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Sample records for inhibits formyl peptide

  1. Bioactive secondary metabolites of a marine Bacillus sp. inhibit superoxide generation and elastase release in human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Jimmy; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chung, Pei-Jen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-06-03

    It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA), an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited superoxide generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, but failed to suppress the cell responses activated by non-FPR1 agonists. IA did not alter superoxide production and elastase activity in cell-free systems. IA also attenuated the downstream signaling from FPR1, such as the Ca2+, MAP kinases and AKT pathways. In addition, IA inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analogue of FMLP, to FPR1 in human neutrophils and FPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. Taken together, these results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of IA in human neutrophils are through the inhibition of FPR1. Also, our data suggest that IA may have therapeutic potential to decrease tissue damage induced by human neutrophils.

  2. Inhibition of formyl peptide receptor 1 reduces the efficacy of anticancer chemotherapy against carcinogen-induced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baracco, Elisa E.; Pietrocola, Federico; Buqué, Aitziber; Bloy, Norma; Senovilla, Laura; Zitvogel, Laurence; Vacchelli, Erika; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The loss-of-function mutation of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) has a negative impact on the progression-free and overall survival of breast cancer patients treated with anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy. This effect may be attributed to the fact that chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires FPR1 and that such anticancer immune responses are responsible for the long-term effects of chemotherapy. Here, we investigated the possible contribution of FPR1 to the efficacy of a combination of mitoxantrone (MTX) and cyclophosphamide (CTX) for the treatment of hormone-induced breast cancer. Breast cancer induced by a combination of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) could be successfully treated with MTX plus CTX in thus far that tumor growth was retarded and overall survival was extended (as compared to vehicle-only treated controls). However, the therapeutic efficacy of the combination therapy was completely abolished when FPR1 receptors were blocked by means of cyclosporin H (CsH). Future genetic studies on neoadjuvant chemotherapy-treated breast cancers are warranted to validate these findings at the clinical level. PMID:27471610

  3. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  4. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  5. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits. PMID:27907124

  6. Derivative of wheat germ agglutinin specifically inhibits formyl-peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis by blocking re-expression (or recycling) of receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, H.D.; Elfman, F.; Lobo, E.; Sklar, L.; Chenoweth, D.; Hooper, C.

    1986-03-01

    The mechanism of action of a derivative of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-D) which specifically and irreversibly inhibits N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotaxis was examined. At a concentration that completely inhibited PMN chemotaxis, WGA-D had no effect on either the uptake or release of (/sup 3/H)-FMLP by PMN. Similarly, WGA-D did not affect either the short-term binding to, or internalization by, PMN of a fluoresceinated FMLP analog. WGA-D did interfere, however, with the re-expression (or recycling) of FMLP receptors by PMN that had been preincubated with 1 ..mu..M FMLP for 10 min at 4/sup 0/C. This effect was specific for WGA-D, because it was not observed when concanavalin A was used. Scatchard plot analysis of FMLP binding to PMN after receptor re-expression demonstrated that WGA-D-treated PMN had a significant diminution in the number of high affinity receptors. WGA-D-mediated inhibition of FMLP receptor re-expression was associated with inhibition of FMLP-induced PMN chemotaxis, but had no effect on either FMLP-induced PMN superoxide anion generation or degranulation. Studies using (/sup 12/%I)-WGA-D demonstrated that PMN did not internalize WGA-D spontaneously. The data indicate that WGA-D perhaps by binding to the FMLP receptor, inhibits FMLP-induced PMN chemotaxis by blocking the re-expression (or recycling) of a population of receptors required for continuous migration.

  7. Formyl peptide-induced chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes does not require either marked changes in cytosolic calcium or specific granule discharge. Role of formyl peptide receptor reexpression (or recycling).

    PubMed Central

    Perez, H D; Elfman, F; Marder, S; Lobo, E; Ives, H E

    1989-01-01

    We examined the role of intracellular and extracellular calcium on the ability of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes to migrate chemotactically and reexpress (or recycle) formyl peptide receptors when challenged with the synthetic chemotactic peptide, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). Extracellular calcium was not required for either optimal chemotactic responses or receptor reexpression. Depletion and chelation of intracellular calcium resulted in significant diminution in the ability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to release the specific granule constituents lactoferrin and vitamin B12-binding protein during the process of chemotaxis, but had no effect on the capability of these cells to respond chemotactically. Similarly, chelation of intracellular calcium did not affect the ability of these cells to reexpress a population of formyl peptide receptors. Inhibition of receptor reexpression, by a nonagglutinating derivative of wheat-germ agglutinin, was associated with inhibition of chemotactic responses to FMLP. Thus, it appears that large changes in cytosolic free calcium are not necessary for formyl peptide-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis. In contrast, continuous reexpression (or recycling) of formyl peptide receptors is required for polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotactic responses to FMLP, a process that appears to be independent from specific granule fusion with plasma membrane. PMID:2723068

  8. Inhibition of phospholipase D activation by CYL-26z in formyl peptide-stimulated neutrophils involves the blockade of RhoA activation.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Chen, Yeh-Long; Tzeng, Cherng-Chyi; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-09-15

    5-[4-Acridin-9-ylamino]phenyl]-5-methyl-3-methylenedihydrofuran-2-one (CYL-26z) inhibited the formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP)-stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) activity, which was assessed by the production of phosphatidylethanol (PEt) in the presence of ethanol, in rat neutrophils (IC50 1.2+/-0.2 microM). CYL-26z caused a slight but significant attenuation of the global protein tyrosine phosphorylation stimulated by fMLP only at concentrations of CYL-26z up to 30 microM. CYL-26z blocked the membrane recruitment of protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha) at concentrations of CYL-26z > or =3 microM, but failed to affect the membrane association of PKC-betaI and -betaII. The translocation of RhoA to the membrane was attenuated by CYL-26z (IC50 3.8+/-0.8 microM) in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils, whereas CYL-26z caused no significant inhibition of the membrane recruitment of ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf). CYL-26z inhibited the activation of RhoA and dissociation of the RhoA-Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complex in fMLP-stimulated neutrophils (IC50 1.8+/-1.0 microM and 1.8+/-0.9 microM, respectively). In a cell-free system, CYL-26z effectively attenuated the membrane association of RhoA in response to GTPgammaS (IC50 1.3+/-0.5 microM). In contrast, the GTPgammaS-stimulated translocation of Arf to membrane was suppressed only at concentrations of CYL-26z up to 30 microM. CYL-26z inhibited the fMLP-stimulated membrane expression of CD11b, CD45 and CD63, and the release of lysozyme and beta-glucuronidase. These results indicate that CYL-26z inhibited the fMLP-stimulated PLD activity, mainly through the blockade of RhoA activation, and degranulation in rat neutrophils.

  9. Structural Determinants for the Interaction of Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 with Peptide Ligands*

    PubMed Central

    He, Hui-Qiong; Troksa, Erica L.; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Pardo, Leonardo; Ye, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Unlike formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1), FPR2/ALX (FPR2) interacts with peptides of diverse sequences but has low affinity for the Escherichia coli-derived chemotactic peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLF). Using computer modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, we investigated the structural requirements for FPR2 to interact with formyl peptides of different length and composition. In calcium flux assay, the N-formyl group of these peptides is necessary for activation of both FPR2 and FPR1, whereas the composition of the C-terminal amino acids appears more important for FPR2 than FPR1. FPR2 interacts better with pentapeptides (fMLFII, fMLFIK) than tetrapeptides (fMLFK, fMLFW) and tripeptide (fMLF) but only weakly with peptides carrying negative charges at the C terminus (e.g. fMLFE). In contrast, FPR1 is less sensitive to negative charges at the C terminus. A CXCR4-based homology model of FPR1 and FPR2 suggested that Asp-2817.32 is crucial for the interaction of FPR2 with certain formyl peptides as its negative charge may be repulsive with the terminal COO- group of fMLF and negatively charged Glu in fMLFE. Asp-2817.32 might also form a stable interaction with the positively charged Lys in fMLFK. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to remove the negative charge at position 281 in FPR2. The D2817.32G mutant showed improved affinity for fMLFE and fMLF and reduced affinity for fMLFK compared with wild type FPR2. These results indicate that different structural determinants are used by FPR1 and FPR2 to interact with formyl peptides. PMID:24285541

  10. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses.

  11. Monocytes and neutrophils from tuberculosis patients are insensitive to anti-inflammatory effects triggered by the prototypic formyl peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)

    PubMed Central

    BEIGIER-BOMPADRE, M; ALEMÁN, M; BARRIONUEVO, P; FRANCO, M C; RUBEL, C J; SASIAIN, M Del C; PALERMO, M S; ABBATE, E; ISTURIZ, M A

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis where formyl peptides, which are cleavage products of bacterial and mitochondrial proteins, are present. In this study, we demonstrated that interferon gamma (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 induced the overexpression of the receptor for the Fc portion of IgG I (FcγRI) in monocytes from tuberculosis (TB) patients, showing that these cells respond to IFN-γ and IL-10 signals. We also demonstrated that lower doses of IL-10 render monocytes from TB patients less responsive to higher doses of the cytokine. Although the prototypic formyl peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) is a well-known proinflammatory agonist, we have demonstrated previously that preincubation of monocytes with FMLP inhibited the up-regulation of FcγRI induced by IFN-γ or IL-10. This effect was not observed in monocytes from TB patientes. FMLP also induced the down-regulation of the expression of FcγRI in monocytes that had been activated already with IFN-γ. However, this effect of FMLP was not observed in monocytes from TB patients and supernatants from monocytes obtained from these patients were incapable of inducing the down-regulation of FcγRI. In contrast to normal donors, supernatants from FMLP-treated neutrophils from TB patients did not modify the basal level of expression of FcγRI in monocytes from normal donors. In conclusion, in this study we demonstrated the existence of two novel mechanisms that may contribute to the pathological effects generated by M. tuberculosis: the enhancement of FcγRI in response to IFN-γ and IL-10, and the unresponsiveness to the anti-inflammatory effects induced by formyl peptides. PMID:12869034

  12. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  13. Design and synthesis of tryptophan containing dipeptide derivatives as formyl peptide receptor 1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hung, Chih-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Yun; Huang, Yin-Ting; Tsai, Yu-Chi; Hsieh, Pei-Wen

    2013-06-14

    Our previous studies identified an Fmoc-(S,R)-tryptophan-containing dipeptide derivative, 1, which selectively inhibited neutrophil elastase release induced by formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP) in human neutrophils. In an attempt to improve pharmacological activity, a series of tryptophan-containing dipeptides were synthesized and their pharmacological activities were investigated in human neutrophils. Of these, five compounds 3, 6, 19a, 24a, and 24b exhibited potent and dual inhibitory effects on FMLP-induced superoxide anion (O2˙(-)) generation and neutrophil elastase release in neutrophils with IC50 values of 0.23/0.60, 1.88/2.47, 1.87/3.60, 0.12/0.37, and 1.32/1.03 μM, respectively. Further studies indicated that inhibition of superoxide production in human neutrophils by these dipeptides was associated with the selective inhibition of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). Furthermore, the results of structure-activity relationship studies concluded that the fragment N-benzoyl-Trp-Phe-OMe (3) was most suitable as a core structure for interaction with FPR1, and may be approved as a lead for the development of new drugs in the treatment of neutrophilic inflammatory diseases. As some of the synthesized compounds exhibited separable conformational isomers, and showed diverse bioactivities, the conformation analysis of these compounds is also discussed herein.

  14. Immunotherapeutic potential of N-formylated peptides of ESAT-6 and glutamine synthetase in experimental tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mir, Shabir Ahmad; Sharma, Sadhna

    2014-02-01

    Recent understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculosis allows the possible application of immunotherapy for the treatment of tuberculosis. Therapies that would upregulate the host anti mycobacterial innate and/or adaptive immune response have been supposed to be useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. Since N-formyl peptides are products of bacterial metabolism, and their binding to a specific phagocyte receptor (FPR) induces chemotaxis and activation of phagocytes that are critical effectors in our innate immune system, it is reasonable to assume that the interaction between these two counterparts (i.e. formylated peptides and FPR) is also important in host defence against M. tuberculosis. In the present study the direct immunotherapeutic potential of N-formylated peptides of two non-classically secreted proteins (early secreted antigenic target-6 and glutamine synthetase) of M. tuberculosis H37Rv was evaluated. Treatment of M. tuberculosis H37Rv infected mice with N-formylated peptides of early secreted antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6) and glutamine synthetase (GS) markedly reduced the bacilli load in their lungs (p < 0.001) and spleen (p < 0.01) as compared to the untreated mice. In addition, the histopathological changes were observed to be in correlation with the CFU data with minor areas of consolidation in the lung sections of N-formylated peptide treated infected mice as compared to those of the untreated mice. Further, these N-formylated peptides were able to confer an additional therapeutic effect when given in combination with the anti tuberculosis drugs and hence can be used as an adjunct to the conventional chemotherapy against tuberculosis.

  15. Walker 256 Tumor Growth Suppression by Crotoxin Involves Formyl Peptide Receptors and Lipoxin A4

    PubMed Central

    Brigatte, Patrícia; Faiad, Odair Jorge; Ferreira Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio; Landgraf, Richardt G.; Palma, Mario Sergio; Cury, Yara; Curi, Rui; Sampaio, Sandra Coccuzzo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Crotoxin (CTX), the main toxin of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom, on Walker 256 tumor growth, the pain symptoms associated (hyperalgesia and allodynia), and participation of endogenous lipoxin A4. Treatment with CTX (s.c.), daily, for 5 days reduced tumor growth at the 5th day after injection of Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the plantar surface of adult rat hind paw. This observation was associated with inhibition of new blood vessel formation and decrease in blood vessel diameter. The treatment with CTX raised plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and its natural analogue 15-epi-LXA4, an effect mediated by formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). In fact, the treatment with Boc-2, an inhibitor of FPRs, abolished the increase in plasma levels of these mediators triggered by CTX. The blockage of these receptors also abolished the inhibitory action of CTX on tumor growth and blood vessel formation and the decrease in blood vessel diameter. Together, the results herein presented demonstrate that CTX increases plasma concentrations of lipoxin A4 and 15-epi-LXA4, which might inhibit both tumor growth and formation of new vessels via FPRs. PMID:27190493

  16. Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides induce cardiovascular collapse and sepsis-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wenceslau, Camilla Ferreira; McCarthy, Cameron G; Szasz, Theodora; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Webb, R Clinton

    2015-04-01

    Fifty percent of trauma patients who present sepsis-like syndrome do not have bacterial infections. This condition is known as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). A unifying factor of SIRS and sepsis is cardiovascular collapse. Trauma and severe blood loss cause the release of endogenous molecules known as damage-associated molecular patterns. Mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) are damage-associated molecular patterns that share similarities with bacterial N-formylated peptides and are potent immune system activators. The goal of this study was to investigate whether F-MIT trigger SIRS, including hypotension and vascular collapse via formyl peptide receptor (FPR) activation. We evaluated cardiovascular parameters in Wistar rats treated with FPR or histamine receptor antagonists and inhibitors of the nitric oxide pathway before and after F-MIT infusion. F-MIT, but not nonformylated peptides or mitochondrial DNA, induced severe hypotension via FPR activation and nitric oxide and histamine release. Moreover, F-MIT infusion induced hyperthermia, blood clotting, and increased vascular permeability. To evaluate the role of leukocytes in F-MIT-induced hypotension, neutrophil, basophil, or mast cells were depleted. Depletion of basophils, but not neutrophils or mast cells, abolished F-MIT-induced hypotension. Rats that underwent hemorrhagic shock increased plasma levels of mitochondrial formylated proteins associated with lung damage and antagonism of FPR ameliorated hemorrhagic shock-induced lung injury. Finally, F-MIT induced vasodilatation in isolated resistance arteries via FPR activation; however, F-MIT impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in the presence of blood. These data suggest that F-MIT may be the link among trauma, SIRS, and cardiovascular collapse.

  17. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Wenceslau, Camilla F.; McCarthy, Cameron G.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma. PMID:27532003

  18. Structural and functional characterization of the human formyl peptide receptor ligand-binding region.

    PubMed Central

    Radel, S J; Genco, R J; De Nardin, E

    1994-01-01

    The formyl peptide (N-formyl-1-methionyl-1-leucyl-1-phenylalanine [FMLP]) receptor is involved in the activation of neutrophils and their subsequent response to chemotactic N-formylated peptides. Recently, we found that the first extracellular loop closest to the N-terminal end of the FMLP receptor exhibited the strongest ligand binding compared with that shown by other extracellular regions. By constructing amino acid substitutional variants of this domain, we have determined that residues Arg-84 and Lys-85 on this loop play major roles in ligand-binding activity. Furthermore, random rearrangement of the residues of this receptor region demonstrated that the position of these charged amino acids did not affect their involvement in ligand binding, although their presence was essential for this binding to occur. We propose that the portion of the first N-terminal extracellular loop of the FMLP receptor containing residues Arg-84 and Lys-85 contributes significantly to the active site in ligand-receptor binding. We further propose that this binding is not dependent on defined structure but rather that these charged moieties may function as important "contacts" in receptor-ligand interactions. Images PMID:8168934

  19. Chemotactic properties and absence of the formyl peptide receptor in ferret (Mustela putorius furo) neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Makoto; Otsubo, Kouji; Kikuchi, Tomoko; Itou, Takuya; Sakai, Takeo

    2010-02-01

    This study describes a chemotaxis assay of ferret polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs). The optimal conditions for this chemotaxis assay were investigated for three chemoattractants: zymosan activated serum (ZAS), recombinant human interleukin-8 (rhIL-8) and N-formyl-Met-Leu- Phe (fMLF). In this study, ferret polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) reacted to ZAS and rhIL-8, but not fMLF. The optimal concentration of ZAS and rhIL-8 were 5% and 100 ng/ml, respectively. The optimal incubation time of each reagent was 60 min. Due to the lack of response shown from fMLF, the existence of formyl peptide receptors (FPR) on ferret PMNs was investigated by evaluating FPR binding using flow cytometry. The receptor was not detected, implying that ferret neutrophils may lack FPR. This study confirms the fundamental experimental conditions for ferret PMNs chemotaxis and elucidates new findings concerning FPR in ferret neutrophils.

  20. Pleiotropic regulation of macrophage polarization and tumorigenesis by formyl peptide receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Cai, L; Wang, H; Wu, P; Gu, W; Chen, Y; Hao, H; Tang, K; Yi, P; Liu, M; Miao, S; Ye, D

    2011-09-08

    Cancer cells recruit monocytes, macrophages and other inflammatory cells by producing abundant chemoattractants and growth factors, such as macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF/CSF-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), to promote tumor growth and dissemination. An understanding of the mechanisms that target cancer cells and regulate tumor microenvironment is essential in designing anticancer therapies. Here, we showed that serum amyloid-A (SAA) and cathelicidin (LL-37) stimulated M-CSF and MCP-1 expression with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration; conversely, lipoxin-A(4) (LXA(4)) and annexin-A1 (ANXA1) inhibited LPS-induced M-CSF and MCP-1 production by human (HepG2) and mouse (H22) hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCCs). The effects of LXA(4), ANXA1, SAA and LL-37 were dependent on the activation of their mutual cell-surface receptor formyl peptide receptor-2 (FPR2) and subsequent ROS-MAPK-NF-kB signalings. Furthermore, our results indicated that LPS switched macrophages into an IL-10(low)IL-12(high) M1 profile, whereas M-CSF+MCP-1 and FPR2 agonists skewed them into M2 (IL-10(high)IL-12(low)). In that respect, through modulating the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), LXA(4) and ANXA1 induced monocyte differentiation into M2a+M2c-like cells and showed antitumorigenetic activities, whereas SAA, LL-37 and M-CSF+MCP-1 led to M2b- or M2d-like polarization, which exacerbated HCC invasion in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Our results suggest that FPR2 has an appreciable pleiotropic regulator role in tumor immunoediting.

  1. Spasmogenic activity of chemotactic N-formylated oligopeptides: identity of structure--function relationships for chemotactic and spasmogenic activities.

    PubMed

    Marasco, W A; Fantone, J C; Ward, P A

    1982-12-01

    The chemotactic N-formylated oligopeptides are potent spasmogenic agents for guinea pig ileum. Structure-activity studies with various N-formylated peptides suggest the presence of a specific receptor that resembles in specificity the formyl peptide receptor on leukocytes. A competitive antagonist of the formyl peptide receptor on leukocytes also inhibits formyl peptide-induced ileum contraction, whereas the antihistamine diphenhydramine is without effect. The contractile response caused by the synthetic N-formylated peptides differs from those induced by acetylcholine, histamine, and substance P. In particular, a latent period after treatment with the N-formyl peptides is seen before the onset of the response, and a sustained contractile response is not maintained. In addition, tachyphylaxis does occur, but complete recovery of activity is seen after a 20- to 30-min rest period. These observations suggest broad biological roles of prokaryotic signal peptides from bacteria as acute inflammatory mediators.

  2. T4-lysozyme fusion for the production of human formyl peptide receptors for structural determination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Cui, Ying; Wang, Jiqian

    2014-03-01

    T4-lysozyme (T4L) fusion was introduced in the intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) of human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3), and the ability of T4L fusion to be used in the production of human FPR3 for structural determination was evaluated in this work. The T4L variant of human FPR3 termed FPR3-T4L was expressed in stable tetracycline-inducible HEK293 cells. A systematic detergent screening showed that fos-choline-14 was the optimal detergent to solubilize and subsequently purify FPR3-T4L from HEK293 cells. Immunoaffinity purification in combination with gel filtration was employed to purify the T4L-fused receptor to high homogeneity. The final yield of the human FPR3-T4L monomer from 2 g of cells was 0.2 mg. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the receptor adopted a correct secondary structure after purification, while ligand binding measurement indicated that the receptor was functional. Thus, the presence of T4L fusion did not evidently disturb the expression in HEK293 cells, proper folding, and functionality of human FPR3. Our study of evaluating T4L fusion for the recombinant production of human formyl peptide receptor would facilitate ongoing efforts in the structural characterization of GPCRs.

  3. Formyl peptide receptor as a novel therapeutic target for anxiety-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Irene; Rattazzi, Lorenza; Piras, Giuseppa; Gobbetti, Thomas; Panza, Elisabetta; Perretti, Mauro; Dalley, Jeffrey W; D'Acquisto, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPR) belong to a family of sensors of the immune system that detect microbe-associated molecules and inform various cellular and sensorial mechanisms to the presence of pathogens in the host. Here we demonstrate that Fpr2/3-deficient mice show a distinct profile of behaviour characterised by reduced anxiety in the marble burying and light-dark box paradigms, increased exploratory behaviour in an open-field, together with superior performance on a novel object recognition test. Pharmacological blockade with a formyl peptide receptor antagonist, Boc2, in wild type mice reproduced most of the behavioural changes observed in the Fpr2/3(-/-) mice, including a significant improvement in novel object discrimination and reduced anxiety in a light/dark shuttle test. These effects were associated with reduced FPR signalling in the gut as shown by the significant reduction in the levels of p-p38. Collectively, these findings suggest that homeostatic FPR signalling exerts a modulatory effect on anxiety-like behaviours. These findings thus suggest that therapies targeting FPRs may be a novel approach to ameliorate behavioural abnormalities present in neuropsychiatric disorders at the cognitive-emotional interface.

  4. Enterococcus faecium stimulates human neutrophils via the formyl-peptide receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Bloes, Dominik Alexander; Otto, Michael; Peschel, Andreas; Kretschmer, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    The human formyl-peptide receptor 2 (FPR2/ALX) senses phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptide toxins produced by pathogenic staphylococcal species and plays a crucial role in directing neutrophil influx during staphylococcal infection. However, it has remained unclear if FPR2 responds also to molecules from other bacterial pathogens. Here we analyzed a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens and found that apart from staphylococci only certain enterococcal strains have the capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX. Most of the analyzed Enterococcus faecium but only sporadic Enterococcus faecalis strains released FPR2/ALX-stimulating molecules leading to neutrophil calcium ion fluxes, chemotaxis, and complement receptor upregulation. Among ten test strains vancomycin-resistant E. faecium had a significantly higher capacity to stimulate FPR2/ALX than vancomycin-susceptible strains, suggesting an association of strong FPR2/ALX activation with health-care associated strains. The enterococcal FPR2/ALX agonists were found to be peptides or proteins, which appear, however, to be unrelated to staphylococcal PSMs in sequence and physicochemical properties. Enterococci are among the most frequent invasive bacterial pathogens but the basis of enterococcal virulence and immune activation has remained incompletely understood. Our study indicates that previously unrecognized proteinaceous agonists contribute to Enterococcus-host interaction and underscores the importance of FPR2/ALX in host defense against major endogenous bacterial pathogens.

  5. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands.

  6. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  7. Annexin A1 Induces Skeletal Muscle Cell Migration Acting through Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2012-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1, lipocortin-1) is a glucocorticoid-regulated 37-kDa protein, so called since its main property is to bind (i.e. to annex) to cellular membranes in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Although ANXA1 has predominantly been studied in the context of immune responses and cancer, the protein can affect a larger variety of biological phenomena, including cell proliferation and migration. Our previous results show that endogenous ANXA1 positively modulates myoblast cell differentiation by promoting migration of satellite cells and, consequently, skeletal muscle differentiation. In this work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that ANXA1 is able to exert effects on myoblast cell migration acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) following changes in its subcellular localization as in other cell types and tissues. The analysis of the subcellular localization of ANXA1 in C2C12 myoblasts during myogenic differentiation showed an interesting increase of extracellular ANXA1 starting from the initial phases of skeletal muscle cell differentiation. The investigation of intracellular Ca2+ perturbation following exogenous administration of the ANXA1 N-terminal derived peptide Ac2-26 established the engagement of the FPRs which expression in C2C12 cells was assessed by qualitative PCR. Wound healing assay experiments showed that Ac2-26 peptide is able to increase migration of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells and to induce cell surface translocation and secretion of ANXA1. Our results suggest a role for ANXA1 as a highly versatile component in the signaling chains triggered by the proper calcium perturbation that takes place during active migration and differentiation or membrane repair since the protein is strongly redistributed onto the plasma membranes after an rapid increase of intracellular levels of Ca2+. These properties indicate that ANXA1 may be involved in a novel repair mechanism for skeletal muscle and may have therapeutic implications with respect to the

  8. Production of a bioengineered G-protein coupled receptor of human formyl peptide receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Shuguang

    2011-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) participate in a wide range of vital regulations of our physiological actions. They are also of pharmaceutical importance and have become many therapeutic targets for a number of disorders and diseases. Purified GPCR-based approaches including structural study and novel biophysical and biochemical function analyses are increasingly being used in GPCR-directed drug discovery. Before these approaches become routine, however, several hurdles need to be overcome; they include overexpression, solubilization, and purification of large quantities of functional and stable receptors on a regular basis. Here we report milligram production of a human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3). FPR3 comprises a functionally distinct GPCR subfamily that is involved in leukocyte chemotaxis and activation. The bioengineered FPR3 was overexpressed in stable tetracycline-inducible mammalian cell lines (HEK293S). After a systematic detergent screening, fos-choline-14 (FC-14) was selected for subsequent solubilization and purification processes. A two-step purification method, immunoaffinity using anti-rho-tag monoclonal antibody 1D4 and gel filtration, was used to purify the receptors to near homogeneity. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that expressed FPR3 was predominantly displayed on cellular membrane. Secondary structural analysis using circular dichroism showed that the purified FPR3 receptor was correctly folded with >50% α-helix, which is similar to other known GPCR secondary structures. Our method can readily produce milligram quantities of human FPR3, which would facilitate in developing human FPR as therapeutic drug targets.

  9. Physiological characterization of formyl peptide receptor expressing cells in the mouse vomeronasal organ

    PubMed Central

    Ackels, Tobias; von der Weid, Benoît; Rodriguez, Ivan; Spehr, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory structure that detects both hetero- and conspecific social cues. Based on largely monogenic expression of either type 1 or 2 vomeronasal receptors (V1Rs/V2Rs) or members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family, the vomeronasal sensory epithelium harbors at least three neuronal subpopulations. While various neurophysiological properties of both V1R- and V2R-expressing neurons have been described using genetically engineered mouse models, the basic biophysical characteristics of the more recently identified FPR-expressing vomeronasal neurons have not been studied. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse strain that coexpresses an enhanced variant of yellow fluorescent protein together with FPR-rs3 allowing to identify and analyze FPR-rs3-expressing neurons in acute VNO tissue slices. Single neuron electrophysiological recordings allow comparative characterization of the biophysical properties inherent to a prototypical member of the FPR-expressing subpopulation of VNO neurons. In this study, we provide an in-depth analysis of both passive and active membrane properties, including detailed characterization of several types of voltage-activated conductances and action potential discharge patterns, in fluorescently labeled vs. unmarked vomeronasal neurons. Our results reveal striking similarities in the basic (electro) physiological architecture of both transgene-expressing and non-expressing neurons, confirming the suitability of this genetically engineered mouse model for future studies addressing more specialized issues in vomeronasal FPR neurobiology. PMID:25484858

  10. Nuclear localization of Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Fioretti, Tiziana; Sarnataro, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Ammendola, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Current models of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling describe binding of external agonists to cell surface receptors which, in turn, trigger several biological responses. New paradigms indicate that GPCRs localize to and signal at the nucleus, thus regulating distinct signaling cascades. The formyl-peptide receptor FPR2 belongs to the GPCR super-family and is coupled to PTX-sensitive Gi proteins. We show by western blot analysis, immunofluorescence experiments and radioligand binding assays that FPR2 is expressed at nuclear level in CaLu-6 and AGS cells. Nuclear FPR2 is a functional receptor, since it participates in intra-nuclear signaling, as assessed by decreased G protein-FPR2 association and enhanced ERK2, c-Jun and c-Myc phosphorylation upon stimulation of intact nuclei with the FPR2 agonist, WKYMVm. We analyzed FPR2 sequence for the search of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and we found a stretch of basic aminoacids (227-KIHKK-231) in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor. We performed single (K230A) and multiple (H229A/K230A/K231A) mutagenesis of NLS. The constructs were individually overexpressed in HEK293 cells and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis showed that nuclear localization or translocation of FPR2 depends on the integrity of the H(229) and K(231) residues within the NLS.

  11. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Ha Young; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Koo, JaeHyung; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525] PMID:27502013

  12. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525].

  13. Human Platelets Exhibit Chemotaxis using Functional N-Formyl Peptide Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    activated phagocytes. Therefore, we examined the chemotactic migration of platelets qualita- tively by videomicroscopy . Platelets in medium were al- lowed...significantly decreased M. Czapiga et al. /Experimental Hematology 33 (2005) 73–84 79Figure 3. Videomicroscopy of human platelets in response to formyl...selected platelets during videomicroscopy from the time of the addition of fMLF (104 M in 1 µL) or PBS. Movement between markers represents 10 frames

  14. Molecular and evolutionary analyses of formyl peptide receptors suggest the absence of VNO-specific FPRs in primates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Shi, Peng

    2010-12-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) were observed to expand in rodents and were recently suggested as candidate vomeronasal chemosensory receptors. Since vomeronasal chemosensory receptors usually underwent positive selection and evolved concordantly with the vomeronasal organ (VNO) morphology, we surveyed FPRs in primates in which VNO morphology is greatly diverse and thus it would provide us a clearer view of VNO-FPRs evolution. By screening available primate genome sequences, we obtained the FPR repertoires in representative primate species. As a result, we did not find FPR family size expansion in primates. Further analyses showed no evolutionary force variance between primates with or without VNO structure, which indicated that there was no functional divergence among primates FPRs. Our results suggest that primates lack the VNO-specific FPRs and the FPR expansion is not a common phenomenon in mammals outside rodent lineage, regardless of VNO complexity.

  15. Peptide length and folding state govern the capacity of staphylococcal β-type phenol-soluble modulins to activate human formyl-peptide receptors 1 or 2.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Dorothee; Rautenberg, Maren; Linke, Dirk; Peschel, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Most staphylococci produce short α-type PSMs and about twice as long β-type PSMs that are potent leukocyte attractants and toxins. PSMs are usually secreted with the N-terminal formyl group but are only weak agonists for the leukocyte FPR1. Instead, the FPR1-related FPR2 senses PSMs efficiently and is crucial for leukocyte recruitment in infection. Which structural features distinguish FPR1 from FPR2 ligands has remained elusive. To analyze which peptide properties may govern the capacities of β-type PSMs to activate FPRs, full-length and truncated variants of such peptides from Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were synthesized. FPR2 activation was observed even for short N- or C-terminal β-type PSM variants once they were longer than 18 aa, and this activity increased with length. In contrast, the shortest tested peptides were potent FPR1 agonists, and this property declined with increasing peptide length. Whereas full-length β-type PSMs formed α-helices and exhibited no FPR1-specific activity, the truncated peptides had less-stable secondary structures, were weak agonists for FPR1, and required N-terminal formyl-methionine residues to be FPR2 agonists. Together, these data suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 have opposed ligand preferences. Short, flexible PSM structures may favor FPR1 but not FPR2 activation, whereas longer peptides with α-helical, amphipathic properties are strong FPR2 but only weak FPR1 agonists. These findings should help to unravel the ligand specificities of 2 critical human PRRs, and they may be important for new, anti-infective and anti-inflammatory strategies.

  16. N-Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine Inhibits both Gamma Interferon- and Interleukin-10-Induced Expression of FcγRI on Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Barrionuevo, Paula; Alves-Rosa, Fernanda; Rubel, Carolina J.; Palermo, Marina S.; Isturiz, Martín A.

    2001-01-01

    Three different classes of receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (FcγRs), FcγRI, FcγRII, and FcγRIII, have been identified on human leukocytes. One of them, FcγRI, is a high-affinity receptor capable of induction of functions that include phagocytosis, respiratory burst, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), and secretion of cytokines. This receptor is expressed on mononuclear phagocytes, and this expression is regulated by cytokines and hormones such as gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IFN-β, interleukin-10 (IL-10), and glucocorticoids. We have recently demonstrated that the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) is capable of inducing a time-dependent downregulation of both FcγRIIIB and FcγRII in human neutrophils, altering FcγR-dependent functions. Considering the biological relevance of the regulation of FcγRI, we investigated the effect of FMLP on the overexpression of FcγRI induced by both IFN-γ and IL-10 on human monocytes. We demonstrate that FMLP significantly abrogated IFN-γ- and IL-10-induced FcγRI expression, although its basal level of expression was not altered. However, other IFN-γ-mediated effects such as the overexpression of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigens and the enhancement of lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha were not affected by FMLP treatment. The formyl peptide completely inhibited the IFN-γ- and IL-10-induced enhancement of ADCC and phagocytosis carried out by adherent cells. The inhibitory effect of FMLP on FcγRI upregulation could exert an important regulatory effect during the evolution of bacterial infections. PMID:11238229

  17. Identification of 1-chloro-2-formyl indenes and tetralenes as novel antistaphylococcal agents exhibiting sortase A inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kahlon, Amandeep Kaur; Negi, Arvind S; Kumari, Ruma; Srivastava, Kishore K; Kumar, Shiv; Darokar, Mahendra P; Sharma, Ashok

    2014-03-01

    Tetralene and indene compounds have shown inhibitory activity against human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Their potential use as antistaphylococcal agent against drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has not been explored so far. We determined in vitro antistaphylococcal activity and mechanism of action of these compounds as sortase A inhibitors through in silico analysis followed by biological assays. Tetralene and indene series were tested against S. aureus strains MTCC96, MRSA, and VA30. Three compounds showed significant reduction in MIC in both wild-type and drug-resistant S. aureus strains. In silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity analysis of identified leads and cytotoxicity testing with colorimetric method using Vero and WRL-68 cell lines showed no significant cytotoxic effects. Molecular docking of these molecules with sortase A (PDB: 2KID) showed H-bond interaction with functional site residue Arg197 of sortase A. Sortase A inhibition assay was developed by expressing SrtA∆N from S. aureus strain MTCC96. Tetralene and indene compounds were found to have sortase A inhibitory potential. S. aureus strain MTCC96 treated with these compounds showed surface-sorting inhibition of fibronectin-binding protein and reduction in adherence to host extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin. 1-Chloro, 2-formyl, 6-methoxy, 1-tetralene (Tet-5), 1,5-dichloro, 2-formyl, 1-indene (Tet-20) and 1-chloro, 2-formyl, 5,6-methylenedioxy, and 1-indene (Tet-21) exhibited antistaphylococcal activity along with sortase A inhibition. The results also indicate the possible role of these leads in other reactions essential for cell viability.

  18. Leucine Leucine-37 Uses Formyl Peptide Receptor–Like 1 to Activate Signal Transduction Pathways, Stimulate Oncogenic Gene Expression, and Enhance the Invasiveness of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor–like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein–coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37–induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37–stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37–treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1. PMID:19491199

  19. Leucine leucine-37 uses formyl peptide receptor-like 1 to activate signal transduction pathways, stimulate oncogenic gene expression, and enhance the invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Danka, Elizabeth S; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the antimicrobial peptide, leucine leucine-37 (LL-37), could play a role in the progression of solid tumors. LL-37 is expressed as the COOH terminus of human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP-18) in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Previous studies have shown that the addition of LL-37 to various cancer cell lines in vitro stimulates proliferation, migration, and invasion. Similarly, overexpression of hCAP-18/LL-37 in vivo accelerates tumor growth. However, the receptor or receptors through which these processes are mediated have not been thoroughly examined. In the present study, expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) was confirmed on ovarian cancer cells. Proliferation assays indicated that LL-37 does not signal through a G protein-coupled receptor, such as FPRL1, to promote cancer cell growth. By contrast, FPRL1 was required for LL-37-induced invasion through Matrigel. The peptide stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling cascades and led to the significant activation of several transcription factors, through both FPRL1-dependent and FPRL1-independent pathways. Likewise, expression of some LL-37-stimulated genes was attenuated by the inhibition of FPRL1. Increased expression of CXCL10, EGF, and PDGF-BB as well as other soluble factors was confirmed from conditioned medium of LL-37-treated cells. Taken together, these data suggest that LL-37 potentiates a more aggressive behavior from ovarian cancer cells through its interaction with FPRL1.

  20. N-formyl peptide receptors in human neutrophils display distinct membrane distribution and lateral mobility when labeled with agonist and antagonist

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Receptors for bacterial N-formyl peptides are instrumental for neutrophil chemotactic locomotion and activation at sites of infection. As regulatory mechanisms for signal transduction, both rapid coupling of the occupied receptor to cytoskeletal components, and receptor lateral redistribution, have been suggested (Jesaitis et al., 1986, 1989). To compare the distribution and lateral diffusion of the nonactivated and activated neutrophil N-formyl-peptide receptor, before internalization, we used a new fluorescent N-formyl-peptide receptor antagonist, tertbutyloxycarbonyl-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe(D)-Leu-Phe-OH (Boc- FLFLF, 0.1-1 microM), and the fluorescent receptor agonist formyl-Nle- Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys (fnLLFnLYK, 0.1-1 microM). Fluorescent Boc-FLFLF did not elicit an oxidative burst in the neutrophil at 37 degrees C, as assessed by chemiluminescence and reduction of p-nitroblue tetrazolium chloride, but competed efficiently both with formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine (fMLF) and fnLLFnLYK. It was not internalized, as evidenced by confocal microscopy and acid elution of surface bound ligand. The lateral mobility characteristics of the neutrophil fMLF receptor were investigated with the technique of FRAP. The diffusion coefficient (D) was similar for antagonist- and agonist-labeled receptors (D approximately 5 x 10(-10) cm2/s), but the fraction of mobile receptors was significantly lower in agonist- compared to antagonist-labeled cells, approximately 40% in contrast to approximately 60%. This reduction in receptor mobile fraction was slightly counteracted, albeit not significantly, by dihydrocytochalasin B (dhcB, 5 microM). To block internalization of agonist-labeled receptors, receptor mobility measurements were done at 14 degrees C. At this temperature, confocal microscopy revealed clustering of receptors in response to agonist binding, compared to a more uniform receptor distribution in antagonist-labeled cells. The pattern of agonist- induced receptor clustering was

  1. Proteomic analysis of the palmitate-induced myotube secretome reveals involvement of the annexin A1-formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) pathway in insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Dayea; Jang, Jin-Hyeok; Ghim, Jaewang; Park, Soyeon; Song, Parkyong; Kwon, Yonghoon; Kim, Jaeyoon; Hwang, Daehee; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-04-01

    Elevated levels of the free fatty acid palmitate are found in the plasma of obese patients and induce insulin resistance. Skeletal muscle secretes myokines as extracellular signaling mediators in response to pathophysiological conditions. Here, we identified and characterized the skeletal muscle secretome in response to palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Using a quantitative proteomic approach, we identified 36 secretory proteins modulated by palmitate-induced insulin resistance. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that palmitate-induced insulin resistance induced cellular stress and modulated secretory events. We found that the decrease in the level of annexin A1, a secretory protein, depended on palmitate, and that annexin A1 and its receptor, formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist, played a protective role in the palmitate-induced insulin resistance of L6 myotubes through PKC-θ modulation. In mice fed with a high-fat diet, treatment with the formyl peptide receptor 2 agonist improved systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, we identified myokine candidates modulated by palmitate-induced insulin resistance and found that the annexin A1- formyl peptide receptor 2 pathway mediated the insulin resistance of skeletal muscle, as well as systemic insulin sensitivity.

  2. Interplay between signaling via the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) and chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Lena; Redvall, Elin; Johnsson, Marianne; Stenfeldt, Anna-Lena; Dahlgren, Claes; Wennerås, Christine

    2009-08-01

    Eosinophils express the chemoattractant receptors CCR3 and FPR. CCR3 binds several agonists such as eotaxin-1, -2, and -3 and RANTES, whereas the FPR binds the formylated tripeptide fMLP and a host of other ligands. The aim of this study was to investigate if there is interplay between these two receptors regarding the elicitation of migration and respiratory burst in human blood-derived eosinophils. Inhibition of the FPR with the antagonists CyH and boc-MLP abrogated the migration of eosinophils toward all of the CCR3 agonists. Similar results were seen when the FPR was desensitized with its cognate ligand, fMLP. In contrast, the respiratory burst triggered by eotaxin-1 was not inhibited by CyH. Thus, signals evoked via the FPR caused unidirectional down-regulation of CCR3-mediated chemotaxis but not respiratory burst in human eosinophils. The underlying mechanism was neither reduced ability of the CCR3 ligand eotaxin-1 to bind to CCR3 nor down-regulation of CCR3 from the cell surface. Finally, confocal microscopy and adFRET analysis ruled out homo- or heterodimer formation between FPR and/or CCR3 as an explanation for the reduction in chemotaxis via CCR3. Pharmacologic inhibition of signal transduction molecules showed that the release of free oxygen radicals in response to eotaxin-1 compared with fMLP is relatively more dependent on the p38 MAPK pathway.

  3. Small-molecule-biased formyl peptide receptor agonist compound 17b protects against myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Cheng Xue; May, Lauren T.; Li, Renming; Cao, Nga; Rosli, Sarah; Deo, Minh; Alexander, Amy E.; Horlock, Duncan; Bourke, Jane E.; Yang, Yuan H.; Stewart, Alastair G.; Kaye, David M.; Du, Xiao-Jun; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Ritchie, Rebecca H.

    2017-01-01

    Effective treatment for managing myocardial infarction (MI) remains an urgent, unmet clinical need. Formyl peptide receptors (FPR) regulate inflammation, a major contributing mechanism to cardiac injury following MI. Here we demonstrate that FPR1/FPR2-biased agonism may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MI. The small-molecule FPR1/FPR2 agonist, Compound 17b (Cmpd17b), exhibits a distinct signalling fingerprint to the conventional FPR1/FPR2 agonist, Compound-43 (Cmpd43). In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with human FPR1 or FPR2, Compd17b is biased away from potentially detrimental FPR1/2-mediated calcium mobilization, but retains the pro-survival signalling, ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, relative to Compd43. The pathological importance of the biased agonism of Cmpd17b is demonstrable as superior cardioprotection in both in vitro (cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts) and MI injury in mice in vivo. These findings reveal new insights for development of small molecule FPR agonists with an improved cardioprotective profile for treating MI. PMID:28169296

  4. Small-molecule-biased formyl peptide receptor agonist compound 17b protects against myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Qin, Cheng Xue; May, Lauren T; Li, Renming; Cao, Nga; Rosli, Sarah; Deo, Minh; Alexander, Amy E; Horlock, Duncan; Bourke, Jane E; Yang, Yuan H; Stewart, Alastair G; Kaye, David M; Du, Xiao-Jun; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Ritchie, Rebecca H

    2017-02-07

    Effective treatment for managing myocardial infarction (MI) remains an urgent, unmet clinical need. Formyl peptide receptors (FPR) regulate inflammation, a major contributing mechanism to cardiac injury following MI. Here we demonstrate that FPR1/FPR2-biased agonism may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MI. The small-molecule FPR1/FPR2 agonist, Compound 17b (Cmpd17b), exhibits a distinct signalling fingerprint to the conventional FPR1/FPR2 agonist, Compound-43 (Cmpd43). In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with human FPR1 or FPR2, Compd17b is biased away from potentially detrimental FPR1/2-mediated calcium mobilization, but retains the pro-survival signalling, ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, relative to Compd43. The pathological importance of the biased agonism of Cmpd17b is demonstrable as superior cardioprotection in both in vitro (cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts) and MI injury in mice in vivo. These findings reveal new insights for development of small molecule FPR agonists with an improved cardioprotective profile for treating MI.

  5. Annexin A1 contributes to pancreatic cancer cell phenotype, behaviour and metastatic potential independently of Formyl Peptide Receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belvedere, Raffaella; Bizzarro, Valentina; Forte, Giovanni; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca2+-binding protein over-expressed in pancreatic cancer (PC). We recently reported that extracellular ANXA1 mediates PC cell motility acting on Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs). Here, we describe other mechanisms by which intracellular ANXA1 could mediate PC progression. We obtained ANXA1 Knock-Out (KO) MIA PaCa-2 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology. LC-MS/MS analysis showed altered expression of several proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. As a result, ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 partially lost their migratory and invasive capabilities with a mechanism that appeared independent of FPRs. The acquisition of a less aggressive phenotype has been further investigated in vivo. Wild type (WT), PGS (scrambled) and ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 cells were engrafted orthotopically in SCID mice. No differences were found about PC primary mass, conversely liver metastatization appeared particularly reduced in ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 engrafted mice. In summary, we show that intracellular ANXA1 is able to preserve the cytoskeleton integrity and to maintain a malignant phenotype in vitro. The protein has a relevant role in the metastatization process in vivo, as such it appears attractive and suitable as prognostic and therapeutic marker in PC progression. PMID:27412958

  6. Differential neutrophil chemotactic response towards IL-8 and bacterial N-formyl peptides in term newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Stålhammar, Maria E.; Douhan Håkansson, Lena; Jonzon, Anders; Sindelar, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background A prerequisite for an effective innate immunity is the migrative ability of neutrophils to respond to inflammatory and infectious agents such as the intermediate interleukin (IL)-8 and the end-target formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) chemoattractants. The aim was to study the chemotactic capacity of neutrophils from newborn infants and adults in response to IL-8 and the bacterial peptide fMLP. Methods In the under-agarose cell migration assay, isolated leukocytes from healthy adults and from cord blood of healthy term newborn infants were studied with dose responses towards IL-8 and fMLP. The same number of leukocytes (1 × 105 cells), with the same distribution of neutrophils and monocytes, were analyzed in neonates and adults. Chemotaxis was distinguished from randomly migrating neutrophils, and the neutrophil pattern of migration, i.e. the migration distance and the number of migrating neutrophils per distance, was evaluated. Results In comparison to adults, fewer neutrophils from newborn infants migrated towards IL-8 and for a shorter distance (P < .01, respectively). The number of neutrophils migrating to different gradients of fMLP, the distance they migrated, and the correlation between the number and the distance were the same for neonates and adults. Random migration did not differ in any instance. Conclusion Chemotaxis of neutrophils from newborn infants was as co-ordinated as neutrophils from adults in response to fMLP, whereas the response to IL-8 was reduced. The differential response of neutrophils from neonates to intermediate and end-target chemoattractants could indicate a reduced infectious response. PMID:27690722

  7. Further Studies on 2-Arylacetamide Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 4,6-Disubstituted Analogues as Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Dahlgren, Claes; Graziano, Alessia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Zerbinati, Serena; Vergelli, Claudia; Quinn, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) play an essential role in the regulation of endogenous inflammation and immunity. In the present studies, a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives bearing an arylacetamide chain at position 2 was synthesized and tested for FPR agonist activity. The pyridazin-3(2H)-one ring was confirmed to be an appropriate scaffold to support FPR agonist activity, and its modification at the 4 and 6 positions led to the identification of additional active agonists, which induced intracellular Ca2+ flux in HL-60 cells transfected with either FPR1, FPR2, or FPR3. Seven formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1)-specific and several mixed FPR1/FPR2 dual agonists were identified with low micromolar EC50 values. Furthermore, these agonists also activated human neutrophils, inducing intracellular Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis. Finally, molecular docking studies indicated that the most potent pyridazin-3(2H)-ones overlapped in their best docking poses with fMLF and WKYMVM peptides in the FPR1 and FPR2 ligand binding sites, respectively. Thus, pyridazinone-based compounds represent potential lead compounds for further development of selective and/or potent FPR agonists. PMID:23685570

  8. Human formyl peptide receptor ligand binding domain(s). Studies using an improved mutagenesis/expression vector reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Vilander, L; Andrews, W H; Holmes, R

    1994-09-09

    Recently, we reported the domain requirements for the binding of formyl peptide to its specific receptor. Based on experiments using receptor chimeras, we also postulated an importance for the amino-terminal domain of the receptor in ligand binding (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L., Adams, R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295). We have begun to perform a detailed analysis of the regions within the formyl peptide receptor involved in ligand binding. To address the importance of the receptor amino-terminal domain, we substituted (or inserted) hydrophilic sequences within the amino-terminal domain, expressed the receptors, and determined their ability to bind ligand. A stretch of nine amino acids next to the initial methionine was identified as crucial for receptor occupancy. A peptide containing such a sequence specifically completed binding of the ligand to the receptor. Alanine screen mutagenesis of the second extracellular domain also identified amino acids involved in ligand binding as well as a disulfide bond (Cys98 to Cys176) crucial for maintaining the binding pocket. These studies provide evidence for a novel mechanism involved in regulation of receptor occupancy. Binding of the ligand induces conformational changes in the receptor that result in the apposition of the amino-terminal domain over the ligand, providing a lid to the binding pocket.

  9. Human neutrophil formyl peptide receptor phosphorylation and the mucosal inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Giovanna; Gripentrog, Jeannie; Lord, Connie; Riesselman, Marcia; Sumagin, Ronen; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma; Jesaitis, Algirdas J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial/mitochondrial fMLF analogs bind FPR1, driving accumulation/activation of PMN at sites of infection/injury, while promoting wound healing in epithelia. We quantified levels of UFPR1 and TFPR1 in isolated PMN by use of phosphosensitive NFPRb and phosphorylation-independent NFPRa antibodies. UFPR1 and total TFPR were assessed inflamed mucosa, observed in human IBD. In isolated PMN after fMLF stimulation, UFPR1 declined 70% (fMLFEC50 = 11 ± 1 nM; t1/2 = 15 s) and was stable for up to 4 h, whereas TFPR1 changed only slightly. Antagonists (tBoc-FLFLF, CsH) and metabolic inhibitor NaF prevented the fMLF-dependent UFPR1 decrease. Annexin A1 fragment Ac2-26 also induced decreases in UFPR1 (Ac2-26EC50 ∼ 3 µM). Proinflammatory agents (TNF-α, LPS), phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid), and G-protein activator (MST) modestly increased fMLFEC50, 2- to 4-fold, whereas PTX, Ca2+ chelators (EGTA/BAPTA), H2O2, GM-CSF, ENA-78, IL-1RA, and LXA4 had no effect. Aggregation-inducing PAF, however, strongly inhibited fMLF-stimulated UFPR1 decreases. fMLF-driven PMN also demonstrated decreased UFPR1 after traversing monolayers of cultured intestinal epithelial cells, as did PMN in intestinal mucosal samples, demonstrating active inflammation from UC patients. Total TFPR remained high in PMN within inflamed crypts, migrating through crypt epithelium, and in the lamina propria-adjoining crypts, but UFPR1 was only observed at some peripheral sites on crypt aggregates. Loss of UFPR1 in PMN results from C-terminal S/T phosphorylation. Our results suggest G protein–insensitive, fMLF-dependent FPR1 phosphorylation in isolated suspension PMN, which may manifest in fMLF-driven transmigration and potentially, in actively inflamed tissues, except at minor discrete surface locations of PMN-containing crypt aggregates. PMID:25395303

  10. Simultaneous mobilization of Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) and formyl peptide chemoattractant receptors in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Graves, V; Gabig, T; McCarthy, L; Strour, E F; Leemhuis, T; English, D

    1992-08-01

    Mobilization of a distinct subset of specific granules provides a physiologically important mechanism to recruit Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) from an intracellular pool to the external surface of the neutrophil plasma membrane, where the functionally active heterodimer mediates several adherence-dependent processes that are crucial for adequate host defense and cellular inflammatory responses. We observed similar characteristics for translocation of Mac-1 and neutrophil formyl peptide receptors (FPR) and hypothesize that the readily accessible pools of both Mac-1 and FPR are colocalized within this specific granule subset. Plasma membrane levels of both FPR (assessed with 3H-FMLP) and Mac-1 (assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis of fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-Mo-1-labeled cells) were markedly downregulated in cells prepared at low temperature from blood cooled to 4 degrees C immediately after removal from the circulation. Levels of both FPR and Mac-1 remained low on cells held at 4 degrees C. Upon warming, spontaneous upregulation of Mac-1 and FPR occurred with similar kinetics and temperature dependency. Translocation of both Mac-1 and FPR was markedly potentiated by exposure of cells to either fluoride ion (which has been shown by others to specifically elicit exocytosis of gelatinase-rich and vitamin B-12 binding protein-poor granules) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that markedly potentiates the neutrophils' host defense capabilities. Levels of both FPR and Mac-1 on F-- or GM-CSF-treated neutrophils exceeded those present on cells incubated at 37 degrees C for extended time intervals, indicating that stimulated translocation may involve mobilization of an additional granule subset. Scatchard analysis showed that only low-affinity FPR were translocated during spontaneous and stimulus-dependent upregulation. To directly compare FPR levels on the surface of cells displaying varying levels of Mac-1 within a

  11. Influence of ionization on the conformational preferences of peptide models. Ramachandran surfaces of N-formyl-glycine amide and N-formyl-alanine amide radical cations.

    PubMed

    Gil, Adrià; Sodupe, Mariona; Bertran, Juan

    2009-09-01

    Ramachandran maps of neutral and ionized HCO-Gly-NH2 and HCO-Ala-NH2 peptide models have been built at the B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level of calculation. Direct optimizations using B3LYP and the recently developed MPWB1K functional have also been carried out, as well as single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level of theory with the 6-311++G(2df,2p) basis set. Results indicate that for both peptide models ionization can cause drastic changes in the shape of the PES in such a way that highly disallowed regions in neutral PES become low-energy regions in the radical cation surface. The structures localized in such regions, epsilonL+* and epsilonD+* are highly stabilized due to the formation of 2-centre-3-electron interactions between the two carbonyl oxygens. Inclusion of solvent effects by the conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) shows that the solute-solvent interaction energy plays an important role in determining the stability order.

  12. 6-Methyl-2,4-Disubstituted Pyridazin-3(2H)-ones: A Novel Class of Small-Molecule Agonists for Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Quinn, Mark T.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Schepetkin, Igor A; Holderness, Jeff; Ye, Richard D.; Rabiet, Marie-Josephe; Biancalani, Claudio; Cesari, Nicoletta; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia; Pieretti, Stefano; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Giovannoni, Maria Paola

    2010-01-01

    Following a ligand-based drug design approach, a potent mixed formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) and formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) agonist (14a) and a potent and specific FPRL1 agonist (14x) were identified. These compounds belong to a large series of pyridazin-3(2H)-one derivatives substituted with a methyl group at position 6 and a methoxy benzyl at position 4. At position 2, an acetamide side chain is essential for activity. Likewise, the presence of lipophilic and/or electronegative substituents in the position para to the aryl group at the end of the chain plays a critical role for activity. Affinity for FPR1 receptors was evaluated by measuring intracellular calcium flux in HL-60 cells transfected with FPR1, FPRL1, and FPRL2. Agonists were able to activate intracellular calcium mobilization and chemotaxis in human neutrophils. The most potent chemotactic agent (EC50 = 0.6 μM) was the mixed FPR/FPRL1 agonist 14h. PMID:19639995

  13. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  14. Novel 3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-2-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)ureido]propanamides as Selective Agonists of Human Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Lacivita, Enza; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Stama, Madia L.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Colabufo, Nicola A.; Perrone, Roberto; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Quinn, Mark T.; Leopoldo, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that play critical roles in inflammatory reactions, and FPR-specific interactions can possibly be used to facilitate the resolution of pathological inflammatory reactions. We here report the synthesis and biological evaluation of six pairs of chiral ureidopropanamido derivatives as potent and selective formyl peptide receptor-2 (FPR2) agonists, that were designed starting from our lead agonist (S )-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-2-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)ureido]-N -[[1-(5-methoxy-2-pyridinyl)cyclohexyl]methyl]propanamide ((S)-9a). The new compounds were obtained in overall yields considerably higher than (S)-9a. Various of the new compounds showed agonist properties comparable to that of (S)-9a along with higher selectivity over FPR1. Molecular modeling was used to define chiral recognition by FPR2. In vitro metabolic stability of selected compounds was also assessed to obtain preliminary insight on drug-like properties of this class of compounds. PMID:25549897

  15. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys–FITC in CHO-Gα16 cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu101) displayed significantly higher pKi values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu101 also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu101 allele of FPR1. PMID:23373827

  16. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-04-15

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-FITC in CHO-G(α16) cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu(101)) displayed significantly higher pK(i) values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu(101) also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu(101) allele of FPR1.

  17. Synthesis, HPLC Enantioresolution, and X-ray Analysis of a New Series of C5-methyl Pyridazines as N-Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Crocetti, Letizia; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Graziano, Alessia; Vergelli, Claudia; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Soldani, Giacomo; Quinn, Mark T.; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Faggi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of three racemates and the corresponding non chiral analogues of a C5-methyl pyridazine series is described here, as well as the isolation of pure enantiomers and their absolute configuration assignment. In order to obtain optically active compounds, direct chromatographic methods of separation by HPLC-UV were investigated using four chiral stationary phases (CSPs: Lux Amylose-2®, Lux Cellulose-1®, Lux Cellulose-2® and Lux Cellulose-3®). The best resolution was achieved using amylose tris(5-chloro-2-methylphenylcarbamate) (Lux Amylose-2®), and single enantiomers were isolated on a semipreparative scale with high enantiomeric excess, suitable for biological assays. The absolute configuration of optically active compounds was unequivocally established by X-ray crystallographic analysis and comparative chiral HPLC-UV profile. All compounds of the series were tested for formyl peptide receptor (FPR) agonist activity, and four were found to be active, with EC50 values in the micromolar range. PMID:23744588

  18. In vivo and in vitro assessment of porcine neutrophil activation responses to chemoattractants: flow cytometric evidence for the selective absence of formyl peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, M P; Stahl, G L; Longhurst, J C

    1990-04-01

    both PMN types (48.6 +/- 5.2% vs. 58.7 +/- 4.9%, P-PMN vs. H-PMN, P less than 0.025). Binding studies using the fluoresceinated N-formyl peptide f-met-leu-phe-lysine-fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FMLPL-FITC) in the absence and presence of excess non-fluoresceinated FMLPL indicated that P-PMN lack specific binding sites for the N-formyl peptides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  19. Bacterial N-formyl Peptides Reduce PMA- and E.coli-induced Neutrophil Respiratory Burst in Term Neonates and Adults.

    PubMed

    Stålhammar, Maria E; Douhan Håkansson, Lena; Sindelar, Richard

    2017-02-15

    Neutrophil migration and respiratory burst is the prerequisite for efficient first line defense against invading microorganisms. However, migration and respiratory burst can be compromised in adults and especially in newborn infants, where sustained neutrophil accumulation, uncontrolled burst and reduced scavenging of ROS might cause inadvertent tissue damage due to uncontrolled inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulatory effect of the chemoattractants formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and IL-8 on respiratory burst in neutrophils from term newborn infants and adults. Whole blood from the umbilical cord of 17 healthy term newborn infants delivered by caesarean section and from 17 healthy adults as reference was preincubated with fMLP or IL-8 and stimulated with PMA or E.coli bacteria. Respiratory burst was quantified by flow cytometry analysis of dihydrorhodamine 123 fluorescence. fMLP reduced the PMA-induced respiratory burst of neutrophils from newborn infants and adults by 12% and 21% respectively (p<0.05). E.coli-induced burst was also reduced by fMLP in neutrophils from newborn infants (10%; p<0.01) and adults (6%; p<0.05). No such changes were observed with IL-8. Similar respiratory burst in response to single stimulus with PMA or E.coli were observed in both newborn infants and adults. fMLP reduced PMA- and E.coli-induced respiratory burst of neutrophils in whole blood from term newborn infants as well as in adults. The reduced respiratory burst by fMLP might be a mechanism to reduce the detrimental effects of uncontrolled inflammation during neutrophil migration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Slow-binding inhibition of peptide deformylase by cyclic peptidomimetics as revealed by a new spectrophotometric assay.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kiet T; Hu, Xubo; Pei, Dehua

    2004-06-01

    A new spectrophotometric/fluorimetric assay for peptide deformylase (PDF) has been developed by coupling the PDF reaction with that of dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) and using N-formyl-Met-Lys-AMC as substrate. Removal of the N-terminal formyl group by PDF renders the dipeptide an efficient substrate of DPPI, which subsequently removes the dipeptidyl units to release 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin as the chromophore/fluorophore. The PDF reaction is conveniently monitored on a UV-Vis spectrophotometer or a fluorimeter in a continuous fashion. The utility of the assay was demonstrated by determining the catalytic activity of PDF and the inhibition constants of PDF inhibitors. These studies revealed the slow-binding behavior of a previously reported macrocyclic PDF inhibitor. This method offers several advantages over the existing PDF assays and should be particularly useful for screening PDF inhibitors in the continuous fashion.

  1. Tailoring elastase inhibition with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Azoia, Nuno G; Carvalho, Ana C; Gomes, Andreia C; Güebitz, Georg; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2011-09-01

    Chronic wounds are the result of excessive amounts of tissue destructive proteases such as human neutrophil elastase (HNE). The high levels of this enzyme found on those types of wounds inactivate the endogenous inhibitor barrier thus, the search for new HNE inhibitors is required. This work presents two new HNE inhibitor peptides, which were synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor protein. The results obtained indicated that these new peptides are competitive inhibitors for HNE and, the inhibitory activity can be modulated by modifications introduced at the N- and C-terminal of the peptides. Furthermore, these peptides were also able to inhibit elastase from a human wound exudate while showing no cytotoxicity against human skin fibroblasts in vitro, greatly supporting their potential application in chronic wound treatment.

  2. [Formylation of porphyrin platinum complexes].

    PubMed

    Rumiantseva, V D; Konovalenko, L I; Nagaeva, E A; Mironov, A F

    2005-01-01

    The formylation reaction of platinum complexes of beta-unsubstituted porphyrins was studied. The interaction of deuteroporphyrin IX derivatives with the Vilsmeyer reagent led to the selective formylation of their macrocycles in the beta position. The resulting formyl derivatives of the porphyrins are of interest for fluorescent immunoassay.

  3. Hydroxyapatite Growth Inhibition Effect of Pellicle Statherin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Karttunen, M; Jalkanen, J; Mussi, M C M; Liao, Y; Grohe, B; Lagugné-Labarthet, F; Siqueira, W L

    2015-08-01

    In our recent studies, we have shown that in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle is a sophisticated biological structure containing a significant portion of naturally occurring salivary peptides. From a functional aspect, the identification of peptides in the acquired enamel pellicle is of interest because many salivary proteins exhibit functional domains that maintain the activities of the native protein. Among the in vivo-acquired enamel pellicle peptides that have been newly identified, 5 peptides are derived from statherin. Here, we assessed the ability of these statherin pellicle peptides to inhibit hydroxyapatite crystal growth. In addition, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to better understand the underlying physical mechanisms of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. A microplate colorimetric assay was used to quantify hydroxyapatite growth. Statherin protein, 5 statherin-derived peptides, and a peptide lacking phosphate at residues 2 and 3 were analyzed. Statherin peptide phosphorylated on residues 2 and 3 indicated a significant inhibitory effect when compared with the 5 other peptides (P < 0.05). MD simulations showed a strong affinity and fast adsorption to hydroxyapatite for phosphopeptides, whereas unphosphorylated peptides interacted weakly with the hydroxyapatite. Our data suggest that the presence of a covalently linked phosphate group (at residues 2 and 3) in statherin peptides modulates the effect of hydroxyapatite growth inhibition. This study provides a mechanism to account for the composition and function of acquired enamel pellicle statherin peptides that will contribute as a base for the development of biologically stable and functional synthetic peptides for therapeutic use against dental caries and/or periodontal disease.

  4. Novel antimicrobial peptides that inhibit gram positive bacterial exotoxin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Joseph A; Nemeth, Kimberly A; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and α-globin and β-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized α-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of α-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges.

  5. Helicobacter pylori HP(2-20) induces eosinophil activation and accumulation in superficial gastric mucosa and stimulates VEGF-alpha and TGF-beta release by interacting with formyl-peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Prevete, N; Rossi, F W; Rivellese, F; Lamacchia, D; Pelosi, C; Lobasso, A; Necchi, V; Solcia, E; Fiocca, R; Ceppa, P; Staibano, S; Mascolo, M; D'Argenio, G; Romano, M; Ricci, V; Marone, G; De Paulis, A

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils participate in the immune response against Helicobacter pylori, but little is known about their role in the gastritis associated to the infection. We recently demonstrated that the Hp(2-20) peptide derived from H. pylori accelerates wound healing of gastric mucosa by interacting with N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) expressed on gastric epithelial cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether eosinophils play a role in the repair of gastric mucosa tissue during H. pylori infection. Immuno-histochemistry and transmission electron microscopy were used to detect eosinophils in gastric mucosal biopsies. Eosinophil re-distribution occurred in the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected patients: their density did not change in the deep mucosal layer, whereas it increased in the superficial lamina propria just below the foveolar epithelium; eosinophils entered the epithelium itself as well as the lumen of foveolae located close to the area harboring bacteria, which in turn were also engulfed by eosinophils. The H. pylori-derived peptide Hp(2-20) stimulated eosinophil migration through the engagement of FPR2 and FPR3, and also induced production of VEGF-A and TGF-beta, two key mediators of tissue remodelling. We also demonstrate that Hp(2-20) in vivo induced eosinophil infiltration in rat gastric mucosa after injury brought about by indomethacin. This study suggests that eosinophil infiltrate could modulate the capacity of gastric mucosa to maintain or recover its integrity thereby shedding light on the role of eosinophils in H. pylori infection.

  6. Aspirin and (or) omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids protect against corticohippocampal neurodegeneration and downregulate lipoxin A4 production and formyl peptide receptor-like 1 expression in pentylenetetrazole-kindled rats.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elghafour, Basma A; El-Sayed, Norhan M; Ahmed, Amal A M; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2016-11-10

    There is evidence for a relationship between inflammation and seizures because epilepsy can be caused by or result in inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the effect of aspirin and (or) omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on seizure activity and neurodegeneration in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled rats focusing on their effect on corticohippocampal production of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and expression of formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1) receptors. Male rats were injected with PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p.) 3 times per week for a total of 15 doses. Rats were treated daily with aspirin (20 mg/kg, i.p.), omega-3 PUFAs (85 mg/kg, p.o.), or a combination of them for 35 days. Both LXA4 level and expression of FPRL1 receptor in the cortices and hippocampi of rats' brains were greater in PTZ-kindled rats compared to a saline control group. Cotreatment with aspirin and (or) omega-3 PUFAs reduced convulsive behaviour; reduced levels of LXA4, interleukin-1β, and nuclear factor-κB; and showed a lower percentage of corticohippocampal degenerative cells compared to PTZ-kindled rats. The combination of the 2 therapeutic agents did not provide significant improvement in comparison with the monotherapies. These findings suggest the use of aspirin or omega-3 PUFAs may delay the development of seizures and provide neuroprotection in a clinical setting.

  7. Synthesis, enantioresolution, and activity profile of chiral 6-methyl-2,4-disubs-tituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones as potent N-formyl peptide receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Crocetti, Letizia; Piaz, Vittorio Dal; Giovannoni, Maria Paola; Graziano, Alessia; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Quinn, Mark T.; Vergelli, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    A series of chiral pyridazin-3(2H)-ones was synthesized, separated as pure enantiomers, and evaluated for N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) agonist activity. Characterization of the purified enantiomers using combined chiral HPLC and chiroptical studies (circular dichroism, allowed unambiguous assignment of the absolute configuration for each pair of enantiomers). Evaluation of the ability of racemic mixtures and purified enantiomers to stimulate intracellular Ca2+ flux in FPR-transfected HL-60 cells and human neutrophils and to induce β-arrestin recruitment in FPR-transfected CHO-K1 cells showed that many enantiomers were potent agonists, inducing responses in the sub-micromolar to nanomolar range. Furthermore, FPRs exhibited enantiomer selectivity, generally preferring the R-(−)-forms over the S-(+)-enantiomers. Finally, we found that elongation of the carbon chain in the chiral center of the active compounds generally increased biological activity. Thus, these studies provide important new information regarding molecular features involved in FPR ligand preference and report the identification of a novel series of FPR agonists. PMID:22607879

  8. N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidene-gamma-butyrolaetam, KNK437 induces caspase-3 activation through inhibition of mTORC1 activity in Cos-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hirofumi; Uyama, Takumi; Hayashi, Junko; Watanabe, Akito; Kobayashi, Ken-ichi; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2010-04-23

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1: mTOR-raptor interaction) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) regulate various cellular processes and are crucial for the progression of many cancers and metabolic diseases. In the recent study, we reported that interaction of Hsp70 with tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1) regulated apoptosis. This study was designed to elucidate the underlying mechanism in Cos-1 cells. Here, we show that N-formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidene-gamma-butyrolaetam (KNK437), which inhibits the expression level of Hsp70, abrogated phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K in response to insulin, and inhibited mTORC1 activity via disruption of an interaction between mTOR and raptor. In addition, KNK437 did not alter TSC1/2 complex formation. Furthermore, KNK437 inhibited the mTOR-raptor interaction on the outer membrane of the mitochondria and triggered caspase-3 activation. A reduction in the level of Hsp70 could result in the inhibition of the mTORC1 signaling pathway, thereby inducing apoptosis.

  9. 3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-2-[3-(4-nitrophenyl)ureido]propanamide enantiomers with human formyl-peptide receptor agonist activity: molecular modeling of chiral recognition by FPR2.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lucente, Ermelinda; Lacivita, Enza; De Giorgio, Paola; Quinn, Mark T

    2013-02-01

    N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that play critical roles in inflammatory reactions, and FPR-specific interactions can possibly be used to facilitate the resolution of pathological inflammatory reactions. Recent studies indicated that FPRs have stereo-selective preference for chiral ligands. Here, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of 24 chiral ureidopropanamides, including previously reported compounds PD168368/PD176252 and their close analogs, and used molecular modeling to define chiral recognition by FPR2. Unlike previously reported 6-methyl-2,4-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones, whose R-forms preferentially activated FPR1/FPR2, we found that four S-enantiomers in the seven ureidopropanamide pairs tested preferentially activated intracellular Ca(2+) flux in FPR2-transfected cells, while the R-counterpart was more active in two enantiomer pairs. Thus, active enantiomers of FPR2 agonists can be in either R- or S-configurations, depending on the molecular scaffold and specific substituents at the chiral center. Using molecular modeling approaches, including field point methodology, homology modeling, and docking studies, we propose a model that can explain stereoselective activity of chiral FPR2 agonists. Importantly, our docking studies of FPR2 chiral agonists correlated well with the FPR2 pharmacophore model derived previously. We conclude that the ability of FPR2 to discriminate between the enantiomers is the consequence of the arrangement of the three asymmetric hydrophobic subpockets at the main orthosteric FPR2 binding site with specific orientation of charged regions in the subpockets.

  10. 3-(1H-Indol-3-yl)-2-[3-(4-nitrophenyl)ureido]propanamide Enantiomers With Human Formyl-Peptide Receptor Agonist Activity: Molecular Modeling of Chiral Recognition by FPR2

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lucente, Ermelinda; Lacivita, Enza; De Giorgio, Paola; Quinn, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    N-formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that play critical roles in inflammatory reactions, and FPR-specific interactions can possibly be used to facilitate the resolution of pathological inflammatory reactions. Recent studies indicated that FPRs have stereo-selective preference for chiral ligands. Here, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of 24 chiral ureidopropanamides, including previously reported compounds PD168368/PD176252 and their close analogs, and used molecular modeling to define chiral recognition by FPR2. Unlike previously reported 6-methyl-2,4-disubstituted pyridazin-3(2H)-ones, whose R-forms preferentially activated FPR1/FPR2, we found that four S-enantiomers in the seven ureidopropanamide pairs tested preferentially activated intracellular Ca2+ flux in FPR2-transfected cells, while the R-counterpart was more active in two enantiomer pairs. Thus, active enantiomers of FPR2 agonists can be in either R- or S- configurations, depending on the molecular scaffold and specific substituents at the chiral center. Using molecular modeling approaches, including field point methodology, homology modeling, and docking studies, we propose a model that can explain stereoselective activity of chiral FPR2 agonists. Importantly, our docking studies of FPR2 chiral agonists correlated well with the FPR2 pharmacophore model derived previously. We conclude that the ability of FPR2 to discriminate between the enantiomers is the consequence of the arrangement of the three asymmetric hydrophobic subpockets at the main orthosteric FPR2 binding site with specific orientation of charged regions in the subpockets. PMID:23219934

  11. Signal transduction by the formyl peptide receptor. Studies using chimeric receptors and site-directed mutagenesis define a novel domain for interaction with G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, T T; Dragas-Graonic, S; Holmes, R; Perez, H D

    1995-11-24

    The binding of small peptide ligands to high affinity chemoattractant receptors on the surface of neutrophils and monocytes leads to activation of heterotrimeric G-proteins, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC), and subsequently to the inflammatory response. It was recently shown (Amatruda, T. T., Gerard, N. P., Gerard, C., and Simon, M. I. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 10139-10144) that the receptor for the chemoattractant peptide C5a specifically interacts with G alpha 16, a G-protein alpha subunit of the Gq class, to trigger ligand-dependent stimulation of PI-PLC in transfected cells. In order to further characterize this chemoattractant peptide signal transduction pathway, we transfected cDNAs encoding the formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine receptor (fMLPR) into COS cells and measured the production of inositol phosphates. Ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC was seen in COS cells transfected with the fMLPR and G alpha 16 and stimulated with fMLP but not in cells transfected with receptor alone or with receptor plus G alpha q. Chimeric receptors in which the N-terminal extracellular domain, the second intracellular domain, or the intracellular C-terminal tail of the fMLP receptor was replaced with C5a receptor domains (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L. R., Adams, R. R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295) were capable of ligand-dependent activation of PI-PLC when co-transfected with G alpha 16. A chimeric receptor exchanging the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR was constitutively activated, stimulating PI-PLC in the absence of ligand. Constitutive activation of PI-PLC, to a level 233% of that seen in cells transfected with wild-type fMLP receptors, was dependent on G alpha 16. Site-directed mutagenesis of the first intracellular domain of the fMLPR (amino acids 54-62) reveals this to be a domain necessary for ligand-dependent activation of G alpha 16. These results suggest that

  12. Peptide-derivatized albumins that inhibit fibrin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joseph W; Doolittle, Russell F

    2011-11-15

    Synthetic peptides patterned on sequences that appear during thrombin proteolysis of fibrinogen are known to influence fibrin formation in very different ways. A-Knob sequences (GPR-) inhibit polymerization, but B-knob sequences (GHR-) can actually enhance the process. We now report that when such peptides are attached to albumin carriers, both knob conjugates inhibit fibrin formation. In contrast, the 2-aminoethylthiol-albumin conjugate control enhances the polymerization to the same degree as albumin. The peptide AHRPam, which is known to bind exclusively to the βC holes of fibrinogen/fibrin, nullifies the inhibitory effects of the GHRPYGGGCam-albumin conjugate on fibrin polymerization, indicating that the inhibition was exclusively due to interactions with βC holes. AHRPam was much less effective in countering inhibition by the GPRPGGGGCam-albumin conjugate, suggesting that the observed effects with this conjugate involve mainly the γC holes of fibrin/fibrinogen. This study demonstrates that peptides modeled on fibrin polymerization knobs tethered to albumin retain their capacity to interact with fibrinogen/fibrin and may prove useful as inhibitors of clotting in vivo.

  13. Tumor-Penetrating iRGD Peptide Inhibits Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Braun, Gary B.; de Mendoza, Tatiana Hurtado; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; French, Randall P.; Lowy, Andrew M.; Teesalu, Tambet; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific tissue-penetrating peptides deliver drugs into extravascular tumor tissue by increasing tumor vascular permeability through interaction with neuropilin (NRP). Here we report that a prototypic tumor-penetrating peptide iRGD (amino acid sequence: CRGDKGPDC) potently inhibits spontaneous metastasis in mice. The anti-metastatic effect was mediated by the NRP-binding RXXK peptide motif (CendR motif), and not by the integrin-binding RGD motif. iRGD inhibited migration of tumor cells and caused chemorepulsion in vitro in a CendR- and NRP-1-dependent manner. The peptide induced dramatic collapse of cellular processes and partial cell detachment, resulting in the repellent activity. These effects were prominently displayed when the cells were seeded on fibronectin, suggesting a role of CendR in functional regulation of integrins. The anti-metastatic activity of iRGD may provide a significant additional benefit when this peptide is used for drug delivery to tumors. PMID:25392370

  14. Regulation of formyl peptide receptor binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes. Use of monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins to discriminate among different states of the receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Feltner, D.E.; Marasco, W.A.

    1989-06-01

    The regulation by monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins of (3H)FMLP binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes was studied by using dissociation techniques to identify regulatory effects on separate receptor states. Under conditions of low receptor occupancy (1 nM (3H)FMLP) and in both Na+ and K+ buffers, dissociation is heterogenous, displaying two distinct, statistically significant off rates. (3H)FMLP binding was enhanced by substituting other monovalent cations for Na+. In particular, enhanced binding in the presence of K+ relative to Na+ was caused by additional binding to both rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors. Three receptor dissociation rates, two of which appear to correspond to the two affinity states detected in equilibrium binding studies, were defined by specific GTP and pertussis toxin (PT) treatments. Neither GTP, nor PT or cholera toxins (CT) had an effect on the rate of dissociation of (3H)FMLP from the rapidly dissociating form of the receptor. Both 100 microM GTP and PT treatments increased the percentage of rapidly dissociating receptors, correspondingly decreasing the percentage of slowly dissociating receptors. The observed changes in the rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors after GTP, PT, and CT treatments were caused by an absolute decrease in the amount of binding to the slowly dissociating receptors. However, complete inhibition of slowly dissociating receptor binding by GTP, PT, or both was never observed. Both GTP and PT treatments, but not CT treatment, increased by two-fold the rate of dissociation of 1 nM (3H)FMLP from the slowly dissociating form of the receptor, resulting in a third dissociation rate. Thus, slowly dissociating receptors comprise two different receptor states, a G protein-associated guanine nucleotide and PT-sensitive state and a guanine nucleotide-insensitive state.

  15. Bioactive peptides: are there more antihypertensive mechanisms beyond ACE inhibition?

    PubMed

    Marques, Claudia; Amorim, Maria Manuela; Pereira, Joana Odila; Pintado, Manuela Estevez; Moura, Daniel; Calhau, Conceicao; Pinheiro, Helder

    2012-01-01

    Diet has a high relevance in health. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and has an important impact on public health, and consequently on countries economy. Scientific research gathered strong evidence about the role of several dietary factors either in etiology or in treatment/prevention of these diseases. Peptides from different food matrices have been studied, and indicated as compounds with particular interest in the context of hypertension. The classical approach involves the identification of peptides with an in vitro ACE inhibitory activity and the assumption that the observed in vivo effects are due to this enzyme blockade. However, in some cases the potency of ACE blockade does not correlate with the antihypertensive activity in vivo. This paper reviews the current literature that identifies mechanisms of action, other than ACE inhibition, that might explain antihypertensive effects of biologically active peptides from different food sources.

  16. Prostaglandin E1 inhibits N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-mediated depolarization responses by decreasing the proportion of responsive cells without affecting chemotaxin-induced forward light scatter changes.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, M P

    1987-12-15

    Hypaque-Ficoll-purified human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) equilibrated with the membrane potential-sensitive probe 3,3'dipentyloxacarbocyanine [di-O-C(5)(3)] were incubated with buffer or cytochalasin B (cyto B) followed by incubation with prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) (0 to 10(-5) M) for 5 min at 37 degrees C. The cells were then stimulated with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) (0 to 10(-5) M). Changes in forward light scatter (FWD-SC), 90 degrees scatter (90 degrees -SC), and fluorescence intensity were measured by flow cytometry to determine the effects of PGE1 on FMLP-induced shape change, secretion, and membrane potential responses, respectively. In other experiments, the effects of PGE1 preincubation on FMLP +/- cyto B and phorbol myristate acetate-induced (O2) production were measured by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cyto c reduction. PGE1 had no direct effects on the FWD-SC, 90 degrees-SC, or resting potential fluorescence of unstimulated or cyto B-pretreated PMN. PGE1 produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the proportion of depolarizing PMN in response to FMLP, which was maximal at 10(-6) M (42.1 +/- 6.9% inhibition, p less than 0.005), but was apparent at 10(-8) M. The PGE1-induced inhibition was maximal after 30 sec of incubation at 37 degrees C and was caused by a decrease in the maximal percentage of depolarizing PMN without a significant change in the FMLP dose-response curve (Km = 2.43 vs 3.62 X 10(-8) M, control vs PGE1-treated) or an inhibition in the degree of depolarization by the responding subpopulation. PGE1 also inhibited the loss of 90 degrees-SC induced by FMLP in cyto B-pretreated cells (secretion response) (46.2 +/- 16.5% inhibition of the maximal 90 degrees-SC loss, n = 5, p less than 0.005), but did not affect the increase in FWD-SC seen with FMLP-induced PMN activation or the ability of cyto B to recruit more PMN to depolarize. PGE1 also inhibited FMLP +/- cyto B-induced O2 production in a dose-dependent fashion

  17. Isolation of peptide aptamers that inhibit intracellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jonathan H.; Dove, Simon L.; Hochschild, Ann; Mekalanos, John J.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a method for isolation of random peptides that inhibit intracellular processes in bacteria. A library of random peptides expressed as fusions to Escherichia coli thioredoxin (aptamers) were expressed under the tight control of the arabinose-inducible PBAD promoter. A selection was applied to the library to isolate aptamers that interfered with the activity of thymidylate synthase (ThyA) in vivo. Expression of an aptamer isolated by this method resulted in a ThyA− phenotype that was suppressed by simultaneous overexpression of ThyA. Two-hybrid analysis showed that this aptamer is likely to interact with ThyA in vivo. The library also was screened for aptamers that inhibited growth of bacteria expressing them, and five such aptamers were characterized. Four aptamers were bacteriostatic when expressed, whereas one showed a bactericidal effect. Introduction of translational stop codons into various aptamers blocked their activity, suggesting that their biological effects were likely to be due to protein aptamer rather than RNA. Combinatorial aptamers provide a new genetic and biochemical tool for identifying targets for antibacterial drug development. PMID:10688899

  18. Peptide redesign for inhibition of the complement system: Targeting age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rohith R.; Cabrera, Andrea P.; Harrison, Reed E. S.; Gorham, Ronald D.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To redesign a complement-inhibiting peptide with the potential to become a therapeutic for dry and wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods We present a new potent peptide (Peptide 2) of the compstatin family. The peptide is developed by rational design, based on a mechanistic binding hypothesis, and structural and physicochemical properties derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The inhibitory activity, efficacy, and solubility of Peptide 2 are evaluated using a hemolytic assay, a human RPE cell–based assay, and ultraviolet (UV) absorption properties, respectively, and compared to the respective properties of its parent peptide (Peptide 1). Results The sequence of Peptide 2 contains an arginine-serine N-terminal extension (a characteristic of parent Peptide 1) and a novel 8-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block C-terminal extension. Peptide 2 has significantly improved aqueous solubility compared to Peptide 1 and comparable complement inhibitory activity. In addition, Peptide 2 is more efficacious in inhibiting complement activation in a cell-based model that mimics the pathobiology of dry AMD. Conclusions We have designed a new peptide analog of compstatin that combines N-terminal polar amino acid extensions and C-terminal PEGylation extensions. This peptide demonstrates significantly improved aqueous solubility and complement inhibitory efficacy, compared to the parent peptide. The new peptide overcomes the aggregation limitation for clinical translation of previous compstatin analogs and is a candidate to become a therapeutic for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27829783

  19. Somatostatin peptides inhibit basolateral potassium channels in human colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Sandle, G I; Warhurst, G; Butterfield, I; Higgs, N B; Lomax, R B

    1999-11-01

    Somatostatin is a powerful inhibitor of intestinal Cl(-) secretion. We used patch-clamp recording techniques to investigate the effects of somatostatin on low-conductance (23-pS) K(+) channels in the basolateral membrane of human colonic crypts, which are an important component of the Cl(-) secretory process. Somatostatin (2 microM) elicited a >80% decrease in "spontaneous" K(+) channel activity in cell-attached patches in nonstimulated crypts (50% inhibition = approximately 8 min), which was voltage-independent and was prevented by pretreating crypts for 18 h with pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml), implicating a G protein-dependent mechanism. In crypts stimulated with 100-200 microM dibutyryl cAMP, 2 microM somatostatin and its synthetic analog octreotide (2 microM) both produced similar degrees of K(+) channel inhibition to that seen in nonstimulated crypts, which was also present under low-Cl(-) (5 mM) conditions. In addition, 2 microM somatostatin abolished the increase in K(+) channel activity stimulated by 2 microM thapsigargin but had no effect on the thapsigargin-stimulated rise in intracellular Ca(2+). These results indicate that somatostatin peptides inhibit 23-pS basolateral K(+) channels in human colonic crypt cells via a G protein-dependent mechanism, which may result in loss of the channel's inherent Ca(2+) sensitivity.

  20. Structural basis of Rap phosphatase inhibition by Phr peptides.

    PubMed

    Gallego del Sol, Francisca; Marina, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Two-component systems, composed of a sensor histidine kinase and an effector response regulator (RR), are the main signal transduction devices in bacteria. In Bacillus, the Rap protein family modulates complex signaling processes mediated by two-component systems, such as competence, sporulation, or biofilm formation, by inhibiting the RR components involved in these pathways. Despite the high degree of sequence homology, Rap proteins exert their activity by two completely different mechanisms of action: inducing RR dephosphorylation or blocking RR binding to its target promoter. However the regulatory mechanism involving Rap proteins is even more complex since Rap activity is antagonized by specific signaling peptides (Phr) through a mechanism that remains unknown at the molecular level. Using X-ray analyses, we determined the structure of RapF, the anti-activator of competence RR ComA, alone and in complex with its regulatory peptide PhrF. The structural and functional data presented herein reveal that peptide PhrF blocks the RapF-ComA interaction through an allosteric mechanism. PhrF accommodates in the C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat domain of RapF by inducing its constriction, a conformational change propagated by a pronounced rotation to the N-terminal ComA-binding domain. This movement partially disrupts the ComA binding site by triggering the ComA disassociation, whose interaction with RapF is also sterically impaired in the PhrF-induced conformation of RapF. Sequence analyses of the Rap proteins, guided by the RapF-PhrF structure, unveil the molecular basis of Phr recognition and discrimination, allowing us to relax the Phr specificity of RapF by a single residue change.

  1. Inhibition Effect of a Custom Peptide on Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yu; Huang, Hsuan-Yu; Forrest, Michael D.; Pan, Yun-Ru; Wu, Wei-Jen; Chen, Hueih-Min

    2014-01-01

    Cecropin B is a natural antimicrobial peptide and CB1a is a custom, engineered modification of it. In vitro, CB1a can kill lung cancer cells at concentrations that do not kill normal lung cells. Furthermore, in vitro, CB1a can disrupt cancer cells from adhering together to form tumor-like spheroids. Mice were xenografted with human lung cancer cells; CB1a could significantly inhibit the growth of tumors in this in vivo model. Docetaxel is a drug in present clinical use against lung cancers; it can have serious side effects because its toxicity is not sufficiently limited to cancer cells. In our studies in mice: CB1a is more toxic to cancer cells than docetaxel, but dramatically less toxic to healthy cells. PMID:25310698

  2. Formyl peptides and ATP stimulate Ca2+ and Na+ inward currents through non-selective cation channels via G-proteins in dibutyryl cyclic AMP-differentiated HL-60 cells. Involvement of Ca2+ and Na+ in the activation of beta-glucuronidase release and superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Krautwurst, D; Seifert, R; Hescheler, J; Schultz, G

    1992-12-15

    In human neutrophils, the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP) induces increases in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) with subsequent activation of beta-glucuronidase release and superoxide (O2-) production. Results from several laboratories suggest that the increase in [Ca2+]i is due to activation of non-selective cation (NSC) channels. We studied the biophysical characteristics, pharmacological modulation and functional role of NSC channels in dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP)-differentiated HL-60 cells. fMLP increased [Ca2+]i by release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular space. fMLP also induced Mn2+ influx. Ca2+ and Mn2+ influxes were inhibited by 1-(beta-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl)-1H-imidazole hydrochloride (SK&F 96365). Under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions, fMLP and ATP (a purinoceptor agonist) activated inward currents characterized by a linear current-voltage relationship and a reversal potential near 0 mV. NSC channels were substantially more permeable to Na+ than to Ca2+. SK&F 96365 inhibited fMLP- and ATP-stimulated currents with a half-maximal effect at about 3 microM. Pertussis toxin prevented stimulation by fMLP of NSC currents and reduced ATP-stimulated currents by about 80%. Intracellular application of the stable GDP analogue, guanosine 5'-O-[2-thio]diphosphate, completely blocked stimulation by agonists of NSC currents. In excised inside-out patches, single channel openings with an amplitude of 0.24 pA were observed in the presence of fMLP and the GTP analogue, guanosine 5'-O-[3-thio]triphosphate. The bath solution contained neither Ca2+ nor ATP. The current/voltage relationship was linear with a conductance of 4-5 pS and reversed at about 0 mV. fMLP-induced beta-glucuronidase release and O2- production were substantially reduced by replacement of extracellular CaCl2 or NaCl by ethylenebis(oxyethylenenitrilo)tetra-acetic acid and

  3. Novel Antifungal Peptides Produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 Effectively Inhibit Growth of Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Muhialdin, Belal J; Hassan, Zaiton; Abu Bakar, Fatimah; Algboory, Hussein L; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-05-01

    The ability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides DU15 to produce antifungal peptides that inhibit growth of Aspergillus niger was evaluated under optimum growth conditions of 30 °C for 48 h. The cell-free supernatant showed inhibitory activity against A. niger. Five novel peptides were isolated with the sequences GPFPL, YVPLF, LLHGVPLP, GPFPLEMTLGPT, and TVYPFPGPL as identified by de novo sequencing using PEAKS 6 software. Peptide LLHGVPLP was the only positively charged (cationic peptides) and peptide GPFPLEMTLGPT negatively charged (anionic), whereas the rest are neutral. The identified peptides had high hydrophobicity ratio and low molecular weights with amino acids sequences ranging from 5 to 12 residues. The mode of action of these peptides is observed under the scanning electron microscope and is due to cell lysis of fungi. This work reveals the potential of peptides from L. mesenteroides DU15 as natural antifungal preservatives in inhibiting the growth of A. niger that is implicated to the spoilage during storage.

  4. Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    increases production of MCP-1 in vitro. INTRODUCTION: Host defense peptides represent a promising new approach to inhibit infection. The anti...vitro effects of the host defense peptides. We have found that the host defense peptide IDR-1018 stimulates production of MCP-1 (Fig. 1). IDR-1018...also inhibits the ability of LPS to stimulate production of TNFα and MCP-1 (Fig. 2). Thus, the effects of IDR-1018 are similar to what has been

  5. Grafting MAP peptide to dental polymer inhibits MMP-8 activity.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Namrata; Settle, Jenifer K; Ye, Qiang; Berrie, Cindy L; Spencer, Paulette; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2015-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc and calcium-dependent endopeptidases responsible for degrading extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Their activity is critical for both normal biological function and pathological processes (Dejonckheere et al., Cytokine Growth Factor Rev 2011;22:73-81). In dental restorations, the release and subsequent acid activation of MMPs contributes to premature failure. In particular, MMP-8 accelerates degradation by cleaving the collagen matrix within the dentin substrate in incompletely infiltrated aged bonded dentin (Buzalaf et al., Adv Dent Res 2012;24:72-76), hastening the need for replacement of restorations. Therefore, development of a dental adhesive that better resists MMP-8 activity is of significant interest. We hypothesize that modification of the polymer surface with an inhibitor would disable MMP-8 activity. Here, we identify the metal abstraction peptide (MAP) as an inhibitor of MMP-8 and demonstrate that tethering MAP to methacrylate polymers effectively inhibits catalysis. Our findings indicate complete inhibition of MMP-8 is achievable using a grafting approach. This strategy has potential to improve longevity of dental adhesives and other polymers and enable rational design of a new generation of biocompatible materials.

  6. Inhibition of the ferric uptake regulator by peptides derived from anti-FUR peptide aptamers: coupled theoretical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Cissé, Cheickna; Mathieu, Sophie V; Abeih, Mohamed B Ould; Flanagan, Lindsey; Vitale, Sylvia; Catty, Patrice; Boturyn, Didier; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Crouzy, Serge

    2014-12-19

    The FUR protein (ferric uptake regulator) is an iron-dependent global transcriptional regulator. Specific to bacteria, FUR is an attractive antibacterial target since virulence is correlated to iron bioavailability. Recently, four anti-FUR peptide aptamers, composed of 13 amino acid variable loops inserted into a thioredoxinA scaffold, were identified, which were able to interact with Escherichia coli FUR (EcFUR), inhibit its binding to DNA and to decrease the virulence of pathogenic E. coli in a fly infection model. The first characterization of anti-FUR linear peptides (pF1 6 to 13 amino acids) derived from the variable part of the F1 anti-FUR peptide aptamer is described herein. Theoretical and experimental approaches, in original combination, were used to study interactions of these peptides with FUR in order to understand their mechanism of inhibition. After modeling EcFUR by homology, docking with Autodock was combined with molecular dynamics simulations in implicit solvent to take into account the flexibility of the partners. All calculations were cross-checked either with other programs or with experimental data. As a result, reliable structures of EcFUR and its complex with pF1 are given and an inhibition pocket formed by the groove between the two FUR subunits is proposed. The location of the pocket was validated through experimental mutation of key EcFUR residues at the site of proposed peptide interaction. Cyclisation of pF1, mimicking the peptide constraint in F1, improved inhibition. The details of the interactions between peptide and protein were analyzed and a mechanism of inhibition of these anti-FUR molecules is proposed.

  7. Endosomolytic Nano-Polyplex Platform Technology for Cytosolic Peptide Delivery To Inhibit Pathological Vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian C; Hocking, Kyle M; Kilchrist, Kameron V; Wise, Eric S; Brophy, Colleen M; Duvall, Craig L

    2015-06-23

    A platform technology has been developed and tested for delivery of intracellular-acting peptides through electrostatically complexed nanoparticles, or nano-polyplexes, formulated from an anionic endosomolytic polymer and cationic therapeutic peptides. This delivery platform has been initially tested and optimized for delivery of two unique vasoactive peptides, a phosphomimetic of heat shock protein 20 and an inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II, to prevent pathological vasoconstriction (i.e., vasospasm) in human vascular tissue. These peptides inhibit vasoconstriction and promote vasorelaxation by modulating actin dynamics in vascular smooth muscle cells. Formulating these peptides into nano-polyplexes significantly enhances peptide uptake and retention, facilitates cytosolic delivery through a pH-dependent endosomal escape mechanism, and enhances peptide bioactivity in vitro as measured by inhibition of F-actin stress fiber formation. In comparison to treatment with the free peptides, which were endowed with cell-penetrating sequences, the nano-polyplexes significantly increased vasorelaxation, inhibited vasoconstriction, and decreased F-actin formation in the human saphenous vein ex vivo. These results suggest that these formulations have significant potential for treatment of conditions such as cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, because many therapeutic peptides include cationic cell-penetrating segments, this simple and modular platform technology may have broad applicability as a cost-effective approach for enhancing the efficacy of cytosolically active peptides.

  8. Inhibition of multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes by peptides isolated from combinatorial phage display libraries.

    PubMed

    Flachbartova, Z; Pulzova, L; Bencurova, E; Potocnakova, L; Comor, L; Bednarikova, Z; Bhide, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to isolate and characterize novel antimicrobial peptides from peptide phage library with antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant Listeria monocytogenes. Combinatorial phage-display library was used to affinity select peptides binding to the cell surface of multidrug resistant L. monocytogenes. After several rounds of affinity selection followed by sequencing, three peptides were revealed as the most promising candidates. Peptide L2 exhibited features common to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), and was rich in Asp, His and Lys residues. Peptide L3 (NSWIQAPDTKSI), like peptide L2, inhibited bacterial growth in vitro, without any hemolytic or cytotoxic effects on eukaryotic cells. L1 peptide showed no inhibitory effect on Listeria. Structurally, peptides L2 and L3 formed random coils composed of α-helix and β-sheet units. Peptides L2 and L3 exhibited antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes with no haemolytic or toxic effects. Both peptides identified in this study have the potential to be beneficial in human and veterinary medicine.

  9. Hydroxyapatite-binding peptides for bone growth and inhibition

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Song, Jie; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2011-09-20

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-binding peptides are selected using combinatorial phage library display. Pseudo-repetitive consensus amino acid sequences possessing periodic hydroxyl side chains in every two or three amino acid sequences are obtained. These sequences resemble the (Gly-Pro-Hyp).sub.x repeat of human type I collagen, a major component of extracellular matrices of natural bone. A consistent presence of basic amino acid residues is also observed. The peptides are synthesized by the solid-phase synthetic method and then used for template-driven HA-mineralization. Microscopy reveal that the peptides template the growth of polycrystalline HA crystals .about.40 nm in size.

  10. Mechanism-based inhibition of Sir2 deacetylases by thioacetyl-lysine peptide.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian C; Denu, John M

    2007-12-18

    Sir2 protein deacetylases (or sirtuins) catalyze NAD+-dependent conversion of epsilon-amino-acetylated lysine residues to deacetylated lysine, nicotinamide, and 2'-O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. Small-molecule modulation of sirtuin activity might treat age-associated diseases, such as type II diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we have evaluated the mechanisms of sirtuin inhibition of histone peptides containing thioacetyl or mono-, di-, and trifluoroacetyl groups at the epsilon-amino of lysine. Although all substituted peptides yielded inhibition of the deacetylation reaction, the thioacetyl-lysine peptide exhibited exceptionally potent inhibition of sirtuins Sirt1, Sirt2, Sirt3, and Hst2. Using Hst2 as a representative sirtuin, the trifluoroacetyl-lysine peptide displayed competitive inhibition with acetyl-lysine substrate and yielded an inhibition constant (Kis) of 4.8 microM, similar to its Kd value of 3.3 microM. In contrast, inhibition by thioacetyl-lysine peptide yielded an inhibition constant (Kis) of 0.017 microM, 280-fold lower than its Kd value of 4.7 microM. Examination of thioacetyl-lysine peptide as an alternative sirtuin substrate revealed conserved production of deacetylated peptide and 1'-SH-2'-O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. Pre-steady-state and steady-state analysis of the thioacetyl-lysine peptide showed rapid nicotinamide formation (4.5 s-1) but slow overall turnover (0.0024 s-1), indicating that the reaction stalled at an intermediate after nicotinamide formation. Mass spectral analysis yielded a novel species (m/z 1754.3) that is consistent with an ADP-ribose-peptidyl adduct (1'-S-alkylamidate) as the stalled intermediate. Additional experiments involving solvent isotope effects, general base mutational analysis, and density functional calculations are consistent with impaired 2'-hydroxyl attack on the ADP-ribose-peptidyl intermediate. These results have implications for the development of mechanism-based inhibitors of Sir2 deacetylases.

  11. Protein-protein interface-binding peptides inhibit the cancer therapy target human thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Daniela; Guaitoli, Giambattista; Tondi, Donatella; Luciani, Rosaria; Henrich, Stefan; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Ferrari, Stefania; Marverti, Gaetano; Guerrieri, Davide; Ligabue, Alessio; Frassineti, Chiara; Pozzi, Cecilia; Mangani, Stefano; Fessas, Dimitrios; Guerrini, Remo; Ponterini, Glauco; Wade, Rebecca C; Costi, M Paola

    2011-08-23

    Human thymidylate synthase is a homodimeric enzyme that plays a key role in DNA synthesis and is a target for several clinically important anticancer drugs that bind to its active site. We have designed peptides to specifically target its dimer interface. Here we show through X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic, kinetic, and calorimetric evidence that the peptides do indeed bind at the interface of the dimeric protein and stabilize its di-inactive form. The "LR" peptide binds at a previously unknown binding site and shows a previously undescribed mechanism for the allosteric inhibition of a homodimeric enzyme. It inhibits the intracellular enzyme in ovarian cancer cells and reduces cellular growth at low micromolar concentrations in both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant cells without causing protein overexpression. This peptide demonstrates the potential of allosteric inhibition of hTS for overcoming platinum drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  12. A p7 Ion Channel-derived Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Lang, Yange; Li, Tian; Zeng, Zhengyang; Song, Yu; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection is an early stage of its life cycle and represents a promising target for antiviral drug development. Here we designed and characterized three peptide inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on the structural features of the membrane-associated p7 polypeptide of HCV. The three peptides exhibited low toxicity and high stability while potently inhibiting initial HCV infection and suppressed established HCV infection at non-cytotoxic concentrations in vitro. The most efficient peptide (designated H2-3), which is derived from the H2 helical region of HCV p7 ion channel, inhibited HCV infection by inactivating both intracellular and extracellular viral particles. The H2-3 peptide inactivated free HCV with an EC50 (50% effective concentration) of 82.11 nm, which is >1000-fold lower than the CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) of Huh7.5.1 cells. H2-3 peptide also bound to cell membrane and protected host cells from viral infection. The peptide H2-3 did not alter the normal electrophysiological profile of the p7 ion channel or block viral release from Huh7.5.1 cells. Our work highlights a new anti-viral peptide design strategy based on ion channel, giving the possibility that ion channels are potential resources to generate antiviral peptides. PMID:26251517

  13. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Mendonça, Simone; de Castro, Luíla Ívini Andrade; Menezes, Amanda Caroline Cardoso Corrêa Carlos; Arêas, José Alfredo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect. PMID:25690031

  14. A Short Double-Stapled Peptide Inhibits Respiratory Syncytial Virus Entry and Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Vanessa; Galloux, Marie; Eléouët, Jean-François; Larcher, Thibaut; Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Boukadiri, Abdelhak; Héritier, Julien; Segura, Jean-Manuel; Baechler, Elodie; Arrell, Miriam; Mottet-Osman, Geneviève

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synthetic peptides derived from the heptad repeat (HR) of fusion (F) proteins can be used as dominant negative inhibitors to inhibit the fusion mechanism of class I viral F proteins. Here, we have performed a stapled-peptide scan across the HR2 domain of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F protein with the aim to identify a minimal domain capable of disrupting the formation of the postfusion six-helix bundle required for viral cell entry. Constraining the peptides with a single staple was not sufficient to inhibit RSV infection. However, the insertion of double staples led to the identification of novel short stapled peptides that display nanomolar potency in HEp-2 cells and are exceptionally robust to proteolytic degradation. By replacing each amino acid of the peptides by an alanine, we found that the substitution of residues 506 to 509, located in a patch of polar contacts between HR2 and HR1, severely affected inhibition. Finally, we show that intranasal delivery of the most potent peptide to BALB/c mice significantly decreased RSV infection in upper and lower respiratory tracts. The discovery of this minimal HR2 sequence as a means for inhibition of RSV infection provides the basis for further medicinal chemistry efforts toward developing RSV fusion antivirals. PMID:28137809

  15. Selected antimicrobial peptides inhibit in vitro growth of Campylobacter spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics are urgently needed for food-animal production. A goal of our laboratory is to develop and evaluate antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to control and reduce foodborne pathogens in poultry. AMP have been found in most every class of living organism where they h...

  16. Derivatives of the Mouse Cathelicidin-Related Antimicrobial Peptide (CRAMP) Inhibit Fungal and Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Delattin, Nicolas; Robijns, Stijn; Steenackers, Hans; Verstraeten, Natalie; Landuyt, Bart; Luyten, Walter; Schoofs, Liliane; Dovgan, Barbara; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Michiels, Jan; Vanderleyden, Jos; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    We identified a 26-amino-acid truncated form of the 34-amino-acid cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) in the islets of Langerhans of the murine pancreas. This peptide, P318, shares 67% identity with the LL-37 human antimicrobial peptide. As LL-37 displays antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity, we tested antifungal and antibiofilm activity of P318 against the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. P318 shows biofilm-specific activity as it inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.15 μM without affecting planktonic survival at that concentration. Next, we tested the C. albicans biofilm-inhibitory activity of a series of truncated and alanine-substituted derivatives of P318. Based on the biofilm-inhibitory activity of these derivatives and the length of the peptides, we decided to synthesize the shortened alanine-substituted peptide at position 10 (AS10; KLKKIAQKIKNFFQKLVP). AS10 inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 0.22 μM and acted synergistically with amphotericin B and caspofungin against mature biofilms. AS10 also inhibited biofilm formation of different bacteria as well as of fungi and bacteria in a mixed biofilm. In addition, AS10 does not affect the viability or functionality of different cell types involved in osseointegration of an implant, pointing to the potential of AS10 for further development as a lead peptide to coat implants. PMID:24982087

  17. Inhibition of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli cell adhesion in-vitro by designed peptides.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepika; Sarkar, Subendu; Sharma, Monica; Thapa, B R; Chakraborti, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) bears remarkable capacity to adhere the host intestinal mucosal surface and results in acute or persistent childhood diarrhea worldwide. In this study, an attempt has been made to inhibit EAEC cell adherence in-vitro using synthetic peptides. E. coli isolates (n = 54) were isolated from the stool samples of clinically diagnosed pediatric diarrheal patients. 92.8% isolates showed different types of aggregative adherence patterns with HEp-2 cells. AAF-II (Aggregative Adherence Fimbriae-II) EAEC exhibited the maximum ability to form biofilm and intracellular survival. Peptides were designed against the high antigenic epitopic regions of AAF-II adhesin of EAEC O42 using prediction algorithms like BcePred and ProPred software to block the EAEC cell adhesion in-vitro. Peptides P2 (DITITPATNRDVNV) and P3 (MRIKAWGEANHGQL) demonstrated higher inhibition of EAEC cell adhesion than P1 (GMQGSITPAIPLRPG). Interestingly, increasing the pre-incubation time of the peptides with HEp-2 cells from 1 h to 2 h showed the maximum inhibition. The data suggested the potential role of P2 and P3 peptides in successfully blocking the binding of AAF-II EAEC with HEp-2 cell receptors. Hence, the peptides may be efficacious in designing new chemotherapeutic for the management of EAEC mediated diarrhea.

  18. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Inhibits Human Small-Cell Lung Cancer Proliferation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruno, Kaname; Absood, Afaf; Said, Sami I.

    1998-11-01

    Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is an aggressive, rapidly growing and metastasizing, and highly fatal neoplasm. We report that vasoactive intestinal peptide inhibits the proliferation of SCLC cells in culture and dramatically suppresses the growth of SCLC tumor-cell implants in athymic nude mice. In both cases, the inhibition was mediated apparently by a cAMP-dependent mechanism, because the inhibition was enhanced by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine in proportion to increases in intracellular cAMP levels, and the inhibition was abolished by selective inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. If confirmed in clinical trials, this antiproliferative action of vasoactive intestinal peptide may offer a new and promising means of suppressing SCLC in human subjects, without the toxic side effects of chemotherapeutic agents.

  19. Inhibition of peptide aggregation by means of enzymatic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Folmert, Kristin; Broncel, Malgorzata; v. Berlepsch, Hans; Ullrich, Christopher Hans; Siegert, Mary-Ann

    2016-01-01

    As is the case in numerous natural processes, enzymatic phosphorylation can be used in the laboratory to influence the conformational populations of proteins. In nature, this information is used for signal transduction or energy transfer, but has also been shown to play an important role in many diseases like tauopathies or diabetes. With the goal of determining the effect of phosphorylation on amyloid fibril formation, we designed a model peptide which combines structural characteristics of α-helical coiled-coils and β-sheets in one sequence. This peptide undergoes a conformational transition from soluble structures into insoluble amyloid fibrils over time and under physiological conditions and contains a recognition motif for PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) that enables enzymatic phosphorylation. We have analyzed the pathway of amyloid formation and the influence of enzymatic phosphorylation on the different states along the conformational transition from random-coil to β-sheet-rich oligomers to protofilaments and on to insoluble amyloid fibrils, and we found a remarkable directing effect from β-sheet-rich structures to unfolded structures in the initial growth phase, in which small oligomers and protofilaments prevail if the peptide is phosphorylated. PMID:28144314

  20. The Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamer A17 potentiates radiosensitization of tumor cells by Hsp90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Daniela; Garrido, Carmen; Combs, Stephanie E; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    The inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a promising strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. However, Hsp90 inhibition induces the expression of Hsp70 which is a prominent cytoprotective protein. Therefore, dual targeting of Hsp70 and Hsp90 might be beneficial to increase the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamers have been shown to increase the sensitivity of tumor cells to apoptosis induced by different anticancer drugs. Herein, we studied the radiosensitizing activity of the Hsp70 inhibiting peptide aptamer A17 in combination with the Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922. Whereas A17 significantly increased apoptosis induction by NVP-AUY922 it did not significantly affect the radiosensitivity of human lung and breast cancer cells. However, Hsp70 inhibition by the aptamer A17 potentiated the radiosensitizing effects of the Hsp90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922. Mechanistically we speculate that an increased number of DNA double strand breaks and an enhanced G2/M arrest might be responsible for the increased radiosensitization in A17 expressing tumor cells. Therefore, the simultaneous inhibition of Hsp90 and Hsp70 combined with radiotherapy might provide a promising anti-cancer strategy.

  1. Molecular mechanism of viomycin inhibition of peptide elongation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Holm, Mikael; Borg, Anneli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna

    2016-01-26

    Viomycin is a tuberactinomycin antibiotic essential for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. It inhibits bacterial protein synthesis by blocking elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzed translocation of messenger RNA on the ribosome. Here we have clarified the molecular aspects of viomycin inhibition of the elongating ribosome using pre-steady-state kinetics. We found that the probability of ribosome inhibition by viomycin depends on competition between viomycin and EF-G for binding to the pretranslocation ribosome, and that stable viomycin binding requires an A-site bound tRNA. Once bound, viomycin stalls the ribosome in a pretranslocation state for a minimum of ∼ 45 s. This stalling time increases linearly with viomycin concentration. Viomycin inhibition also promotes futile cycles of GTP hydrolysis by EF-G. Finally, we have constructed a kinetic model for viomycin inhibition of EF-G catalyzed translocation, allowing for testable predictions of tuberactinomycin action in vivo and facilitating in-depth understanding of resistance development against this important class of antibiotics.

  2. Molecular mechanism of viomycin inhibition of peptide elongation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Mikael; Borg, Anneli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Sanyal, Suparna

    2016-01-01

    Viomycin is a tuberactinomycin antibiotic essential for treating multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. It inhibits bacterial protein synthesis by blocking elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzed translocation of messenger RNA on the ribosome. Here we have clarified the molecular aspects of viomycin inhibition of the elongating ribosome using pre-steady-state kinetics. We found that the probability of ribosome inhibition by viomycin depends on competition between viomycin and EF-G for binding to the pretranslocation ribosome, and that stable viomycin binding requires an A-site bound tRNA. Once bound, viomycin stalls the ribosome in a pretranslocation state for a minimum of ∼45 s. This stalling time increases linearly with viomycin concentration. Viomycin inhibition also promotes futile cycles of GTP hydrolysis by EF-G. Finally, we have constructed a kinetic model for viomycin inhibition of EF-G catalyzed translocation, allowing for testable predictions of tuberactinomycin action in vivo and facilitating in-depth understanding of resistance development against this important class of antibiotics. PMID:26755601

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  4. Inhibition of Growth and Gene Expression by PNA-peptide Conjugates in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Krawack, Franziska; Walda, Claudia; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Jacob, Anette; Hain, Torsten; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    While Streptococcus pyogenes is consistently susceptible toward penicillin, therapeutic failure of penicillin treatment has been reported repeatedly and a considerable number of patients exhibit allergic reactions to this substance. At the same time, streptococcal resistance to alternative antibiotics, e.g., macrolides, has increased. Taken together, these facts demand the development of novel therapeutic strategies. In this study, S. pyogenes growth was inhibited by application of peptide-conjugated antisense-peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) specific for the essential gyrase A gene (gyrA). Thereby, HIV-1 Tat peptide-coupled PNAs were more efficient inhibitors of streptococcal growth as compared with (KFF)3K-coupled PNAs. Peptide-anti-gyrA PNAs decreased the abundance of gyrA transcripts in S. pyogenes. Growth inhibition by antisense interference was enhanced by combination of peptide-coupled PNAs with protein-level inhibitors. Antimicrobial synergy could be detected with levofloxacin and novobiocin, targeting the gyrase enzyme, and with spectinomycin, impeding ribosomal function. The prospective application of carrier peptide-coupled antisense PNAs in S. pyogenes covers the use as an antimicrobial agent and the employment as a knock-down strategy for the investigation of virulence factor function. PMID:24193033

  5. Melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides inhibit TNF-alpha signaling in human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Hill, R P; MacNeil, S; Haycock, J W

    2006-02-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) has been identified as a potent anti-inflammatory in various tissues including the skin. It has previously been shown in skin cell keratinocytes and melanocytes/melanoma cells that MSH peptides inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) upregulation. However, the precise anti-inflammatory role of MSH peptides in dermal fibroblasts is unclear. Some studies report on pro-inflammatory responses, while others on anti-inflammatory responses. The present study confirms MC1R expression in cultured human dermal fibroblasts and reports that the MSH peptides alpha-MSH and KP(-D-)V inhibit TNF-alpha stimulated NF-kappaB activity and ICAM-1 upregulation, consistent with an anti-inflammatory role. However, involvement of IkappaB-alpha regulation by either peptide was not confirmed, supporting a mechanism independent of the NF-kappaB inhibitor. In conclusion, alpha-MSH and KP(-D-)V peptides have an anti-inflammatory action on dermal fibroblast signaling by inhibiting the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF-alpha in vitro.

  6. Experimental inhibition of peptide fibrillogenesis by synthetic peptides, carbohydrates and drugs.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Alagiri

    2012-01-01

    Peptide fibrillogenesis generally begins by the transformation of normally soluble proteins into elongated aggregates which are called as amyloid. These fibrils mainly consist of ß-sheets. They share certain common characteristics such as a cross-ß x-ray diffraction pattern, association with other common proteins and typical staining by the dye Congo Red. The individual form of the deposit consists of a disease-specific peptide/protein. The disease-specific protein serves as the basis for the classification of the amyloids. The association of fibril-forming peptides/proteins with diseases makes them primary disease-targets. Understanding the molecular interactions involved in the fibril formation becomes the foremost requirement to characterize the target. Interference with these interactions of ß-sheets in vitro prevents and sometimes reverses the fibril assembly. A small molecule capable of interfering with the formation of fibril could have therapeutic applications in these diseases. This anti-aggregation approach appears to be a viable treatment option. A search for such a molecule is pursued actively world over. All types of compounds and approaches to slow down or prevent the aggregation process have been described in the literature. These efforts are reviewed in this chapter.

  7. Inhibition of LtxA toxicity by blocking cholesterol binding with peptides.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Koufos, E; Balashova, N V; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of (334) LEEYSKR(340), in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC(336) motif of LtxA (CRAC(336WT)). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of repeats-in-toxin-producing organisms.

  8. Inhibition of LtxA Toxicity by Blocking Cholesterol Binding With Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Koufos, Evan; Balashova, Nataliya; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of 334LEEYSKR340, in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC336 motif of LtxA (CRAC336WT). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of RTX-producing organisms. PMID:26352738

  9. A TLR4-interacting SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Vijay; Madhusoodhanan, Rakhesh; Kosanke, Stanley; Awasthi, Shanjana

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between surfactant protein-A (SP-A) and TLR4 is important for host defense. We have recently identified an SPA4 peptide region from the interface of SP-A-TLR4 complex. Here, we studied the involvement of the SPA4 peptide region in SP-A-TLR4 interaction using a two-hybrid system, and biological effects of SPA4 peptide in cell systems and a mouse model. HEK293 cells were transfected with plasmid DNAs encoding SP-A or a SP-A-mutant lacking SPA4 peptide region and TLR4. Luciferase activity was measured as the end-point of SP-A-TLR4 interaction. NF-κB activity was also assessed simultaneously. Next, the dendritic cells or mice were challenged with Escherichia coli-derived LPS and treated with SPA4 peptide. Endotoxic shock-like symptoms and inflammatory parameters (TNF-α, NF-κB, leukocyte influx) were assessed. Our results reveal that the SPA4 peptide region contributes to the SP-A-TLR4 interaction and inhibits the LPS-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α. We also observed that the SPA4 peptide inhibits LPS-induced expression of TNF-α, nuclear localization of NF-κB-p65 and cell influx, and alleviates the endotoxic shock-like symptoms in a mouse model. Our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory activity of the SPA4 peptide through its binding to TLR4 can be of therapeutic benefit.

  10. Macrocyclized Extended Peptides: Inhibiting the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Tankyrase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenshu; Lau, Yu Heng; Fischer, Gerhard; Tan, Yaw Sing; Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; de la Roche, Marc; Hyvönen, Marko; Verma, Chandra; Spring, David R; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2017-02-15

    We report a double-click macrocyclization approach for the design of constrained peptide inhibitors having non-helical or extended conformations. Our targets are the tankyrase proteins (TNKS), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) that regulate Wnt signaling by targeting Axin for degradation. TNKS are deregulated in many different cancer types, and inhibition of TNKS therefore represents an attractive therapeutic strategy. However, clinical development of TNKS-specific PARP catalytic inhibitors is challenging due to off-target effects and cellular toxicity. We instead targeted the substrate-recognition domain of TNKS, as it is unique among PARP family members. We employed a two-component strategy, allowing peptide and linker to be separately engineered and then assembled in a combinatorial fashion via click chemistry. Using the consensus substrate-peptide sequence as a starting point, we optimized the length and rigidity of the linker and its position along the peptide. Optimization was further guided by high-resolution crystal structures of two of the macrocyclized peptides in complex with TNKS. This approach led to macrocyclized peptides with submicromolar affinities for TNKS and high proteolytic stability that are able to disrupt the interaction between TNKS and Axin substrate and to inhibit Wnt signaling in a dose-dependent manner. The peptides therefore represent a promising starting point for a new class of substrate-competitive inhibitors of TNKS with potential for suppressing Wnt signaling in cancer. Moreover, by demonstrating the application of the double-click macrocyclization approach to non-helical, extended, or irregularly structured peptides, we greatly extend its potential and scope, especially given the frequency with which such motifs mediate protein-protein interactions.

  11. Macrocyclized Extended Peptides: Inhibiting the Substrate-Recognition Domain of Tankyrase

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report a double-click macrocyclization approach for the design of constrained peptide inhibitors having non-helical or extended conformations. Our targets are the tankyrase proteins (TNKS), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) that regulate Wnt signaling by targeting Axin for degradation. TNKS are deregulated in many different cancer types, and inhibition of TNKS therefore represents an attractive therapeutic strategy. However, clinical development of TNKS-specific PARP catalytic inhibitors is challenging due to off-target effects and cellular toxicity. We instead targeted the substrate-recognition domain of TNKS, as it is unique among PARP family members. We employed a two-component strategy, allowing peptide and linker to be separately engineered and then assembled in a combinatorial fashion via click chemistry. Using the consensus substrate-peptide sequence as a starting point, we optimized the length and rigidity of the linker and its position along the peptide. Optimization was further guided by high-resolution crystal structures of two of the macrocyclized peptides in complex with TNKS. This approach led to macrocyclized peptides with submicromolar affinities for TNKS and high proteolytic stability that are able to disrupt the interaction between TNKS and Axin substrate and to inhibit Wnt signaling in a dose-dependent manner. The peptides therefore represent a promising starting point for a new class of substrate-competitive inhibitors of TNKS with potential for suppressing Wnt signaling in cancer. Moreover, by demonstrating the application of the double-click macrocyclization approach to non-helical, extended, or irregularly structured peptides, we greatly extend its potential and scope, especially given the frequency with which such motifs mediate protein–protein interactions. PMID:28084734

  12. A defined peptide that inhibits the formation of the glycoprotein IIb and IIIa complex.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Thomas M; Zhu, Jiaqian

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-platelet interaction plays an important role in hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. The proposed mechanism of the interaction was the activation of platelets-->releasing of contents from granules-->aggregation. The common end point is the platelets and fibrin aggregates. Platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (the alphaIIbbeta3 integrin) complexes serve as a receptor for the binding of fibrinogen to form firmed aggregates. Blockading of GP IIb/IIIa has been proposed to prevent platelet aggregation independent of the substance(s) responsible for activating the platelets. The development of various forms of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor has resulted in the inhibition of platelet aggregation, although studies of alphaIIbbeta3 receptor function and various GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors have demonstrated the potential for these agents to produce effects on other aspects of platelet function as well as having nonplatelet effects. This study investigated platelet inhibition provided by blocking the GP IIb/IIIa complex formation by using a peptide derived from the GP IIIa molecule. The peptide inhibits both types I and III collagen-induced platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. The defined peptide interferes with the formation of the GP IIb/IIIa complex by inhibiting the binding of FITC-PAC-1 onto ADP-, type I collagen-, and type III collagen-activated platelets. However, P-selectin secretion is not affected by the peptide. In addition, the peptide is not interfering with the binding of FITC-PAC-1 to platelets that were preincubated with indomethacin. Results from this study may suggest that the defined peptide is an effective agent to block the interaction of types I and III collagen with platelets.

  13. Inhibition of Vaccinia virus entry by a broad spectrum antiviral peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Altmann, S.E.; Jones, J.C.; Schultz-Cherry, S.; Brandt, C.R.

    2009-06-05

    Concerns about the possible use of Variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, as a weapon for bioterrorism have led to renewed efforts to identify new antivirals against orthopoxviruses. We identified a peptide, EB, which inhibited infection by Vaccinia virus with an EC{sub 50} of 15 muM. A control peptide, EBX, identical in composition to EB but differing in sequence, was inactive (EC{sub 50} > 200 muM), indicating sequence specificity. The inhibition was reversed upon removal of the peptide, and EB treatment had no effect on the physical integrity of virus particles as determined by electron microscopy. Viral adsorption was unaffected by the presence of EB, and the addition of EB post-entry had no effect on viral titers or on early gene expression. The addition of EB post-adsorption resulted in the inhibition of beta-galactosidase expression from an early viral promoter with an EC{sub 50} of 45 muM. A significant reduction in virus entry was detected in the presence of the peptide when the number of viral cores released into the cytoplasm was quantified. Electron microscopy indicated that 88% of the virions remained on the surface of cells in the presence of EB, compared to 37% in the control (p < 0.001). EB also blocked fusion-from-within, suggesting that virus infection is inhibited at the fusion step. Analysis of EB derivatives suggested that peptide length may be important for the activity of EB. The EB peptide is, to our knowledge, the first known small molecule inhibitor of Vaccinia virus entry.

  14. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  15. Tryptophan inhibits Proteus vulgaris TnaC leader peptide elongation, activating tna operon expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vera, Luis R; Yang, Rui; Yanofsky, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Expression of the tna operon of Escherichia coli and of Proteus vulgaris is induced by L-tryptophan. In E. coli, tryptophan action is dependent on the presence of several critical residues (underlined) in the newly synthesized TnaC leader peptide, WFNIDXXL/IXXXXP. These residues are conserved in TnaC of P. vulgaris and of other bacterial species. TnaC of P. vulgaris has one additional feature, distinguishing it from TnaC of E. coli; it contains two C-terminal lysine residues following the conserved proline residue. In the present study, we investigated L-tryptophan induction of the P. vulgaris tna operon, transferred on a plasmid into E. coli. Induction was shown to be L-tryptophan dependent; however, the range of induction was less than that observed for the E. coli tna operon. We compared the genetic organization of both operons and predicted similar folding patterns for their respective leader mRNA segments. However, additional analyses revealed that L-tryptophan action in the P. vulgaris tna operon involves inhibition of TnaC elongation, following addition of proline, rather than inhibition of leader peptide termination. Our findings also establish that the conserved residues in TnaC of P. vulgaris are essential for L-tryptophan induction, and for inhibition of peptide elongation. TnaC synthesis is thus an excellent model system for studies of regulation of both peptide termination and peptide elongation, and for studies of ribosome recognition of the features of a nascent peptide.

  16. Potent and Selective Peptide-based Inhibition of the G Protein Gαq.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thomas H; Waldo, Gary L; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D; Kash, Thomas L; Harden, T Kendall; Sondek, John

    2016-12-02

    In contrast to G protein-coupled receptors, for which chemical and peptidic inhibitors have been extensively explored, few compounds are available that directly modulate heterotrimeric G proteins. Active Gαq binds its two major classes of effectors, the phospholipase C (PLC)-β isozymes and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) related to Trio, in a strikingly similar fashion: a continuous helix-turn-helix of the effectors engages Gαq within its canonical binding site consisting of a groove formed between switch II and helix α3. This information was exploited to synthesize peptides that bound active Gαq in vitro with affinities similar to full-length effectors and directly competed with effectors for engagement of Gαq A representative peptide was specific for active Gαq because it did not bind inactive Gαq or other classes of active Gα subunits and did not inhibit the activation of PLC-β3 by Gβ1γ2 In contrast, the peptide robustly prevented activation of PLC-β3 or p63RhoGEF by Gαq; it also prevented G protein-coupled receptor-promoted neuronal depolarization downstream of Gαq in the mouse prefrontal cortex. Moreover, a genetically encoded form of this peptide flanked by fluorescent proteins inhibited Gαq-dependent activation of PLC-β3 at least as effectively as a dominant-negative form of full-length PLC-β3. These attributes suggest that related, cell-penetrating peptides should effectively inhibit active Gαq in cells and that these and genetically encoded sequences may find application as molecular probes, drug leads, and biosensors to monitor the spatiotemporal activation of Gαq in cells.

  17. Inhibition of new vessel growth in mouse model of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization by adiponectin peptide II

    PubMed Central

    Lyzogubov, Valeriy V.; Tytarenko, Ruslana G.; Thotakura, Sushma; Viswanathan, Tito; Bora, Nalini S.; Bora, Puran S.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of adiponectin (APN) peptide II on new vessel growth in mouse model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) or wet type age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with APN peptide II, control peptide, or PBS on day 1–7 or day 5–14. APN, AdipoR1, PCNA, and VEGF localization was investigated using confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and RT-PCR. APN peptide II decreased the relative area of FITC-dextran perfused vessels by 4-fold, PCNA expression by 3-fold, and the number of PCNA stained HUVEC and MAVEC cells by 38 and 46%, respectively. We concluded that APN peptide II inhibits CNV size on days 7 and 14 by inhibiting the proliferation of endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. APN peptide II may have therapeutic potential to inhibit CNV or wet AMD. PMID:19422927

  18. Inhibition of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particle formation by Gag protein-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Niedrig, M; Gelderblom, H R; Pauli, G; März, J; Bickhard, H; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1994-06-01

    Sequential overlapping Gag protein-derived oligopeptides of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) 22 to 24 amino acids long, were synthesized and tested in vitro for antiviral activity. Two synthetic peptides, one derived from the matrix protein p17 (NPGLLETSEGCRQ, amino acids 47 to 59) and one located in the capsid protein p24 (PAATLEEMMTA, amino acids 339 to 349) inhibited the production of infectious virus when added to HIV-1-infected cultures when used in the range of 20 to 200 micrograms/ml. As shown by thin section electron microscopy, peptide treatment resulted in the release of immature, deformed virus particles suggesting that the two peptides interfered with assembly and maturation. Other Gag protein-derived oligopeptides had little or no influence on virus production. To characterize further the functionally active regions we synthesized peptide derivatives with three consecutive amino acids substituted by alanine; they did not cause inhibition. Therefore the regions responsible for inhibition were located between amino acids 50 to 61 in p17, and 342 to 350 in p24. These observations might lead to the development of a new antiviral strategy affecting the late stage of virus replication.

  19. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  20. Phage Display against Corneal Epithelial Cells Produced Bioactive Peptides That Inhibit Aspergillus Adhesion to the Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ge; Li, Siyuan; Zhao, Wei; He, Kun; Xi, Haijie; Li, Weihua; Zhou, Qingjun; Wang, Yiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Dissection of host-pathogen interactions is important for both understanding the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and developing therapeutics for the infectious diseases like various infectious keratitis. To enhance the knowledge about pathogenesis infectious keratitis, a random 12-mer peptide phage display library was screened against cultured human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC). Fourteen sequences were obtained and BLASTp analysis showed that most of their homologue counterparts in GenBank were for defined or putative proteins in various pathogens. Based on known or predicted functions of the homologue proteins, ten synthetic peptides (Pc-A to Pc-J) were measured for their affinity to bind cells and their potential efficacy to interfere with pathogen adhesion to the cells. Besides binding to HCEC, most of them also bound to human corneal stromal cells and umbilical endothelial cells to different extents. When added to HCEC culture, the peptides induced expression of MyD88 and IL-17 in HCEC, and the stimulated cell culture medium showed fungicidal potency to various extents. While peptides Pc-C and Pc-E inhibited Aspergillus fumigatus (A.f) adhesion to HCEC in a dose-dependent manner, the similar inhibition ability of peptides Pc-A and Pc-B required presence of their homologue ligand Alb1p on A.f. When utilized in an eyeball organ culture model and an in vivo A.f keratitis model established in mouse, Pc-C and Pc-E inhibited fungal adhesion to corneas, hence decreased corneal disruption caused by inflammatory infiltration. Affinity pull-down of HCEC membrane proteins with peptide Pc-C revealed several molecules as potential receptors for this peptide. In conclusion, besides proving that phage display-selected peptides could be utilized to interfere with adhesion of pathogens to host cells, hence could be exploited for managing infectious diseases including infectious keratitis, we also proposed that the phage display technique and the resultant peptides could

  1. Peptides of Matrix Gla protein inhibit nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals.

    PubMed

    Goiko, Maria; Dierolf, Joshua; Gleberzon, Jared S; Liao, Yinyin; Grohe, Bernd; Goldberg, Harvey A; de Bruyn, John R; Hunter, Graeme K

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated protein that has been shown to prevent the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the walls of blood vessels. MGP is also expressed in kidney and may inhibit the formation of kidney stones, which mainly consist of another crystalline phase, calcium oxalate monohydrate. To determine the mechanism by which MGP prevents soft-tissue calcification, we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated sequences of human MGP in both post-translationally modified and non-modified forms. The effects of these peptides on hydroxyapatite formation and calcium oxalate crystallization were quantified using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Peptides YGlapS (MGP1-14: YγEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YEpS (YEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YGlaS (YγESHESMESYELNP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56: SKPVHγELNRγEACDD) inhibited formation of hydroxyapatite in order of potency YGlapS > YEpS > YGlaS > SK-Gla. The effects of YGlapS, YEpS and YGlaS on hydroxyapatite formation were on both crystal nucleation and growth; the effect of SK-Gla was on nucleation. YGlapS and YEpS significantly inhibited the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, while simultaneously promoting the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate. The effects of these phosphopeptides on calcium oxalate monohydrate formation were on growth of crystals rather than nucleation. We have shown that the use of dynamic light scattering allows inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation and growth to be distinguished. We have also demonstrated for the first time that MGP peptides inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate. Based on the latter finding, we propose that MGP function not only to prevent blood-vessel calcification but also to inhibit stone formation in kidney.

  2. The insect peptide CopA3 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyo Jung; Oh, Ah Reum; Nam, Seung Taek; Kang, Jin Ku; Chang, Jong Soo; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Ji Hye; Hwang, Jae Sam; Shong, Ko Eun; Park, Mi Jung; Seok, Heon; Kim, Ho

    2012-10-01

    We recently demonstrated that the insect peptide CopA3 (LLCIALRKK), a disulfide-linked dimeric peptide, exerts antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities in a mouse colitis model. Here, we examined whether CopA3 inhibited activation of macrophages by LPS. Exposure of an unseparated mouse peritoneal cell population or isolated peritoneal macrophages to LPS markedly increased secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α; these effects were significantly inhibited by CopA3 treatment. The inhibitory effect of CopA3 was also evident in murine macrophage cell line, RAW 264.7. Western blotting revealed that LPS-induced activation of STAT1 and STAT5 in macrophages was significantly inhibited by CopA3. Inhibition of JAK (STAT1/STAT5 kinase) with AG490 markedly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in macrophages. Collectively, these observations suggest that CopA3 inhibits macrophage activation by inhibiting activating phosphorylations of the transcription factors, STAT1 and STAT5, and blocking subsequent production of IL-6 and TNF-α and indicate that CopA3 may be useful as an immune-modulating agent.

  3. Isolation and characterization of two peptides with prolactin release-inhibiting activity from porcine hypothalami.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Guoth, J G; Redding, T W; Groot, K; Rodriguez, H; Szonyi, E; Stults, J; Nikolics, K

    1991-01-01

    Two peptides with in vitro prolactin release-inhibiting activity were purified from stalk median eminence (SME) fragments of 20,000 pig hypothalami. Monolayer cultures of rat anterior pituitary cells were incubated with aliquots of chromatographic fractions and the inhibition of release of prolactin in vitro was measured by RIA in order to monitor the purification. The hypothalamic tissue extract was separated into 11 fractions by high-performance aqueous size-exclusion chromatography with one fraction showing a 4-fold increase in prolactin release-inhibiting factor (PIF) activity. This material was further purified by semipreparative reversed-phase (RP) HPLC. This process resulted in the separation of two distinct fractions that showed high PIF activity. These were further purified by semipreparative and analytical RP-HPLC to apparent homogeneity as judged by the UV absorbance profiles. Neither of the two peptides showed cross-reactivity with gonadotropin releasing hormone-associated peptide or with somatostatin-14 antibodies. Protein sequence analysis revealed that one of the PIF peptides was Trp-Cys-Leu-Glu-Ser-Ser-Gln-Cys-Gln-Asp-Leu-Ser-Thr-Glu-Ser-Asn-Leu-Leu- Ala-Cys - Ile-Arg-Ala-Cys-Lys-Pro, identical to residues 27-52 of the N-terminal region of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) precursor (corresponding to amino acids 1-26 of the 16-kDa fragment). The sequence of the other PIF was Ala-Ser-Asp-Arg-Ser-Asn-Ala-Thr-Leu-Leu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Ser-Gly-Ala-Leu-Leu- Leu-Arg - Leu-Val-Gln-Leu-Ala-Gly-Ala-Pro-Glu-Pro-Ala-Glu-Pro-Ala-Gln-Pro-Gly-Val- Tyr, representing residues 109-147 of the vasopressin-neurophysin precursor. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the N-terminal region of POMC had significant PIF activity in vitro. PMID:2023899

  4. FKBPL and Peptide Derivatives: Novel Biological Agents That Inhibit Angiogenesis by a CD44-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Andrea; O’Rourke, Martin; Yakkundi, Anita; Worthington, Jenny; Hookham, Michelle; Bicknell, Roy; McCarthy, Helen O.; McClelland, Keeva; McCallum, Lynn; Dyer, Hayder; McKeen, Hayley; Waugh, David; Roberts, Jennifer; McGregor, Joanne; Cotton, Graham; James, Iain; Harrison, Timothy; Hirst, David G.; Robson, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anti-angiogenic therapies can be an important adjunct to the management of many malignancies. Here we investigated a novel protein, FKBPL, and peptide derivative for their anti-angiogenic activity and mechanism of action. Experimental Design Recombinant FKBPL (rFKBPL) and its peptide derivative were assessed in a range of human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC-1) assays in vitro. Their ability to inhibit proliferation, migration and Matrigel dependent tubule formation was determined. They were further evaluated in an ex-vivo rat model of neo-vascularisation and in two in vivo mouse models of angiogenesis; the sponge implantation and the intra-vital microscopy models. Anti-tumor efficacy was determined in two human tumor xenograft models grown in SCID mice. Finally, the dependence of peptide on CD44 was determined using a CD44 targeted siRNA approach or in cell lines of differing CD44 status. Results rFKBPL inhibited endothelial cell migration, tubule formation and microvessel formation in vitro and in vivo. The region responsible for FKBPL’s anti-angiogenic activity was identified and a 24 amino acid peptide (AD-01) spanning this sequence was synthesised. It was potently anti-angiogenic and inhibited growth in two human tumor xenograft models (DU145 and MDA-231) when administered systemically, either on its own, or in combination with docetaxel. The anti-angiogenic activity of FKBPL and AD-01 was dependent on the cell surface receptor CD44 and signalling downstream of this receptor promoted an anti-migratory phenotype. Conclusion FKBPL and its peptide derivative AD-01 have potent anti-angiogenic activity. Thus, these agents offer the potential of an attractive new approach to anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:21364036

  5. PEDF-derived peptide inhibits corneal angiogenesis by suppressing VEGF expression.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takanori; Nishino, Yuri; Maeda, Sayaka; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi

    2012-07-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) a glycoprotein that belongs to the superfamily of serine protease inhibitors, has been recently shown to be the most potent inhibitor of angiogenesis in the mammalian eye. However, which active domain of PEDF protein could be involved in its anti-angiogenic properties remains unknown. Therefore, in this study, we examined which PEDF-derived synthetic peptides could inhibit corneal neovascularization induced by chemical cauterization in vivo. Rats treated with topical application of PEDF protein had 31% less corneal neovascularization at day 7 after the injury than phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated rats. P5-2 and P5-3 peptides (residues 388-393 and 394-400 of PEDF protein, respectively) significantly suppressed the corneal neovascularization after chemical cauterization at day 7, and its anti-angiogenic potential was almost equal to that of full-length PEDF protein. Further, full-length PEDF protein and P5-3 peptide significantly decreased 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in the corneal. Our present study suggests that PEDF-derived synthetic peptide, P5-3 could inhibit the corneal neovascularization induced by chemical cauterization in rats by suppressing VEGF expression via its anti-oxidative properties.

  6. Macrocycle peptides delineate locked-open inhibition mechanism for microorganism phosphoglycerate mutases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Dranchak, Patricia; Li, Zhiru; MacArthur, Ryan; Munson, Matthew S; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Baird, Nathan J; Battalie, Kevin P; Ross, David; Lovell, Scott; Carlow, Clotilde K S; Suga, Hiroaki; Inglese, James

    2017-04-03

    Glycolytic interconversion of phosphoglycerate isomers is catalysed in numerous pathogenic microorganisms by a cofactor-independent mutase (iPGM) structurally distinct from the mammalian cofactor-dependent (dPGM) isozyme. The iPGM active site dynamically assembles through substrate-triggered movement of phosphatase and transferase domains creating a solvent inaccessible cavity. Here we identify alternate ligand binding regions using nematode iPGM to select and enrich lariat-like ligands from an mRNA-display macrocyclic peptide library containing >10(12) members. Functional analysis of the ligands, named ipglycermides, demonstrates sub-nanomolar inhibition of iPGM with complete selectivity over dPGM. The crystal structure of an iPGM macrocyclic peptide complex illuminated an allosteric, locked-open inhibition mechanism placing the cyclic peptide at the bi-domain interface. This binding mode aligns the pendant lariat cysteine thiolate for coordination with the iPGM transition metal ion cluster. The extended charged, hydrophilic binding surface interaction rationalizes the persistent challenges these enzymes have presented to small-molecule screening efforts highlighting the important roles of macrocyclic peptides in expanding chemical diversity for ligand discovery.

  7. Inhibition of plant-pathogenic bacteria by short synthetic cecropin A-melittin hybrid peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferre, Rafael; Badosa, Esther; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta; Montesinos, Emili; Bardají, Eduard

    2006-05-01

    Short peptides of 11 residues were synthesized and tested against the economically important plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria and compared to the previously described peptide Pep3 (WKLFKKILKVL-NH(2)). The antimicrobial activity of Pep3 and 22 analogues was evaluated in terms of the MIC and the 50% effective dose (ED(50)) for growth. Peptide cytotoxicity against human red blood cells and peptide stability toward protease degradation were also determined. Pep3 and several analogues inhibited growth of the three pathogens and had a bactericidal effect at low micromolar concentrations (ED(50) of 1.3 to 7.3 microM). One of the analogues consisting of a replacement of both Trp and Val with Lys and Phe, respectively, resulted in a peptide with improved bactericidal activity and minimized cytotoxicity and susceptibility to protease degradation compared to Pep3. The best analogues can be considered as potential lead compounds for the development of new antimicrobial agents for use in plant protection either as components of pesticides or expressed in transgenic plants.

  8. Inhibition of Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria by Short Synthetic Cecropin A-Melittin Hybrid Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ferre, Rafael; Badosa, Esther; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta; Montesinos, Emili; Bardají, Eduard

    2006-01-01

    Short peptides of 11 residues were synthesized and tested against the economically important plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria and compared to the previously described peptide Pep3 (WKLFKKILKVL-NH2). The antimicrobial activity of Pep3 and 22 analogues was evaluated in terms of the MIC and the 50% effective dose (ED50) for growth. Peptide cytotoxicity against human red blood cells and peptide stability toward protease degradation were also determined. Pep3 and several analogues inhibited growth of the three pathogens and had a bactericidal effect at low micromolar concentrations (ED50 of 1.3 to 7.3 μM). One of the analogues consisting of a replacement of both Trp and Val with Lys and Phe, respectively, resulted in a peptide with improved bactericidal activity and minimized cytotoxicity and susceptibility to protease degradation compared to Pep3. The best analogues can be considered as potential lead compounds for the development of new antimicrobial agents for use in plant protection either as components of pesticides or expressed in transgenic plants. PMID:16672470

  9. Quantification of ACE inhibiting peptides in human plasma using high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Platerink, Chris J; Janssen, Hans-Gerd M; Horsten, Roos; Haverkamp, Johan

    2006-01-02

    An HPLC-MRM-MS method was developed for the quantification of 17 small ACE inhibiting (ACEI) peptides in plasma samples collected from human volunteers after the consumption of a peptide-enriched drink. The assay shows the high selectivity and sensitivity necessary to monitor small changes in the levels of the ACEI peptides after consumption of drinks developed to effect lowering of the blood pressure. Four different sample preparation methods were tested and evaluated. The final sample preparation method selected is simple and effective and consists mainly of the removal of proteins by acidification and heating, followed by a large volume injection. Additional sample preparation steps such as solid phase extraction and liquid/liquid partitioning were studied. Although they resulted in cleaner extracts, losses of specific peptides such as SAP were frequently seen. The isotope labeled form of one of the peptides to be quantified, [U(13)C]IPP, was used as an internal standard. The limit of detection of the assay is below 0.01 ng ml(-1). The limit of quantification is between 0.05 and 0.2 ng ml(-1), which is approximately 10% of the expected peptide concentration in plasma based on a normal diet. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations for all peptides have shown to be below 25% and the method has an accuracy of better than 75%. The long-term stability is good. At least 200 samples could be analysed before the system had to be cleaned. The assay has been successfully applied to blood samples collected from volunteers during a human trial.

  10. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism.

  11. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits local acute inflammation and protects mice against lethal endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Rachel Novaes; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Bozza, Patricia T; Soares, Milena B P; Shoemaker, Charles B; David, John R; Bozza, Marcelo T

    2005-12-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilatory peptide present in central and peripheral neurons, is released at inflammatory sites and inhibits several macrophage, dendritic cell, and lymphocyte functions. In the present study, we investigated the role of CGRP in models of local and systemic acute inflammation and on macrophage activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Intraperitoneal pretreatment with synthetic CGRP reduces in approximately 50% the number of neutrophils in the blood and into the peritoneal cavity 4 h after LPS injection. CGRP failed to inhibit neutrophil recruitment induced by the direct chemoattractant platelet-activating factor, whereas it significantly inhibited LPS-induced KC generation, suggesting that the effect of CGRP on neutrophil recruitment is indirect, acting on chemokine production by resident cells. Pretreatment of mice with 1 mug of CGRP protects against a lethal dose of LPS. The CGRP-induced protection is receptor mediated because it is completely reverted by the CGRP receptor antagonist, CGRP 8-37. The protective effect of CGRP correlates with an inhibition of TNF-alpha and an induction of IL-6 and IL-10 in mice sera 90 min after LPS challenge. Finally, CGRP significantly inhibits LPS-induced TNF-alpha released from mouse peritoneal macrophages. These results suggest that activation of the CGRP receptor on macrophages during acute inflammation could be part of the negative feedback mechanism controlling the extension of acute inflammatory responses.

  12. Inhibition of pepsin by analogues of pepsinogen-(1-12)-peptide with substitutions in the 4-7 sequence region.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B M; Lewitt, M; Pham, C

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the 1-12 sequence of pig pepsinogen were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis. The three derivatives contain substitutions in the 4-7 region of the 1-12 sequence. Glycine was used to replace the hydrophobic residues -Val-Pro-Leu-Val- in pairs. After cleavage and purification, the synthetic peptides were compared with a synthetic peptide of the native sequence, prepared at the same time, with respect to their ability to inhibit the pepsin-catalysed clotting of milk. Inhibitory potency, determined from plots of percentage inhibition versus concentration of synthetic peptide, is inversely correlated with the substitution of glycine residues for the hydrophobic residues. Therefore the equilibrium inhibition of pepsin by these peptides is dominated by the hydrophobic nature of the 4-7 sequence region. PMID:6405735

  13. The molecular mechanism of fullerene-inhibited aggregation of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Luogang; Luo, Yin; Lin, Dongdong; Xi, Wenhui; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of β-sheet formation has been considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Increasing data show that nanoparticles can retard or promote the fibrillation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides depending on the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, our replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations show that fullerene nanoparticle - C60 (with a fullerene : peptide molar ratio greater than 1 : 8) can dramatically prevent β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments further confirm the inhibitory effect of C60 on Aβ(16-22) fibrillation, in support of our REMD simulations. An important finding from our REMD simulations is that fullerene C180, albeit with the same number of carbon atoms as three C60 molecules (3C60) and smaller surface area than 3C60, displays an unexpected stronger inhibitory effect on the β-sheet formation of Aβ(16-22) peptides. A detailed analysis of the fullerene-peptide interaction reveals that the stronger inhibition of β-sheet formation by C180 results from the strong hydrophobic and aromatic-stacking interactions of the fullerene hexagonal rings with the Phe rings relative to the pentagonal rings. The strong interactions between the fullerene nanoparticles and Aβ(16-22) peptides significantly weaken the peptide-peptide interaction that is important for β-sheet formation, thus retarding Aβ(16-22) fibrillation. Overall, our studies reveal the significant role of fullerene hexagonal rings in the inhibition of Aβ(16-22) fibrillation and provide novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.Amyloid deposits are implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). The inhibition of

  14. A Novel Trypsin Inhibitor-Like Cysteine-Rich Peptide from the Frog Lepidobatrachus laevis Containing Proteinase-Inhibiting Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tan, Ji-Min; Du, Can-Wei; Luan, Ning; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiu-Min

    2015-08-01

    Various bio-active substances in amphibian skins play important roles in survival of the amphibians. Many protease inhibitor peptides have been identified from amphibian skins, which are supposed to negatively modulate the activity of proteases to avoid premature degradation or release of skin peptides, or to inhibit extracellular proteases produced by invading bacteria. However, there is no information on the proteinase inhibitors from the frog Lepidobatrachus laevis which is unique in South America. In this work, a cDNA encoding a novel trypsin inhibitor-like (TIL) cysteine-rich peptide was identified from the skin cDNA library of L. laevis. The 240-bp coding region encodes an 80-amino acid residue precursor protein containing 10 half-cysteines. By sequence comparison and signal peptide prediction, the precursor was predicted to release a 55-amino acid mature peptide with amino acid sequence, IRCPKDKIYKFCGSPCPPSCKDLTPNCIAVCKKGCFCRDGTVDNNHGKCVKKENC. The mature peptide was named LL-TIL. LL-TIL shares significant domain similarity with the peptides from the TIL supper family. Antimicrobial and trypsin-inhibitory abilities of recombinant LL-TIL were tested. Recombinant LL-TIL showed no antimicrobial activity, while it had trypsin-inhibiting activity with a Ki of 16.5178 μM. These results suggested there was TIL peptide with proteinase-inhibiting activity in the skin of frog L. laevis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of TIL peptide from frog skin.

  15. Discovery of macrocyclic peptides armed with a mechanism-based warhead: isoform-selective inhibition of human deacetylase SIRT2.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Jumpei; Hayashi, Yuuki; Suga, Hiroaki

    2012-04-02

    Designed to inhibit: by using the random nonstandard peptide integrated discovery (RaPID) system, highly potent isoform-selective inhibitors can be identified from a library of nonstandard macrocyclic peptides. These inhibitors, which contain a mechanism-based warhead residue, are active against the human deacetylase SIRT2, with IC(50) values in the low nanomolar region.

  16. An Analog of the Antimicrobial Peptide CopA5 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, I Na; Hong, Ji; Zhang, Peng; Hwang, Jae Sam; Kim, Ho

    2017-02-28

    We previously reported that the CopA3 peptide (LLCIALRKK, D-form) originally isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial and immunosuppressive effects. However, the high cost of producing the synthetic peptide, especially the D-form, has limited the development of CopA3 for therapeutic purposes. Here, we investigated whether the CopA3 deletion derivative, CopA5, which is composed of only five amino acids (LLCIA) and has the L-form structure, could inhibit the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of macrophages. Peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEM) were isolated from mice and exposed to LPS in the presence or absence of CopA5, and biomarkers of macrophage activation were measured. Our results revealed that LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion, and phagocytic activity of PEM were significantly inhibited by CopA5 treatment. Similar to CopA3, the structurally modified CopA5 peptide had no cell toxicity (as assessed by measurement of cell viability loss and apoptosis) in PEM. Moreover, the LPS-induced upregulation of the activating phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) was markedly inhibited by CopA5 treatment. These results suggest that, similar to CopA3, CopA5 inhibits macrophage activation by inhibiting STAT1 phosphorylation and blocking the release of NO and TNF-α. CopA5 may therefore prove therapeutically useful in the realm of immune suppression.

  17. Food-derived opioid peptides inhibit cysteine uptake with redox and epigenetic consequences

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Malav S; Shah, Jayni S; Al-Mughairy, Sara; Hodgson, Nathaniel W; Simms, Benjamin; Trooskens, Geert A; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deth, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Dietary interventions like gluten-free and casein-free diets have been reported to improve intestinal, autoimmune and neurological symptoms in patients with a variety of conditions; however, the underlying mechanism of benefit for such diets remains unclear. Epigenetic programming, including CpG methylation and histone modifications, occurring during early postnatal development can influence the risk of disease in later life, and such programming may be modulated by nutritional factors such as milk and wheat, especially during the transition from a solely milk-based diet to one that includes other forms of nutrition. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, and in the present study, we demonstrate that these food-derived proline-rich opioid peptides modulate cysteine uptake in cultured human neuronal and gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cells via activation of opioid receptors. Decreases in cysteine uptake were associated with changes in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione and the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. Bovine and human casein-derived opioid peptides increased genome-wide DNA methylation in the transcription start site region with a potency order similar to their inhibition of cysteine uptake. Altered expression of genes involved in redox and methylation homeostasis was also observed. These results illustrate the potential of milk- and wheat-derived peptides to exert antioxidant and epigenetic changes which may be particularly important during the postnatal transition from placental to GI nutrition. Differences between peptides derived from human and bovine milk may contribute to developmental differences between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Restricted antioxidant capacity, caused by wheat- and milk-derived opioid peptides, may predispose susceptible individuals to inflammation and systemic oxidation, partly explaining the benefits of gluten

  18. Food-derived opioid peptides inhibit cysteine uptake with redox and epigenetic consequences.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Malav S; Shah, Jayni S; Al-Mughairy, Sara; Hodgson, Nathaniel W; Simms, Benjamin; Trooskens, Geert A; Van Criekinge, Wim; Deth, Richard C

    2014-10-01

    Dietary interventions like gluten-free and casein-free diets have been reported to improve intestinal, autoimmune and neurological symptoms in patients with a variety of conditions; however, the underlying mechanism of benefit for such diets remains unclear. Epigenetic programming, including CpG methylation and histone modifications, occurring during early postnatal development can influence the risk of disease in later life, and such programming may be modulated by nutritional factors such as milk and wheat, especially during the transition from a solely milk-based diet to one that includes other forms of nutrition. The hydrolytic digestion of casein (a major milk protein) and gliadin (a wheat-derived protein) releases peptides with opioid activity, and in the present study, we demonstrate that these food-derived proline-rich opioid peptides modulate cysteine uptake in cultured human neuronal and gastrointestinal (GI) epithelial cells via activation of opioid receptors. Decreases in cysteine uptake were associated with changes in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione and the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine. Bovine and human casein-derived opioid peptides increased genome-wide DNA methylation in the transcription start site region with a potency order similar to their inhibition of cysteine uptake. Altered expression of genes involved in redox and methylation homeostasis was also observed. These results illustrate the potential of milk- and wheat-derived peptides to exert antioxidant and epigenetic changes that may be particularly important during the postnatal transition from placental to GI nutrition. Differences between peptides derived from human and bovine milk may contribute to developmental differences between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Restricted antioxidant capacity, caused by wheat- and milk-derived opioid peptides, may predispose susceptible individuals to inflammation and systemic oxidation, partly explaining the benefits of gluten-free or

  19. Proline-rich peptide from the coral pathogen Vibrio shiloi that inhibits photosynthesis of Zooxanthellae.

    PubMed

    Banin, E; Khare, S K; Naider, F; Rosenberg, E

    2001-04-01

    The coral-bleaching bacterium Vibrio shiloi biosynthesizes and secretes an extracellular peptide, referred to as toxin P, which inhibits photosynthesis of coral symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae). Toxin P was produced during the stationary phase when the bacterium was grown on peptone or Casamino Acids media at 29 degrees C. Glycerol inhibited the production of toxin P. Toxin P was purified to homogeneity, yielding the following 12-residue peptide: PYPVYAPPPVVP (molecular weight, 1,295.54). The structure of toxin P was confirmed by chemical synthesis. In the presence of 12.5 mM NH(4)Cl, pure natural or synthetic toxin P (10 microM) caused a 64% decrease in the photosynthetic quantum yield of zooxanthellae within 5 min. The inhibition was proportional to the toxin P concentration. Toxin P bound avidly to zooxanthellae, such that subsequent addition of NH(4)Cl resulted in rapid inhibition of photosynthesis. When zooxanthellae were incubated in the presence of NH(4)Cl and toxin P, there was a rapid decrease in the pH (pH 7.8 to 7.2) of the bulk liquid, suggesting that toxin P facilitates transport of NH(3) into the cell. It is known that uptake of NH(3) into cells can destroy the pH gradient and block photosynthesis. This mode of action of toxin P can help explain the mechanism of coral bleaching by V. shiloi.

  20. Inhibition of bovine platelets aggregation in response to Hyalomma anatolicum salivary gland proteins/peptides

    PubMed Central

    Surbhi; Sangwan, Nirmal; Sangwan, Arun K.; Singh, Vijender; Kumar, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ticks are obligate ectoparasites that have an impact on wide range of vertebrates and also act as a potential vector for the transmission of tropical theileriosis, babesiosis, etc., causing significant loss to livestock production worldwide. While feeding, they introduce their saliva containing different bioactive molecules into the host. These molecules have the capability to counteract the host hemostatic mechanism to suck host blood successfully. Therefore, the study was aimed to isolate anti-platelet aggregating peptides from salivary gland extract (SGE) of Hyalomma anatolicum ticks, a commonly available tick in India. Materials and Methods: Female H. anatolicum salivary glands were dissected out and SGE was prepared by homogenizing it in a suitable buffer under ice. Extract so obtained was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography using Sephacryl S-200 column. Total protein concentration in fractions was estimated and bovine platelets were isolated, stimulated with thrombin (positive control), treated with Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro amide (negative control) and with salivary gland fractions for identification of proteins/peptides having anti-platelet aggregating activities. Results: Proteins/peptides present in various salivary gland fractions inhibited the bovine platelet aggregation and the percent inhibition ranged between 33% and 35.8%. Conclusion: The results suggests that the fractions of H. anatolicum salivary glands possess thrombin-induced anti-platelet aggregating activity and which could be further exploited for raising anti-tick vaccine and also for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27956779

  1. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes.

  2. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29.

  3. Peptides derived from CXCL8 based on in silico analysis inhibit CXCL8 interactions with its receptor CXCR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Liou, Je-Wen; Chang, Chun-Chun; Chung, Yi; Lin, Lee-Fong; Hsu, Hao-Jen

    2015-12-01

    Chemokine CXCL8 is crucial for regulation of inflammatory and immune responses via activating its cognate receptor CXCR1. In this study, molecular docking and binding free energy calculations were combined to predict the initial binding event of CXCL8 to CXCR1 for peptide drug design. The simulations reveal that in the initial binding, the N-loop of CXCL8 interacts with the N-terminus of CXCR1, which is dominated by electrostatic interactions. The derived peptides from the binding region of CXCL8 are synthesized for further confirmation. Surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that the CXCL8 derived peptide with 14 residues is able to bind to the receptor CXCR1 derived peptide with equilibrium KD of 252 μM while the peptide encompassing a CXCL8 K15A mutation hardly binds to CXCR1 derived peptide (KD = 1553 μM). The cell experiments show that the designed peptide inhibits CXCL8-induced and LPS-activated monocytes adhesion and transmigration. However, when the peptides were mutated on two lysine residues (K15 and K20), the inhibition effects were greatly reduced indicating these two amino acids are key residues for the initial binding of CXCL8 to CXCR1. This study demonstrates that in silico prediction based functional peptide design can be effective for developing anti-inflammation drugs.

  4. Neonatal NET-inhibitory factor and related peptides inhibit neutrophil extracellular trap formation

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Christian C.; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Cody, Mark J.; Wallace, Jared A.; Campbell, Robert A.; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Araujo, Claudia V.; Schubert, Sebastian; Harris, Estelle S.; Rowley, Jesse W.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Koening, Curry L.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes, also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), extrude molecular lattices of decondensed chromatin studded with histones, granule enzymes, and antimicrobial peptides that are referred to as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs capture and contain bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens. Nevertheless, experimental evidence indicates that NETs also cause inflammatory vascular and tissue damage, suggesting that identifying pathways that inhibit NET formation may have therapeutic implications. Here, we determined that neonatal NET-inhibitory factor (nNIF) is an inhibitor of NET formation in umbilical cord blood. In human neonatal and adult neutrophils, nNIF inhibits key terminal events in NET formation, including peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) activity, neutrophil nuclear histone citrullination, and nuclear decondensation. We also identified additional nNIF-related peptides (NRPs) that inhibit NET formation. nNIFs and NRPs blocked NET formation induced by pathogens, microbial toxins, and pharmacologic agonists in vitro and in mouse models of infection and systemic inflammation, and they improved mortality in murine models of systemic inflammation, which are associated with NET-induced collateral tissue injury. The identification of NRPs as neutrophil modulators that selectively interrupt NET generation at critical steps suggests their potential as therapeutic agents. Furthermore, our results indicate that nNIF may be an important regulator of NET formation in fetal and neonatal inflammation. PMID:27599294

  5. Inhibiting complex IL-17A and IL-17RA interactions with a linear peptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shenping; Desharnais, Joel; Sahasrabudhe, Parag V.; Jin, Ping; Li, Wei; Oates, Bryan D.; Shanker, Suman; Banker, Mary Ellen; Chrunyk, Boris A.; Song, Xi; Feng, Xidong; Griffor, Matt; Jimenez, Judith; Chen, Gang; Tumelty, David; Bhat, Abhijit; Bradshaw, Curt W.; Woodnutt, Gary; Lappe, Rodney W.; Thorarensen, Atli; Qiu, Xiayang; Withka, Jane M.; Wood, Lauren D.

    2016-01-01

    IL-17A is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has been implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Monoclonal antibodies inhibiting IL-17A signaling have demonstrated remarkable efficacy, but an oral therapy is still lacking. A high affinity IL-17A peptide antagonist (HAP) of 15 residues was identified through phage-display screening followed by saturation mutagenesis optimization and amino acid substitutions. HAP binds specifically to IL-17A and inhibits the interaction of the cytokine with its receptor, IL-17RA. Tested in primary human cells, HAP blocked the production of multiple inflammatory cytokines. Crystal structure studies revealed that two HAP molecules bind to one IL-17A dimer symmetrically. The N-terminal portions of HAP form a β-strand that inserts between two IL-17A monomers while the C-terminal section forms an α helix that directly blocks IL-17RA from binding to the same region of IL-17A. This mode of inhibition suggests opportunities for developing peptide antagonists against this challenging target. PMID:27184415

  6. Neonatal NET-inhibitory factor and related peptides inhibit neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Yost, Christian C; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Cody, Mark J; Wallace, Jared A; Campbell, Robert A; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Araujo, Claudia V; Schubert, Sebastian; Harris, Estelle S; Rowley, Jesse W; Rondina, Matthew T; Fulcher, James M; Koening, Curry L; Weyrich, Andrew S; Zimmerman, Guy A

    2016-10-03

    Neutrophil granulocytes, also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), extrude molecular lattices of decondensed chromatin studded with histones, granule enzymes, and antimicrobial peptides that are referred to as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs capture and contain bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens. Nevertheless, experimental evidence indicates that NETs also cause inflammatory vascular and tissue damage, suggesting that identifying pathways that inhibit NET formation may have therapeutic implications. Here, we determined that neonatal NET-inhibitory factor (nNIF) is an inhibitor of NET formation in umbilical cord blood. In human neonatal and adult neutrophils, nNIF inhibits key terminal events in NET formation, including peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) activity, neutrophil nuclear histone citrullination, and nuclear decondensation. We also identified additional nNIF-related peptides (NRPs) that inhibit NET formation. nNIFs and NRPs blocked NET formation induced by pathogens, microbial toxins, and pharmacologic agonists in vitro and in mouse models of infection and systemic inflammation, and they improved mortality in murine models of systemic inflammation, which are associated with NET-induced collateral tissue injury. The identification of NRPs as neutrophil modulators that selectively interrupt NET generation at critical steps suggests their potential as therapeutic agents. Furthermore, our results indicate that nNIF may be an important regulator of NET formation in fetal and neonatal inflammation.

  7. A Truncated Nef Peptide from SIVcpz Inhibits the Production of HIV-1 Infectious Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Sabino Cunha, Marcela; Lima Sampaio, Thatiane; Peterlin, B. Matija; Jesus da Costa, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    Nef proteins from all primate Lentiviruses, including the simian immunodeficiency virus of chimpanzees (SIVcpz), increase viral progeny infectivity. However, the function of Nef involved with the increase in viral infectivity is still not completely understood. Nonetheless, until now, studies investigating the functions of Nef from SIVcpz have been conducted in the context of the HIV-1 proviruses. In an attempt to investigate the role played by Nef during the replication cycle of an SIVcpz, a Nef-defective derivative was obtained from the SIVcpzWTGab2 clone by introducing a frame shift mutation at a unique restriction site within the nef sequence. This nef-deleted clone expresses an N-terminal 74-amino acid truncated peptide of Nef and was named SIVcpz-tNef. We found that the SIVcpz-tNef does not behave as a classic nef-deleted HIV-1 or simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques SIVmac. Markedly, SIVcpz-tNef progeny from both Hek-293T and Molt producer cells were completely non-infectious. Moreover, the loss in infectivity of SIVcpz-tNef correlated with the inhibition of Gag and GagPol processing. A marked accumulation of Gag and very low levels of reverse transcriptase were detected in viral lysates. Furthermore, these observations were reproduced once the tNef peptide was expressed in trans both in SIVcpzΔNef and HIV-1WT expressing cells, demonstrating that the truncated peptide is a dominant negative for viral processing and infectivity for both SIVcpz and HIV-1. We demonstrated that the truncated Nef peptide binds to GagPol outside the protease region and by doing so probably blocks processing of both GagPol and Gag precursors at a very early stage. This study demonstrates for the first time that naturally-occurring Nef peptides can potently block lentiviral processing and infectivity. PMID:27399760

  8. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with

  9. Signal peptide-dependent inhibition of MHC class I heavy chain translation by rhesus cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Powers, Colin J; Früh, Klaus

    2008-10-03

    The US2-11 region of human and rhesus cytomegalovirus encodes a conserved family of glycoproteins that inhibit MHC-I assembly with viral peptides, thus preventing cytotoxic T cell recognition. Since HCMV lacking US2-11 is no longer able to block assembly and transport of MHC-I, we examined whether this is also observed for RhCMV lacking the corresponding region. Unexpectedly, recombinant RhCMV lacking US2-11 was still able to inhibit MHC-I expression in infected fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of an additional MHC-I evasion mechanism. Progressive deletion analysis of RhCMV-specific genomic regions revealed that MHC-I expression is fully restored upon additional deletion of rh178. The protein encoded by this RhCMV-specific open reading frame is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In the presence of rh178, RhCMV prevented MHC-I heavy chain (HC) expression, but did not inhibit mRNA transcription or association of HC mRNA with translating ribosomes. Proteasome inhibitors stabilized a HC degradation intermediate in the absence of rh178, but not in its presence, suggesting that rh178 prevents completion of HC translation. This interference was signal sequence-dependent since replacing the signal peptide with that of CD4 or murine HC rendered human HCs resistant to rh178. We have identified an inhibitor of antigen presentation encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus unique in both its lack of homology to any other known protein and in its mechanism of action. By preventing signal sequence-dependent HC translocation, rh178 acts prior to US2, US3 and US11 which attack MHC-I proteins after protein synthesis is completed. Rh178 is the first viral protein known to interfere at this step of the MHC-I pathway, thus taking advantage of the conserved nature of HC leader peptides, and represents a new mechanism of translational interference.

  10. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 inhibits cerebellar cell death in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Pañeda, Covadonga; Arroba, Ana I; Frago, Laura M; Holm, Anne Mette; Rømer, John; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2003-08-26

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I is essential for cerebellar granule neuron survival and a decline in IGF-I is implicated in various age-dependent processes. Here we show that IGF-I mRNA levels are decreased in the cerebellum of old rats compared with young rats and this was associated with increased cell death and activation of caspases 3 and 9. Growth hormone-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6, a synthetic ligand for the ghrelin receptor, increased IGF-I mRNA levels, decreased cell death and inhibited caspase 3 and 9 activation in the cerebellum of aged rats. These results suggest that increasing IGF-I expression in the cerebellum can decrease cell death in aged rats via inhibition of caspase 3 and 9 activation.

  11. Mechanism of beta-purothionin antimicrobial peptide inhibition by metal ions: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Oard, Svetlana; Karki, Bijaya

    2006-04-20

    Wheat beta-purothionin is a highly potent antimicrobial peptide which, however, is inactivated by metal ions. The key structural properties and mechanisms of inhibition of beta-purothionin were investigated for the first time using unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water. A series of simulations were performed to determine effects of temperature and the metal ions. Analyses of the unconstrained simulations allowed the experimentally unavailable structural and dynamic details to be unambiguously examined. The global fold and the alpha1 helix of beta-purothionin are thermally stable and not affected by metal ions. In contrast, the alpha2 helix unfolds with shift of temperature from 300 K and in the presence of metal ions. The network of conserved residues including Arg30 and Lys5 is sensitive to environmental changes and triggers unfolding. Loop regions display high flexibility and elevated dynamics, but are affected by metal ions. Our study provides insights into the mechanism of metal ion-based inhibition.

  12. The Antitumor Peptide CIGB-552 Increases COMMD1 and Inhibits Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández Massó, Julio R; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Tejeda, Yelaine; Astrada, Soledad; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Delgado-Roche, Livan; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Vallespí, Maribel G

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the peptide L-2 designed from an alanine scanning of the Limulus-derived LALF32-51 region is a potential candidate for the anticancer therapy and its cell-penetrating capacity is an associated useful property. By the modification in the primary structure of L-2, a second-generation peptide (CIGB-552) was developed. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxic activity remains partially unknown. In this study, it was shown that CIGB-552 increases the levels of COMMD1, a protein involved in copper homeostasis, sodium transport, and the NF-κB signaling pathway. We found that CIGB-552 induces ubiquitination of RelA and inhibits the antiapoptotic activity regulated by NF-κB, whereas the knockdown of COMMD1 blocks this effect. We also found that CIGB-552 decreases the antioxidant capacity and induces the peroxidation of proteins and lipids in the tumor cells. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the mechanism of action of the peptide CIGB-552, which could be relevant in the design of future anticancer therapies.

  13. Myostatin inhibition by a follistatin-derived peptide ameliorates the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy model mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, K

    2008-07-01

    Gene-targeted therapies, such as adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-mediated gene therapy and cell-mediated therapy using myogenic stem cells, are hopeful molecular strategies for muscular dystrophy. In addition, drug therapies based on the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy patients are desirable. Multidisciplinary approaches to drug design would offer promising therapeutic strategies. Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily, is predominantly produced by skeletal muscle and negatively regulates the growth and differentiation of cells of the skeletal muscle lineage. Myostatin inhibition would increase the skeletal muscle mass and prevent muscle degeneration, regardless of the type of muscular dystrophy. Myostatin inhibitors include myostatin antibodies, myostatin propeptide, follistatin and follistatin-related protein. Although follistatin possesses potent myostatin-inhibiting activity, it works as an efficient inhibitor of activins. Unlike myostatin, activins regulate the growth and differentiation of nearly all cell types, including cells of the gonads, pituitary gland and skeletal muscle. We have developed a myostatin-specific inhibitor derived from follistatin, designated FS I-I. Transgenic mice expressing this myostatin-inhibiting peptide under the control of a skeletal muscle-specific promoter showed increased skeletal muscle mass and strength. mdx mice were crossed with FS I-I transgenic mice and any improvement of the pathological signs was investigated. The resulting mdx/FS I-I mice exhibited increased skeletal muscle mass and reduced cell infiltration in muscles. Muscle strength was also recovered in mdx/FS I-I mice. Our data indicate that myostatin inhibition by this follistatin-derived peptide has therapeutic potential for muscular dystrophy.

  14. Simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways in melanoma cells and tumor regression by a designed bidentate constrained helical peptide.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Amlanjyoti; Mallick, Shampa; Ghosh, Piya; Maiti, Atanu; Ahmed, Israr; Bhattacharya, Seemana; Mandal, Tapashi; Manna, Asit; Roy, Koushik; Singh, Sandeep; Nayak, Dipak Kumar; Wilder, Paul T; Markowitz, Joseph; Weber, David; Ghosh, Mrinal K; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Guha, Rajdeep; Konar, Aditya; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Roy, Siddhartha

    2014-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions are part of a large number of signaling networks and potential targets for drug development. However, discovering molecules that can specifically inhibit such interactions is a major challenge. S100B, a calcium-regulated protein, plays a crucial role in the proliferation of melanoma cells through protein-protein interactions. In this article, we report the design and development of a bidentate conformationally constrained peptide against dimeric S100B based on a natural tight-binding peptide, TRTK-12. The helical conformation of the peptide was constrained by the substitution of α-amino isobutyric acid--an amino acid having high helical propensity--in positions which do not interact with S100B. A branched bidentate version of the peptide was bound to S100B tightly with a dissociation constant of 8 nM. When conjugated to a cell-penetrating peptide, it caused growth inhibition and rapid apoptosis in melanoma cells. The molecule exerts antiproliferative action through simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways, including reactivation of wild-type p53 and inhibition of Akt and STAT3 phosphorylation. The apoptosis induced by the bidentate constrained helix is caused by direct migration of p53 to mitochondria. At moderate intravenous dose, the peptide completely inhibits melanoma growth in a mouse model without any significant observable toxicity. The specificity was shown by lack of ability of a double mutant peptide to cause tumor regression at the same dose level. The methodology described here for direct protein-protein interaction inhibition may be effective for rapid development of inhibitors against relatively weak protein-protein interactions for de novo drug development.

  15. CIGB-300, a proapoptotic peptide, inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farina, Hernán G; Benavent Acero, Fernando; Perera, Yasser; Rodríguez, Arielis; Perea, Silvio E; Castro, Boris Acevedo; Gomez, Roberto; Alonso, Daniel F; Gomez, Daniel E

    2011-07-15

    We have previously demonstrated that a proapoptotic cyclic peptide CIGB-300, formerly known as P15-Tat delivered into the cells by the cell-penetrating peptide Tat, was able to abrogate the CK2-mediated phosphorylation and induce tumor regression when injected directly into solid tumors in mice or by systemic administration. In this work, we studied the role of CIGB-300 on the main events that take place in angiogenesis. At non-cytotoxic doses, CIGB-300 was able to inhibit adhesion, migration, and tubular network formation induced by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) growing upon Matrigel in vitro. Likewise, we evaluated the cellular penetration and localization into the HUVEC cells of CIGB-300. Our results confirmed a quick cellular penetration and a cytoplasmic accumulation in the early minutes of incubation and a translocation into the nuclei beginning at 12h of treatment, with a strong presence in the perinuclear area. A microarray analysis was used to determine the genes affected by the treatment. We observed that CIGB-300 significantly decreased four genes strongly associated with tubulogenesis, growth, and differentiation of endothelial cells. The CIGB-300 was tested in vivo on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes (CAM), and a large number of newly formed blood vessels were significantly regressed. The results suggested that CIGB-300 has a potential as an antiangiogenic treatment. The mechanism of action may be associated with partial inhibition of VEGF and Notch pathways.

  16. Exploring monovalent and multivalent peptides for the inhibition of FBP21-tWW

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzon, Miriam; Marczynke, Michaela; Seitz, Oliver; Volkmer, Rudolf; Haag, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Summary The coupling of peptides to polyglycerol carriers represents an important route towards the multivalent display of protein ligands. In particular, the inhibition of low affinity intracellular protein–protein interactions can be addressed by this design. We have applied this strategy to develop binding partners for FBP21, a protein which is important for the splicing of pre-mRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Firstly, by using phage display the optimized sequence WPPPPRVPR was derived which binds with K Ds of 80 μM and 150 µM to the individual WW domains and with a K D of 150 μM to the tandem-WW1–WW2 construct. Secondly, this sequence was coupled to a hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) that allowed for the multivalent display on the surface of the dendritic polymer. This novel multifunctional hPG-peptide conjugate displayed a K D of 17.6 µM which demonstrates that the new carrier provides a venue for the future inhibition of proline-rich sequence recognition by FBP21 during assembly of the spliceosome. PMID:26124874

  17. Exploring monovalent and multivalent peptides for the inhibition of FBP21-tWW.

    PubMed

    Henning, Lisa Maria; Bhatia, Sumati; Bertazzon, Miriam; Marczynke, Michaela; Seitz, Oliver; Volkmer, Rudolf; Haag, Rainer; Freund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of peptides to polyglycerol carriers represents an important route towards the multivalent display of protein ligands. In particular, the inhibition of low affinity intracellular protein-protein interactions can be addressed by this design. We have applied this strategy to develop binding partners for FBP21, a protein which is important for the splicing of pre-mRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Firstly, by using phage display the optimized sequence WPPPPRVPR was derived which binds with K Ds of 80 μM and 150 µM to the individual WW domains and with a K D of 150 μM to the tandem-WW1-WW2 construct. Secondly, this sequence was coupled to a hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) that allowed for the multivalent display on the surface of the dendritic polymer. This novel multifunctional hPG-peptide conjugate displayed a K D of 17.6 µM which demonstrates that the new carrier provides a venue for the future inhibition of proline-rich sequence recognition by FBP21 during assembly of the spliceosome.

  18. Selective inhibition by a synthetic hirudin peptide of fibrin-dependent thrombosis in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Cadroy, Y.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A. ); Maraganore, J.M. )

    1991-02-15

    To determine the importance of the thrombin substrate recognition exosite for fibrinogen binding in the formation of both arterial and venous thrombi the authors evaluated the antithrombotic effects of the tyrosine-sulfated dodecapeptide from residues 53-64 of hirudin (H peptide) in a nonhuman primate model. This peptide was studied because it inhibits thrombin cleavages of fibrinogen by simple competition without blocking enzyme catalytic-site function. When an exteriorized arteriovenous access shunt model was used in baboons (Papio anubis), thrombus formation was induced by placing a thrombogenic device made of (i) a segment of tubing coated covalently with type I collagen, which generated platelet-rich thrombi under arterial flow conditions, and (ii) two subsequent annular regions of flow expansion that produced fibrin-rich thrombi typically associated with venous valves and veins. Thrombus formation was quantified by measurements of {sup 111}In-labeled platelet and {sup 125}I-labeled fibrinogen deposition in both arterial-flow and venous-flow portions of the device. These finding suggest that, by competitive inhibition of fibrinogen binding to thrombin, fibrin-rich venous-type thrombus formation may be selectively prevented. This strategy may be therapeutically attractive for preserving normal platelet function when conventional anticoagulant therapy is contraindicated.

  19. Optimization of adiponectin-derived peptides for inhibition of cancer cell growth and signaling.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Laszlo; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olah, Julia; Coroniti, Roberta; Knappe, Daniel; Nollmann, Friederike I; Hoffmann, Ralf; Wade, John D; Lovas, Sandor; Surmacz, Eva

    2015-05-01

    Adiponectin, an adipose tissue-excreted adipokine plays protective roles in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and exerts anti-cancer activities, partially by interfering with leptin-induced signaling. Previously we identified the active site in the adiponectin protein, and generated both a nanomolar monomeric agonist of the adiponectin receptor (10-mer ADP355) and an antagonist (8-mer ADP400) to modulate various adiponectin receptor-mediated cellular functions. As physiologically circulating adiponectin forms multimeric complexes, we also generated an agonist dimer with improved biodistribution and in vitro efficacy. In the current report, we attempted to optimize the monomeric agonist structure. Neither extension of the peptide up to 14-mer analogs nor reinstallation of native residues in permissible positions enhanced significantly the activity profile. The only substitutions that resulted in 5-10-fold improved agonistic activity were the replacement of turn-forming Gly4 and Tyr7 residues with Pro and Hyp, respectively, yielding the more active native β-sheet structure. All peptides retained good stability in human serum exhibiting half-lives >2 h. The cellular efficacy and stability rankings among the peptides followed expected structure-activity relationship trends. To investigate whether simultaneous activation of adiponectin pathways and inhibition of leptin-induced signals can result in cytostatic and anti-oncogenic signal transduction processes, we developed a chimera of the leptin receptor antagonist peptide Allo-aca (placed to the N-terminus) and ADP355 (at the C-terminus). The in vitro anti-tumor activity and intracellular signaling of the chimera were dominated by the more active Allo-aca component. The ADP355 part, however, reversed unfavorable in vivo metabolic effects of the leptin receptor antagonist.

  20. Inhibition of PDC-E2 human combinatorial autoantibodies by peptide mimotopes.

    PubMed

    Leung, P S; Cha, S; Joplin, R E; Galperin, C; Van de Water, J; Ansari, A A; Coppel, R L; Schatz, P J; Cwirla, S; Fabris, L E; Neuberger, J M; Gershwin, M E

    1996-12-01

    Immunohistochemical studies have shown that a unique immunoreactive molecule is present near the apical region of human biliary epithelial (BE) cells in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). This can be visualized by confocal microscopy in PBC livers using a number of unique monoclonal antibodies to the E2 component of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC-E2), the autoantigen most commonly recognized by antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). One such antibody, the murine mAb C355.1 was used to identify peptide mimotopes of PDC-E2 by screening a random dodecapeptide phage library ON 159.2 to identify the possible biochemical nature of this apical staining molecule. Out of 36 independent clones, 29 showed a common sequence and seven other sequences were singly represented. Three common amino acid motifs (SYP, TYVS and VRH) were found among these eight sequences. Similar to C355.1, the human combinatorial antibodies derived from a patient with PBC, SP1 and SP4, recognize the inner lipoyl domain of PDC-E2. However, when these antibodies are used to stain PBC BE cells, SP4 stains the apical region of PBC BE cells with high intensity whereas SP1 produces only cytoplasmic staining. Competitive inhibition of immunohistochemical staining using PDC-E2 specific human combinatorial antibodies SP1 and SP4 was performed using five of the above dodecapeptides. Interestingly, the peptides selected with C355.1 differentially inhibited the binding of SP1 and SP4 to PBC BE cells. Finally, rabbit sera raised against one such peptide (WMSYPDRTLRTS) stained BE cells from patients with PBC with a higher intensity than controls. Comparable data was obtained with immunoelectronmicroscopy. These data suggest that a molecular mimic of PDC-E2 is present at the external aspect of PBC BE cells.

  1. Quinolinol and Peptide Inhibitors of Zinc Protease in Botulinum Neurotoxin A: Effects of Zinc Ion and Peptides on Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    binding to a hydrophobic site in BoNT/A LC and in the peptide-BoNT/A LC complex. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Clostridium botulinum , neurotoxin, serotype A... botulinum neurotoxin A: Effects of zinc ion and peptides on inhibitionq Huiguo Lai a, Minghao Feng a, Virginia Roxas-Duncan b, Sivanesan Dakshanamurthy c...September 2009 Keywords: Zinc protease Inhibitor Quinolinol Peptide Botulinum Neurotoxin Slow binding Tight binding Molecular modeling Fluorescence

  2. Dynamic behavior of small heat shock protein inhibition on amyloid fibrillization of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, Dong; Dong, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Lai, Luhua

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of small heat shock protein inhibition on fibril formation was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peptide SSTSAA with modified ends was used for amyloid fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRET signal was followed during the fibril formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 inhibits fibril formation when introduced in the lag phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mj HSP16.5 slows down fibril formation when introduced after the lag phase. -- Abstract: Small heat shock proteins, a class of molecular chaperones, are reported to inhibit amyloid fibril formation in vitro, while the mechanism of inhibition remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Mj HSP16.5 inhibits amyloid fibril formation of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A. A model peptide (dansyl-SSTSAA-W) was designed by introducing a pair of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes into the peptide, allowing for the monitoring of fibril formation by this experimental model. Mj HSP16.5 completely inhibited fibril formation of the model peptide at a molar ratio of 1:120. The dynamic process of fibril formation, revealed by FRET, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, showed a lag phase of about 2 h followed by a fast growth period. The effect of Mj HSP16.5 on amyloid fibril formation was investigated by adding it into the incubation solution during different growth phases. Adding Mj HSP16.5 to the incubating peptide before or during the lag phase completely inhibited fibril formation. However, introducing Mj HSP16.5 after the lag phase only slowed down the fibril formation process by adhering to the already formed fibrils. These findings provide insight into the inhibitory roles of small heat shock proteins on amyloid fibril formation at the molecular level.

  3. The Chemopreventive Peptide Lunasin Inhibits d-Galactose- Induced Experimental Cataract in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guangzhi; Zhang, Ping; Ye, Pei; Zhang, Miaoqing; Han, Ning; Shuai, Haoyue; Tan, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage to the constituents of the eye lens is a major mechanism in the initiation and development of cataract. Lunasin, a 43-amino acids chemoprevention peptide, has been proved to possess potent anti-oxidative activity other than its established anticancer activities. Herein, we explored whether lunasin has preventative effects on d-galactose-induced experimental cataract in rat. After modeling, SD rats were administrated by instillation, 80 µM of lunasin eye drops to each eye thrice daily and consecutively for 30 days. As a result, lunasin treatment effectively inhibited the progression of d-galactose-induced experimental cataract, and protected the lenses of rats from oxidative damage and attenuated the lipid peroxidation through up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and inhibited the activation of polyol pathway by decreasing AR activity. Additionally, in vitro studies proved that lunasin treatment could protect human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) against d-galactose induced cell damage and apoptosis, and up-regulate antioxidant enzymes. This is the first demonstration that lunasin could inhibit d-galactose-induced experimental cataract in rats by protecting against oxidative damage and inhibiting the activation of polyol pathway.

  4. Purification and amino acid composition of a peptide with molt-inhibiting activity from the lobster, Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Chang, E S; Bruce, M J; Newcomb, R W

    1987-01-01

    A peptide was isolated and purified from sinus glands of the lobster, Homarus americanus, that was able to decrease circulating titers of ecdysteroids and increase the molt interval of eyestalk-ablated juvenile lobsters. This molt-inhibiting activity was demonstrated to consist of two very closely related peptides by means of high-performance liquid chromatography and gel electrophoresis. By means of amino acid analyses, a molecular weight of approximately 8700 was obtained.

  5. Arabidopsis 10-formyl tetrahydrofolate deformylases are essential for photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Collakova, Eva; Goyer, Aymeric; Naponelli, Valeria; Krassovskaya, Inga; Gregory, Jesse F; Hanson, Andrew D; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2008-07-01

    In prokaryotes, PurU (10-formyl tetrahydrofolate [THF] deformylase) metabolizes 10-formyl THF to formate and THF for purine and Gly biosyntheses. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains two putative purU genes, At4g17360 and At5g47435. Knocking out these genes simultaneously results in plants that are smaller and paler than the wild type. These double knockout (dKO) mutant plants show a 70-fold increase in Gly levels and accumulate elevated levels of 5- and 10-formyl THF. Embryo development in dKO mutants arrests between heart and early bent cotyledon stages. Mature seeds are shriveled, accumulate low amounts of lipids, and fail to germinate. However, the dKO mutant is only conditionally lethal and is rescued by growth under nonphotorespiratory conditions. In addition, culturing dKO siliques in the presence of sucrose restores normal embryo development and seed viability, suggesting that the seed and embryo development phenotypes are a result of a maternal effect. Our findings are consistent with the involvement of At4g17360 and At5g47435 proteins in photorespiration, which is to prevent excessive accumulation of 5-formyl THF, a potent inhibitor of the Gly decarboxylase/Ser hydroxymethyltransferase complex. Supporting this role, deletion of the At2g38660 gene that encodes the bifunctional 5,10-methylene THF dehydrogenase/5,10-methenyl THF cyclohydrolase that acts upstream of 5-formyl THF formation restored the wild-type phenotype in dKO plants.

  6. Does the cis/trans configuration of peptide bonds in bioactive tripeptides play a role in ACE-1 enzyme inhibition?

    PubMed Central

    Siltari, Aino; Viitanen, Riikka; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Valjakka, Jarkko

    2014-01-01

    Background The milk casein-derived bioactive tripeptides isoleucine-proline-proline (IPP) and valine-proline-proline (VPP) have been shown to prevent development of hypertension in animal models and to lower blood pressure in moderately hypertensive subjects in most but not all clinical trials. Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme 1 (ACE-1) has been suggested as the explanation for these antihypertensive and beneficial vascular effects. Previously, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) have not been used to test ACE-1 inhibiting properties of casein derived tripeptides in vasculature. Purpose We focused on the cis/trans configurations of the peptide bonds in proline-containing tripeptides in order to discover whether the different structural properties of these peptides influence their activity in ACE-1 inhibition. We hypothesized that the configuration of proline-containing peptides plays a significant role in enzyme inhibition. Methods AutoDock 4.2 docking software was used to predict suitable peptide bond configurations of the tripeptides. Besides modeling studies, we completed ACE-1 activity measurements in vitro using HUVEC cultures. Results In HUVEC cells, both IPP and VPP inhibited ACE-1. Based on molecular docking studies, we propose that in ACE-1 inhibition IPP and VPP share a similar cis configuration between the first aliphatic (isoleucine or valine) and the second (proline) amino acid residues and more different configurations between two proline residues. In vivo experiments are needed to validate the significance of the present findings. PMID:24596454

  7. Calcitonin Peptide Family Members Are Differentially Regulated by LPS and Inhibit Functions of Rat Alveolar NR8383 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soultanova, Aichurek; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Pfeil, Uwe; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the calcitonin peptide family—calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (AM), and adrenomedullin2/intermedin (IMD)–exert modulatory effects upon monocytes and macrophages of various extrapulmonary origins. Utilizing the rat alveolar macrophage (AMφ) cell line NR8383, we here set out to determine to which extent these three peptides and their receptors are differentially regulated in AMφ and what specific effects they have on AMφ key functions. LPS treatment differentially up-regulated expression of the peptides and receptors. Among the three peptides, IMD mRNA content was lowest both in primary rat AMφ and NR8383 cells, whereas IMD peptide dominated in basal and LPS-stimulated secretion from NR8383 cells. Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis and TNF-α production were inhibited by AM, IMD, and CGRP, whereas pro-IL-1β mRNA was slightly down-regulated exclusively by CGRP. Neither of these peptides affected IL-6 or IL-10 production. None increased intracellular calcium concentration, but AM significantly inhibited store-operated calcium entry. In conclusion, the rat AMφ cell line NR8383 is both a source and a target of the calcitonin peptide family members AM, IMD, and CGRP. Despite sharing proteins of the receptor complexes, AM, IMD, and CGRP each showed a characteristic pattern of effects and regulation, suggesting that these closely related peptides are not just redundant members of one common signaling pathway but act in concert by addressing parallel signaling cascades. Since peptide and receptor expression are up-regulated by LPS, these signaling pathways might act as inhibitory feedback mechanisms in pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27737007

  8. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Gonzalo P; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L; Bignon, Eduardo A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Vidal, Simon E; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-07-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses.

  9. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Gonzalo P.; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L.; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H.; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Vidal, Simon E.; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  10. Differential Inhibition of Signal Peptide Peptidase Family Members by Established γ-Secretase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Yong; Ladd, Gabriela Z.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jung, Joo In; Greenbaum, Doron; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Golde, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    The signal peptide peptidases (SPPs) are biomedically important proteases implicated as therapeutic targets for hepatitis C (human SPP, (hSPP)), plasmodium (Plasmodium SPP (pSPP)), and B-cell immunomodulation and neoplasia (signal peptide peptidase like 2a, (SPPL2a)). To date, no drug-like, selective inhibitors have been reported. We use a recombinant substrate based on the amino-terminus of BRI2 fused to amyloid β 1-25 (Aβ1-25) (FBA) to develop facile, cost-effective SPP/SPPL protease assays. Co-transfection of expression plasmids expressing the FBA substrate with SPP/SPPLs were conducted to evaluate cleavage, which was monitored by ELISA, Western Blot and immunoprecipitation/MALDI-TOF Mass spectrometry (IP/MS). No cleavage is detected in the absence of SPP/SPPL overexpression. Multiple γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and (Z-LL)2 ketone differentially inhibited SPP/SPPL activity; for example, IC50 of LY-411,575 varied from 51±79 nM (on SPPL2a) to 5499±122 nM (on SPPL2b), while Compound E showed inhibition only on hSPP with IC50 of 1465±93 nM. Data generated were predictive of effects observed for endogenous SPPL2a cleavage of CD74 in a murine B-Cell line. Thus, it is possible to differentially inhibit SPP family members. These SPP/SPPL cleavage assays will expedite the search for selective inhibitors. The data also reinforce similarities between SPP family member cleavage and cleavage catalyzed by γ-secretase. PMID:26046535

  11. Novel peptide VIP-TAT with higher affinity for PAC1 inhibited scopolamine induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjie; Yang, Yanxu; Cui, Zekai; Zheng, Lijun; Zeng, Zhixing; Zhang, Huahua

    2014-10-01

    A novel peptide VIP-TAT with a cell penetrating peptide TAT at the C-terminus of VIP was constructed and prepared using intein mediated purification with an affinity chitin-binding tag (IMPACT) system to enhance the brain uptake efficiency for the medical application in central nervous system. It was found by labeling VIP-TAT and VIP with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) that the extension with TAT increased the brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT significantly. Then short-term and long-term treatment with scopolamine (Scop) was used to evaluate the effect of VIP-TAT or VIP on Scop induced amnesia. Both short-term and long-term administration of VIP-TAT inhibited the latent time reduction in step-through test induced by Scop significantly, but long-term administration of VIP aggravated the Scop induced amnesia. Long-term i.p. injection of VIP-TAT was shown to have positive effect by inhibiting the oxidative damage, apoptosis and the cholinergic system activity reduction that induced by Scop, while VIP exerted negative effect in brain opposite to that in periphery system. The in vitro data showed that VIP-TAT had not only protective but also proliferative effect on Neuro2a cells which was inhibited by PAC1 antagonist PACAP(6-38). Competition binding assay and cAMP assay confirmed that VIP-TAT had higher affinity and activation for PAC1 than VIP. So it was concluded that the significantly stronger protective effect of VIP-TAT against Scop induced amnesia than VIP was due to (1) the enhanced brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT and (2) the increased affinity and activation of VIP-TAT for receptor PAC1.

  12. A peptide targeted against phosphoprotein and leader RNA interaction inhibits growth of Chandipura virus -- an emerging rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arunava; Chakraborty, Prasenjit; Polley, Smarajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Roy, Siddhartha

    2013-11-01

    The fatal illness caused by Chandipura virus (CHPV), an emerging pathogen, presently lacks any therapeutic option. Previous research suggested that interaction between the virally encoded phosphoprotein (P) and the positive sense leader RNA (le-RNA) may play an important role in the viral lifecycle. In this report, we have identified a β-sheet/loop motif in the C-terminal domain of the CHPV P protein as essential for this interaction. A synthetic peptide encompassing this motif and spanning a continuous stretch of 36 amino acids (Pep208-243) was found to bind the le-RNA in vitro and inhibit CHPV growth in infected cells. Furthermore, a stretch of three amino acid residues at position 217-219 was identified as essential for this interaction, both in vitro and in infected cells. siRNA knockdown-rescue experiments demonstrated that these three amino acid residues are crucial for the leader RNA binding function of P protein in the CHPV life cycle. Mutations of these three amino acid residues render the peptide completely ineffective against CHPV. Effect of inhibition of phosphoprotein-leader RNA interaction on viral replication was assayed. Peptide Pep208-243 tagged with a cell penetrating peptide was found to inhibit CHPV replication as ascertained by real time RT-PCR. The specific inhibition of viral growth observed using this peptide suggests a new possibility for designing of anti-viral agents against Mononegavirale group of human viruses.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Formyl-Methionyl Transferase Mutants Demonstrate Reduced Virulence Factor Production and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Thomas; Huang, Jianzhong; Fan, Frank; Rogers, Shannon; Gentry, Daniel; Holland, Reannon; DeMarsh, Peter; Zalacain, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptide deformylase (PDF) represent a new class of antibacterial agents with a novel mechanism of action. Mutations that inactivate formyl methionyl transferase (FMT), the enzyme that formylates initiator methionyl-tRNA, lead to an alternative initiation of protein synthesis that does not require deformylation and are the predominant cause of resistance to PDF inhibitors in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we report that loss-of-function mutations in FMT impart pleiotropic effects that include a reduced growth rate, a nonhemolytic phenotype, and a drastic reduction in production of multiple extracellular proteins, including key virulence factors, such as α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), that have been associated with S. aureus pathogenicity. Consequently, S. aureus FMT mutants are greatly attenuated in neutropenic and nonneutropenic murine pyelonephritis infection models and show very high survival rates compared with wild-type S. aureus. These newly discovered effects on extracellular virulence factor production demonstrate that FMT-null mutants have a more severe fitness cost than previously anticipated, leading to a substantial loss of pathogenicity and a restricted ability to produce an invasive infection. PMID:23571548

  14. A non-peptide NK1-receptor antagonist, RP 67580, inhibits neurogenic inflammation postsynaptically.

    PubMed Central

    Moussaoui, S. M.; Montier, F.; Carruette, A.; Blanchard, J. C.; Laduron, P. M.; Garret, C.

    1993-01-01

    1. The non-peptide neurokinin NK1-receptor antagonist, RP 67580 (3aR, 7aR), a perhydroisoindolone derivative, powerfully reduced plasma extravasation in rat hind paw skin induced by local application of xylene (ID50 = 0.03 mg kg-1, i.v.) or capsaicin (ID50 = 0.06 mg kg-1, i.v.), or by i.v. injection of exogenous substance P (SP) or septide ([pGlu6,Pro9]SP(6-11)) (ID50 = 0.04-0.05 mg kg-1, i.v.). RP 67580 (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) also abolished capsaicin-induced nasal fluid hypersecretion (by 82 +/- 5%). These effects were found to be stereospecific, the enantiomer, RP 68651 (3aS, 7aS), being inactive at 1 mg kg-1, i.v. 2. In rats neonatally treated with capsaicin (50 mg kg-1, s.c.), plasma extravasation induced by SP was significantly increased (by 43 +/- 7%). RP 67580 (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) completely inhibited the SP-induced plasma extravasation in capsaicin neonatally treated-animals, as it did in control animals. This result suggests that RP 67580 acts at the postsynaptic level for the inhibition of plasma extravasation. 3. Opioid receptor agonists, mu-(morphine) and kappa-(PD-117302) at 10 mg kg-1, s.c., in contrast to NK1-receptor antagonists, did not inhibit plasma extravasation induced by exogenous SP. They were, however, partially effective against plasma extravasation induced by electrical nerve stimulation (74 +/- 4% and 48 +/- 9% inhibition at 10 mg kg-1, s.c. of morphine and PD-117302, respectively, compared to 90 +/- 3% inhibition obtained with RP 67580, 3 mg kg-1, s.c.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7684305

  15. Inhibition of NF-kappa B activation by peptides targeting NF-kappa B essential modulator (nemo) oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Agou, Fabrice; Courtois, Gilles; Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Baleux, Françoise; Coïc, Yves-Marie; Traincard, François; Israël, Alain; Véron, Michel

    2004-12-24

    NF-kappa B essential modulator/IKK-gamma (NEMO/IKK-gamma) plays a key role in the activation of the NF-kappa B pathway in response to proinflammatory stimuli. Previous studies suggested that the signal-dependent activation of the IKK complex involves the trimerization of NEMO. The minimal oligomerization domain of this protein consists of two coiled-coil subdomains named Coiled-coil 2 (CC2) and leucine zipper (LZ) (Agou, F., Traincard, F., Vinolo, E., Courtois, G., Yamaoka, S., Israel, A., and Veron, M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 27861-27869). To search for drugs inhibiting NF-kappa B activation, we have rationally designed cell-permeable peptides corresponding to the CC2 and LZ subdomains that mimic the contact areas between NEMO subunits. The peptides were tagged with the Antennapedia/Penetratin motif and delivered to cells prior to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. Peptide transduction was monitored by fluorescence-activated cell sorter, and their effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-kappa B activation was quantified using an NF-kappa B-dependent beta-galactosidase assay in stably transfected pre-B 70Z/3 lymphocytes. We show that the peptides corresponding to the LZ and CC2 subdomains inhibit NF-kappa B activation with an IC(50) in the mum range. Control peptides, including mutated CC2 and LZ peptides and a heterologous coiled-coil peptide, had no inhibitory effect. The designed peptides are able to induce cell death in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells exhibiting constitutive NF-kappa B activity. Our results provide the "proof of concept" for a new and promising strategy for the inhibition of NF-kappa B pathway activation through targeting the oligomerization state of the NEMO protein.

  16. A novel approach to the design of inhibitors of human secreted phospholipase A2 based on native peptide inhibition.

    PubMed

    Church, W B; Inglis, A S; Tseng, A; Duell, R; Lei, P W; Bryant, K J; Scott, K F

    2001-08-31

    Human Type IIA secreted phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)-IIA) is an important modulator of cytokine-dependent inflammatory responses and a member of a growing superfamily of structurally related phospholipases. We have previously shown that sPLA(2)-IIA is inhibited by a pentapeptide sequence comprising residues 70-74 of the native sPLA(2)-IIA protein and that peptides derived from the equivalent region of different sPLA(2)-IIA species specifically inhibit the enzyme from which they are derived. We have now used an analogue screen of the human pentapeptide (70)FLSYK(74) in which side-chain residues were substituted, together with molecular docking approaches that modeled low-energy conformations of (70)FLSYK(74) bound to human sPLA(2)-IIA, to generate inhibitors with improved potency. Importantly, the modeling studies showed a close association between the NH(2) and COOH termini of the peptide, predicting significant enhancement of the potency of inhibition by cyclization. Cyclic compounds were synthesized and indeed showed 5-50-fold increased potency over the linear peptide in an Escherichia coli membrane assay. Furthermore, the potency of inhibition correlated with steady-state binding of the cyclic peptides to sPLA(2)-IIA as determined by surface plasmon resonance studies. Two potential peptide interaction sites were identified on sPLA(2)-IIA from the modeling studies, one in the NH(2)-terminal helix and the other in the beta-wing region, and in vitro association assays support the potential for interaction of the peptides with these sites. The inhibitors were effective at nanomolar concentrations in blocking sPLA(2)-IIA-mediated amplification of cytokine-induced prostaglandin synthesis in human rheumatoid synoviocytes in culture. These studies provide an example where native peptide sequences can be used for the development of potent and selective inhibitors of enzyme function.

  17. Thiosemicarbazone modification of 3-acetyl coumarin inhibitspeptide aggregation and protect against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Dnyanesh S; Bapat, Archika M; Ramteke, Shefali N; Joshi, Bimba N; Roussel, Pascal; Tomas, Alain; Deschamps, Patrick; Kulkarni, Prasad P

    2016-10-04

    Aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) is an important event in the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, among the available therapeutic approaches to fight with disease, inhibition of Aβ aggregation is widely studied and one of the promising approach for the development of treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Thiosemicarbazone compounds are known for their variety of biological activities. However, the potential of thiosemicarbazone compounds towards inhibition of Aβ peptide aggregation and the subsequent toxicity is little explored. Herein, we report synthesis and x-ray crystal structure of novel compound 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone and its efficacy toward inhibition of Aβ(1-42) peptide aggregation. Our results indicate that 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone inhibits Aβ(1-42) peptide aggregation up to 80% compared to the parent 3-acetyl coumarin which inhibits 52%. Further, 3-acetyl coumarin thiosemicarbazone provides neuroprotection against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cell line. These findings indicate that thiosemicarbazone modification renders 3-acetyl coumarin neuroprotective properties.

  18. Feedback Inhibition in the PhoQ/PhoP Signaling System by a Membrane Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lippa, Andrew M.; Goulian, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The PhoQ/PhoP signaling system responds to low magnesium and the presence of certain cationic antimicrobial peptides. It regulates genes important for growth under these conditions, as well as additional genes important for virulence in many gram-negative pathogens. PhoQ is a sensor kinase that phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor PhoP. Since feedback inhibition is a common theme in stress-response circuits, we hypothesized that some members of the PhoP regulon may play such a role in the PhoQ/PhoP pathway. We therefore screened for PhoP-regulated genes that mediate feedback in this system. We found that deletion of mgrB (yobG), which encodes a 47 amino acid peptide, results in a potent increase in PhoP-regulated transcription. In addition, over-expression of mgrB decreased transcription at both high and low concentrations of magnesium. Localization and bacterial two-hybrid studies suggest that MgrB resides in the inner-membrane and interacts directly with PhoQ. We further show that MgrB homologs from Salmonella typhimurium and Yersinia pestis also repress PhoP-regulated transcription in these organisms. In cell regulatory circuits, feedback has been associated with modulating the induction kinetics and/or the cell-to-cell variability in response to stimulus. Interestingly, we found that elimination of MgrB-mediated feedback did not have a significant effect on the kinetics of reporter protein production and did not decrease the variability in expression among cells. Our results indicate MgrB is a broadly conserved membrane peptide that is a critical mediator of negative feedback in the PhoQ/PhoP circuit. This new regulator may function as a point of control that integrates additional input signals to modulate the activity of this important signaling system. PMID:20041203

  19. Developmental changes in the inhibition of cultured rat uterine cell proliferation by opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Környei, J L; Vértes, Z; Kovács, K A; Göcze, P M; Vértes, M

    2003-06-01

    Opioid peptides are negative regulators of cell proliferation in several organs including the uterus. In the present study, the ontogeny of the direct inhibitory action of opioid peptides on the proliferation of cultured rat uterine cells was investigated. Uteri of 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 60-day-old rats were removed in a sterile way. Tissue blocks were dispersed by limited digestions with trypsin and collagenase. Cells were cultured in enriched Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). Treatments were present during the entire culture period. Cell densities of the monolayers were determined by counting the cells following trypsinization and trypan blue exclusion. Rat uterine mixed cell cultures grew to confluence within 10 days. The average population doubling time gradually increased with the age of animals. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) increased cell densities of cultures from all age groups. The oestradiol (E2)-responsiveness appeared at 21 days of age. The effect of [D-Met2-Pro5]-enkephalinamide (ENK) was biphasic. ENK and [Met5]-enkephalin (OGF) decreased cell densities of both unstimulated and EGF-stimulated cultures from 7-day-old rats to the same extent. ENK failed to act in 14-day-old animals. From 21 days of age on, the E2- or EGF-stimulated proliferation was inhibited only by ENK and DAMGO, while 30 nm DPDPE, Dynorhin-A, OGF, [Leu5]-enkephalin, beta-endorphin, and morphiceptin were ineffective. The half-inhibitory concentration of ENK was 0.3 nm. The effects of ENK were prevented by concomitant treatment with naloxone. Our novel data demonstrate two different phases of the inhibitory action of opioid peptides on rat uterine cell proliferation during ontogeny with an insensitive interval in between.

  20. Small stress molecules inhibit aggregation and neurotoxicity of prion peptide 106-126

    SciTech Connect

    Kanapathipillai, Mathumai; Ku, Sook Hee; Girigoswami, Koyeli; Park, Chan Beum

    2008-01-25

    In prion diseases, the posttranslational modification of host-encoded prion protein PrP{sup c} yields a high {beta}-sheet content modified protein PrP{sup sc}, which further polymerizes into amyloid fibrils. PrP106-126 initiates the conformational changes leading to the conversion of PrP{sup c} to PrP{sup sc}. Molecules that can defunctionalize such peptides can serve as a potential tool in combating prion diseases. In microorganisms during stressed conditions, small stress molecules (SSMs) are formed to prevent protein denaturation and maintain protein stability and function. The effect of such SSMs on PrP106-126 amyloid formation is explored in the present study using turbidity, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cellular toxicity assay. Turbidity and AFM studies clearly depict that the SSMs-ectoine and mannosylglyceramide (MGA) inhibit the PrP106-126 aggregation. Our study also connotes that ectoine and MGA offer strong resistance to prion peptide-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma cells, concluding that such molecules can be potential inhibitors of prion aggregation and toxicity.

  1. Cyclodepsipeptides produced by actinomycetes inhibit cyclic-peptide-mediated quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Desouky, Said E; Shojima, Akane; Singh, Ravindra Pal; Matsufuji, Takahisa; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamagaki, Tohru; Okubo, Ken-Ichi; Ohtani, Kaori; Sonomoto, Kenji; Nakayama, Jiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyclic peptides are commonly used as quorum-sensing autoinducers in Gram-positive Firmicutes bacteria. Well-studied examples of such molecules are thiolactone and lactone, used to regulate the expression of a series of virulence genes in the agr system of Staphylococcus aureus and the fsr system of Enterococcus faecalis, respectively. Three cyclodepsipeptides WS9326A, WS9326B and cochinmicin II/III were identified as a result of screening actinomycetes culture extracts for activity against the agr/fsr system. These molecules are already known as receptor antagonists, the first two for tachykinin and the last one for endothelin. WS9326A also inhibited the transcription of pfoA regulated by the VirSR two-component system in Clostridium perfringens. Receptor-binding assays using a fluorescence-labeled autoinducer (FITC-GBAP) showed that WS9326A and WS9326B act as receptor antagonists in this system. In addition, an ex vivo assay showed that WS9326B substantially attenuated the toxicity of S. aureus for human corneal epithelial cells. These results suggest that these three natural cyclodepsipeptides have therapeutic potential for targeting the cyclic peptide-mediated quorum sensing of Gram-positive pathogens.

  2. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, induce biofilm formation, and inhibit antimicrobial peptide function†

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Jennifer; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Chen, Haihan; Stebounova, Larissa; Wu, Chia-Ming; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Caraballo, Juan Carlos; Zabner, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Given the increased use of iron-containing nanoparticles in a number of applications, it is important to understand any effects that iron-containing nanoparticles can have on the environment and human health. Since iron concentrations are extremely low in body fluids, there is potential that iron-containing nanoparticles may influence the ability of bacteria to scavenge iron for growth, affect virulence and inhibit antimicrobial peptide (AMP) function. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) and AMPs were exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles, hematite (α-Fe2O3), of different sizes ranging from 2 to 540 nm (2 ± 1, 43 ± 6, 85 ± 25 and 540 ± 90 nm) in diameter. Here we show that the greatest effect on bacterial growth, biofilm formation, and AMP function impairment is found when exposed to the smallest particles. These results are attributed in large part to enhanced dissolution observed for the smallest particles and an increase in the amount of bioavailable iron. Furthermore, AMP function can be additionally impaired by adsorption onto nanoparticle surfaces. In particular, lysozyme readily adsorbs onto the nanoparticle surface which can lead to loss of peptide activity. Thus, this current study shows that co-exposure of nanoparticles and known pathogens can impact host innate immunity. Therefore, it is important that future studies be designed to further understand these types of impacts. PMID:25221673

  3. Hsp70 and antifibrillogenic peptides promote degradation and inhibit intracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic light chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Dul, J. L.; Davis, D. P.; Williamson, E. K.; Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Univ. of Chicago

    2001-02-19

    In light chain (LC) amyloidosis an immunoglobulin LC assembles into fibrils that are deposited in various tissues. Little is known about how these fibrils form in vivo. We previously showed that a known amyloidogenic LC, SMA, can give rise to amyloid fibrils in vitro when a segment of one of its {beta} sheets undergoes a conformational change, exposing an Hsp70 binding site. To examine SMA aggregation in vivo, we expressed it and its wild-type counterpart, LEN, in COS cells. While LEN is rapidly oxidized and subsequently secreted, newly synthesized SMA remains in the reduced state. Most SMA molecules are dislocated out of the ER into the cytosol, where they are ubiquitinylated and degraded by proteasomes. A parallel pathway for molecules that are not degraded is condensation into perinuclear aggresomes that are surrounded by vimentin-containing intermediate filaments and are dependent upon intact microtubules. Inhibition of proteasome activity shifts the balance toward aggresome formation. Intracellular aggregation is decreased and targeting to proteasomes improved by overexpression of the cytosolic chaperone Hsp70. Importantly, transduction into the cell of an Hsp70 target peptide, derived from the LC sequence, also reduces aggresome formation and increases SMA degradation. These results demonstrate that an amyloidogenic LC can aggregate intracellularly despite the common presentation of extracellular aggregates, and that a similar molecular surface mediates both in vitro fibril formation and in vivo aggregation. Furthermore, rationally designed peptides can be used to suppress this aggregation and may provide a feasible therapeutic approach.

  4. Structural insight into the inhibition of tubulin by vinca domain peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Anthony; Marchand, Matthieu; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2008-11-01

    The tubulin vinca domain is the target of widely different microtubule inhibitors that interfere with the binding of vinblastine. Although all these ligands inhibit the hydrolysis of GTP, they affect nucleotide exchange to variable extents. The structures of two vinca domain antimitotic peptides--phomopsin A and soblidotin (a dolastatin 10 analogue)--bound to tubulin in a complex with a stathmin-like domain show that their sites partly overlap with that of vinblastine and extend the definition of the vinca domain. The structural data, together with the biochemical results from the ligands we studied, highlight two main contributors in nucleotide exchange: the flexibility of the tubulin subunits' arrangement at their interfaces and the residues in the carboxy-terminal part of the beta-tubulin H6-H7 loop. The structures also highlight common features of the mechanisms by which vinca domain ligands favour curved tubulin assemblies and destabilize microtubules.

  5. Inhibition of amyloid fiber assembly by both BiP and its target peptide.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D. P.; Raffen, R.; Vogen, S.; Williamson, E.; Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2000-10-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain (LC) normally is a soluble, secreted protein, but some LC assemble into ordered fibrils whose deposition in tissues results in amyloidosis and organ failure. Here we reconstitute fibril formation in vitro and show that preformed fibrils can nucleate polymerization of soluble LC. This prion-like behavior has important physiological implications, since somatic mutations generate multiple related LC sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate that fibril formation in vitro and aggregation of whole LC within cells are inhibited by BiP and by a synthetic peptide that is identical to a major LC binding site for BiP. We propose that LC form fibrils via an interprotein loop swap and that the underlying conformational change should be amenable to drug therapy.

  6. The immune-stimulating peptide WKYMVm has therapeutic effects against ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Doo; Kwon, Soonil; Lee, Sung Kyun; Kook, Minsoo; Lee, Ha Young; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Park, Chan Bae; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the therapeutic effects of an immune-stimulating peptide, WKYMVm, in ulcerative colitis. The administration of WKYMVm to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated mice reversed decreases in body weight, bleeding score and stool score in addition to reversing DSS-induced mucosa destruction and shortened colon. The WKYMVm-induced therapeutic effect against ulcerative colitis was strongly inhibited by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 2 antagonist, WRWWWW, indicating the crucial role of FPR2 in this effect. Mechanistically, WKYMVm effectively decreases intestinal permeability by stimulating colon epithelial cell proliferation. WKYMVm also strongly decreases interleukin-23 and transforming growth factor-β production in the colon of DSS-treated mice. We suggest that the potent immune-modulating peptide WKYMVm and its receptor FPR2 may be useful in the development of efficient therapeutic agents against chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:24030327

  7. An extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaves and purified gymnemic acid inhibits glucose-stimulated gastric inhibitory peptide secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fushiki, T; Kojima, A; Imoto, T; Inoue, K; Sugimoto, E

    1992-12-01

    Gastric inhibitory peptide release into the portal vein in response to duodenal infusion of D-glucose was studied in the presence of a leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and inhibitors of some putative glucose sensors and carriers in the intestinal lumen. Intraduodenal infusion of D-glucose significantly increased the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentration in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in the portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide induced by glucose was significantly depressed by concomitantly infused leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin but not by cytochalasin B. Mannoheptulose, which inhibits glycolysis, and procaine and lidocaine, which inhibit the vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen, did not affect portal immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide concentrations. These results suggest that a glucose receptor, which interacts with the leaf extract of Gymnema sylvestre, purified gymnemic acid and phlorizin, exists for the release of immunoreactive gastric inhibitory peptide and that the glucose receptor for gastric inhibitory peptide release is not likely to be identical with a glucose transporter or a vagal glucoreceptor in the lumen.

  8. An optimized B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) antagonist peptide inhibits the interaction of BLyS with BCMA.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Feng; Wu, Zhen; Feng, Jian-Nan; Li, Yan; Shen, Bei-Fen; Sun, Jian

    2013-04-01

    B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) antagonists are new therapeutic reagents for treating the autoimmune diseases. Peptibodies can inhibit the bioactivity of BLyS, the same as other BLyS antagonists: decoyed BLyS receptors and anti-BLyS antibodies. In this study, a new optimized BLyS antagonist peptide was designed according to our previous work by the computer-aided homology modeling. Competitive ELISA showed that the peptide at 100 μg/ml could inhibit 54 % of the BCMA-Fc binding to BLyS. To maintain its stability and spatial conformation, the peptide was fused to human IgG1 Fc to form a peptide-Fc fusion protein-a novel peptibody by gene engineering. ELISA indicated that the peptibody could bind with BLyS in dosage-dependent manner as BCMA-Fc did. This study highlights the possibility of designing and optimizing BLyS antagonist peptides with high biopotency by the computer-aided design. Thus, these peptides could neutralize BLyS activity and be potential antagonists to treat autoimmune diseases related with BLyS overexpression.

  9. Acid-labile formylation of amino terminal proline of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 p24(gag) was found by proteomics using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Takashi; Misumi, Shogo; Takamune, Nobutoki; Takahashi, Ichiro; Takama, Michiho; Shoji, Shozo

    2002-05-10

    HIV-1(LAV-1) particles were collected by ultracentrifugation, treated with subtilisin, and then purified by Sepharose CL-4B column chromatography to remove microvesicles. The lysate of the purified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles was subjected to two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and stained, and the stained spots were excised and digested with trypsin. The resulting peptide fragments were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Twenty-five proteins were identified as the proteins inside the virion and the acid-labile formyl group of an amino terminal proline residue of HIV-1(LAV-1) p24(gag) was determined by MALDI-TOF MS before and after weak-acid treatments (0.6 N hydrochloric acid) and confirmed by post-source decay (PSD) of the N-formylated N-terminal tryptic peptide (N-formylated Pro(1)-Arg(18)). The role of formylation has been unclear so far, but it is surmised that the acid-labile formylation of HIV-1(LAV-1) p24(gag) may play a critical role in the formation of the HIV-1 core for conferring HIV-1 infectivity.

  10. Identification and Evaluation of Cryoprotective Peptides from Chicken Collagen: Ice-Growth Inhibition Activity Compared to That of Type I Antifreeze Proteins in Sucrose Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-06-29

    The ability of chicken collagen peptides to inhibit the growth of ice crystals was evaluated and compared to that of fish antifreeze proteins (AFPs). This ice inhibition activity was assessed using a polarized microscope by measuring ice crystal dimensions in a sucrose model system with and without collagen peptides after seven thermal cycles. The system was stabilized at -25 °C and cycled between -16 and -12 °C. Five candidate peptides with ice inhibition activity were identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry and were then synthesized. Their ice inhibition capacity was compared to that of type I AFPs in a 23% sucrose model system. Specific collagen peptides with certain amino acid sequences reduced the extent of ice growth by approximately 70% at a relatively low concentration (1 mg/mL). These results suggest that specific collagen peptides may act in a noncolligative manner, inhibiting ice crystal growth like type I AFPs, but less efficiently.

  11. Inhibition of serotonin release by bombesin-like peptides in rat hypothalamus in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Saporito, M.S.; Warwick, R.O. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the activity of bombesin (BN), neuromedin-C (NM-C) and neuromedin-B (NM-B) on serotonin (5-HT) release and reuptake in rat hypothalamus (HYP) in vitro. BN and NM-C but not NM-B decreased K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release from superfused HYP slices by 25%. Bacitracin, a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, reversed the inhibitory effect of BN on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Phosphoramidon (PAN, 10 /mu/M) an endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor, abolished the inhibitory effect of BN, but not NM-C, on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. The peptidyl dipeptidase A inhibitor enalaprilat (ENP, 10 /mu/M), enhanced both BN and NM-C inhibition of /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Bestatin (BST, 10 /mu/M) had no effect on BN or NM-C inhibitory activity on /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Neither BN, NM-C nor NM-B affected reuptake of /sup 3/H-5-HT into HYP synaptosomes alone or in combination with any of the peptidase inhibitors, nor did these peptides alter the ability of fluoxetine to inhibit /sup 3/H-5-HT uptake.

  12. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  13. Fusion protein of CDR mimetic peptide with Fc inhibit TNF-alpha induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weisong; Feng, Jiannan; Li, Yan; Lin, Zhou; Shen, Beifen

    2006-02-01

    The variable regions of antibodies play central roles in the binding with antigens. Based on the model of a tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) neutralizing monoclonal antibody (named as Z12) with TNF-alpha, heavy chain CDR2 (HCDR2) and light chain CDR3 (LCDR3) of Z12 were found to be the most responsible to bind with TNF-alpha. A mimetic peptide (PT) was designed based on the sequence derived from HCDR2 and LCDR3. Fusion protein PT-Fc was constructed by linking PT with Fc of human IgG1 through a flexible linker (GGGGGS). The primary structural characteristics of Fc and PT-Fc were analyzed, including the flexibility, hydrophilicity and epitopes. It was demonstrated that PT and Fc in the fusion protein possessed bio-function properly and non-interfering with each other. Furthermore, PT-Fc was expressed in Escherichia coli by fusion with thioredoxin (Trx). After trx-PT-Fc was cleaved with recombinant enterokinase, PT-Fc was obtained. The results of in vitro cytotoxic assays showed that both PT and PT-Fc could efficiently inhibit TNF-alpha induced apoptosis on L929 cells. At the same micromole concentration, the inhibition activity of PT-Fc was significantly higher than PT.

  14. Deprotection of the indole (N(ind))-formyl (For) group on tryptophan employing a new reagent, N,N'-dimethylethylendiamine (DMEDA) in an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Odagami, Takenao; Tsuda, Yuko; Kogami, Yuji; Kouji, Hiroyuki; Okada, Yoshio

    2009-02-01

    The deprotection of the indole (N(ind))-formyl (For) group on Trp was achieved in a 95% yield using N,N'-dimethylethylendiamine (DMEDA) (1.5, 2.0, 3.0 eq) in water at room temperature. A new reagent was successfully applied to the deprotection of a model peptide, H-Phe-Trp(N(ind)-For)-Lys-Tyr-OH, to give H-Phe-Trp-Lys-Tyr-OH in a 91% yield.

  15. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    PubMed

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  16. A novel recombinant slow-release TNF α-derived peptide effectively inhibits tumor growth and angiogensis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Shaojun; Shen, Shutao; Fang, Shixiong; Ye, Zulu; Shi, Zhi; Hong, An

    2015-01-01

    RMP16, a recombinant TNF α-derived polypeptide comprising a specific human serum albumin (HSA)-binding 7-mer peptide identified by phage display screening (WQRPSSW), a cleavage peptide for Factor Xa (IEGR), and a 20-amino acid bioactive peptide P16 (TNF α segment including amino acid residues 75–94), was prepared by gene-engineering technology. RMP16 showed prolonged half-life, 13.11 hours in mice (half-lives of P16 and TNF α are 5.77 and 29.0 minutes, respectively), and obviously higher receptor selectivity for TNFRI than TNF α. RMP16 had significant inhibition effects for multiple tumor cells, especially prostate cancer Du145 cells, and human vascular endothelial cells but not for human mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells. RMP16 can more effectively induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation for DU145 cells than P16 and TNF α via the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. In nude mice with transplanted tumor of DU145 cells, RMP16 significantly induced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor tissues but causing less side effects, and tumor inhibitory rate reached nearly 80%, furthermore, RMP16 can potently inhibit tumor angiogenesis and neovascularization. These findings suggest that RMP16 may represent a promising long-lasting antitumor therapeutic peptide with less TNF α-induced toxicity. PMID:26337231

  17. A novel recombinant slow-release TNF α-derived peptide effectively inhibits tumor growth and angiogensis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Shaojun; Shen, Shutao; Fang, Shixiong; Ye, Zulu; Shi, Zhi; Hong, An

    2015-09-04

    RMP16, a recombinant TNF α-derived polypeptide comprising a specific human serum albumin (HSA)-binding 7-mer peptide identified by phage display screening (WQRPSSW), a cleavage peptide for Factor Xa (IEGR), and a 20-amino acid bioactive peptide P16 (TNF α segment including amino acid residues 75-94), was prepared by gene-engineering technology. RMP16 showed prolonged half-life, 13.11 hours in mice (half-lives of P16 and TNF α are 5.77 and 29.0 minutes, respectively), and obviously higher receptor selectivity for TNFRI than TNF α. RMP16 had significant inhibition effects for multiple tumor cells, especially prostate cancer Du145 cells, and human vascular endothelial cells but not for human mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells. RMP16 can more effectively induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation for DU145 cells than P16 and TNF α via the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway and G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. In nude mice with transplanted tumor of DU145 cells, RMP16 significantly induced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor tissues but causing less side effects, and tumor inhibitory rate reached nearly 80%, furthermore, RMP16 can potently inhibit tumor angiogenesis and neovascularization. These findings suggest that RMP16 may represent a promising long-lasting antitumor therapeutic peptide with less TNF α-induced toxicity.

  18. Inhibition of the aggregation of lactoferrin and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in the presence of polyphenols, oligosaccharides, and collagen peptide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Liu, Fuguo; Xu, Chenqi; Sun, Cuixia; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yanxiang

    2015-05-27

    The aggregation of lactoferrin and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) was inhibited by polyphenols, oligosaccharides, and collagen peptide in this study. Polyphenols, oligosaccharides, or collagen peptide can effectively prevent the formation of lactoferrin-EGCG aggregates, respectively. The addition sequence of lactoferrin, polyphenols (oligosaccharides or collagen peptide) and EGCG can affect the turbidity and particle size of the ternary complexes in the buffer solution; however, it hardly affected the ζ-potential and fluorescence characteristics. With either positive or negative charge, polyphenols and collagen peptide disrupted the formation of lactoferrin-EGCG aggregate mainly through the mechanism of its competition with EGCG molecules which surrounded the lactoferrin molecule surface with weaker binding affinities, forming polyphenols or a collagen peptide-lactoferrin-EGCG ternary complex; for neutral oligosaccharides, the ternary complex was generated mainly through steric effects, accompanied by a change in the lactoferrin secondary structure induced by gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, and xylo-oligosaccharide. Polyphenols, oligosaccharides, or collagen peptide restraining the formation of lactoferrin-EGCG aggregate could be applied in the design of clear products in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries.

  19. Empirical and bioinformatic characterization of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) colostrum whey peptides & their angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ashok, N R; Aparna, H S

    2017-08-01

    Whey based peptides are well known for their nutritional and multifunctional properties. In this context, whey proteins from buffalo colostrum & milk were digested by in vitro simulation digestion and analyzed by nano-LC-MS/MS. Functional protein association networks, gene annotations and localization of identified proteins were carried out. An ACE inhibitory peptide sorted from the library was custom synthesized and an in vitro ACE assay was performed. The study led to the identification of 74 small peptides which were clustered into 5 gene functional groups and majority of them were secretory proteins. Among the identified peptides, majority of them were found identical to angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, antioxidant, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory and opioidal peptides. An octapeptide (m/z - 902.51, IQKVAGTW) synthesized was found to inhibit ACE with an IC50 of 300±2µM. The present investigation thus establishes newer vista for food derived peptides having ACE inhibitory potential for nutraceutical or therapeutic applications.

  20. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen) on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD). Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins. PMID:25973613

  1. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by peptide mimics of the coiled-coil region of its ATPase subunits.

    PubMed

    Inobe, Tomonao; Genmei, Reiko

    Regulation of proteasomal degradation is an indispensable tool for biomedical studies. Thus, there is demand for novel proteasome inhibitors. Proteasomal degradation requires formation of coiled-coil structure by the N-terminal region of ATPase subunits of the proteasome cap. Here we show that peptides that mimic the N-terminal coiled-coil region of ATPase subunits interfere with proteasome function. These results suggest that coiled-coil peptides represent promising new proteasome inhibitors and that N-terminal coiled-coil regions of ATPase subunits are targets for proteasome inhibition.

  2. Mo polyoxometalate nanoclusters capable of inhibiting the aggregation of Aβ-peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingchang; Yang, Licong; Zheng, Chuping; Zheng, Wenjing; Zhang, Jingnan; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-05-01

    A neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aggregation of a forty-residue peptide known as amyloid beta forty (Aβ40). While past work has indicated that blocking Aβ40 aggregation could be an effective strategy for the treatment of AD, developing therapies with this goal has been met with limited success. Polyoxometalates (POMs) have been previously investigated for their anti-viral and anti-tumoral properties and we report here that three representative POM nanoclusters have been synthesized for use against Aβ40 aggregation. Through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, turbidity, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we found that all three POM complexes can significantly inhibit both natural Aβ40 self-aggregation and metal-ion induced Aβ40 aggregation. We also evaluated the protective effect of POM complexes on Aβ40-induced neurotoxicity in cultured PC12 cells and found that treatment with POM complexes can elevate cell viability, decrease levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, and stabilize mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings indicate that all three representative POM complexes are capable of inhibiting Aβ40 aggregation and subsequent neurotoxicity. While a complete mechanistic understanding remains to be elucidated, the synthesized POM complexes may work through a synergistic interaction with metal ions and Aβ40. These data indicate that POM complexes have high therapeutic potential for use against one of the primary neuropathological features of AD.A neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aggregation of a forty-residue peptide known as amyloid beta forty (Aβ40). While past work has indicated that blocking Aβ40 aggregation could be an effective strategy for the treatment of AD, developing therapies with this goal has been met with limited success. Polyoxometalates (POMs) have been previously investigated for their anti-viral and anti-tumoral properties

  3. Inhibition of tumor implantation at sites of trauma by Arg-Gly-Asp containing proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Murthy, M S; Weiss, B D; Miller, R J; Trueheart, R; Scanlon, E F

    1992-01-01

    We report on the inhibition of wound implantation by TA3Ha mammary carcinoma cells by Arg-Gly-Asp containing proteins and peptides using a hepatic wedge resection model. Intravenously injected TA3Ha cells rarely form tumor in the liver of syngeneic mice, but after hepatic wedge resection, 45% (107/240) of the mice develop tumors in the hepatic wound. Hepatic wound implantation is significantly (P = 0.01) inhibited by pretreating the cells with whole mouse plasma, but not with fibrinogen-depleted plasma or serum. Tumor inhibition is also achieved by pretreatment of cells with fibrinogen (P = 0.05-0.0004), fibronectin (P = 0.007) and laminin, but not by albumin. The active domain appears to be the RGDS sequence since the deca- and tetrapeptides containing RGDS inhibit wound implantation (P less than 0.05). However, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser has no such activity. None of these agents affects ascites tumor formation by the intraperitoneally injected cells, suggesting that anchorage independent growth of cells is not affected. We propose that proteins and peptides containing RGD occupy the binding sites and prevent the cells from interacting with cell adhesion proteins in healing wounds. Proteins and/or peptides containing RGD may be useful for preventing local recurrence in postsurgical cancer patients.

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibition enhances antimicrobial peptide but not inflammatory cytokine expression upon bacterial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Natalie; Sechet, Emmanuel; Friedman, Robin; Amiot, Aurélien; Sobhani, Iradj; Nigro, Giulia; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Sperandio, Brice

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are defense effectors of the innate immunity playing a crucial role in the intestinal homeostasis with commensals and protection against pathogens. Herein we aimed to investigate AMP gene regulation by deciphering specific characteristics allowing their enhanced expression among innate immune genes, particularly those encoding proinflammatory mediators. Our emphasis was on epigenetic regulation of the gene encoding the AMP β-defensin 2 (HBD2), taken as a model of possibly specific induction, upon challenge with a commensal bacterium, compared with the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8. Using an in vitro model of colonic epithelial cells challenged with Escherichia coli K12, we showed that inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC) by trichostatin A dramatically enhanced induction of HBD2 expression, without affecting expression of IL-8. This mechanism was supported by an increased phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine S10, preferentially at the HBD2 promoter. This process occurred through activation of the IκB kinase complex, which also led to activation of NF-κB. Moreover, we demonstrated that NF-κB was modified by acetylation upon HDAC inhibition, partly by the histone acetyltransferase p300, and that both NF-κB and p300 supported enhanced induction of HBD2 expression. Furthermore, we identified additional genes belonging to antimicrobial defense and epithelial restitution pathways that showed a similar pattern of epigenetic control. Finally, we confirmed our finding in human colonic primary cells using an ex vivo organoid model. This work opens the way to use epigenetic pharmacology to achieve induction of epithelial antimicrobial defenses, while limiting the deleterious risk of an inflammatory response. PMID:27162363

  5. Farnesoid X receptor inhibits glucagon-like peptide-1 production by enteroendocrine L cells.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Mohamed-Sami; Daoudi, Mehdi; Prawitt, Janne; Ducastel, Sarah; Touche, Véronique; Sayin, Sama I; Perino, Alessia; Brighton, Cheryl A; Sebti, Yasmine; Kluza, Jérôme; Briand, Olivier; Dehondt, Hélène; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Dorchies, Emilie; Baud, Grégory; Spinelli, Valeria; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Caron, Sandrine; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Caiazzo, Robert; Reimann, Frank; Marchetti, Philippe; Lefebvre, Philippe; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Gribble, Fiona M; Schoonjans, Kristina; Pattou, François; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Lestavel, Sophie

    2015-07-02

    Bile acids are signalling molecules, which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex bile acids in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here, we show that FXR activation in L cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycaemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes.

  6. A Cyclic Peptide Inhibitor of HIF-1 Heterodimerization That Inhibits Hypoxia Signaling in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor that acts as the master regulator of cellular response to reduced oxygen levels, thus playing a key role in the adaptation, survival, and progression of tumors. Here we report cyclo-CLLFVY, identified from a library of 3.2 million cyclic hexapeptides using a genetically encoded high-throughput screening platform, as an inhibitor of the HIF-1α/HIF-1β protein–protein interaction in vitro and in cells. The identified compound inhibits HIF-1 dimerization and transcription activity by binding to the PAS-B domain of HIF-1α, reducing HIF-1-mediated hypoxia response signaling in a variety of cell lines, without affecting the function of the closely related HIF-2 isoform. The reported cyclic peptide demonstrates the utility of our high-throughput screening platform for the identification of protein–protein interaction inhibitors, and forms the starting point for the development of HIF-1 targeted cancer therapeutics. PMID:23796364

  7. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Production by Enteroendocrine L-cells

    PubMed Central

    TRABELSI, Mohamed-Sami; DAOUDI, Mehdi; PRAWITT, Janne; DUCASTEL, Sarah; TOUCHE, Véronique; SAYIN, Sama I.; PERINO, Alessia; BRIGHTON, Cheryl A.; SEBTI, Yasmine; KLUZA, Jérôme; BRIAND, Olivier; DEHONDT, Hélène; VALLEZ, Emmanuelle; DORCHIES, Emilie; BAUD, Grégory; SPINELLI, Valeria; HENNUYER, Nathalie; CARON, Sandrine; BANTUBUNGI, Kadiombo; CAIAZZO, Robert; REIMANN, Frank; MARCHETTI, Philippe; LEFEBVRE, Philippe; BÄCKHED, Fredrik; GRIBBLE, Fiona M.; SCHOONJANS, Kristina; PATTOU, François; TAILLEUX, Anne; STAELS, Bart; LESTAVEL, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are signalling molecules which activate the transmembrane receptor TGR5 and the nuclear receptor FXR. BA sequestrants (BAS) complex BA in the intestinal lumen and decrease intestinal FXR activity. The BAS-BA complex also induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) production by L-cells which potentiates β-cell glucose-induced insulin secretion. Whether FXR is expressed in L-cells and controls GLP-1 production is unknown. Here we show that FXR activation in L-cells decreases proglucagon expression by interfering with the glucose-responsive factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and GLP-1 secretion by inhibiting glycolysis. In vivo, FXR-deficiency increases GLP-1 gene expression and secretion in response to glucose hence improving glucose metabolism. Moreover, treatment of ob/ob mice with the BAS colesevelam increases intestinal proglucagon gene expression and improves glycemia in a FXR-dependent manner. These findings identify the FXR/GLP-1 pathway as a new mechanism of BA control of glucose metabolism and a pharmacological target for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26134028

  8. Efficient inhibition of miR-155 function in vivo by peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Fabani, Martin M.; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Williams, Donna; Lyons, Paul A.; Torres, Adrian G.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Enright, Anton J.; Gait, Michael J.; Vigorito, Elena

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in diverse physiological processes and are potential therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides (ONs) of different chemistries have proven successful for blocking miRNA expression. However, their specificity and efficiency have not been fully evaluated. Here, we show that peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) efficiently block a key inducible miRNA expressed in the haematopoietic system, miR-155, in cultured B cells as well as in mice. Remarkably, miR-155 inhibition by PNA in primary B cells was achieved in the absence of any transfection agent. In mice, the high efficiency of the treatment was demonstrated by a strong overlap in global gene expression between B cells isolated from anti-miR-155 PNA-treated and miR-155-deficient mice. Interestingly, PNA also induced additional changes in gene expression. Our analysis provides a useful platform to aid the design of efficient and specific anti-miRNA ONs for in vivo use. PMID:20223773

  9. Peptides derived from the copper-binding region of lysyl oxidase exhibit antiangiogeneic properties by inhibiting enzyme activity: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mohankumar, Arun; Renganathan, Bhuvanasundar; Karunakaran, Coral; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi; Konerirajapuram Natarajan, Sulochana

    2014-11-01

    Despite the rigorous research on abnormal angiogenesis, there is a persistent need for the development of new and efficient therapies against angiogenesis-related diseases. The role of Lysyl oxidase (LOX) in angiogenesis and cancer has been established in prior studies. Copper is known to induce the synthesis of LOX, and hence regulates its activity. Hypoxia-induced metastasis is dependent on LOX expression and activity. It has been believed that the inhibition of LOX would be a therapeutic strategy to inhibit angiogenesis. To explore this, we designed peptides (M peptides) from the copper-binding region of LOX and hypothesized them to modulate LOX. The peptides were characterized, and their copper-binding ability was confirmed by mass spectrometry. The M peptides were found to reduce the levels of intracellular copper when the cells were co-treated with copper. The peptides showed promising effect on aortic LOX, recombinant human LOX and LOX produced by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The study also explores the effect of these peptides on copper and hypoxia-stimulated angiogenic response in HUVECs. It was found that the M peptides inhibited copper/hypoxia-induced LOX activity and inhibited stimulated HUVEC tube formation and migration. This clearly indicated the potential of M peptides in inhibiting angiogenesis, highlighting their role in the formulation of drugs for the same.

  10. Inhibition of HLA-DM Mediated MHC Class II Peptide Loading by HLA-DO Promotes Self Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Denzin, Lisa K

    2013-12-17

    Major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) molecules are loaded with peptides derived from foreign and self-proteins within the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen presenting cells (APCs). This process is mediated by interaction of MHCII with the conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule HLA-DM (DM). DM activity is directly opposed by HLA-DO (DO), another conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule. DO is an MHCII substrate mimic. Binding of DO to DM prevents MHCII from binding to DM, thereby inhibiting peptide loading. Inhibition of DM function enables low stability MHC complexes to survive and populate the surface of APCs. As a consequence, DO promotes the display of a broader pool of low abundance self-peptides. Broadening the peptide repertoire theoretically reduces the likelihood of inadvertently acquiring a density of self-ligands that is sufficient to activate self-reactive T cells. One function of DO, therefore, is to promote T cell tolerance by shaping the visible image of self. Recent data also shows that DO influences the adaptive immune response by controlling B cell entry into the germinal center reaction. This review explores the data supporting these concepts.

  11. Inhibition of HLA-DM Mediated MHC Class II Peptide Loading by HLA-DO Promotes Self Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Denzin, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) molecules are loaded with peptides derived from foreign and self-proteins within the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen presenting cells (APCs). This process is mediated by interaction of MHCII with the conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule HLA-DM (DM). DM activity is directly opposed by HLA-DO (DO), another conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule. DO is an MHCII substrate mimic. Binding of DO to DM prevents MHCII from binding to DM, thereby inhibiting peptide loading. Inhibition of DM function enables low stability MHC complexes to survive and populate the surface of APCs. As a consequence, DO promotes the display of a broader pool of low abundance self-peptides. Broadening the peptide repertoire theoretically reduces the likelihood of inadvertently acquiring a density of self-ligands that is sufficient to activate self-reactive T cells. One function of DO, therefore, is to promote T cell tolerance by shaping the visible image of self. Recent data also shows that DO influences the adaptive immune response by controlling B cell entry into the germinal center reaction. This review explores the data supporting these concepts. PMID:24381574

  12. Identifying and characterising PPE7 (Rv0354c) high activity binding peptides and their role in inhibiting cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Diana P; Ocampo, Marisol; Varela, Yahson; Curtidor, Hernando; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2017-02-15

    This study was aimed at characterising the PPE7 protein from the PE/PPE protein family. The presence and transcription of the rv0354c gene in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was determined and the subcellular localisation of the PPE7 protein on mycobacterial membrane was confirmed by immunoelectron microscope. Two peptides were identified as having high binding activity (HABPs) and were tested in vitro regarding the invasion of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. HABP 39224 inhibited invasion in A549 epithelial cells and U937 macrophages by more than 50%, whilst HABP 39225 inhibited invasion by 40% in U937 cells. HABP 39224, located in the protein's C-terminal region, has a completely conserved amino acid sequence in M. tuberculosis complex species and could be selected as a base peptide when designing a subunit-based, anti-tuberculosis vaccine.

  13. Identification of a small peptide that inhibits PCSK9 protein binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingnan; Eigenbrot, Charles; Zhou, Lijuan; Shia, Steven; Li, Wei; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Moran, Paul; Di Lello, Paola; Skelton, Nicholas J; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Peterson, Andrew; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2014-01-10

    PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) is a negative regulator of the hepatic LDL receptor, and clinical studies with PCSK9-inhibiting antibodies have demonstrated strong LDL-c-lowering effects. Here we screened phage-displayed peptide libraries and identified the 13-amino acid linear peptide Pep2-8 as the smallest PCSK9 inhibitor with a clearly defined mechanism of inhibition that has been described. Pep2-8 bound to PCSK9 with a KD of 0.7 μm but did not bind to other proprotein convertases. It fully restored LDL receptor surface levels and LDL particle uptake in PCSK9-treated HepG2 cells. The crystal structure of Pep2-8 bound to C-terminally truncated PCSK9 at 1.85 Å resolution showed that the peptide adopted a strand-turn-helix conformation, which is remarkably similar to its solution structure determined by NMR. Consistent with the functional binding site identified by an Ala scan of PCSK9, the structural Pep2-8 contact region of about 400 Å(2) largely overlapped with that contacted by the EGF(A) domain of the LDL receptor, suggesting a competitive inhibition mechanism. Consistent with this, Pep2-8 inhibited LDL receptor and EGF(A) domain binding to PCSK9 with IC50 values of 0.8 and 0.4 μm, respectively. Remarkably, Pep2-8 mimicked secondary structural elements of the EGF(A) domain that interact with PCSK9, notably the β-strand and a discontinuous short α-helix, and it engaged in the same β-sheet hydrogen bonds as EGF(A) does. Although Pep2-8 itself may not be amenable to therapeutic applications, this study demonstrates the feasibility of developing peptidic inhibitors to functionally relevant sites on PCSK9.

  14. Theaflavins, dimeric catechins, inhibit peptide transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers via down-regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated peptide transporter PEPT1.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Junko; Park, Ha-Young; Kunitake, Yuri; Yoshiura, Keiko; Matsui, Toshiro

    2013-06-15

    In the small intestine, peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) plays a role in the transport of di- and tripeptides. In this study, we investigated whether theaflavins (TFs) affect the absorption of small peptides in human intestinal Caco-2 cells, since TFs do not penetrate through the cells and might be involved in intestinal transport systems. In transport experiments, the transport of glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar, a model molecule for PEPT1 transport) and other dipeptides (Val-Tyr and Ile-Phe) were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in TFs-pretreated cells. In TF 3'-O-gallate-pretreated cells, Western blot analysis revealed attenuated expression of PEPT1 transporter and Gly-Sar transport was completely ameliorated by 10 μM Compound C, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TFs inhibit peptide transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers, probably through suppression of AMPK-mediated PEPT1 expression, which should be considered a new bioactivity of TFs in black tea.

  15. Peptide nucleic acids targeting β-globin mRNAs selectively inhibit hemoglobin production in murine erythroleukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    MONTAGNER, GIULIA; GEMMO, CHIARA; FABBRI, ENRICA; MANICARDI, ALEX; ACCARDO, IGEA; BIANCHI, NICOLETTA; FINOTTI, ALESSIA; BREVEGLIERI, GIULIA; SALVATORI, FRANCESCA; BORGATTI, MONICA; LAMPRONTI, ILARIA; BRESCIANI, ALBERTO; ALTAMURA, SERGIO; CORRADINI, ROBERTO; GAMBARI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of hemoglobinopathies, amending altered hemoglobins and/or globins produced in excess is an important part of therapeutic strategies and the selective inhibition of globin production may be clinically beneficial. Therefore the development of drug-based methods for the selective inhibition of globin accumulation is required. In this study, we employed peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to alter globin gene expression. The main conclusion of the present study was that PNAs designed to target adult murine β-globin mRNA inhibit hemoglobin accumulation and erythroid differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells with high efficiency and fair selectivity. No major effects were observed on cell proliferation. Our study supports the concept that PNAs may be used to target mRNAs that, similar to globin mRNAs, are expressed at very high levels in differentiating erythroid cells. Our data suggest that PNAs inhibit the excess production of globins involved in the pathophysiology of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:25405921

  16. Cytokine-mediated inhibition of fibrillar amyloid-β peptide degradation by human mononuclear phagocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Kiyota, Tomomi; Walsh, Shannon M.; Liu, Jianuo; Kipnis, Jonathan; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2008-01-01

    Vaccination therapy of AD animal models and patients strongly suggests an active role of brain mononuclear phagocytes in immune-mediated clearance of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in brain. Although Aβ uptake by macrophages can be regulated by pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, their effects on macrophage-mediated Aβ degradation are poorly understood. To better understand this mechanism of degradation, we examined whether pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines affect the degradation of Aβ using primary cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and microglia using pulse-chase analysis of fibrillar and oligomer 125I-Aβ40 and Aβ42. Initial uptake of fibrillar Aβ40 and Aβ42 was 40% and its degradation was saturated by 120 hrs in both MDM and microglia, compared to an initial uptake of oligomeric Aβ less than 0.5% and saturation of degradation within 24 hrs. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) increased the intracellular retention of fibrillar Aβ40 and Aβ42 by inhibiting degradation, whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), but not IL-13 and IL-27, enhanced degradation. Fibrillar Aβ degradation in MDM is sensitive to lysosomal and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors but insensitive to proteasomal and neprilysin inhibitors. IFN-γ and TNF-α directly reduced the expression of IDE and chaperone molecules (Hsp70 and Hsc70), which are involved in refolding of aggregated proteins. Co-culture of MDM with activated, but not naïve T cells, suppressed Aβ degradation in MDM, which was partially blocked by a combination of neutralizing antibodies against pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines suppress Aβ degradation in MDM, whereas select anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines antagonize these effects. PMID:18768842

  17. Bax inhibiting peptide reduces apoptosis in neonatal rat hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng-Ya; Cui, Kai-Jie; Yu, Mao-Min; Zhang, Hui; Peng, Xiang-Li; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) has been reported to induce apoptosis in neonates. We, therefore, analyzed the ability of Bax-inhibiting peptide (BIP) to provide neuroprotective effects during hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Seven-day-old wistar rat pups (n = 198) were randomly divided into a sham-operated group (Group S, n = 18), saline group (Group C, n = 90) and BIP group (Group B, n = 90). Pathological changes in the cerebral tissues of rat pups were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, TUNEL and Western blot. The expression of cytochrome c and caspase-3 was determined using western blot technique. Rat pups demonstrated neurobehavioral alteration in Groups C and B. TUNEL-positive cells in the left hippocampus were significantly increased in Group C and Group B after HIBD (P < 0.01) when compared with Group S. There was a marked reduction in TUNEL positive cells in subgroups B1 through B4 when compared with the respective subgroups C1 through C5. Compared with Group S, the expression of caspase-3 and cytochrome c was significantly increased in Groups C and B (P < 0.01). The difference in expression of caspase-3 and cytochrome c between subgroups B1 through B4 and C1 through C4 was significant (P < 0.01). In conclusions, the neuro-protective effect of BIP was due to a reduction of nerve cell apoptosis in our neonatal HIE rat model. We propose that BIP has potential as a neuro-protective drug in neonatal HIE cases. PMID:26823794

  18. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok; Bae, Jeehyeon; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer. - Highlights: • TM-JM1/2 peptides are efficiently delivered into cells by AuNP-Apt-conjugates. • TM-JM1/2 peptides loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates inhibit DDR2 activation. • Inhibition of DDR2 activation by TM-JM1/2 peptides decreases tumor progression.

  19. A novel Omp25-binding peptide screened by phage display can inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 infection in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junbo; Guo, Fei; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Yin, Shuanghong; Li, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Brucellosis is a globally distributed zoonotic disease affecting animals and humans, and current antibiotic and vaccine strategies are not optimal. The surface-exposed protein Omp25 is involved in Brucella virulence and plays an important role in Brucella pathogenesis during infection, suggesting that Omp25 could be a useful target for selecting potential therapeutic molecules to inhibit Brucella pathogenesis. In this study, we identified, we believe for the first time, peptides that bind specifically to the Omp25 protein of pathogens, using a phage panning technique, After four rounds of panning, 42 plaques of eluted phages were subjected to pyrosequencing. Four phage clones that bound better than the other clones were selected following confirmation by ELISA and affinity constant determination. The peptides selected could significantly inhibit Brucella abortus 2308 (S2308) internalization and intracellular growth in RAW264.7 macrophages, and significantly induce secretion of TNF-α and IL-12 in peptide- and S2308-treated cells. Any observed peptide (OP11, OP27, OP35 or OP40) could significantly inhibit S2308 infection in BALB/c mice. Moreover, the peptide OP11 was the best candidate peptide for inhibiting S2308 infection in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that peptide OP11 has potential for exploitation as a peptide drug in resisting S2308 infection. PMID:24722798

  20. Recombinant albumins containing additional peptide sequences smaller than barbourin retain the ability of barbourin-albumin to inhibit platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, William P; Wilson, Brianna; Eltringham-Smith, Louise J; Gataiance, Sharon; Bhakta, Varsha

    2005-05-01

    The previously described fusion protein BLAH(6) (Marques JA et al.,Thromb Haemost 2001; 86: 902-8) is a recombinant protein that combines the small disintegrin barbourin with hexahistidine-tagged rabbit serumalbumin (RSA) produced in Pichia pastoris yeast. We sought to determine: (1) if BLAH(6) was immunogenic; and (2) if its barbourin domain could be productively replaced with smaller peptides. Purified BLAH(6) was injected into rabbits, and anti-barbourin antibodies were universally detected in plasma 28 days later; BLAH(6) was, however, equally effective in reducing platelet aggregation in both naive and pre-treated rabbits. Thrombocytopenia was not observed, and complexing BLAH(6) to alpha(IIb)beta(3) had no effect on antibody detection. The barbourin moiety of BLAH(6) was replaced with each of four sequences: Pep I (VCKGDWPC); PepII (VCRGDWPC); PepIII (bar-bourin 41-54); and PepIV (LPSPGDWR). The corresponding fusion proteins were tested for their ability to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation. PepIII-LAH(6) inhibited neither rabbit nor human platelets. PepI-LAH(6) and PepIV-LAH(6) inhibited rabbit platelet aggregation as effectively as BLAH(6), but PepIV-LAH(6) did not inhibit human platelet aggregation. PepI-LAH(6) and PepIILAH(6) inhibited human platelet aggregation with IC(50)s 10- and 20-fold higher than BLAH(6). Cross-immunoprecipitation assays with human platelet lysates confirmed that all proteins and peptides interacted with the platelet integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), but with greatly varying affinities. Our results suggest that the antiplatelet activity of BLAH(6) can be retained in albumin fusion proteins in which smaller peptides replace the barbourin domain; these proteins may be less immunogenic than BLAH(6).

  1. Salivary mucins inhibit antibacterial activity of the cathelicidin-derived LL-37 peptide but not the cationic steroid CSA-13

    PubMed Central

    Bucki, Robert; Namiot, Dorota B.; Namiot, Zbigniew; Savage, Paul B.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) are the effector molecules of innate immunity, similar in potency to classic antibiotics that function in the first-line of defence against infectious agents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of negatively charged mucins on the antibacterial activity of the positively charged cathelicidin LL-37 peptide, its synthetic analogue WLBU2 and the antimicrobial cationic steroid CSA-13. Methods Mucin, DNA, F-actin and hCAP-18/LL-37 in saliva samples were evaluated by microscopy or immunoblotting. Bacterial killing assays and determination of MICs were used to determine bactericidal activity. Binding of rhodamine-B-labelled LL-37 peptide to mucin was fluorimetrically assessed. Results Microscopic evaluation of saliva after addition of rhodamine-B-labelled LL-37 showed localization similar to that observed after the addition of a specific mucin-binding lectin. Immunoblotting confirmed the presence of hCAP-18/LL-37 in saliva samples and LL-37 peptide bound to isolated submaxillary gland mucin-coated plates. Mucin/LL-37 binding was partially prevented by treatment of mucin with neuraminidase, indicating involvement of sialic acid moieties. Decreased LL-37 and WLBU2 antibacterial activity was observed in the presence of mucin or dialysed human saliva, whereas CSA-13 antibacterial activity was significantly resistant to inhibition by mucins. Conclusions This study shows that the antibacterial LL-37 peptide and its synthetic analogue WLBU2 are inhibited by salivary mucin and that the cationic steroid CSA-13 retains most of its function in the presence of an equal amount of mucin or saliva. PMID:18456648

  2. Inhibition of iron/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation by an N-terminal peptide of bovine lactoferrin and its acylated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, H; Matsumoto, H; Hashimoto, K; Teraguchi, S; Takase, M; Hayasawa, H

    1999-05-01

    Bovine lactoferrin (LF) and lactoferricin B (LFcin B), an antimicrobial peptide derived from bovine LF, inhibited thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) formation in a iron/ascorbate-induced liposomal phospholipid peroxidation system. The inhibition of TBARS formation occurred with N-acylated 9-mer peptides with a core sequence of LFcin B and, compared to LFcin B, their antioxidant effect was clearly observed at a concentration almost 100 times lower.

  3. Bioactive Formylated Flavonoids from Eugenia rigida: Isolation, Synthesis, and X-ray Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Mohamed A; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Hetta, Mona H; Jacob, Melissa R; Khan, Shabana I; Mohammed, Rabab; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Samoylenko, Volodymyr; Coleman, Christina; Fronczek, Frank R; Ferreira, Daneel; Muhammad, Ilias

    2016-09-23

    Two new flavonoids, rac-6-formyl-5,7-dihydroxyflavanone (1) and 2',6'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxy-3'-methylchalcone (2), together with five known derivatives, rac-8-formyl-5,7-dihydroxyflavanone (3), 4',6'-dihydroxy-2'-methoxy-3'-methyldihydrochalcone (4), rac-7-hydroxy-5-methoxy-6-methylflavanone (5), 3'-formyl-2',4',6'-trihydroxy-5'-methyldihydrochalcone (6), and 3'-formyl-2',4',6'-trihydroxydihydrochalcone (7), were isolated from the leaves of Eugenia rigida. The individual (S)- and (R)-enantiomers of 1 and 3, together with the corresponding formylated flavones 8 (6-formyl-5,7-dihydroxyflavone) and 9 (8-formyl-5,7-dihydroxyflavone), as well as 2',4',6'-trihydroxychalcone (10), 3'-formyl-2',4',6'-trihydroxychalcone (11), and the corresponding 3'-formyl-2',4',6'-trihydroxydihydrochalcone (7) and 2',4',6'-trihydroxydihydrochalcone (12), were synthesized. The structures of the isolated and synthetic compounds were established via NMR, HRESIMS, and electronic circular dichroism data. In addition, the structures of 3, 5, and 8 were confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction crystallography. The isolated and synthetic flavonoids were evaluated for their antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities against a panel of microorganisms and solid tumor cell lines.

  4. Galectin-1-asialofetuin interaction is inhibited by peptides containing the tyr-xxx-tyr motif acting on the glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Wéber, Edit; Hetényi, Anasztázia; Váczi, Balázs; Szolnoki, Eva; Fajka-Boja, Roberta; Tubak, Vilmos; Monostori, Eva; Martinek, Tamás A

    2010-01-25

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a ubiquitous beta-galactoside-binding protein expressed by various normal and pathological tissues, has been implicated in cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory diseases in consequence of its regulatory role in adhesion, cell viability, proliferation, and angiogenesis. The functions of Gal-1 depend on its affinity for beta-galactoside-containing glycoconjugates; accordingly, the inhibition of sugar binding blocks its functions, hence promising potential therapeutic tools. The Tyr-Xxx-Tyr peptide motifs have been reported to be glycomimetic sequences, mainly on the basis of their inhibitory effect on the Gal-1-asialofetuin (ASF) interaction. However, the results regarding the efficacy of the Tyr-Xxx-Tyr motif as a glycomimetic inhibitor are still controversial. The present STD and trNOE NMR experiments reveal that the Tyr-Xxx-Tyr peptides studied do not bind to Gal-1, whereas their binding to ASF is clearly detected. (15)N,(1)H HSQC titrations with (15)N-labeled Gal-1 confirm the absence of any peptide-Gal-1 interaction. These data indicate that the Tyr-Xxx-Tyr peptides tested in this work are not glycomimetics as they interact with ASF via an unrevealed molecular linkage.

  5. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A: design, inhibition, cocrystal structures, structure-activity relationship and pharmacophore modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar G.; Swaminathan S.; Kumaran, D.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins are classified as Category A bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The seven serotypes (A-G) of the botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of the disease botulism, block neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. Using a structure-based drug-design approach, a number of peptide inhibitors were designed and their inhibitory activity against botulinum serotype A (BoNT/A) protease was determined. The most potent peptide, RRGF, inhibited BoNT/A protease with an IC{sub 50} of 0.9 {micro}M and a K{sub i} of 358 nM. High-resolution crystal structures of various peptide inhibitors in complex with the BoNT/A protease domain were also determined. Based on the inhibitory activities and the atomic interactions deduced from the cocrystal structures, the structure-activity relationship was analyzed and a pharmacophore model was developed. Unlike the currently available models, this pharmacophore model is based on a number of enzyme-inhibitor peptide cocrystal structures and improved the existing models significantly, incorporating new features.

  6. Single residue deletions along the length of the influenza HA fusion peptide lead to inhibition of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, William A.; Thoennes, Sudha; Bradley, Konrad C.; Galloway, Summer E.; Talekar, Ganesh R.; Cummings, Sandra F.; Vareckova, Eva; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2009-11-25

    A panel of eight single amino acid deletion mutants was generated within the first 24 residues of the fusion peptide domain of the of the hemagglutinin (HA) of A/Aichi/2/68 influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype). The mutant HAs were analyzed for folding, cell surface transport, cleavage activation, capacity to undergo acid-induced conformational changes, and membrane fusion activity. We found that the mutant DELTAF24, at the C-terminal end of the fusion peptide, was expressed in a non-native conformation, whereas all other deletion mutants were transported to the cell surface and could be cleaved into HA1 and HA2 to activate membrane fusion potential. Furthermore, upon acidification these cleaved HAs were able to undergo the characteristic structural rearrangements that are required for fusion. Despite this, all mutants were inhibited for fusion activity based on two separate assays. The results indicate that the mutant fusion peptide domains associate with target membranes in a non-functional fashion, and suggest that structural features along the length of the fusion peptide are likely to be relevant for optimal membrane fusion activity.

  7. Inhibition of PKCalpha and rhoA translocation in differentiated smooth muscle by a caveolin scaffolding domain peptide.

    PubMed

    Taggart, M J; Leavis, P; Feron, O; Morgan, K G

    2000-07-10

    Receptor-coupled contraction of smooth muscle involves recruitment to the plasma membrane of downstream effector molecules PKCalpha and rhoA but the mechanism of this signal integration is unclear. Caveolins, the principal structural proteins of caveolar plasma membrane invaginations, have been implicated in the organization and regulation of many signal transducing molecules. Thus, using laser scanning confocal immunofluorescent microscopy, we tested the hypothesis that caveolin is involved in smooth muscle signaling by investigating caveolin isoform expression and localization, together with the effect of a peptide inhibitor of caveolin function, in intact differentiated smooth muscle cells. All three main caveolin isoforms were identified in uterine, stomach, and ileal smooth muscles and assumed a predominantly plasma membranous localization in myometrial cells. Cytoplasmic introduction of a peptide corresponding to the caveolin-1 scaffolding domain-an essential region for caveolin interaction with signaling molecules--significantly inhibited agonist-induced translocation of both PKCalpha and rhoA. Translocation was unimpaired by a scrambled peptide and was unaltered in sham-treated cells. The membranous localization of caveolins, and direct inhibition of receptor-coupled PKCalpha and rhoA translocation by the caveolin-1 scaffolding domain, supports the concept that caveolins can regulate the integration of extracellular contractile stimuli and downstream intracellular effectors in smooth muscle.

  8. Inhibition of TLR4 signaling by Brucella TIR-containing protein TcpB-derived decoy peptides.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuehua; Li, Wenna; Wang, Yufei; Yang, Mingjuan; Guo, Jinpeng; Zhan, Shaoxia; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Yang, Min; Li, Juan; Li, Wenfeng; Chen, Zeliang

    2016-09-01

    Brucella spp. avoid host immune recognition and thus, weaken the immune response to infection. The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella spp. is thought to be involved in blocking host innate immune responses by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. In this study, based on the observation that TcpB binds to the host target proteins, MAL, through the TIR domain, we examined decoy peptides from TcpB TIR domains and found that TB-8 and TB-9 substantially inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced signaling in vitro and in vivo. Both these peptides share a common loop, the DD loop, indicating a novel structural region mediating TIR interactions. The inhibition of LPS signaling by TB-8 and TB-9 shows no preference to MyD88-dependent cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β or TRIF-dependent cytokines including IFN-β and IL-6. Furthermore, these two peptides rescue the virulence of Brucella ΔtcpB mutants at the cellular level, indicating key roles of the DD loop in Brucella pathogenesis. In conclusion, identification of inhibitors from the bacterial TIR domains is helpful not only for illustrating interacting mechanisms between TIR domains and bacterial pathogenesis, but also for developing novel signaling inhibitors and therapeutics for human inflammatory diseases.

  9. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Julia A.; Hair, Pamela S.; Pallera, Haree K.; Kumar, Parvathi S.; Mauriello, Clifford T.; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Phelps, Cody A.; Park, Dalnam; Thielens, Nicole M.; Pascal, Stephen M.; Chen, Waldon; Duffy, Diane M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases. PMID:26196285

  10. Evidence That Bacteriophage λ Kil Peptide Inhibits Bacterial Cell Division by Disrupting FtsZ Protofilaments and Sequestering Protein Subunits.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M; Alfonso, Carlos; Margolin, William; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2015-08-14

    The effects of Kil peptide from bacteriophage λ on the assembly of Escherichia coli FtsZ into one subunit thick protofilaments were studied using combined biophysical and biochemical methods. Kil peptide has recently been identified as the factor from bacteriophage λ responsible for the inhibition of bacterial cell division during lytic cycle, targeting FtsZ polymerization. Here, we show that this antagonist blocks FtsZ assembly into GTP-dependent protofilaments, producing a wide distribution of smaller oligomers compared with the average size of the intact protofilaments. The shortening of FtsZ protofilaments by Kil is detectable at concentrations of the peptide in the low micromolar range, the mid-point of the inhibition being close to its apparent affinity for GDP-bound FtsZ. This antagonist not only interferes with FtsZ assembly but also reverses the polymerization reaction. The negative regulation by Kil significantly reduces the GTPase activity of FtsZ protofilaments, and FtsZ polymers assembled in guanosine-5'-[(α,β)-methyleno]triphosphate are considerably less sensitive to Kil. Our results suggest that, at high concentrations, Kil may use an inhibition mechanism involving the sequestration of FtsZ subunits, similar to that described for other inhibitors like the SOS response protein SulA or the moonlighting enzyme OpgH. This mechanism is different from those employed by the division site selection antagonists MinC and SlmA. This work provides new insight into the inhibition of FtsZ assembly by phages, considered potential tools against bacterial infection.

  11. Inhibition of altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism of human GAD65-responsive CD4+ T cells by non-antagonizable T cells.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Masewicz, Susan A; Kochik, Sharon A; Reijonen, Helena; Nepom, Gerald T

    2004-12-01

    Altered peptide ligands derived from T cell-reactive self antigens have been shown to be protective therapeutic agents in animal models of autoimmunity. In this study we identified several altered peptide ligands derived from the type 1 diabetes-associated autoantigen human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (hGAD65) epitope that were capable of antagonizing a subset of a panel of human CD4(+) GAD65 (555-567)-responsive T cell clones derived from a diabetic individual. While no altered peptide ligand was able to antagonize all six clones in the T cell panel, a single-substituted peptide of isoleucine to methionine at position 561, which resides at the TCR contact p5 position, was able to antagonize five out of the six hGAD65-responsive clones. In a mixed T cell culture system we observed that altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism is inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the presence of non-antagonizable hGAD65 (555-567)-responsive T cells. From an analysis of the cytokines present in the mixed T cell cultures, interleukin-2 was sufficient to inhibit altered peptide ligand-induced antagonism. The inhibition of altered peptide ligand-mediated antagonism of self-antigen-responsive T cells by non-antagonizable T cells has implications in altered peptide ligand therapy where T cell antagonism is the goal.

  12. Cytotoxic amyloid peptides inhibit cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction by enhancing MTT formazan exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Schubert, D

    1997-12-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (A beta) neurotoxicity is believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. An early indicator of A beta toxicity is the inhibition of cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction to MTT formazan, a widely used assay for measuring cell viability. In this report we show that A beta and other cytotoxic amyloid peptides such as human amylin dramatically enhance MTT formazan exocytosis, resulting in the inhibition of cellular MTT reduction. Only the amyloid peptides that are known to be cytotoxic enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis. Basal MTT formazan exocytosis and amyloid peptide-enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis are blocked by several drugs with diverse known effects. These and other data suggest that MTT formazan exocytosis is a multistep process and that cytotoxic amyloid peptides enhance MTT formazan exocytosis through an intracellular signal transduction pathway.

  13. Inhibition of fibronectin binding and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion to collagen by a peptide from the second type I repeat of thrombospondin

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The platelet and extracellular matrix glycoprotein thrombospondin interacts with various types of cells as both a positive and negative modulator of cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation. These effects may be mediated by binding of thrombospondin to cell surface receptors or indirectly by binding to other extracellular matrix components. The role of peptide sequences from the type I repeats of thrombospondin in its interaction with fibronectin were investigated. Fibronectin bound specifically to the peptide Gly-Gly-Trp-Ser-His-Trp from the second type I repeat of thrombospondin but not to the corresponding peptides from the first or third repeats or flanking sequences from the second repeat. The two Trp residues and the His residue were essential for binding, and the two Gly residues enhanced the affinity of binding. Binding of the peptide and intact thrombospondin to fibronectin were inhibited by the gelatin-binding domain of fibronectin. The peptide specifically inhibited binding of fibronectin to gelatin or type I collagen and inhibited fibronectin-mediated adhesion of breast carcinoma and melanoma cells to gelatin or type I collagen substrates but not direct adhesion of the cells to fibronectin, which was inhibited by the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser. Thus, the fibronectin- binding thrombospondin peptide Gly-Gly-Trp-Ser-His-Trp is a selective inhibitor of fibronectin-mediated interactions of cells with collagen in the extracellular matrix. PMID:8468356

  14. Identifying Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface antigen 3 (MSP3) protein peptides that bind specifically to erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Luis E.; Curtidor, Hernando; Ocampo, Marisol; Garcia, Javier; Puentes, Alvaro; Valbuena, John; Vera, Ricardo; López, Ramses; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    Receptor–ligand interactions between synthetic peptides and normal human erythrocytes were studied to determine Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-3 (MSP-3) FC27 strain regions that specifically bind to membrane surface receptors on human erythrocytes. Three MSP-3 protein high activity binding peptides (HABPs) were identified; their binding to erythrocytes became saturable, had nanomolar affinity constants, and became sensitive on being treated with neuraminidase and trypsin but were resistant to chymotrypsin treatment. All of them specifically recognized 45-, 55-, and 72-kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. They all presented α-helix structural elements. All HABPs inhibited in vitro P. falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes by ~55%–85%, suggesting that MSP-3 protein’s role in the invasion process probably functions by using mechanisms similar to those described for other MSP family antigens. PMID:15987906

  15. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  16. Minimum requirements for inhibition of smooth-muscle myosin light-chain kinase by synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J T; Floyd, D M; Lee, V G; Little, D K; Moreland, S

    1989-01-01

    Although the amino acid residues that are important for peptide substrates of myosin light-chain kinase have been reported, those that are important for peptide inhibitors of this enzyme have not previously been investigated. Synthetic peptides based on the sequence Lys11-Lys12-Arg13-Ala-Ala-Arg16-Ala-Thr-Ser19 -Asn-Val21-Phe22-Ala of the chicken gizzard myosin light chain were tested as inhibitors of pig carotid-artery myosin light-chain kinase. The basic amino acid residues of the known myosin light-chain kinase inhibitor Lys-Lys-Arg-Ala-Ala-Arg-Ala-Thr-Ser-NH2 (IC50 = 14 microM) [Pearson, Misconi & Kemp (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 25-27] were shown to be the important residues that contribute to inhibitor potency, as evidence by the finding that the hexapeptide Lys-Lys-Arg-Ala-Ala-Arg-NH2 had an IC50 value of 22 microM. This indicates that binding of the phosphorylatable serine residue to myosin light-chain kinase, which is of obvious importance for a substrate, does not enhance the potency of an inhibitor. With the aim of preparing more potent inhibitors, peptides Lys-Lys-Arg-Ala-Ala-Arg-Ala-Ala-Xaa-NH2 were prepared with a variety of amino acids substituted for the phosphorylatable serine residue. None of these peptides was a more potent inhibitor than the serine peptide. PMID:2920029

  17. Inhibition of retinal detachment-induced apoptosis in photoreceptors by a small peptide inhibitor of the fas receptor.

    PubMed

    Besirli, Cagri G; Chinskey, Nicholas D; Zheng, Qiong-Duan; Zacks, David N

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. To test the effect of a small peptide inhibitor (Met12) of the Fas receptor on the activation of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways after retinal detachment. Methods. Retinal-RPE separation was created in Brown Norway rats by subretinal injection of 1% hyaluronic acid. Met12, derived from the Fas-binding extracellular domain of the oncoprotein Met, was injected into the subretinal space at the time of separation. A mutant peptide and vehicle administered in a similar fashion acted as inactive controls. The extrinsic apoptotic pathway was induced in 661W cells using a Fas-activating antibody in the presence or absence of Met12. Caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 activities were measured with calorimetric and luminescent assays in retinal extracts and cell lysates. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) was performed in retinal sections 3 days after separation. Histology was performed in retinal sections 2 months after retinal detachment. Results. Met12 inhibited Fas-induced caspase 8 activation in 661W cells. Similarly, administration of Met12 into the subretinal space inhibited the activation of caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 after retinal detachment. This corresponded to a decreased level of TUNEL-positive staining of photoreceptors after retinal-RPE separation in animals that received Met12, but not inactive mutant, peptide treatment. After 2 months, the outer nuclear layer was significantly thicker, and the photoreceptor count was higher in animals treated with subretinal Met12. Conclusions. The small peptide Met12 may serve as a photoreceptor-protective agent in the setting of retinal-RPE separation.

  18. Impact of commercial precooking of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) on the generation of peptides, after pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis, capable to inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Luis; Chen, Karen; de Mejía, Elvira González

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the bioactive properties of the released peptides from commercially available precook common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Bioactive properties and peptide profiles were evaluated in protein hydrolysates of raw and commercially precooked common beans. Five varieties (Black, Pinto, Red, Navy, and Great Northern) were selected for protein extraction, protein and peptide molecular mass profiles, and peptide sequences. Potential bioactivities of hydrolysates, including antioxidant capacity and inhibition of α-amylase, α-glucosidase, dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV), and angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE) were analyzed after digestion with pepsin/pancreatin. Hydrolysates from Navy beans were the most potent inhibitors of DPP-IV with no statistical differences between precooked and raw (IC50 = 0.093 and 0.095 mg protein/mL, respectively). α-Amylase inhibition was higher for raw Red, Navy and Great Northern beans (36%, 31%, 27% relative to acarbose (rel ac)/mg protein, respectively). α-Glucosidase inhibition among all bean hydrolysates did not show significant differences; however, inhibition values were above 40% rel ac/mg protein. IC50 values for ACE were not significantly different among all bean hydrolysates (range 0.20 to 0.34 mg protein/mL), except for Red bean that presented higher IC50 values. Peptide molecular mass profile ranged from 500 to 3000 Da. A total of 11 and 17 biologically active peptide sequences were identified in raw and precooked beans, respectively. Peptide sequences YAGGS and YAAGS from raw Great Northern and precooked Pinto showed similar amino acid sequences and same potential ACE inhibition activity. Processing did not affect the bioactive properties of released peptides from precooked beans. Commercially precooked beans could contribute to the intake of bioactive peptides and promote health.

  19. Inhibition of discoidin domain receptor 2-mediated lung cancer cells progression by gold nanoparticle-aptamer-assisted delivery of peptides containing transmembrane-juxtamembrane 1/2 domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Boeun; Lee, Kangseok; Bae, Jeehyeon; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2015-08-21

    The delivery of biologically functional peptides into mammalian cells can be a direct and effective method for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen-induced receptor tyrosine kinase recently identified as a novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. In this study, we report that peptides containing the functional domain of DDR2 can be efficiently delivered into lung malignant cancer cells via a gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer conjugate (AuNP-Apt)-based system. Peptide delivery resulted in the abrogation of DDR2 activation triggered by collagen. Moreover, the peptide delivered by the AuNP-Apt system inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion mediated by DDR2 activation. Thus, these results suggest that peptide loaded onto AuNP-Apt conjugates can be used for the development of peptide-based biomedical applications for the treatment of DDR2-positive cancer.

  20. The role of citric acid in oral peptide and protein formulations: relationship between calcium chelation and proteolysis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Welling, Søren H; Hubálek, František; Jacobsen, Jette; Brayden, David J; Rahbek, Ulrik L; Buckley, Stephen T

    2014-04-01

    The excipient citric acid (CA) has been reported to improve oral absorption of peptides by different mechanisms. The balance between its related properties of calcium chelation and permeation enhancement compared to a proteolysis inhibition was examined. A predictive model of CA's calcium chelation activity was developed and verified experimentally using an ion-selective electrode. The effects of CA, its salt (citrate, Cit) and the established permeation enhancer, lauroyl carnitine chloride (LCC) were compared by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability of insulin and FD4 across Caco-2 monolayers and rat small intestinal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. Proteolytic degradation of insulin was determined in rat luminal extracts across a range of pH values in the presence of CA. CA's capacity to chelate calcium decreased ~10-fold for each pH unit moving from pH 6 to pH 3. CA was an inferior weak permeation enhancer compared to LCC in both in vitro models using physiological buffers. At pH 4.5 however, degradation of insulin in rat luminal extracts was significantly inhibited in the presence of 10mM CA. The capacity of CA to chelate luminal calcium does not occur significantly at the acidic pH values where it effectively inhibits proteolysis, which is its dominant action in oral peptide formulations. On account of insulin's low basal permeability, inclusion of alternative permeation enhancers is likely to be necessary to achieve sufficient oral bioavailability since this is a weak property of CA.

  1. Inhibition of p53-dependent transcription by BOX-I phospho-peptide mimetics that bind to p300

    PubMed Central

    Dornan, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2001-01-01

    The N-terminal BOX-I domain of p53 containing a docking site for the negative regulator MDM2 and the positive effector p300, harbours two recently identified phosphorylation sites at Thr18 or Ser20 whose affect on p300 is undefined. Biochemical assays demonstrate that although MDM2 binding is inhibited by these phosphorylations, p300 binding is strikingly stabilized by Thr18 or Ser20 phosphorylation. Introducing EGFP-BOX-I domain peptides with an aspartate substitution at Thr18 or Ser20 induced a significant inhibition of endogenous p53-dependent transcription in cycling cells, in irradiated cells, as well as in cells transiently co-transfected with p300 and p53. In contrast an EGFP-wild-type BOX-I domain peptide stimulated p53 activity via inhibition of MDM2 protein binding. These results suggest that phosphorylation of p53 at Thr18 or Ser20 can activate p53 by stabilizing the p300–p53 complex and also identify a class of small molecular weight ligands capable of selective discrimination between MDM2- and p300-dependent activities. PMID:11258706

  2. A novel leptin antagonist peptide inhibits breast cancer growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Stefania; Leggio, Antonella; Barone, Ines; De Marco, Rosaria; Gelsomino, Luca; Campana, Antonella; Malivindi, Rocco; Panza, Salvatore; Giordano, Cinzia; Liguori, Alessia; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Liguori, Angelo; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    The role of the obesity cytokine leptin in breast cancer progression has raised interest in interfering with leptin's actions as a valuable therapeutic strategy. Leptin interacts with its receptor through three different binding sites: I–III. Site I is crucial for the formation of an active leptin–leptin receptor complex and in its subsequent activation. Amino acids 39-42 (Leu-Asp-Phe-Ile- LDFI) were shown to contribute to leptin binding site I and their mutations in alanine resulted in muteins acting as typical antagonists. We synthesized a small peptide based on the wild-type sequence of leptin binding site I (LDFI) and evaluated its efficacy in antagonizing leptin actions in breast cancer using in vitro and in vivo experimental models. The peptide LDFI abolished the leptin-induced anchorage-dependent and -independent growth as well as the migration of ERα-positive (MCF-7) and -negative (SKBR3) breast cancer cells. These results were well correlated with a reduction in the phosphorylation levels of leptin downstream effectors, as JAK2/STAT3/AKT/MAPK. Importantly, the peptide LDFI reversed the leptin-mediated up-regulation of its gene expression, as an additional mechanism able to enhance the peptide antagonistic activity. The described effects were specific for leptin signalling, since the developed peptide was not able to antagonize the other growth factors' actions on signalling activation, proliferation and migration. Finally, we showed that the LDFI pegylated peptide markedly reduced breast tumour growth in xenograft models. The unmodified peptide LDFI acting as a full leptin antagonist could become an attractive option for breast cancer treatment, especially in obese women. PMID:25721149

  3. Role of N-terminal protein formylation in central metabolic processes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial protein biosynthesis usually depends on a formylated methionyl start tRNA but Staphylococcus aureus is viable in the absence of Fmt, the tRNAMet formyl transferase. fmt mutants exhibit reduced growth rates indicating that the function of certain proteins depends on formylated N-termini but it has remained unclear, which cellular processes are abrogated by the lack of formylation. Results In order to elucidate how global metabolic processes are affected by the absence of formylated proteins the exometabolome of an S. aureus fmt mutant was compared with that of the parental strain and the transcription of corresponding enzymes was analyzed to identify possible regulatory changes. The mutant consumed glucose and other carbon sources slower than the wild type. While the turnover of several metabolites remained unaltered fmt inactivation led to increases pyruvate release and, concomitantly, reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. In parallel, the release of the pyruvate-derived metabolites lactate, acetoin, and alanine was reduced. The anaerobic degradation of arginine was also reduced in the fmt mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Moreover, the lack of formylated proteins caused increased susceptibility to the antibiotics trimethoprim and sulamethoxazole suggesting that folic acid-dependant pathways were perturbed in the mutant. Conclusions These data indicate that formylated proteins are crucial for specific bacterial metabolic processes and they may help to understand why it has remained important during bacterial evolution to initiate protein biosynthesis with a formylated tRNAMet. PMID:23320528

  4. Inhibition of Hepatocyte Apoptosis: An Important Mechanism of Corn Peptides Attenuating Liver Injury Induced by Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhili; Hou, Tao; Shi, Wen; Liu, Weiwei; He, Hui

    2015-09-11

    In this study, the effects of mixed corn peptides and synthetic pentapeptide (QLLPF) on hepatocyte apoptosis induced by ethanol were investigated in vivo. QLLPF, was previously characterized from corn protein hydrolysis, which had been shown to exert good facilitating alcohol metabolism activity. Mice were pre-treated with the mixed corn peptides and the pentapeptide for 1 week and then treated with ethanol. After treatment of three weeks, the biochemical indices and the key ethanol metabolizing enzymes, the serum TNF-α, liver TGF-β1 concentrations and the protein expressions related to apoptosis were determined. We found that the Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c expressions in the intrinsic pathway and the Fas, FasL and NF-κB expressions in the extrinsic pathway together with higher TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations were reversed compared with the model group by both the mixed corn peptides and the pentapeptide. The activation of caspase3 was also suppressed. Additionally, apoptosis was further confirmed with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and the TUNEL assay demonstrated peptides suppressed hepatocyte apoptosis. Our results suggest that apoptosis induced by ethanol is alleviated in response to the treatment of corn peptides, potentially due to reversing the related protein expression.

  5. Selective inhibition of miR-21 by phage display screened peptide

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Debojit; Nahar, Smita; Rai, Manish Kumar; Ray, Arjun; Chakraborty, Kausik; Maiti, Souvik

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are nodal regulators of gene expression and deregulation of miRNAs is causally associated with different diseases, including cancer. Modulation of miRNA expression is thus of therapeutic importance. Small molecules are currently being explored for their potential to downregulate miRNAs. Peptides have shown to have better potency and selectivity toward their targets but their potential in targeting and modulating miRNAs remain unexplored. Herein, using phage display we found a very selective peptide against pre-miR-21. Interestingly, the peptide has the potential to downregulate miR-21, by binding to pre-miR-21 and hindering Dicer processing. It is selective towards miR-21 inside the cell. By antagonising miR-21 function, the peptide is able to increase the expression of its target proteins and thereby increase apoptosis and suppress cell proliferation, invasion and migration. This peptide can further be explored for its anti-cancer activity in vivo and may be even extended to clinical studies. PMID:25824952

  6. A novel phage-library-selected peptide inhibits human TNF-α binding to its receptors.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Lelli, Barbara; Scali, Silvia; Falciani, Chiara; Bracci, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro

    2014-06-03

    We report the identification of a new human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) specific peptide selected by competitive panning of a phage library. Competitive elution of phages was obtained using the monoclonal antibody adalimumab, which neutralizes pro-inflammatory processes caused by over-production of TNF-α in vivo, and is used to treat severe symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. The selected peptide was synthesized in monomeric and branched form and analyzed for binding to TNF-α and competition with adalimumab and TNF-α receptors. Results of competition with TNF-α receptors in surface plasmon resonance and melanoma cells expressing both TNF receptors make the peptide a candidate compound for the development of a novel anti-TNF-α drug.

  7. Sea anemone peptide with uncommon β-hairpin structure inhibits acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) and reveals analgesic activity.

    PubMed

    Osmakov, Dmitry I; Kozlov, Sergey A; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Koshelev, Sergey G; Sanamyan, Nadezhda P; Sanamyan, Karen E; Dyachenko, Igor A; Bondarenko, Dmitry A; Murashev, Arkadii N; Mineev, Konstantin S; Arseniev, Alexander S; Grishin, Eugene V

    2013-08-09

    Three novel peptides were isolated from the venom of the sea anemone Urticina grebelnyi. All of them are 29 amino acid peptides cross-linked by two disulfide bridges, with a primary structure similar to other sea anemone peptides belonging to structural group 9a. The structure of the gene encoding the shared precursor protein of the identified peptides was determined. One peptide, π-AnmTX Ugr 9a-1 (short name Ugr 9-1), produced a reversible inhibition effect on both the transient and the sustained current of human ASIC3 channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. It completely blocked the transient component (IC50 10 ± 0.6 μM) and partially (48 ± 2%) inhibited the amplitude of the sustained component (IC50 1.44 ± 0.19 μM). Using in vivo tests in mice, Ugr 9-1 significantly reversed inflammatory and acid-induced pain. The other two novel peptides, AnmTX Ugr 9a-2 (Ugr 9-2) and AnmTX Ugr 9a-3 (Ugr 9-3), did not inhibit the ASIC3 current. NMR spectroscopy revealed that Ugr 9-1 has an uncommon spatial structure, stabilized by two S-S bridges, with three classical β-turns and twisted β-hairpin without interstrand disulfide bonds. This is a novel peptide spatial structure that we propose to name boundless β-hairpin.

  8. Surface behavior of peptides from E1 GBV-C protein: Interaction with anionic model membranes and importance in HIV-1 FP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Galatola, R; Cruz, A; Gómara, M J; Prat, J; Alsina, M A; Haro, I; Pujol, M

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between a peptide sequence from GB virus C E1 protein (E1P8) and its structural analogs (E1P8-12), (E1P8-13), and (E1P8-21) with anionic lipid membranes (POPG vesicles and POPG, DPPG or DPPC/DPPG (2:1) monolayers) and their association with HIV-1 fusion peptide (HIV-1 FP) inhibition at the membrane level were studied using biophysical methods. All peptides showed surface activity but leakage experiments in vesicles as well as insertion kinetics in monolayers and lipid/peptide miscibility indicated a low level of interaction: neither E1P8 nor its analogs induced the release of vesicular content and the exclusion pressure values (πe) were clearly lower than the biological membrane pressure (24-30 mN m(-1)) and the HIV-1 FP (35 mN m(-1)). Miscibility was elucidated in terms of the additivity rule and excess free energy of mixing (GE). E1P8, E1P8-12 and E1P8-21 (but not E1P8-13) induced expansion of the POPG monolayer. The mixing process is not thermodynamically favored as the positive GE values indicate. To determine how E1 peptides interfere in the action of HIV-1 FP at the membrane level, mixed monolayers of HIV-1 FP/E1 peptides (2:1) and POPG were obtained. E1P8 and its derivative E1P8-21 showed the greatest HIV-1 FP inhibition. The LC-LE phase lipid behavior was morphologically examined via fluorescence microscopy (FM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Images revealed that the E1 peptides modify HIV-1 FP-lipid interaction. This fact may be attributed to a peptide/peptide interaction as indicated by AFM results. Finally, hemolysis assay demonstrated that E1 peptides inhibit HIV-1 FP activity.

  9. Cisplatin inhibits the formation of a reactive intermediate during copper-catalyzed oxidation of amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Walke, Gulshan R; Rapole, Srikanth; Kulkarni, Prasad P

    2014-10-06

    Cisplatin was studied for its effect on the copper-catalyzed oxidation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. The interaction of cisplatin with Aβ1-16 in the presence of Cu(II) was investigated using cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry. The positive shift in the E1/2 value of Aβ1-16-Cu(II) suggests that the interaction of cisplatin alters the copper-binding properties of Aβ1-16. The mass spectrometry data show complete inhibition of copper-catalyzed decarboxylation/deamination of the Asp1 residue of Aβ1-16, while there is a significant decrease in copper-catalyzed oxidation of Aβ1-16 in the presence of cisplatin. Overall, our results provide a novel mode by which cisplatin inhibits copper-catalyzed oxidation of Aβ. These findings may lead to the design of better platinum complexes to treat oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease and other related neurological disorders.

  10. The host antimicrobial peptide Bac71-35 binds to bacterial ribosomal proteins and inhibits protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Mario; Grzela, Renata; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry; Gennaro, Renato; Mergaert, Peter; Scocchi, Marco

    2014-12-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules from innate immunity with high potential as novel anti-infective agents. Most of them inactivate bacteria through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, but others cross the membrane without damages and act inside the cells, affecting vital processes. However, little is known about their intracellular bacterial targets. Here we report that Bac71-35, a proline-rich AMP belonging to the cathelicidin family, can reach high concentrations (up to 340 μM) inside the E. coli cytoplasm. The peptide specifically and completely inhibits in vitro translation in the micromolar concentration range. Experiments of incorporation of radioactive precursors in macromolecules with E. coli cells confirmed that Bac71-35 affects specifically protein synthesis. Ribosome coprecipitation and crosslinking assays showed that the peptide interacts with ribosomes, binding to a limited subset of ribosomal proteins. Overall, these results indicate that the killing mechanism of Bac71-35 is based on a specific block of protein synthesis.

  11. An autoinhibitory peptide from the erythrocyte Ca-ATPase aggregates and inhibits both muscle Ca-ATPase isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, L G; Shi, Y; Kutchai, H; Filoteo, A G; Penniston, J T; Thomas, D D

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the effects of C28R2, a basic peptide derived from the autoinhibitory domain of the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase, on enzyme activity, oligomeric state, and E1-E2 conformational equilibrium of the Ca-ATPase from skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) was used to determine changes in the distribution of Ca-ATPase among its different oligomeric species in SR. C28R2, at a concentration of 1-10 microM, inhibits the Ca-ATPase activity of both skeletal and cardiac SR (CSR). In skeletal SR, this inhibition by C28R2 is much greater at low (0.15 microM) than at high (10 microM) Ca2+, whereas in CSR the inhibition is the same at low and high Ca2+. The effects of the peptide on the rotational mobility of the Ca-ATPase correlated well with function, indicating that C28R2-induced protein aggregation and Ca-ATPase inhibition are much more Ca-dependent in skeletal than in CSR. In CSR at low Ca2+, phospholamban (PLB) antibody (functionally equivalent to PLB phosphorylation) increased the inhibitory effect of C28R2 slightly. Fluorescence of fluorescein 5-isothiocyanate-labeled SR suggests that C28R2 stabilizes the E1 conformation of the Ca-ATPase in skeletal SR, whereas in CSR it stabilizes E2. After the addition of PLB antibody, C28R2 still stabilizes the E2 conformational state of CSR. Therefore, we conclude that C28R2 affects Ca-ATPase activity, conformation, and self-association differently in cardiac and skeletal SR and that PLB is probably not responsible for the differences. PMID:10354431

  12. Peptide inhibition of p22phox and Rubicon interaction as a therapeutic strategy for septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Ram; Koh, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Yun, Jin-Seung; Jang, Kiseok; Lee, Joo-Youn; Jung, Jae U; Yang, Chul-Su

    2016-09-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome that complicates severe infection and is characterized by the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), is a life threatening disease characterized by inflammation of the entire body. Upon microbial infection, p22phox-gp91phox NADPH oxidase (NOX) complexes produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are critical for the elimination of invading microbes. However, excess production of ROS represents a key element in the cascade of deleterious processes in sepsis. We have previously reported direct crosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis machineries by demonstrating that the Rubicon protein interacts with p22phox upon microbial infection, facilitating phagosomal trafficking of the p22phox-gp91phox NOX complex to induce a ROS burst, inflammatory cytokine production, and thereby, potent anti-microbial activities. Here, we showed N8 peptide, an N-terminal 8-amino acid peptide derived from p22phox, was sufficient for Rubicon interaction and thus, capable of robustly blocking the Rubicon-p22phox interaction and profoundly suppressing ROS and inflammatory cytokine production. Consequently, treatment with the Tat-N8 peptide or a N8 peptide-mimetic small-molecule dramatically reduced the mortality associated with Cecal-Ligation-and-Puncture-induced polymicrobial sepsis in mice. This study demonstrates a new anti-sepsis therapeutic strategy by blocking the crosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis innate immunity machineries, representing a potential paradigm shift for urgently needed therapeutic intervention against this life-threatening SIRS.

  13. In vitro growth of growth of campylobacter spp. inhibited by selected antimicrobial peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics are urgently needed for food-animal production. A goal of our laboratory is to develop and evaluate antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to control and reduce foodborne pathogens in poultry. AMP have been found in most every class of living organism...

  14. Metacaspase-binding peptide inhibits heat shock-induced death in Leishmania (L.) amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Peña, Mauricio S; Cabral, Guilherme C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Perez, Katia R; Stolf, Beatriz S

    2017-03-02

    Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis is an important agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. This parasite faces cell death in some situations during transmission to the vertebrate host, and this process seems to be dependent on the activity of metacaspase (MCA), an enzyme bearing trypsin-like activity present in protozoans, plants and fungi. In fact, the association between MCA expression and cell death induced by different stimuli has been demonstrated for several Leishmania species. Regulators and natural substrates of MCA are poorly known. To fulfill this gap, we have employed phage display over recombinant L. (L.) amazonensis MCA to identify peptides that could interact with the enzyme and modulate its activity. Four peptides were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to MCA and interfere with its activity. One of these peptides, similar to ecotin-like ISP3 of L. (L.) major, decreases trypsin-like activity of promastigotes under heat shock, and significantly decreases parasite heat shock-induced death. These findings indicate that peptide ligands identified by phage display affect trypsin-like activity and parasite death, and that an endogenous peptidase inhibitor is a possible natural regulator of the enzyme.

  15. Transgenic tobacco expressing a modified spider peptide inhibits the growth of plant pathogens and insect larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The gene encoding lycotoxin I, an amphipathic pore-forming peptide, was modified to increase oral toxicity to insects. One of the most active modified genes was then constitutively expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and transformants were evaluated for insect and disease resistance. Pathogenic...

  16. Peptides Derived from a Phage Display Library Inhibit Adhesion and Protect the Host against Infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; Michaloski, Jussara S.; da Silva, Julhiany F.; Scorzoni, Liliana; de Paula e Silva, Ana C. A.; Marcos, Caroline M.; Assato, Patrícia A.; Yamazaki, Daniella S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.; Giordano, Ricardo J.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii are dimorphic fungi and are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Adhesion is one of the most important steps in infections with Paracoccidioides and is responsible for the differences in the virulence of isolates of these fungi. Because of the importance of adhesion to the establishment of an infection, this study focused on the preliminary development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit adhesion by Paracoccidioides, thus inhibiting infection and preventing the disease. We used two phage display libraries to select peptides that strongly bind to the Paracoccidioides cell wall to inhibit adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (laminin, fibronectin, and type I and type IV collagen). This approach allowed us to identify four peptides that inhibited up to 64% of the adhesion of Paracoccidioides to pneumocytes in vitro and inhibited the adhesion to the ECM components by up to 57%. Encouraged by these results, we evaluated the ability of these peptides to protect Galleria mellonella from Paracoccidioides infection by treating G. mellonella larvae with the different peptides prior to infection with Paracoccidioides and observing larval survival. The results show that all of the peptides tested increased the survival of the larvae infected with P. brasiliensis by up to 64% and by up to 60% in those infected with P. lutzii. These data may open new horizons for therapeutic strategies to prevent PCM, and anti-adhesion therapy could be an important strategy. PMID:28066254

  17. Peptides Derived from a Phage Display Library Inhibit Adhesion and Protect the Host against Infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Haroldo C; Michaloski, Jussara S; da Silva, Julhiany F; Scorzoni, Liliana; de Paula E Silva, Ana C A; Marcos, Caroline M; Assato, Patrícia A; Yamazaki, Daniella S; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M; Giordano, Ricardo J; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J S

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii are dimorphic fungi and are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Adhesion is one of the most important steps in infections with Paracoccidioides and is responsible for the differences in the virulence of isolates of these fungi. Because of the importance of adhesion to the establishment of an infection, this study focused on the preliminary development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit adhesion by Paracoccidioides, thus inhibiting infection and preventing the disease. We used two phage display libraries to select peptides that strongly bind to the Paracoccidioides cell wall to inhibit adhesion to host cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (laminin, fibronectin, and type I and type IV collagen). This approach allowed us to identify four peptides that inhibited up to 64% of the adhesion of Paracoccidioides to pneumocytes in vitro and inhibited the adhesion to the ECM components by up to 57%. Encouraged by these results, we evaluated the ability of these peptides to protect Galleria mellonella from Paracoccidioides infection by treating G. mellonella larvae with the different peptides prior to infection with Paracoccidioides and observing larval survival. The results show that all of the peptides tested increased the survival of the larvae infected with P. brasiliensis by up to 64% and by up to 60% in those infected with P. lutzii. These data may open new horizons for therapeutic strategies to prevent PCM, and anti-adhesion therapy could be an important strategy.

  18. Preparation and characterization of novel bioactive peptides responsible for angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibition from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Li, C H; Osajima, Y

    1999-07-01

    Reported is the preparation of wheat germ (WG) hydrolyzate with potent angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, and the characterization of peptides responsible for ACE inhibition. Successful hydrolyzate with the most potent ACE inhibitory activity was obtained by 0.5 wt.%-8 h Bacillus licheniformis alkaline protease hydrolysis after 3.0 wt.%-3 h alpha-amylase treatment of defatted WG (IC50; 0.37 mg protein ml(-1)). The activity of WG hydrolyzate was markedly increased by ODS and subsequent AG50W purifications (IC50; 0.018 mg protein ml(-1)). As a result of isolations by high performance liquid chromatographies, 16 peptides with the IC50 value of less than 20 microM, composed of 2-7 amino acid residues were identified from the WG hydrolyzate. Judging from the high content (260 mg in 100 g of AG50W fraction) and powerful ACE inhibitory activity (IC50; 0.48 microM), Ile-Val-Tyr was identified as a main contributor to the ACE inhibition of the hydrolyzate.

  19. TRAM-Derived Decoy Peptides inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mastitis model in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Qu, Shihui; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-10-05

    It has been proved that TRAM-Derived Decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRAM-Derived decoy peptide (TM6), belongs to TRAM TIR domain, of which sequence is "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK, KENFLRDTWCNFQFY-"C" and evaluated the effects of TM6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, LPS-induced mice mastitis model was established by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. TM6 was injected 1h before or after LPS treatment. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells were used to investigate the effects of TM6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TM6 inhibited LPS-induced mammary gland histopathologic changes, MPO activity, and TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in mice. In vitro, TM6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production, as well as NF-κB and MAPKs activation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that TM6 had protective effects on LPS-mastitis and may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment.

  20. Acceleration and inhibition of amyloid-β fibril formation by peptide-conjugated fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaat, Hadas; Shafir, Gilead; Margel, Shlomo

    2011-08-01

    The formation of amyloid aggregates by association of peptides into ordered structures is hallmark of certain neurodegenerative disorders. Exploring the effect of specific nanoparticles on the formation of amyloid fibrils may contribute toward a mechanistic understanding of the aggregation processes, leading to design nanoparticles that modulate the formation of toxic amyloid plaques. Uniform maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles, containing fluorescein covalently encapsulated within (F-γ-Fe2O3), were prepared. These F-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles of 14.0 ± 4.0 nm were then coated with human serum albumin (HSA) via a precipitation process. Covalent conjugation of the spacer arm succinimidyl polyethylene glycol succinimidyl ester (NHS-PEG-NHS) to the F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles was then accomplished by interacting the primary amine groups of the HSA coating with excess NHS-PEG-NHS molecules. Covalent conjugation of the peptides amyloid-β 40 (Aβ40) or Leu-Pro-Phe-Phe-Asp (LPFFD) onto the surface of the former fluorescent nanoparticles was then performed, by interacting the terminal activated NHS groups of the PEG derivatized F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles with primary amino groups of the peptides. Kinetics of the Aβ40 fibrillation process in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of the Aβ40 or LPFFD conjugated nanoparticles were also elucidated. The non-peptide conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles do not affect the Aβ40 fibrillation process significantly. However, the Aβ40-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-Aβ40) accelerate the fibrillation process while the LPFFD-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-LPFFD) inhibit it. By applying MRI and fluorescence imaging techniques simultaneously these bioactive fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be used as an efficient tool to study and control the Aβ40 amyloid fibril formation process.

  1. Release of Membrane-Bound Vesicles and Inhibition of Tumor Cell Adhesion by the Peptide Neopetrosiamide A

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Pamela; Heller, Markus; Williams, David E.; McIntosh, Lawrence P.; Vogl, A. Wayne; Foster, Leonard J.; Andersen, Raymond J.; Roberge, Michel; Roskelley, Calvin D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Neopetrosiamide A (NeoA) is a 28-amino acid tricyclic peptide originally isolated from a marine sponge as a tumor cell invasion inhibitor whose mechanism of action is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that NeoA reversibly inhibits tumor cell adhesion, disassembles focal adhesions in pre-attached cells, and decreases the level of β1 integrin subunits on the cell surface. NeoA also induces the formation of dynamic, membrane-bound protrusions on the surface of treated cells and the release of membrane-bound vesicles into the culture medium. Proteomic analysis indicates that the vesicles contain EGF and transferrin receptors as well as a number of proteins involved in adhesion and migration including: β1 integrin and numerous α integrin subunits; actin and actin-binding proteins such as cofilin, moesin and myosin 1C; and membrane modulating eps15 homology domain (EHD) proteins. Surface labeling, trafficking inhibition, and real-time imaging experiments all suggest that β1 integrin-containing vesicles are released directly from NeoA-induced cell surface protrusions rather than from vesicles generated intracellularly. The biological activity of NeoA is dependent on its disulfide bond pattern and NMR spectroscopy indicates that the peptide is globular with a continuous ridge of hydrophobic groups flanked by charged amino acid residues that could facilitate a simultaneous interaction with lipids and proteins in the membrane. Conclusions/Significance NeoA is an anti-adhesive peptide that decreases cell surface integrin levels through a novel, yet to be elucidated, mechanism that involves the release of adhesion molecule-containing vesicles from the cell surface. PMID:20520768

  2. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  3. CopA3 peptide prevents ultraviolet-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hee; Kim, Han-Hyuk; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Jung, Hyun-Gug; Yu, Jae-Myo; Lee, Eun-Su; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Dong-In; An, Bong-Jeun

    2014-05-20

    Ultraviolet (UV) exposure is well-known to induce premature aging, which is mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity. A 9-mer peptide, CopA3 (CopA3) was synthesized from a natural peptide, coprisin, which is isolated from the dung beetle Copris tripartitus. As part of our continuing search for novel bioactive natural products, CopA3 was investigated for its in vitro anti-skin photoaging activity. UV-induced inhibition of type-I procollagen and induction of MMP-1 were partially prevented in human skin fibroblasts by CopA3 peptide in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 25 μM, CopA3 nearly completely inhibited MMP-1 expression. These results suggest that CopA3, an insect peptide, is a potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of skin aging.

  4. Anti-TAR Polyamide Nucleotide Analog Conjugated with a Membrane-Permeating Peptide Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Production

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Neerja; Basu, Amartya; Palumbo, Paul; Myers, Rene L.; Pandey, Virendra N.

    2002-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant variants has posed a significant setback against effective antiviral treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The choice of a nonmutable region of the viral genome such as the conserved transactivation response element (TAR element) in the 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR) may potentially be an effective target for drug development. We have earlier demonstrated that a polyamide nucleotide analog (PNA) targeted to the TAR hairpin element, when transfected into cells, can effectively inhibit Tat-mediated transactivation of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) LTR (T. Mayhood et al., Biochemistry 39:11532-11539, 2000). Here we show that this anti-TAR PNA (PNATAR), upon conjugation with a membrane-permeating peptide vector (transportan) retained its affinity for TAR in vitro similar to the unconjugated analog. The conjugate was efficiently internalized into the cells when added to the culture medium. Examination of the functional efficacy of the PNATAR-transportan conjugate in cell culture using luciferase reporter gene constructs resulted in a significant inhibition of Tat-mediated transactivation of HIV-1 LTR. Furthermore, PNATAR-transportan conjugate substantially inhibited HIV-1 production in chronically HIV-1-infected H9 cells. The mechanism of this inhibition appeared to be regulated at the level of transcription. These results demonstrate the efficacy of PNATAR-transportan as a potential anti-HIV agent. PMID:11907228

  5. Post-intoxication inhibition of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A within neurons by small-molecule, non-peptidic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ruthel, Gordon; Burnett, James C; Nuss, Jonathan E; Wanner, Laura M; Tressler, Lyal E; Torres-Melendez, Edna; Sandwick, Sarah J; Retterer, Cary J; Bavari, Sina

    2011-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) comprise seven distinct serotypes that inhibit the release of neurotransmitter across neuromuscular junctions, resulting in potentially fatal flaccid paralysis. BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A), which targets synaptosomal-associated protein of 25kDa (SNAP-25), is particularly long-lived within neurons and requires a longer time for recovery of neuromuscular function. There are currently no treatments available to counteract BoNT/A after it has entered the neuronal cytosol. In this study, we examined the ability of small molecule non-peptidic inhibitors (SMNPIs) to prevent SNAP-25 cleavage post-intoxication of neurons. The progressive cleavage of SNAP-25 observed over 5 h following 1 h BoNT/A intoxication was prevented by addition of SMNPIs. In contrast, anti-BoNT/A neutralizing antibodies that strongly inhibited SNAP-25 cleavage when added during intoxication were completely ineffective when added post-intoxication. Although Bafilomycin A1, which blocks entry of BoNT/A into the cytosol by preventing endosomal acidification, inhibited SNAP-25 cleavage post-intoxication, the degree of inhibition was significantly reduced versus addition both during and after intoxication. Post-intoxication application of SMNPIs, on the other hand, was nearly as effective as application both during and after intoxication. Taken together, the results indicate that competitive SMNPIs of BoNT/A light chain can be effective within neurons post-intoxication.

  6. Inhibition of Myeloperoxidase Activity in Cystic Fibrosis Sputum by Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1)

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Pamela S.; Sass, Laura A.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2017-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase is the major peroxidase enzyme in neutrophil granules and implicated in contributing to inflammatory lung damage in cystic fibrosis. Free myeloperoxidase is present in cystic fibrosis lung fluid and generates hypochlorous acid. Here we report a new inhibitor of myeloperoxidase activity, Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1). Using TMB as the oxidizing substrate, PIC1 inhibited myeloperoxidase activity in cystic fibrosis sputum soluble fractions by an average of a 3.4-fold decrease (P = 0.02). PIC1 also dose-dependently inhibited myeloperoxidase activity in a neutrophil lysate or purified myeloperoxidase by up to 28-fold (P < 0.001). PIC1 inhibited myeloperoxidase activity similarly, on a molar basis, as the specific myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide (ABAH) for various oxidizing substrates. PIC1 was able to protect the heme ring of myeloperoxidase from destruction by NaOCl, assayed by spectral analysis. PIC1 incubated with oxidized TMB reversed the oxidation state of TMB, as measured by absorbance at 450 nm, with a 20-fold reduction in oxidized TMB (P = 0.02). This result was consistent with an antioxidant mechanism for PIC1. In summary, PIC1 inhibits the peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase in CF sputum likely via an antioxidant mechanism. PMID:28135312

  7. Concise syntheses of the cruciferous phytoalexins brassilexin, sinalexin, wasalexins, and analogues: expanding the scope of the vilsmeier formylation.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Jha, Mukund

    2005-03-04

    Efficient syntheses of the phytoalexins brassilexin, sinalexin, and analogues are demonstrated through the application of the Vilsmeier formylation to indoline-2-thiones followed by a new aqueous ammonia workup procedure. Similarly, a very concise two-pot synthesis of the phytoalexins wasalexins using sequential formylation-amination of indolin-2-ones is described. Remarkably, this novel aqueous ammonia workup allows the sequential one-pot formylation-amination, expanding substantially the scope of the Vilsmeier formylation of both indoline-2-thiones and indolin-2-ones. The examination of the formylation-amination reaction and optimization of conditions, as well as the syntheses and antifungal activities of several brassilexin analogues, are reported.

  8. Potent inhibition of HIV type 1 infection of mononuclear phagocytes by synthetic peptide analogs of HIV type 1 protease substrates.

    PubMed

    Dukes, C S; Matthews, T J; Lambert, D M; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Weinberg, J B

    1996-06-10

    The HIV-1 genome encodes a protease that is required for viral processing of the precursor polyproteins Pr55gag and Pr160gag-pol. Interference with this process in human lymphocytes inhibits production of infectious virus. We tested the ability of several protease inhibitors to decrease replication of HIV-1BaL in human monocytes and peritoneal macrophages. The compounds tested are oligopeptide analogs of HIV-1 protease substrates in which the scissile dipeptide has been replaced by a hydroxyethylene isostere. The protease inhibitors were added only once, 1 hr prior to inoculation with virus. Every 3-5 days, half the medium was replaced with fresh medium. Inhibition of virus production was assessed by measuring reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in supernatant medium 14 days after infection. The concentration of drug required to inhibit infection by 50% (IC50) in monocytes ranged from 0.17 to 2.99 microM; IC50 values for peritoneal macrophages ranged from 0.21 to 1.9 microM. The IC50 values for these compounds were 1.1- to 10-fold higher when tested in monocytes compared to their inhibitory effect in lymphocytes, although still potently effective in the dosage range that appeared nontoxic to cells. Cell toxicity was seen only at concentrations greater than 10 microM, and varied among the drugs tested. Immunoblot analysis of two of the drugs (SB205700 and SB108922) confirmed inhibition of polyprotein processing. In control cells, 22% of viral protein pr55 was processed to p24 by 24 hr, and 51% was processed by 48 hr. In cells treated with the protease inhibitors (2 microM), Pr55 processing was inhibited 77% at 24 hr and 89% at 48 hr. Thus, these synthetic peptide analogs potently inhibit productive infection of mononuclear phagocytes by HIV-1. Drugs of this class may be useful for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans.

  9. Inhibition of primary breast tumor growth and metastasis using a neuropilin-1 transmembrane domain interfering peptide

    PubMed Central

    Arpel, Alexia; Gamper, Coralie; Spenlé, Caroline; Fernandez, Aurore; Jacob, Laurent; Baumlin, Nadège; Laquerriere, Patrice; Orend, Gertraud; Crémel, Gérard; Bagnard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMD) in membrane receptors play a key role in cell signaling. As previously shown by us a peptide targeting the TMD of neuropilin-1 (MTP-NRP1), blocks cell proliferation, cell migration and angiogenesis in vitro, and decreases glioblastoma growth in vivo. We now explored the clinical potential of MTP-NRP1 on breast cancer models and demonstrate that MTP-NRP1 blocks proliferation of several breast cancer lines including the MDA-MB-231, a triple negative human breast cancer cell line. In models with long term in vivo administration of the peptide, MTP-NRP1 not only reduced tumor volume but also decreased number and size of breast cancer metastases. Strikingly, treating mice before tumors developed protected from metastasis establishment/formation. Overall, our results report that targeting the TMD of NRP1 in breast cancer is a potent new strategy to fight against breast cancer and related metastasis. PMID:27351129

  10. Selection of Small Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides Inhibiting Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Causing Citrus Canker

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeahyuk; Park, Euiho; Lee, Se-Weon; Hyun, Jae-Wook; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Citrus canker disease decreases the fruit quality and yield significantly, furthermore, emerging of streptomycin-resistant pathogens threatens the citrus industry seriously because of a lack of proper control agents. Small synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could be a promising alternative. Fourteen hexapeptides were selected by using positional scanning of synthetic peptide combinatorial libraries. Each hexapeptide showed different antimicrobial spectrum against Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, and Candida species. Intriguingly, BHC10 showed bactericidal activity exclusively on Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), while BHC7 was none-active exclusively against two Pseudomonas spp. at concentration of 100 μg/ml suggesting potential selectivity constrained in hexapeptide frame. Three hexapeptides, BHC02, 06 and 11, showed bactericidal activities against various Xcc strains at concentration of 10 μg/ml. When they were co-infiltrated with pathogens into citrus leaves the disease progress was suppressed significantly. Further study would be needed to confirm the actual disease control capacity of the selected hexapeptides. PMID:28167892

  11. Combination treatment with Grb7 peptide and Doxorubicin or Trastuzumab (Herceptin) results in cooperative cell growth inhibition in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pero, S C; Shukla, G S; Cookson, M M; Flemer, S; Krag, D N

    2007-05-21

    Grb7 has potential importance in the progression of cancer. We have previously identified a novel peptide that binds to the SH2 domain of Grb7 and inhibits its association with several different receptor tyrosine kinases. We have synthesised the Grb7 peptide, G7-18NATE, with two different cell penetrating peptides, Penetratin and Tat. In this study, we have shown that both Penetratin- and Tat-conjugated G7-18NATE peptides are able to inhibit the proliferation of SK-BR-3, ZR-75-30, MDA-MB-361 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. There was no significant effects on breast cancer MCF-7cells, non-malignant MCF 10A or 3T3 cells. In addition, there was no significant inhibition of proliferation by Penetratin or Tat alone or by their conjugates with arbitrary peptide sequence in any of the cell lines tested. We determined the EC50 of G7-18NATE-P peptide for SK-BR-3 cell proliferation to be 7.663 x 10(-6) M. Co-treatment of G7-18NATE-P peptide plus Doxorubicin in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells resulted in an additional inhibition of proliferation, resulting in 56 and 84% decreases in the Doxorubicin EC50 value in the presence of 5 x 10(-6) and 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide, respectively. Importantly, the co-treatment with Doxorubicin and the delivery peptide did not change the Doxorubicin EC50. Since Grb7 associates with ErbB2, we assessed whether the peptide inhibitor would have a combined effect with a molecule that targets ErbB2, Herceptin. Co-treatment of Herceptin plus 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide in SK-BR-3 cells resulted in a 46% decrease in the Herceptin EC50 value and no decrease following the co-treatment with Herceptin and penetratin alone. This Grb7 peptide has potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent alone, in combination with traditional chemotherapy, or in combination with other targeting molecules.

  12. Short communication: Inhibition of angiotensin 1-converting enzyme by peptides derived from variants of bovine β-casein upon apical exposure to a Caco-2 cell monolayer.

    PubMed

    Petrat-Melin, Bjørn; Le, Thao T; Møller, Hanne S; Larsen, Lotte B; Young, Jette F

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the consequence of genetically contingent amino acid substitutions in bovine β-casein (CN) genetic variants A(1), A(2), B, and I on the structure and bioactive potential of peptides following in vitro digestion. The β-CN variants were digested in vitro using pepsin and pancreatin, and a peptide profile was obtained by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, revealing among others, the β-casomorphin precursor peptides VYPFPGPIHN and VYPFPGPIPN, derived from variant A(1)/B and from A(2)/I, respectively. These 2 peptides were synthesized and assessed for angiotensin 1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacity before and after incubation with a monolayer of Caco-2 intestinal cells. The VYPFPGPIHN was a stronger ACE inhibitor than VYPFPGPIPN, with the concentration needed to reach half-maximal inhibition (IC50) of 123 ± 14.2 μM versus 656 ± 7.6 μM. Exposure to a Caco-2 intestinal cell monolayer did not affect ACE inhibition by VYPFPGPIHN, but resulted in an almost 2-fold increase in inhibition by VYPFPGPIPN after incubation. Subsequent tandem mass spectrometric analysis identified the truncated peptide VYPFPGPIP, suggesting hydrolysis by a cell membrane associated peptidase. Thus, genetic variation in bovine β-CN results in the generation of peptides that differ in bioactivity, and are differently affected by intestinal brush border peptidases.

  13. Antisecretory Factor Peptide AF-16 Inhibits the Secreted Autotransporter Toxin-Stimulated Transcellular and Paracellular Passages of Fluid in Cultured Human Enterocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Both the endogenous antisecretory factor (AF) protein and peptide AF-16, which has a sequence that matches that of the active N-terminal region of AF, inhibit the increase in the epithelial transport of fluid and electrolytes induced by bacterial toxins in animal and ex vivo models. We conducted a study to investigate the inhibitory effect of peptide AF-16 against the increase of transcellular passage and paracellular permeability promoted by the secreted autotransporter toxin (Sat) in a cultured cellular model of the human intestinal epithelial barrier. Peptide AF-16 produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the Sat-induced increase in the formation of fluid domes, in the mucosal-to-serosal passage of d-[1-14C]mannitol, and in the rearrangements in the distribution and protein expression of the tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins ZO-1 and occludin in cultured human enterocyte-like Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. In addition, we show that peptide AF-16 also inhibits the cholera toxin-induced increase of transcellular passage and the Clostridium difficile toxin-induced effects on paracellular permeability and TJ protein organization in Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers. Treatment of cell monolayers by the lipid raft disorganizer methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished the inhibitory activity of peptide AF-16 at the transcellular passage level and did not modify the effect of the peptide at the paracellular level. PMID:25534938

  14. Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    model, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii 7 emg3@cwru.edu 15 Sep 2010 - 14 Sep 2011Annual01-10-2011 Table of Contents...Staph. aureus Acinetobacter baumannii A d h e re n t B a c te ri a ( C F U /i m p la n t) INTRODUCTION: Host defense peptides represent a...Figure 1. Adherence of bacteria to implants. Cultures of Staphylococcus aureus or Acinetobacter baumannii with indicated absorbance values (A600) were

  15. Inhibition of Orthopaedic Implant Infections by Immunomodulatory Effects of Host Defense Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    with adherent bacteria based on our previously validated murine model of osseointegration [1,2]. We quantified the bacterial burden by bioluminescence ...Preliminary results indicate that the soluble host defense peptides increases osseointegration in mice that were not inoculated with bacteria . The host...implant infection without causing any signs of systemic sepsis. In mice without bacteria , BLI was low at all time points (Fig. 1) and no bacteria were

  16. In vitro conversion of vinyl to formyl groups in naturally occurring chlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, Patrick C; Willows, Robert D; Chen, Min

    2014-08-14

    The chemical structural differences distinguishing chlorophylls in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are either formyl substitution (chlorophyll b, d, and f) or the degree of unsaturation (8-vinyl chlorophyll a and b) of a side chain of the macrocycle compared with chlorophyll a. We conducted an investigation of the conversion of vinyl to formyl groups among naturally occurring chlorophylls. We demonstrated the in vitro oxidative cleavage of vinyl side groups to yield formyl groups through the aid of a thiol-containing compound in aqueous reaction mixture at room temperature. Heme is required as a catalyst in aqueous solution but is not required in methanolic reaction mixture. The conversion of vinyl- to formyl- groups is independent of their position on the macrocycle, as we observed oxidative cleavages of both 3-vinyl and 8-vinyl side chains to yield formyl groups. Three new chlorophyll derivatives were synthesised using 8-vinyl chlorophyll a as substrate: 8-vinyl chlorophyll d, [8-formyl]-chlorophyll a, and [3,8-diformyl]-chlorophyll a. The structural and spectral properties will provide a signature that may aid in identification of the novel chlorophyll derivatives in natural systems. The ease of conversion of vinyl- to formyl- in chlorophylls demonstrated here has implications regarding the biosynthetic mechanism of chlorophyll d in vivo.

  17. In vitro Conversion of Vinyl to Formyl Groups in Naturally Occurring Chlorophylls

    PubMed Central

    Loughlin, Patrick C.; Willows, Robert D.; Chen, Min

    2014-01-01

    The chemical structural differences distinguishing chlorophylls in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are either formyl substitution (chlorophyll b, d, and f) or the degree of unsaturation (8-vinyl chlorophyll a and b) of a side chain of the macrocycle compared with chlorophyll a. We conducted an investigation of the conversion of vinyl to formyl groups among naturally occurring chlorophylls. We demonstrated the in vitro oxidative cleavage of vinyl side groups to yield formyl groups through the aid of a thiol-containing compound in aqueous reaction mixture at room temperature. Heme is required as a catalyst in aqueous solution but is not required in methanolic reaction mixture. The conversion of vinyl- to formyl- groups is independent of their position on the macrocycle, as we observed oxidative cleavages of both 3-vinyl and 8-vinyl side chains to yield formyl groups. Three new chlorophyll derivatives were synthesised using 8-vinyl chlorophyll a as substrate: 8-vinyl chlorophyll d, [8-formyl]-chlorophyll a, and [3,8-diformyl]-chlorophyll a. The structural and spectral properties will provide a signature that may aid in identification of the novel chlorophyll derivatives in natural systems. The ease of conversion of vinyl- to formyl- in chlorophylls demonstrated here has implications regarding the biosynthetic mechanism of chlorophyll d in vivo. PMID:25119484

  18. Direct inhibition of NF-κB activation by peptide targeting the NOA ubiquitin binding domain of NEMO.

    PubMed

    Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Fontan, Elisabeth; Fsihi, Hafida; Coic, Yves-Marie; Baleux, Françoise; Véron, Michel; Agou, Fabrice

    2011-11-01

    Aberrant and constitutive NF-κB activation are frequently reported in numerous tumor types, making its inhibition an attractive target for the treatment of certain cancers. NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) is the crucial component of the canonical NF-κB pathway that mediates IκB kinase (IKK) complex activation. IKK activation resides in the ability of the C-terminal domain of NEMO to properly dimerize and interact with linear and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Here, we have identified a new NEMO peptide inhibitor, termed UBI (ubiquitin binding inhibitor) that derives from the NOA/NUB/UBAN ubiquitin binding site located in the CC2-LZ domain of NEMO. UBI specifically inhibits the NF-κB pathway at the IKK level in different cell types stimulated by a variety of NF-κB signals. Circular dichroïsm and fluorescence studies showed that UBI exhibits an increased α-helix character and direct, good-affinity binding to the NOA-LZ region of NEMO. We also showed that UBI targets NEMO in cells but its mode of inhibition is completely different from the previously reported LZ peptide (herein denoted NOA-LZ). UBI does not promote dissociation of NEMO subunits in cells but impairs the interaction between the NOA UBD of NEMO and polyubiquitin chains. Importantly, we showed that UBI efficiently competes with the in vitro binding of K63-linked chains, but not with linear chains. The identification of this new NEMO inhibitor emphasizes the important contribution of K63-linked chains for IKK activation in NF-κB signaling and would provide a new tool for studying the complex role of NF-κB in inflammation and cancer.

  19. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  20. Highly selective inhibition of histone demethylases by de novo macrocyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Akane; Münzel, Martin; Kojima, Tatsuya; Yapp, Clarence; Bhushan, Bhaskar; Goto, Yuki; Tumber, Anthony; Katoh, Takayuki; King, Oliver N F; Passioura, Toby; Walport, Louise J; Hatch, Stephanie B; Madden, Sarah; Müller, Susanne; Brennan, Paul E; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Hopkinson, Richard J; Suga, Hiroaki; Schofield, Christopher J

    2017-04-06

    The JmjC histone demethylases (KDMs) are linked to tumour cell proliferation and are current cancer targets; however, very few highly selective inhibitors for these are available. Here we report cyclic peptide inhibitors of the KDM4A-C with selectivity over other KDMs/2OG oxygenases, including closely related KDM4D/E isoforms. Crystal structures and biochemical analyses of one of the inhibitors (CP2) with KDM4A reveals that CP2 binds differently to, but competes with, histone substrates in the active site. Substitution of the active site binding arginine of CP2 to N-ɛ-trimethyl-lysine or methylated arginine results in cyclic peptide substrates, indicating that KDM4s may act on non-histone substrates. Targeted modifications to CP2 based on crystallographic and mass spectrometry analyses results in variants with greater proteolytic robustness. Peptide dosing in cells manifests KDM4A target stabilization. Although further development is required to optimize cellular activity, the results reveal the feasibility of highly selective non-metal chelating, substrate-competitive inhibitors of the JmjC KDMs.

  1. Substrate activity of synthetic formyl phosphate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Jahansouz, H.; Kofron, J.L.; Himes, R.H.; Reed, G.H.

    1987-06-30

    Formyl phosphate, a putative enzyme-bound intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.3), was synthesized from formyl fluoride and inorganic phosphate, and the product was characterized by /sup 31/P, /sup 1/H, and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Measurement of hydrolysis rates by /sup 31/P NMR indicates that formyl phosphate is particularly labile, with a half-life of 48 min in a buffered neutral solution at 20 /sup 0/C. At pH 7, hydrolysis occurs with P-O bond cleavage, as demonstrated by /sup 18/O incorporation from H/sub 2//sup 18/O into P/sub i/, while at pH 1 and pH 13 hydrolysis occurs with C-O bond cleavage. The substrate activity of formyl phosphate was tested in the reaction catalyzed by formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase isolated from Clostridium cylindrosporum. Formyl phosphate supports the reaction in both the forward and reverse directions. Thus, N/sup 10/-formyltetrahydrofolate is produced from tetrahydrofolate and formyl phosphate in a reaction mixture that contains enzyme, Mg(II), and ADP, and ATP is produced from formyl phosphate and ADP with enzyme, Mg(II), and tetrahydrofolate present. The requirements for ADP and for tetrahydrofolate as cofactors in these reactions are consistent with previous steady-state kinetic and isotope exchange studies, which demonstrated that all substrate subsites must be occupied prior to catalysis. The k/sub cat/ values for both the forward and reverse directions, with formyl phosphate as the substrate, are much lower than those for the normal forward and reverse reactions. Kinetic analysis of the formyl phosphate supported reactions indicates that the low steady-state rates observed for the synthetic intermediate are most likely due to the sequential nature of the normal reaction.

  2. Potent and Broad Inhibition of HIV-1 by a Peptide from the gp41 Heptad Repeat-2 Domain Conjugated to the CXCR4 Amino Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Haggarty, Beth S.; Duong, Jennifer; Jordon, Andrea P. O.; Romano, Josephine; DeClercq, Joshua J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Riley, James L.; Holmes, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry can be inhibited by soluble peptides from the gp41 heptad repeat-2 (HR2) domain that interfere with formation of the 6-helix bundle during fusion. Inhibition has also been seen when these peptides are conjugated to anchoring molecules and over-expressed on the cell surface. We hypothesized that potent anti-HIV activity could be achieved if a 34 amino acid peptide from HR2 (C34) were brought to the site of virus-cell interactions by conjugation to the amino termini of HIV-1 coreceptors CCR5 or CXCR4. C34-conjugated coreceptors were expressed on the surface of T cell lines and primary CD4 T cells, retained the ability to mediate chemotaxis in response to cognate chemokines, and were highly resistant to HIV-1 utilization for entry. Notably, C34-conjugated CCR5 and CXCR4 each exhibited potent and broad inhibition of HIV-1 isolates from diverse clades irrespective of tropism (i.e., each could inhibit R5, X4 and dual-tropic isolates). This inhibition was highly specific and dependent on positioning of the peptide, as HIV-1 infection was poorly inhibited when C34 was conjugated to the amino terminus of CD4. C34-conjugated coreceptors could also inhibit HIV-1 isolates that were resistant to the soluble HR2 peptide inhibitor, enfuvirtide. When introduced into primary cells, CD4 T cells expressing C34-conjugated coreceptors exhibited physiologic responses to T cell activation while inhibiting diverse HIV-1 isolates, and cells containing C34-conjugated CXCR4 expanded during HIV-1 infection in vitro and in a humanized mouse model. Notably, the C34-conjugated peptide exerted greater HIV-1 inhibition when conjugated to CXCR4 than to CCR5. Thus, antiviral effects of HR2 peptides can be specifically directed to the site of viral entry where they provide potent and broad inhibition of HIV-1. This approach to engineer HIV-1 resistance in functional CD4 T cells may provide a novel cell-based therapeutic for controlling HIV infection in humans. PMID:27855210

  3. Inhibition of HIV-1 Env-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion by Lectins, Peptide T-20, and Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Michael; Konopka, Krystyna; Balzarini, Jan; Düzgüneş, Nejat

    2011-01-01

    Background: Broadly cross-reactive, neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, including 2F5, 2G12, 4E10 and IgG1 b12, can inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro at very low concentrations. We examined the ability of these antibodies to inhibit cell-cell fusion between Clone69TRevEnv cells induced to express the viral envelope proteins, gp120/gp41 (Env), and highly CD4-positive SupT1 cells. The cells were loaded with green and red-orange cytoplasmic fluorophores, and fusion was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Results: Cell-cell fusion was inhibited completely by the carbohydrate binding proteins (CBPs), Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) agglutinin (HHA), and Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) agglutinin (GNA), and by the peptide, T-20, at relatively low concentrations. Anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 antibodies, at concentrations much higher than those required for neutralization, were not particularly effective in inhibiting fusion. Monoclonal antibodies b12, m14 IgG and 2G12 had moderate inhibitory activity; the IC50 of 2G12 was about 80 µg/ml. Antibodies 4E10 and 2F5 had no inhibitory activity at the concentrations tested. Conclusions: These observations raise concerns about the ability of neutralizing antibodies to inhibit the spread of viral genetic material from infected cells to uninfected cells via cell-cell fusion. The interaction of gp120/gp41 with cell membrane CD4 may be different in cell-cell and virus-cell membrane fusion reactions, and may explain the differential effects of antibodies in these two systems. The fluorescence assay described here may be useful in high throughput screening of potential HIV fusion inhibitors. PMID:21660189

  4. Inhibition of isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3 by serine 465 sequence-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Li, Liaoliao; Washington, Jacqueline M; Xu, Xuebing; Sando, Julianne J; Lin, Daowei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-03-25

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) transport glutamate into cells to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain nontoxic extracellular glutamate levels for neurons. We showed previously that the commonly used volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases the transporting activity of EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. This effect requires a protein kinase C (PKC) α-mediated and S465-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that specific peptides can be designed to block this effect. We conjugated a 10-amino acid synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of EAAT3 around the S465 to a peptide that can facilitate permeation of the plasma membrane. This fusion peptide inhibited the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane in C6 cells and hippocampus. It did not affect the basal EAAT3 activity. This peptide also attenuated isoflurane-induced increase of PKCα in the immunoprecipitates produced by an anti-EAAT3 antibody. A scrambled peptide that has the same amino acid composition as the S465 sequence-specific peptide but has a random sequence did not change the effects of isoflurane on EAAT3. The S465 sequence-specific peptide, but not the scrambled peptide, is a good PKCα substrate in in vitro assay. These peptides did not affect cell viability. These results, along with our previous findings, strongly suggest that PKCα interacts with EAAT3 to regulate its functions. The S465 sequence-specific peptide may interrupt this interaction and is an effective inhibitor for the regulation of EAAT3 activity and trafficking by PKCα and isoflurane.

  5. PCSK9 binds to multiple receptors and can be functionally inhibited by an EGF-A peptide.

    PubMed

    Shan, LiXin; Pang, Ling; Zhang, Rumin; Murgolo, Nicholas J; Lan, Hong; Hedrick, Joseph A

    2008-10-10

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) binds to low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and induces its internalization and degradation. PCSK9 binding to LDLR is mediated through the LDLR epidermal growth factor-like repeat A (EGF-A) domain. We show for the first time that an EGF-A peptide inhibits PCSK9-mediated degradation of LDLR in HepG2 cells. In addition to LDLR, we show that PCSK9 also binds directly to ApoER2 and mouse VLDLR. Importantly, binding of PCSK9 to either LDLR or mouse VLDLR was effectively inhibited by EGF-A while binding to ApoER2 was less affected. In contrast, LDL receptor-associated protein (RAP), which interacts with LDL receptor repeat type A (LA) domains, inhibited PCSK9 binding to ApoER2 with greater efficacy than either LDLR or mVLDLR. These data demonstrate that while PCSK9 binds several receptors via its EGF-A binding domain, additional contacts with other receptor domains are also involved.

  6. MEPE-Derived ASARM Peptide Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells and Impairs Mineralization in Tooth Models of X-Linked Hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Khaddam, Mayssam; Naji, Jiar; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Baroukh, Brigitte; Letourneur, Franck; Lesieur, Julie; Decup, Franck; Le Denmat, Dominique; Nicoletti, Antonino; Poliard, Anne; Rowe, Peter S.; Huet, Eric; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Linglart, Agnès; McKee, Marc D.; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X-chromosome) cause X-linked familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH), a disorder having severe bone and tooth dentin mineralization defects. The absence of functional PHEX leads to abnormal accumulation of ASARM (acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif) peptide − a substrate for PHEX and a strong inhibitor of mineralization − derived from MEPE (matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein) and other matrix proteins. MEPE-derived ASARM peptide accumulates in tooth dentin of XLH patients where it may impair dentinogenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of ASARM peptides in vitro and in vivo on odontoblast differentiation and matrix mineralization. Dental pulp stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) were seeded into a 3D collagen scaffold, and induced towards odontogenic differentiation. Cultures were treated with synthetic ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated) derived from the human MEPE sequence. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide inhibited SHED differentiation in vitro, with no mineralized nodule formation, decreased odontoblast marker expression, and upregulated MEPE expression. Phosphorylated ASARM peptide implanted in a rat molar pulp injury model impaired reparative dentin formation and mineralization, with increased MEPE immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, using complementary models to study tooth dentin defects observed in XLH, we demonstrate that the MEPE-derived ASARM peptide inhibits both odontogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization, while increasing MEPE expression. These results contribute to a partial mechanistic explanation of XLH pathogenesis: direct inhibition of mineralization by ASARM peptide leads to the mineralization defects in XLH teeth. This process appears to be positively reinforced by the increased MEPE expression induced by ASARM. The MEPE-ASARM system can therefore be considered as a potential therapeutic

  7. RGD peptide-modified multifunctional dendrimer platform for drug encapsulation and targeted inhibition of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xuedan; Alves, Carla S; Oliveira, Nilsa; Rodrigues, João; Zhu, Jingyi; Bányai, István; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Development of multifunctional nanoscale drug-delivery systems for targeted cancer therapy still remains a great challenge. Here, we report the synthesis of cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-conjugated generation 5 (G5) poly(amidoamine) dendrimers for anticancer drug encapsulation and targeted therapy of cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrins. In this study, amine-terminated G5 dendrimers were used as a platform to be sequentially modified with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) via a thiourea linkage and RGD peptide via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer, followed by acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines. The developed multifunctional dendrimer platform (G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD) was then used to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). We show that approximately six DOX molecules are able to be encapsulated within each dendrimer platform. The formed complexes are water-soluble, stable, and able to release DOX in a sustained manner. One- and two-dimensional NMR techniques were applied to investigate the interaction between dendrimers and DOX, and the impact of the environmental pH on the release rate of DOX from the dendrimer/DOX complexes was also explored. Furthermore, cell biological studies demonstrate that the encapsulation of DOX within the G5.NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD dendrimers does not compromise the anticancer activity of DOX and that the therapeutic efficacy of the dendrimer/DOX complexes is solely related to the encapsulated DOX drug. Importantly, thanks to the role played by RGD-mediated targeting, the developed dendrimer/drug complexes are able to specifically target αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells and display specific therapeutic efficacy to the target cells. The developed RGD peptide-targeted multifunctional dendrimers may thus be used as a versatile platform for targeted therapy of different types of αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells.

  8. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs.

  9. Modification of Titanium Substrates with Chimeric Peptides Comprising Antimicrobial and Titanium-Binding Motifs Connected by Linkers To Inhibit Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zihao; Ma, Shiqing; Duan, Shun; Xuliang, Deng; Sun, Yingchun; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xinhua; Guan, Binbin; Wang, Chao; Hu, Meilin; Qi, Xingying; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2016-03-02

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are the primary causes of implant-associated infection, which is difficult to eliminate and may induce failure in dental implants. Chimeric peptides with both binding and antimicrobial motifs may provide a promising alternative to inhibit biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. In this study, chimeric peptides were designed by connecting an antimicrobial motif (JH8194: KRLFRRWQWRMKKY) with a binding motif (minTBP-1: RKLPDA) directly or via flexible/rigid linkers to modify Ti surfaces. We evaluated the binding behavior of peptides using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques and investigated the effect of the modification of titanium surfaces with these peptides on the bioactivity of Streptococcus gordonii (S. gordonii) and Streptococcus sanguis (S. sanguis). Compared with the flexible linker (GGGGS), the rigid linker (PAPAP) significantly increased the adsorption of the chimeric peptide on titanium surfaces (p < 0.05). Concentration-dependent adsorption is consistent with a single Langmuir model, whereas time-dependent adsorption is in line with a two-domain Langmuir model. Additionally, the chimeric peptide with the rigid linker exhibited more effective antimicrobial ability than the peptide with the flexible linker. This finding was ascribed to the ability of the rigid linker to separate functional domains and reduce their interference to the maximum extent. Consequently, the performance of chimeric peptides with specific titanium-binding motifs and antimicrobial motifs against bacteria can be optimized by the proper selection of linkers. This rational design of chimeric peptides provides a promising alternative to inhibit the formation of biofilms on titanium surfaces with the potential to prevent peri-implantitis and peri-implant mucositis.

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 enhancer-controlled transcription by artificial enhancer-binding peptides derived from bacteriophage 434 repressor.

    PubMed

    Caderas, G; Klauser, S; Liu, N; Bienz, A; Gutte, B

    1999-12-01

    An artificial HIV-1 enhancer-binding 42-residue peptide (R42) that had been derived from bacteriophage 434 repressor inhibited the cell-free in vitro transcription of HIV-1 enhancer-containing plasmids [Hehlgans, T., Stolz, M., Klauser, S., Cui, T., Salgam, P., Brenz Verca, S., Widmann, M., Leiser, A., Städler, K. & Gutte, B. (1993) FEBS Lett. 315, 51-55; Caderas, G. (1997) PhD Thesis, University of Zürich]. Here we show that, after N-terminal extension of R42 with a viral nuclear localization signal, the resulting nucR42 peptide was active in intact cells. NucR42 could be detected immunologically in nuclear extracts and produced a 60-70% reduction of the rate of transcription of an HIV-1 enhancer-carrying plasmid in COS-1 cells that had been cotransfected with the HIV enhancer plasmid, an expression plasmid for nucR42, and a control. NucR42 was also synthesized chemically and the synthetic product characterized by HPLC, mass spectrometry, and quantitative amino acid analysis. Band shift, footprint, and in vitro transcription assays in the presence of exogenous NF-kappaBp50 indicated that the binding sites of nucR42 and NF-kappaB on the HIV enhancers overlapped and that a relatively small excess of nucR42 sufficed to displace NF-kappaBp50. Band shift and in vitro transcription experiments showed also that exchange of the 434 repressor-derived nine-residue recognition helix of nucR42 for four glycines abolished the HIV enhancer binding specificity whereas leucine zipper- or retro-leucine zipper-mediated dimerization of R42 analogues increased it suggesting the potential application of such dimeric HIV enhancer-binding peptides as intracellular inhibitors of HIV replication.

  11. Regulation of Breast Carcinoma Growth and Neovacularization by Novel Peptide Sequences In Thromospondin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    were also synthesized using fmoc chemistry. Peptides were analyzed by reverse phase HPLC chromatography or gel permeation using a Superdex 75 HR 10...gel filtration (Fig. 15B). The major peak of the peptide comigrated with the purified monomer fraction from peptide 529 (Fig. 15C). Use of fmoc ...tBOC chemistry (Panel A), by tBOC chemistry using N-a-BOC-N-formyl-D-tryptophan (Panel B), or by FMOC chemistry (Panel D). Peptides were analyzed by

  12. Specific interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein-derived peptides and target cells inhibits mycobacterial entry in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Marisol; Curtidor, Hernando; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues being one of the diseases having the greatest mortality rates around the world, 8.7 million cases having been reported in 2011. An efficient vaccine against TB having a great impact on public health is an urgent need. Usually, selecting antigens for vaccines has been based on proteins having immunogenic properties for patients suffering TB and having had promising results in mice and non-human primates. Our approach has been based on a functional approach involving the pathogen-host interaction in the search for antigens to be included in designing an efficient, minimal, subunit-based anti-TB vaccine. This means that Mycobacterium tuberculosis has mainly been involved in studies and that lipoproteins represent an important kind of protein on the cell envelope which can also contribute towards this pathogen's virulence. This study has assessed the expression of four lipoproteins from M. tuberculosis H37Rv, that is, Rv1411c (LprG), Rv1911c (LppC), Rv2270 (LppN) and Rv3763 (LpqH), and the possible biological activity of peptides derived from these. Five peptides were found for these proteins which had high specific binding to both alveolar A549 epithelial cells and U937 monocyte-derived macrophages which were able to significantly inhibit mycobacterial entry to these cells in vitro.

  13. Folic Acid Inhibits Amyloid β-Peptide Production through Modulating DNA Methyltransferase Activity in N2a-APP Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Jiang, Mingyue; Zhao, Shijing; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xumei; Wilson, John X; Huang, Guowei

    2015-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease resulting in progressive dementia, and is a principal cause of dementia among older adults. Folate acts through one-carbon metabolism to support the methylation of multiple substrates. We hypothesized that folic acid supplementation modulates DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and may alter amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production in AD. Mouse Neuro-2a cells expressing human APP695 were incubated with folic acid (2.8-40 μmol/L), and with or without zebularine (the DNMT inhibitor). DNMT activity, cell viability, Aβ and DNMTs expression were then examined. The results showed that folic acid stimulated DNMT gene and protein expression, and DNMT activity. Furthermore, folic acid decreased Aβ protein production, whereas inhibition of DNMT activity by zebularine increased Aβ production. The results indicate that folic acid induces methylation potential-dependent DNMT enzymes, thereby attenuating Aβ production.

  14. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide

    PubMed Central

    Notter, Robert H.; Wang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP)-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid). Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C). In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg. Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46–48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22–24 mN/m), and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency. Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic of native SP

  15. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection and syncytium formation in human cells by V3 loop synthetic peptides from gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Nehete, P N; Arlinghaus, R B; Sastry, K J

    1993-01-01

    Because V3 loop-specific antibodies have been shown to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of human cells and because specific mutations in the V3 loop render the virus ineffective for infection and syncytium formation, we tested the anti-HIV effects of V3 loop peptides from different HIV-1 strains. We obtained evidence that V3 loop synthetic peptides of 8 to 15 amino acids at nanogram concentrations efficiently blocked HIV-1 IIIB infection of several human T-cell lines and of freshly prepared normal human T cells. More importantly, syncytium formation by three different primary clinical HIV isolates was inhibited by the V3 loop peptide from HIV-1 IIIB at a concentration of 1 micrograms/ml. Concentrations of V3 peptides up to 50 micrograms/ml were not toxic to any of the human cells studied. Additionally, V3 peptides incubated in normal human serum or plasma exhibited biological and physical stability for up to 24 h. Taken together, these results suggest that the V3 loop peptides have medical utility as therapeutic reagents to either prevent HIV-1 infection in humans or reduce the spread of virus infection in HIV-infected individuals. These findings are especially significant because a number of reports in the literature indicate that the V3 loop region in gp120 plays an important role in the initial stages of HIV-1 infection of cells. Images PMID:7692087

  16. Benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole inhibit neuroprotection against amyloid peptides by catalase overexpression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chilumuri, Amrutha; Odell, Mark; Milton, Nathaniel G N

    2013-11-20

    Alzheimer's disease, Familial British dementia, Familial Danish dementia, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, plus Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are associated with amyloid fibril deposition and oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzyme catalase is a neuroprotective amyloid binding protein. Herein the effects of catalase overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells on the toxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ), amyloid-Bri (ABri), amyloid-Dan (ADan), amylin (IAPP), and prion protein (PrP) peptides were determined. Results showed catalase overexpression was neuroprotective against Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. The catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) and catalase-amyloid interaction inhibitor benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) (BTA-EG4) significantly enhanced neurotoxicity of amyloid peptides in catalase overexpressing neuronal cells. This suggests catalase neuroprotection involves breakdown of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plus a direct binding interaction between catalase and the Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. Kisspeptin 45-50 had additive neuroprotective actions against the Aβ peptide in catalase overexpressing cells. The effects of 3-AT had an intracellular site of action, while catalase-amyloid interactions had an extracellular component. These results suggest that the 3-AT and BTA-EG4 compounds may be able to inhibit endogenous catalase mediated neuroprotection. Use of BTA-EG4, or compounds that inhibit catalase binding to amyloid peptides, as potential therapeutics for Neurodegenerative diseases may therefore result in unwanted effects.

  17. Fibronectin connecting segment-1 peptide inhibits pathogenic leukocyte trafficking and inflammatory demyelination in experimental models of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chaoling; Greathouse, Kelsey M; Beacham, Rebecca L; Palladino, Steven P; Helton, E Scott; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2017-02-16

    The molecular determinants of pathogenic leukocyte migration across the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) are unknown. Specific disease modifying therapies for CIDP are also lacking. Fibronectin connecting segment-1 (FNCS1), an alternatively spliced fibronectin variant expressed by microvascular endothelial cells at sites of inflammation in vitro and in situ, is a counterligand for leukocyte α4 integrin (also known as CD49d) implicated in pathogenic leukocyte trafficking in multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease. We sought to determine the role of FNCS1 in CIDP patient leukocyte trafficking across the BNB in vitro and in severe chronic demyelinating neuritis in vivo using a representative spontaneous murine CIDP model. Peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from 7 untreated CIDP patients were independently infused into a cytokine-treated, flow-dependent in vitro BNB model system. Time-lapse digital video microscopy was performed to visualize and quantify leukocyte trafficking, comparing FNCS1 peptide blockade to relevant controls. Fifty 24-week old female B7-2 deficient non-obese diabetic mice with spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy (SAPP) were treated daily with 2mg/kg FNCS1 peptide for 5days via intraperitoneal injection with appropriate controls. Neurobehavioral measures of disease severity, motor nerve electrophysiology assessments and histopathological quantification of inflammation and morphometric assessment of demyelination were performed to determine in vivo efficacy. The biological relevance of FNCS1 and CD49d in CIDP was evaluated by immunohistochemical detection in affected patient sural nerve biopsies. 25μM FNCS1 peptide maximally inhibited CIDP leukocyte trafficking at the human BNB in vitro. FNCS1 peptide treatment resulted in significant improvements in disease severity, motor electrophysiological parameters of demyelination and histological measures of

  18. Inhibition of Candida albicans Biofilm Formation by the Synthetic Lactoferricin Derived Peptide hLF1-11

    PubMed Central

    Morici, Paola; Fais, Roberta; Rizzato, Cosmeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of the synthetic peptide hLF1-11 against biofilm produced by clinical isolates of Candida albicans with different fluconazole susceptibility. The antibiofilm activity of the peptide hLF1-11 was assessed in terms of reduction of biofilm cellular density, metabolic activity and sessile cell viability. The extent of morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms was also investigated microscopically. Transcription levels of genes related to cell adhesion, hyphal development and extracellular matrix production were analysed by qRT-PCR in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms. Exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) was used to rescue morphogenesis in cells exposed to the peptide. The results revealed that hLF1-11 exhibited an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by all C. albicans isolates tested in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of their fluconazole susceptibility. Visual inspection of treated or untreated biofilm cells with an inverted microscope revealed a significant reduction in hyphal formation by hLF1-11 treated cells, as early as 3 hours of incubation. Moreover, hLF1-11 showed a reduced activity on preadherent cells. hLF1-11 induced the down-regulation of biofilm and hyphal-associated genes, which were predominantly regulated via the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Indeed, exogenous db-cAMP restored morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated cells. The hLF1-11 peptide significantly inhibited biofilm formation by C. albicans mainly at early stages, interfering with biofilm cellular density and metabolic activity, and affected morphogenesis through the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Our findings provide the first evidence that hLF1-11 could represent a potential candidate for the prevention of biofilm formation by C. albicans. PMID:27902776

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of peptide deformylase (PDF) from Bacillus cereus in ligand-free and actinonin-bound forms

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Kyu; Moon, Jin Ho; Kim, Jae-Hong; Kim, Eunice EunKyeong

    2005-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) from B. cereus has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in ligand-free and actinonin-bound forms. Diffraction data have been collected from these crystals to 1.7 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. In bacteria, protein expression initiates with an N-formyl group and this needs to be removed in order to ensure proper bacterial growth. These formylation and deformylation processes are unique to eubacteria; therefore, inhibition of these would provide a novel antibacterial therapy. Deformylation is carried out by peptide deformylase (PDF). PDF from Bacillus cereus, one of the major pathogenic bacteria, was cloned into expression plasmid pET-28a (Novagen), overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified to high quality. Crystals have been obtained of both ligand-free PDF and PDF to which actinonin, a highly potent naturally occurring inhibitor, is bound. Both crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.72, b = 44.04, c = 85.19 Å and a = 41.31, b = 44.56, c = 84.47 Å, respectively. Diffraction data were collected to 1.7 Å resolution for the inhibitor-free crystals and to 2.0 Å resolution for the actinonin-bound crystals.

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition by Heterotrimeric Triple-Helical Peptide Transition State Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Stawikowska, Roma; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Fields, Gregg B.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in numerous pathologies. An overall lack of selectivity has rendered active site targeted MMP inhibitors problematic. The present study describes MMP inhibitors that function by binding both secondary binding sites (exosites) and the active site. Heterotrimeric triple-helical peptide transition-state analog inhibitors (THPIs) were assembled utilizing click chemistry. Three different heterotrimers were constructed, allowing for the inhibitory phosphinate moiety to be present uniquely in the leading, middle, or trailing strand of the triple-helix. All heterotrimeric constructs had sufficient thermally stability to warrant analysis as inhibitors. The heterotrimeric THPIs were effective against MMP-13 and MT1-MMP, with Ki spanning 100–400 nM. Unlike homotrimeric THPIs, the heterotrimeric THPIs offered complete selectivity between MT1-MMP and MMP-1. Exosite-based approaches are providing inhibitors with desired MMP selectivities. PMID:25766890

  1. Inhibition of calcitonin gene-related peptide function: a promising strategy for treating migraine.

    PubMed

    Durham, Paul L

    2008-09-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine. Serum levels of CGRP, which are elevated during a migraine attack, have been reported to return to normal with alleviation of pain. In addition, CGRP administration has been shown to cause a migraine-like headache in susceptible individuals. Importantly, CGRP receptors are found on many cell types within the trigeminovascular system that are thought to play important roles in controlling inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Based on these findings, it was proposed that blockage of CGRP receptor function and, hence, the physiological effects of CGRP would be effective in aborting a migraine attack. This review will summarize key preclinical data that support the therapeutic potential of using CGRP receptor antagonists or molecules that bind CGRP within the context of current neurovascular theories on migraine pathology.

  2. Protein matrices for improved wound healing: elastase inhibition by a synthetic peptide model.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Andreia; Pêgo, Ana Paula; Henriques, Lara; Lamghari, Meriem; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2010-09-13

    The unique properties of silk fibroin were combined with keratin to develop new wound-dressing materials. Silk fibroin/keratin (SF/K) films were prepared to reduce high levels of elastase found on chronic wounds. This improved biological function was achieved by the incorporation of a small peptide synthesized based on the reactive-site loop of the Bowman-Birk Inhibitor (BBI) protein. In vitro degradation and release were evaluated using porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) solution as a model of wound exudate. It was found that biological degradation and release rate are highly dependent on film composition. Furthermore, the level of PPE activity can be tuned by changing the film composition, thus showing an innovative way of controlling the elastase-antielastase imbalance found on chronic wounds.

  3. Ascalin, a new anti-fungal peptide with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase-inhibiting activity from shallot bulbs.

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2002-06-01

    An isolation procedure comprising ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose and gel filtration on Superdex 75 was used to isolate an anti-fungal peptide from the bulbs of the shallot Allium ascalonicum. The peptide demonstrated a molecular weight of 9.5kDa, and possessed an N-terminal sequence YQCGQGG somewhat similar to chitinases from other Allium species which are however much larger in molecular weight. The peptide designated ascalin manifested a unique specific anti-fungal activity. It inhibited mycelial growth in the fungus Botrytis cinerea but not in the fungi Mycosphaerella arachidicola and Fusarium oxysporum. Ascalin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 10 microM, much more potently than Allium tuberosum anti-fungal protein and other anti-fungal proteins.

  4. Inhibition of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infectivity by a Dendrimeric Heparan Sulfate-Binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Donalisio, Manuela; Rusnati, Marco; Cagno, Valeria; Civra, Andrea; Bugatti, Antonella; Giuliani, Andrea; Pirri, Giovanna; Volante, Marco; Papotti, Mauro; Landolfo, Santo

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) interacts with cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) to initiate infection. The interaction of RSV with HSPGs thus presents an attractive target for the development of novel inhibitors of RSV infection. In the present study, a minilibrary of linear, dimeric, and dendrimeric peptides containing clusters of basic amino acids was screened with the aim of identifying peptides able to bind HSPGs and thus block RSV attachment and infectivity. Of the compounds identified, the dendrimer SB105-A10 was the most potent inhibitor of RSV infectivity, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 0.35 μM and 0.25 μM measured in Hep-2 and A549 cells, respectively. SB105-A10 was found to bind to both cell types via HSPGs, suggesting that its antiviral activity is indeed exerted by competing with RSV for binding to cell surface HSPGs. SB105-A10 prevented RSV infection when added before the viral inoculum, in line with its proposed HSPG-binding mechanism of action; moreover, antiviral activity was also exhibited when SB105-A10 was added postinfection, as it was able to reduce the cell-to-cell spread of the virus. The antiviral potential of SB105-A10 was further assessed using human-derived tracheal/bronchial epithelial cells cultured to form a pseudostratified, highly differentiated model of the epithelial tissue of the human respiratory tract. SB105-A10 strongly reduced RSV infectivity in this model and exhibited no signs of cytotoxicity or proinflammatory effects. Together, these features render SB105-A10 an attractive candidate for further development as a RSV inhibitor to be administered by aerosol delivery. PMID:22850525

  5. Discovery of three toxin peptides with Kv1.3 channel and IL-2 cytokine inhibiting activities from Non-Buthidae scorpions Chaerilus tricostatus and Chaerilus tryznai.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Chen, Jing; Hao, Jinbo; Zhang, Jiahui; Huang, Xuejun; Hu, Fangfang; Wu, Zheng; Liu, Yaru; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Jian; Li, Shan; Liu, Hongyan; Wu, Wenlong; Chen, Zongyun

    2017-03-11

    Non-Buthidae venomous scorpions are huge natural sources, however, only a few works have been done to understand their toxin peptides. Here, we described three new potential immunomodulating toxin peptides Ctri18, Ctry68 and Ctry2908 from two Non-Buthidae scorpions Chaerilus tricostatus and Chaerilus tryznai. Sequence alignment analyses showed that Ctri18, Ctry68 and Ctry2908 are three new members of scorpion toxin α-KTx15 subfamily. Electrophysiological experiments showed that Ctri18, Ctry68 and Ctry2908 blocked the Kv1.3 channel at micromole to nanomole levels, but had weak effects on potassium channel KCNQ1 and sodium channel Nav1.4, which indicated that Ctri18, Ctry68 and Ctry2908 might have specific inhibiting effects on the Kv1.3 channel. ELISA experiments showed that Ctri18, Ctry68 and Ctry2908 inhibited IL-2 cytokine secretions of activated T lymphocyte in human PBMCs. Excitingly, consistent with the good Kv1.3 channel inhibitory activity, Ctry2908 inhibited cytokine IL-2 secretion in nanomole level, which indicated that Ctry2908 might be a new lead drug template towards Kv1.3 channels. Together, these studies discovered three new toxin peptides Ctri18, Ctry68 and Ctry2908 with Kv1.3 channel and IL-2 cytokine inhibiting activities from two scorpions Chaerilus tricostatus and Chaerilus tryznai, and highlighted that non-Buthidae venomous scorpions are new natural toxin peptide sources.

  6. Exogenous carbon monoxide inhibits neutrophil infiltration in LPS-induced sepsis by interfering with FPR1 via p38 MAPK but not GRK2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Qin, Weiting; Song, Mingming; Zhang, Yisen; Sun, Bingwei

    2016-01-01

    Excessive neutrophil infiltration in vital organs is life-threatening to patients who suffer from sepsis. We identified a critical role of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) in the inhibition of neutrophil infiltration during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. CO delivered from carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) dramatically increased the survival rate of C57BL/6 mice subjected to LPS in vivo. CORM-2 significantly suppressed neutrophil infiltration in liver and lung as well as markers of inflammatory responses. Affymetrix GeneChip array analysis revealed that the increased expression of chemoattractant receptor formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) may contribute to the excessive neutrophil infiltration. The under agarose migration assay demonstrated that LPS stimulation promoted migration to the ligand of FPR1, N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) but that CORM-2 treatment inhibited this promotion. Further studies demonstrated that CORM-2 internalized FPR1 by inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), which may explain the inhibitory effect of CORM-2 on LPS-stimulated neutrophils. In summary, our study demonstrates that exogenous CO inhibits sepsis-induced neutrophil infiltration by interfering with FPR1 via p38 MAPK but not GRK2. PMID:27144520

  7. Structure-activity relationships for a series of compounds that inhibit aggregation of the Alzheimer's peptide, Aβ42.

    PubMed

    McKoy, Angela F; Chen, Jermont; Schupbach, Trudi; Hecht, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    Inhibiting aggregation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide may be an effective strategy for combating Alzheimer's disease. As the high-resolution structure of the toxic Aβ aggregate is unknown, rational design of small molecule inhibitors is not possible, and inhibitors are best isolated by high-throughput screening. We applied high-throughput screening to a collection of 65,000 compounds to identify compound D737 as an inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. D737 diminished the formation of oligomers and fibrils, and reduced Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity. Most importantly, D737 increased the life span and locomotive ability of transgenic flies in a Drosophila melanogaster model of Alzheimer's disease (J Biol Chem, 287, 2012, 38992). To explore the chemical features that make D737 an effective inhibitor of Aβ42 aggregation and toxicity, we tested a small collection of eleven analogues of D737. Overall, the ability of a compound to inhibit Aβ aggregation was a good predictor of its efficacy in prolonging the life span and locomotive ability of transgenic flies expressing human Aβ42 in the central nervous system. Two compounds (D744 and D830) with fluorine substitutions on an aromatic ring were effective inhibitors of Aβ42 aggregation and increased the longevity of transgenic flies beyond that observed for the parent compound, D737.

  8. Dual antifungal properties of cationic antimicrobial peptides polybia-MPI: membrane integrity disruption and inhibition of biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kairong; Yan, Jiexi; Dang, Wen; Xie, Junqiu; Yan, Bo; Yan, Wenjin; Sun, Mengyang; Zhang, Bangzhi; Ma, Mingxia; Zhao, Yanyan; Jia, Fengjing; Zhu, Ranran; Chen, Wei; Wang, Rui

    2014-06-01

    With the increasing emergence of resistant fungi, the discovery and development of novel antifungal therapeutics were urgently needed. Compared with conventional antibiotics, the limited propensity of AMPs to induce resistance in pathogens has attracted great interest. In the present study, the antifungal activity and its mechanism-of-action of polybia-MPI, a cationic peptide from the venom of Social wasp Polybia Paulista was investigated. We demonstrated that polybia-MPI could potently inhibit the growth of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Candida glabrata (C. glabrata). The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of Polybia-MPI against cancer cells were much higher than the MICs against the tested C. albicans and C. glabrata cells, indicating that polybia-MPI had high selectivity between the fungal and mammalian cells. Our results also indicated that membrane disturbance mechanism was involved in the antifungal activity. Furthermore, polybia-MPI could inhibit the bio film forming of C. glabrata, which was frequently associated with clinically significant biofilm. These results suggest that polybia-MPI has great advantages in the development of antifungal agents.

  9. [The correlation between postsynaptic inhibition and GABA, opioid peptides, SP in electroacupuncture].

    PubMed

    Fang, Z; Yu, Q; Li, Y

    1993-01-01

    Identified tract cells in lumbar enlargement were recorded from intact anaesthetized rats. The prolongation of the latency of antidromic action potential was a measure of postsynaptic inhibition. Both ST 36 and SP 6 were stimulated electrically. In EA group (N = 12) EA prolonged the latency for 0.111 +/- 0.022 ms (P < 0.001). In bicuculline group (N = 12) the prolongation of the latency for 0.010 +/- 0.004 ms (P < 0.05) by EA was less than that of EA group with statistical significance. In naloxone group (N = 12) and SP antiserum group (N = 12) EA did not induce a significant prolongation of the latency. It suggested that GABA, opioides and SP might be involved in postsynaptic inhibition induced by EA.

  10. Cholesterol inhibits the insertion of the Alzheimer's peptide Abeta(25-35) in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Dante, Silvia; Hauss, Thomas; Dencher, Norbert A

    2006-08-01

    The physiological relationship between brain cholesterol content and the action of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a highly controversially discussed topic. Evidences for modulations of the Abeta/membrane interaction induced by plasma membrane cholesterol have already been observed. We have recently reported that Abeta(25-35) is capable of inserting in lipid membranes and perturbing their structure. Applying neutron diffraction and selective deuteration, we now demonstrate that cholesterol alters, at the molecular level, the capability of Abeta(25-35) to penetrate into the lipid bilayers; in particular, a molar weight content of 20% of cholesterol hinders the intercalation of monomeric Abeta(25-35) completely. At very low cholesterol content (about 1% molar weight) the location of the C-terminal part of Abeta(25-35) has been unequivocally established in the hydrocarbon region of the membrane, in agreement with our previous results on pure phospholipids membrane. These results link a structural property to a physiological and functional behavior and point to a therapeutical approach to prevent the AD by modulation of membrane properties.

  11. The two peptide lantibiotic lacticin 3147 acts synergistically with polymyxin to inhibit Gram negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of bacterial drug resistance encourages the re-evaluation of the potential of existing antimicrobials. Lantibiotics are post-translationally modified, ribosomally synthesised antimicrobial peptides with a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. Here, we focussed on expanding the potential of lacticin 3147, one of the most studied lantibiotics and one which possesses potent activity against a wide range of Gram positive species including many nosocomial pathogens. More specifically, our aim was to investigate if lacticin 3147 activity could be enhanced when combined with a range of different clinical antibiotics. Results Initial screening revealed that polymyxin B and polymyxin E (colistin) exhibited synergistic activity with lacticin 3147. Checkerboard assays were performed against a number of strains, including both Gram positive and Gram negative species. The resultant fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index values established that, while partial synergy was detected against Gram positive targets, synergy was obvious against Gram negative species, including Cronobacter and E. coli. Conclusions Combining lacticin 3147 with low levels of a polymyxin could provide a means of broadening target specificity of the lantibiotic, while also reducing polymyxin use due to the lower concentrations required as a result of synergy. PMID:24069959

  12. Small Molecule Inhibited Parathyroid Hormone Mediated cAMP Response by N–Terminal Peptide Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Baumann, Monika; Balbach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Ligand binding to certain classes of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) stimulates the rapid synthesis of cAMP through G protein. Human parathyroid hormone (PTH), a member of class B GPCRs, binds to its receptor via its N–terminal domain, thereby activating the pathway to this secondary messenger inside cells. Presently, GPCRs are the target of many pharmaceuticals however, these drugs target only a small fraction of structurally known GPCRs (about 10%). Coordination complexes are gaining interest due to their wide applications in the medicinal field. In the present studies we explored the potential of a coordination complex of Zn(II) and anthracenyl–terpyridine as a modulator of the parathyroid hormone response. Preferential interactions at the N–terminal domain of the peptide hormone were manifested by suppressed cAMP generation inside the cells. These observations contribute a regulatory component to the current GPCR–cAMP paradigm, where not the receptor itself, but the activating hormone is a target. To our knowledge, this is the first report about a coordination complex modulating GPCR activity at the level of deactivating its agonist. Developing such molecules might help in the control of pathogenic PTH function such as hyperparathyroidism, where control of excess hormonal activity is essentially required. PMID:26932583

  13. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of Schiff bases and amines derived from alkyl 2-(2-formyl-4-nitrophenoxy)alkanoates.

    PubMed

    Goszczyńska, Agata; Kwiecień, Halina; Fijałkowski, Karol

    A series of novel Schiff bases and secondary amines were obtained in good yields, as a result of the reductive amination of alkyl 2-(2-formyl-4-nitrophenoxy)alkanoates with both aniline and 4-methoxyaniline under established mild reaction conditions. Sodium triacetoxyborohydride as well as hydrogen in the presence of palladium on carbon were used as efficient reducing agents of the Schiff bases, in both direct and stepwise reductive amination processes. The Schiff bases, amines, and amine hydrochlorides were designed as potential antibacterial agents, and structure-activity relationship could be established following in vitro assays against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentration and zone of inhibition were also determined. In these tests, some of Schiff bases and secondary amine hydrochlorides showed moderate-to-good activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including S. aureus, M. luteus, and S. mutans.

  14. A chimeric peptide of intestinal trefoil factor containing cholesteryl ester transfer protein B cell epitope significantly inhibits atherosclerosis in rabbits after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Qi, Gaofu; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Shengying; Xin, Shanshan; Du, Peng; Zhang, Qingye; Zhao, Xiuyun

    2011-04-01

    Vaccination against cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is proven to be effective for inhibiting atherosclerosis in animal models. In this study, the proteases-resistant intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3) was used as a molecular vehicle to construct chimeric TFF3 (cTFF3) containing CETP B cell epitope and tetanus toxin helper T cell epitope. It was found that cTFF3 still preserved a trefoil structure, and can resist proteases digestion in vitro. After oral immunization with cTFF3, the CETP-specific IgA and IgG could be found in intestine lavage fluid and serum, and the anti-CETP antibodies could inhibit partial CETP activity to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and inhibit atherosclerosis in animals. Therefore, TFF3 is a potential molecular vehicle for developing oral peptide vaccines. Our research highlights a novel strategy for developing oral peptide vaccines in the future.

  15. Mambalgin-1 Pain-relieving Peptide, Stepwise Solid-phase Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Functional Domain for Acid-sensing Ion Channel 1a Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Gilles; Salinas, Miguel; Kessler, Pascal; Stura, Enrico A.; Leblanc, Mathieu; Tepshi, Livia; Besson, Thomas; Diochot, Sylvie; Baron, Anne; Douguet, Dominique; Lingueglia, Eric; Servent, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mambalgins are peptides isolated from mamba venom that specifically inhibit a set of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) to relieve pain. We show here the first full stepwise solid phase peptide synthesis of mambalgin-1 and confirm the biological activity of the synthetic toxin both in vitro and in vivo. We also report the determination of its three-dimensional crystal structure showing differences with previously described NMR structures. Finally, the functional domain by which the toxin inhibits ASIC1a channels was identified in its loop II and more precisely in the face containing Phe-27, Leu-32, and Leu-34 residues. Moreover, proximity between Leu-32 in mambalgin-1 and Phe-350 in rASIC1a was proposed from double mutant cycle analysis. These data provide information on the structure and on the pharmacophore for ASIC channel inhibition by mambalgins that could have therapeutic value against pain and probably other neurological disorders. PMID:26680001

  16. Mambalgin-1 Pain-relieving Peptide, Stepwise Solid-phase Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Functional Domain for Acid-sensing Ion Channel 1a Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mourier, Gilles; Salinas, Miguel; Kessler, Pascal; Stura, Enrico A; Leblanc, Mathieu; Tepshi, Livia; Besson, Thomas; Diochot, Sylvie; Baron, Anne; Douguet, Dominique; Lingueglia, Eric; Servent, Denis

    2016-02-05

    Mambalgins are peptides isolated from mamba venom that specifically inhibit a set of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) to relieve pain. We show here the first full stepwise solid phase peptide synthesis of mambalgin-1 and confirm the biological activity of the synthetic toxin both in vitro and in vivo. We also report the determination of its three-dimensional crystal structure showing differences with previously described NMR structures. Finally, the functional domain by which the toxin inhibits ASIC1a channels was identified in its loop II and more precisely in the face containing Phe-27, Leu-32, and Leu-34 residues. Moreover, proximity between Leu-32 in mambalgin-1 and Phe-350 in rASIC1a was proposed from double mutant cycle analysis. These data provide information on the structure and on the pharmacophore for ASIC channel inhibition by mambalgins that could have therapeutic value against pain and probably other neurological disorders.

  17. New Formyl Phloroglucinol Meroterpenoids from the Leaves of Eucalyptus robusta

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Zhi-Chun; Yang, Ming-Hua; Liu, Rui-Huan; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Seven new formyl phloroglucinol meroterpenoids (FPMs), namely eucalrobusones J-P (1–7), as well as three known ones (8–10) were isolated from the leaves of Eucalyptus robusta. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis, and their absolute configurations were determined by applications of the Snatzke’s helicity rule and the electron circular dichroism (ECD) calculation. These FPMs are diverse in coupling patterns between phloroglucinol and sesquiterpenoid units, forming novel polycyclic ring systems. Compound 1 possesses a new carbon skeleton that a 1-oxaspiro[5.6]dodecane core is formed through C-14 rather than C-4 of the aromadendrane moiety. Compound 2 features a novel 6/7/5 ring-fused 6-oxabicyclo[3.2.2]nonane skeleton. Compounds 3–5 are rare aristolane-based FPMs. By forming different oxo bridges, compound 3 is the first sample of FPM with benzo-dihydrofuran structure, and compound 4 possesses a novel 6/6/6/6/3-fused pentacyclic skeleton. Compounds 1, 6, and 8 exhibited significant antifungal activities against Candida glabrata with MIC50 values of 2.57, 1.95, and 2.49 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:28004790

  18. Amaranth lunasin-like peptide internalizes into the cell nucleus and inhibits chemical carcinogen-induced transformation of NIH-3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Cervantes, Enrique; Jeong, Hyung Jin; León-Galván, Fabiola; Barrera-Pacheco, Alberto; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; González de Mejia, Elvira; de Lumen, Ben O; Barba de la Rosa, Ana P

    2010-09-01

    Because an unbalanced diet is an important risk factor for several illnesses, interest has increased in finding novel health-promoting foods. Amaranth produces seeds that not only have substantial nutritional properties but that also contain phytochemical compounds as rutin and nicotiflorin and peptides with antihypertensive and anticarcinogenic activities. We report that a cancer-preventive peptide in amaranth has activities similar to those of soybean lunasin. The amaranth lunasin-like peptide, however, requires less time than the soybean lunasin to internalize into the nucleus of NIH-3T3 cells, and inhibits histone acetylation (H(3) and H(4) in a 70 and 77%, respectively). The amaranth lunasin-like peptide inhibited the transformation of NIH-3T3 cells to cancerous foci. The open reading frame (ORF) of amaranth lunasin corresponds to a bifunctional inhibitor/lipid-transfer protein (LTP). LTPs are a family of proteins that in plants are implicated in different functions, albeit all linked to developmental processes and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. Our results open new intriguing questions about the function of lunasin in plants and support that amaranth is a food alternative containing natural peptides with health-promoting benefits.

  19. Role of atrial natriuretic peptide in mediating the blood pressure-independent natriuresis elicited by systemic inhibition of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Leszek; Kuczeriszka, Marta; Castillo, Alexander; Majid, Dewan S; Navar, L Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    While it is clearly recognized that increased intrarenal nitric oxide (NO) levels elicit natriuresis, confounding data showing that systemic nitric oxide synthase inhibition (NOSi) also increases sodium excretion (UNaV) poses a conundrum. This response has been attributed to the associated increases in arterial pressure (AP); however, the increases in AP and in UNaV are temporally dissociated. The changes in regional renal haemodynamics induced by NOSi could also contribute to the alterations of UNaV. To evaluate the roles of AP and non-AP mechanisms mediating the natriuresis, N ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) was infused i.v. at doses ranging from 5 to 50 μg/kg/min in anaesthetized rats. UNaV, perfusion of the cortex (cortical blood flow, CBF) and medulla (medullary blood flow, MBF) with laser-Doppler flowmetry and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were measured. UNaV increased from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 1.6 ± 0.1 μmol/kg/min (P < 0.05) with the lower nonpressor doses. With the higher doses, AP increased from 116 ± 4 to 122 ± 4 mmHg and UNaV increased from 1.1 ± 0.3 to 3.3 ± 0.7 μmol/min/g (P < 0.002). UNaV increased similarly in a group where renal AP was maintained at baseline levels. The associated reductions in CBF (17 ± 5 and 38 ± 5 %) and MBF (27 ± 6 and 52 ± 6 %) would be expected to attenuate rather than contribute to the natriuresis. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations increased significantly following NOSi. Anantin, a natriuretic peptide receptor-A blocker, prevented or reversed the L-NAME-induced natriuresis without altering the L-NAME-induced changes in AP or CBF. The results indicate that increased ANP and related natriuretic peptides mediate the AP-independent natriuresis, at least partly, elicited by systemic L-NAME infusion and help resolve the conundrum of natriuresis during systemic NOSi.

  20. Inhibition of Intracellular Growth of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Tissue Culture by Antisense Peptide-Phosphorodiamidate Morpholino Oligomer ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mitev, Georgi M.; Mellbye, Brett L.; Iversen, Patrick L.; Geller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) were tested for inhibition of growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both PMOs have the same 11-base sequence that is antisense to the region near the start codon of acpP, which is essential for lipid biosynthesis and viability. To the 3′ end of each is attached the membrane-penetrating peptide (RXR)4XB (R, X, and B indicate arginine, 6-aminohexanoic acid, and β-alanine, respectively). One peptide-PMO (AcpP PPMO) has no charge on the PMO moiety. The second PPMO has three cations (piperazine) attached to the phosphorodiamidate linkages (3+Pip-AcpP PPMO). A scrambled-sequence PPMO (Scr PPMO) was synthesized for each type of PMO. The MICs of AcpP PPMO, 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO, and either one of the Scr PPMOs were 1.25 μM (7 μg/ml), 0.156 μM (0.94 μg/ml), and >160 μM (>900 μg/ml), respectively. 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO at 1.25 or 2.5 μM significantly reduced the growth rates of pure cultures, whereas AcpP PPMO or either Scr PPMO had no effect. However, the viable cell count was significantly reduced at either concentration of 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO or AcpP PPMO, but not with either Scr PPMO. In other experiments, macrophages were infected intracellularly with S. enterica and treated with 3 μM 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO. Intracellular bacteria were reduced >99% with 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO, whereas intracellular bacteria increased 3 orders of magnitude in untreated or Scr PPMO-treated cultures. We conclude that either AcpP PPMO or 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO inhibited growth of S. enterica in pure culture and that 3+Pip-AcpP PPMO reduced intracellular viability of S. enterica in macrophages. PMID:19581453

  1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibits autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis through cAMP/PKA signaling in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Machado, Juliano; Manfredi, Leandro H; Silveira, Wilian A; Gonçalves, Dawit A P; Lustrino, Danilo; Zanon, Neusa M; Kettelhut, Isis C; Navegantes, Luiz C

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide released by motor neuron in skeletal muscle and modulates the neuromuscular transmission by induction of synthesis and insertion of acetylcholine receptor on postsynaptic muscle membrane; however, its role in skeletal muscle protein metabolism remains unclear. We examined the in vitro and in vivo effects of CGRP on protein breakdown and signaling pathways in control skeletal muscles and muscles following denervation (DEN) in rats. In isolated muscles, CGRP (10(-10) to 10(-6)M) reduced basal and DEN-induced activation of overall proteolysis in a concentration-dependent manner. The in vitro anti-proteolytic effect of CGRP was completely abolished by CGRP8-37, a CGRP receptor antagonist. CGRP down-regulated the lysosomal proteolysis, the mRNA levels of LC3b, Gabarapl1 and cathepsin L and the protein content of LC3-II in control and denervated muscles. In parallel, CGRP elevated cAMP levels, stimulated PKA/CREB signaling and increased Foxo1 phosphorylation in both conditions. In denervated muscles and starved C2C12 cells, Rp-8-Br-cAMPs or PKI, two PKA inhibitors, completely abolished the inhibitory effect of CGRP on Foxo1, 3 and 4 and LC3 lipidation. A single injection of CGRP (100 μg kg(-1)) in denervated rats increased the phosphorylation levels of CREB and Akt, inhibited Foxo transcriptional activity, the LC3 lipidation as well as the mRNA levels of LC3b and cathepsin L, two bona fide targets of Foxo. This study shows for the first time that CGRP exerts a direct inhibitory action on autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in control and denervated skeletal muscle by recruiting cAMP/PKA signaling, effects that are related to inhibition of Foxo activity and LC3 lipidation.

  2. ARF1(2-17) does not specifically interact with ARF1-dependent pathways. Inhibition by peptide of phospholipases C beta, D and exocytosis in HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Fensome, A; Cunningham, E; Troung, O; Cockcroft, S

    1994-07-25

    The small GTP-binding protein ARF has been shown recently to regulate phospholipase D (PLD). In order to investigate the role of ARF proteins in regulated exocytosis, we have used the N-terminal peptide ARF1(2-17) of the ARF1 protein. ARF1 reconstituted PLD activity in cytosol-depleted HL60 cells was inhibited by ARF1(2-17). In the presence of endogenous cytosol, ARF1(2-17) also inhibited GTP-gamma-S-stimulated PLD activity and exocytosis. Mastoparan Politses jadwagae and mastoparan Vespula lewisii which exhibit similar structural properties to ARF1(2-17) also inhibited GTP-gamma-S-stimulated PLD and exocytosis. GTP-gamma-S-stimulated phospholipase C-beta (PLC-beta) was also inhibited by ARF(2-17) and mastoparan. In cytosol-depleted HL60 cells, the ARF(2-17) inhibited the reconstitution of GTP-gamma-S-stimulated PLC-beta activity with exogenously-added PLC-beta 1 and phosphatidylinositol transfer protein. We conclude that the widely-used ARF1(2-17) peptide inhibits both ARF-independent (i.e. PLC-beta) and ARF-dependent pathways (i.e. PLD) and therefore cannot be regarded as a specific inhibitor of ARF function.

  3. Structure, Sulfatide Binding Properties, and Inhibition of Platelet Aggregation by a Disabled-2 Protein-derived Peptide*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuyan; Charonko, John J.; Fu, Xiangping; Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Davalos, Rafael V.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Finkielstein, Carla V.; Capelluto, Daniel G. S.

    2012-01-01

    Disabled-2 (Dab2) targets membranes and triggers a wide range of biological events, including endocytosis and platelet aggregation. Dab2, through its phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, inhibits platelet aggregation by competing with fibrinogen for αIIbβ3 integrin receptor binding. We have recently shown that the N-terminal region, including the PTB domain (N-PTB), drives Dab2 to the platelet membrane surface by binding to sulfatides through two sulfatide-binding motifs, modulating the extent of platelet aggregation. The three-dimensional structure of a Dab2-derived peptide encompassing the sulfatide-binding motifs has been determined in dodecylphosphocholine micelles using NMR spectroscopy. Dab2 sulfatide-binding motif contains two helices when embedded in micelles, reversibly binds to sulfatides with moderate affinity, lies parallel to the micelle surface, and when added to a platelet mixture, reduces the number and size of sulfatide-induced aggregates. Overall, our findings identify and structurally characterize a minimal region in Dab2 that modulates platelet homotypic interactions, all of which provide the foundation for rational design of a new generation of anti-aggregatory low-molecular mass molecules for therapeutic purposes. PMID:22977233

  4. Allosteric Inhibition of a Semaphorin 4D Receptor Plexin B1 by a High-Affinity Macrocyclic Peptide.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yukiko; Bashiruddin, Nasir K; Kitago, Yu; Takagi, Junichi; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-11-17

    Semaphorin axonal guidance factors are multifunctional proteins that play important roles in immune response, cancer cell proliferation, and organogenesis, making semaphorins and their signaling receptor plexins important drug targets for various diseases. However, the large and flat binding surface of the semaphorin-plexin interaction interface is difficult to target by traditional small-molecule drugs. Here, we report the discovery of a high-affinity plexin B1 (PlxnB1)-binding macrocyclic peptide, PB1m6 (KD = 3.5 nM). PB1m6 specifically inhibited the binding of physiological ligand semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) in vitro and completely suppressed Sema4D-induced cell collapse. Structural studies revealed that PB1m6 binds at a groove between the fifth and sixth blades of the sema domain in PlxnB1 distant from the Sema4D-binding site, indicating the non-competitive and allosteric nature of the inhibitory activity. The discovery of this novel allosteric site can potentially be used to target plexin family proteins for the development of drugs that modulate semaphorin and plexin signaling.

  5. Inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cells by the peptides related to bacterial cell wall mucopeptide precursors: quantitative structure-activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.H.; Martin, Y.; Otis, E.; Mao, J.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) of N-Ac amino acids, N-Ac dipeptides, and N-Ac tripeptides in inhibition of /sup 125/I-labeled ristocetin binding to Micrococcus luteus cell wall have been developed to probe the details of the binding between ristocetin and N-acetylated peptides. The correlation equations indicate that (1) the binding is stronger for peptides in which the side chain of the C-terminal amino acid has a large molar refractivity (MR) value, (2) the binding is weaker for peptides with polar than for those with nonpolar C-terminal side chains, (3) the N-terminal amino acid in N-Ac dipeptides contributes 12 times that of the C-terminal amino acid to binding affinity, and (4) the interactions between ristocetin and the N-terminal amino acid of N-acetyl tripeptides appear to be much weaker than those with the first two amino acids.

  6. Peripheral Administration of a Long-Acting Peptide Oxytocin Receptor Agonist Inhibits Fear-Induced Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Meera E.; Majchrzak, Mark J.; Fonseca, Kari R.; Doran, Angela; Osgood, Sarah; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle; Feyfant, Eric; McInnes, Heather; Darvari, Ramin; Buhl, Derek L.

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) modulates the expression of social and emotional behaviors and consequently has been proposed as a pharmacologic treatment of psychiatric diseases, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia; however, endogenous OT has a short half-life in plasma and poor permeability across the blood-brain barrier. Recent efforts have focused on the development of novel drug delivery methods to enhance brain penetration, but few efforts have aimed at improving its half-life. To explore the behavioral efficacy of an OT analog with enhanced plasma stability, we developed PF-06655075 (PF1), a novel non–brain-penetrant OT receptor agonist with increased selectivity for the OT receptor and significantly increased pharmacokinetic stability. PF-06478939 was generated with only increased stability to disambiguate changes to selectivity versus stability. The efficacy of these compounds in evoking behavioral effects was tested in a conditioned fear paradigm. Both central and peripheral administration of PF1 inhibited freezing in response to a conditioned fear stimulus. Peripheral administration of PF1 resulted in a sustained level of plasma concentrations for greater than 20 hours but no detectable accumulation in brain tissue, suggesting that plasma or cerebrospinal fluid exposure was sufficient to evoke behavioral effects. Behavioral efficacy of peripherally administered OT receptor agonists on conditioned fear response opens the door to potential peripheral mechanisms in other behavioral paradigms, whether they are mediated by direct peripheral activation or feed-forward responses. Compound PF1 is freely available as a tool compound to further explore the role of peripheral OT in behavioral response. PMID:27217590

  7. Inhibition of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infectivity by peptides analogous to the viral spike protein

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Bruno; Mossel, Eric C.; Gallaher, William R.; Wimley, William C.; Peters, C.J.; Wilson, Russell B.; Garry, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the cause of an atypical pneumonia that affected Asia, North America and Europe in 2002–2003. The viral spike (S) glycoprotein is responsible for mediating receptor binding and membrane fusion. Recent studies have proposed that the carboxyl terminal portion (S2 subunit) of the S protein is a class I viral fusion protein. The Wimley and White interfacial hydrophobicity scale was used to identify regions within the CoV S2 subunit that may preferentially associate with lipid membranes with the premise that peptides analogous to these regions may function as inhibitors of viral infectivity. Five regions of high interfacial hydrophobicity spanning the length of the S2 subunit of SARS-CoV and murine hepatitis virus (MHV) were identified. Peptides analogous to regions of the N-terminus or the pre-transmembrane domain of the S2 subunit inhibited SARS-CoV plaque formation by 40–70% at concentrations of 15–30 μM. Interestingly, peptides analogous to the SARS-CoV or MHV loop region inhibited viral plaque formation by >80% at similar concentrations. The observed effects were dose-dependent (IC50 values of 2–4 μM) and not a result of peptide-mediated cell cytotoxicity. The antiviral activity of the CoV peptides tested provides an attractive basis for the development of new fusion peptide inhibitors corresponding to regions outside the fusion protein heptad repeat regions. PMID:16616792

  8. Human biliverdin reductase-based peptides activate and inhibit glucose uptake through direct interaction with the kinase domain of insulin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Poulin, Amelia; Farah, Elie; Maines, Mahin D.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin binding changes conformation of the insulin receptor kinase (IRK) domain and initiates glucose uptake through the insulin, IGF-1, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and MAPK pathways; human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) is an IRK substrate and pathway effector. This is the first report on hBVR peptide-mediated IRK activation and conformational change. 290KYCCSRK, which increased IRK Vmax without changing Km, stimulated glucose uptake and potentiated insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in 4 cell lines. KYCCSRK in native hBVR was necessary for the hBVR and IRK cross-activation. Peptide treatment also activated PI3K downstream effectors, Akt and ERK, phosphorylation, and Elk transcriptional activity. In cells transfected with CMV-regulated EGFP-VP-peptide plasmid, C292→A mutant did not stimulate glucose uptake; K296→A decreased uptake and kinase activity. KEDQYMKMTV, corresponding to hBVR's SH2-binding domain, was a potent inhibitor of glucose uptake and IRK. The mechanism of action of peptides was examined using cells expressing IRK (aa 988–1263) activated by coexpressed KYCCSRK. Three active cys-mutants of IRK, with fluorophore coupled to cysteines, C1056, C1138, or C1234, were examined for changes in fluorescence emission spectra in the presence of peptides. KYCCSRK and KEDQYMKMTV bound to different sites in IRK. The findings identify novel agents for activating or inhibiting insulin signaling and offer a new approach for treatment of type 2 diabetes and hypoglycemia.—Gibbs, P. E. M., Lerner-Marmarosh, N., Poulin, A., Farah, E., Maines, M. D. Human biliverdin reductase-based peptides activate and inhibit glucose uptake through direct interaction with the kinase domain of insulin receptor. PMID:24568842

  9. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Raquel; To, Joyce; Lund, Maria E; Pinar, Anita; Mansell, Ashley; Robinson, Mark W; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Dalton, John P; Donnelly, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex that controls the production of IL-1β, a cytokine that influences the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Helminth parasites secrete molecules that interact with innate immune cells, modulating their activity to ultimately determine the phenotype of differentiated T cells, thus creating an immune environment that is conducive to sustaining chronic infection. We show that one of these molecules, FhHDM-1, a cathelicidin-like peptide secreted by the helminth parasite, Fasciola hepatica, inhibits the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β by macrophages. FhHDM-1 had no effect on the synthesis of pro-IL-1β. Rather, the inhibitory effect was associated with the capacity of the peptide to prevent acidification of the endolysosome. The activation of cathepsin B protease by lysosomal destabilization was prevented in FhHDM-1-treated macrophages. By contrast, peptide derivatives of FhHDM-1 that did not alter the lysosomal pH did not inhibit secretion of IL-1β. We propose a novel immune modulatory strategy used by F. hepatica, whereby secretion of the FhHDM-1 peptide impairs the activation of NLRP3 by lysosomal cathepsin B protease, which prevents the downstream production of IL-1β and the development of protective T helper 1 type immune responses that are detrimental to parasite survival.-Alvarado, R., To, J., Lund, M. E., Pinar, A., Mansell, A., Robinson, M. W., O'Brien, B. A., Dalton, J. P., Donnelly, S. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages.

  10. Identification of the peptide derived from S1 domain that inhibits type I and type II feline infectious peritonitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Koyama, Yusuke; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2015-06-02

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) can cause a lethal disease in cats, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). A therapeutic drug that is effective against FIP has not yet been developed. Peptides based on viral protein amino acid sequences have recently been attracting attention as new antiviral drugs. In the present study, we synthesized 30 overlapping peptides based on the amino acid sequence of the S1 domain of the type I FIPV strain KU-2 S protein, and investigated their inhibitory effects on FIPV infection. To evaluate the inhibitory effects on type I FIPV infection of these peptides, we investigated a method to increase the infection efficiency of poorly replicative type I FIPV. The efficiency of type I FIPV infection was increased by diluting the virus with medium containing a polycation. Of the 30 peptides, I-S1-8 (S461-S480), I-S1-9 (S471-S490), I-S1-10 (S481-S500), I-S1-16 (S541-S560), and I-S1-22 (S601-S620) significantly decreased the infectivity of FIPV strain KU-2 while I-S1-9 and I-S1-16 exhibited marked inhibitory effects on FIPV infection. The inhibitory effects on FIPV infection of these 2 peptides on other type I and type II FIPV strains, feline herpesvirus (FHV), and feline calicivirus (FCV) were also examined. These 2 peptides specifically inhibited type I and type II FIPV, but did FHV or FCV infection. In conclusion, the possibility of peptides derived from the S protein of type I FIPV strain KU-2 as anti-FIPV agents effective not only for type I, but also type II FIPV was demonstrated in vitro.

  11. Oral administration of L-mR18L, a single domain cationic amphipathic helical peptide, inhibits lesion formation in ApoE null mice.

    PubMed

    Handattu, Shaila P; Datta, Geeta; Epand, Richard M; Epand, Raquel F; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N; Mishra, Vinod K; Monroe, Candyce E; Keenum, Tamara D; Chaddha, Manjula; Anantharamaiah, G M; Garber, David W

    2010-12-01

    We have shown that Ac-hE18A-NH₂, a dual-domain cationic apolipoprotein-mimetic peptide, reduces plasma cholesterol levels in dyslipidemic mice. Two single-domain cationic peptides based on the lytic class L peptide 18L were developed to test the hypothesis that a single-domain cationic amphipathic peptide can reduce atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein (apo)E null mice when orally administered. To incorporate anti-inflammatory properties, aromatic residues were clustered in the nonpolar face similar to peptide 4F, resulting in modified 18L (m18L). To reduce lytic properties, the Lys residues of 18L were replaced with Arg with the resulting peptide called modified R18L (mR18L). Biophysical studies showed that mR18L had stronger interactions with lipids than did m18L. Peptide mR18L was also more effective than m18L in promoting LDL uptake by HepG2 cells. ApoE null mice received normal chow or chow containing m18L or mR18L for six weeks. A significant reduction in plasma cholesterol and aortic sinus lesion area was seen only in the mR18L group. Plasma from mice administered mR18L, unlike those from the control and m18L groups, did not enhance monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Thus oral administration of mR18L reduces plasma cholesterol and lesion formation and inhibits monocyte adhesion.

  12. [STUDIES IN VITRO INHIBITION OF THE ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME-I, HYPOTENSIVE AND ANTIHYPERTENSIVE EFFECTS OF PEPTIDE FRACTIONS OF V. UNGUICULATA].

    PubMed

    Cú-Cañetas, Trinidad; Betancur Ancona, David; Gallegos Tintoré, Santiago; Sandoval Peraza, Mukthar; Chel Guerrero, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme I (ACE-I) in vitro and in vivo from peptide fractions by enzymatic hydrolysis of the Vigna unguiculata protein concentrate was evaluated. Hydrolysis was done with Pepsin-Pancreatin and Flavourzima in two separate systems. The resulting hidrolysates were ultrafiltrated to obtain fractions with different molecular weight. The fractions with better inhibition Flavourzima were size > 1 kDa (> 1 kDa-F) and < 1 kDa (< 1 kDa-F), with an IC50 of 1222.84 and 1098.6 μg/ml respectively. Pepsin-Pancreatin fraction.

  13. Annexin A1 mimetic peptide controls the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of silica particles in mice

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, P G; Ferreira, T P T; Arantes, A C S; Ciambarella, B T; Cordeiro, R S B; Flower, R J; Perretti, M; Martins, M A; Silva, P M R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endogenous glucocorticoids are pro-resolving mediators, an example of which is the endogenous glucocorticoid-regulated protein annexin A1 (ANXA1). Because silicosis is an occupational lung disease characterized by unabated inflammation and fibrosis, in this study we tested the therapeutic properties of the N-terminal ANXA1-derived peptide annexin 1-(2-26) (Ac2-26) on experimental silicosis. Experimental Approach Swiss-Webster mice were administered silica particles intranasally and were subsequently treated with intranasal peptide Ac2-26 (200 μg per mouse) or dexamethasone (25 μg per mouse) for 7 days, starting 6 h post-challenge. Ac2-26 abolished the leukocyte infiltration, collagen deposition, granuloma formation and generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines evoked by silica; these variables were only partially inhibited by dexamethasone. Key Results A clear exacerbation of the silica-induced pathological changes was observed in ANXA1 knockout mice as compared with their wild-type (WT) littermate controls. Incubation of lung fibroblasts from WT mice with Ac2-26 in vitro reduced IL-13 or TGF-β-induced production of CCL2 (MCP-1) and collagen, but this peptide did not affect the production of CCL2 (MCP-1) by stimulated fibroblasts from formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1) knockout mice. Ac2-26 also inhibited the production of CCL2 (MCP-1) from fibroblasts of FPR2 knockout mice. Conclusions and Implications Collectively, our findings reveal novel protective properties of the ANXA1 derived peptide Ac2-26 on the inflammatory and fibrotic responses induced by silica, and suggest that ANXA1 mimetic agents might be a promising strategy as innovative anti-fibrotic approaches for the treatment of silicosis. PMID:25659822

  14. Velvet antler peptide prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis via transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihong; Mi, Yang; Guan, Hongya; Xu, Yan; Mei, Yingwu

    2016-07-15

    Velvet antlers (VAs) are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine and invigorant and contain many functional components for health promotion. The velvet antler peptide sVAP32 is one of active components in VAs; based on structural study, the sVAP32 interacts with TGF-β1 receptors and disrupts the TGF-β1 pathway. We hypothesized that sVAP32 prevents cardiac fibrosis from pressure overload by blocking TGF-β1 signaling. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or a sham operation. After one month, rats received either sVAP32 (15mg/kg/day) or vehicle for an additional one month. TAC surgery induced significant cardiac dysfunction, fibroblast activation and fibrosis; these effects were improved by treatment with sVAP32. In the heart tissue, TAC remarkably increased the expression of TGF-β1 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), reactive oxygen species levels, and the phosphorylation levels of Smad2/3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). SVAP32 inhibited the increases in reactive oxygen species levels, CTGF expression and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and ERK1/2, but not TGF-β1 expression. In cultured cardiac fibroblasts, angiotensin II (Ang II) had similar effects compared to TAC surgery, such as increases in α-SMA-positive cardiac fibroblasts and collagen synthesis. SVAP32 eliminated these effects by disrupting TGF-β1 binding to its receptors and blocking Ang II/TGF-β1 downstream signaling. These results demonstrated that sVAP32 has anti-fibrotic effects by blocking the TGF-β1 pathway in cardiac fibroblasts.

  15. Inhibition of CD4+ T lymphocyte binding to fibronectin and immune-cell accumulation in inflammatory sites by non-peptidic mimetics of Arg-Gly-Asp.

    PubMed Central

    Hershkoviz, R; Greenspoon, N; Mekori, Y A; Hadari, R; Alon, R; Kapustina, G; Lider, O

    1994-01-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion motif has been demonstrated in various studies to play a pivotal role in leucocyte and platelet interactions with plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. The recognition of the RGD sequence is mediated by heterodimeric receptors designated integrins of the beta 1 subfamily, expressed on distinct cell types, including T lymphocytes. We have recently shown that flexible non-peptidic mimetics of RGD, in which the two ionic side groups were separated by a linear spacer of 11 atoms, bound specifically to the platelet integrin alpha 11b beta 3, and inhibited T cell-mediated immune responses. The present study was designed to (i) further characterize the structural requirements for RGD interactions with CD4+ T cells, and (ii) examine the mechanisms by which the RGD mimetics interfere with immune cell reactivity in vivo. We now report that freezing the conformational degrees of freedom in the spacer chain, which fixes the relative orientation of the guanidinium and carboxylate side groups in a favourable manner, results in a higher level of inhibition of T cell binding to immobilized fibronectin, an RGD-containing ECM glycoprotein. In vivo, treatment of mice with relatively low doses of the RGD mimetics, but not the RGD peptide, inhibited the elicitation of an adoptively transferred DTH reaction. This inhibition was achieved by direct impairment of the ability of antigen-primed lymph node cells to migrate and accumulate in inflammatory sites. Hence, we suggest that the design and production of non-peptidic mimetics of RGD offers a novel approach to study defined parameters related to the structure-function requirements of small adhesion epitopes. Furthermore, this approach could be used therapeutically to inhibit pathological processes which depend on RGD recognition. PMID:7905794

  16. Brain RVD-haemopressin, a haemoglobin-derived peptide, inhibits bombesin-induced central activation of adrenomedullary outflow in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Takahiro; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Nemoto, Takayuki; Nakamura, Kumiko; Taniuchi, Keisuke; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Yokotani, Kunihiko; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Haemopressin and RVD-haemopressin, derived from the haemoglobin α-chain, are bioactive peptides found in brain and are ligands for cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Activation of brain CB1 receptors inhibited the secretion of adrenal catecholamines (noradrenaline and adrenaline) induced by i.c.v. bombesin in the rat. Here, we investigated the effects of two haemoglobin-derived peptides on this bombesin-induced response EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Anaesthetised male Wistar rats were pretreated with either haemoglobin-derived peptide, given i.c.v., 30 min before i.c.v. bombesin and plasma catecholamines were subsequently measured electrochemically after HPLC. Direct effects of bombesin on secretion of adrenal catecholamines were examined using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Furthermore, activation of haemoglobin α-positive spinally projecting neurons in the rat hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, a regulatory centre of central adrenomedullary outflow) after i.c.v. bombesin was assessed by immunohistochemical techniques. KEY RESULTS Bombesin given i.c.v. dose-dependently elevated plasma catecholamines whereas incubation with bombesin had no effect on spontaneous and nicotine-induced secretion of catecholamines from chromaffin cells. The bombesin-induced increase in catecholamines was inhibited by pretreatment with i.c.v. RVD-haemopressin (CB1 receptor agonist) but not after pretreatment with haemopressin (CB1 receptor inverse agonist). Bombesin activated haemoglobin α-positive spinally projecting neurons in the PVN. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The haemoglobin-derived peptide RVD-haemopressin in the brain plays an inhibitory role in bombesin-induced activation of central adrenomedullary outflow via brain CB1 receptors in the rat. These findings provide basic information for the therapeutic use of haemoglobin-derived peptides in the modulation of central adrenomedullary outflow. PMID:24138638

  17. Development of a high-affinity peptide that prevents phospholemman (PLM) inhibition of the sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (NCX1).

    PubMed

    Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Hodne, Kjetil; Hafver, Tandekile Lubelwana; Lunde, Marianne; Martinsen, Marita; Louch, William Edward; Sejersted, Ole Mathias; Carlson, Cathrine Rein

    2016-08-01

    NCX1 (Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca(2+) and a potential therapeutic target for brain ischaemia and for diastolic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. PLM (phospholemman), a substrate for protein kinases A and C, has been suggested to regulate NCX1 activity. However, although several studies have demonstrated that binding of phosphorylated PLM (pSer(68)-PLM) leads to NCX1 inhibition, other studies have failed to demonstrate a functional interaction of these proteins. In the present study, we aimed to analyse the biological function of the pSer(68)-PLM-NCX1 interaction by developing high-affinity blocking peptides. PLM was observed to co-fractionate and co-immunoprecipitate with NCX1 in rat left ventricle, and in co-transfected HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. For the first time, the NCX1-PLM interaction was also demonstrated in the brain. PLM binding sites on NCX1 were mapped to two regions by peptide array assays, containing the previously reported PASKT and QKHPD motifs. Conversely, the two NCX1 regions bound identical sequences in the cytoplasmic domain of PLM, suggesting that NCX1-PASKT and NCX1-QKHPD might bind to each PLM monomer. Using two-dimensional peptide arrays of the native NCX1 sequence KHPDKEIEQLIELANYQVLS revealed that double substitution of tyrosine for positions 1 and 4 (K1Y and D4Y) enhanced pSer(68)-PLM binding 8-fold. The optimized peptide blocked binding of NCX1-PASKT and NCX1-QKHPD to PLM and reversed PLM(S68D) inhibition of NCX1 activity (both forward and reverse mode) in HEK-293 cells. Altogether our data indicate that PLM interacts directly with NCX1 and inhibits NCX1 activity when phosphorylated at Ser(68).

  18. Development of a high-affinity peptide that prevents phospholemman (PLM) inhibition of the sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (NCX1)

    PubMed Central

    Wanichawan, Pimthanya; Hodne, Kjetil; Hafver, Tandekile Lubelwana; Lunde, Marianne; Martinsen, Marita; Louch, William Edward; Sejersted, Ole Mathias; Carlson, Cathrine Rein

    2016-01-01

    NCX1 (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1) is an important regulator of intracellular Ca2+ and a potential therapeutic target for brain ischaemia and for diastolic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. PLM (phospholemman), a substrate for protein kinases A and C, has been suggested to regulate NCX1 activity. However, although several studies have demonstrated that binding of phosphorylated PLM (pSer68-PLM) leads to NCX1 inhibition, other studies have failed to demonstrate a functional interaction of these proteins. In the present study, we aimed to analyse the biological function of the pSer68-PLM–NCX1 interaction by developing high-affinity blocking peptides. PLM was observed to co-fractionate and co-immunoprecipitate with NCX1 in rat left ventricle, and in co-transfected HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. For the first time, the NCX1–PLM interaction was also demonstrated in the brain. PLM binding sites on NCX1 were mapped to two regions by peptide array assays, containing the previously reported PASKT and QKHPD motifs. Conversely, the two NCX1 regions bound identical sequences in the cytoplasmic domain of PLM, suggesting that NCX1-PASKT and NCX1-QKHPD might bind to each PLM monomer. Using two-dimensional peptide arrays of the native NCX1 sequence KHPDKEIEQLIELANYQVLS revealed that double substitution of tyrosine for positions 1 and 4 (K1Y and D4Y) enhanced pSer68-PLM binding 8-fold. The optimized peptide blocked binding of NCX1-PASKT and NCX1-QKHPD to PLM and reversed PLM(S68D) inhibition of NCX1 activity (both forward and reverse mode) in HEK-293 cells. Altogether our data indicate that PLM interacts directly with NCX1 and inhibits NCX1 activity when phosphorylated at Ser68. PMID:27247424

  19. Peptides based on alphaV-binding domains of erythrocyte ICAM-4 inhibit sickle red cell-endothelial interactions and vaso-occlusion in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Dhananjay K; Liu, Xiao-du; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Mankelow, Tosti; Parsons, Stephen; Spring, Frances; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2006-11-01

    Growing evidence shows that adhesion molecules on sickle erythrocytes interact with vascular endothelium leading to vaso-occlusion. Erythrocyte intercellular adhesion molecule-4 (ICAM-4) binds alphaV-integrins, including alphaVbeta3 on endothelial cells. To explore the contribution of ICAM-4 to vascular pathology of sickle cell disease, we tested the effects of synthetic peptides, V(16)PFWVRMS (FWV) and T(91)RWATSRI (ATSR), based on alphaV-binding domains of ICAM-4 and capable of inhibiting ICAM-4 and alphaV-binding in vitro. For these studies, we utilized an established ex vivo microvascular model system that enables intravital microscopy and quantitation of adhesion under shear flow. In this model, the use of platelet-activating factor, which causes endothelial oxidant generation and endothelial activation, mimicked physiological states known to occur in sickle cell disease. Infusion of sickle erythrocytes into platelet-activating factor-treated ex vivo rat mesocecum vasculature produced pronounced adhesion of erythrocytes; small-diameter venules were sites of maximal adhesion and frequent blockage. Both FWV and ATSR peptides markedly decreased adhesion, and no vessel blockage was observed with either of the peptides, resulting in improved hemodynamics. ATSR also inhibited adhesion in unactivated microvasculature. Although infused fluoresceinated ATSR colocalized with vascular endothelium, pretreatment with function-blocking antibody to alphaVbeta3-integrin markedly inhibited this interaction. Our data strengthen the thesis that ICAM-4 on sickle erythrocytes binds endothelium via alphaVbeta3 and that this interaction contributes to vaso-occlusion. Thus peptides or small molecule mimetics of ICAM-4 may have therapeutic potential.

  20. Seasonal plasticity in the peptide neuronal systems: potential roles of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone, neuropeptide Y and vasoactive intestinal peptide in the regulation of the reproductive axis in subtropical Indian weaver birds.

    PubMed

    Surbhi; Rastogi, A; Rani, S; Kumar, V

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments examined the expression of gonadotrophin-releasing and inhibiting hormones (GnRH-I, GnRH-II and GnIH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in subtropical Indian weaver birds, which demonstrate relative photorefractoriness. Experiment 1 measured peptide expression levels in the form of immunoreactive (-IR) cells, percentage cell area and cell optical density in the preoptic area (GnRH-I), midbrain (GnRH-II), paraventricular nucleus (GnIH), mediobasal hypothalamus [dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), infundibular complex (INc), NPY and VIP] and lateral septal organ (VIP) during the progressive, breeding, regressive and nonbreeding phases of the annual reproductive cycle. GnRH-I was decreased in the nonbreeding and VIP was increased in INc in the breeding and regressive states. GnRH-II and NPY levels did not differ between the testicular phases. Double-labelled immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed a close association between the GnRH/GnIH, GnRH/NPY, GnRH/VIP and GnIH/NPY peptide systems, implicating them interacting and playing roles in the reproductive regulation in weaver birds. Experiment 2 further measured these peptide levels in the middle of day and night in weaver birds that were maintained under short days (8 : 16 h light /dark cycle; photosensitive), exposed to ten long days (16 : 8 h light /dark cycle; photostimulated) or maintained for approximately 2 years on a 16 : 8 h light /dark cycle (photorefractory). Reproductively immature testes in these groups precluded the possible effect of an enhanced gonadal feedback on the hypothalamic peptide expression. There were group differences in the GnRH-I (not GnRH-II), GnIH, NPY and VIP immunoreactivity, albeit with variations in immunoreactivity measures in the present study. These results, which are consistent with those reported in birds with relative photorefractoriness, show the distribution and possibly a complex interaction of key neuropeptides in the regulation of the

  1. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V.; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A.; Kotukhov, Yuriy A.; Danilova, Alevtina N.; Özek, Temel; Başer, K. Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEOf+l and AKEOstm, respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyl eugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEOstm, but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEOstm composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). We found that one component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca2+ flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca2+ flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by an inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production. PMID:25959257

  2. Inhibition of Human Neutrophil Responses by the Essential Oil of Artemisia kotuchovii and Its Constituents.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kushnarenko, Svetlana V; Özek, Gulmira; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Utegenova, Gulzhakhan A; Kotukhov, Yuriy A; Danilova, Alevtina N; Özek, Temel; Başer, K Hüsnü Can; Quinn, Mark T

    2015-05-27

    Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers+leaves and stems of Artemisia kotuchovii Kupr. (AKEO(f+l) and AKEO(stm), respectively) and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The primary components of the oils were estragole, (E)- and (Z)-β-ocimenes, methyleugenol, limonene, spathulenol, β-pinene, myrcene, and (E)-methyl cinnamate. Seventy-four constituents were present at concentrations from 0.1 to 1.0%, and 34 compounds were identified in trace (<0.1%) amounts in one or both plant components. Screening of the essential oils for biological activity showed that AKEO(stm), but not AKEOf+l, inhibited N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux and chemotaxis and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human neutrophils. Selected pure constituents, representing >96% of the AKEO(stm) composition, were also tested in human neutrophils and HL-60 cells transfected with N-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). One component, 6-methyl-3,5-heptadien-2-one (MHDO), inhibited fMLF- and interleukin 8 (IL-8)-stimulated Ca(2+) flux, fMLF-induced chemotaxis, and PMA-induced ROS production in human neutrophils. MHDO also inhibited fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux in FPR1-HL60 cells. These results suggest that MHDO may be effective in modulating some innate immune responses, possibly by inhibition of neutrophil migration and ROS production.

  3. Inhibition of protein interactions with the beta 2 sliding clamp of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III by peptides from beta 2-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wijffels, Gene; Dalrymple, Brian P; Prosselkov, Pavel; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Epa, V Chandana; Lilley, Penelope E; Jergic, Slobodan; Buchardt, Jens; Brown, Susan E; Alewood, Paul F; Jennings, Philip A; Dixon, Nicholas E

    2004-05-18

    The sliding clamp of the Escherichia coli replisome is now understood to interact with many proteins involved in DNA synthesis and repair. A universal interaction motif is proposed to be one mechanism by which those proteins bind the E. coli sliding clamp, a homodimer of the beta subunit, at a single site on the dimer. The numerous beta(2)-binding proteins have various versions of the consensus interaction motif, including a related hexameric sequence. To determine if the variants of the motif could contribute to the competition of the beta-binding proteins for the beta(2) site, synthetic peptides derived from the putative beta(2)-binding motifs were assessed for their abilities to inhibit protein-beta(2) interactions, to bind directly to beta(2), and to inhibit DNA synthesis in vitro. A hierarchy emerged, which was consistent with sequence similarity to the pentameric consensus motif, QL(S/D)LF, and peptides containing proposed hexameric motifs were shown to have activities comparable to those containing the consensus sequence. The hierarchy of peptide binding may be indicative of a competitive hierarchy for the binding of proteins to beta(2) in various stages or circumstances of DNA replication and repair.

  4. Investigation the Possibility of Using Peptides with a Helical Repeating Pattern of Hydro-Phobic and Hydrophilic Residues to Inhibit IL-10.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guoying; Chen, Shu; Yang, Yuedong; Cummins, Scott F; Zhan, Jian; Li, Zhixiu; Zhu, Bin; Mounsey, Kate; Walton, Shelley; Wei, Ming Q; Wang, Yuejian; Zhou, Yaoqi; Wang, Tianfang; Liu, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of IL-10 signalling clears chronic viral and bacterial infections. Immunization together with blockade of IL-10 signalling or relatively low level of IL-10 further enhances viral and bacterial clearance. IL-10 functions through binding to interleukin 10 receptor (IL-10R). Here we showed that peptides P1 and P2 with the hydrophobic and hydrophilic pattern of the IL10R-binding helix in IL-10 could bind with either IL-10R1 or IL-10, and inhibit inflammatory signals with long duration and negligible cytotoxicity in vitro. Furthermore, P2 can enhance antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice induced by the vaccine based on a long peptide of protein E7 in a human papillomavirus type 16.

  5. Investigation the Possibility of Using Peptides with a Helical Repeating Pattern of Hydro-Phobic and Hydrophilic Residues to Inhibit IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Guoying; Chen, Shu; Yang, Yuedong; Cummins, Scott F.; Zhan, Jian; Li, Zhixiu; Zhu, Bin; Mounsey, Kate; Walton, Shelley; Wei, Ming Q.; Wang, Yuejian; Zhou, Yaoqi; Wang, Tianfang; Liu, Xiaosong

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of IL-10 signalling clears chronic viral and bacterial infections. Immunization together with blockade of IL-10 signalling or relatively low level of IL-10 further enhances viral and bacterial clearance. IL-10 functions through binding to interleukin 10 receptor (IL-10R). Here we showed that peptides P1 and P2 with the hydrophobic and hydrophilic pattern of the IL10R-binding helix in IL-10 could bind with either IL-10R1 or IL-10, and inhibit inflammatory signals with long duration and negligible cytotoxicity in vitro. Furthermore, P2 can enhance antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice induced by the vaccine based on a long peptide of protein E7 in a human papillomavirus type 16. PMID:27100390

  6. OMP peptides activate the DegS stress-sensor protease by a relief of inhibition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A; Sauer, Robert T

    2009-10-14

    In the E. coli periplasm, C-terminal peptides of misfolded outer-membrane porins (OMPs) bind to the PDZ domains of the trimeric DegS protease, triggering cleavage of a transmembrane regulator and transcriptional activation of stress genes. We show that an active-site DegS mutation partially bypasses the requirement for peptide activation and acts synergistically with mutations that disrupt contacts between the protease and PDZ domains. Biochemical results support an allosteric model, in which these mutations, active-site modification, and peptide/substrate binding act in concert to stabilize proteolytically active DegS. Cocrystal structures of DegS in complex with different OMP peptides reveal activation of the protease domain with varied conformations of the PDZ domain and without specific contacts from the bound OMP peptide. Taken together, these results indicate that the binding of OMP peptides activates proteolysis principally by relieving inhibitory contacts between the PDZ domain and the protease domain of DegS.

  7. OMP Peptides Activate the DegS Stress-Sensor Protease by a Relief of Inhibition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; MIT

    2010-03-19

    In the E. coli periplasm, C-terminal peptides of misfolded outer-membrane porins (OMPs) bind to the PDZ domains of the trimeric DegS protease, triggering cleavage of a transmembrane regulator and transcriptional activation of stress genes. We show that an active-site DegS mutation partially bypasses the requirement for peptide activation and acts synergistically with mutations that disrupt contacts between the protease and PDZ domains. Biochemical results support an allosteric model, in which these mutations, active-site modification, and peptide/substrate binding act in concert to stabilize proteolytically active DegS. Cocrystal structures of DegS in complex with different OMP peptides reveal activation of the protease domain with varied conformations of the PDZ domain and without specific contacts from the bound OMP peptide. Taken together, these results indicate that the binding of OMP peptides activates proteolysis principally by relieving inhibitory contacts between the PDZ domain and the protease domain of DegS.

  8. HLA-DO increases bacterial superantigen binding to human MHC molecules by inhibiting dissociation of class II-associated invariant chain peptides.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Abdul Mohammad; Azar, Georges A; Mourad, Walid; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Boulassel, Mohamed-Rachid; Denzin, Lisa K; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    HLA-DO (H2-O in mice) is an intracellular non-classical MHC class II molecule (MHCII). It forms a stable complex with HLA-DM (H2-M in mice) and shapes the MHC class II-associated peptide repertoire. Here, we tested the impact of HLA-DO and H2-O on the binding of superantigens (SAgs), which has been shown previously to be sensitive to the structural nature of the class II-bound peptides. We found that the binding of staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) A and B, as well as toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), was similar on the HLA-DO(+) human B cell lines 721.45 and its HLA-DO(-) counterpart. However, overexpressing HLA-DO in MHC class II(+) HeLa cells (HeLa-CIITA-DO) improved binding of SEA and TSST-1. Accordingly, knocking down HLA-DO expression using specific siRNAs decreased SEA and TSST-1 binding. We tested directly the impact of the class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP), which dissociation from MHC class II molecules is inhibited by overexpressed HLA-DO. Loading of synthetic CLIP on HLA-DR(+) cells increased SEA and TSST-1 binding. Accordingly, knocking down HLA-DM had a similar effect. In mice, H2-O deficiency had no impact on SAgs binding to isolated splenocytes. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of SAgs to the MHCII-associated peptide has physiological basis and that the effect of HLA-DO on SEA and TSST-1 is mediated through the inhibition of CLIP release.

  9. Structural characterization of native autoinducing peptides and abiotic analogues reveals key features essential for activation and inhibition of an AgrC quorum sensing receptor in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tal-Gan, Yftah; Ivancic, Monika; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Cornilescu, Claudia C; Blackwell, Helen E

    2013-12-11

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that uses quorum sensing (QS) to control virulence. Its QS system is regulated by macrocyclic peptide signals (or autoinducing peptides (AIPs)) and their cognate transmembrane receptors (AgrCs). Four different specificity groups of S. aureus have been identified to date (groups I-IV), each of which uses a different AIP:AgrC pair. Non-native ligands capable of intercepting AIP:AgrC binding, and thereby QS, in S. aureus have attracted considerable interest as chemical tools to study QS pathways and as possible antivirulence strategies for the treatment of infection. We recently reported a set of analogues of the group-III AIP that are capable of strongly modulating the activity of all four AgrC receptors. Critical to the further development of such ligands is a detailed understanding of the structural features of both native AIPs and non-native analogues that are essential for activity. Herein, we report the first three-dimensional structural analysis of the known native AIP signals (AIPs-I-IV) and several AIP-III analogues with varied biological activities using NMR spectroscopy. Integration of these NMR studies with the known agonism and antagonism profiles of these peptides in AgrC-III revealed two key structural elements that control AIP-III (and non-native peptide) activity: (1) a tri-residue hydrophobic "knob" essential for both activation and inhibition and (2) a fourth anchor point on the exocyclic tail needed for receptor activation. These results provide strong structural support for a mechanism of AIP-mediated AgrC activation and inhibition in S. aureus , and should facilitate the design of new AgrC ligands with enhanced activities (as agonists or antagonists) and simplified chemical structures.

  10. Topical administration of a suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) mimetic peptide inhibits ocular inflammation and mitigates ocular pathology during mouse uveitis.

    PubMed

    He, Chang; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Sun, Lin; Mahdi, Rashid M; Larkin, Joseph; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2015-08-01

    Uveitis is a diverse group of potentially sight-threatening intraocular inflammatory diseases and pathology derives from sustained production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the optical axis. Although topical or systemic steroids are effective therapies, their adverse effects preclude prolonged usage and are impetus for seeking alternative immunosuppressive agents, particularly for patients with refractory uveitis. In this study, we synthesized a 16 amino acid membrane-penetrating lipophilic suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 peptide (SOCS1-KIR) that inhibits JAK/STAT signaling pathways and show that it suppresses and ameliorates experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), the mouse model of human uveitis. Fundus images, histological and optical coherence tomography analysis of eyes showed significant suppression of clinical disease, with average clinical score of 0.5 compared to 2.0 observed in control mice treated with scrambled peptide. We further show that SOCS1-KIR conferred protection from ocular pathology by inhibiting the expansion of pathogenic Th17 cells and inhibiting trafficking of inflammatory cells into the neuroretina during EAU. Dark-adapted scotopic and photopic electroretinograms further reveal that SOCS1-KIR prevented decrement of retinal function, underscoring potential neuroprotective effects of SOCS1-KIR in uveitis. Importantly, SOCS1-KIR is non-toxic, suggesting that topical administration of SOCS1-Mimetics can be exploited as a non-invasive treatment for uveitis and for limiting cytokine-mediated pathology in other ocular inflammatory diseases including scleritis.

  11. Peptide derived from desalinated boiled tuna extract inhibits adipogenesis through the downregulation of C/EBP-α and PPAR-γ in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Eun-Young; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-05-01

    Recently, obesity has increased due to a variety of reasons, including the availability of 'fast food' and high-fat diets. Developing anti-obesity functional drugs and foods from natural sources may offer solutions to this global concern. Generally, tuna is a high-protein, low-fat and low-calorie food with various bioactive effects. It may improve memory, reduce cholesterol levels and positively affect the development of brain cells. In this study, we screened the anti-obesity potential of peptides derived from tuna protein. We then observed protein bands by the Coomassie blue staining of a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel. The protein mixture was concentrated and desalted using in-gel trypsin digestion and a C18 nano column and Poros R2 reversed-phase preparation, prior to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS). We screened the peptides for their ability to affect adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We also measured glucose uptake, triglyceride levels and lipid droplets using Oil Red O staining. As a result, we confirmed that one peptide inhibited adipocyte differentiation. We also observed the expression of obesity-related genes by western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The peptide from the tuna extract significantly reduced the expression levels of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBP-α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) adipocyte marker genes. Thus, our data suggest that this peptide from boiled tuna extract reduces lipid components and adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells, and these characteristics may be of value in the development of anti-obesity foods.

  12. Nef-M1, a peptide antagonist of CXCR4, inhibits tumor angiogenesis and epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition in colon and breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Katkoori, Venkat R; Basson, Marc D; Bond, Vincent C; Manne, Upender; Bumpers, Harvey L

    2015-09-29

    The Nef-M1 peptide competes effectively with the natural ligand of CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), stromal cell-derived factor 1-alpha, to induce apoptosis and inhibit growth in colon cancer (CRC) and breast cancer (BC). Its role in tumor angiogenesis, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulation, key steps involved in tumor growth and metastasis, are unknown. We evaluated the angioinhibitory effect of Nef-M1 peptide and examined its role in the inhibition of EMT in these cancers. Colon (HT29) and breast (MDA-MB231) cancer cells expressing CXCR4 were studied in vitro and in xenograft tumors propagated in severe combined immunodeficient mice. The mice were treated intraperitoneally with Nef-M1 or scrambled amino acid sequence of Nef-M1 (sNef-M1) peptide, a negative control, starting at the time of tumor implantation. Sections from tumors were evaluated for tumor angiogenesis, as measured by microvessel density (MVD) based on immunostaining of endothelial markers. In vitro tumor angiogenesis was assessed by treating human umbilical vein endothelial cells with conditioned media from the tumor cell lines. A BC cell line (MDA-MB 468) which does not express CXCR4 was used to study the actions of Nef-M1 peptide. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses assessed the effect of Nef-M1 on tumor angiogenesis and EMT in both tumors and cancer cells. Metastatic lesions of CRC and BC expressed more CXCR4 than primary lesions. It was also found that tumors from mice treated with sNef-M1 had well established vascularity, while Nef-M1 treated tumors had very poor vascularization. Indeed, the mean MVD was lower in tumors from Nef-M1 treated mice than in sNef-M1 treated tumors. Nef-M1 treated tumor has poor morphology and loss of endothelial integrity. Although conditioned medium from CRC or BC cells supported HUVEC tube formation, the conditioned medium from Nef-M1 treated CRC or BC cells did not support tube formation. Western blot analyses revealed that Nef-M1

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of esters of 16-formyl-17-methoxy-dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives as inhibitors of 5α-reductase type 2.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Márquez, Araceli; Arellano, Yazmín; Bratoeff, Eugene; Heuze, Yvonne; Córdova, Karen; Nieves, Gladys; Soriano, Juan; Cabeza, Marisa

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vitro effect of 16-formyl-17-methoxy dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives on the activity of 5α-reductase type 2 (5α-R2) obtained from human prostate. The activity of different concentrations of these derivatives was determined for the conversion of labelled testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. The results indicated that an aliphatic ester moiety at the C-3 position of these derivatives increases their in vitro potency as inhibitors of 5α-R2 activity compared to finasteride®, which is considered to be a potent inhibitor of 5α-R2. In this case, the augmentation of the lipophilicity of these dehydroepiandrosterone derivatives increased their potency as inhibitors of 5α-R2. However, the presence of cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl or cycloheptyl rings as the cycloaliphatic ester moiety at C-3 of the formyl methoxy dehydroepiandrosterone scaffold did not inhibit the activity of this enzyme. This may be due to the presence of steric factors between the enzyme and the spatial structure of these derivatives.

  14. Pyrrhocoricin, a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide derived from insect, inhibits the translation process in the cell-free Escherichia coli protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Akihito; Kondo, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Shun; Ishiyama, Yohei; Saitoh, Eiichi; Kato, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Takaaki

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that pyrrhocoricin, a proline-rich antimicrobial peptide (PrAMP), killed sensitive species in a dose-dependent manner by specifically binding to DnaK. Here, on the basis of the finding that DnaK-deficient Escherichia coli strains are susceptible to PrAMPs, we used pyrrhocoricin to investigate internal targets other than DnaK. Using conventional antibiotics (bleomycin, streptomycin, and fosfomycin) that have known modes of action, first, we validated the availability of an assay using a cell-free rapid translation system (RTS), which is an in vitro protein synthesis system based on E. coli lysate, for evaluating inhibition of protein synthesis. We found that, similarly to bleomycin and streptomycin, pyrrhocoricin inhibited GFP synthesis in RTS in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, blockage of transcription and translation steps in RTS was individually estimated using RT-PCR after gene expression to determine mRNA products and using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to determine the amounts of GFP expressed from purified mRNA, respectively. The results demonstrated that this inhibition of GFP synthesis by pyrrhocoricin did not occur at the transcription step but rather at the translation step, in a manner similar to that of GFP synthesis by streptomycin, an inhibitor of the translation step by causing misreading of tRNA. These results suggest that RTS is a powerful assay system for determining if antimicrobial peptides inhibit protein synthesis and its transcription and/or translation steps. This is the first study to have shown that pyrrhocoricin inhibited protein synthesis by specifically repressing the translation step.

  15. Synthetic antimicrobial β-peptide in dual-treatment with fluconazole or ketoconazole enhances the in vitro inhibition of planktonic and biofilm Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Mora-Navarro, Camilo; Caraballo-León, Jean; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Ortiz-Bermúdez, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    Fungal infections are a pressing concern for human health worldwide, particularly for immunocompromised individuals. Current challenges such as the elevated toxicity of common antifungal drugs and the emerging resistance towards these could be overcome by multidrug therapy. Natural antimicrobial peptides, AMPs, in combination with other antifungal agents are a promising avenue to address the prevailing challenges. However, they possess limited biostability and susceptibility to proteases, which has significantly hampered their development as antifungal therapies. β-peptides are synthetic materials designed to mimic AMPs while allowing high tunability and increased biostability. In this work, we report for the first time the inhibition achieved in Candida albicans when treated with a mixture of a β-peptide model and fluconazole or ketoconazole. This combination treatment enhanced the biological activity of these azoles in planktonic and biofilm Candida, and also in a fluconazole-resistant strain. Furthermore, the in vitro cytotoxicity of the dual treatment was evaluated towards the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, a widely used model derived from liver tissue, which is primarily affected by azoles. Analyses based on the LA-based method and the mass-action law principle, using a microtiter checkerboard approach, revealed synergism of the combination treatment in the inhibition of planktonic C. albicans. The dual treatment proved to be fungicidal at 48 and 72 h. Interestingly, it was also found that the viability of HepG2 was not significantly affected by the dual treatments. Finally, a remarkable enhancement in the inhibition of the highly azole-resistant biofilms and fluconazole resistant C. albicans strain was obtained.

  16. Genetic Selection of Peptide Aptamers That Interact and Inhibit Both Small Protein B and Alternative Ribosome-Rescue Factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Dan; Tang, Yanqiong; Tang, Hongqian; Song, Haichao; Sun, Qun; Zhang, Yueling; Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA) in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides) was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN) as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB) which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H) employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl) and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus, the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti-microbial drugs targeted to the ribosome rescued factors in A

  17. Determination of the optimal position of adjacent proton-donor centers for the activation or inhibition of peptide bond formation--a computational model study.

    PubMed

    Rangelov, Miroslav A; Petrova, Galina P; Yomtova, Vihra M; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2011-09-01

    The study reports a computational analysis of the influence of proton donor group adjacent to the reaction center during ester ammonolysis of an acylated diol as a model reaction for peptide bond formation. This analysis was performed using catalytic maps constructed after a detailed scanning of the available space around the reaction centers in different transition states, a water molecule acting as a typical proton donor. The calculations suggest that an adjacent proton donor center can reduce the activation barrier of the rate determining transition states by up to 7.2 kcal/mol, while no inhibition of the reaction can be achieved by such a group.

  18. Anti-Biofilm and Immunomodulatory Activities of Peptides That Inhibit Biofilms Formed by Pathogens Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Mansour, Sarah C; Wang, Zhejun; Jiang, Lucy; Breidenstein, Elena B M; Elliott, Melissa; Reffuveille, Fany; Speert, David P; Reckseidler-Zenteno, Shauna L; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Hancock, Robert E W

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients often acquire chronic respiratory tract infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) species. In the CF lung, these bacteria grow as multicellular aggregates termed biofilms. Biofilms demonstrate increased (adaptive) resistance to conventional antibiotics, and there are currently no available biofilm-specific therapies. Using plastic adherent, hydroxyapatite and flow cell biofilm models coupled with confocal and scanning electron microscopy, it was demonstrated that an anti-biofilm peptide 1018 prevented biofilm formation, eradicated mature biofilms and killed biofilms formed by a wide range of P. aeruginosa and B. cenocepacia clinical isolates. New peptide derivatives were designed that, compared to their parent peptide 1018, showed similar or decreased anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but increased activity against biofilms formed by the Gram-positive bacterium methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In addition, some of these new peptide derivatives retained the immunomodulatory activity of 1018 since they induced the production of the chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and suppressed lipopolysaccharide-mediated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and were non-toxic towards these cells. Peptide 1018 and its derivatives provide promising leads for the treatment of chronic biofilm infections and hyperinflammatory lung disease in CF patients.

  19. Consumption of peptide-included and free tryptophan induced by peroxyl radicals: A kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, E; López-Alarcón, C

    2014-10-01

    It is well-known that tryptophan residues are efficiently oxidized by peroxyl radicals, generating kynurenine, and N-formyl kynurenine as well as hydroperoxide derivatives as products. In the present work we studied the kinetic of such reaction employing free and peptide-included tryptophan. Two azocompounds were used to produce peroxyl radicals: AAPH (2,2'-Azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride) and ABCVA (4,4'-Azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid)), which generate cationic and anionic peroxyl radicals, respectively. Tryptophan consumption was assessed by fluorescence spectroscopy and the reactions were carried out in phosphate buffer (75mM, pH 7.4) at 45°C. Only a slight effect of the peroxyl radical charge was evidenced on the consumption of free tryptophan and the dipeptide Gly-Trp. Employing AAPH as peroxyl radical source, at low free tryptophan concentrations (1-10µM) near 0.3 mol of tryptophan were consumed per each mol of peroxyl radicals introduced into the system. However, at high free tryptophan concentrations (100µM-1mM) such stoichiometry increased in a tryptophan concentration-way. At 1mM three moles of tryptophan were consumed per mol of AAPH-derived peroxyl radicals, evidencing the presence of chain reactions. A similar behavior was observed when di and tri-peptides (Gly-Trp, Trp-Gly, Gly-Trp-Gly, Trp-Ala, Ala-Trp-Ala) were studied. Nonetheless, at low initial concentration (5µM), the initial consumption rate of tryptophan included in the peptides was two times higher than free tryptophan. In contrast, at high concentration (1mM) free and peptide-included tryptophan showed similar initial consumption rates. These results could be explained considering a disproportionation process of tryptophanyl radicals at low free tryptophan concentrations, a process that would be inhibited when tryptophan is included in peptides.

  20. An antisense peptide nucleic acid against Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibiting bacterial-induced inflammatory responses in the cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cellular model system.

    PubMed

    Montagner, Giulia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cabrini, Giulio; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Lampronti, Ilaria; Finotti, Alessia; Nielsen, Peter E; Gambari, Roberto

    2017-02-03

    Discovery of novel antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa able to inhibit bacterial growth as well as the resulting inflammatory response is a key goal in cystic fibrosis research. We report in this paper that a peptide nucleic acid (PNA3969) targeting the translation initiation region of the essential acpP gene of P. aeruginosa, and previously shown to inhibit bacterial growth, concomitantly also strongly inhibits PAO1 induced up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory markers IL-8, IL-6, G-CSF, IFN-γ, IP-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α in IB3-1 cystic fibrosis cells infected by P. aeruginosa PAO1. Remarkably, no effect on PAO1 induction of VEGF, GM-CSF and IL-17 was observed. Analogous experiments using a two base mis-match control PNA did not show such inhibition. Furthermore, no significant effects of the PNAs were seen on cell growth, apoptosis or secretome profile in uninfected IB3-1 cells (with the exception of a PNA-mediated up-regulation of PDGF, IL-17 and GM-CSF). Thus, we conclude that in cell culture an antimicrobial PNA against Pseudomonas can inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines otherwise induced by the infection. In particular, the effects of PNA-3969 on IL-8 gene expression are significant considering the key role of this protein in the cystic fibrosis inflammatory process exacerbated by P. aeruginosa infection.

  1. Peptide IDR-1002 Inhibits NF-κB Nuclear Translocation by Inhibition of IκBα Degradation and Activates p38/ERK1/2–MSK1-Dependent CREB Phosphorylation in Macrophages Stimulated with Lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Huante-Mendoza, Alejandro; Silva-García, Octavio; Oviedo-Boyso, Javier; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Baizabal-Aguirre, Víctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a critical molecular defense mechanism of the innate immune system that mediates the elimination of disease-causing bacteria. Repair of the damaged tissue, and the reestablishment of homeostasis, must be accomplished after elimination of the pathogen. The innate defense regulators (IDRs) are short cationic peptides that mimic natural host defense peptides and are effective in eliminating pathogens by enhancing the activity of the immune system while controlling the inflammatory response. Although the role of different IDRs as modulators of inflammation has been reported, there have been only limited studies of the signaling molecules regulated by this type of peptide. The present study investigated the effect of IDR-1002 on nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors that are responsible for triggering and controlling inflammation, respectively, in macrophages. We found that TNF-α and COX-2 expression, IκBα phosphorylation, and NF-κB nuclear translocation were strongly inhibited in macrophages pre-incubated with IDR-1002 and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). IDR-1002 also increased CREB phosphorylation at Ser133 via activation of the p38/ERK1/2–MSK1 signaling pathways without detectable expression of the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13 involved is suppressing inflammation or alternative activation. Transcriptional activation of NF-κB and CREB is known to require interaction with the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). To test for CBP–NF-κB and CBP–CREB complex formation, we performed co-immunoprecipitation assays. These assays showed that IDR-1002 inhibited the interaction between CBP and NF-κB in macrophages stimulated with LPS, which might explain the inhibition of TNF-α and COX-2 expression. Furthermore, the complex between CBP and CREB in macrophages stimulated with IDR-1002 was also inhibited, which might explain why IDR-1002 did

  2. The tachykinin peptide neurokinin B binds copper forming an unusual [CuII(NKB)2] complex and inhibits copper uptake into 1321N1 astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Russino, Debora; McDonald, Elle; Hejazi, Leila; Hanson, Graeme R; Jones, Christopher E

    2013-10-16

    Neurokinin B (NKB) is a member of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides that have neuroinflammatory, neuroimmunological, and neuroprotective functions. In a neuroprotective role, tachykinins can help protect cells against the neurotoxic processes observed in Alzheimer's disease. A change in copper homeostasis is a clear feature of Alzheimer's disease, and the dysregulation may be a contributory factor in toxicity. Copper has recently been shown to interact with neurokinin A and neuropeptide γ and can lead to generation of reactive oxygen species and peptide degradation, which suggests that copper may have a place in tachykinin function and potentially misfunction. To explore this, we have utilized a range of spectroscopic techniques to show that NKB, but not substance P, can bind Cu(II) in an unusual [Cu(II)(NKB)2] neutral complex that utilizes two N-terminal amine and two imidazole nitrogen ligands (from each molecule of NKB) and the binding substantially alters the structure of the peptide. Using 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, we show that copper can enter the cells and subsequently open plasma membrane calcium channels but when bound to neurokinin B copper ion uptake is inhibited. This data suggests a novel role for neurokinin B in protecting cells against copper-induced calcium changes and implicates the peptide in synaptic copper homeostasis.

  3. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Acylated Peptides Derived from the Large Viral Surface Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Gripon, Philippe; Cannie, Isabelle; Urban, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The lack of an appropriate in vitro infection system for the major human pathogen hepatitis B virus (HBV) has prevented a molecular understanding of the early infection events of HBV. We used the novel HBV-infectible cell line HepaRG and primary human hepatocytes to investigate the interference of infection by HBV envelope protein-derived peptides. We found that a peptide consisting of the authentically myristoylated N-terminal 47 amino acids of the pre-S1 domain of the large viral envelope protein (L protein) specifically prevented HBV infection, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 nM. The replacement of myristic acid with other hydrophobic moieties resulted in changes in the inhibitory activity, most notably by a decrease in the IC50 to picomolar concentrations for longer unbranched fatty acids. The obstruction of HepaRG cell susceptibility to HBV infection after short preincubation times with the peptides suggested that the peptides efficiently target and inactivate a receptor at the hepatocyte surface. Our data both shed light on the molecular mechanism of HBV entry into hepatocytes and provide a basis for the development of potent hepadnaviral entry inhibitors as a novel therapeutic concept for the treatment of hepatitis Β. PMID:15650187

  4. Unprecedented Vilsmeier formylation: expedient syntheses of the cruciferous phytoalexins sinalexin and brassilexin and discovery of a new heteroaromatic ring system.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M S; Zaharia, I L

    2001-04-19

    [reaction: see text]. A very concise first synthesis of sinalexin was achieved by regioselective formylation of 1-methoxyindoline-2-thione under Vilsmeier conditions followed by unprecedented ammonia workup. Similar formylation of indoline-2-thione yielded brassilexin and a novel pentacyclic heteroaromatic compound resulting from condensation of the Vilsmeier adduct of indoline-2-thione. Both sinalexin and brassilexin displayed strong antifungal activity against several pathogens of crucifers.

  5. Potent inhibition of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15 by the phosphonamide peptide N-(phenylethylphosphonyl)-Gly-L-Pro-L-aminohexanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Barelli, H; Dive, V; Yiotakis, A; Vincent, J P; Checler, F

    1992-10-15

    A phosphonamide peptide, N-(phenylethylphosphonyl)-Gly-L-Pro-L-aminohexanoic acid, previously shown to block Clostridium histolyticum collagenases, was examined as a putative inhibitor of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15. Hydrolysis of two endopeptidase 24.16 substrates, i.e. 3-carboxy-7-methoxycoumarin (Mcc)-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-D-Lys-dinitrophenyl (Dnp) and neurotensin, were completely and dose-dependently inhibited by the phosphonamide inhibitor with KI values of 0.3 and 0.9 nM respectively. In addition, the phosphonamide peptide inhibited the hydrolysis of benzoyl (Bz)-Gly-Ala-Ala-Phe-(pAB) p-aminobenzoate and neurotensin by endopeptidase 24.15 with about a 10-fold lower potency (KI values of 5 and 7.5 nM respectively). The selectivity of this inhibitor towards several exo- and endo-peptidases belonging to the zinc-containing metallopeptidase family established that a 1 microM concentration of this inhibitor was unable to affect leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase A, angiotensin-converting enzyme and endopeptidase 24.11. The present paper therefore reports on the first hydrophilic highly potent endopeptidase 24.16 inhibitor and describes the most potent inhibitory agent directed towards endopeptidase 24.15 developed to date. These tools should allow one to assess the contribution of endopeptidase 24.16 and endopeptidase 24.15 to the physiological inactivation of neurotensin as well as other neuropeptides.

  6. Peptide-Derivatized SB105-A10 Dendrimer Inhibits the Infectivity of R5 and X4 HIV-1 Strains in Primary PBMCs and Cervicovaginal Histocultures

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Isabella; Lembo, David; Rusnati, Marco; Clò, Alberto; Morini, Silvia; Miserocchi, Anna; Bugatti, Antonella; Grigolon, Sonia; Musumeci, Giuseppina; Landolfo, Santo; Re, Maria Carla; Gibellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Peptide dendrimers are a class of molecules that exhibit a large array of biological effects including antiviral activity. In this report, we analyzed the antiviral activity of the peptide-derivatized SB105-A10 dendrimer, which is a tetra-branched dendrimer synthetized on a lysine core, in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that were challenged with reference and wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains. SB105-A10 inhibited infections by HIV-1 X4 and R5 strains, interfering with the early phases of the viral replication cycle. SB105-A10 targets heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and, importantly, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay revealed that SB105-A10 strongly binds gp41 and gp120, most likely preventing HIV-1 attachment/entry through multiple mechanisms. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of SB105-A10 was also detectable in an organ-like structure of human cervicovaginal tissue, in which SB105-A10 inhibited the HIV-1ada R5 strain infection without altering the tissue viability. These results demonstrated the strong antiviral activity of SB105-A10 and suggest a potential microbicide use of this dendrimer to prevent the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:24116111

  7. Inhibition of Wnt signaling induces amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein and the production and aggregation of Amyloid-β (Aβ)42 peptides.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Burgos, Patricia V; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and the most frequent cause of dementia in the aged population. According to the amyloid hypothesis, the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD. Aβ is generated from the amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein and can aggregate to form oligomers, which have been described as a major synaptotoxic agent in neurons. Dysfunction of Wnt signaling has been linked to increased Aβ formation; however, several other studies have argued against this possibility. Herein, we use multiple experimental approaches to confirm that the inhibition of Wnt signaling promoted the amyloidogenic proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein. We also demonstrate that inhibiting Wnt signaling increases the production of the Aβ42 peptide, the Aβ42 /Aβ40 ratio, and the levels of Aβ oligomers such as trimers and tetramers. Moreover, we show that activating Wnt signaling reduces the levels of Aβ42 and its aggregates, increases Aβ40 levels, and reduces the Aβ42 /Aβ40 ratio. Finally, we show that the protective effects observed in response to activation of the Wnt pathway rely on β-catenin-dependent transcription, which is demonstrated experimentally via the expression of various 'mutant forms of β-catenin'. Together, our findings indicate that loss of the Wnt signaling pathway may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  8. Kinetics and molecular docking studies of the inhibitions of angiotensin converting enzyme and renin activities by hemp seed (Cannabis sativa L.) peptides.

    PubMed

    Girgih, Abraham T; He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-05-07

    Four novel peptide sequences (WVYY, WYT, SVYT, and IPAGV) identified from an enzymatic digest of hemp seed proteins were used for enzyme inhibition kinetics and molecular docking studies. Results showed that WVYY (IC50 = 0.027 mM) was a more potent (p < 0.05) ACE-inhibitory peptide than WYT (IC50 = 0.574 mM). However, WYT (IC50 = 0.054 mM) and SVYT (IC50 = 0.063 mM) had similar renin-inhibitory activity, which was significantly better than that of IPAGV (IC50 = 0.093 mM). Kinetics studies showed that WVYY had a lower inhibition constant (Ki) of 0.06 mM and hence greater affinity for ACE when compared to the 1.83 mM obtained for WYT. SVYT had lowest Ki value of 0.89 mM against renin, when compared to the values obtained for WYT and IPAGV. Molecular docking results showed that the higher inhibitory activities of WVYY and SVYT were due to the greater degree of noncovalent bond-based interactions with the enzyme protein, especially formation of higher numbers of hydrogen bonds with active site residues.

  9. Inhibition on JAK-STAT3 Signaling Transduction Cascade Is Taken by Bioactive Peptide Alpha-S2 Casein Protein from Goat Ethawah Breed Milk

    PubMed Central

    Rohmah, Rista Nikmatu; Hardiyanti, Ferlany; Fatchiyah, Fatchiyah

    2015-01-01

    Background: RA is a systemic inflammatory disease that causes developing comorbidity conditions. This condition can cause by overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokine. In a previous study, we have found bioactive peptide CSN1S2 from Ethawah goat milk for anti-inflammatory for repair the ileum destruction. However, the signaling transduction cascade of bioactive peptides inhibits inflammation still not clear yet. Therefore, we analyzed the signaling transduction cascade via JAK-STAT3 pathway by in vivo and in silico. Methods: The ileum was isolated DNA and amplification with specific primer. The sequence was analyzed using the Sanger sequencing method. Modeling 3D-structure was predicted by SWISS-MODEL and virtual interaction was analyzed by docking system using Pymol and Discovery Studio 4.0 software. Results: This study showed that STAT3 has target gene 480bp. The normal group and normal treating- CSN1S2 of goat milk have similarity from gene bank. Whereas, RA group had transversion mutation that the purine change into pyrimidine even cause frameshift mutation. Interestingly, after treating with the CSN1S2 protein of goat milk shows reverse to the normal acid sequence group. Based on in silico study, from eight peptides, only three peptides of CSN1S2 protein, which carried by PePT1 to enter the small intestine. The fragments are PepT1-41-NMAIHPR-47; PepT1-182-KISQYYQK-189 and PepT1-214-TNAIPYVR-221. We have found just one bioactive peptide of f182-KISQYYQK-189 is able bind to STAT3. The energy binding of f182-KISQYYQK-189 and RA-STAT3 amino acid, it was Σ = -402.43 kJ/mol and the energy binding of f182-KISQYYQK-189 and RAS-STAT3 amino acid is decreasing into Σ = -407.09 kJ/mol. Conclusion: This study suggested that the fragment 182-KISQYYQK-189 peptides from Ethawah goat milk may act as an anti-inflammatory agent via JAK-STAT3 signal transduction cascade at the cellular level. PMID:26483598

  10. Placenta Peptide Can Protect Mitochondrial Dysfunction through Inhibiting ROS and TNF-α Generation, by Maintaining Mitochondrial Dynamic Network and by Increasing IL-6 Level during Chronic Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Muluye, Rekik A.; Bian, Yuhong; Wang, Li; Alemu, Paulos N.; Cui, Huantian; Peng, Xiaofei; Li, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Level of fatigue is related to the metabolic energy available to tissues and cells, mainly through mitochondrial respiration, as well fatigue is the most common symptom of poorly functioning mitochondria. Hence, dysfunction of these organelles may be the cause of the fatigue seen in Chronic fatigue (CF). Placenta has been used for treatment of fatigue and various disease, moreover peptides has known protect mitochondrial viability, and alleviate fatigue. These properties of placenta and peptides may link with its effect on mitochondria; therefore, it is highly important to investigate the effectiveness of placenta peptide on fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: After administration of sheep placenta peptide (SPP) for 1 month, mice’s were forced to swim till exhaustion for 90 min to induce chronic fatigue. Electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure, tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA), mitochondrial SOD and serum inflammatory cytokines level were investigated in order to determine the potential effect of SPP on mitochondria during CF. Rat skeletal muscle (L6 cell) were also treated with different concentration of SPP to determine the effect of SPP on cell viability using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium assay. Results: Our finding revealed that forced swimming induced fatigue model can cause mitochondrial damage through Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated lipid peroxidation and Tumor Necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) elevation. Whereas SPP protected fatigue induced mitochondrial dysfunction through preventing ROS and TNF-α generation, by maintaining mitochondrial dynamic network and by increasing serum IL-6 level. Conclusion: SPP can protect damage in mitochondrial components which will allow proper functioning of mitochondria that will in turn inhibit progression of chronic fatigue. Therefore, SPP may represent a novel therapeutic advantage for preventing mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue. PMID

  11. Ammonia inhibits the C-type natriuretic peptide-dependent cyclic GMP synthesis and calcium accumulation in a rat brain endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Konopacka, Agnieszka; Zielińska, Magdalena; Albrecht, Jan

    2008-05-01

    Recently we reported a decrease of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-dependent, natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP (cGMP) synthesis in a non-neuronal compartment of cerebral cortical slices of hyperammonemic rats [Zielińska, M., Fresko, I., Konopacka, A., Felipo, V., Albrecht, J., 2007. Hyperammonemia inhibits the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2)-mediated cyclic GMP synthesis in the astrocytic compartment of rat cerebral cortex slices. Neurotoxicology 28, 1260-1263]. Here we accounted for the possible involvement of cerebral capillary endothelial cells in this response by measuring the effect of ammonia on the CNP-mediated cGMP formation and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) accumulation in a rat cerebral endothelial cell line (RBE-4). We first established that stimulation of cGMP synthesis in RBE-4 cells was coupled to protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated Ca2+ influx from the medium which was inhibited by an L-type channel blocker nimodipine. Ammonia treatment (1h, 5mM NH4Cl) evoked a substantial decrease of CNP-stimulated cGMP synthesis which was related to a decreased binding of CNP to NPR2 receptors, and depressed the CNP-dependent [Ca2+]i accumulation in these cells. Ammonia also abolished the CNP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation in the absence of Na+. In cells incubated with ammonia in the absence of Ca2+ a slight CNP-dependent increase of [Ca2+]i was observed, most likely representing Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Depression of CNP-dependent cGMP-mediated [Ca2+]i accumulation may contribute to cerebral vascular endothelial dysfunction associated with hyperammonemia or hepatic encephalopathy.

  12. Modulation of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Response to N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-10

    thank Richard Brandenburg for procurement of samples of peripheral blood from dogs and for his infectious cheerfulness; to Gloria Contraras for...deactivation of PMN migration to serum factors was noted. Ward and Baker (70) found that preincubation of rabbit peritoneal exudate cells with activated rabbit...factor. These investigators found pretreatment of PMNs from rabbit peritoneal exudates with N-formyl-1-norleucyl-1-leucyl-1-phenylaJanine (FNLLP

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Nitromethylation of Aryl Halides: An Orthogonal Formylation Equivalent

    PubMed Central

    Walvoord, Ryan R.; Berritt, Simon; Kozlowski, Marisa C.

    2012-01-01

    An efficient cross-coupling reaction of aryl halides and nitromethane was developed with the use of parallel microscale experimentation. The arylnitromethane products are precursors for numerous useful synthetic products. An efficient method for their direct conversion to the corresponding oximes and aldehydes in a one-pot operation has been discovered. The process exploits inexpensive nitromethane as a carbonyl equivalent, providing a mild and convenient formylation method that is compatible with many functional groups. PMID:22839593

  14. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal peptides inhibit platelet adherence to arterial subendothelium at high wall shear rates. An effect dissociable from interference with adhesive protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J B; Kramer, W S; McKeown, L P; Williams, S B; Gralnick, H R

    1990-01-01

    Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)- and fibrinogen gamma-chain carboxyterminal (GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV) peptides inhibit fibrinogen, fibronectin (Fn), vitronectin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) binding to the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (GP IIb-IIIa). GP IIb-IIIa, vWF, and Fn are essential for normal platelet adherence to subendothelium. We added peptides to normal citrated whole blood before perfusion over human umbilical artery subendothelium and evaluated platelet adherence morphometrically at high (2,600 s-1) and low (800 s-1) wall shear rates. We also examined the effects of the peptides on platelet adhesion to collagen in a static system. At the high wall shear rate, RGDS and GQQHHLGGAKQAGDV caused dose-dependent reduction in the surface coverage with spread and adherent platelets. Amino acid transposition and conservative substitutions of RGD peptides and the AGDV peptide significantly inhibited platelet adherence at 2,600 s-1. By contrast, the modified RGD peptides and AGDV do not affect adhesive protein binding to platelets. None of the native or modified RGD- or fibrinogen gamma-chain peptides significantly inhibited either platelet adherence to subendothelium at 800 s-1 or platelet adhesion to collagen. Our findings demonstrate that peptides that interfere with adhesive protein binding to GP IIb-IIIa inhibit platelet adherence to vascular subendothelium with flowing blood only at high wall shear rates. Platelet adherence to subendothelium at high wall shear rates appears to be mediated by different recognition specificities from those required for fluid-phase adhesive protein binding or static platelet adhesion. PMID:2243140

  15. Aloe arborescens Extract Protects IMR-32 Cells against Alzheimer Amyloid Beta Peptide via Inhibition of Radical Peroxide Production.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Tringali, Giuseppe; Triggiani, Doriana; Giardina, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Aloe arborescens is commonly used as a pharmaceutical ingredient for its effect in burn treatment and ability to increase skin wound healing properties. Besides, it is well known to have beneficial phytotherapeutic, anticancer, and radio-protective properties. In this study, we first provided evidence that A. arborescens extract protects IMR32, a neuroblastoma human cellular line, from toxicity induced by beta amyloid, the peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. In particular, pretreatment with A. arborescens maintains an elevated cell viability and exerts a protective effect on mitochondrial functionality, as evidenced by oxygen consumption experiments. The protective mechanism exerted by A. arborescens seems be related to lowering of oxidative potential of the cells, as demonstrated by the ROS measurement compared with the results obtained in the presence of amyloid beta (1-42) peptide alone. Based on these preliminary observations we suggest that use ofA. arborescens extract could be developed as agents for the management of AD.

  16. Inhibition of ovarian cancer cell proliferation by a cell cycle inhibitory peptide fused to a thermally responsive polypeptide carrier

    PubMed Central

    Massodi, Iqbal; Moktan, Shama; Rawat, Aruna; Bidwell, Gene L.; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-01-01

    Current treatment of solid tumors is limited by normal tissue tolerance, resulting in a narrow therapeutic index. To increase drug specificity and efficacy and to reduce toxicity in normal tissues, we have developed a polypeptide carrier for a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, which has the potential to be thermally targeted to the tumor site. The design of this polypeptide is based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). The coding sequence of ELP was modified by the addition of the cell penetrating peptide Bac-7 at the N-terminus and a 23 amino acid peptide derived from p21 at the C-terminus (Bac-ELP1-p21). Bac-ELP1-p21 is soluble in aqueous solutions below physiological temperature (37°C) but aggregates when the temperature is raised above 39°C, making it a promising thermally responsive therapeutic carrier that may be actively targeted to solid tumors by application of focused hyperthermia. While Bac-ELP1-p21 at 37°C did not have any effect on SKOV-3 cell proliferation, the use of hyperthermia increased the antiproliferative effect of Bac-ELP1-p21 compared with a thermally unresponsive control polypeptide. Bac-ELP1-p21 displayed both a cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution in the SKOV-3 cells, with nuclear-localized polypeptide enriched in the heated cells, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Using Western blotting, we show that Bac-ELP1-p21 caused a decrease in Rb phosphorylation levels in cells treated at 42°C. The polypeptide also induced caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and cell cycle arrest in S-phase and G2/M-phase. These studies indicate that ELP is a promising macromolecular carrier for the delivery of cell cycle inhibitory peptides to solid tumors. PMID:19588502

  17. Structures of proline-rich peptides bound to the ribosome reveal a common mechanism of protein synthesis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Roy, Raktim N.; Lomakin, Ivan B.; Florin, Tanja; Mankin, Alexander S.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    With bacterial resistance becoming a serious threat to global public health, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have become a promising area of focus in antibiotic research. AMPs are derived from a diverse range of species, from prokaryotes to humans, with a mechanism of action that often involves disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) are instead actively transported inside the bacterial cell where they bind and inactivate specific targets. Recently, it was reported that some PrAMPs, such as Bac71–35, oncocins and apidaecins, bind and inactivate the bacterial ribosome. Here we report the crystal structures of Bac71–35, Pyrrhocoricin, Metalnikowin and two oncocin derivatives, bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. Each of the PrAMPs blocks the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome by simultaneously occupying three well characterized antibiotic-binding sites and interferes with the initiation step of translation, thereby revealing a common mechanism of action used by these PrAMPs to inactivate protein synthesis. Our study expands the repertoire of PrAMPs and provides a framework for designing new-generation therapeutics. PMID:26809677

  18. Structures of proline-rich peptides bound to the ribosome reveal a common mechanism of protein synthesis inhibition

    DOE PAGES

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Roy, Raktim N.; Lomakin, Ivan B.; ...

    2016-01-24

    Here, with bacterial resistance becoming a serious threat to global public health, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have become a promising area of focus in antibiotic research. AMPs are derived from a diverse range of species, from prokaryotes to humans, with a mechanism of action that often involves disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) are instead actively transported inside the bacterial cell where they bind and inactivate specific targets. Recently, it was reported that some PrAMPs, such as Bac71–35, oncocins and apidaecins, bind and inactivate the bacterial ribosome. Here we report the crystal structures of Bac71–35, Pyrrhocoricin, Metalnikowinmore » and two oncocin derivatives, bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. Each of the PrAMPs blocks the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome by simultaneously occupying three well characterized antibioticbinding sites and interferes with the initiation step of translation, thereby revealing a common mechanism of action used by these PrAMPs to inactivate protein synthesis. Our study expands the repertoire of PrAMPs and provides a framework for designing new-generation therapeutics.« less

  19. Structures of proline-rich peptides bound to the ribosome reveal a common mechanism of protein synthesis inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Matthieu G.; Roy, Raktim N.; Lomakin, Ivan B.; Florin, Tanja; Mankin, Alexander S.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2016-01-24

    Here, with bacterial resistance becoming a serious threat to global public health, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have become a promising area of focus in antibiotic research. AMPs are derived from a diverse range of species, from prokaryotes to humans, with a mechanism of action that often involves disruption of the bacterial cell membrane. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs) are instead actively transported inside the bacterial cell where they bind and inactivate specific targets. Recently, it was reported that some PrAMPs, such as Bac71–35, oncocins and apidaecins, bind and inactivate the bacterial ribosome. Here we report the crystal structures of Bac71–35, Pyrrhocoricin, Metalnikowin and two oncocin derivatives, bound to the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome. Each of the PrAMPs blocks the peptide exit tunnel of the ribosome by simultaneously occupying three well characterized antibioticbinding sites and interferes with the initiation step of translation, thereby revealing a common mechanism of action used by these PrAMPs to inactivate protein synthesis. Our study expands the repertoire of PrAMPs and provides a framework for designing new-generation therapeutics.

  20. Selective Inhibition of Mitochondrial JNK Signaling Achieved Using Peptide Mimicry of the Sab Kinase Interacting Motif-1 (KIM1)

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Jeremy W.; Cherry, Lisa; Laughlin, John D.; Figuera-Losada, Mariana; LoGrasso, Philip V.

    2011-01-01

    The c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are responsive to stress stimuli leading to activation of proapoptotic proteins and transcription. Additionally, JNK mitochondrial localization has been reported. To selectively target mitochondrial JNK signaling, we exploited JNKs interaction with its mitochondrial scaffold, Sab, using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and a cell permeable peptide corresponding to the KIM1 domain of Sab. Gene silencing and peptide interference of this interaction disrupted JNK translocation to the mitochondria and reduced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 without significant impact on c-Jun phosphorylation or AP-1 transcription. In contrast, the JNK inhibitory peptide (TI-JIP1) prevented these three functions. Tat-SabKIM1 selectivity was also demonstrated in anisomycin-stressed HeLa cells where Tat-SabKIM1 prevented Bcl-2 phosphorylation, cell death, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and superoxide generation, but not c-Jun phosphorylation. Conversely, TI-JIP1 prevented all aforementioned stress-induced events. This probe introduces a means to evaluate JNK-mediated events on the mitochondria without intervening in nuclear functions of JNK. PMID:21563797

  1. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial JNK signaling achieved using peptide mimicry of the Sab kinase interacting motif-1 (KIM1).

    PubMed

    Chambers, Jeremy W; Cherry, Lisa; Laughlin, John D; Figuera-Losada, Mariana; Lograsso, Philip V

    2011-08-19

    The c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are responsive to stress stimuli leading to activation of proapoptotic proteins and transcription. Additionally, JNK mitochondrial localization has been reported. To selectively target mitochondrial JNK signaling, we exploited JNK interaction with its mitochondrial scaffold, Sab, using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and a cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the KIM1 domain of Sab. Gene silencing and peptide interference of this interaction disrupted JNK translocation to the mitochondria and reduced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 without significant impact on c-Jun phosphorylation or AP-1 transcription. In contrast, the JNK inhibitory peptide (TI-JIP1) prevented these three functions. Tat-Sab(KIM1) selectivity was also demonstrated in anisomycin-stressed HeLa cells where Tat-Sab(KIM1) prevented Bcl-2 phosphorylation, cell death, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and superoxide generation but not c-Jun phosphorylation. Conversely, TI-JIP1 prevented all aforementioned stress-induced events. This probe introduces a means to evaluate JNK-mediated events on the mitochondria without intervening in nuclear functions of JNK.

  2. Bifidobacteria inhibit the inflammatory response induced by gliadins in intestinal epithelial cells via modifications of toxic peptide generation during digestion.

    PubMed

    Laparra, J M; Sanz, Y

    2010-03-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic enteropathy triggered by intake of gliadin, the toxic component of gluten. This study aims at evaluating the capacity of different Bifidobacterium strains to counteract the inflammatory effects of gliadin-derived peptides in intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. A commercial extract of several gliadin (Gld) types (alpha, beta, gamma, [symbol: see text] ) was subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion (pepsin at pH 3, pancreatin-bile at pH 6), inoculated or not with cell suspensions (10(8) colony forming units/ml) of either B. animalis IATA-A2, B. longum IATA-ES1, or B. bifidum IATA-ES2, in a bicameral system. The generated gliadin-derived peptides were identified by reverse phase-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Caco-2 cell cultures were exposed to the different gliadin peptide digestions (0.25 mg protein/ml), and the mRNA expression of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and chemokine CXCR3 receptor were analyzed by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in stimulated cells. The production of the pro-inflammatory markers NF-kappaB p50, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta (interleukine 1beta) by Caco-2 cells was also determined by ELISA. The peptides from gliadin digestions inoculated with bifidobacteria did not exhibit the toxic amino acid sequences identified in those noninoculated (alpha/beta-Gld [158-164] and alpha/beta-Gld [122-141]). The RT-PCR analysis evidenced a down-regulation in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory biomarkers. Consistent with these results the production of NF-kappaB, TNF-alpha, and IL-1beta was reduced (18.2-22.4%, 28.0-64.8%, and abolished, respectively) in cell cultures exposed to gliadin digestions inoculated with bifidobacteria. Therefore, bifidobacteria change the gliadin-derived peptide pattern and, thereby, attenuate their pro-inflammatory effects on Caco-2 cells.

  3. Peptide YY directly inhibits ghrelin-activated neurons of the arcuate nucleus and reverses fasting-induced c-Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Thomas; Bothe, Christine; Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) monitors and integrates hormonal and metabolic signals involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The orexigenic peptide ghrelin is secreted from the stomach during negative status of energy intake and directly activates neurons of the medial arcuate nucleus (ArcM) in rats. In contrast to ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY) is released postprandially from the gut and reduces food intake when applied peripherally. Neurons in the ArcM express ghrelin receptors and neuropeptide Y receptors. Thus, PYY may inhibit feeding by acting on ghrelin-sensitive Arc neurons. Using extracellular recordings, we (1) characterized the effects of PYY on the electrical activity of ghrelin-sensitive neurons in the ArcM of rats. In order to correlate the effect of PYY on neuronal activity with the energy status, we (2) investigated the ability of PYY to reverse fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. In addition, we (3) sought to confirm that PYY reduces food intake under our experimental conditions. Superfusion of PYY reversibly inhibited 94% of all ArcM neurons by a direct postsynaptic mechanism. The PYY-induced inhibition was dose-dependent and occurred at a threshold concentration of 10(-8)M. Consistent with the opposite effects of ghrelin and PYY on food intake, a high percentage (50%) of Arc neurons was activated by ghrelin and inhibited by PYY. In line with this inhibitory action, peripherally injected PYY partly reversed the fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. Similarly, refeeding of food-deprived mice reversed the fasting-induced activation in the Arc. Furthermore, peripherally injected PYY reduced food intake in 12-hour fasted mice. Thus the activity of Arc neurons correlated with the feeding status and was not only reduced by feeding but also by administration of PYY in non-refed mice. In conclusion, our current observations suggest that PYY may contribute to signaling a positive status of energy intake

  4. Chronic treatment with the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411,575 inhibits beta-amyloid peptide production and alters lymphopoiesis and intestinal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gwendolyn T; Manfra, Denise; Poulet, Frederique M; Zhang, Qi; Josien, Hubert; Bara, Thomas; Engstrom, Laura; Pinzon-Ortiz, Maria; Fine, Jay S; Lee, Hu-Jung J; Zhang, Lili; Higgins, Guy A; Parker, Eric M

    2004-03-26

    Inhibition of gamma-secretase, one of the enzymes responsible for the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to produce the pathogenic beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides, is an attractive approach to the treatment of Alzheimer disease. In addition to APP, however, several other gamma-secretase substrates have been identified (e.g. Notch), and altered processing of these substrates by gamma-secretase inhibitors could lead to unintended biological consequences. To study the in vivo consequences of gamma-secretase inhibition, the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411,575 was administered to C57BL/6 and TgCRND8 APP transgenic mice for 15 days. Although most tissues were unaffected, doses of LY-411,575 that inhibited Abeta production had marked effects on lymphocyte development and on the intestine. LY-411,575 decreased overall thymic cellularity and impaired intrathymic differentiation at the CD4(-)CD8(-)CD44(+)CD25(+) precursor stage. No effects on peripheral T cell populations were noted following LY-411,575 treatment, but evidence for the altered maturation of peripheral B cells was observed. In the intestine, LY-411,575 treatment increased goblet cell number and drastically altered tissue morphology. These effects of LY-411,575 were not seen in mice that were administered LY-D, a diastereoisomer of LY-411,575, which is a very weak gamma-secretase inhibitor. These studies show that inhibition of gamma-secretase has the expected benefit of reducing Abeta in a murine model of Alzheimer disease but has potentially undesirable biological effects as well, most likely because of the inhibition of Notch processing.

  5. N-Formylmethionyl Peptide Receptors on Equine Leukocytes Initiate Secretion but not Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyderman, Ralph; Pike, Marilyn C.

    1980-07-01

    The chemotaxis of leukocytes appears to be initiated by the binding of chemotactic factors to the surface of these cells. N-Formylated peptides induce chemotaxis and lysosomal enzyme secretion of leukocytes; because these peptides are available in a purified radiolabeled form, they have been useful in the characterization of receptors for chemotactic factors. Equine polymorphonuclear leukocytes secrete lysosomal enzymes but do not exhibit chemotaxis in response to the N-formylated peptides, even though they have a high-affinity cell surface receptor for these agents. The specificity of the equine receptor resembles the specificity of the receptor on chemotactically responsive leukocytes from other species. Equine polymorphonuclear leukocytes may thus be an excellent model for the study of the events that lead to a biological response following receptor occupancy.

  6. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist or N-acetylcysteine combined with omeprazol protect against mitochondrial complex II inhibition in a rat model of gastritis.

    PubMed

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Petronilho, Fabricia C; Araújo, João H; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Cardoso, Mariane R; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2011-03-01

    The pathophysiology of gastritis involves an imbalance between gastric acid attack and mucosal defence. In addition, the gastric mucosal injury results in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Several studies have shown the association of mitochondrial disorders with gastrointestinal dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activity in the stomach of rats with gastritis induced by indomethacin (IDM) and treated with omeprazole (OM), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist RC-3095. Adult male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 7 days with OM, NAC, RC-3095, combination of OM plus RC-3095, OM plus NAC and water (control). The animals were then submitted to fasting for 24 hr; IDM was administered. The rats were killed 6 hr later, and the stomachs were used for evaluation of macroscopic damage and respiratory chain activity. Our results showed that complex I and IV activities were not affected by administration of IDM. On the other hand, complex II and III activities were inhibited. In addition, OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC did not reverse complex II activity inhibition. However, the complex III activity inhibition was reversed only with the combined use of OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC. Our results are in agreement with previous studies indicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal tract disease and we suggest that GRPR antagonism might be a novel therapeutic strategy in gastritis.

  7. The Macrocyclic Peptide Antibiotic Micrococcin P1 Is Secreted by the Food-Borne Bacterium Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 and Inhibits Listeria monocytogenes on Soft Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Carnio, Markus C.; Höltzel, Alexandra; Rudolf, Melanie; Henle, Thomas; Jung, Günther; Scherer, Siegfried

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 was found to produce a substance exhibiting a bacteriostatic effect on a variety of gram-positive bacteria. The metabolite was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and semipreparative reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the high purity of the compound and revealed a molecular mass of 1,143 Da. By two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy the substance was identified as micrococcin P1 which is a macrocyclic peptide antibiotic that has not yet been reported for the genus Staphylococcus. A total of 95 out of 95 Listeria strains and 130 out of 135 other gram-positive bacteria were inhibited by this substance, while none of 37 gram-negative bacteria were affected. The antilisterial potential of this food-grade strain as a protective starter culture was evaluated by its in situ application in cheese-ripening experiments under laboratory conditions. A remarkable growth reduction of Listeria monocytogenes could be achieved compared to control cheese ripened with a nonbacteriocinogenic type strain of Staphylococcus equorum. In order to prove that inhibition was due to micrococcin P1, a micrococcin-deficient mutant was constructed which did not inhibit L. monocytogenes in cheese-ripening experiments. PMID:10831414

  8. The macrocyclic peptide antibiotic micrococcin P(1) is secreted by the food-borne bacterium Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 and inhibits Listeria monocytogenes on soft cheese.

    PubMed

    Carnio, M C; Höltzel, A; Rudolf, M; Henle, T; Jung, G; Scherer, S

    2000-06-01

    Staphylococcus equorum WS 2733 was found to produce a substance exhibiting a bacteriostatic effect on a variety of gram-positive bacteria. The metabolite was purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and semipreparative reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the high purity of the compound and revealed a molecular mass of 1,143 Da. By two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy the substance was identified as micrococcin P(1) which is a macrocyclic peptide antibiotic that has not yet been reported for the genus Staphylococcus. A total of 95 out of 95 Listeria strains and 130 out of 135 other gram-positive bacteria were inhibited by this substance, while none of 37 gram-negative bacteria were affected. The antilisterial potential of this food-grade strain as a protective starter culture was evaluated by its in situ application in cheese-ripening experiments under laboratory conditions. A remarkable growth reduction of Listeria monocytogenes could be achieved compared to control cheese ripened with a nonbacteriocinogenic type strain of Staphylococcus equorum. In order to prove that inhibition was due to micrococcin P(1), a micrococcin-deficient mutant was constructed which did not inhibit L. monocytogenes in cheese-ripening experiments.

  9. Inhibition of N1-Src kinase by a specific SH3 peptide ligand reveals a role for N1-Src in neurite elongation by L1-CAM

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Sarah; Wetherill, Sarah J.; Ugbode, Christopher I.; Chawla, Sangeeta; Brackenbury, William J.; Evans, Gareth J. O.

    2017-01-01

    In the mammalian brain the ubiquitous tyrosine kinase, C-Src, undergoes splicing to insert short sequences in the SH3 domain to yield N1- and N2-Src. We and others have previously shown that the N-Srcs have altered substrate specificity and kinase activity compared to C-Src. However, the exact functions of the N-Srcs are unknown and it is likely that N-Src signalling events have been misattributed to C-Src because they cannot be distinguished by conventional Src inhibitors that target the kinase domain. By screening a peptide phage display library, we discovered a novel ligand (PDN1) that targets the unique SH3 domain of N1-Src and inhibits N1-Src in cells. In cultured neurons, PDN1 fused to a fluorescent protein inhibited neurite outgrowth, an effect that was mimicked by shRNA targeting the N1-Src microexon. PDN1 also inhibited L1-CAM-dependent neurite elongation in cerebellar granule neurons, a pathway previously shown to be disrupted in Src−/− mice. PDN1 therefore represents a novel tool for distinguishing the functions of N1-Src and C-Src in neurons and is a starting point for the development of a small molecule inhibitor of N1-Src. PMID:28220894

  10. N-formylation of lysine in histone proteins as a secondary modification arising from oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Xinfeng; Taghizadeh, Koli; Dong, Min; Dedon, Peter C

    2007-01-02

    The posttranslational modification of histone and other chromatin proteins has a well recognized but poorly defined role in the physiology of gene expression. With implications for interfering with these epigenetic mechanisms, we now report the existence of a relatively abundant secondary modification of chromatin proteins, the N(6)-formylation of lysine that appears to be uniquely associated with histone and other nuclear proteins. Using both radiolabeling and sensitive bioanalytical methods, we demonstrate that the formyl moiety of 3'-formylphosphate residues arising from 5'-oxidation of deoxyribose in DNA, caused by the enediyne neocarzinostatin, for example, acylate the N(6)-amino groups of lysine side chains. A liquid chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS) method was developed to quantify the resulting N(6)-formyl-lysine residues, which were observed to be present in unperturbed cells and all sources of histone proteins to the extent of 0.04-0.1% of all lysines in acid-soluble chromatin proteins including histones. Cells treated with neocarzinostatin showed a clear dose-response relationship for the formation of N(6)-formyl-lysine, with this nucleosome linker-selective DNA-cleaving agent causing selective N(6)-formylation of the linker histone H1. The N(6)-formyl-lysine residue appears to represent an endogenous histone secondary modification, one that bears chemical similarity to lysine N(6)-acetylation recognized as an important determinant of gene expression in mammalian cells. The N(6)-formyl modification of lysine may interfere with the signaling functions of lysine acetylation and methylation and thus contribute to the pathophysiology of oxidative and nitrosative stress.

  11. Peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) inhibit the angiotensin-I converting enzyme by interacting with its catalytic cavity independent of their antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; González de Mejía, Elvira; Mendoza, Sandra; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to evaluate the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory potential and the antioxidant capacity of pure synthesized peptides (GLTSK, LSGNK, GEGSGA, MPACGSS and MTEEY) originally identified in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans (P. vulgaris L.) that had previously demonstrated antiproliferative activity against human colorectal cancer cells. The five peptides were able to inhibit ACE with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values ranging from 65.4 (GLTSK) to 191.5 μM (MPACGSS). The combination of GLTSK and MTEEY increased the ACE inhibition by 30% compared to equieffective doses of the single peptides. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides had lower estimated free energy values (-6.47 to -9.34 kcal mol(-1)) when they interacted with the catalytic site of ACE than that of the substrate hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (-5.41 kcal mol(-1)), thus inhibiting the enzymatic activity. According to molecular docking analysis, the five peptides interacted with four (His353, Ala354, Glu411 and Tyr523) out of 6 catalytic residues. Moreover, MPACGSS had the highest antioxidant activity according to Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) (421.58 μmol FeSO4 mg(-1)), Fe(2+) chelation (2.01 μmol Na2EDTA mg(-1)) assays, and also in DPPH (748.39 μmol Trolox per mg of dry peptide) and ABTS (561.42 μmol Trolox mg(-1)) radical scavenging assays. The results support the hypothesis that peptides present in the non-digestible fraction of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) may exert their physiological benefits independent of their antioxidant capacity, by ACE inhibition through interaction with its catalytic cavity.

  12. Biodegradable hydrophilic polyurethane PEGU25 loading antimicrobial peptide Bmap-28: a sustained-release membrane able to inhibit bacterial biofilm formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzhong; Liu, Qinyu; Tian, Ye; Jian, Zhongyu; Li, Hong; Wang, Kunjie

    2015-03-02

    Catheter-related infection makes up a large part of hospital infection and contributes 80% to all nosocomial urological infection, costing hundreds of millions dollar per year for treatment. Biodegradable hydrophilic material incorporating antibiotic substance is a promising way to prevent catheter-related infection. And antimicrobial peptide seems an optimal drug for its desirable antibiotic effect. In the current research, we produced a new kind of antibiotic material by incorporating antimicrobial peptide Bmap-28 with polyurethane PEGU25 and tested its effect on Proteus mirabilis in vitro. Compared with the control group, PEGU25 membrane incorporating Bmap-28 had a significant lower bacteria load after co-cultured with the Proteus mirabilis. And its antibiotic effect could be observed throughout the whole 7-day test. Also the Bmap-28 membrane could delay catheter obstruction caused by encrustation. Our findings reveal that PEGU25 incorporating Bmap-28 can well inhibit bacterial biofilm formation of common pathogens for catheter-related urinary tract infection in vitro, which makes it a promising antibiotic material for medical tubes for urology.

  13. ANEPIII, a new recombinant neurotoxic polypeptide derived from scorpion peptide, inhibits delayed rectifier, but not A-type potassium currents in rat primary cultured hippocampal and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Li; Zhang, Jing-Hai; Yang, Bao-Feng; Jiao, Jun-Dong; Wang, Ling; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2006-01-15

    A new recombinant neurotoxic polypeptide ANEPIII (BmK ANEPIII) derived from Scorpion peptide, which was demonstrated with antineuroexcitation properties in animal models, was examined for its action on K+ currents in primary cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons using the patch clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. The delayed rectifier K+ current (I(k)) was inhibited by externally applied recombinant BmK ANEPIII, while the transient A-current (I(A)) remained virtually unaffected. BmK ANEPIII 3 microM, reduced the delayed rectifier current by 28.2% and 23.6% in cultured rat hippocampal and cortical neurons, respectively. The concentration of half-maximal block was 155.1 nM for hippocampal neurons and 227.2 nM for cortical neurons, respectively. These results suggest that BmK ANEPIII affect K+ currents, which may lead to a reduction in neuronal excitability.

  14. Enhanced striatial /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding induced by chronic haloperidol treatment inhibited by peptides administered during the withdrawal phase

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, H.N.

    1984-02-27

    Chronic intragastric administration of haloperidol (1.5 mg/kg/day) for 21 days followed by a 3-day withdrawal period resulted in the development of enhanced locomotor activity response to apomorphine, and an increase in the number of binding sites for /sup 3/H-spiroperidol in the striatal membranes of the rat brain. Subcutaneous administration of Pro-Leu-Gly-NH/sub 2/ or cyclo-(Leu-Gly) in doses of 2 mg/kg/day given for 3-days after termination of haloperidol treatment inhibited the enhanced response to apomorphine, as well as the increases in the number of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding sites in the striatum. If indeed, the supersensitivity of striatal dopamine receptors is one of the mechanisms in the development of tardive dyskinesia symptoms, the present results suggest that the above peptides may be helpful in ameliorating some of the symptoms of tardive dyskinesia induced by neuroleptic drugs. 31 references, 3 figures.

  15. Identification of an RNA aptamer binding hTERT-derived peptide and inhibiting telomerase activity in MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Akhil; Bala, Jyoti; Santosh, Baby; Bhaskar, Ashima; Kumar, Suresh; Yadava, Pramod K

    2017-03-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase is an essential rate-limiting component of telomerase complex. hTERT protein in association with other proteins and the human telomerase RNA (hTR) shows telomerase activity, essential for maintaining genomic integrity in proliferating cells. hTERT binds hTR through a decapeptide located in the RID2 (RNA interactive domain 2) domain of N-terminal region. Since hTERT is essential for telomerase activity, inhibitors of hTERT are of great interest as potential anti-cancer agent. We have selected RNA aptamers against a synthetic peptide from the RID2 domain of hTERT by employing in vitro selection protocol (SELEX). The selected RNAs could bind the free peptide, as CD spectra suggested conformational change in aptamer upon RID2 binding. Extracts of cultured breast cancer cells (MCF7) expressing this aptamer showed lower telomerase activity as estimated by TRAP assay. hTERT-binding RNA aptamers hold promise as probable anti-cancer therapeutic agent.

  16. Inhibition of the Electrostatic Interaction between β -amyloid Peptide and Membranes Prevents β -amyloid-induced Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, C.; Terzi, E.; Hauser, N.; Jakob-Rotne, R.; Seelig, J.; Kemp, J. A.

    1997-08-01

    The accumulation of β -amyloid peptides (Aβ ) into senile plaques is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. Aggregated Aβ is toxic to cells in culture and this has been considered to be the cause of neurodegeneration that occurs in the Alzheimer disease brain. The discovery of compounds that prevent Aβ toxicity may lead to a better understanding of the processes involved and ultimately to possible therapeutic drugs. Low nanomolar concentrations of Aβ 1-42 and the toxic fragment Aβ 25-35 have been demonstrated to render cells more sensitive to subsequent insults as manifested by an increased sensitivity to formazan crystals following MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction. Formation of the toxic β -sheet conformation by Aβ peptides is increased by negatively charged membranes. Here we demonstrate that phloretin and exifone, dipolar compounds that decrease the effective negative charge of membranes, prevent association of Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 25-35 to negatively charged lipid vesicles and Aβ induced cell toxicity. These results suggest that Aβ toxicity is mediated through a nonspecific physicochemical interaction with cell membranes.

  17. Small molecular peptide-ScFv αvβ3 conjugates specifically inhibit lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Qianqian; Wang, Qiongyao; Deng, Changxu; Sun, Yanqin; Chen, Taoliang; Guo, Linlang; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 (ITG) is highly expressed in various cancers and is considered a major target for anti-angiogensis cancer therapy. The single chain fragment variable of which (ScFv αvβ3) has been reported to inhibit tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we conjugated cdGIGPQc which can exclusively bind to NSCLC cells according to our previous study synthesized by SPPS with ScFv αvβ3 expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) to develop a novel lung cancer specific targeted drug. Specific cell targeting of cdGIGPQc-ScFv was assessed in parallel with the single ScFv and a control nonspecific peptide-ScFv through immunofluorescence and flow cytometry while the αvβ3-binding property was examined by Western blot. Our results showed that cdGIGPQc-ScFv retained both the lung cancer-binding activity of cdGIGPQc and the antigen-recognizing ability of ScFv αvβ3 in vitro. CCK8 assays and in animal experiments suggested that cdGIGPQc-ScFv possessed a superior antitumor effect than ScFv and nonspecific peptide-ScFv both in vitro and vivo. Further immunohistochemical staining revealed that cdGIGPQc-ScFv retarded lung cancer growth through inhibiting tumor angiogensis and proliferation. Therefore, cdGIGPQc delivery of ScFv αvβ3 to lung cancer may be a hopeful new strategy for enhancing specific antitumor efficacy and cdGIGPQc-ScFv could be a potential drug for lung cancer targeted treatment. PMID:28042504

  18. Crystal and molecular structure of two geometrically restricted chemotactic tripeptides, analogues of formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Michel, A G; Lajoie, G; Hassani, C A

    1990-12-01

    The crystal structures of HCO-Met-Leu-Phe-OC(CH3)3, (CH25H39N3O5S), fMLP-OtBu, and HCO-Met psi [CSNH]-Leu-Phe-OCH3, (C22H33N3O4S2), fMS LP-OMe, have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and their conformational properties investigated by molecular mechanics energy calculations. Crystals of fMLP-OtBu are monoclinic, space group P2(1), a = 12.027(4), b = 9.492(3), c = 12.660(4) A, beta = 101.99(3) degrees, Z = 2; those of fMS LP-OMe are orthorhombic, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), a = 7.130(1), b = 12.097(2), c = 31.060(5) A, Z = 4. The first compounds fMLP-OtBu is the t-butyl ester of the tripeptide fMLP that represents one of the most potent compounds in inducing the lysozyme release from human neutrophils that reflects the chemotactic activity. From the crystal structure, it is shown that the orientation of the phenylalanine side chain is largely affected by the presence of the bulky group. fMSLP-OMe was shown to be inactive after thionation of the methionine residue in the original tripeptide. Nevertheless, the crystal structure does not reveal any influence of the presence of the thionated peptidic bond on the backbone conformation. The X-ray results have been used to generate parameters for empirical energy calculations. Subsequently, a strategy based on random generation of conformations followed by energy-minimization was applied to investigate the conformational space of thiopeptides, in comparison with normal peptides. From molecular free energy calculations, it is shown that the main influence of the introduction of a thioamide bond on the molecular structure is to prevent the existence of C7(eq) conformations involving the thiomethionine residue. Consequently, a larger number of conformers are found to form intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving the formyl group, reducing its availability to interact with the receptor. For the first time, the theoretical prediction of the existence of C7eq conformations for fMLP is made. The resulting

  19. Polysaccharide peptides from Coriolus versicolor competitively inhibit tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation in specific human CYP2C9 isoform and pooled human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yeung, John H K; Or, Penelope M Y

    2011-10-15

    Polysaccharide peptide (PSP), isolated from COV-1 strain of Coriolus versicolor, is commonly used as an adjunct in cancer chemotherapy in China. Previous studies have shown that PSP decreased antipyrine clearance and inhibited CYP2C11-mediated tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation in the rat both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the effects of water extractable fraction of PSP on tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation was investigated in pooled human liver microsomes and in specific human CYP2C9 isoform. PSP (2.5-20μM) dose-dependently decreased the biotransformation of tolbutamide to 4-hydroxy-tolbutamide. Enzyme kinetics studies showed inhibition of tolbutamide 4-hydroxylase activity was competitive and concentration-dependent. In pooled human liver microsomes, PSP had a K(i) value of 14.2μM compared to sulfaphenazole, a human CYP2C9 inhibitor, showed a K(i) value of 0.32μM. In human CYP2C9 isoform, the K(i) value of PSP was 29.5μM and the K(i) value of sulfaphenazole was 0.04μM. This study demonstrated that PSP can competitively inhibit tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation in both pooled human liver microsomes and specific human CYP2C9 in vitro. This study compliments previous findings in the rat that PSP can inhibit human tolbutamide 4-hydroxylase, but the relatively high K(i) values in human CYP2C9 would suggest a low potential for PSP to cause herb-drug interaction.

  20. Millimeter-wave spectroscopy of syn formyl azide (HC(O)N3) in seven vibrational states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Nicholas A.; Amberger, Brent K.; Esselman, Brian J.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Millimeter-wave spectra for formyl azide (HC(O)N3) were obtained from 240 to 360 GHz at ambient temperature. For the ground state of syn formyl azide, over 1500 independent rotational transitions were measured and least-squares fit to a complete S-reduced 8th order centrifugal distortion/rigid rotor Hamiltonian. The decomposition of formyl azide was monitored over a period of several hours, the half-life (t½ = 30 min) was determined, and its decomposition products were investigated. Transitions from five vibrational satellites of syn formyl azide (ν9, ν12, 2ν9, ν9 + ν12, and ν11) were observed, measured, and least-squares fit to complete or nearly complete octic centrifugally-distorted, single-state S-reduced models. A less complete single-state fit of 3ν9 (509.3 cm-1) was obtained from an unperturbed subset of its assignable transitions. This state is apparently coupled to the fundamental ν8 (489.4 cm-1) and the overtone 2ν12 (503.6 cm-1), but the coupling remains unanalyzed. Anharmonic CCSD(T)/ANO1 estimates of the vibrational frequencies of syn formyl azide were in close agreement with previously published experimental and computational values. Experimentally determined vibration-rotation interaction (αi) values were in excellent agreement with coupled-cluster predicted αi values for the fundamentals ν9, ν12, and ν11.

  1. Anti-Fatigue Effect by Peptide Fraction from Protein Hydrolysate of Croceine Croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) Swim Bladder through Inhibiting the Oxidative Reactions including DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu-Qin; Zeng, Li; Yang, Zui-Su; Huang, Fang-Fang; Ding, Guo-Fang; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage in mice. In conclusion, SBP-III-3 possessed good anti-fatigue capacities on mice by inhibiting the oxidative reactions and provided an important basis for developing the swim bladder peptide functional food. PMID:27983570

  2. Inhibition of ACTH Release by Peptide Hormones: Molecular Mechanisms and Possible Role as Anti-Stress Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-16

    somatostatin (SRIF) may be a non- steriod inhibitor of Ar.TH release. The goals of the proposal were to examine the structure of the SRIF receptor and determine...major objective of the research proposal was the identification of non- steriodal factors which inhibit ACTH release and may be useful in the treatment

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  4. Self-Assembly of a 9-Residue Amyloid-Forming Peptide Fragment of SARS Corona Virus E-protein: Mechanism of Self Aggregation and Amyloid-Inhibition of hIAPP

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Jyotsna; Bera, Supriyo; Midya, Anupam; Fierke, Carol A.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly, a phenomenon widely observed in nature, has been exploited through organic molecules, proteins, DNA and peptides to study complex biological systems. These self-assembly systems may also be used in understanding the molecular and structural biology which can inspire the design and synthesis of increasingly complex biomaterials. Specifically, use of these building blocks to investigate protein folding and misfolding has been of particular value since it can provide tremendous insights into peptide aggregation related to a variety of protein misfolding diseases, or amyloid diseases (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, type-II diabetes). Herein, the self-assembly of TK9, a 9 residue peptide of the extra membrane C-terminal tail of the SARS Corona virus envelope, and its variants were characterized through biophysical, spectroscopic and simulated studies, and it was confirmed that the structure of these peptides influence their aggregation propensity, hence, mimicking amyloid proteins. TK9, which forms a beta-sheet rich fibril, contains a key sequence motif that may be critical for beta-sheet formation, thus making it an interesting system to study amyloid fibrillation. TK9 aggregates were further examined through simulations to evaluate the possible intra- and inter peptide interactions at the molecular level. These self-assembly peptides can also serve as amyloid inhibitors through hydrophobic and electrophilic recognition interactions. Our results show that TK9 inhibits the fibrillation of hIAPP, a 37 amino acid peptide implicated in the pathology of type-II diabetes. Thus, biophysical and NMR experimental results have revealed a molecular level understanding of peptide folding events, as well as the inhibition of amyloid-protein aggregation are reported. PMID:25785896

  5. Activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells in a cAMP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hejun; Wei, Rui; Wang, Liang; Tian, Qing; Tao, Ming; Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Hou, Wenfang; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Jin; Hong, Tianpei

    2014-06-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes pancreatic β-cell regeneration through GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. However, whether it promotes exocrine pancreas growth and thereby increases the risk of pancreatic cancer has been a topic of debate in recent years. Clinical data and animal studies published so far have been controversial. In the present study, we report that GLP-1R activation with liraglutide inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro and attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model in vivo. These effects of liraglutide were mediated through activation of cAMP production and consequent inhibition of Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in a GLP-1R-dependent manner. Moreover, we examined GLP-1R expression in human pancreatic cancer tissues and found that 43.3% of tumor tissues were GLP-1R-null. In the GLP-1R-positive tumor tissues (56.7%), the level of GLP-1R was lower compared with that in tumor-adjacent normal pancreatic tissues. Furthermore, the GLP-1R-positive tumors were significantly smaller than the GLP-1R-null tumors. Our study shows for the first time that GLP-1R activation has a cytoreductive effect on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which may help address safety concerns of GLP-1-based therapies in the context of human pancreatic cancer.

  6. Cellular and molecular insight into the inhibition of primary root growth of Arabidopsis induced by peptaibols, a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Ling; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Li-Xia; Gong, Zhi-Ting; Li, Shuyu; Li, Chun-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Mei; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Song, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well known biocontrol agents that produce a variety of antibiotics. Peptaibols are a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma Alamethicin, the most studied peptaibol, is reported as toxic to plants at certain concentrations, while the mechanisms involved are unclear. We illustrated the toxic mechanisms of peptaibols by studying the growth-inhibitory effect of Trichokonin VI (TK VI), a peptaibol from Trichoderma longibrachiatum SMF2, on Arabidopsis primary roots. TK VI inhibited root growth by suppressing cell division and cell elongation, and disrupting root stem cell niche maintenance. TK VI increased auxin content and disrupted auxin response gradients in root tips. Further, we screened the Arabidopsis TK VI-resistant mutant tkr1. tkr1 harbors a point mutation in GORK, which encodes gated outwardly rectifying K(+)channel proteins. This mutation alleviated TK VI-induced suppression of K(+)efflux in roots, thereby stabilizing the auxin gradient. The tkr1 mutant also resisted the phytotoxicity of alamethicin. Our results indicate that GORK channels play a key role in peptaibol-plant interaction and that there is an inter-relationship between GORK channels and maintenance of auxin homeostasis. The cellular and molecular insight into the peptaibol-induced inhibition of plant root growth advances our understanding of Trichoderma-plant interactions.

  7. Cellular and molecular insight into the inhibition of primary root growth of Arabidopsis induced by peptaibols, a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Ling; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Li-Xia; Gong, Zhi-Ting; Li, Shuyu; Li, Chun-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Mei; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Song, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well known biocontrol agents that produce a variety of antibiotics. Peptaibols are a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma. Alamethicin, the most studied peptaibol, is reported as toxic to plants at certain concentrations, while the mechanisms involved are unclear. We illustrated the toxic mechanisms of peptaibols by studying the growth-inhibitory effect of Trichokonin VI (TK VI), a peptaibol from Trichoderma longibrachiatum SMF2, on Arabidopsis primary roots. TK VI inhibited root growth by suppressing cell division and cell elongation, and disrupting root stem cell niche maintenance. TK VI increased auxin content and disrupted auxin response gradients in root tips. Further, we screened the Arabidopsis TK VI-resistant mutant tkr1. tkr1 harbors a point mutation in GORK, which encodes gated outwardly rectifying K+ channel proteins. This mutation alleviated TK VI-induced suppression of K+ efflux in roots, thereby stabilizing the auxin gradient. The tkr1 mutant also resisted the phytotoxicity of alamethicin. Our results indicate that GORK channels play a key role in peptaibol–plant interaction and that there is an inter-relationship between GORK channels and maintenance of auxin homeostasis. The cellular and molecular insight into the peptaibol-induced inhibition of plant root growth advances our understanding of Trichoderma–plant interactions. PMID:26850879

  8. A novel peptide sansalvamide analogue inhibits pancreatic cancer cell growth through G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Ujiki, Michael B. |; Milam, Ben; Ding Xianzhong |; Roginsky, Alexandra B.; Salabat, M. Reza; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H. |; Gu Wenxin; Silverman, Richard B. ||; Adrian, Thomas E. |. E-mail: tadrian@northwestern.edu

    2006-02-24

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have little hope for cure because no effective therapies are available. Sansalvamide A is a cyclic depsipeptide produced by a marine fungus. We investigated the effect of a novel sansalvamide A analogue on growth, cell-cycle phases, and induction of apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The sansalvamide analogue caused marked time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of two human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1 and S2-013). The analogue induced G0/G1 phase cell-cycle arrest and morphological changes suggesting induction of apoptosis. Apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V binding. This novel sansalvamide analogue inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer cells through G0/G1 arrest and induces apoptosis. Sansalvamide analogues may be valuable for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides inhibit expression and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in human ovarian cancer cell lines and a mouse ovarian cancer model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Navab, Mohamad; Grijalva, Victor; Su, Feng; Fogelman, Alan M; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Farias-Eisner, Robin

    2012-08-01

    Our previous results demonstrated that the apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides L-4F and L-5F inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor production and tumor angiogenesis. The present study was designed to test whether apoA-I mimetic peptides inhibit the expression and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which plays a critical role in the production of angiogenic factors and angiogenesis. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to examine the expression of HIF-1α in tumor tissues. Immunoblotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence, and luciferase activity assays were used to determine the expression and activity of HIF-1α in human ovarian cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemistry staining demonstrated that L-4F treatment dramatically decreased HIF-1α expression in mouse ovarian tumor tissues. L-4F inhibited the expression and activity of HIF-1α induced by low oxygen concentration, cobalt chloride (CoCl(2), a hypoxia-mimic compound), lysophosphatidic acid, and insulin in two human ovarian cancer cell lines, OV2008 and CAOV-3. L-4F had no effect on the insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt, but inhibited the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p70s6 kinase, leading to the inhibition of HIF-1α synthesis. Pretreatment with L-4F dramatically accelerated the proteasome-dependent protein degradation of HIF-1α in both insulin- and CoCl(2)-treated cells. The inhibitory effect of L-4F on HIF-1α expression is in part mediated by the reactive oxygen species-scavenging effect of L-4F. ApoA-I mimetic peptides inhibit the expression and activity of HIF-1α in both in vivo and in vitro models, suggesting the inhibition of HIF-1α may be a critical mechanism responsible for the suppression of tumor progression by apoA-I mimetic peptides.

  10. Fluorescent primuline derivatives inhibit hepatitis C virus NS3-catalyzed RNA unwinding, peptide hydrolysis and viral replicase formation.

    PubMed

    Ndjomou, Jean; Kolli, Rajesh; Mukherjee, Sourav; Shadrick, William R; Hanson, Alicia M; Sweeney, Noreena L; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) multifunctional nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is a protease that cleaves viral and host proteins and a helicase that separates DNA and RNA structures in reactions fueled by ATP hydrolysis. Li et al. (2012) recently synthesized a series of new NS3 helicase inhibitors from the benzothiazole dimer component of the fluorescent yellow dye primuline. This study further characterizes a subset of these primuline derivatives with respect to their specificity, mechanism of action, and effect on cells harboring HCV subgenomic replicons. All compounds inhibited DNA and RNA unwinding catalyzed by NS3 from different HCV genotypes, but only some inhibited the NS3 protease function, and few had any effect on HCV NS3 catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. A different subset contained potent inhibitors of RNA stimulated ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the related NS3 protein from Dengue virus. In assays monitoring intrinsic protein fluorescence in the absence of nucleic acids, the compounds cooperatively bound NS3 with K(d)s that reflect their potency in assays. The fluorescent properties of the primuline derivatives both in vitro and in cells are also described. The primuline derivative that was the most active against subgenomic replicons in cells caused a 14-fold drop in HCV RNA levels (IC(50)=5±2μM). In cells, the most effective primuline derivative did not inhibit the cellular activity of NS3 protease but disrupted HCV replicase structures.

  11. The Inhibition and Resistance Mechanisms of Actinonin, Isolated from Marine Streptomyces sp. NHF165, against Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Na; Sun, Chaomin

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio sp. is the most serious pathogen in marine aquaculture, and the development of anti-Vibrio agents is urgently needed. However, it is extreme lack of high-throughput screening (HTS) model for searching anti-Vibrio compounds. Here, we established a protein-based HTS screening model to identify agents targeting peptide deformylase (PDF) of Vibrio anguillarum. To find potential anti-Vibrio compounds, crude extracts derived from marine actinomycetes were applied for screening with this model. Notably, crude extract of strain Streptomyces sp. NHF165 inhibited dramatically both on V. anguillarum PDF (VaPDF) activity and V. anguillarum cell growth. And actinonin was further identified as the functional component. Anti-VaPDF and anti-V. anguillarum activities of actinonin were dose-dependent, and the IC50 values were 6.94 and 2.85 μM, respectively. To understand the resistance of V. anguillarum against actinonin, spontaneous V. anguillarum mutants with resistance against actinonin were isolated. Surprisingly, for the resistant strains, the region between 774 and 852 base pairs was found to be absent in the gene folD which produces 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate, a donor of N-formyl to Met-tRNAfmet. When compared to the wild type strain, ΔfolD mutant showed eight times of minimum inhibition concentration on actinonin, however, the folD complementary strain could not grow on the medium supplemented with actinonin, which suggested that folD gene mutation was mainly responsible for the actinonin resistance. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that marine derived Streptomyces sp. could produce actinonin with anti-VaPDF activity and the resistance against actinonin by V. anguillarum is mediated by mutation in folD gene. PMID:27679625

  12. Preventive and therapeutic vaccination with PAP-3, a novel human prostate cancer peptide, inhibits carcinoma development in HLA transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Machlenkin, Arthur; Azriel-Rosenfeld, Ronit; Volovitz, Ilan; Vadai, Ezra; Lev, Avital; Paz, Adrian; Goldberger, Ofir; Reiter, Yoram; Tzehoval, Esther; Benhar, Itai; Eisenbach, Lea

    2007-02-01

    Conventional treatment of recurrent and metastasized prostate cancer (CaP) remains inadequate; this fact mandates development of alternative therapeutic modalities, such as specific active or passive immunotherapy. Previously, we reported the identification of a novel highly immunogenic HLA-A*0201-restricted Prostatic Acid Phosphatase-derived peptide (PAP-3) by a two-step in vivo screening in an HLA-transgenic (HHD) mouse system. In the present study we aimed at elucidating the efficiency of PAP-3-based vaccine upon active antitumor immunization. To this end we established preventive and therapeutic carcinoma models in HHD mice. The 3LL murine Lewis lung carcinoma clone D122 transduced to express HLA-A*0201 and PAP served as a platform for these models. The HLA-A*0201-PAP-3 complex specific recombinant single chain scFV-PAP-3 antibodies were generated and used to confirm an endogenous PAP processing resulting in PAP-3 presentation by HLA-A*0201. PAP-3 based vaccines significantly decreased tumor incidence in a preventive immunization setting. Therapeutic vaccination of HHD mice with PAP-3 led to rejection of early established tumors and to increase of mouse survival. These results strongly support a therapeutic relevance of the identified CTL epitope upon active antitumor immunization. The newly established carcinoma model presented herein might be a useful tool for cancer vaccine design and optimization.

  13. Epstein-Barr viral miRNAs inhibit antiviral CD4+ T cell responses targeting IL-12 and peptide processing

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Andreas; Mautner, Josef; Zielinski, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a tumor virus that establishes lifelong infection in most of humanity, despite eliciting strong and stable virus-specific immune responses. EBV encodes at least 44 miRNAs, most of them with unknown function. Here, we show that multiple EBV miRNAs modulate immune recognition of recently infected primary B cells, EBV's natural target cells. EBV miRNAs collectively and specifically suppress release of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-12, repress differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells to Th1 cells, interfere with peptide processing and presentation on HLA class II, and thus reduce activation of cytotoxic EBV-specific CD4+ effector T cells and killing of infected B cells. Our findings identify a previously unknown viral strategy of immune evasion. By rapidly expressing multiple miRNAs, which are themselves nonimmunogenic, EBV counteracts recognition by CD4+ T cells and establishes a program of reduced immunogenicity in recently infected B cells, allowing the virus to express viral proteins required for establishment of life-long infection. PMID:27621419

  14. Theoretical study on the vibrational spectra of methoxy- and formyl-dihydroxy- trans-stilbenes and their hydrolytic equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Viktor; Billes, Ferenc; Tyihák, Ernő; Mikosch, Hans

    2008-02-01

    Compounds formed by exchanging one of the resveratrol hydroxy groups to methoxy or formyl groups are biologically important. Quantum chemical DFT calculations were applied for the simulation of some of their properties. Their optimized structures and charge distributions were computed. Based on the calculated vibrational force constants and optimized molecular structure infrared and Raman spectra were calculated. The characteristics of the vibrational modes were determined by normal coordinate analysis. Applying the calculated thermodynamic functions also for resveratrol, methanol, formaldehyde and water, thermodynamic equilibria were calculated for the equilibria between resveratrol and its methyl and formyl substituted derivatives, respectively.

  15. Inhibition of bupropion metabolism by selegiline: mechanism-based inactivation of human CYP2B6 and characterization of glutathione and peptide adducts.

    PubMed

    Sridar, Chitra; Kenaan, Cesar; Hollenberg, Paul F

    2012-12-01

    Selegiline, the R-enantiomer of deprenyl, is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Bupropion, an antidepressant, often used to treat patients in conjunction with selegiline, is metabolized primarily by CYP2B6. The effect of selegiline on the enzymatic activity of human cytochrome CYP2B6 in a reconstituted system and its effect on the metabolism of bupropion were examined. Selegiline was found to be a mechanism-based inactivator of the 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin O-deethylation (7-EFC) activity of CYP2B6 as well as bupropion metabolism. The inactivations were time-, concentration-, and NADPH-dependent and were characterized by K(I) values of 0.14 and 0.6 μM, k(inact) values of 0.022 and 0.029 min⁻¹, and t(½) values of 31.5 and 24 min, respectively. In standard inhibition assays, selegiline increased the K(m) of CYP2B6 for bupropion from 10 to 92 μM and decreased the k(cat) by ∼50%. The reduced carbon-monoxide difference spectrum revealed over a 50% loss in the cytochrome P450 spectrum in the inactivated sample, with no loss in heme, and there was ∼70% loss in enzyme activity. Trapping of the reactive metabolite using GSH led to the identification of a GSH-selegiline conjugate with a m/z 528 that could be explained by hydroxylation of selegiline followed by the addition of glutathione to the propargyl moiety after oxygenation to form the ketene intermediate. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the labeled protein following digestion with trypsin revealed the peptide ⁶⁴DVFTVHLGPR⁷³ as the peptide modified by the reactive metabolite of selegiline and the site of adduct formation is Asp64.

  16. Structure of the fusion core and inhibition of fusion by a heptad repeat peptide derived from the S protein of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Lu, Guangwen; Qi, Jianxun; Li, Yan; Wu, Ying; Deng, Yao; Geng, Heyuan; Li, Hongbin; Wang, Qihui; Xiao, Haixia; Tan, Wenjie; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2013-12-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) recently emerged as a severe worldwide public health concern. The virus is highly pathogenic, manifesting in infected patients with an approximately 50% fatality rate. It is known that the surface spike (S) proteins of coronaviruses mediate receptor recognition and membrane fusion, thereby playing an indispensable role in initiating infection. In this process, heptad repeats 1 and 2 (HR1 and HR2) of the S protein assemble into a complex called the fusion core, which represents a key membrane fusion architecture. To date, however, the MERS-CoV fusion core remains uncharacterized. In this study, we performed a series of biochemical and biophysical analyses characterizing the HR1/HR2 complexes of this novel virus. The HR sequences were variably truncated and then connected with a flexible amino acid linker. In each case, the recombinant protein automatically assembled into a trimer in solution, displaying a typical α-helical structure. One of these trimers was successfully crystallized, and its structure was solved at a resolution of 1.9 Å. A canonical 6-helix bundle, like those reported for other coronaviruses, was revealed, with three HR1 helices forming the central coiled-coil core and three HR2 chains surrounding the core in the HR1 side grooves. This demonstrates that MERS-CoV utilizes a mechanism similar to those of other class I enveloped viruses for membrane fusion. With this notion, we further identified an HR2-based peptide that could potently inhibit MERS-CoV fusion and entry by using a pseudotyped-virus system. These results lay the groundwork for future inhibitory peptidic drug design.

  17. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Daniel E; Gibson, Matthew I

    2015-10-12

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs.

  18. Latent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity in Nonantifreeze Proteins: Ca2+-Activated Plant Lectins and Cation-Activated Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Organisms living in polar regions have evolved a series of antifreeze (glyco) proteins (AFGPs) to enable them to survive by modulating the structure of ice. These proteins have huge potential for use in cellular cryopreservation, ice-resistant surfaces, frozen food, and cryosurgery, but they are limited by their relatively low availability and questions regarding their mode of action. This has triggered the search for biomimetic materials capable of reproducing this function. The identification of new structures and sequences capable of inhibiting ice growth is crucial to aid our understanding of these proteins. Here, we show that plant c-type lectins, which have similar biological function to human c-type lectins (glycan recognition) but no sequence homology to AFPs, display calcium-dependent ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activity. This IRI activity can be switched on/off by changing the Ca2+ concentration. To show that more (nonantifreeze) proteins may exist with the potential to display IRI, a second motif was considered, amphipathicity. All known AFPs have defined hydrophobic/hydrophilic domains, rationalizing this choice. The cheap, and widely used, antimicrobial Nisin was found to have cation-dependent IRI activity, controlled by either acid or addition of histidine-binding ions such as zinc or nickel, which promote its amphipathic structure. These results demonstrate a new approach in the identification of antifreeze protein mimetic macromolecules and may help in the development of synthetic mimics of AFPs. PMID:26407233

  19. Effect of connexin 43 inhibition by the mimetic peptide Gap27 on corneal wound healing, inflammation and neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Pierfrancesco; Xeroudaki, Maria; Parekh, Mohit; Bertolin, Marina; Breda, Claudia; Cagini, Carlo; Ponzin, Diego; Lagali, Neil; Ferrari, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The connexin 43 (Cx43) mimetic peptide Gap27 was designed to transiently block the function of this gap junction. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of Gap27 on corneal healing, inflammation and neovascularization. Experimental Approach The effect of Gap27 on wound healing, inflammation and vascularization was assessed in primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) in vitro and whole human corneas ex vivo, and in an in vivo rat wound healing model. Key Results Gap27 enhanced the wound closure of HCEC in vitro and accelerated wound closure and stratification of epithelium in human corneas ex vivo, but did not suppress the corneal release of inflammatory mediators IL‐6 or TNF‐α in vivo. In human corneas ex vivo, F4/80 positive macrophages were observed around the wound site. In vivo, topical Gap27 treatment enhanced the speed and density of early granulocyte infiltration into rat corneas. After 7 days, the expressions of TNF‐α and TGFβ1 were elevated and correlated with inflammatory cell accumulation in the tissue. Additionally, Gap27 did not suppress VEGF release in organotypic culture, nor did it suppress early or late VEGFA expression or neovascularization in vivo. Conclusions and Implications Gap27 can be effective in promoting the healing of superficial epithelial wounds, but in deep stromal wounds it has the potential to promote inflammatory cell migration and accumulation in the tissue and does not suppress the subsequent neovascularization response. These results support the proposal that Gap27 acts as a healing agent in the transient, early stages of corneal epithelial wounding. PMID:27472295

  20. Glucocorticoids decrease body weight and food intake and inhibit appetite regulatory peptide expression in the hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Jian-Hua; DU, Wen-Hua; Fan, Yan-Ping; Hu, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Chen-Chen; Xu, Huan-Bai; Miao, Yan-Jun; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Xiang, Ping; Chen, Feng-Ling

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of glucocorticoids (GCs) on appetite and gene expression of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AGRP) and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), in non-obese and obese rats. Both non-obese and obese rats were randomly assigned to three groups: normal saline, low- and high-dose GC groups (NSG, LDG and HDG, respectively), which received an intraperitoneal injection with normal saline (0.2 ml/100 g) or hydrocortisone sodium succinate at 5 and 15 mg/kg, respectively, for 20 days. The expression levels of NPY, AGRP and CART mRNA in the hypothalamus were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Non-obese and obese rats were found to undergo weight loss after GC injection, and a higher degree of weight loss was observed in the HDG rats. The average and cumulative food intakes in the obese and non-obese rats injected with high-dose GC were lower compared to that in the NSG (p<0.05). mRNA expression levels of the orexigenic neuropeptides, NPY and AGRP, and the anorexigenic neuropeptide, CART, were significantly lower in the HDG than levels in the NSG for both the obese and non-obese rats (p<0.05). GC treatment decreased appetite and body weight, induced apparent glucolipid metabolic disturbances and hyperinsulinemia, while down-regulated mRNA expression levels of the orexigenic neuropeptides, NPY and AGRP, and anorexigenic neuropeptide, CART, in the hypothalamus in the rats. The mechanism which induces this neuropeptide expression requires further study.

  1. Kinesin-1 inhibits the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide as detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanpeng; Tian, Shijun; Peng, Xianglei; Yang, Jingfa; Fu, Yuanhui; Jiao, Yueying; Zhao, Jiang; He, Jinsheng; Hong, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Although the exact etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still unclear, amyloid-β (Aβ) generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) aggregate to form toxic amyloid species. Kinesin-1 is the first identified ATP-dependent axonal transport motor protein that has been proven to affect Aβ generation and deposition. In this paper, we applied dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (DC-FCCS) to investigate the direct interaction of Aβ with kinesin-1 at the single-molecule fluorescence level in vitro. The results showed that two kinds of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged kinesin light-chain subunits of kinesin-1(KLCs), KLC-E and E-KLC inhibited the aggregation of Aβ over a period of time, providing additional insight into the mechanism of axonal transport deficits in AD.

  2. Sesamin inhibits bacterial formylpeptide-induced inflammatory responses in a murine air-pouch model and in THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Youhong; Hou, Xinwei; Chen, Juan; Xie, Lianying; Yang, Lang; Le, Yingying

    2010-02-01

    The reaction of human leukocytes to chemoattractants is an important component of the host immune response and also plays a crucial role in the development of inflammation. Sesamin has been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation and regulate cytokine production. In this study, we examined the effect of sesamin on inflammatory responses elicited by the bacterial chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) in vitro and in vivo and explored the mechanisms involved. fMLF is recognized by a human G protein-coupled receptor formyl peptide receptor (FPR) on phagocytic leukocytes. Sesamin at concentrations between 12.5 and 50 micromol/L inhibited fMLF-induced chemotaxis of human monocyte cell line THP-1 differentiated with dibutyryl cyclic AMP (P < 0.01). Similarly, sesamin inhibited FPR-transfected rat basophilic leukemia cell [epitope-tagged human FPR (ETFR) cell] migration toward fMLF (P < 0.01). In fMLF-induced inflammation in a murine air-pouch model, intraperitoneal administration of sesamin (12 mgkg(-1)d(-1) for 2 d) suppressed leukocyte infiltration into the air pouch induced by fMLF [(62.89 +/- 7.93) x 10(4) vs. (19.67 +/- 4.43) x 10(4) cells/air pouch; n = 9; P < 0.001]. Ca(2+) mobilization and mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) activation are involved in fMLF-induced leukocyte migration. Pretreatment of ETFR cells with sesamin inhibited fMLF-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner but did not affect fMLF-induced Ca(2+) flux. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that pretreatment of THP-1 cells with sesamin dose dependently inhibited fMLF-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. These results suggest that sesamin inhibits leukocyte activation by fMLF through ERK1/2- and NF-kappaB-related signaling pathways and thus is a potential compound for the management of inflammatory diseases.

  3. Inhibition of Grape Crown Gall by Agrobacterium vitis F2/5 Requires Two Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases and One Polyketide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Desen; Burr, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Agrobacterium vitis nontumorigenic strain F2/5 is able to inhibit crown gall disease on grapevines. The mechanism of grape tumor inhibition (GTI) by F2/5 has not been fully determined. In this study, we demonstrate that two nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes (F-avi3342 and F-avi5730) and one polyketide synthase gene (F-avi4330) are required for GTI. Knockout of any one of them resulted in F/25 losing GTI capacity. We previously reported that F-avi3342 and F-avi4330 but not F-avi5730 are required for induction of grape tissue necrosis and tobacco hypersensitive response. F-avi5730 is predicted to encode a single modular NRPS. It is located in a cluster that is homologous to the siderophore vicibactin biosynthesis locus in Rhizobium species. Individual disruption of F-avi5730 and two immediate downstream genes, F-avi5731 and F-avi5732, all resulted in reduced siderophore production; however, only F-avi5730 was found to be required for GTI. Complemented F-avi5730 mutant (ΔF-avi5730(+)) restored a wild-type level of GTI activity. It was determined that, over time, populations of ΔF-avi4330, ΔF-avi3342, and ΔF-avi5730 at inoculated wound sites on grapevine did not differ from those of ΔF-avi5730(+) indicating that loss of GTI was not due to reduced colonization of wound sites by mutants.

  4. Potassium iodide catalyzed simultaneous C3-formylation and N-aminomethylation of indoles with 4-substituted-N,N-dimethylanilines.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-Tao; Li, Hong-Ying; Xing, Li-Juan; Wen, Li-Juan; Wang, Peng; Wang, Bin

    2012-12-28

    A one-pot dual functionalization of indoles has been developed. The simultaneous C3-formylation and N-aminomethylation of indoles can be achieved using readily available potassium iodide as a catalyst and tert-butyl peroxybenzoate as a co-oxidant.

  5. Homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assays for the detection of activity and inhibition of phosphatase enzymes employing phosphorescently labeled peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Desmond J; O'Riordan, Tomás C; O'Sullivan, Paul J; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2007-02-05

    A rapid, homogenous, antibody-free assay for phosphatase enzymes was developed using the phosphorescent platinum (II)-coproporphyrin label (PtCP) and time-resolved fluorescent detection. An internally quenched decameric peptide substrate containing a phospho-tyrosine residue, labeled with PtCP-maleimide and dabcyl-NHS at its termini was designed. Phosphatase catalysed dephosphorylation of the substrate resulted in a minor increase in PtCP signal, while subsequent cleavage by chymotrypsin at the dephosphorylated Tyr-Leu site provided a 3.5 fold enhancement of PtCP phosphorescence. This phosphorescence phosphatase enhancement assay was optimized to a 96 well plate format with detection on a commercial TR-F plate reader, and applied to measure the activity and inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, recombinant human CD45, and tyrosine phosphatases in Jurkat cell lysates within 40 min. Parameters of these enzymatic reactions such as Km's, limits of detection (L.O.D's) and IC50 values for the non-specific inhibitor sodium orthovanadate were also determined.

  6. Analgesic-antitumor peptide inhibits the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells by an upregulated VGSC β1 subunit.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guili; Cui, Yong; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Lili; Zhao, Mingyi; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jinghai; Liu, Yanfeng

    2016-03-01

    Analgesic-antitumor peptide (AGAP), one of the scorpion toxin polypeptides, has been shown to have an antitumor activity. Recombinant AGAP (rAGAP) was shown to affect the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells via a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) β1 subunit. The VGSC β1 subunit was validated as a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. rAGAP suppresses the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells but has no significant effect of human liver HL7702 cells without β1 subunit expression. rAGAP inhibits the migration and invasion of the cells when the VGSC β1 subunit is overexpressed in HL7702 cells. To explain these findings, VGSC β1 subunit messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were measured. The β1 subunit protein level was upregulated in a dose-dependent manner following treatment with rAGAP while there was no significant change in the mRNA level, so rAGAP might be an active component of the VGSC β1 subunit.

  7. Secretory expression of porcine interferon-gamma in baculovirus using HBM signal peptide and its inhibition activity on the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Bin; Wang, Zhen-Ya; Chen, Hong-Ying; Cui, Bao-An; Wang, Ya-Bin; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Wang, Rui

    2009-12-15

    The gene sequence encoding mature porcine interferon-gamma (PoIFN-gamma) fused with a C-terminal 6x histidine tag was cloned into the baculovirus pFastBac Dual vector of the Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus expression system under the control of PH promoter. The authentic signal sequence of porcine interferon-gamma was substituted with the honeybee melittin (HBM) signal sequence, and expressed in insect cells. The recombinant proteins were detected by SDS-PAGE and immunofluorescence assay. The nickel affinity column purified recombinant porcine interferon-gamma with HBM signal peptide (rPoIFN-gammaH) was shown to be a 19kDa protein as confirmed by Western blot analysis. The recombinant PoIFN-gammaH was shown to have cytokine activity, inhibiting the cytopathic effect of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in PK-15 cells at about 1.07x10(6)U/mL. The 2(-7) dilution of the rPoIFN-gammaH in culture supernatant protected the MARC-145 cells from the cytopathic effect caused by 100TCID(50) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

  8. Cutting Edge: Immature human dendritic cells express latency-associated peptide and inhibit T cell activation in a TGF-beta-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Roopali; Anderson, David E; Weiner, Howard L

    2007-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in both initiating immune responses and in maintaining peripheral tolerance. However, the exact mechanism by which DCs instruct/influence the generation of effector vs regulatory T cells is not clear. In this study, we present evidence that TGF-beta, an important immunoregulatory molecule, is present on the surface of ex vivo immature human DCs bound by latency-associated peptide (LAP). Maturation of DCs upon stimulation with LPS results in loss of membrane-bound LAP and up-regulation of HLA class II and costimulatory molecules. The presence of LAP on immature DCs selectively inhibits Th1 cell but not Th17 cell differentiation and is required for differentiation and/or survival of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells. Taken together, our results indicate that surface expression of TGF-beta on DCs in association with LAP is one of the mechanisms by which immature DCs limit T cell activation and thus prevent autoimmune responses.

  9. NEMO-Binding Domain Peptide Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inhibiting the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianhua; Li, Li; Yuan, Weifeng; Zheng, Linxin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the protective effects and relevant mechanisms exerted by NEMO-binding domain peptide (NBD) against lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. The ALI model was induced by intratracheally administered atomized LPS (5 mg/kg) to BABL/c mice. Half an hour before LPS administration, we treated the mice with increasing concentrations of intratracheally administered NBD or saline aerosol. Two hours after LPS administration, each group of mice was sacrificed. We observed that NBD pretreatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced lung histopathological injury in a dose-dependent manner. Western blotting established that NBD pretreatment obviously attenuated LPS-induced IκB-α and NF-κBp65 activation and NOX1, NOX2, and NOX4 overexpression. Furthermore, NBD pretreatment increased SOD and T-AOC activity and decreased MDA levels in lung tissue. In addition, NBD also inhibited TNF-α and IL-1β secretion in BALF after LPS challenge. In conclusion, NBD protects against LPS-induced ALI in mice. PMID:27956761

  10. Marine collagen peptides prepared from chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) skin extend the life span and inhibit spontaneous tumor incidence in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiang; Pei, Xin-Rong; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Wang, Jun-Bo; Li, Yong

    2010-08-01

    To observe the effects of marine collagen peptides (MCPs) prepared from chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) skin on life span and spontaneous tumor incidence, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets supplemented with MCP at concentrations of 0%, 2.25%, 4.5%, and 9% (wt/wt) from the age of 4 weeks until natural death. There were 40 rats in each group (male:female ratio = 1:1). The results showed that the MCP did not significantly influence body weight or food consumption of rats of either sex throughout the life span; it did dose-dependently inhibit the age-related decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and the age-related increase in the levels of lipid peroxidation product in both sexes. MCP notably increased the mean life span, the life span of the last 30% of the survivors, and the maximal life span; it decreased overall spontaneous tumor incidence of both sexes with significance in the 4.5% and 9% MCP-treated male groups and 9% MCP-treated female group. Compared to the control group, the incidence of death from tumors was decreased in MCP groups in comparison with the control group of both sexes. Therefore, we concluded that MCPs dose-dependently increase life span and decrease spontaneous tumor incidence in Sprague-Dawley rats. Moreover, the antioxidative property of MCPs may be responsible for the increased life span and protection against tumor development.

  11. Effects of substituents on synthetic analogs of chlorophylls. Part 4: How formyl group location dictates the spectral properties of chlorophylls b, d and f.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Jonathan M; Harris, Michelle A; Liu, Mengran; Diers, James R; Kirmaier, Christine; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Holten, Dewey

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are adapted to light characteristics in their habitat in part via the spectral characteristics of the associated chlorophyll pigments, which differ in the position of a formyl group around the chlorin macrocycle (chlorophylls b, d, f) or no formyl group (chlorophyll a). To probe the origin of this spectral tuning, the photophysical and electronic structural properties of a new set of synthetic chlorins are reported. The zinc and free base chlorins have a formyl group at either the 2- or 3-position. The four compounds have fluorescence yields in the range 0.19-0.28 and singlet excited-state lifetimes of ca 4 ns for zinc chelates and ca 8 ns for the free base forms. The photophysical properties of the 2- and 3-formyl zinc chlorins are similar to those observed previously for 13-formyl or 3,13-diformyl chlorins, but differ markedly from those for 7-formyl analogs. Molecular-orbital characteristics obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used as input to spectral simulations employing the four-orbital model. The analysis has uncovered the key changes in electronic structure engendered by the presence/location of a formyl group at various macrocycle positions, which is relevant to understanding the distinct spectral properties of the natural chlorophylls a, b, d and f.

  12. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Formyl Azide (HC(O)N_3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Nicholas A.; Amberger, Brent K.; Esselman, Brian J.; Woods, R. Claude; McMahon, Robert J.

    2015-06-01

    Formyl azide (HC(O)N_3) is a highly unstable molecule (t1/2˜2 hours at room temperature as a gas) that has only recently been studied spectroscopically by UV, IR, Raman and NMR methods. We have synthesized formyl azide and obtained its absorption spectrum at room temperature over the range 250-360 GHz. As in the case of carbonyl diazide, two conformers are expected for HC(O)N_3, with the syn-isomer 2.8 kcal/mol lower in energy than the anti-isomer (CCSD(T)/ANO1). Calculations at the same level of theory and the same basis set predict the dipole moments for the syn-isomer (μ = 1.56 D) and anti-isomer (μ = 2.56 D). These calculations also indicate that b-type transitions should dominate the syn-isomer spectrum, while a-type transitions become more significant in the case of the anti-isomer. Despite the anti-isomer having a larger dipole moment, the syn-isomer still gives rise to all the dominant features of the spectrum. Thus far, five vibrational states (νb{9}, νb{12}, 2νb{9}, νb{9} + νb{12}, νb{11}) have been studied for the syn-isomer, with the highest energy state νb{11} = 582.6 wn. Searches for the spectra of the anti-isomer are ongoing. Banert, K. et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51, 4718-4721 Zeng, X. et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 3503-3506 Amberger, B.K. et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 259, (2014) 15-20

  13. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of small GTP-binding proteins. Lack of amino acid sequence specificity and importance of polybasic motif.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Gorzalczany, Y; Koshkin, V; Pick, E

    1994-11-18

    The small GTP-binding protein (G protein) Rac1 is an obligatory participant in the assembly of the superoxide (O2-.)-generating NADPH oxidase complex of macrophages. We investigated the effect of synthetic peptides, mapping within the near carboxyl-terminal domains of Rac1 and of related G proteins, on the activity of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of solubilized guinea pig macrophage membrane, a cytosolic fraction enriched in p47phox and p67phox (or total cytosol), highly purified Rac1-GDP dissociation inhibitor for Rho (Rho GDI) complex, and the activating amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. Peptides Rac1-(178-188) and Rac1-(178-191), but not Rac2-(178-188), inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in a Rac1-dependent system when added prior to or simultaneously with the initiation of activation. However, undecapeptides corresponding to the near carboxyl-terminal domains of RhoA and RhoC and, most notably, a peptide containing the same amino acids as Rac1-(178-188), but in reversed orientation, were also inhibitory. Surprisingly, O2-. production in a Rac2-dependent cell-free system was inhibited by Rac1-(178-188) but not by Rac2-(178-188). Finally, basic polyamino acids containing lysine, histidine, or arginine, also inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of certain small G proteins is not amino acid sequence-specific but related to the presence of a polybasic motif. It has been proposed that such a motif serves as a plasma membrane targeting signal for a number of small G proteins (Hancock, J.F., Paterson, H., and Marshall, C.J. (1990) Cell 63, 133-139).

  14. Simultaneous Production of Formylated and Nonformylated Enterocins L50A and L50B as well as 61A, a New Glycosylated Durancin, by Enterococcus durans 61A, a Strain Isolated from Artisanal Fermented Milk in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hanchi, Hasna; Hammami, Riadh; Fernandez, Benoit; Kourda, Rim; Ben Hamida, Jeannette; Fliss, Ismail

    2016-05-11

    Enterococcus durans 61A, a broad-spectrum strain, was isolated from artisanal fermented dairy products. The strain is a multibacteriocin producer, free from virulence genes, and could be considered a good candidate for application in food preservation. In the present study, E. durans 61A was shown to produce simultaneously formylated and nonformylated forms of leaderless enterocins L50A and L50B as well as 61A, a new glycosylated durancin. Bacteriocins were characterized using mass spectrometry. Formylation was found to increase enterocin antimicrobial activity of enterocin L50A (8×) and, to a lesser extent, the activity of L50B (2×). Durancin 61A was found glycosylated by two hexoses (glucose and arabinose) and exhibited broad-spectrum inhibition against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungal spores. Durancin 61A was highly bactericidal at 15.6 μg/mL (10× the MIC) on Listeria innocua HPB13 and seems to target bacterial membrane as shown by ion efflux and transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Alzheimer's amyloid-β A2T variant and its N-terminal peptides inhibit amyloid-β fibrillization and rescue the induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Wei; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chang, Yu-Jen; Liao, Yi-Hung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chen, Yun-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementia affecting tens of million people worldwide. The primary neuropathological hallmark in AD is amyloid plaques composed of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Several familial mutations found in Aβ sequence result in early onset of AD. Previous studies showed that the mutations located at N-terminus of Aβ, such as the English (H6R) and Tottori (D7N) mutations, promote fibril formation and increase cytotoxicity. However, A2T mutant located at the very N-terminus of Aβ shows low-prevalence incidence of AD, whereas, another mutant A2V causes early onset of AD. To understand the molecular mechanism of the distinct effect and develop new potential therapeutic strategy, here, we examined the effect of full-length and N-terminal A2V/T variants to wild type (WT) Aβ40 by fibrillization assays and NMR studies. We found that full-length and N-terminal A2V accelerated WT fibrillization and induced large chemical shifts on the N-terminus of WT Aβ, whereas, full-length and N-terminal A2T retarded the fibrillization. We further examined the inhibition effect of various N-terminal fragments (NTFs) of A2T to WT Aβ. The A2T NTFs ranging from residue 1 to residue 7 to 10, but not 1 to 6 or shorter, are capable to retard WT Aβ fibrillization and rescue cytotoxicity. The results suggest that in the presence of full-length or specific N-terminal A2T can retard Aβ aggregation and the A2T NTFs can mitigate its toxicity. Our results provide a novel targeting site for future therapeutic development of AD.

  16. Alzheimer’s amyloid-β A2T variant and its N-terminal peptides inhibit amyloid-β fibrillization and rescue the induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tien-Wei; Chang, Chi-Fon; Chang, Yu-Jen; Liao, Yi-Hung; Yu, Hui-Ming; Chen, Yun-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common dementia affecting tens of million people worldwide. The primary neuropathological hallmark in AD is amyloid plaques composed of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Several familial mutations found in Aβ sequence result in early onset of AD. Previous studies showed that the mutations located at N-terminus of Aβ, such as the English (H6R) and Tottori (D7N) mutations, promote fibril formation and increase cytotoxicity. However, A2T mutant located at the very N-terminus of Aβ shows low-prevalence incidence of AD, whereas, another mutant A2V causes early onset of AD. To understand the molecular mechanism of the distinct effect and develop new potential therapeutic strategy, here, we examined the effect of full-length and N-terminal A2V/T variants to wild type (WT) Aβ40 by fibrillization assays and NMR studies. We found that full-length and N-terminal A2V accelerated WT fibrillization and induced large chemical shifts on the N-terminus of WT Aβ, whereas, full-length and N-terminal A2T retarded the fibrillization. We further examined the inhibition effect of various N-terminal fragments (NTFs) of A2T to WT Aβ. The A2T NTFs ranging from residue 1 to residue 7 to 10, but not 1 to 6 or shorter, are capable to retard WT Aβ fibrillization and rescue cytotoxicity. The results suggest that in the presence of full-length or specific N-terminal A2T can retard Aβ aggregation and the A2T NTFs can mitigate its toxicity. Our results provide a novel targeting site for future therapeutic development of AD. PMID:28362827

  17. Natural sweetener agave inhibits gastric emptying in rats by a cholecystokinin-2- and glucagon like peptide-1 receptor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bihter Gürler, E; Özbeyli, Dilek; Buzcu, Hülya; Bayraktar, Sezin; Carus, İrem; Dağ, Beyza; Geriş, Yasemin; Jeral, Seda; Yeğen, Berrak Ç

    2017-02-22

    Low-calorie sweeteners are considered to be beneficial in calorie control, but the impact of these sweeteners on gastric emptying is not well described. The purpose of this study was to compare the gastric emptying rate of agave nectar with those of glucose and fructose, and to evaluate the interaction of cholecystokinin (CCK)-1, CCK-2 and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors in agave-induced alterations in gastric emptying. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with gastric cannulas. Following the recovery, the gastric emptying rates of glucose, fructose and agave at 12.5%, 15% or 50% concentrations were measured and compared with that of saline. GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin fragment 9-39 (30 μg kg(-1)), CCK-1 receptor antagonist devazepide (1 mg kg(-1)) or gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YM022 (1 mg kg(-1)) was injected subcutaneously 1 min before the emptying of glucose, fructose or agave at their 50% concentrations. When compared with saline emptying, gastric emptying of glucose was significantly delayed at its 25% and 50% concentrations, but the emptying of 12.5% glucose was not different from that of saline. Agave emptying, which was delayed with respect to saline emptying, was not altered by CCK-1 receptor blockade; but agave emptied from the stomach as rapidly as saline following the blockade of either CCK-2 or GLP-1 receptors. The findings demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of agave on gastric emptying is mediated by both CCK-2 and GLP-1 receptors, suggesting that natural sweeteners including agave may have satiating effects through the inhibition of gastric motility via enteroendocrine mechanisms.

  18. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4⁺ T-cells.

    PubMed

    McLinden, James H; Stapleton, Jack T; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Xiang, Jinhua

    2013-04-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glycoprotein (E2) of two GBV-Ccpz isolates obtained from the sera of captive chimpanzees. The deduced GBV-Ccpz E2 protein differed from human GBV-C by 31 % at the amino acid level. Similar to human GBV-C E2, expression of GBV-Ccpz E2 in a tet-off human CD4(+) Jurkat T-cell line significantly inhibited the replication of diverse HIV-1 isolates. This anti-HIV-replication effect of GBV-Ccpz E2 protein was reversed by maintaining cells in doxycycline to reduce E2 expression. Previously, we found a 17 aa region within human GBV-C E2 that was sufficient to inhibit HIV-1. Although GBV-Ccpz E2 differed by 3 aa differences in this region, the chimpanzee GBV-C 17mer E2 peptide inhibited HIV-1 replication. Similarly, the GBV-A peptide that aligns with this GBV-C E2 region inhibited HIV-1 replication despite sharing only 5 aa with the human GBV-C E2 sequence. Thus, despite amino acid differences, the peptide region on both the GBV-Ccpz and the GBV-A E2 protein inhibit HIV-1 replication similar to human GBV-C. Consequently, GBV-Ccpz or GBV-A infection of non-human primates may provide an animal model to study GB virus-HIV interactions.

  19. Polysaccharide peptides from COV-1 strain of Coriolus versicolor inhibit tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation in the rat in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yeung, John H K; Chan, Siu-Lung; Or, Penelope M Y

    2006-08-01

    Polysaccharide peptide (PSP), isolated from COV-1 strain of Coriolus versicolor, is commonly used as an adjunct in cancer chemotherapy in China. In this study, the effects of whole PSP extract and water extract of PSP on 4-hydroxylation of tolbutamide were investigated in rat liver microsomes in vitro and in vivo in the rat. Both the whole PSP extract and the water soluble fraction (0.5-20 microM) decreased the metabolism of tolbutamide to 4-hydroxytolbutamide in vitro. Enzyme kinetics studies showed that PSP inhibited tolbutamide 4-hydroxylase activity in a competitive, concentration-dependent manner. The whole PSP extract had a Ki value of 12.6 microM and IC50 at 18.4 microM, while the water extract had a Ki value of 6.9 microM and IC50 at 9.8 microM. Sulphaphenazole, a specific human CYP2C9 inhibitor, showed a Ki value of 30.8 microM and IC50 at 44.0 microM in the test system. In the pharmacokinetic studies in vivo, acute PSP (4 micromol/kg, i.p.) treatment did not produce significant changes in tolbutamide clearance, but produced a decrease in the Cinitial (7.4%) and an increase in the Vd (7.4%). Sub-chronic pre-treatment of PSP (1-2 micromol/kg/day, i.p.) for three days did not affect the clearance and AUC of tolbutamide, but the Cinitial was decreased, together with increases in the T1/2, and Vd. The formation of 4-hydroxytolbutamide in vivo was decreased in both acute and sub-chronic studies. Taken together, this study demonstrated the PSP can inhibit tolbutamide 4-hydroxylation both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the fact that CYP isoforms that metabolise tolbutamide are different between rat and human liver due to different catalytic characteristics, and rat studies may not be directly extrapolatable to man, the concomitant use of PSP with other CYP2C substrates should be carefully monitored.

  20. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Marini, Frank C.; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; LaMarca, Heather L.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; zu Bentrup, Kerstin Honer; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121