin gene (C. G. Cupples and R. E. Pearlman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:5160-5164, 1986), here called ACT1, was disrupted by insertion of a neo3 cassette. Cells in which all expressed copies of this gene were disrupted exhibited intermittent and extremely slow motility and severely curtailed phagocytic uptake. Transformation of these cells with inducible genetic constructs that contained a normal ACT1 gene restored motility. Use of an epitope-tagged construct permitted visualization of Act1p in the isolated axonemes of these rescued cells. In ACT1Delta mutant cells, ultrastructural abnormalities of outer doublet microtubules were present in some of the axonemes. Nonetheless, these cells were still able to assemble cilia after deciliation. The nearly paralyzed ACT1Delta cells completed cleavage furrowing normally, but the presumptive daughter cells often failed to separate from one another and later became reintegrated. Clonal analysis revealed that the cell cycle length of the ACT1Delta cells was approximately double that of wild-type controls. Clones could nonetheless be maintained for up to 15 successive fissions, suggesting that the ACT1 gene is not essential for cell viability or growth. Examination of the cell cortex with monoclonal antibodies revealed that whereas elongation of ciliary rows and formation of oral structures were normal, the ciliary rows of reintegrated daughter cells became laterally displaced and sometimes rejoined indiscriminately across the former division furrow. We conclude that Act1p is required in Tetrahymena thermophila primarily for normal ciliary motility and for phagocytosis and secondarily for the final separation of daughter cells.

  8. T Cell Interstitial Migration: Motility Cues from the Inflamed Tissue for Micro- and Macro-Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Gaylo, Alison; Schrock, Dillon C.; Fernandes, Ninoshka R. J.; Fowell, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cells exit the inflamed vasculature into an environment shaped by tissue-specific structural configurations and inflammation-imposed extrinsic modifications. Once within interstitial spaces of non-lymphoid tissues, T cells migrate in an apparent random, non-directional, fashion. Efficient T cell scanning of the tissue environment is essential for successful location of infected target cells or encounter with antigen-presenting cells that activate the T cell’s antimicrobial effector functions. The mechanisms of interstitial T cell motility and the environmental cues that may promote or hinder efficient tissue scanning are poorly understood. The extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important scaffolding role in guidance of T cell migration and likely provides a platform for the display of chemotactic factors that may help to direct the positioning of T cells. Here, we discuss how intravital imaging has provided insight into the motility patterns and cellular machinery that facilitates T cell interstitial migration and the critical environmental factors that may optimize the efficiency of effector T cell scanning of the inflamed tissue. Specifically, we highlight the local micro-positioning cues T cells encounter as they migrate within inflamed tissues, from surrounding ECM and signaling molecules, as well as a requirement for appropriate long-range macro-positioning within distinct tissue compartments or at discrete foci of infection or tissue damage. The central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury and infection by extensively remodeling the ECM and with the de novo generation of a fibroblastic reticular network that likely influences T cell motility. We examine how inflammation-induced changes to the CNS landscape may regulate T cell tissue exploration and modulate function. PMID:27790220

  9. Annexin A6 - a multifunctional scaffold in cell motility.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Thomas; Hoque, Monira; Conway, James R W; Reverter, Meritxell; Wahba, Mohamed; Beevi, Syed S; Timpson, Paul; Enrich, Carlos; Rentero, Carles

    2017-01-06

    Annexin A6 (AnxA6) belongs to a highly conserved protein family characterized by their calcium (Ca(2+)) -dependent binding to phospholipids. Over the years, immunohistochemistry, subcellular fractionations, and live cell microscopy established that AnxA6 is predominantly found at the plasma membrane and endosomal compartments. In these locations, AnxA6 acts as a multifunctional scaffold protein, recruiting signaling proteins, modulating cholesterol and membrane transport and influencing actin dynamics. These activities enable AnxA6 to contribute to the formation of multifactorial protein complexes and membrane domains relevant in signal transduction, cholesterol homeostasis and endo-/exocytic membrane transport. Hence, AnxA6 has been implicated in many biological processes, including cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, inflammation, but also membrane repair and viral infection. More recently, we and others identified roles for AnxA6 in cancer cell migration and invasion. This review will discuss how the multiple scaffold functions may enable AnxA6 to modulate migratory cell behaviour in health and disease.

  10. Annexin A6-A multifunctional scaffold in cell motility.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Thomas; Hoque, Monira; Conway, James R W; Reverter, Meritxell; Wahba, Mohamed; Beevi, Syed S; Timpson, Paul; Enrich, Carlos; Rentero, Carles

    2017-01-06

    Annexin A6 (AnxA6) belongs to a highly conserved protein family characterized by their calcium (Ca(2+)) -dependent binding to phospholipids. Over the years, immunohistochemistry, subcellular fractionations, and live cell microscopy established that AnxA6 is predominantly found at the plasma membrane and endosomal compartments. In these locations, AnxA6 acts as a multifunctional scaffold protein, recruiting signaling proteins, modulating cholesterol and membrane transport and influencing actin dynamics. These activities enable AnxA6 to contribute to the formation of multifactorial protein complexes and membrane domains relevant in signal transduction, cholesterol homeostasis and endo-/exocytic membrane transport. Hence, AnxA6 has been implicated in many biological processes, including cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, inflammation, but also membrane repair and viral infection. More recently, we and others identified roles for AnxA6 in cancer cell migration and invasion. This review will discuss how the multiple scaffold functions may enable AnxA6 to modulate migratory cell behavior in health and disease.

  11. Functional role of glycosphingolipids and gangliosides in control of cell adhesion, motility, and growth, through glycosynaptic microdomains.

    PubMed

    Regina Todeschini, Adriane; Hakomori, Sen-itiroh

    2008-03-01

    At cell surface microdomains, glycosyl epitopes, carried either by glycosphingolipids, N- or O-linked oligosaccharides, are recognized by carbohydrate-binding proteins or complementary carbohydrates. In both cases, the carbohydrate epitopes may be clustered with specific signal transducers, tetraspanins, adhesion receptors or growth factor receptors. Through this framework, carbohydrates can mediate cell signaling leading to changes in cellular phenotype. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion inducing cell activation, motility, and growth are termed "glycosynapse". In this review a historical synopsis of glycosphingolipids-enriched microdomains study leading to the concept of glycosynapse is presented. Examples of glycosynapse as signaling unit controlling the tumor cell phenotype are discussed in three contexts: (i) Cell-to-cell adhesion mediated by glycosphingolipids-to-glycosphingolipids interaction between interfacing glycosynaptic domains, through head-to-head (trans) carbohydrate-to-carbohydrate interaction. (ii) Functional role of GM3 complexed with tetraspanin CD9, and interaction of such complex with integrins, or with fibroblast growth factor receptor, to control tumor cell phenotype and its reversion to normal cell phenotype. (iii) Inhibition of integrin-dependent Met kinase activity by GM2/tetraspanin CD82 complex in glycosynaptic microdomain. Data present here suggest that the organizational status of glycosynapse strongly affects cellular phenotype influencing tumor cell malignancy.

  12. PHA665752 inhibits the HGF-stimulated migration and invasion of cells by blocking PI3K/AKT pathway in human cell line uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; He, C; Liu, L; Ma, N; Chen, X; Zheng, D; Qiu, G H

    2017-03-03

    HGF/c-MET is frequently associated with tumor metastasis in many cancers, including uveal melanoma (UM). PHA665752, a selective c-MET inhibitor, exhibits anticancer activity through inhibiting cell motility in some cancers. In this study, we investigated the effects of PHA665752 on UM cell lines M17 and SP6.5. Our data show that HGF stimulated the motility of UM cells, and induced the activation of both c-MET and PI3K/AKT, but not ERK1/2. Moreover, consistent with the amount of c-MET within the nucleus, PHA665752 significantly inhibited HGF-promoted cell motility and suppressed the phosphorylation of c-MET and PI3K/AKT, but not ERK1/2 induced by HGF. Additionally, the effects of PHA665752 on both the inhibition of HGF-induced cell motility and the suppression of active AKT are similar to those of PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In xenograft models, PHA665752 significantly inhibited tumor growth in nude mice and similarly suppressed the phosphorylation of c-MET and PI3K/AKT. Our current findings, combined with previous results, demonstrate that PHA665752 inhibits HGF-induced motility via the inhibition of PI3K/AKT. This study suggests that targeting HGF/c-MET could be a promising therapeutic strategy for UM by preventing cell motility.

  13. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  14. Automated tracking and laser micromanipulation of motile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhrmann, B.; Gögler, M.; Betz, T.; Ehrlicher, A.; Koch, D.; Käs, J.

    2005-03-01

    Control over neuronal growth is a prerequisite for the creation of defined in vitro neuronal networks as assays for the elucidation of interneuronal communication. Neuronal growth has been directed by focusing a near-infrared laser beam at a nerve cell's leading edge [A. Ehrlicher, T. Betz, B. Stuhrmann, D. Koch, V. Milner, M. G. Raizen, and J. Käs, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16024 (2002)]. The setup reported by Ehrlicher et al. was limited to local laser irradiation and relied on a great deal of subjective interaction since the laser beam could only be steered manually. To overcome the drawbacks of the reported setup, we developed and here present a fully automated low-contrast edge detection software package, which responds to detected cell morphological changes by rapidly actuating laser steering devices, such as acousto-optical deflectors or moving mirrors, thus enabling experiments with minimum human interference. The resulting radiation patterns can be arbitrary functions of space, time, and cell morphology, and are calculated by experiment specific feedback routines. Data processing is repeated on the order of 1s allowing rapid reactions to morphological changes. The strengths of our program are the combination of real-time low contrast shape detection with complex feedback mechanisms, as well as easy adaptability due to a modular programming concept. In this article we demonstrate automated optical guidance; however, the software is easily adaptable to other problems requiring automated rapid responses of equipment to changes in the morphology of low contrast objects.

  15. Keratins mediate localization of hemidesmosomes and repress cell motility.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Kristin; Roth, Wera; Kröger, Cornelia; Loschke, Fanny; Lederer, Marcell; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Magin, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The keratin (K)-hemidesmosome (HD) interaction is crucial for cell-matrix adhesion and migration in several epithelia, including the epidermis. Mutations in constituent proteins cause severe blistering skin disorders by disrupting the adhesion complex. Despite extensive studies, the role of keratins in HD assembly and maintenance is only partially understood. Here we address this issue in keratinocytes in which all keratins are depleted by genome engineering. Unexpectedly, such keratinocytes maintain many characteristics of their normal counterparts. However, the absence of the entire keratin cytoskeleton leads to loss of plectin from the hemidesmosomal plaque and scattering of the HD transmembrane core along the basement membrane zone. To investigate the functional consequences, we performed migration and adhesion assays. These revealed that, in the absence of keratins, keratinocytes adhere much faster to extracellular matrix substrates and migrate approximately two times faster compared with wild-type cells. Reexpression of the single keratin pair K5 and K14 fully reversed the above phenotype. Our data uncover a role of keratins, which to our knowledge is previously unreported, in the maintenance of HDs upstream of plectin, with implications for epidermal homeostasis and pathogenesis. They support the view that the downregulation of keratins observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition supports the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells.

  16. Keratins mediate localization of hemidesmosomes and repress cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Seltmann, Kristin; Roth, Wera; Loschke, Fanny; Lederer, Marcell; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Magin, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The keratin-hemidesmosome interaction is crucial for cell-matrix adhesion and migration in several epithelia including the epidermis. Mutations in constituent proteins cause severe blistering skin disorders by disrupting the adhesion complex. Despite extensive studies, the role of keratins in hemidesmosome assembly and maintenance is only partially understood. Here, we address this issue in keratinocytes in which all keratins are depleted by genome engineering. Unexpectedly, such keratinocytes maintain many characteristics of normal counterparts. The absence of the entire keratin cytoskeleton, however, leads to loss of plectin from the hemidesmosomal plaque and scattering of the hemidesmosome transmembrane core along the basement membrane zone. To investigate the functional consequences, we performed migration and adhesion assays. These revealed that in the absence of keratins, keratinocytes adhere much faster to ECM substrates and migrate ~2 times faster compared to wildtype cells. Re-expression of the single keratin pair K5 and K14 fully reversed the above phenotype. Our data uncover a novel role of keratins in the maintenance of hemidesmosomes upstream of plectin with implications for epidermal homeostasis and pathogenesis. They support the view that the downregulation of keratins observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition supports the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells. PMID:22895363

  17. Programmable manipulation of motile cells in optoelectronic tweezers using a grayscale image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonjae; Nam, Seong-Won; Hwang, Hyundoo; Park, Sungsu; Park, Je-Kyun

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a grayscale optoelectronic tweezers (OET) which allows adjustment of the electric field strength at each position of OET. A grayscale light image was used to pattern vertical electric field strength on an OET. As an electric field depends on the brightness at each point, the brighter light patterns generate the stronger electric field in the OET. Its feasibility for application to cell manipulation was demonstrated by aligning highly motile protozoan cells in vertical direction. Depending on the brightness of each pixel, the behaviors of aligned cells varied due to the different electric field strength to each cell.

  18. Bacterial tracking of motile algae assisted by algal cell's vorticity field.

    PubMed

    Locsei, J T; Pedley, T J

    2009-07-01

    Previously published experimental work by other authors has shown that certain motile marine bacteria are able to track free-swimming algae by executing a zigzag path and steering toward the algae at each turn. Here, we propose that the apparent steering behaviour could be a hydrodynamic effect, whereby an algal cell's vorticity and strain-rate fields rotate a pursuing bacterial cell in the appropriate direction. Using simplified models for the bacterial and algal cells, we numerically compute the trajectory of a bacterial cell and demonstrate the plausibility of this hypothesis.

  19. A Mutation in Flavobacterium psychrophilum tlpB Inhibits Gliding Motility and Induces Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, B.; Secades, P.; Prieto, M.; McBride, M. J.; Guijarro, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a psychrotrophic, fish-pathogenic bacterium belonging to the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. Tn4351-induced mutants deficient in gliding motility, growth on iron-depleted media, and extracellular proteolytic activity were isolated. Some of these mutants were affected in only one of these characteristics, whereas others had defects in two or more. FP523, a mutant deficient in all of these properties, was studied further. FP523 had a Tn4351 insertion in tlpB (thiol oxidoreductase-like protein gene), which encodes a 41.4-kDa protein whose sequence does not exhibit high levels of similar to the sequences of proteins having known functions. TlpB has two domains; the N-terminal domains has five transmembrane regions, whereas the C-terminal domains has the Cys-X-X-Cys motif and other conserved motifs characteristic of thiol:disulfide oxidoreductases. Quantitative analysis of the thiol groups of periplasmic proteins revealed that TlpB is required for reduction of these groups. The tlpB gene is part of the fpt (F. psychrophilum thiol oxidoreductase) operon that contains two other genes, tlpA and tpiA, which encode a thiol:disulfide oxidoreductase and a triosephosphate isomerase, respectively. FP523 exhibited enhanced biofilm formation and decreased virulence and cytotoxicity. Complementation with the tlpB loci restored the wild-type phenotype. Gliding motility and biofilm formation appear to be antagonistic properties, which are both affected by TlpB. PMID:16751514

  20. Constitutively Active 5-HT Receptors: An Explanation of How 5-HT Antagonists Inhibit Gut Motility in Species Where 5-HT is Not an Enteric Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.

    2015-01-01

    Antagonists of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors are well known to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI)-motility and transit in a variety of mammals, including humans. Originally, these observations had been interpreted by many investigators (including us) as evidence that endogenous 5-HT plays a major role in GI motility. This seemed a logical assumption. However, the story changed dramatically after recent studies revealed that 5-HT antagonists still blocked major GI motility patterns (peristalsis and colonic migrating motor complexes) in segments of intestine depleted of all 5-HT. Then, these results were further supported by Dr. Gershons' laboratory, which showed that genetic deletion of all genes that synthesizes 5-HT had minor, or no inhibitory effects on GI transit in vivo. If 5-HT was essential for GI motility patterns and transit, then one would expect major disruptions in motility and transit when 5-HT synthesis was genetically ablated. This does not occur. The inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility clearly occur independently of any 5-HT in the gut. Evidence now suggests that 5-HT antagonists act on 5-HT receptors in the gut which are constitutively active, and don't require 5-HT for their activation. This would explain a long-standing mystery of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species like mice, rats, and humans where 5-HT is not an enteric neurotransmitter. Studies are now increasingly demonstrating that the presence of a neurochemical in enteric neurons does not mean they function as neurotransmitters. Caution should be exercised when interpreting any inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility. PMID:26732863

  1. The green tea catechin epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) blocks cell motility, chemotaxis and development in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    McQuade, Kyle J; Nakajima, Akihiko; Ilacqua, April N; Shimada, Nao; Sawai, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Catechins, flavanols found at high levels in green tea, have received significant attention due to their potential health benefits related to cancer, autoimmunity and metabolic disease, but little is known about the mechanisms by which these compounds affect cellular behavior. Here, we assess whether the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum is a useful tool with which to characterize the effects of catechins. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the most abundant and potent catechin in green tea, has significant effects on the Dictyostelium life cycle. In the presence of EGCG aggregation is delayed, cells do not stream and development is typically stalled at the loose aggregate stage. The developmental effects very likely result from defects in motility, as EGCG reduces both random movement and chemotaxis of Dictyostelium amoebae. These results suggest that catechins and their derivatives may be useful tools with which to better understand cell motility and development in Dictyostelium and that this organism is a useful model to further characterize the activities of catechins.

  2. Modelling cell motility and pathways that signal to the actin cytoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2007-03-01

    Gradient sensing, polarization, and motility of rapidly moving cells such as neutrophils involves the actin cytoskeleton, and regulatory modules such as membrane bound phosphoinositides (PIs), kinases/phosphatases, and proteins of the Rho family (Rho GTPases). I describe recent work in my group in which we have modeled components of these modules, their interconversions, interactions, and action in the context of protrusive cell motility. By connecting three modules, we find that Rho GTPases work as a spatial switch, and that PIs filter noise, and define the front vs. back. Relatively fast PI diffusion also leads to selection of a unique pattern of Rho distribution from a collection of possible patterns. We use the model to explore the importance of specific hypothesized interactions, to explore mutant phenotypes, and to study the role of actin polymerization in the maintenance of the PI asymmetry. Collaborators on this work include A.T. Dawes, A. Jilkine, and A.F.M. Maree.

  3. Integrin inhibition promotes atypical anoikis in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Silginer, M; Weller, M; Ziegler, U; Roth, P

    2014-01-01

    Integrins regulate cellular adhesion and transmit signals important for cell survival, proliferation and motility. They are expressed by glioma cells and may contribute to their malignant phenotype. Integrin inhibition may therefore represent a promising therapeutic strategy. GL-261 and SMA-560 glioma cells grown under standard conditions uniformly detached and formed large cell clusters after integrin gene silencing or pharmacological inhibition using EMD-121974, a synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp-motif peptide, or GLPG0187, a nonpeptidic integrin inhibitor. After 120 h, the clusters induced by integrin inhibition decayed and cells died. In contrast, when cells were cultured under stem cell (sphere) conditions, no disaggregation became apparent upon integrin inhibition, and cell death was not observed. As poly-HEMA-mediated detachment had similar effects on cell viability as integrin inhibition, we postulated that cell death may result from detachment alone, which was confirmed using various permissive and nonpermissive substrates. No surrogate markers of apoptosis were detected and electron microscopy confirmed that necrosis represents the dominant morphology of detachment-induced cell death. In addition, integrin inhibition resulted in the induction of autophagy that represents a survival signal. When integrins were inhibited in nonsphere glioma cells, the TGF-β pathway was strongly impaired, whereas no such effect was observed in glioma cells cultured under sphere conditions. Cell death induced by integrin inhibition was rescued by the addition of recombinant transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and accelerated by exposure to the TGF-β receptor inhibitor, SD-208. In summary, cell death following integrin inhibition is detachment mediated, represents an atypical form of anoikis involving necrosis as well as autophagy, and is modulated by TGF-β pathway activity. PMID:24457956

  4. Differential Function of N-Cadherin and Cadherin-7 in the Control of Embryonic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Sylvie; Beauvais-Jouneau, Alice; Delouvée, Annie; Thiery, Jean Paul

    1999-01-01

    Similar amounts of N-cadherin and cadherin-7, the prototypes of type I and type II cadherin, induced cell-cell adhesion in murine sarcoma 180 transfectants, Ncad-1 and cad7-29, respectively. However, in the initial phase of aggregation, Ncad-1 cells aggregated more rapidly than cad7-29 cells. Isolated Ncad-1 and cad7-29 cells adhered and spread in a similar manner on fibronectin (FN), whereas aggregated cad7-29 cells were more motile and dispersed than aggregated Ncad-1 cells. cad7-29 cells established transient contacts with their neighbors which were stabilized if FN-cell interactions were perturbed. In contrast, Ncad-1 cells remained in close contact when they migrated on FN. Both β-catenin and cadherin were more rapidly downregulated in cad7-29 than in Ncad-1 cells treated with cycloheximide, suggesting a higher turnover rate for cadherin-7–mediated cell-cell contacts than for those mediated by N-cadherin. The extent of FN-dependent focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation was much lower if the cells had initiated N-cadherin–mediated rather than cadherin-7–mediated cell adhesion before plating. On grafting into the embryo, Ncad-1 cells did not migrate and remained at or close to the graft site, even after 48 h, whereas grafted cad7-29 cells dispersed efficiently into embryonic structures. Thus, the adhesive phenotype of cadherin-7–expressing cells is regulated by the nature of the extracellular matrix environment which also controls the migratory behavior of the cells. In addition, adhesions mediated by different cadherins differentially regulate FN-dependent signaling. The transient contacts specifically observed in cadherin- 7–expressing cells may also be important in the control of cell motility. PMID:10427101

  5. Role of prostatic interstitial cells in prostate motility

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Richard J; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The prostate is a gland whose secretions contribute to the seminal fluids ejaculated upon activation of autonomic sympathetic nerves. In elder males, the prostate undergoes an increase in stroma mass and myogenic tone, leading to benign prostatic hyperplasia that occludes the proximal urethra and the presentation of various lower urinary tract symptoms that decrease their quality of life. This review summarises the role of prostatic interstitial cells (PICs) in the generation of the spontaneous tone in the prostate. It presents current knowledge of the role of Ca2+ plays in PIC pacemaking, as well as the mechanisms by which this spontaneous activity triggers slow wave generation and stromal contraction. PICs display a small T-type Ca2+ current (ICaT) and a large L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL). In contrast to other interstitial cells in the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, spontaneous Ca2+ signalling in PICs is uniquely dependent on Ca2+ influx through ICaL channels. A model of prostatic pacemaking is presented describing how ICaL can be triggered by an initial membrane depolarization evoked upon the selective opening of Ca2+-activated Cl– channels by Ca2+ flowing only through ICaT channels. The resulting current flow through ICaL results in release of Ca2+ from internal stores and the summation of Cl–-selective spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) to form pacemaker potentials that propagate passively into the prostatic stroma to evoke regenerative action potentials and excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:28652517

  6. On an evolution equation in a cell motility model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuhara, Matthew S.; Berlyand, Leonid; Rybalko, Volodymyr; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with the evolution equation of a curve obtained as the sharp interface limit of a non-linear system of two reaction-diffusion PDEs. This system was introduced as a phase-field model of (crawling) motion of eukaryotic cells on a substrate. The key issue is the evolution of the cell membrane (interface curve) which involves shape change and net motion. This issue can be addressed both qualitatively and quantitatively by studying the evolution equation of the sharp interface limit for this system. However, this equation is non-linear and non-local and existence of solutions presents a significant analytical challenge. We establish existence of solutions for a wide class of initial data in the so-called subcritical regime. Existence is proved in a two step procedure. First, for smooth (H2) initial data we use a regularization technique. Second, we consider non-smooth initial data that are more relevant from the application point of view. Here, uniform estimates on the time when solutions exist rely on a maximum principle type argument. We also explore the long time behavior of the model using both analytical and numerical tools. We prove the nonexistence of traveling wave solutions with nonzero velocity. Numerical experiments show that presence of non-linearity and asymmetry of the initial curve results in a net motion which distinguishes it from classical volume preserving curvature motion. This is done by developing an algorithm for efficient numerical resolution of the non-local term in the evolution equation.

  7. Effect of cell physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Collins, S.A.; Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater were examined in flow-through columns. Four strains of bacteria isolated from a crystalline rock groundwater system were investigated, with carboxylate-modified and amidine-modified latex microspheres and bromide as reference tracers. The bacterial isolates included a gram-positive rod (ML1), a gram-negative motile rod (ML2), a nonmotile mutant of ML2 (ML2m), and a gram-positive coccoid (ML3). Experiments were repeated at two flow velocities, in a glass column packed with glass beads, and in another packed with iron-oxyhydroxide coated glass beads. Bacteria breakthrough curves were interpreted using a transport equation that incorporates a sorption model from microscopic observation of bacterial deposition in flow-cell experiments. The model predicts that bacterial desorption rate will decrease exponentially with the amount of time the cell is attached to the solid surface. Desorption kinetics appeared to influence transport at the lower flow rate, but were not discernable at the higher flow rate. Iron-oxyhydroxide coatings had a lower-than-expected effect on bacterial breakthrough and no effect on the microsphere recovery in the column experiments. Cell wall type and shape also had minor effects on breakthrough. Motility tended to increase the adsorption rate, and decrease the desorption rate. The transport model predicts that at field scale, desorption rate kinetics may be important to the prediction of bacteria transport rates. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of cell physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew W.; Collins, Samantha A.; Metge, David W.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Shapiro, Allen M.

    2004-04-01

    The influence of physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater were examined in flow-through columns. Four strains of bacteria isolated from a crystalline rock groundwater system were investigated, with carboxylate-modified and amidine-modified latex microspheres and bromide as reference tracers. The bacterial isolates included a gram-positive rod (ML1), a gram-negative motile rod (ML2), a nonmotile mutant of ML2 (ML2m), and a gram-positive coccoid (ML3). Experiments were repeated at two flow velocities, in a glass column packed with glass beads, and in another packed with iron-oxyhydroxide coated glass beads. Bacteria breakthrough curves were interpreted using a transport equation that incorporates a sorption model from microscopic observation of bacterial deposition in flow-cell experiments. The model predicts that bacterial desorption rate will decrease exponentially with the amount of time the cell is attached to the solid surface. Desorption kinetics appeared to influence transport at the lower flow rate, but were not discernable at the higher flow rate. Iron-oxyhydroxide coatings had a lower-than-expected effect on bacterial breakthrough and no effect on the microsphere recovery in the column experiments. Cell wall type and shape also had minor effects on breakthrough. Motility tended to increase the adsorption rate, and decrease the desorption rate. The transport model predicts that at field scale, desorption rate kinetics may be important to the prediction of bacteria transport rates.

  9. Effect of cell physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Becker, Matthew W; Collins, Samantha A; Metge, David W; Harvey, Ronald W; Shapiro, Allen M

    2004-04-01

    The influence of physicochemical characteristics and motility on bacterial transport in groundwater were examined in flow-through columns. Four strains of bacteria isolated from a crystalline rock groundwater system were investigated, with carboxylate-modified and amidine-modified latex microspheres and bromide as reference tracers. The bacterial isolates included a gram-positive rod (ML1), a gram-negative motile rod (ML2), a nonmotile mutant of ML2 (ML2m), and a gram-positive coccoid (ML3). Experiments were repeated at two flow velocities, in a glass column packed with glass beads, and in another packed with iron-oxyhydroxide coated glass beads. Bacteria breakthrough curves were interpreted using a transport equation that incorporates a sorption model from microscopic observation of bacterial deposition in flow-cell experiments. The model predicts that bacterial desorption rate will decrease exponentially with the amount of time the cell is attached to the solid surface. Desorption kinetics appeared to influence transport at the lower flow rate, but were not discernable at the higher flow rate. Iron-oxyhydroxide coatings had a lower-than-expected effect on bacterial breakthrough and no effect on the microsphere recovery in the column experiments. Cell wall type and shape also had minor effects on breakthrough. Motility tended to increase the adsorption rate, and decrease the desorption rate. The transport model predicts that at field scale, desorption rate kinetics may be important to the prediction of bacteria transport rates.

  10. BMP promotes motility and represses growth of smooth muscle cells by activation of tandem Wnt pathways

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Perez, Vinicio A.; Ali, Ziad; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Sawada, Hirofumi; Lai, Ying-Ju; Kleisli, Thomas; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Qu, Xiumei; Rubinos, Laura H.; Ashley, Euan; Amieva, Manuel; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel cell-signaling paradigm in which bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) consecutively and interdependently activates the wingless (Wnt)–β-catenin (βC) and Wnt–planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathways to facilitate vascular smooth muscle motility while simultaneously suppressing growth. We show that BMP-2, in a phospho-Akt–dependent manner, induces βC transcriptional activity to produce fibronectin, which then activates integrin-linked kinase 1 (ILK-1) via α4-integrins. ILK-1 then induces the Wnt–PCP pathway by binding a proline-rich motif in disheveled (Dvl) and consequently activating RhoA-Rac1–mediated motility. Transfection of a Dvl mutant that binds βC without activating RhoA-Rac1 not only prevents BMP-2–mediated vascular smooth muscle cell motility but promotes proliferation in association with persistent βC activity. Interfering with the Dvl-dependent Wnt–PCP activation in a murine stented aortic graft injury model promotes extensive neointima formation, as shown by optical coherence tomography and histopathology. We speculate that, in response to injury, factors that subvert BMP-2–mediated tandem activation of Wnt–βC and Wnt–PCP pathways contribute to obliterative vascular disease in both the systemic and pulmonary circulations. PMID:21220513

  11. GAR22β regulates cell migration, sperm motility, and axoneme structure.

    PubMed

    Gamper, Ivonne; Fleck, David; Barlin, Meltem; Spehr, Marc; El Sayad, Sara; Kleine, Henning; Maxeiner, Sebastian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Gülcan; Hoss, Mareike; Litchfield, David W; Lüscher, Bernhard; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton remodeling is pivotal for cell adhesion and migration. Here we investigated the function of Gas2-related protein on chromosome 22 (GAR22β), a poorly characterized protein that interacts with actin and microtubules. Primary and immortalized GAR22β(-/-) Sertoli cells moved faster than wild-type cells. In addition, GAR22β(-/-) cells showed a more prominent focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β overexpression or its reexpression in GAR22β(-/-) cells reduced cell motility and focal adhesion turnover. GAR22β-actin interaction was stronger than GAR22β-microtubule interaction, resulting in GAR22β localization and dynamics that mirrored those of the actin cytoskeleton. Mechanistically, GAR22β interacted with the regulator of microtubule dynamics end-binding protein 1 (EB1) via a novel noncanonical amino acid sequence, and this GAR22β-EB1 interaction was required for the ability of GAR22β to modulate cell motility. We found that GAR22β is highly expressed in mouse testes, and its absence resulted in reduced spermatozoa generation, lower actin levels in testes, and impaired motility and ultrastructural disorganization of spermatozoa. Collectively our findings identify GAR22β as a novel regulator of cell adhesion and migration and provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of diverse cytoskeleton-dependent processes. © 2016 Gamper et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Low-cost motility tracking system (LOCOMOTIS) for time-lapse microscopy applications and cell visualisation.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Adam E; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81 ± 0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17 ± 0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24 ± 0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21 ± 0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers.

  13. Low-Cost Motility Tracking System (LOCOMOTIS) for Time-Lapse Microscopy Applications and Cell Visualisation

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Adam E.; Triajianto, Junian; Routledge, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Direct visualisation of cells for the purpose of studying their motility has typically required expensive microscopy equipment. However, recent advances in digital sensors mean that it is now possible to image cells for a fraction of the price of a standard microscope. Along with low-cost imaging there has also been a large increase in the availability of high quality, open-source analysis programs. In this study we describe the development and performance of an expandable cell motility system employing inexpensive, commercially available digital USB microscopes to image various cell types using time-lapse and perform tracking assays in proof-of-concept experiments. With this system we were able to measure and record three separate assays simultaneously on one personal computer using identical microscopes, and obtained tracking results comparable in quality to those from other studies that used standard, more expensive, equipment. The microscopes used in our system were capable of a maximum magnification of 413.6×. Although resolution was lower than that of a standard inverted microscope we found this difference to be indistinguishable at the magnification chosen for cell tracking experiments (206.8×). In preliminary cell culture experiments using our system, velocities (mean µm/min ± SE) of 0.81±0.01 (Biomphalaria glabrata hemocytes on uncoated plates), 1.17±0.004 (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells), 1.24±0.006 (SC5 mouse Sertoli cells) and 2.21±0.01 (B. glabrata hemocytes on Poly-L-Lysine coated plates), were measured and are consistent with previous reports. We believe that this system, coupled with open-source analysis software, demonstrates that higher throughput time-lapse imaging of cells for the purpose of studying motility can be an affordable option for all researchers. PMID:25121722

  14. Implications of caveolae in testicular and epididymal myoid cells to sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Regiana L; Parent, Adam; Cyr, Daniel G; Gregory, Mary; Mandato, Craig A; Smith, Charles E; Hermo, Louis

    2016-06-01

    Seminiferous tubules of the testis and epididymal tubules in adult rodents are enveloped by contractile myoid cells, which move sperm and fluids along the male reproductive tract. Myoid cells in the testis influence Sertoli cells by paracrine signaling, but their role in the epididymis is unknown. Electron microscopy revealed that elongated myoid cells formed several concentric layers arranged in a loose configuration. The edges of some myoid cells in a given layer closely approximated one another, and extended small foot-like processes to cells of overlying layers. Gap junction proteins, connexins 32 and 43, were detected within the myoid cell layers by immunohistochemistry. These myoid cells also had caveolae that contained caveolin-1 and cavin-1 (also known as PTRF). The number of caveolae per unit area of plasma membrane was significantly reduced in caveolin-1-deficient mice (Cav1(-/-) ). Morphometric analyses of Cav1-null testes revealed an enlargement in whole-tubule and epithelial profile areas, whereas these parameters were slightly reduced in the epididymis. Although sperm are non-motile as they pass through the proximal epididymis, statistical analyses of cauda epididymidis sperm concentrations revealed no significant differences between wild-type and Cav1(-/-) mice. Motility analyses, however, indicated that sperm velocity parameters were reduced while beat cross frequency was higher in gametes of Cav1(-/-) mice. Thus while caveolae and their associated proteins are not necessary for myoid cell contractility, they appear to be crucial for signaling with the epididymal epithelium to regulate the proper acquisition of sperm motility. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 526-540, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Reassessing the mechanics of parasite motility and host-cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to migrate is fundamental to multicellular and single-celled life. Apicomplexan parasites, an ancient protozoan clade that includes malaria parasites (Plasmodium) and Toxoplasma, achieve remarkable speeds of directional cell movement. This rapidity is achieved via a divergent actomyosin motor system, housed within a narrow compartment that lies underneath the length of the parasite plasma membrane. How this motor functions at a mechanistic level during motility and host cell invasion is a matter of debate. Here, we integrate old and new insights toward refining the current model for the function of this motor with the aim of revitalizing interest in the mechanics of how these deadly pathogens move. PMID:27573462

  16. Molecular dissection of zyxin function reveals its involvement in cell motility.

    PubMed

    Drees, B E; Andrews, K M; Beckerle, M C

    1999-12-27

    Spatially controlled actin filament assembly is critical for numerous processes, including the vectorial cell migration required for wound healing, cell- mediated immunity, and embryogenesis. One protein implicated in the regulation of actin assembly is zyxin, a protein concentrated at sites where the fast growing ends of actin filaments are enriched. To evaluate the role of zyxin in vivo, we developed a specific peptide inhibitor of zyxin function that blocks its interaction with alpha-actinin and displaces it from its normal subcellular location. Mislocalization of zyxin perturbs cell migration and spreading, and affects the behavior of the cell edge, a structure maintained by assembly of actin at sites proximal to the plasma membrane. These results support a role for zyxin in cell motility, and demonstrate that the correct positioning of zyxin within the cell is critical for its physiological function. Interestingly, the mislocalization of zyxin in the peptide-injected cells is accompanied by disturbances in the distribution of Ena/VASP family members, proteins that have a well-established role in promoting actin assembly. In concert with previous work, our findings suggest that zyxin promotes the spatially restricted assembly of protein complexes necessary for cell motility.

  17. Adenosine triphosphate acts as a paracrine signaling molecule to reduce the motility of T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chiuhui Mary; Ploia, Cristina; Anselmi, Fabio; Sarukhan, Adelaida; Viola, Antonella

    2014-06-17

    Organization of immune responses requires exchange of information between cells. This is achieved through either direct cell-cell contacts and establishment of temporary synapses or the release of soluble factors, such as cytokines and chemokines. Here we show a novel form of cell-to-cell communication based on adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP released by stimulated T cells induces P2X4/P2X7-mediated calcium waves in the neighboring lymphocytes. Our data obtained in lymph node slices suggest that, during T-cell priming, ATP acts as a paracrine messenger to reduce the motility of lymphocytes and that this may be relevant to allow optimal tissue scanning by T cells.

  18. Blue-light-dependent inhibition of twitching motility in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1: additive involvement of three BLUF-domain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Bitrian, Mariana; González, Rodrigo H; Paris, Gaston; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Nudel, Clara B

    2013-09-01

    Twitching motility in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 is inhibited by moderate intensities of blue light in a temperature-dependent manner (maximally at 20 °C). We analysed the involvement of four predicted blue-light sensing using flavin (BLUF)-domain-containing proteins encoded in the genome of this strain in the twitching motility phenotype. All four genes were expressed both in light and in darkness. A phylogenetic tree showed that one BLUF domain, ACIAD2110, grouped separately from the other three (ACIAD1499, ACIAD2125 and ACIAD2129). Individual knockout mutants of the latter three, but not of ACIAD2110, fully abolished the light dependency of the twitching motility response. Quantitative analysis of transcript level of the three genes showed a decreased expression in the light, with dark/light ratios of 1.65±0.28, 1.79±0.21 and 2.69±0.39, for ACIAD2125, ACIAD2129 and ACIAD1499, respectively. Double and triple knockouts of ACIAD1499, ACIAD2125 and ACIAD2129 confirmed the same phenotype as the corresponding single knockouts. Complementation of all the single knockouts and the triple knockout mutants with any of the three BLUF-domain-encoding genes fully restored the inhibition of twitching motility by blue light that is observed in the wild-type strain. A. baylyi ADP1 therefore shows a high degree of redundancy in the genes that encode BLUF-containing photoreceptors. Moreover, all plasmid-complemented strains, expressing any of the BLUF proteins irrespective of the specific set of deleted photoreceptors, displayed increased light-dependent inhibition of twitching motility, as compared to the wild-type (P<0.001). We conclude that the three genes ACIAD1499, ACIAD2125 and ACIAD2129 are jointly required to inhibit twitching motility under moderate blue-light illumination.

  19. The role of filament-packing dynamics in powering amoeboid cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Long; Vanderlinde, Orion; Liu, Jun; Grant, Richard P.; Wouterse, Alan; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Philipse, Albert; Stewart, Murray; Roberts, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Although several models have been proposed to account for how cytoskeleton polymerization drives protrusion in cell motility, the precise mechanism remains controversial. Here, we show that, in addition to force exerted directly against the membrane by growing filaments, the way elongating filaments pack also contributes to protrusion by generating an expansion of the cytoskeleton gel. Tomography shows that filament packing in the major sperm protein (MSP) -based nematode sperm-motility machinery resembles that observed with rigid rods. Maximum rod-packing density decreases dramatically as the rods lengthen. Therefore, as filaments elongate, the cytoskeleton gel expands to accommodate their packing less densely. This volume expansion combines with polymerization to drive protrusion. Consistent with this hypothesis, an engineered MSP mutant that generates shorter filaments shows higher filament-packing density and slower movement. PMID:18385381

  20. The role of filament-packing dynamics in powering amoeboid cell motility.

    PubMed

    Miao, Long; Vanderlinde, Orion; Liu, Jun; Grant, Richard P; Wouterse, Alan; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Philipse, Albert; Stewart, Murray; Roberts, Thomas M

    2008-04-08

    Although several models have been proposed to account for how cytoskeleton polymerization drives protrusion in cell motility, the precise mechanism remains controversial. Here, we show that, in addition to force exerted directly against the membrane by growing filaments, the way elongating filaments pack also contributes to protrusion by generating an expansion of the cytoskeleton gel. Tomography shows that filament packing in the major sperm protein (MSP) -based nematode sperm-motility machinery resembles that observed with rigid rods. Maximum rod-packing density decreases dramatically as the rods lengthen. Therefore, as filaments elongate, the cytoskeleton gel expands to accommodate their packing less densely. This volume expansion combines with polymerization to drive protrusion. Consistent with this hypothesis, an engineered MSP mutant that generates shorter filaments shows higher filament-packing density and slower movement.

  1. Antisense inhibition of hyaluronan synthase-2 in human osteosarcoma cells inhibits hyaluronan retention and tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ynishida@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Knudson, Warren; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2005-07-01

    Osteosarcoma is a common malignant bone tumor associated with childhood and adolescence. The results of numerous studies have suggested that hyaluronan plays an important role in regulating the aggressive behavior of various types of cancer cells. However, no studies have addressed hyaluronan with respect to osteosarcomas. In this investigation, the mRNA expression copy number of three mammalian hyaluronan synthases (HAS) was determined using competitive RT-PCR in the osteoblastic osteosarcoma cell line, MG-63. MG-63 are highly malignant osteosarcoma cells with an abundant hyaluronan-rich matrix. The results demonstrated that HAS-2 is the predominant HAS in MG-63. Accumulation of intracellular hyaluronan increased in association with the proliferative phase of these cells. The selective inhibition of HAS-2 mRNA in MG-63 cells by antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides resulted in reduced hyaluronan accumulation by these cells. As expected, the reduction in hyaluronan disrupted the assembly of cell-associated matrices. However, of most interest, coincident with the reduction in hyaluronan, there was a substantial decrease in cell proliferation, a decrease in cell motility and a decrease in cell invasiveness. These data suggest that hyaluronan synthesized by HAS-2 in MG-63 plays a crucial role in osteosarcoma cell proliferation, motility, and invasion.

  2. High Avidity CD8+ T Cells Efficiently Eliminate Motile HIV-Infected Targets and Execute a Locally Focused Program of Anti-Viral Function

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Maria Hottelet; Forcier, Talitha; McAndrew, Elizabeth; Gonzalez, Michael; Chen, Huabiao; Juelg, Boris; Walker, Bruce D.; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of HIV from an initial site of infection is facilitated by motile HIV-infected CD4+ T-cells. However, the impact of infected target cell migration on antigen recognition by HIV-specific CD8+ T-cells is unclear. Using a 3D in vitro model of tissue, we visualized dynamic interactions between HIV-infected or peptide-pulsed CD4+ T-cells and HIV-specific CD8+ T-cells. CTLs engaged motile HIV-infected targets, but ∼50% of targets broke contact and escaped. In contrast, immobilized target cells were readily killed, indicating target motility directly inhibits CD8+ T-cell function. Strong calcium signals occurred in CTLs killing a motile target but calcium signaling was weak or absent in CTLs which permitted target escape. Neutralization of adhesion receptors LFA-1 and CD58 inhibited CD8+ T-cell function within the 3D matrix, demonstrating that efficient motile target lysis as dependent on adhesive engagement of targets. Antigen sensitivity (a convolution of antigen density, TCR avidity and CD8 coreceptor binding) is also critical for target recognition. We modulated this parameter (known as functional avidity but referred to here as “avidity” for the sake of simplicity) by exploiting common HIV escape mutations and measured their impact on CTL function at the single-cell level. Targets pulsed with low avidity mutant antigens frequently escaped while CTLs killed targets bearing high avidity antigen with near-perfect efficiency. CTLs engaged, arrested, and killed an initial target bearing high avidity antigen within minutes, but serial killing was surprisingly rare. CD8 cells remained committed to their initial dead target for hours, accumulating TCR signals that sustained secretion of soluble antiviral factors. These data indicate that high-avidity CD8+ T-cells execute an antiviral program in the precise location where antigen has been sensed: CTL effector functions are spatiotemporally coordinated with an early lytic phase followed by a sustained

  3. High avidity CD8+ T cells efficiently eliminate motile HIV-infected targets and execute a locally focused program of anti-viral function.

    PubMed

    Foley, Maria Hottelet; Forcier, Talitha; McAndrew, Elizabeth; Gonzalez, Michael; Chen, Huabiao; Juelg, Boris; Walker, Bruce D; Irvine, Darrell J

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of HIV from an initial site of infection is facilitated by motile HIV-infected CD4(+) T-cells. However, the impact of infected target cell migration on antigen recognition by HIV-specific CD8(+) T-cells is unclear. Using a 3D in vitro model of tissue, we visualized dynamic interactions between HIV-infected or peptide-pulsed CD4(+) T-cells and HIV-specific CD8(+) T-cells. CTLs engaged motile HIV-infected targets, but ∼ 50% of targets broke contact and escaped. In contrast, immobilized target cells were readily killed, indicating target motility directly inhibits CD8(+) T-cell function. Strong calcium signals occurred in CTLs killing a motile target but calcium signaling was weak or absent in CTLs which permitted target escape. Neutralization of adhesion receptors LFA-1 and CD58 inhibited CD8(+) T-cell function within the 3D matrix, demonstrating that efficient motile target lysis as dependent on adhesive engagement of targets. Antigen sensitivity (a convolution of antigen density, TCR avidity and CD8 coreceptor binding) is also critical for target recognition. We modulated this parameter (known as functional avidity but referred to here as "avidity" for the sake of simplicity) by exploiting common HIV escape mutations and measured their impact on CTL function at the single-cell level. Targets pulsed with low avidity mutant antigens frequently escaped while CTLs killed targets bearing high avidity antigen with near-perfect efficiency. CTLs engaged, arrested, and killed an initial target bearing high avidity antigen within minutes, but serial killing was surprisingly rare. CD8 cells remained committed to their initial dead target for hours, accumulating TCR signals that sustained secretion of soluble antiviral factors. These data indicate that high-avidity CD8(+) T-cells execute an antiviral program in the precise location where antigen has been sensed: CTL effector functions are spatiotemporally coordinated with an early lytic phase followed by a

  4. Motility and stem cell properties induced by the epithelial-mesenchymal transition require destabilization of lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Prijic, Sara; Chen, Xiaoling; Levental, Ilya; Chang, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a developmental program that provides cancer cells with the characteristics necessary for metastasis, including increased motility and stem cell properties. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not yet fully understood, hampering efforts to develop therapeutics. In recent years, it has become apparent that EMT is accompanied by wholesale changes in diverse signaling pathways that are initiated by proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). The PM contains thousands of lipid and protein species that are dynamically and spatially organized into lateral membrane domains, an example of which are lipid rafts. Since one of the major functions of rafts is modulation of signaling originating at the PM, we hypothesized that the signaling changes occurring during an EMT are associated with alterations in PM organization. To test this hypothesis, we used Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs) to study the organization of intact plasma membranes isolated from live cells. We observed that induction of EMT significantly destabilized lipid raft domains. Further, this reduction in stability was crucial for the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and EMT-induced remodeling of PM-orchestrated pathways. Exogenously increasing raft stability by feeding cells with ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) repressed these phenotypes without altering EMT markers, and inhibited the metastatic capacity of breast cancer cells. Hence, modulating raft properties regulates cell phenotype, suggesting a novel approach for targeting the impact of EMT in cancer. PMID:27303921

  5. Filamin C promotes lymphatic invasion and lymphatic metastasis and increases cell motility by regulating Rho GTPase in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Kita, Yoshiaki; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Minami, Kentaro; Kawahara, Kohichi; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Baba, Kenji; Mori, Shinichiro; Uchikado, Yasuto; Maemura, Kosei; Tanimoto, Akihide; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2017-01-01

    To establish treatments to improve the prognosis of cancer patients, it is necessary to find new targets to control metastasis. We found that expression of FilaminC (FLNC), a member of the actin binding and cross-linking filamin protein family is correlated with lymphatic invasion and lymphatic metastasis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by increasing cell motility through activation of Rho GTPase. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that FLNC expression in ESCC is associated with lymphatic invasion, metastasis, and prognosis. FLNC knockdown in esophageal cancer cell lines decreased cell migration in wound healing and transwell migration assays, and invasion in transwell migration assays. Furthermore, FLNC knockdown reduced the amount of activated Rac-1 (GTP-Rac1) and activated Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42). Our results suggest that FLNC expression is a useful biomarker of ESCC metastatic tendency and that inhibiting FLNC function may be useful to control the metastasis of ESCC. PMID:28031525

  6. Choreography of Cell Motility and Interaction Dynamics Imaged by Two-Photon Microscopy in Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Cahalan, Michael D.; Parker, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The immune system is the most diffuse cellular system in the body. Accordingly, long-range migration of cells and short-range communication by local chemical signaling and by cell-cell contacts are vital to the control of an immune response. Cellular homing and migration within lymphoid organs, antigen recognition, and cell signaling and activation are clearly vital during an immune response, but these events had not been directly observed in vivo until recently. Introduced to the field of immunology in 2002, two-photon microscopy is the method of choice for visualizing living cells deep within native tissue environments, and it is now revealing an elegant cellular choreography that underlies the adaptive immune response to antigen challenge. We review cellular dynamics and molecular factors that contribute to basal motility of lymphocytes in the lymph node and cellular interactions leading to antigen capture and recognition, T cell activation, B cell activation, cytolytic effector function, and antibody production. PMID:18173372

  7. Choreography of cell motility and interaction dynamics imaged by two-photon microscopy in lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Michael D; Parker, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is the most diffuse cellular system in the body. Accordingly, long-range migration of cells and short-range communication by local chemical signaling and by cell-cell contacts are vital to the control of an immune response. Cellular homing and migration within lymphoid organs, antigen recognition, and cell signaling and activation are clearly vital during an immune response, but these events had not been directly observed in vivo until recently. Introduced to the field of immunology in 2002, two-photon microscopy is the method of choice for visualizing living cells deep within native tissue environments, and it is now revealing an elegant cellular choreography that underlies the adaptive immune response to antigen challenge. We review cellular dynamics and molecular factors that contribute to basal motility of lymphocytes in the lymph node and cellular interactions leading to antigen capture and recognition, T cell activation, B cell activation, cytolytic effector function, and antibody production.

  8. Role of α6β4 integrin in cell motility, invasion and metastasis of mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Soung, Young Hwa; Gil, Hyea Jin; Clifford, John L; Chung, Jun

    2011-02-01

    Integrin α6β4 is the receptor for the laminin family of extracellular matrix proteins and is widely expressed in most epithelial tissues and Schwann cells. The expression of this integrin is up-regulated in most epithelial tumors, suggesting the role of α6β4 in their progression. The tumor microenvironment is also known to enhance the signaling competence of α6β4 through functional and physical interactions with other receptors. In this review, we discuss the biological mechanisms by which integrin α6β4 promotes carcinoma cell motility and invasion that leads to mammary tumor progression.

  9. The motile response of alveolar macrophages. An experimental study using single-cell and cell population approaches.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, J E; Farrell, B E; Fisher, E S; Lauffenburger, D A; Daniele, R P

    1989-02-01

    In this report, we studied the applicability of a random walk model of individual cell motility in predicting the motile behavior of alveolar macrophage populations under agarose. The migration of a population of cells in the absence of a chemotactic or chemokinetic gradient can be characterized by the random motility coefficient, mu, which is analogous to a particle diffusion coefficient. Random walk theory relates this latter coefficient to particle speed and collision time (equivalent to the time between changes in particle direction). By analogy, according to a similar random walk theory for cell migration, mu for a cell population is a function of the speed and persistence time (with direction changes governed by cell behavioral processes rather than by collisions) of individual cells. To test the model, normal guinea pig alveolar macrophages were incubated in the presence or absence of uniform concentrations of the chemotactic tripeptide formyl-norleucyl leucyl phenylalanine (FNLLP) to elicit different levels of motile activity. Mu was calculated from cell population density profiles obtained by fixing and staining cultures after 2, 3, or 4 days. In parallel experiments, individual cell speeds and persistence times were measured from 1-h, time-lapse video microscopy recordings. The value of mu calculated from single-cell measurements was in good agreement with that from population studies for stimulated random migration (at 10(-7) to 10(-11) M FNLLP), but not in the absence of stimulant. Overall, these results support the applicability of the random walk model of individual cell migration to randomly migrating alveolar macrophage populations.

  10. The Membrane-associated Protein, Supervillin, Accelerates F-actin-dependent Rapid Integrin Recycling and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhiyou; Takizawa, Norio; Wilson, Korey A.; Smith, Tara C.; Delprato, Anna; Davidson, Michael W.; Lambright, David G.; Luna, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    In migrating cells, the cytoskeleton coordinates signal transduction and re-distributions of transmembrane proteins, including integrins and growth factor receptors. Supervillin is an F-actin- and myosin II-binding protein that tightly associates with signaling proteins in cholesterol-rich, “lipid raft” membrane microdomains. We show here that supervillin also can localize with markers for early and sorting endosomes (EE/SE) and with overexpressed components of the Arf6 recycling pathway in the cell periphery. Supervillin tagged with the photoswitchable fluorescent protein, tdEos, moves both into and away from dynamic structures resembling podosomes at the basal cell surface. Rapid integrin recycling from EE/SE is inhibited in supervillin-knockdown cells, but the rates of integrin endocytosis and recycling from the perinuclear recycling center (PNRC) are unchanged. A lack of synergy between supervillin knockdown and the actin filament barbed-end inhibitor, cytochalasin D, suggests that both treatments affect actin-dependent rapid recycling. Supervillin also enhances signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK) and increases the velocity of cell translocation. These results suggest that supervillin, F-actin, and associated proteins may coordinate a rapid, basolateral membrane recycling pathway that contributes to ERK signaling and actin-based cell motility. PMID:20331534

  11. The membrane-associated protein, supervillin, accelerates F-actin-dependent rapid integrin recycling and cell motility.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhiyou; Takizawa, Norio; Wilson, Korey A; Smith, Tara C; Delprato, Anna; Davidson, Michael W; Lambright, David G; Luna, Elizabeth J

    2010-06-01

    In migrating cells, the cytoskeleton coordinates signal transduction and redistribution of transmembrane proteins, including integrins and growth factor receptors. Supervillin is an F-actin- and myosin II-binding protein that tightly associates with signaling proteins in cholesterol-rich, 'lipid raft' membrane microdomains. We show here that supervillin also can localize with markers for early and sorting endosomes (EE/SE) and with overexpressed components of the Arf6 recycling pathway in the cell periphery. Supervillin tagged with the photoswitchable fluorescent protein, tdEos, moves both into and away from dynamic structures resembling podosomes at the basal cell surface. Rapid integrin recycling from EE/SE is inhibited in supervillin-knockdown cells, but the rates of integrin endocytosis and recycling from the perinuclear recycling center (PNRC) are unchanged. A lack of synergy between supervillin knockdown and the actin filament barbed-end inhibitor, cytochalasin D, suggests that both treatments affect actin-dependent rapid recycling. Supervillin also enhances signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2 and increases the velocity of cell translocation. These results suggest that supervillin, F-actin and associated proteins coordinate a rapid, basolateral membrane recycling pathway that contributes to ERK signaling and actin-based cell motility.

  12. Live cell imaging of neuronal growth cone motility and guidance in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The neuronal growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of neuronal processes, is an excellent model system for studying directional cell movements. While biochemical and genetic approaches unveiled molecular interactions between ligand, receptor, signaling and cytoskeleton-associated proteins controlling axonal growth and guidance, in vitro live cell imaging has emerged as a crucial approach for dissecting cellular mechanisms of growth cone motility and guidance. Important insights into these mechanisms have been gained from studies using the large growth cones elaborated by Aplysia californica neurons, an outstanding model system for live cell imaging for a number of reasons. Identified neurons can be isolated and imaged at room temperature. Aplysia growth cones are 5–10 times larger than growth cones from other species, making them suitable for quantitative high-resolution imaging of cytoskeletal protein dynamics and biophysical approaches. Lastly, protein, RNA, fluorescent probes and small molecules can be microinjected into the neuronal cell body for localization and functional studies. The following chapter describes culturing of Aplysia bag cell neurons, live cell imaging of neuronal growth cones using differential interference contrast and fluorescent speckle microscopy as well as the restrained bead interaction assay to induce adhesion-mediated growth cone guidance in vitro. PMID:21748670

  13. Cathepsin E Deficiency Ameliorates Graft-versus-Host Disease and Modifies Dendritic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Mengwasser, Jörg; Babes, Liane; Cordes, Steffen; Mertlitz, Sarah; Riesner, Katarina; Shi, Yu; McGearey, Aleixandria; Kalupa, Martina; Reinheckel, Thomas; Penack, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Microbial products influence immunity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). In this context, the role of cathepsin E (Ctse), an aspartate protease known to cleave bacterial peptides for antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs), has not been studied. During experimental acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we found infiltration by Ctse-positive immune cells leading to higher Ctse RNA- and protein levels in target organs. In Ctse-deficient allo-SCT recipients, we found ameliorated GVHD, improved survival, and lower numbers of tissue-infiltrating DCs. Donor T cell proliferation was not different in Ctse-deficient vs. wild-type allo-SCT recipients in MHC-matched and MHC-mismatched models. Furthermore, Ctse-deficient DCs had an intact ability to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation, suggesting that its role in antigen presentation may not be the main mechanism how Ctse impacts GVHD. We found that Ctse deficiency significantly decreases DC motility in vivo, reduces adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM), and diminishes invasion through ECM. We conclude that Ctse has a previously unrecognized role in regulating DC motility that possibly contributes to reduced DC counts and ameliorated inflammation in GVHD target organs of Ctse-deficient allo-SCT recipients. However, our data do not provide definite proof that the observed effect of Ctse−/− deficiency is exclusively mediated by DCs. A contribution of Ctse−/−-mediated functions in other recipient cell types, e.g., macrophages, cannot be excluded. PMID:28298913

  14. 2-Deoxyglucose and sorafenib synergistically suppress the proliferation and motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells consume more glucose than normal cells, mainly due to their increased rate of glycolysis. 2-Deoxy-d-glucose (2DG) is an analogue of glucose, and sorafenib is a kinase inhibitor and molecular agent used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The present study aimed to demonstrate whether combining 2DG and sorafenib suppresses tumor cell proliferation and motility more effectively than either drug alone. HLF and PLC/PRF/5 HCC cells were incubated with sorafenib with or without 1 µM 2DG, and subjected to a proliferation assay. A scratch assay was then performed to analyze cell motility following the addition of 2DG and sorafenib in combination, and each agent alone. RNA was isolated and subjected to reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction to analyze the expression of cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) following the addition of 2DG and sorafenib in combination and each agent alone. Proliferation was markedly suppressed in cells cultured with 1 µM 2DG and 30 µM sorafenib compared with cells cultured with either agent alone (P<0.05). In addition, levels of Cyclin D1 expression decreased in cells exposed to 3 µM sorafenib and 1 µM 2DG compared with cells exposed to 2DG or sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Scratch assay demonstrated that the distance between the growing edge of the cell sheet and the scratched line was shorter in cells cultured with sorafenib and 2DG than in cells cultured with 2DG or sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Levels of MMP9 expression decreased more in cells treated with both sorafenib and 2DG than in cells treated with 2DG or sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Therefore, 2DG and sorafenib in combination suppressed the proliferation and motility of HCC cells more effectively than 2DG or sorafenib alone, and a cancer treatment combining both drugs may be more effective than sorafenib alone. PMID:28356961

  15. Eph/ephrin interactions modulate muscle satellite cell motility and patterning

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Danny A.; Karvas, Rowan M.; Siegel, Ashley L.; Cornelison, D. D. W.

    2011-01-01

    During development and regeneration, directed migration of cells, including neural crest cells, endothelial cells, axonal growth cones and many types of adult stem cells, to specific areas distant from their origin is necessary for their function. We have recently shown that adult skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells), once activated by isolation or injury, are a highly motile population with the potential to respond to multiple guidance cues, based on their expression of classical guidance receptors. We show here that, in vivo, differentiated and regenerating myofibers dynamically express a subset of ephrin guidance ligands, as well as Eph receptors. This expression has previously only been examined in the context of muscle-nerve interactions; however, we propose that it might also play a role in satellite cell-mediated muscle repair. Therefore, we investigated whether Eph-ephrin signaling would produce changes in satellite cell directional motility. Using a classical ephrin ‘stripe’ assay, we found that satellite cells respond to a subset of ephrins with repulsive behavior in vitro; patterning of differentiating myotubes is also parallel to ephrin stripes. This behavior can be replicated in a heterologous in vivo system, the hindbrain of the developing quail, in which neural crest cells are directed in streams to the branchial arches and to the forelimb of the developing quail, where presumptive limb myoblasts emigrate from the somite. We hypothesize that guidance signaling might impact multiple steps in muscle regeneration, including escape from the niche, directed migration to sites of injury, cell-cell interactions among satellite cell progeny, and differentiation and patterning of regenerated muscle. PMID:22071104

  16. Growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist inhibits the invasiveness of human endometrial cancer cells by down-regulating twist and N-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsien-Ming; Huang, Hong-Yuan; Schally, Andrew V; Chao, Angel; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Leung, Peter C.K.; Wang, Hsin-Shih

    2017-01-01

    More than 25% of patients diagnosed with endometrial carcinoma have invasive primary cancer accompanied by metastases. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) plays an important role in reproduction. Here, we examined the effect of a GHRH antagonist on the motility of endometrial cancer cells and the mechanisms of action of the antagonist in endometrial cancer. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to determine the expression of the GHRH receptor protein. The activity of Twist and N-cadherin was determined by Western blotting. Cell motility was assessed by an invasion and migration assay. GHRH receptor siRNA was applied to knockdown the GHRH receptor in endometrial cancer cells. The GHRH antagonist inhibited cell motility in a dose-dependent manner. The GHRH antagonist inhibited cell