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Sample records for inhibits in-vitro candida

  1. Glycerol Monolaurate Inhibits Candida and Gardnerella vaginalis In Vitro and In Vivo but Not Lactobacillus▿

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Kristi L.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Pack, Melinda C.; Chase, David J.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of glycerol monolaurate (GML) on Lactobacillus, Candida, and Gardnerella vaginalis human vaginal microflora. Our previous work demonstrated that 6 months of GML treatment vaginally does not alter lactobacillus counts in monkeys. Candida and G. vaginalis are commonly associated with vaginal infections in women, many becoming chronic or recurrent. In vitro growth inhibition studies determined the effects of GML (0 to 500 μg/ml) against multiple Candida species and G. vaginalis. A randomized, double-blind study investigated the effects of GML on vaginal microflora Lactobacillus, Candida, and G. vaginalis in colonized or infected women (n = 36). Women self-administered intravaginal gels containing 0% (n = 14), 0.5% (n = 13), or 5% (n = 9) GML every 12 h for 2 days. Vaginal swabs were collected before and immediately after the first gel administration and 12 h after the final gel administration. Swabs were tested for Lactobacillus, Candida, G. vaginalis, and GML. In vitro GML concentrations of 500 μg/ml were candicidal for all species tested, while a concentration of 10 μg/ml was bactericidal for G. vaginalis. Control and GML gels applied vaginally in women did not alter vaginal pH or Lactobacillus counts. Control gels reduced G. vaginalis counts but not Candida counts, whereas GML gels reduced both Candida and G. vaginalis. No adverse events were reported by participating women. GML is antimicrobial for Candida and G. vaginalis in vitro. Vaginal GML gels in women do not affect Lactobacillus negatively but significantly reduce Candida and G. vaginalis. PMID:20008774

  2. Glycerol monolaurate inhibits Candida and Gardnerella vaginalis in vitro and in vivo but not Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Strandberg, Kristi L; Peterson, Marnie L; Lin, Ying-Chi; Pack, Melinda C; Chase, David J; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the effects of glycerol monolaurate (GML) on Lactobacillus, Candida, and Gardnerella vaginalis human vaginal microflora. Our previous work demonstrated that 6 months of GML treatment vaginally does not alter lactobacillus counts in monkeys. Candida and G. vaginalis are commonly associated with vaginal infections in women, many becoming chronic or recurrent. In vitro growth inhibition studies determined the effects of GML (0 to 500 microg/ml) against multiple Candida species and G. vaginalis. A randomized, double-blind study investigated the effects of GML on vaginal microflora Lactobacillus, Candida, and G. vaginalis in colonized or infected women (n=36). Women self-administered intravaginal gels containing 0% (n=14), 0.5% (n=13), or 5% (n=9) GML every 12 h for 2 days. Vaginal swabs were collected before and immediately after the first gel administration and 12 h after the final gel administration. Swabs were tested for Lactobacillus, Candida, G. vaginalis, and GML. In vitro GML concentrations of 500 microg/ml were candicidal for all species tested, while a concentration of 10 microg/ml was bactericidal for G. vaginalis. Control and GML gels applied vaginally in women did not alter vaginal pH or Lactobacillus counts. Control gels reduced G. vaginalis counts but not Candida counts, whereas GML gels reduced both Candida and G. vaginalis. No adverse events were reported by participating women. GML is antimicrobial for Candida and G. vaginalis in vitro. Vaginal GML gels in women do not affect Lactobacillus negatively but significantly reduce Candida and G. vaginalis.

  3. A Novel Antifungal Is Active against Candida albicans Biofilms and Inhibits Mutagenic Acetaldehyde Production In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Mikko T.; Novak-Frazer, Lily; Rautemaa, Vilma; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sorsa, Timo; Ramage, Gordon; Bowyer, Paul; Rautemaa, Riina

    2014-01-01

    The ability of C. albicans to form biofilms is a major virulence factor and a challenge for management. This is evident in biofilm-associated chronic oral-oesophageal candidosis, which has been shown to be potentially carcinogenic in vivo. We have previously shown that most Candida spp. can produce significant levels of mutagenic acetaldehyde (ACH). ACH is also an important mediator of candidal biofilm formation. We have also reported that D,L-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) significantly inhibits planktonic growth of C. albicans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HICA on C. albicans biofilm formation and ACH production in vitro. Inhibition of biofilm formation by HICA, analogous control compounds or caspofungin was measured using XTT to measure biofilm metabolic activity and PicoGreen as a marker of biomass. Biofilms were visualised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ACH levels were measured by gas chromatography. Transcriptional changes in the genes involved in ACH metabolism were measured using RT-qPCR. The mean metabolic activity and biomass of all pre-grown (4, 24, 48 h) biofilms were significantly reduced after exposure to HICA (p<0.05) with the largest reductions seen at acidic pH. Caspofungin was mainly active against biofilms pre-grown for 4 h at neutral pH. Mutagenic levels (>40 µM) of ACH were detected in 24 and 48 h biofilms at both pHs. Interestingly, no ACH production was detected from D-glucose in the presence of HICA at acidic pH (p<0.05). Expression of genes responsible for ACH catabolism was up-regulated by HICA but down-regulated by caspofungin. SEM showed aberrant hyphae and collapsed hyphal structures during incubation with HICA at acidic pH. We conclude that HICA has potential as an antifungal agent with ability to inhibit C. albicans cell growth and biofilm formation. HICA also significantly reduces the mutagenic potential of C. albicans biofilms, which may be important when treating bacterial-fungal biofilm

  4. A novel antifungal is active against Candida albicans biofilms and inhibits mutagenic acetaldehyde production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Mikko T; Novak-Frazer, Lily; Rautemaa, Wilma; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sorsa, Timo; Ramage, Gordon; Bowyer, Paul; Rautemaa, Riina

    2014-01-01

    The ability of C. albicans to form biofilms is a major virulence factor and a challenge for management. This is evident in biofilm-associated chronic oral-oesophageal candidosis, which has been shown to be potentially carcinogenic in vivo. We have previously shown that most Candida spp. can produce significant levels of mutagenic acetaldehyde (ACH). ACH is also an important mediator of candidal biofilm formation. We have also reported that D,L-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) significantly inhibits planktonic growth of C. albicans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HICA on C. albicans biofilm formation and ACH production in vitro. Inhibition of biofilm formation by HICA, analogous control compounds or caspofungin was measured using XTT to measure biofilm metabolic activity and PicoGreen as a marker of biomass. Biofilms were visualised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ACH levels were measured by gas chromatography. Transcriptional changes in the genes involved in ACH metabolism were measured using RT-qPCR. The mean metabolic activity and biomass of all pre-grown (4, 24, 48 h) biofilms were significantly reduced after exposure to HICA (p<0.05) with the largest reductions seen at acidic pH. Caspofungin was mainly active against biofilms pre-grown for 4 h at neutral pH. Mutagenic levels (>40 μM) of ACH were detected in 24 and 48 h biofilms at both pHs. Interestingly, no ACH production was detected from D-glucose in the presence of HICA at acidic pH (p<0.05). Expression of genes responsible for ACH catabolism was up-regulated by HICA but down-regulated by caspofungin. SEM showed aberrant hyphae and collapsed hyphal structures during incubation with HICA at acidic pH. We conclude that HICA has potential as an antifungal agent with ability to inhibit C. albicans cell growth and biofilm formation. HICA also significantly reduces the mutagenic potential of C. albicans biofilms, which may be important when treating bacterial-fungal biofilm

  5. A novel antifungal is active against Candida albicans biofilms and inhibits mutagenic acetaldehyde production in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Mikko T; Novak-Frazer, Lily; Rautemaa, Vilma; Rajendran, Ranjith; Sorsa, Timo; Ramage, Gordon; Bowyer, Paul; Rautemaa, Riina

    2014-01-01

    The ability of C. albicans to form biofilms is a major virulence factor and a challenge for management. This is evident in biofilm-associated chronic oral-oesophageal candidosis, which has been shown to be potentially carcinogenic in vivo. We have previously shown that most Candida spp. can produce significant levels of mutagenic acetaldehyde (ACH). ACH is also an important mediator of candidal biofilm formation. We have also reported that D,L-2-hydroxyisocaproic acid (HICA) significantly inhibits planktonic growth of C. albicans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HICA on C. albicans biofilm formation and ACH production in vitro. Inhibition of biofilm formation by HICA, analogous control compounds or caspofungin was measured using XTT to measure biofilm metabolic activity and PicoGreen as a marker of biomass. Biofilms were visualised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ACH levels were measured by gas chromatography. Transcriptional changes in the genes involved in ACH metabolism were measured using RT-qPCR. The mean metabolic activity and biomass of all pre-grown (4, 24, 48 h) biofilms were significantly reduced after exposure to HICA (p<0.05) with the largest reductions seen at acidic pH. Caspofungin was mainly active against biofilms pre-grown for 4 h at neutral pH. Mutagenic levels (>40 µM) of ACH were detected in 24 and 48 h biofilms at both pHs. Interestingly, no ACH production was detected from D-glucose in the presence of HICA at acidic pH (p<0.05). Expression of genes responsible for ACH catabolism was up-regulated by HICA but down-regulated by caspofungin. SEM showed aberrant hyphae and collapsed hyphal structures during incubation with HICA at acidic pH. We conclude that HICA has potential as an antifungal agent with ability to inhibit C. albicans cell growth and biofilm formation. HICA also significantly reduces the mutagenic potential of C. albicans biofilms, which may be important when treating bacterial-fungal biofilm

  6. New synthetic sulfone derivatives inhibit growth, adhesion and the leucine arylamidase APE2 gene expression of Candida albicans in vitro.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Ochal, Zbigniew

    2015-01-15

    The successful preventing and effective treatment of invasive Candida albicans infections required research focused on synthesis of new classes of agents and antifungal activity studies. Bromodichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named compound 6); dichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named 7); and chlorodibromomethyl-4-hydrazino-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named 11) on inhibition of planktonic cells' growth, leucine arylamidase APE2 gene expression, and adhesion to epithelial cells were investigated. In vitro anti-Candida activities were determined against wild-types, and the morphogenesis mutants: Δefg1 and Δcph1. MICs of compounds 6, 7 and 11 (concentrated at 0.25-16μg/ml) were determined using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Broth Microdilution Method (M27-A3 Document). APE2 expression was analyzed using RT-PCR; relative quantification was normalized against ACT1 in cells growth in YEPD and on Caco-2 cell line. Adherence assay of C. albicans to Caco-2 was performed in 24-well-plate. The structure activity relationship suggested that sulfone containing hydrazine function at C-1 (compound 11) showed higher antifungal activity (cell inhibition%=100 at 1-16μg/ml) than the remaining sulfones with chlorine at C-1. Δcph1/Δefg1 was highly sensitive to compound 11, while the sensitivity was reduced in Δcph1/Δefg1::EFG1 (%=100 at 16-fold higher concentration). Compound 11 significantly affected adherence to epithelium (P ⩽0.05) and hyphae formation. The APE2 up-regulation plays role in sulfones' resistance on MAP kinase pathway. Either CPH1 or EFG1 play a role in the resistance mechanism in sulfones. The strain-dependent phenomenon is a factor in the sulfone resistance mechanism. Sulfones' mode of action was attributed to reduced virulence arsenal in terms of adhesiveness and pathogenic potential related to the APE2 expression and morphogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hibiscus sabdariffa extract inhibits in vitro biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans isolated from recurrent urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Alshami, Issam; Alharbi, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the prevention of recurrent candiduria using natural based approaches and to study the antimicrobial effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) extract and the biofilm forming capacity of Candida albicans strains in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract. Methods In this particular study, six strains of fluconazole resistant Candida albicans isolated from recurrent candiduria were used. The susceptibility of fungal isolates, time-kill curves and biofilm forming capacity in the present of the H. sabdariffa extract were determined. Results Various levels minimum inhibitory concentration of the extract were observed against all the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/mL. Time-kill experiment demonstrated that the effect was fungistatic. The biofilm inhibition assay results showed that H. sabdariffa extract inhibited biofilm production of all the isolates. Conclusions The results of the study support the potential effect of H. sabdariffa extract for preventing recurrent candiduria and emphasize the significance of the plant extract approach as a potential antifungal agent. PMID:25182280

  8. Symbiotic Plant Peptides Eliminate Candida albicans Both In Vitro and in an Epithelial Infection Model and Inhibit the Proliferation of Immortalized Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ördögh, Lilla; Vörös, Andrea; Nagy, István; Kondorosi, Éva

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of multidrug-resistant microbes now emerging necessitates the identification of novel antimicrobial agents. Plants produce a great variety of antimicrobial peptides including hundreds of small, nodule-specific cysteine-rich NCR peptides that, in the legume Medicago truncatula, govern the differentiation of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria and, in vitro, can display potent antibacterial activities. In this study, the potential candidacidal activity of 19 NCR peptides was investigated. Cationic NCR peptides having an isoelectric point above 9 were efficient in killing Candida albicans, one of the most common fungal pathogens of humans. None of the tested NCR peptides were toxic for immortalized human epithelial cells at concentrations that effectively killed the fungus; however, at higher concentrations, some of them inhibited the division of the cells. Furthermore, the cationic peptides successfully inhibited C. albicans induced human epithelial cell death in an in vitro coculture model. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of cationic NCR peptides in the treatment of candidiasis. PMID:25243129

  9. Influence of Candida krusei and Candida glabrata on Candida albicans gene expression in in vitro biofilms.

    PubMed

    Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Ribeiro, Felipe Camargo; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the interactions between the species Candida albicans, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata in monotypic and mixed biofilm models formed in vitro as well as the relative expression of the ALS1, ALS3, HWP1, BCR1, EFG1, TEC1, SAP5, PLB2 and LIP9 genes. Mixed (C. albicans/C. krusei and C. albicans/C. glabrata) and monotypic biofilms were cultured for 0, 12 and 24h. Gene expression was analyzed in the same biofilm model in which the number of CFU/mL was counted. The C. albicans CFU/mL values were lower at the 12 and 24h time points in the mixed biofilms compared with the monotypic biofilms, and decreases of 56.23% and 64.4% in C. albicans were observed when this species was associated with C. glabrata and C. krusei, respectively. In the presence of C. krusei, the expression of the ALS3, HWP1, BCR1, EFG1 and TEC1 genes of C. albicans was completely inhibited, indicating both transcriptome and the phenotypic antagonism between these two species, but genes related to the secretion of enzymes were stimulated. In the presence of C. glabrata, C. albicans showed a similar gene expression profile to that obtained in association with C. krusei, though it was altered to a lesser degree. We conclude that C. krusei and C. glabrata may alter or inhibit the mechanisms involved in the in vitro adherence and formation of C. albicans biofilms, influencing the pathogenicity of this species and suggesting a competitive interaction with C. krusei and C. glabrata in biofilm formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthetic antimicrobial β-peptide in dual-treatment with fluconazole or ketoconazole enhances the in vitro inhibition of planktonic and biofilm Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Mora-Navarro, Camilo; Caraballo-León, Jean; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Ortiz-Bermúdez, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    Fungal infections are a pressing concern for human health worldwide, particularly for immunocompromised individuals. Current challenges such as the elevated toxicity of common antifungal drugs and the emerging resistance towards these could be overcome by multidrug therapy. Natural antimicrobial peptides, AMPs, in combination with other antifungal agents are a promising avenue to address the prevailing challenges. However, they possess limited biostability and susceptibility to proteases, which has significantly hampered their development as antifungal therapies. β-peptides are synthetic materials designed to mimic AMPs while allowing high tunability and increased biostability. In this work, we report for the first time the inhibition achieved in Candida albicans when treated with a mixture of a β-peptide model and fluconazole or ketoconazole. This combination treatment enhanced the biological activity of these azoles in planktonic and biofilm Candida, and also in a fluconazole-resistant strain. Furthermore, the in vitro cytotoxicity of the dual treatment was evaluated towards the human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, a widely used model derived from liver tissue, which is primarily affected by azoles. Analyses based on the LA-based method and the mass-action law principle, using a microtiter checkerboard approach, revealed synergism of the combination treatment in the inhibition of planktonic C. albicans. The dual treatment proved to be fungicidal at 48 and 72 h. Interestingly, it was also found that the viability of HepG2 was not significantly affected by the dual treatments. Finally, a remarkable enhancement in the inhibition of the highly azole-resistant biofilms and fluconazole resistant C. albicans strain was obtained.

  11. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy on Candida albicans biofilms: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hang; Li, Jiyang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Hongying

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the photoinactivation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) has been investigated on Candida albicans biofilms in vitro. After culture and proliferation of Candida albicans biofilms in vitro, the metabolic activity was confirmed using XTT reduction assay. Then, the suitable incubation time and concentration of ALA were determined by measuring PpIX accumulation quantities. Photosensitivity of the biofilms treated with ALA solution was studied in optical doses of 50, 100, 200 and 300J/cm(2) while light irradiation was applied by a red light semiconductor. Finally, rapid immunofluorescence staining method using the LIVE/DEAD FungaLight Yeast Viability Kit and XTT assay were conducted to visualize and quantify the antifungal effect of ALA-PDT on Candida albicans biofilms. A 5h incubation time and 15mM ALA concentration were determined for this study. Photoinactivation of ALA-PDT on Candida albicans biofilms showed a significant increase of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in the biofilms. The metabolic activity of Candida albicans biofilms tread with ALA-PDT confirmed the inhibition efficacy compared with control groups. Upon radiation at 300J/cm(2), cells in Candida albicans biofilms were 74.45% inhibited. PpIX can be absorbed in biofilm-grown Candida albicans in vitro and under appropriate parameters, photochemistry can be triggered by light in combination with ALA and inhibits Candida albicans biofilms effectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sodium houttuyfonate and EDTA-Na₂ in combination effectively inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weifeng; Duan, Qiangjun; Li, Fang; Shao, Jing; Cheng, Huijuan; Wu, Daqiang

    2015-01-01

    Sodium houttuyfonate (SH) has been found to be mildly anti-pathogenetic against the planktonic and biofilm phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we have attempted to investigate further the anti-pathogenicity of SH and EDTA-Na₂ in combination and in vitro and in vivo against planktonic and biofilm phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16 strains), Staphylococcus aureus (13 strains) and Candida albicans (13 strains). The antimicrobial activity of SH against all three pathogens increased dramatically when it was combined with EDTA-Na₂, in vitro. Toxic reactions to the drugs when administered orally were insignificant in mice; no abnormalities were observed in the internal organs, such as the lungs and kidneys. Finally, the results of in vivo studies indicate that SH could extend the lifespan of infected animals when administered in combination with EDTA-Na2. Therefore, the results of the present study lead us to suggest that SH could be a promising antimicrobial agent and that SH combined with EDTA-Na₂ has the potential to be an excellent choice of drug for combating bacterial infections clinically.

  13. Damage to Pseudohyphal Forms of Candida albicans by Neutrophils in the Absence of Serum In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Richard D.; Krzesicki, Raymond; Jao, Wellington

    1978-01-01

    Large forms of Candida are characteristically present in invasive lesions and are often cleared by host defenses. Therefore, an in vitro system was developed to study interactions between leukocytes and pseudohyphae. By light, phase contrast, and electron microscopic observations, in the absence of serum, neutrophils attached to and spread over the surfaces of partially ingested pseudohyphae, which then appeared damaged. Using a new assay which measured neutrophil-induced inhibition of uptake of [14C]cytosine by Candida, damage to Candida in the absence of serum was 53.04±2.96% by neutrophils from 27 normal subjects. With serum, damage to Candida increased because of opsonization by low levels of anti-Candida immunoglobulin G in normal sera. Damage to Candida was inhibited by colchicine, cytochalasin B, and 2-deoxyglucose, which interfered with spreading of neutrophils over the surfaces of Candida. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP, theophylline, and isoproterenol also inhibited damage to Candida. Hydrocortisone was inhibitory in levels (10 μM) achievable with pharmacologic doses in man. Light, fluorescence, and electron microscopy indicated that neutrophils degranulated after contact with Candida. Quantitative studies revealed only a minimal increase in specific release of lysosomal enzymes from azurophil granules, but much greater release of lysozyme from specific granules. Candida activated neutrophil oxidative microbicidal mechanisms, as shown by iodination of Candida by neutrophils, and chemiluminescence from neutrophils interacting with Candida. Unlike live Candida, killed Candida did not induce chemiluminescence, were not iodinated, and did not attach to neutrophils by microscopy. Like Candida pseudohyphae, contact between neutrophils and hyphal forms of Aspergillus and Rhizopus occurred in the absence of serum. This did not occur with Cryptococcus neoformans, an encapsulated yeast, and was low with Candida yeasts. These findings indicate that neutrophils can recognize

  14. In vitro susceptibilities of Candida and Aspergillus species to Melaleuca alternafolia (tea tree) oil.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, J A; Arganoza, M T; Boikov, D; Akins, R A; Vaishampayan, J K

    2000-06-01

    Candida species are an important cause of opportunistic infection in the oral cavity of immunocompromised patients, especially HIV infected patients. Melaleuca oil obtained commercially was investigated since it is known to have broad antifungal properties. The in-vitro susceptibilities of Aspergillus and susceptible and resistant Candida species were performed utilizing serial dilutions in microtiter plates with Sabouraud dextrose agar and the commercial preparation of Melaleuca. As a comparator, in vitro susceptibilities to amphotericin B and fluconazole were also determined using the broth microdilution technique. The results demonstrate that Melaleuca inhibited the Candida species. However, the growth of Aspergillus was not inhibited at the concentrations tested. Thus, preparations containing Melaleuca alternafolia may be a useful alternative for superficial candidal infections. In fact, it may be a useful alternative regimen for advanced HIV-positive patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis refractory to fluconazole. However, controlled clinical studies to evaluate its efficacy are still needed.

  15. In vitro effectiveness of anidulafungin against Candida sp. biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Antonio; Piarulli, Monica; Schiavone, Brigida Pia Immacolata; Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Carrieri, Antonio; Carone, Addolorata; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Franchini, Carlo; Corbo, Filomena; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2013-12-01

    This study furnishes deeper insights to previous works on anidulafungin, demonstrating the potent activity against Candida strains planktonic cells and biofilms. Candida sp., associated with many biomaterial-related infections, give rise to infective pathologies typically associated with biofilm formation. We recently determined the in vitro antifungal activities of echinocandin anidulafungin in association with some antifungal drugs against some Candida strains in their planktonic states. A total of 11 Candida strains biofilms were tested in this study: six Candida albicans, three C. parapsilosis and two C. tropicalis. All yeast isolates and ATCC strains were stored at -20°C in glycerol stocks and were subcultured on antimicrobial agent-free Sabouraud dextrose agar plates. MIC endpoints were determined colorimetrically by using the indicator 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) with menadione as electron-coupling agent. The activity of anidulafungin was assessed using in vitro microbiological model relevant for clinical practice. Anidulafungin showed a strong activity in vitro against both planktonic and biofilms cells, and our study confirms that high anidulafungin concentrations might establish paradoxical growth effect in C. albicans and C. tropicalis biofilms.

  16. In vitro shoot growth of Brugmansia x candida Pers.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to improve the growth of in vitro shoot cultures of Brugmansia × candida 'Creamsickle'. Several mineral nutrient experiments were conducted to determine the effect of NH4+, NO3-, K+, FeSO4/EDTA, ZnSO4, MnSO4, and CuSO4 on quality, leaf width and length, size and weigh...

  17. Quercetin Assists Fluconazole to Inhibit Biofilm Formations of Fluconazole-Resistant Candida Albicans in In Vitro and In Vivo Antifungal Managements of Vulvovaginal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mei; Wang, Hui; Zhu, LiJuan

    2016-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a common gynecological disease. Candida albicans is believed to be mainly implicated in VVC occurrence, the biofilm of which is one of the virulence factors responsible for resistance to traditional antifungal agents especially to fluconazole (FCZ). Quercetin (QCT) is a dietary flavonoid and has been demonstrated to be antifungal against C. albicans biofilm. 17 C. albicans isolates including 15 clinical ones isolated from VVC patients were employed to investigate the effects of QCT and/or FCZ on the inhibition of C. albicans biofilm. We observed that 64 µg/mL QCT and/or 128 µg/mL FCZ could (i) be synergistic against 10 FCZ-resistant planktonic and 17 biofilm cells of C. albicans, (ii) inhibit fungal adherence, cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH), flocculation, yeast-to-hypha transition, metabolism, thickness and dispersion of biofilms; (iii) down-regulate the expressions of ALS1, ALS3, HWP1, SUN41, UME6 and ECE1 and up-regulate the expressions of PDE2, NRG1 and HSP90, and we also found that (iv) the fungal burden was reduced in vaginal mucosa and the symptoms were alleviated in a murine VVC model after the treatments of 5 mg/kg QCT and/or 20 mg/kg FCZ. Together with these results, it could be demonstrated that QCT could be a favorable antifungal agent and a promising synergist with FCZ in the clinical management of VVC caused by C. albicans biofilm. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. In vitro combination therapy with isavuconazole against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Katragkou, Aspasia; McCarthy, Matthew; Meletiadis, Joseph; Hussain, Kaiser; Moradi, Patriss W; Strauss, Gittel E; Myint, Kyaw L; Zaw, Myo H; Kovanda, Laura L; Petraitiene, Ruta; Roilides, Emmanuel; Walsh, Thomas J; Petraitis, Vidmantas

    2017-11-01

    Combination therapy may be an alternative therapeutic approach for difficult-to-treat Candida infections with the aim of increasing efficacy of antifungal therapy. Whether isavuconazole, an extended-spectrum triazole, possesses synergistic activity in combination therapy with echinocandins or polyenes for the treatment of invasive candidiasis has not been studied. We used Bliss independence drug interaction analysis and time-kill assays to examine the in vitro interactions of isavuconazole with amphotericin B or micafungin, an echinocandin, against strains of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. The Bliss independence-based drug interactions modeling showed that the combination of isavuconazole and micafungin resulted in synergistic interactions against C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei. The degree of synergy ranged from 1.8% to 16.7% (mean %ΔΕ value) with the highest synergy occurring against C. albicans (⊙SYN% = 8.8%-110%). Time-kill assays showed that the isavuconazole-micafungin combination demonstrated concentration-depended synergy against C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. The combined interaction by Bliss analysis between isavuconazole and amphotericin B was indifferent for C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis while for C. glabrata was antagonistic (-2% to -6%) and C. krusei synergistic (3.4% to 7%). The combination of isavuconazole-amphotericin B by time-kill assay was antagonistic against C. krusei and C. glabrata. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that combinations of isavuconazole and micafungin are synergistic against Candida spp., while those of isavuconazole and amphotericin B are indifferent in vitro. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. In vitro pharmacodynamic modelling of anidulafungin against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Ortega, Ignacio; Eraso, Elena; Suárez, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to fit anidulafungin in vitro static time-kill data from nine strains of Candida with a pharmacodynamic (PD) model in order to describe the antifungal activity of this drug against Candida spp. Time-kill data from strains of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis clades were best fit using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model and resulted in a set of PD parameters (Emax, EC50 and Hill factor) for each fungal strain. The data were analysed with NONMEM 7. Anidulafungin was effective in a species- and concentration-dependent manner against the strains of C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis clades as observed with the EC50 estimates. Maximum killing rate constant (Emax) values were higher against C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis complex strains. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the activity of anidulafungin against Candida can be accurately described using an adapted sigmoidal Emax model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. In Vitro Interactions of Micafungin with Amphotericin B against Clinical Isolates of Candida spp.▿

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Carolina; Mariné, Marçal; Quindós, Guillermo; Carrillo, Alfonso J.; Cano, J. F.; Pastor, F. Javier; Guarro, Josep

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro activity of amphotericin B in combination with micafungin was evaluated against 115 isolates representing seven species of Candida. Overall, the percentages of synergistic interactions were 50% and 20% when the MIC-2 (lowest drug concentration to cause a prominent reduction in growth) and MIC-0 (lowest drug concentration to cause 100% growth inhibition) end point criteria, respectively, were used. Antagonism was not observed. Some of the interactions were confirmed by time-kill assays. PMID:18227181

  1. In vitro activity of Caspofungin combined with Fluconazole on mixed Candida albicans and Candida glabrata biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pesee, Siripen; Angkananuwat, Chayanit; Tancharoensukjit, Sudarat; Muanmai, Somporn; Sirivan, Pattaraporn; Bubphawas, Manita; Tanarerkchai, Nissara

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effect of caspofungin (CAS) combined with fluconazole (FLU) on the biofilm biomass and cultivable viability and microstructure of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm in vitro.Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microtiter plate for crystal violet assay and colony forming unit (CFU) method and grown on plastic coverslip disks for scanning electron microscopy. MIC50 of CAS and FLU against single Candida spp.and mixed Candida spp.biofilms were evaluated using crystal violet assay. Additional,C. albicans and C. glabrata mixed biofilms were incubated with subinhibitory CAS concentration plus FLU and their percentages of Candida biofilm reduction were calculated. We found that percentages of biofilm reduction were significantly decreased when CAS at 0.25MIC and FLU (0.25 or 0.5MIC) were combined (P< .05) but not different when CAS at 0.5 MIC combined with FLU at 0.25 or 0.5MIC, compared to CAS treatment alone. Structural analyses revealed that CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms showed less hyphae and blastospores with some aberrant cells compared to control group. Although it was evident that a greater CFU of Candida glabrata were demonstrated in every group, the total viable cells derived from CAS/FLU combination-treated biofilms at any ratio were not significantly different from positive control. Overall, CAS/FLU combinations appeared to affect the quantity and cell architecture, but number of viable cell, of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata mixed biofilm. This antifungal effect was CAS concentration dependent.

  2. In vitro evaluation of vincristine and fluconazole combination against Candida.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Tawfik, A F

    2013-09-01

    Infections associated with cancer are a major scourge and cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. The aim of present study was to appraise the in vitro activity of anticancer agent vincristine and antifungal fluconazole alone and in combination against Candida spp. Results were interpreted in terms of fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). Antifungal activity of fluconazole showed marked synergism when used in combination with vincristine, with FICI ranging from 0.25-0.5 against different Candida spp. Although, the use of vincristine with fluconazole is always disputed due to its side effects including decreased peristalsis, but the present research can help to perform suitability analysis of fluconazole use in life threatening invasive candidiasis associated with cancer patients. In addition, the synergism in antifungal activity after using with vincristine also warrants further research in the direction of minimizing adverse reaction associated with combined use of fluconazole and vincristine.

  3. Chrysin Inhibits Lymphangiogenesis in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Prangsaengtong, Orawin; Athikomkulchai, Sirivan; Xu, Jiuxiang; Koizumi, Keiichi; Inujima, Akiko; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Shimada, Yutaka; Tadtong, Sarin; Awale, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The induction of lymphangiogenesis is an important process to promote cancer growth and cancer metastasis via the lymphatic system. Identifying the compounds that can prevent lymphangiogenesis for cancer therapy is urgently required. Chrysin, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone, a natural flavone extracted from Thai propolis, was used to investigate the effect on the lymphangiogenesis process of TR-LE, rat lymphatic endothelial cells. In this study, maximal nontoxic doses of chrysin on TR-LE cells were selected by performing a proliferation assay. The process of lymphangiogenesis in vitro was determined by cord formation assay, adhesion assay and migration assay. Chrysin at a nontoxic dose (25 μM) significantly inhibited cord formation, cell adhesion and migration of TR-LE cells when compared with the control group. We also found that chrysin significantly induced vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) mRNA expression and nitric oxide (NO) production in TR-LE cells which was involved in decreasing the cord formation of TR-LE cells. In conclusion, we report for the first time that chrysin inhibited the process of lymphangiogenesis in an in vitro model. This finding may prove to be a natural compound for anti-lymphangiogenesis that could be developed for use in cancer therapy.

  4. The in vitro activity of vaginal Lactobacillus with probiotic properties against Candida.

    PubMed

    Strus, Magdalena; Kucharska, Agnieszka; Kukla, Grazyna; Brzychczy-Włoch, Monika; Maresz, Katarzyna; Heczko, Piotr B

    2005-06-01

    Lactobacilli, the predominant vaginal microorganisms in healthy premenopausal women, control other members of the vaginal microflora and thus protect against bacterial vaginosis and urinary tract infections. It has been claimed that some lactobacilli are also protective against Candida vaginitis. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms by which these lactobacilli can control vaginal populations of Candida and prevent vaginitis. To address this question, vaginal Lactobacillus strains with known antagonistic properties against bacteria were tested for their cell surface properties, adhesion to vaginal cell lines in vitro and antagonistic activities against Candida. A small proportion of the lactobacilli tested adhered strongly to cultured vaginal epithelial cells and inhibited growth of Candida albicans but not of C. pseudotropicalis. This anticandidal activity was in some Lactobacillus strains related to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, but catalase treatment did not suppress this activity in other Lactobacillus strains, suggesting alternative mechanism(s). Moreover, tested vaginal Candida strains were resistant to relatively high concentrations of H2O2 that markedly exceeded those produced by even the most active Lactobacillus strains.

  5. Lipidomics and in Vitro Azole Resistance in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashutosh; Mahto, Kaushal Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We have shown earlier that fluconazole (FLC) stress induces global changes in the lipidome of Candida albicans in clinically adapted isolates. However, several laboratories have developed adapted in vitro FLC resistant strains of C. albicans to study azole resistance mechanisms. This study aimed to identify the lipid changes associated with FLC resistance in these in vitro adapted isolates. Using comparative lipidomics and principal component and discriminant analyses, we observed gradual changes in several lipid classes and molecular species upon FLC exposure of in vitro resistant C. albicans strains. Although the lipid imprint of FLC in vitro resistant isolates was very distinct from that of clinical isolates of C. albicans, the overall changes in lipid class compositions were similar in both cases. For example, an increased sterol content and depleted sphingolipid levels were the salient features of FLC resistance in both conditions. Taken together, it appears that the overall cellular lipid homeostasis is a critical factor in the observed FLC resistance and in handling FLC stress in both clinical and laboratory situations. The new observations reported herein have implications for more efficacious antifungal drug development as well as understanding host–infectious agent interactions in postgenomics microbiology practice. PMID:23374108

  6. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Oral Candida Isolates from Patients Suffering from Caries and Chronic Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    De-la-Torre, Janire; Ortiz-Samperio, María Esther; Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier; Eraso, Elena; Echebarria-Goicouria, María Ángeles; Aguirre-Urizar, José Manuel; Quindós, Guillermo

    2017-01-25

    Caries and chronic periodontitis are common oral diseases where a higher Candida colonization is reported. Antifungal agents could be adjuvant drugs for the therapy of both clinical conditions. The aim of the current study has been to evaluate the in vitro activities of conventional and new antifungal drugs against oral Candida isolates from patients suffering from caries and/or chronic periodontitis. In vitro activities of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, nystatin, posaconazole and voriconazole against 126 oral Candida isolates (75 Candida albicans, 18 Candida parapsilosis, 11 Candida dubliniensis, six Candida guilliermondii, five Candida lipolytica, five Candida glabrata, four Candida tropicalis and two Candida krusei) from 61 patients were tested by the CLSI M27-A3 method. Most antifungal drugs were highly active, and resistance was observed in less than 5% of tested isolates. Miconazole was the most active antifungal drug, being more than 98% of isolates susceptible. Fluconazole, itraconazole, and the new triazoles, posaconazole and voriconazole, were also very active. Miconazole, fluconazole and voriconazole have excellent in vitro activities against all Candida isolates and could represent suitable treatment for a hypothetically adjunctive therapy of caries and chronic periodontitis.

  7. Miltefosine inhibits Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida spp. biofilms and impairs the dispersion of infectious cells.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa; Ishida, Kelly; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    Candida spp. can adhere to and form biofilms over different surfaces, becoming less susceptible to antifungal treatment. Resistance of biofilms to antifungal agents is multifactorial and the extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important role. Among the few available antifungals for treatment of candidaemia, only the lipid formulations of amphotericin B (AmB) and the echinocandins are effective against biofilms. Our group has previously demonstrated that miltefosine has an important effect against Candida albicans biofilms. Thus, the aim of this work was to expand the analyses of the in vitro antibiofilm activity of miltefosine to non-albicans Candida spp. Miltefosine had significant antifungal activity against planktonic cells and the development of biofilms of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. The activity profile in biofilms was superior to fluconazole and was similar to that of AmB and caspofungin. Biofilm-derived cells with their ECM extracted became as susceptible to miltefosine as planktonic cells, confirming the importance of the ECM in the biofilm resistant behaviour. Miltefosine also inhibited biofilm dispersion of cells at the same concentration needed to inhibit planktonic cell growth. The data obtained in this work reinforce the potent inhibitory activity of miltefosine on biofilms of the four most pathogenic Candida spp. and encourage further studies for the utilisation of this drug and/or structural analogues on biofilm-related infections.

  8. Comparison of the effect of honey and miconazole against Candida albicans in vitro.

    PubMed

    Banaeian-Borujeni, Shayeste; Mobini, Gholam R; Pourgheysari, Batoul; Validi, Majid

    2013-01-01

    One of the most common causes of vaginitis is candidiasis. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of honey and miconazole against Candida albicans, in vitro. The different W/V concentrations of honey were prepared at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 95% and different dilutions of miconazole were prepared in 0.05, 5, and 50 μg/ml. A microdilution of 100/000 cells per ml of a two-day old culture of Candida albicans was prepared in normal saline, after culturing the strain of PTCC 5027 in RPMI 1640 medium. Ten microliters of this dilution was added to 1 ml of the RPMI 1640 medium containing different concentrations of honey and to 1 ml of the RPMI 1640 medium containing different dilutions of miconazole. The cultures were incubated at 35°C for 12, 24, and 48 hours. The growth rate of Candida albicans was determined in the cultures. The results indicated that the honey prevented the growth of C. albicans greatly only at an 80% concentration, whereas, miconazole inhibited it completely. As Candida albicans is a normal vaginal flora, the inhibitory effect of honey without the fungicide effect is a very good trend in the treatment of vaginal candidiasis.

  9. Comparison of the effect of honey and miconazole against Candida albicans in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Banaeian-Borujeni, Shayeste; Mobini, Gholam R.; Pourgheysari, Batoul; Validi, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Background: One of the most common causes of vaginitis is candidiasis. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of honey and miconazole against Candida albicans, in vitro. Materials and Methods: The different W/V concentrations of honey were prepared at 20, 40, 60, 80, and 95% and different dilutions of miconazole were prepared in 0.05, 5, and 50 μg/ml. A microdilution of 100/000 cells per ml of a two-day old culture of Candida albicans was prepared in normal saline, after culturing the strain of PTCC 5027 in RPMI 1640 medium. Ten microliters of this dilution was added to 1 ml of the RPMI 1640 medium containing different concentrations of honey and to 1 ml of the RPMI 1640 medium containing different dilutions of miconazole. The cultures were incubated at 35°C for 12, 24, and 48 hours. Results: The growth rate of Candida albicans was determined in the cultures. The results indicated that the honey prevented the growth of C. albicans greatly only at an 80% concentration, whereas, miconazole inhibited it completely. Conclusions: As Candida albicans is a normal vaginal flora, the inhibitory effect of honey without the fungicide effect is a very good trend in the treatment of vaginal candidiasis. PMID:24223372

  10. In Vivo and In Vitro Anaerobic Mating in Candida albicans▿

    PubMed Central

    Dumitru, Raluca; Navarathna, Dhammika H. M. L. P.; Semighini, Camile P.; Elowsky, Christian G.; Dumitru, Razvan V.; Dignard, Daniel; Whiteway, Malcolm; Atkin, Audrey L.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans cells of opposite mating types are thought to conjugate during infection in mammalian hosts, but paradoxically, the mating-competent opaque state is not stable at mammalian body temperatures. We found that anaerobic conditions stabilize the opaque state at 37°C, block production of farnesol, and permit in vitro mating at 37°C at efficiencies of up to 84%. Aerobically, farnesol prevents mating because it kills the opaque cells necessary for mating, and as a corollary, farnesol production is turned off in opaque cells. These in vitro observations suggest that naturally anaerobic sites, such as the efficiently colonized gastrointestinal (GI) tract, could serve as niches for C. albicans mating. In a direct test of mating in the mouse GI tract, prototrophic cells were obtained from auxotrophic parent cells, confirming that mating will occur in this organ. These cells were true mating products because they were tetraploid, mononuclear, and prototrophic, and they contained the heterologous hisG marker from one of the parental strains. PMID:17259544

  11. Polyketide Glycosides from Bionectria ochroleuca Inhibit Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges presented by Candida infections is that many of the isolates encountered in the clinic produce biofilms, which can decrease these pathogens’ susceptibilities to standard-of-care antibiotic therapies. Inhibitors of fungal biofilm formation offer a potential solution to counteracting some of the problems associated with Candida infections. A screening campaign utilizing samples from our fungal extract library revealed that a Bionectria ochroleuca isolate cultured on Cheerios breakfast cereal produced metabolites that blocked the in vitro formation of Candida albicans biofilms. A scale-up culture of the fungus was undertaken using mycobags (also known as mushroom bags or spawn bags), which afforded four known [TMC-151s C–F (1–4)] and three new [bionectriols B–D (5–7)] polyketide glycosides. All seven metabolites exhibited potent biofilm inhibition against C. albicans SC5314, as well as exerted synergistic antifungal activities in combination with amphotericin B. In this report, we describe the structure determination of the new metabolites, as well as compare the secondary metabolome profiles of fungi grown in flasks and mycobags. These studies demonstrate that mycobags offer a useful alternative to flask-based cultures for the preparative production of fungal secondary metabolites. PMID:25302529

  12. Pseudomonas phage inhibition of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nazik, Hasan; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Secor, Patrick R; Sweere, Johanna M; Bollyky, Paul L; Sass, Gabriele; Cegelski, Lynette; Stevens, David A

    2017-10-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) and Candida albicans (Ca) are major bacterial and fungal pathogens in immunocompromised hosts, and notably in the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. The bacteriophages of Pa physically alter biofilms, and were recently shown to inhibit the biofilms of Aspergillus fumigatus. To understand the range of this viral-fungal interaction, we studied Pa phages Pf4 and Pf1, and their interactions with Ca biofilm formation and preformed Ca biofilm. Both forms of Ca biofilm development, as well as planktonic Ca growth, were inhibited by either phage. The inhibition of biofilm was reversed by the addition of iron, suggesting that the mechanism of phage action on Ca involves denial of iron. Birefringence studies on added phage showed an ordered structure of binding to Ca. Electron microscopic observations indicated phage aggregation in the biofilm extracellular matrix. Bacteriophage-fungal interactions may be a general feature with several pathogens in the fungal kingdom.

  13. The effect of denture adhesives on Candida albicans growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Figueiral, Maria Helena; Sousa-Rodrigues, Patricia; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Scully, Crispian

    2012-06-01

    Denture-wearing favours the growth of Candida. In view of the fact that many denture wearers regularly use adhesives to enhance denture retention, stability and function, the aim of this work was to study the effect of denture adhesives on Candida albicans growth in vitro. The denture adhesives tested were Corega(®) cream, Kukident(®) cream, Novafix(®) cream, Polident(®) cream, Protefix(®) cream, Steradent(®) cream, Aderyn(®) powder, Corega(®) ultra powder, Protefix(®) powder and Corega(®) strip. C. albicans growth curves were obtained in the presence or absence of a 1% solution of the denture adhesive diluted in Sabouraud broth. Macro- and microscopic morphological changes in C. albicans were analysed, as was microbial contamination of the denture adhesive. Most of the denture adhesives studied induced morphological changes in C. albicans cells and colonies, but only two had any significant inhibitory effect on yeast growth. Kukident(®) cream markedly inhibited C. albicans growth in a concentration-dependent way, reducing the growth rate by 95%, whereas Corega(®) cream also inhibited C. albicans growth but in a non-concentration-dependent way, reducing the growth rate by 37%. In addition, denture adhesives available as powders had detectable microbial contamination. Some commercially available denture adhesives showed microbial contamination and some had significant inhibitory effect on C. albicans growth. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. In-vitro activity of essential oils, in particular Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil and tea tree oil products, against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    1998-11-01

    The in-vitro activity of a range of essential oils, including tea tree oil, against the yeast candida was examined. Of the 24 essential oils tested by the agar dilution method against Candida albicans ATCC 10231, three did not inhibit C. albicans at the highest concentration tested, which was 2.0% (v/v) oil. Sandalwood oil had the lowest MIC, inhibiting C. albicans at 0.06%. Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil was investigated for activity against 81 C. albicans isolates and 33 non-albicans Candida isolates. By the broth microdilution method, the minimum concentration of oil inhibiting 90% of isolates for both C. albicans and non-albicans Candida species was 0.25% (v/v). The minimum concentration of oil killing 90% of isolates was 0.25% for C. albicans and 0.5% for non-albicans Candida species. Fifty-seven Candida isolates were tested for sensitivity to tea tree oil by the agar dilution method; the minimum concentration of oil inhibiting 90% of isolates was 0.5%. Tests on three intra-vaginal tea tree oil products showed these products to have MICs and minimum fungicidal concentrations comparable to those of non-formulated tea tree oil, indicating that the tea tree oil contained in these products has retained its anticandidal activity. These data indicate that some essential oils are active against Candida spp., suggesting that they may be useful in the topical treatment of superficial candida infections.

  15. Pentamidine Inhibition of Group I Intron Splicing in Candida albicans Correlates with Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Miletti, Karl E.; Leibowitz, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that pentamidine, which has been clinically used against Pneumocystis carinii, inhibits in vitro a group I intron ribozyme from that organism. Another fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, also harbors a group I intron ribozyme (Ca.LSU) in the essential rRNA genes in almost half of the clinical isolates analyzed. To determine whether pentamidine inhibits Ca.LSU in vitro and in cells, phylogenetically closely related intron-containing (4-1) and intronless (62-1) strains were studied. Splicing in vitro of the Ca.LSU group I intron ribozyme was completely inhibited by pentamidine at 200 μM. On rich glucose medium, the intron-containing strain was more sensitive to growth inhibition by pentamidine than was the intronless strain, as measured by disk or broth microdilution assays. On rich glycerol medium, they were equally susceptible to pentamidine. At pentamidine levels selectively inhibiting the intron-containing strain (1 μM) in glucose liquid cultures, inhibition of splicing and rRNA maturation was detected by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR within 1 min with a 10- to 15-fold accumulation of precursor rRNA. No comparable effect was seen in the intronless strain. These results correlate the cellular splicing inhibition of Ca.LSU with the growth inhibition of strain 4-1 harboring Ca.LSU. Broth microdilution assays of 13 Candida strains showed that intron-containing strains were generally more susceptible to pentamidine than the intronless strains. Our data suggest that ribozymes found in pathogenic microorganisms but absent in mammals may be targets for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:10722497

  16. Synergy of Nitric Oxide and Azoles against Candida Species In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McElhaney-Feser, Gail E.; Raulli, Robert E.; Cihlar, Ronald L.

    1998-01-01

    The candidacidal activity of nitric oxide (NO) as delivered by a class of compounds termed diazeniumdiolates has been investigated. Diazeniumdiolates are stable agents capable of releasing NO in a biologically usable form at a predicted rate, and three such compounds were examined for activity. One compound, (Z)-1-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA-NO), proved to be most suitable for examining NO activity due to its relatively long half-life (20 h) and because of limited candidacidal activity of the uncomplexed DETA nucleophile. DETA-NO was active against six species of Candida for which the MICs necessary to inhibit 50% growth (MIC50s) ranged from 0.25 to 1.0 mg/ml. C. parapsilosis and C. krusei were the most susceptible to the compound. In addition to a determination of NO effects alone, the complex was utilized to investigate the synergistic potential of released NO in combination with ketoconazole, fluconazole, and miconazole. Activity was investigated in vitro against representative strains of Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. dubliniensis. Determination of MIC50, MIC80 and MICs indicated that DETA-NO inhibits all strains tested, with strains of C. parapsilosis and C. krusei being consistently the most sensitive. The combination of DETA-NO with each azole was synergistic against all strains tested as measured by fractional inhibitory concentration indices that ranged from 0.1222 to 0.4583. The data suggest that DETA-NO or compounds with similar properties may be useful in the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of Candida infections. PMID:9736560

  17. Anti-fungal activity of Morinda citrifolia (noni) extracts against Candida albicans: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Barani, K; Manipal, Sunayana; Prabu, D; Ahmed, Adil; Adusumilli, Preethi; Jeevika, C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-fungal activity of Morinda citrifolia fruit extract on Candida albicans. Juice extract from M. citrifolia fruit was lyophilized and used in anti-fungal testing. Anti-fungal activity of M. citrifolia fruit extract against C. albicans was tested in vitro at various concentrations. The inhibitory effect of M. citrifolia extract on C. albicans was determined by agar culture and applied broth dilution test. M. citrifolia extract at 1000 μg/ml concentration effectively inhibited the growth of C. albicans (16.6 ± 0.3) compared with the positive control - amphotericin B (20.6 ± 0.6). It was found to be a dose-dependent reaction. M. citrifolia fruit extract had an anti-fungal effect on C. albicans and the inhibitory effect varied with concentration.

  18. In vitro interactions between anidulafungin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on biofilms of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Antonio; Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Carrieri, Antonio; Carone, Addolorata; Caggiano, Giuseppina; Franchini, Carlo; Corbo, Filomena; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Candida spp. are responsible for many biomaterial-related infections; they give rise to infective pathologies typically associated with biofilm formation. We recently reported that the echinocandin anidulafungin (ANF) showed a strong in vitro activity against both planktonic and biofilms cells. Herein, we report the antifungal activities of ANF alone and in association with some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against nine Candida strain biofilms: four Candida albicans, two Candida glabrata and three Candida guilliermondii. The activity of ANF was assessed using an in vitro microbiological model relevant for clinical practice. ANF proved oneself to be active against biofilms cells, and a clear-cut synergism was found against Candida species biofilms when ANF was used in combination with three NSAIDs: aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen. The positive synergism against Candida spp. of ANF in association with aspirin or the other NSAIDs proved to be a very effective antifungal treatment (FICI<0.5). These results may provide the starting point for new combination therapies of ANF with NSAIDs against Candida biofilm pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The in vitro effects of new D186 dendrimer on virulence factors of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Paulina; Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia

    2014-06-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant Candida albicans strains necessitates identifying new antimycotics along with studying their modes of action. The influence of a new rationally designed dendrimer D186 containing N,N-dioctyl tail and four tryptophane residues on inhibition of planktonic cells, aspartic protease SAP5 expression and adhesion to epithelial cells was investigated. In vitro anti-Candida activities were determined against wild types, Δsap mutants and morphogenesis mutants: Δefg1, Δcph1 and Δcph1/Δefg1. MICs of D186 determined with M27-A3 protocol were in the range 2-16 μg ml(-1). Adherence assay of C. albicans to Caco-2 was performed in 24-well plate. Group I (MIC=8 μg ml(-1), inhibition=82.05-100%) was the most frequent followed by Group II (MIC=4 μg ml(-1), inhibition=99.64-100%) and Group III (MIC=2 μg ml(-1), inhibition=96.47-96.98%). SAP5 expression was analyzed using RT-PCR; relative quantification was normalized against ACT1 in cells after 18-h growth on Caco-2 cell line. D186 exhibited more potent inhibition activity (statistically significant P⩽0.05) against Δsap10 and Δsap9/Δsap10 (MIC=2 μg ml(-1)) than the remaining strains tested. Pretreating cells with D186 significantly inhibited adhesion of all Candida strains compared with their non-treated counterparts (P⩽0.05). D186 affected SAP5 expression of all strains suggesting that this gene is controlled by environmental conditions. A hypothesis can be formulated that the hydrophobicity of D186 and presence of four Trp residues favors its accumulation in the membrane causing membrane disruption, especially facilitated in mutants perturbed in the cell wall compositions. The D186 mode of action was attributed to reduced virulence in terms of adhesiveness and pathogenic potential related to SAP5 expression and morphogenesis.

  20. Histone Deacetylases and Their Inhibition in Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Garnaud, Cécile; Champleboux, Morgane; Maubon, Danièle; Cornet, Muriel; Govin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are generally benign members of the human mucosal flora or live as saprophytes in the environment. However, they can become pathogenic, leading to invasive and life threatening infections in vulnerable patients. These invasive fungal infections are regarded as a major public health problem on a similar scale to tuberculosis or malaria. Current treatment for these infections is based on only four available drug classes. This limited therapeutic arsenal and the emergence of drug-resistant strains are a matter of concern due to the growing number of patients to be treated, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Adaptation of fungi to drug pressure involves transcriptional regulation, in which chromatin dynamics and histone modifications play a major role. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove acetyl groups from histones and actively participate in controlling stress responses. HDAC inhibition has been shown to limit fungal development, virulence, biofilm formation, and dissemination in the infected host, while also improving the efficacy of existing antifungal drugs toward Candida spp. In this article, we review the functional roles of HDACs and the biological effects of HDAC inhibitors on Candida spp., highlighting the correlations between their pathogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. We focus on how HDAC inhibitors could be used to treat invasive candidiasis while also reviewing recent developments in their clinical evaluation. PMID:27547205

  1. In vitro activity of anidulafungin in combination with amphotericin B or voriconazole against biofilms of five Candida species.

    PubMed

    Valentín, A; Cantón, E; Pemán, J; Fernandez-Rivero, M E; Tormo-Mas, M A; Martínez, J P

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the in vitro activity of anidulafungin combined with amphotericin B or voriconazole against Candida spp. biofilms. Four Candida albicans, four Candida tropicalis, four Candida glabrata, two Candida parapsilosis and two Candida orthopsilosis blood isolates were tested by the microdilution chequerboard method combined with the XTT metabolic assay. Biofilm MIC was defined as the lowest concentration producing 50% metabolic inhibition with respect to control (BMIC50). Concentrations in the combinations ranged from 1/8 × BMIC50 to 4 × BMIC50 found for each antifungal tested alone. Anidulafungin plus amphotericin B acted synergistically against C. albicans and C. glabrata biofilms [fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI): 0.082-0.387], but showed no interaction against C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis (FICI: 0.516-2.099). The combination of these antifungals failed to completely remove biofilms of C. albicans and C. glabrata, decreasing the metabolic activity of the biofilms up to 80% and 95%, respectively, which did not occur when each antifungal was used alone. Anidulafungin plus voriconazole showed no interaction against all isolates. Using a less stringent criterion previously proposed to define synergism (FICI < 1) and antagonism (FICI > 1.25), antagonistic interactions were found against some isolates. Anidulafungin with amphotericin B results in a synergistic effect against C. albicans and C. glabrata biofilms at serum concentrations of the drugs, but showed no interaction against C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis complex. Anidulafungin plus voriconazole showed no interaction against the five Candida species assayed. Biofilms of C. tropicalis were found to be the most resistant towards the combinations assayed. The results presented may be of potential interest in the clinical setting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

  2. Candida albicans survival, growth and biofilm formation are differently affected by mouthwashes: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Paulone, Simona; Malavasi, Giulia; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Orsi, Carlotta Francesca; Peppoloni, Samuele; Neglia, Rachele Giovanna; Blasi, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common cause of oral mycoses. The aim of the present study was to investigate in vitro the susceptibility of C. albicans to mouthwashes, in terms of growth, survival and biofilm formation. Candida albicans, laboratory strain SC5314, and 7 commercial mouthwashes were employed: 3 with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate; 1 with 0.06% chlorhexidine digluconate and 250 ppm F- sodium fluoride; 3 with fluorine-containing molecules. None of the mouthwashes contained ethanol in their formulations. The anti-Candida effects of the mouthwashes were assessed by disk diffusion, crystal violet and XTT assays. By using five protocols combining different dilutions and contact times the mouthwashes were tested against: 1) C. albicans growth; 2) biofilm formation; 3) survival of fungal cells in early, developing and mature Candida biofilm. Chlorhexidine digluconate-containing mouthwashes consistently exhibited the highest anti-Candida activity, irrespective of the protocols employed. Fungal growth, biofilm formation and survival of Candida cells within biofilm were impaired, the effects strictly depending on both the dilution employed and the time of contact. These in vitro studies provide evidence that mouthwashes exert anti-Candida activity against both planktonic and biofilm fungal structures, but to a different extent depending on their composition. This suggests special caution in the choice of mouthwashes for oral hygiene, whether aimed at prevention or treatment of oral candidiasis.

  3. In vitro inhibitory activity of probiotic products against oral Candida species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Lv, X; Fu, J; He, C; Hua, H; Yan, Z

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the inhibitory activity of probiotics against oral Candida species. Four commercial probiotic products were screened. Bacillus subtilis R0179 was found to have a significant antifungal effect. Bacillus subtilis-Candida interactions were evaluated using disc diffusion tests, confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and interaction with engineered human oral mucosa tissue. Bacillus subtilis exhibited clear zones of inhibition for Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis but not for Candida krusei. A remarkable reduction in the number of Candida cells and abundant Candida cell death were visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Shrinkage and deformation of Candida cells was observed using scanning electron microscopy. Culture of C. albicans on engineered human oral mucosa tissues resulted in the presence of a large number of yeast cells on the tissue surface and the development of large-scale tissue damage. However, comparatively fewer Candida cells were observed on B. subtilis-treated tissues. We also use ultra performance liquid chromatography/time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/TOF MS) to explore the preliminary antifungal mechanism of B. subtilis R0179 and to detect that whether it can secrete an antifungal agent, Iturin A. Bacillus subtilis R0179 exhibits a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of Candida species. Bacillus subtilis has the potential to be used in the prevention or treatment of oral candidiasis. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Praziquantel inhibits Schistosoma mansoni attachment in vitro.

    PubMed

    da-Silva, S P; Noel, F

    1990-01-01

    Male adult Schistosoma mansoni worms were placed in a glass dish containing Tyrode solution and observed for 15 min after addition of praziquantel (0.01 to 1 microM). Praziquantel promoted a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of sucker-mediated attachment of the worm. Attachment inhibition was correlated with shortening of the parasite. We propose that the rapid and total inhibition of worm attachment observed in vitro with 1 microM praziquantel indicates that therapeutic concentrations of this drug should promote a rapid hepatic shift, in vivo, which may facilitate host tissue reaction.

  5. Antifungal activity of Turkish honey against Candida spp. and Trichosporon spp: an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ayşe Nedret; Silici, Sibel; Ercal, Bariş Derya; Kasap, Filiz; Hörmet-Oz, Hatice Tuna; Mavus-Buldu, Hikmet

    2009-11-01

    Abstract Honey samples from different floral sources were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the growth of 40 yeast strains (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. glabrata and Trichosoporon spp.). Broth microdilution method (CLSI, M27-A2) was used to assess the activity of the honeys against yeasts at different concentrations ranging from 1.25-80% (v/v). All of the yeast strains tested were inhibited by honeys in this study. Broth microdilution assay revealed that inhibition of growth depends on the type and concentration of honey as well as the test pathogen. Little or no antifungal activity was seen at honey concentrations <2%. Rhododendron and multifloral honeys have generally more inhibitory effect than eucalyptus and orange honeys (P<0.05). Fluconazole-resistant yeast strains were examined for their susceptibility to honeys. This study demonstrated that, in vitro, these honeys had antifungal activity at the high concentration of 80% (v/v) in these fluconazole-resistant strains. Further studies are now required to demonstrate if this antifungal activity has any clinical application.

  6. Simvastatin inhibits planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida and Cryptococcus species.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Caetano, Erica Pacheco de; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Souza, Elizabeth Ribeiro Yokobatake; Alencar, Lucas Pereira de; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha

    2015-01-01

    The antifungal activity of some statins against different fungal species has been reported. Thus, at the first moment, the in vitro antifungal activity of simvastatin, atorvastatin and pravastatin was tested against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. Then, in a second approach, considering that the best results were obtained for simvastatin, this drug was evaluated in combination with antifungal drugs against planktonic growth and tested against biofilms of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. Drug susceptibility testing was performed using the microdilution broth method, as described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The interaction between simvastatin and antifungals against planktonic cells was analyzed by calculating the fractional inhibitory concentration index. Regarding biofilm susceptibility, simvastatin was tested against growing biofilm and mature biofilm of one strain of each tested yeast species. Simvastatin showed inhibitory effect against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 15.6 to 1000 mg L(-1) and from 62.5 to 1000 mg L(-1), respectively. The combination of simvastatin with itraconazole and fluconazole showed synergism against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp., while the combination of simvastatin with amphotericin B was synergistic only against Cryptococcus spp. Concerning the biofilm assays, simvastatin was able to inhibit both growing biofilm and mature biofilm of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The present study showed that simvastatin inhibits planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida and Cryptococcus species.

  7. Miltefosine is effective against Candida albicans and Fusarium oxysporum nail biofilms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Machado Vila, Taissa Vieira; Sousa Quintanilha, Natália; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-11-01

    Onychomycosis is a fungal nail infection that represents ∼50 % of all nail disease cases worldwide. Clinical treatment with standard antifungals frequently requires long-term systemic therapy to avoid chronic disease. Onychomycosis caused by non-dermatophyte moulds, such as Fusarium spp., and yeasts, such as Candida spp., is particularly difficult to treat, possibly due to the formation of drug-resistant fungal biofilms on affected areas. Here, we show that the alkylphospholipid miltefosine, used clinically against leishmaniasis and cutaneous breast metastases, has potent activity against biofilms of Fusarium oxysporum and Candida albicans formed on human nail fragments in vitro. Miltefosine activity was compared with that of commercially available antifungals in the treatment of biofilms at two distinct developmental phases: formation and maturation (pre-formed biofilms). Drug activity towards biofilms formed on nail fragments and on microplate surfaces (microdilution assays) was evaluated using XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assays, and drug effects on fingernail biofilms were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For F. oxysporum, miltefosine at 8 μg ml- 1 inhibited biofilm formation by 93%, whilst 256 μg ml- 1 reduced the metabolic activity of pre-formed nail biofilms by 93%. Treatment with miltefosine at 1000 μg ml- 1 inhibited biofilm formation by 89% and reduced the metabolic activity of pre-formed C. albicans biofilms by 99%. SEM analyses of biofilms formed on fingernail fragments showed a clear reduction in biofilm biomass after miltefosine treatment, in agreement with XTT results. Our results show that miltefosine has potential as a therapeutic agent against onychomycosis and should be considered for in vivo efficacy studies, especially in topical formulations for refractory disease treatment.

  8. In vitro activities of natural products against oral Candida isolates from denture wearers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a frequent infectious disease. Treatment of this oral condition is difficult because failures and recurrences are common. The aim of this study was to test the in vitro antifungal activity of pure constituents of essentials oils. Methods Eight terpenic derivatives (carvacrol, farnesol, geraniol, linalool, menthol, menthone, terpinen-4-ol, and α-terpineol), a phenylpropanoid (eugenol), a phenethyl alcohol (tyrosol) and fluconazole were evaluated against 38 Candida isolated from denture-wearers and 10 collection Candida strains by the CLSI M27-A3 broth microdilution method. Results Almost all the tested compounds showed antifungal activity with MIC ranges of 0.03-0.25% for eugenol and linalool, 0.03-0.12% for geraniol, 0.06-0.5% for menthol, α-terpineol and terpinen-4-ol, 0.03-0.5% for carvacrol, and 0.06-4% for menthone. These compounds, with the exception of farnesol, menthone and tyrosol, showed important in vitro activities against the fluconazole-resistant and susceptible-dose dependent Candida isolates. Conclusions Carvacrol, eugenol, geraniol, linalool and terpinen-4-ol were very active in vitro against oral Candida isolates. Their fungistatic and fungicidal activities might convert them into promising alternatives for the topic treatment of oral candidiasis and denture stomatitis. PMID:22118215

  9. In Vitro Antifungal Activity of Equol against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Ah

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that equol has fungicidal activities against Candida albicans. The minimum inhibitory and minimum fungicidal concentrations of equol against C. albicans were 516 and 1,032 µM, respectively. Two separate viability assays found that equol changed the integrity of the C. albicans cell membrane, possibly by formation of membrane lesions. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated ultrastructural changes. PMID:23956675

  10. Ocimum sanctum essential oil inhibits virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2014-03-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which causes disease mainly in immunocompromised patients. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes is essential for virulence of C. albicans and so is the capacity of these cells to undergo transition from yeast to mycelial form of growth. Ocimum sanctum is cultivated worldwide for its essential oil which exhibits medicinal properties. This work evaluates the anti-virulence activity of O. sanctum essential oil (OSEO) on 22 strains of C. albicans (including a standard strain ATCC 90028) isolated from both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Candida isolates were exposed to sub-MICs of OSEO. In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively. Morphological transition from yeast to filamentous form was monitored microscopically in LSM. For genetic analysis, respective genes associated with morphological transition (HWP1), proteinase (SAP1) and phospholipase (PLB2) were also investigated by Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results were analyzed using Student's t-test. OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and had a significant inhibitory effect on extracellular secretion of proteinases and phospholipases. Expression profile of respective selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by qRT-PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, SAP1 and PLB2 genes in cells treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of OSEO. This work suggests that OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and decreases the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the early stage of infection as well as down regulates the associated genes. Further studies will assess the clinical application of OSEO and its constituents in the treatment of fungal infections.

  11. Placental and fetal findings in intrauterine Candida lusitaniae infection following in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Michael; Cham, Elaine M; Eppes, Carey S; Gerber, Susan E; Reed, Kurt D; Ernst, Linda M

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine infection with non- albicans Candida species is rare but can be catastrophic to the fetus. A subset of intrauterine infections with non- albicans Candida species has occurred in women who have undergone in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). We report a case of a 33-year-old healthy woman, pregnant with triplets by in vitro fertilization, who experienced preterm premature rupture of membranes of fetus A at 16 weeks' gestation and subsequently developed oligohydramnios in all 3 fetuses. Following elective pregnancy termination, microscopic examination and molecular analysis demonstrated Candida lusitaniae chorioamnionitis and pneumonia in all 3 fetuses associated with granulomatous inflammation. Our case is only the 2nd report of C. lusitaniae chorioamnionitis and should raise awareness that C. lusitaniae intrauterine infection is associated with IVF-ET. We also show here that C. lusitaniae can cause granulomatous intraplacental inflammation and intrauterine pneumonia.

  12. Methods for obtaining reliable and reproducible results in studies of Candida biofilms formed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Costa, Anna C B P; Pereira, Cristiane A; Freire, Fernanda; Junqueira, Juliana C; Jorge, Antonio O C

    2013-11-01

    Biofilm formation is one of the most important attributes for virulence in Candida species and contributes to increased resistance to antifungal drugs and host immune mechanisms. These features have led to the development of several methodologies to reproduce a sessile community in vitro that can be used to study the development of a biofilm, its interaction with other microorganisms and the environment, and its susceptibility to available antifungal agents and also to search for new therapy strategies. The purpose of this review is to describe the most commonly used methods to study Candida biofilms in vitro, to discuss the benefits and limitations of the different methods to induce biofilm formation, and to analyse the architecture, viability and growth kinetics of Candida biofilms.

  13. Effects of Candida norvegensis live cells on in vitro oat straw rumen fermentation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the effect of Candida norvegensis viable yeast culture on in vitro ruminal fermentation of oat straw. Ruminal fluid was mixed with buffer solution (1:2) and anaerobically incubated with or without yeast at 39°C for 0, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h. A fully randomized design was used. Th...

  14. Synthesis of melanin pigment by Candida albicans in vitro and during infection.

    PubMed

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Gomez, Beatriz L; Diez, Soraya; Uran, Martha; Morris-Jones, Stephen D; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Hamilton, Andrew J

    2005-09-01

    Melanins are implicated in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases. This study confirmed the presence of melanin particles in Candida albicans in vitro and during infection. Dark particles were isolated from the digestion of C. albicans cultures and from infected tissue, as established by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques.

  15. Synthesis of Melanin Pigment by Candida albicans In Vitro and during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Gomez, Beatriz L.; Diez, Soraya; Uran, Martha; Morris-Jones, Stephen D.; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Hamilton, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    Melanins are implicated in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases. This study confirmed the presence of melanin particles in Candida albicans in vitro and during infection. Dark particles were isolated from the digestion of C. albicans cultures and from infected tissue, as established by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques. PMID:16113337

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Activity of a Novel Antifungal Small Molecule against Candida Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Kwok Yong; Wang, Yu; Yang, Dan; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2014-01-01

    Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of humans worldwide and has become a major clinical problem because of the growing number of immunocompromised patients, who are susceptible to infection. Moreover, the number of available antifungals is limited, and antifungal-resistant Candida strains are emerging. New and effective antifungals are therefore urgently needed. Here, we discovered a small molecule with activity against Candida spp. both in vitro and in vivo. We screened a library of 50,240 small molecules for inhibitors of yeast-to-hypha transition, a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans. This screening identified 20 active compounds. Further examination of the in vitro antifungal and anti-biofilm properties of these compounds, using a range of Candida spp., led to the discovery of SM21, a highly potent antifungal molecule (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.2 – 1.6 µg/ml). In vitro, SM21 was toxic to fungi but not to various human cell lines or bacterial species and was active against Candida isolates that are resistant to existing antifungal agents. Moreover, SM21 was relatively more effective against biofilms of Candida spp. than the current antifungal agents. In vivo, SM21 prevented the death of mice in a systemic candidiasis model and was also more effective than the common antifungal nystatin at reducing the extent of tongue lesions in a mouse model of oral candidiasis. Propidium iodide uptake assay showed that SM21 affected the integrity of the cell membrane. Taken together, our results indicate that SM21 has the potential to be developed as a novel antifungal agent for clinical use. PMID:24465737

  17. [In vitro synergistic effect of moxifloxacin and amphotericin B combination against Candida strains].

    PubMed

    Yalçin, Burçe; Kalkanci, Ayşe; Gürelik, Feryal; Fidan, Işil; Kustimur, Semra; Ozdek, Sengül

    2010-01-01

    Contradictory results such as synergy or indifferent effect, have been reported about the interactions between quinolones and antifungal drugs in different studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibilities of Candida spp. to moxifloxacin (MOX) alone and MOX + amphotericin B (AmB) combination. A total of 20 strains were included to the study, of which 19 were clinical isolates (10 Candida albicans, 4 Candida glabrata, 2 Candida parapsilosis, 1 Candida tropicalis, 1 Candida pelliculosa ve 1 Candida sake) and 1 was a standard strain (C. albicans ATCC 90028). In vitro susceptibilities of the strains to MOX with AmB were investigated by broth microdilution method according to the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), and in vitro interaction of these drugs were determined by a chequerboard titration method. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of Candida spp. for MOX were found > or = 400 microg/ml indicating that MOX, by itself has no antifungal activity. AmB MIC values were found 1 microg/ml in 11 of the clinical isolates, and < or = 0.5 microg/ml in the other 8 clinical isolates and 1 standard strain. The inhibitor activity of AmB was slightly enhanced when combined with MOX, there being a decrease of 1-4 fold dilutions in the AmB MICs against all isolates tested. Synergistic effect between MOX and AmB, defined as a fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index as < or = 0.5, was observed in 90% (18/20; all were clinical isolates) of the strains, whereas indifferent effect (FIC = 1) was detected in 10% (2/20; 1 was clinical and 1 was standard strain) of the strains. Antagonistic effect was not observed for this combination even at 48th hours. It was concluded that these preliminary results should be confirmed by large-scaled in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate MOX + AmB combination as a therapeutic option for the treatment of Candida infections.

  18. In Vitro Analysis of Finasteride Activity against Candida albicans Urinary Biofilm Formation and Filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A.; Lown, Livia; Jahng, Maximillian; Walraven, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the 3rd most common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, with a strong propensity to form drug-resistant catheter-related biofilms. Due to the limited efficacy of available antifungals against biofilms, drug repurposing has been investigated in order to identify novel agents with activities against fungal biofilms. Finasteride is a 5-α-reductase inhibitor commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, with activity against human type II and III isoenzymes. We analyzed the Candida Genome Database and identified a C. albicans homolog of type III 5-α-reductase, Dfg10p, which shares 27% sequence identity and 41% similarity to the human type III 5-α-reductase. Thus, we investigated finasteride for activity against C. albicans urinary biofilms, alone and in combination with amphotericin B or fluconazole. Finasteride alone was highly effective in the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation at doses of ≥16 mg/liter and the treatment of preformed biofilms at doses of ≥128 mg/liter. In biofilm checkerboard analyses, finasteride exhibited synergistic activity in the prevention of biofilm formation in a combination of 4 mg/liter finasteride with 2 mg/liter fluconazole. Finasteride inhibited filamentation, thus suggesting a potential mechanism of action. These results indicate that finasteride alone is highly active in the prevention of C. albicans urinary biofilms in vitro and has synergistic activity in combination with fluconazole. Further investigation of the clinical utility of finasteride in the prevention of urinary candidiasis is warranted. PMID:25049253

  19. In vitro analysis of finasteride activity against Candida albicans urinary biofilm formation and filamentation.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A; Lown, Livia; Jahng, Maximillian; Walraven, Carla J; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-10-01

    Candida albicans is the 3rd most common cause of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, with a strong propensity to form drug-resistant catheter-related biofilms. Due to the limited efficacy of available antifungals against biofilms, drug repurposing has been investigated in order to identify novel agents with activities against fungal biofilms. Finasteride is a 5-α-reductase inhibitor commonly used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, with activity against human type II and III isoenzymes. We analyzed the Candida Genome Database and identified a C. albicans homolog of type III 5-α-reductase, Dfg10p, which shares 27% sequence identity and 41% similarity to the human type III 5-α-reductase. Thus, we investigated finasteride for activity against C. albicans urinary biofilms, alone and in combination with amphotericin B or fluconazole. Finasteride alone was highly effective in the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation at doses of ≥16 mg/liter and the treatment of preformed biofilms at doses of ≥128 mg/liter. In biofilm checkerboard analyses, finasteride exhibited synergistic activity in the prevention of biofilm formation in a combination of 4 mg/liter finasteride with 2 mg/liter fluconazole. Finasteride inhibited filamentation, thus suggesting a potential mechanism of action. These results indicate that finasteride alone is highly active in the prevention of C. albicans urinary biofilms in vitro and has synergistic activity in combination with fluconazole. Further investigation of the clinical utility of finasteride in the prevention of urinary candidiasis is warranted.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of plant extracts on Candida albicans: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Doddanna, Sunitha Jagalur; Patel, Shilpa; Sundarrao, Madhusudan Astekar; Veerabhadrappa, Ravindra Setru

    2013-01-01

    Plants as sources of medicinal compounds have continued to play a predominant role in the maintenance of human health since ancient times. Even though several effective antifungal agents are available for oral candida infections, the failure is not uncommon because isolates of Candida albicans may exhibits resistance to the drug during therapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of few plant extracts on Candida albicans. An additional objective was to identify an alternative, inexpensive, simple, and effective method of preventing and controlling Candida albicans. Fine texture powder or paste form of leaves was soaked in sterile distilled water and 100% ethyl alcohol, which were kept in refrigerator at 4°C for 24 h. Then filtrates were prepared and kept in a hot air oven to get a black shining crystal powder/paste form. Stock solutions of plant extracts were inoculated on petri plates containing species of Candida albicans and incubated at 25 ± 2°C for 72 h. Alcoholic curry leaves showed the maximum zone of inhibition on Candida albicans followed by aqueous tea leaves. The other plant extracts like alcoholic onion leaves, alcoholic tea leaves, alcoholic onion bulb, alcoholic aloe vera, and alcoholic mint leaves also inhibited the growth of Candida albicans but lesser extent. The present study renders few medicinal plants as an alternative medicines to the field of dentistry which can be used adjunct to conventional therapy of oral candidasis.

  1. Acetaldehyde production from ethanol and glucose by non-Candida albicans yeasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Mikko T; Uittamo, Johanna; Salaspuro, Mikko; Rautemaa, Riina

    2009-12-01

    Major environmental risk factors for upper digestive tract cancers are tobacco smoking, alcohol intake and poor oral hygiene. They all result in increased acetaldehyde (ACH) levels in saliva which has been shown to be carcinogenic. During alcohol challenge the oral microbiota is the main determinant of the local ACH concentration. Many bacteria and Candida albicans have been shown to be capable of ACH production. Moreover, chronic candidal mucositis can be carcinogenic. The ability of non-C. albicans Candida to produce ACH has not been studied. The aim of this study was to explore the ability of non-C. albicans Candida species to produce ACH in vitro during ethanol and glucose incubation. A total of 30 non-C. albicans Candida isolates and one C. albicans reference strain were used. The cells were exposed to 11 mM of ethanol and to 100mM glucose in vitro. ACH was measured by gas chromatography. All Candida isolates produced significant amounts of ACH in ethanol incubation. C. tropicalis isolates were the highest (252.3 microM) and C. krusei isolates were the lowest (54.6 microM) producers of ACH from ethanol. Only C.glabrata produced significant amounts of ACH by fermentation from glucose. Colonization of oral mucosa with a non-C.albicans species such as C. glabrata, capable of producing carcinogenic amounts of ACH from both ethanol and glucose, may contribute to the development of oral cancer.

  2. In vitro biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates: any association with clinical characteristics?

    PubMed

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Benedek, Kálmán; Juhász, Emese; Iván, Miklós; Kristóf, Katalin

    2016-04-01

    Candida spp. are a leading cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) and are associated with high mortality rates. Biofilm production is a virulence factor of Candida spp., and has been linked with poor clinical outcome. The aim of our study was to assess biofilm production of Candida bloodstream isolates at our institute, and to determine whether in vitro biofilm production is associated with any clinical characteristics of infection. During the four-year study period, 93 cases of Candida BSI were analysed. The most frequently isolated species was C. albicans (66.7 %), followed by C. glabrata (9.7 %), C. parapsilosis (9.7 %), C. tropicalis (9.7 %) and C. krusei (4.3 %). Biofilm production was more prevalent among non-albicans Candida spp. (77.4 %) than C. albicans (30.6 %) (P = 0.02). Abdominal surgery was identified as a risk factor of BSI caused by biofilm producing non-albicans Candida isolates. No risk factors predisposing to bloodstream infection caused by a biofilm producing C. albicans isolate were identified. Biofilm production was not verified as a risk factor of mortality.

  3. Comparison of the in vitro Effect of Chemical and Herbal Mouthwashes on Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Somayeh; Sabokbar, Azar; Riazipour, Majid; Saffari, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: During the recent decades research has focused to find scientific evidence for the effects of herbal medicines. Researchers are interested in herbal remedies for medication and aim to substitute herbal material instead of chemical formula with limited side effects for human being. Objectives: The aim of the current study was to compare the in vitro effect of herbal and chemical mouthwashes against Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: In this research, we used a standard strain of C. albicans, PTCC 5027. The suspension was made by a fresh culture of C. albicans (24 hours) and the optical density (turbidity equating to a McFarland standard of 0.5) was read at 530 nm. The C. albicans suspension was cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar plate. Next, two wells were filled with mouthwashes and after incubation at 30ºC for 24 hours, the inhibition zone was measured. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of mouthwashes were determined. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software, independent T-tests and one-sided variance analysis (ANOVA-one way). Results: Based on these findings on agar diffusion with (P = 0.764), MIC and MFC tests (P = 0.879), there were no significant differences between the antifungal effect of herbal and chemical mouthwashes. Conclusions: This study showed that, chemical mouthwashes acted better than herbal mouthwashes and among different chemical mouthwashes, Oral B was most effective. PMID:25741429

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Pterostilbene against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Dong; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hu, Gan-Hai; Zou, Yong; Huang, Tong-Kun; Yan, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Pterostilbene (PTE) is a stilbene-derived phytoalexin that originates from several natural plant sources. In this study, we evaluated the activity of PTE against Candida albicans biofilms and explored the underlying mechanisms. In 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assays, biofilm biomass measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we found that ≤16 μg/ml PTE had a significant effect against C. albicans biofilms in vitro, while it had no fungicidal effect on planktonic C. albicans cells, which suggested a unique antibiofilm effect of PTE. Then we found that PTE could inhibit biofilm formation and destroy the maintenance of mature biofilms. At 4 μg/ml, PTE decreased cellular surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and suppressed hyphal formation. Gene expression microarrays and real-time reverse transcription-PCR showed that exposure of C. albicans to 16 μg/ml PTE altered the expression of genes that function in morphological transition, ergosterol biosynthesis, oxidoreductase activity, and cell surface and protein unfolding processes (heat shock proteins). Filamentation-related genes, especially those regulated by the Ras/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway, including ECE1, ALS3, HWP1, HGC1, and RAS1 itself, were downregulated upon PTE treatment, indicating that the antibiofilm effect of PTE was related to the Ras/cAMP pathway. Then, we found that the addition of exogenous cAMP reverted the PTE-induced filamentous growth defect. Finally, with a rat central venous catheter infection model, we confirmed the in vivo activity of PTE against C. albicans biofilms. Collectively, PTE had strong activities against C. albicans biofilms both in vitro and in vivo, and these activities were associated with the Ras/cAMP pathway. PMID:24514088

  5. In vitro damage of Candida albicans biofilms by chitosan

    PubMed Central

    PU, YU; LIU, AIBO; ZHENG, YUQIANG; YE, BIN

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing usage of indwelling medical devices in clinical practice, the frequency of fungal infections has increased, such as that of Candida albicans (C. albicans). Biofilms, a protected niche for microorganisms, are resistant to a range of current antifungal agents. Chitosan is a polyatomic biopolymer with advantageous biocompatibility, biodegradation, nontoxicity and antibacterial properties. To investigate the inhibitory effect of chitosan on biofilms formed by C. albicans, cell viability, 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide reduction, and morphological assays, including fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were employed. As assessed by cell viability assay, chitosan showed significant inhibitory effects on the planktonic cells and the biofilm of C. albicans in a dose-dependent manner. Fluorescence microscopy and SEM assays confirmed that the chitosan-treated group showed delayed C. albicans biofilm formation with defect morphological features, due to the inhibitory effects of the vast majority of fungal cell growth. In conclusion, C. albicans biofilms were compromised by the treatment with chitosan, providing an alternative therapeutic strategy against the fungal biofilms in the medical devices. PMID:25120626

  6. Enterococcus faecalis Inhibits Hyphal Morphogenesis and Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Melissa R.; Graham, Carrie E.; Gagliano, Bryce C.

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis and the fungus Candida albicans are both found as commensals in many of the same niches of the human body, such as the oral cavity and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, both are opportunistic pathogens and have frequently been found to be coconstituents of polymicrobial infections. Despite these features in common, there has been little investigation into whether these microbes affect one another in a biologically significant manner. Using a Caenorhabditis elegans model of polymicrobial infection, we discovered that E. faecalis and C. albicans negatively impact each other's virulence. Much of the negative effect of E. faecalis on C. albicans was due to the inhibition of C. albicans hyphal morphogenesis, a developmental program crucial to C. albicans pathogenicity. We discovered that the inhibition was partially dependent on the Fsr quorum-sensing system, a major regulator of virulence in E. faecalis. Specifically, two proteases regulated by Fsr, GelE and SerE, were partially required. Further characterization of the inhibitory signal revealed that it is secreted into the supernatant, is heat resistant, and is between 3 and 10 kDa. The substance was also shown to inhibit C. albicans filamentation in the context of an in vitro biofilm. Finally, a screen of an E. faecalis transposon mutant library identified other genes required for suppression of C. albicans hyphal formation. Overall, we demonstrate a biologically relevant interaction between two clinically important microbes that could affect treatment strategies as well as impact our understanding of interkingdom signaling and sensing in the human-associated microbiome. PMID:23115035

  7. Role of Candida species from HIV infected children in enamel caries lesions: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Charone, Senda; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Martins, Karol de Oliveira; Soares, Rosangela Maria; Castro, Gloria Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzed the capacity of Candida spp. from dental biofilm of HIV infected (HIV+) children to demineralize primary molar enamel in vitro by Transversal Microhardness (TMH), Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) and the quantity of calcium ions (Ca2+) released from the enamel. Candida spp. samples were isolated from the supragingival biofilm of HIV+ children. A hundred and forty (140) enamel blocks were randomly assigned to six groups: biofilm formed by C. albicans (Group 1); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans and C. tropicalis (Group 2); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (Group 3); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (Group 4); biofilm formed by C. albicans ATCC (Group 5) and medium without Candida (Group 6). Enamel blocks from each group were removed on days 3, 5, 8 and 15 after biofilm formation to evaluate the TMH and images of enamel were analyzed by PLM. The quantity of Ca2+ released, from Groups 1 and 6, was determined using an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The SPSS program was used for statistical analysis and the significance level was 5%. TMH showed a gradual reduction in enamel hardness (p<0.05) from the 1st to 15th day, but mainly five days after biofilm formation in all groups. The PLM showed superficial lesions indicating an increase in porosity. C. albicans caused the release of Ca2+ into suspension during biofilm formation. Candida species from dental biofilm of HIV+ children can cause demineralization of primary enamel in vitro.

  8. In Vitro Activity of Tea Tree Oil Vaginal Suppositories against Candida spp. and Probiotic Vaginal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Di Vito, Maura; Mattarelli, Paola; Modesto, Monica; Girolamo, Antonietta; Ballardini, Milva; Tamburro, Annunziata; Meledandri, Marcello; Mondello, Francesca

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the in vitro microbicidal activity of vaginal suppositories (VS) containing tea tree oil (TTO-VS) towards Candida spp. and vaginal probiotics. A total of 20 Candida spp. strains, taken from patients with vaginitis and from an established type collection, including reference strains, were analysed by using the CLSI microdilution method. To study the action of VS towards the beneficial vaginal microbiota, the sensitivity of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (DSM 10140) and Lactobacillus spp. (Lactobacillus casei R-215 and Lactobacillus acidophilus R-52) was tested. Both TTO-VS and TTO showed fungicidal activity against all strains of Candida spp. whereas placebo-VS or the Aloe gel used as controls were ineffective. The study of fractional fungicidal concentrations (FFC) showed synergistic interaction with the association between Amphotericin B and TTO (0.25 to 0.08 µg/ml, respectively) against Candida albicans. Instead, the probiotics were only affected by TTO concentration ≥ 4% v/v, while, at concentrations < 2% v/v, they remained viable. TTO-VS exhibits, in vitro, a selective fungicidal action, slightly affecting only the Bifidobacteriun animalis strain growth belonging to the vaginal microbiota. In vivo studies are needed to confirm the efficacy to prevent acute or recurrent vaginal candidiasis.

  9. In vitro efficacy of liposomal amphotericin B, micafungin and fluconazole against non-albicans Candida species biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Akira; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2015-09-01

    Non-albicans Candida species are being isolated with increasing frequency. In this study, biofilm formation by Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata was evaluated and the activities of liposomal amphotericin B (LAB), micafungin (MFG) and fluconazole (FLC) against these biofilms were assessed using a clinically relevant in vitro model system. LAB exhibited strong activities against the three non-albicans Candida species and showed dose-dependent efficacy. MFG displayed a paradoxical growth effect against the C. tropicalis biofilm. FLC was ineffective for non-albicans biofilms. This study shows that Candida biofilms have unique susceptibility to LAB. The dose-dependent effects of LAB indicate that this drug may be a useful treatment for biofilm formation by non-albicans Candida species in cases in which the catheter cannot be removed for clinical reasons.

  10. Phytic acid inhibits lipid peroxidation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Alicja; Wilczok, Adam; Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10-20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products.

  11. Phytic Acid Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Węglarz, Ludmiła; Dzierżewicz, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    Phytic acid (PA) has been recognized as a potent antioxidant and inhibitor of iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate, with the use of HPLC/MS/MS, whether PA is capable of inhibiting linoleic acid autoxidation and Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation, as well as Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation in human colonic epithelial cells. PA at 100 μM and 500 μM effectively inhibited the decay of linoleic acid, both in the absence and presence of Fe(II)/ascorbate. The observed inhibitory effect of PA on Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation was lower (10–20%) compared to that of autoxidation. PA did not change linoleic acid hydroperoxides concentration levels after 24 hours of Fe(II)/ascorbate-induced peroxidation. In the absence of Fe(II)/ascorbate, PA at 100 μM and 500 μM significantly suppressed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxides. Moreover, PA at the tested nontoxic concentrations (100 μM and 500 μM) significantly decreased 4-hydroxyalkenal levels in Caco-2 cells which structurally and functionally resemble the small intestinal epithelium. It is concluded that PA inhibits linoleic acid oxidation and reduces the formation of 4-hydroxyalkenals. Acting as an antioxidant it may help to prevent intestinal diseases induced by oxygen radicals and lipid peroxidation products. PMID:24260736

  12. Microdilution in vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Candida Species, From Mild Cutaneous to Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Elham; Sabokbar, Azar; Moazeni, Maryam; Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Badali, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida species, as opportunistic organisms, can cause various clinical manifestations, ranging from mild cutaneous infections to systemic candidiasis in otherwise healthy individuals. Remarkably, the incidence and mortality rates of candidemia have significantly increased worldwide, even after advances in medical interventions and the development of novel antifungal drugs. Objectives Given the possible resistance to antifungal agents, susceptibility testing can be useful in defining the activity spectrum of antifungals and determining the appropriate treatment regime. Materials and Methods The in vitro susceptibilities of molecularly identified Candida strains (n = 150) belonging to seven species recovered from clinical specimens, including vaginal, cutaneous, sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and blood samples, were determined for six antifungal drugs (amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin), based on the clinical and laboratory standards institute’s M27-A3 and M27-S4 documents. Results Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated species (44.66%), followed by non-albicans Candida, including C. glabrata (20%), C. parapsilosis (13.33%), C. krusei (8%), C. tropicalis (7.3%), C. dubliniensis (4%), and C. africana (3.33%). Posaconazole had the lowest geometric mean minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) (0.0122 µg/ml), followed by amphotericin B (0.0217 µg/mL), voriconazole (0.1022 µg/mL), itraconazole (0.1612 µg/mL), caspofungin (0.2525 µg/mL), and fluconazole (0.4874 µg/mL) against all isolated Candida species. Candida africana and C. parapsilosis were significantly more susceptible to fluconazole, compared to C. albicans and other Candida species (P < 0.001). However, their clinical effectiveness in the treatment of Candida infections remains to be determined. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of precise and correct species identification of clinical yeast isolates via

  13. A human in vitro granuloma model using heat killed Candida albicans cells immobilized on plastic culture wells.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, D E; Peters, J H; Gahr, M

    1997-06-01

    A new model for studying the initial events of granuloma formation in vitro is presented using heat killed Candida albicans immobilized on the surface of plastic culture wells. Human monocytes were induced to accumulate and to proliferate, forming multinucleated giant cells (MGC) and epitheloid cells within 4 days of culture. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 were detected in culture supernatants. These monokines, and additionally macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), were also detected immunocytochemically. The granuloma formation was inhibited by Dexamethasone (Dex), Pentoxifylline (POF), or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in a dose-dependent manner. Antibodies to M-CSF reduced the granuloma formation to a great extent with a striking reduction of monocyte proliferation. Using antibodies to TNF-alpha the authors found a complete inhibition of the granuloma including MGC formation and monocyte proliferation.

  14. An in vitro antifungal efficacy of silver nanoparticles activated by diode laser to Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, S. D.; Kharisma, D. H.; Kholimatussa'diah, S.; Zaidan, A. H.

    2017-09-01

    Microbial infectious diseases and increased resistance to antibiotics become urgent problems requiring immediate solutions. One promising alternative is the using of silver nanoparticles. The combination of the microbial inhibition characteristic of silver nanotechnology enhances the activity of antimicrobial effect. This study aims to determine effectiveness of antifungal silver nanoparticles with the activation of the diode laser on Candida albicans. The samples were culture of Candida albicans. Candida albicans cultures were incubated with silver nanoparticles (concentration 10-4 M) and treated with various exposure time of diode laser (15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90)s. The suspension was planted on Sabouraud Dextrone Agar sterile media and incubated for 24 hours at temperature of 37oC. The number of colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml) was determined after incubation. The results were log-transformed and analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). In this analysis, P value ≤0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. The result of this study showed the quantum yield of silver nanoparticles with diode laser 450 nm was 63,61%. Irradiating with diode laser 450 nm for 75 s resulted in the highest decreasing percentage of Candida albicans viability 65,03%. Irradiating with diode laser 450 nm 75 s with silver nanoparticles resulted in the higest decreasing percentage of Candida albicans viability 84,63%. Therefore, silver nanoparticles activated with diode laser irradiation of 450 nm resulted antifungal effect to Candida albicans viability.

  15. Species Distribution and In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility of Vulvovaginal Candida Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng-Juan; Zhang, Dai; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Wu, Wen-Xiang; Bai, Hui-Hui; Dong, Han-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) was a common infection associated with lifelong harassment of woman's social and sexual life. The purpose of this study was to describe the species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida species (Candida spp.) isolated from patients with VVC over 8 years. Methods: Species which isolated from patients with VVC in Peking University First Hospital were identified using chromogenic culture media. Susceptibility to common antifungal agents was determined using agar diffusion method based on CLSI M44-A2 document. SPSS software (version 14.0, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used for statistical analysis, involving statistical description and Chi-square test. Results: The most common strains were Candida (C.) albicans, 80.5% (n = 1775) followed by C. glabrata, 18.1% (n = 400). Nystatin exhibited excellent activity against all species (<4% resistant [R]). Resistance to azole drugs varied among different species. C. albicans: clotrimazole (3.1% R) < fluconazole (16.6% R) < itraconazole (51.5% R) < miconazole (54.0% R); C. glabrata: miconazole (25.6% R) < clotrimazole (50.5% R) < itraconazole (61.9% R) < fluconazole (73.3% R); Candida krusei: clotrimazole (0 R) < fluconazole (57.7% R) < miconazole (73.1% R) < itraconazole (83.3% R). The susceptibility of fluconazole was noticeably decreasing among all species in the study period. Conclusions: Nystatin was the optimal choice for the treatment of VVC at present. The species distribution and in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida spp. isolated from patients with VVC had changed over time. PMID:27174323

  16. Antifungal activity in vitro and in vivo of a salmon protamine peptide and its derived cyclic peptide against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Jun-Ichi; Cho, Tamaki; Mitarai, Makoto; Iohara, Keishi; Hayama, Kazumi; Abe, Shigeru; Tanaka, Yoshihiko

    2017-02-01

    Protamine peptide (PP) derived from salmon is a 14-mer with 10 arginine residues. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of PP against Candida albicans PP showed a concentration-dependent dual mode of action, with fungicidal activity and inhibitory activity for hyphal development in vitro. At lethal concentrations of PP, intracellular accumulation of PP was energy-dependent but independent of endocytosis, and resulted in ATP efflux and the generation of reactive oxygen species in the cells. PP at sublethal concentrations inhibited hyphal development in C. albicans by binding to the cell surface. Though antifungal activity of PP was inactivated by high concentrations of NaCl, the antifungal activity of the synthetic cyclic (via a disulfide bond) form of PP (cyclic PP) was not. Cyclic PP also showed the concentration-dependent dual mode of action, and had five-fold greater antifungal activity than PP. The advantage of antifungal activity of cyclic PP compared with PP in vitro resulted in a high in vivo efficacy in a murine oral candidiasis model. Oral treatment with cyclic PP inhibited hyphal development of C. albicans on mouse tongues and protected against the development of severe candidiasis. This study shows the therapeutic potential of cyclic PP as an antifungal peptide against C. albicans. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Effectiveness of Photodynamic Therapy for the Inactivation of Candida spp. on Dentures: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Dovigo, Livia Nordi; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the inactivation of different species of Candida on maxillary complete dentures. Background data: The treatment of denture stomatitis requires the inactivation of Candida spp. on dentures. PDT has been reported as an effective method for Candida inactivation. Methods: Reference strains of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis and C. krusei were tested. Thirty-four dentures were fabricated in a standardized procedure and subjected to ethylene oxide sterilization. The dentures were individually inoculated with one of the strains and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Dentures submitted to PDT (P+L+) were individually sprayed with 50 mg/L of Photogem® (PS) and, after 30 min, illuminated by LED light for 26 min (37.5 J/cm2). Additional dentures were treated only with PS (P+L-) or light (P-L+) or neither (P-L-). Samples of serial dilutions were spread on Sabouraud dextrose agar and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colonies were counted and the values of log (cfu/mL) were analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Results: For all species of Candida, PDT resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) of cfu/mL values from dentures when compared with P-L- (reductions from 1.73 to 3.99 log10). Significant differences (p<0.05), but lower reductions, were also observed for P+L- and P-L+when compared with P-L- for some species of Candida. Conclusions: PDT was an effective method for reducing Candida spp. on dentures. PMID:21916614

  18. Human pathogenic viruses are retained in and released by Candida albicans biofilm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mazaheritehrani, Elham; Sala, Arianna; Orsi, Carlotta Francesca; Neglia, Rachele Giovanna; Morace, Giulia; Blasi, Elisabetta; Cermelli, Claudio

    2014-01-22

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent human fungal pathogen associated with biofilm formation on indwelling medical devices. Under this form, Candida represents an infectious reservoir difficult to eradicate and possibly responsible for systemic, often lethal infections. Currently, no information is available on the occurrence and persistence of pathogenic viruses within C. albicans biofilm. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) and Coxsackievirus type B5 (CVB5) can be encompassed in Candida biofilm, retain their infectivity and then be released. Thus, cell-free virus inocula or HSV-1-infected cells were added to 24h-old fungal biofilm in tissue culture plates; 48 h later, the biofilm was detached by washing and energetic scratching and the presence of virus in the rescued material was end-point titrated on VERO cells. Planktonic Candida cultures and samples containing only medium were run in parallel as controls. We found that both HSV-1 and CVB5 free virus particles, as well as HSV-1 infected cells remain embedded in the biofilm retaining their infectivity. As a second step, the influence of biofilm on virus sensitivity to sodium hypochlorite and to specific neutralizing antibodies was investigated. The results showed that virus encompassment in fungal biofilm reduces virus sensitivity to chemical inactivation but does not affect antibody neutralization. Overall, these data provide the first in vitro evidence that viruses can be encompassed within Candida biofilm and then be released. Thus, it may be speculated that Candida biofilm can be a reservoir of viruses too, posing a further health risk.

  19. Effectiveness of photodynamic therapy for the inactivation of Candida spp. on dentures: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Dovigo, Livia Nordi; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2011-12-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the inactivation of different species of Candida on maxillary complete dentures. The treatment of denture stomatitis requires the inactivation of Candida spp. on dentures. PDT has been reported as an effective method for Candida inactivation. Reference strains of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis and C. krusei were tested. Thirty-four dentures were fabricated in a standardized procedure and subjected to ethylene oxide sterilization. The dentures were individually inoculated with one of the strains and incubated at 37°C for 24 h. Dentures submitted to PDT (P+L+) were individually sprayed with 50 mg/L of Photogem(®) (PS) and, after 30 min, illuminated by LED light for 26 min (37.5 J/cm(2)). Additional dentures were treated only with PS (P+L-) or light (P-L+) or neither (P-L-). Samples of serial dilutions were spread on Sabouraud dextrose agar and incubated at 37°C for 48 h. The colonies were counted and the values of log (cfu/mL) were analyzed by Kruskall-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). For all species of Candida, PDT resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) of cfu/mL values from dentures when compared with P-L- (reductions from 1.73 to 3.99 log(10)). Significant differences (p<0.05), but lower reductions, were also observed for P+L- and P-L+when compared with P-L- for some species of Candida. PDT was an effective method for reducing Candida spp. on dentures.

  20. Inhibition of Candida albicans by methanethiol produced by Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B A

    1985-10-01

    Brevibacterium linens was screened for antifungal activity against Candida albicans using several antibiotic assay methods. The growth of C. albicans was inhibited only when the dual culture assay method was employed and using methionine-supplemented media. Results suggest that methanethiol which is produced by B. linens' utilization of methionine is the agent inhibitory to C. albicans' growth.

  1. Use of Candida-specific chicken egg yolk antibodies to inhibit the adhering of Candida to denture base materials: prevention of denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamikawa, Yoshiaki; Fujisaki, Junichi; Nagayama, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Kiyotsugu; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Hamada, Tomofumi; Sakamoto, Ryoich; Mukai, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Kazumasa

    2016-09-01

    Polyclonal anti-Candida chicken egg yolk antibodies (anti-IgY) were used to investigate the prevention of adherence of Candida species to denture base material in vitro. Candida is a potential virulence factor that can cause systemic infection and even death in immunocompromised individuals. Because long-term antifungal treatment may lead to the emergence of drug-resistant strains, it is necessary to develop novel preventive measures and treatments for candidiasis. Three types of chicken egg yolk antibodies were used in this study: non-specific antibody (control IgY), Candida albicans-specific antibody (anti-C.a.IgY) and Candida glabrata-specific antibody (anti-C.g.IgY). A mixture of different dilutions of each antibody with a suspension of Candida species and denture base material was incubated for 3 h, and then the colony-forming units of Candida on the denture base material were counted. Compared with control IgY, anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY significantly inhibited the adherence of C. albicans, but anti-C.a.IgY tended to be more potent than anti-C.g.IgY. The adherence of C. glabrata was also inhibited significantly by anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY with almost equivalent potency, indicating that their actions against C. glabrata were comparable. This study revealed the inhibitory effects of anti-C.a.IgY and anti-C.g.IgY against the adherence of C. albicans and C. glabrata to denture base material. This finding indicates the possibility of a beneficial effect of IgYs for the prevention of denture stomatitis and candidiasis in clinical settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Role of Candida species from HIV infected children in enamel caries lesions: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    CHARONE, Senda; PORTELA, Maristela Barbosa; MARTINS, Karol de Oliveira; SOARES, Rosangela Maria; CASTRO, Gloria Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study analyzed the capacity of Candida spp. from dental biofilm of HIV infected (HIV+) children to demineralize primary molar enamel in vitro by Transversal Microhardness (TMH), Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) and the quantity of calcium ions (Ca2+) released from the enamel. Material and Methods Candida spp. samples were isolated from the supragingival biofilm of HIV+ children. A hundred and forty (140) enamel blocks were randomly assigned to six groups: biofilm formed by C. albicans (Group 1); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans and C. tropicalis (Group 2); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans and C. parapsilosis (Group 3); mixed biofilm formed by C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata (Group 4); biofilm formed by C. albicans ATCC (Group 5) and medium without Candida (Group 6). Enamel blocks from each group were removed on days 3, 5, 8 and 15 after biofilm formation to evaluate the TMH and images of enamel were analyzed by PLM. The quantity of Ca2+ released, from Groups 1 and 6, was determined using an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The SPSS program was used for statistical analysis and the significance level was 5%. Results TMH showed a gradual reduction in enamel hardness (p<0.05) from the 1st to 15th day, but mainly five days after biofilm formation in all groups. The PLM showed superficial lesions indicating an increase in porosity. C. albicans caused the release of Ca2+ into suspension during biofilm formation. Conclusion Candida species from dental biofilm of HIV+ children can cause demineralization of primary enamel in vitro. PMID:28198976

  3. The influence of photodynamic therapy parameters on the inactivation of Candida spp: in vitro and in vivo studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, F.; Mima, E. G.; Dovigo, L. N.; Bagnato, V. S.; Jorge, J. H.; de Souza Costa, C. A.; Pavarina, A. C.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of parameters of photodynamic therapy (PDT), such as pre-irradiation time (PIT), on the inactivation of Candida spp. was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Suspensions of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei and Candida glabrata were treated with Photogem®, incubated for 5, 10 or 15 min and illuminated with a blue LED light. Colonies were cultivated and log values of CFU ml-1 were analyzed by ANOVA and Kruskall-Wallis test. For in vivo evaluation, immunosuppressed mice were inoculated with C. albicans. PDT was performed on the dorsum of the tongue by topical administration of Photogem® and illumination after 5, 10 or 15 min. C. albicans was recovered from the tongue and the number of CFU ml-1 was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test. Animals were killed and the tongues were surgically removed for histological analysis. Susceptibility of Candida spp. suspensions to PDT was in decreasing order: C. albicans = C. tropicalis < C. krusei < C. glabrata. No significant difference was observed among the different PIT (p > 0.05), both in vivo and in vitro. A significant reduction (p < 0.05) of log(CFU ml-1) of C. albicans from tongues of mice was observed with no adverse effects in the tissue. PDT was effective to inactivate in vitroCandida spp. and for reduction of C. albicans in vivo, independently of the PIT used.

  4. Human serum inhibits adhesion and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans can form biofilms on intravenous catheters; this process plays a key role in the pathogenesis of catheter infections. This study evaluated the effect of human serum (HS) on C. albicans biofilm formation and the expression of adhesion-related genes in vitro. A C. albicans laboratory strain (ATCC90028) and three clinical strains were grown for 24 h in RPMI 1640 supplemented with HS or RPMI 1640 alone (as a control). The growth of biofilm cells of four strains was monitored by a Live Cell Movie Analyzer, and by XTT reduction assay. The expression of the adhesion-related genes BCR1, ALS1, ALS3, HWP1 and ECE1 was analyzed by RT-PCR at three time points (60 min, 90 min, and 24 h). Results In the adhesion phase, C. albicans cells kept a Brownian movement in RPMI medium containing HS until a large number of germ tubes were formed. In the control group, C. albicans cells quickly adhered to the bottom of the reaction plate. Compared with RPMI 1640, medium supplemented with 3–50% HS caused a significant decrease in biofilm development (all p < 0.001). However, the presence of HS had no significant inhibitory effect on the pre-adhered biofilms (all p > 0.05). Biofilm formation was also inhibited by heat-inactivated and proteinase K pre-treated HS. The presence of 50% HS did not significantly affect the planktonic growth of C. albicans (p > 0.05). At three time points, HS inhibited expression of the ALS1 and ALS3 genes and promoted expression of the HWP1 and ECE1 genes. Significant up-regulation of BCR1 was observed only at the 90-min point. Conclusions Human serum reduces biofilm formation by inhibiting the adhesion of C. albicans cells. This response may be associated with the down-regulation of adhesion-related genes ALS1, ALS3 and BCR1. The inhibitory serum component is protease-resistant and heat stable. PMID:24673895

  5. Growth kinetics of candida biofilm on medical polymers: a long-term in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Matthias; Tobudic, Selma; Moser, Doris; Zatorska, Beata; Bigenzahn, Wolfgang; Schneider-Stickler, Berit

    2013-03-01

    Recent in vitro models simulating biofilm formation on medical polymers are restricted to only short-term observation periods of 2 hours to 12 days. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro model to generate a long-term polymicrobial biofilm with Candida albicans (C albicans) and Streptococcus salivarius (S salivarius) on thermoplastic medical grade silicone (TPS) and polyurethane (TPU) and continuous documentation of growth kinetics. Test platelets of TPS and TPU were incubated in well plates in RPMI agar at 37°C. Both microbial specimen were isolated from explanted voice prostheses and added every second day for 28 days. Afterward, only the nutrition solution has been changed regularly. Biofilm kinetics were monitored using a specially designed image analysis software to calculate the percentual surface covering of each platelet. Biofilm architecture was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Microbial infiltration was examined by crystal violet staining and thin section microscopy. On both materials tested, a cover of living candida biofilm could be generated over 140 days. Colonization was permanent with at least 10% surface coverage. Initially, both materials showed coverage of up to 80% followed by biofilm detachment, which could be reduced by adding planktonic microbes. SEM confirmed three-dimensional biofilm architecture with dimorphic candida growth. Microbial material infiltration of nonhypheal types was proved in 2 TPU platelets, but not in TPS. The in vitro model presented in this study mimics in vivo events of biofilm formation on medical polymers with continuous monitoring of living biofilm kinetics. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. In vitro activity of origanum vulgare essential oil against candida species

    PubMed Central

    Cleff, Marlete Brum; Meinerz, Ana Raquel; Xavier, Melissa; Schuch, Luiz Filipe; Schuch, Luiz Filipe; Araújo Meireles, Mário Carlos; Alves Rodrigues, Maria Regina; de Mello, João Roberto Braga

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of the essential oil extracted from Origanum vulgare against sixteen Candida species isolates. Standard strains tested comprised C. albicans (ATCC strains 44858, 4053, 18804 and 3691), C. parapsilosis (ATCC 22019), C. krusei (ATCC 34135), C. lusitaniae (ATCC 34449) and C. dubliniensis (ATCC MY646). Six Candida albicans isolates from the vaginal mucous membrane of female dogs, one isolate from the cutaneous tegument of a dog and one isolate of a capuchin monkey were tested in parallel. A broth microdilution technique (CLSI) was used, and the inoculum concentration was adjusted to 5 x 106 CFU mL-1. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation in a Clevenger apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography. Susceptibility was expressed as Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimal Fungicidal Concentration (MFC). All isolates tested in vitro were sensitive to O. vulgare essential oil. The chromatographic analysis revealed that the main compounds present in the essential oil were 4-terpineol (47.95%), carvacrol (9.42%), thymol (8.42%) and □-terpineol (7.57%). C. albicans isolates obtained from animal mucous membranes exhibited MIC and MFC values of 2.72 μL mL-1 and 5 μL mL-1, respectively. MIC and MFC values for C. albicans standard strains were 2.97 μL mL-1 and 3.54 μL mL-1, respectively. The MIC and MFC for non-albicans species were 2.10 μL mL-1 and 2.97 μL mL-1, respectively. The antifungal activity of O. vulgare essential oil against Candida spp. observed in vitro suggests its administration may represent an alternative treatment for candidiasis. PMID:24031471

  7. Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri has antifungal effects on oral Candida species in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Mette Rose; Kragelund, Camilla; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Keller, Mette Kirstine; Twetman, Svante

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: An alternative approach for managing Candida infections in the oral cavity by modulating the oral microbiota with probiotic bacteria has been proposed. Objective: The aim was to investigate the antifungal potential of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938 and ATCC PTA 5289) against six oral Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. dubliniensis, and C. parapsilosis). Design: The lactobacilli were tested for their ability to co-aggregate with and inhibit the growth of the yeasts assessed by spectrophotometry and the agar overlay inhibition assay. Additionally, the pH was evaluated with microsensors, and the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by the lactobacilli was verified. Results: Both L. reuteri strains showed co-aggregation abilities with the yeasts. The lactobacilli almost completely inhibited the growth of C. albicans and C. parapsilosis, but did not affect C. krusei. Statistically significant differences in co-aggregation and growth inhibition capacities between the two L. reuteri strains were observed (p<0.001). The pH measurements suggested that C. krusei can resist the acids produced by the lactobacilli. Conclusions: L. reuteri exhibited antifungal properties against five of the six most common oral Candida species. Further, the results reconfirms that the probiotic capacity of L. reuteri is strain specific. PMID:28326154

  8. Absence of Photoreactivating Enzyme in Candida albicans, Candida stellatoidea, and Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Glendon R.; Sarachek, Alvin

    1974-01-01

    In vitro assays demonstrate photoreactivating enzyme activity in extracts of Candida pseudotropicalis but not in extracts of Candida albicans, Candida stellatoidea, or Candida tropicalis. PMID:4604052

  9. Comparison of in vitro and vivo efficacy of caspofungin against Candida parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Földi, Richárd; Kovács, Renátó; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Kardos, Gábor; Berényi, Réka; Juhász, Béla; Szilágyi, Judit; Mózes, Julianna; Majoros, László

    2012-10-01

    Caspofungin activity was determined in vitro and in vivo against three Candida orthopsilosis, three C. metapsilosis, two C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and two C. albicans isolates. MIC values and killing activity were determined in RPMI-1640 plus 50 % human serum. Neutropenic (cyclophosphamide-treated) mice were infected intravenously. Five-day intraperitoneal treatment with caspofungin was started after 24 h postinfection. Kidney burden was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test with Dunn's post-test. In killing studies, caspofungin was fungistatic and fungicidal against C. albicans at ≥0.25 and ≥2 μg/ml concentrations, respectively. Caspofungin was fungistatic at ≥8-16, ≥2-8 and at ≥2-8 μg/ml against C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis, respectively. In the murine model, C. albicans was inhibited by 1, 2 and 5 mg/kg of caspofungin (P < 0.001 compared to the controls). Against C. parapsilosis, only 5 mg/kg caspofungin was effective against both isolates (P < 0.05). Two and five mg/kg of caspofungin was effective against all C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis isolates (P < 0.05 to <0.001). Serum-based killing tests proved to be useful in predicting in vivo efficacy of caspofungin against four Candida species. Caspofungin at clinically attainable concentrations proved to be effective against all four species.

  10. In vitro activity of fluconazole and voriconazole against clinical isolates of Candida spp. by E-test method.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, P; Jamal, F; Chong, P P; Ng, K P

    2010-08-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of clinical Candida isolates towards fluconazole and voriconazole was determined using the E-test method. A total of 41 clinical isolates recovered from patients since 2004 until 2009 from two local hospitals in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were used. These comprised Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida rugosa, Candida dubliniensis and Candida glabrata. Strains from American Type Culture Collection were used as quality control. Lawn cultures of the isolates on RPMI-1640 agar medium supplemented with 2% glucose were incubated with the E-test strips at 35ºC for 48 h. Our results show that 71% were susceptible to fluconazole and 90% were susceptible to voriconazole. All strains of C. krusei were resistant to fluconazole and 50% were susceptible in a dose-dependent manner to voriconazole. There were 66% and 33% of C. glabrata that were resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole. Our study revealed that majority of the clinical Candida isolates was susceptible to fluconazole and voriconazole with a small percentage being resistant to both the drugs.

  11. Effects of Treated versus Untreated Polystyrene on Caspofungin In Vitro Activity against Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Annette W; McCarthy, Dora I; Albataineh, Mohammad T; Sanders, Carmita; McElmeel, Maria; Wiederhold, Nathan P

    2016-03-01

    Significant interlaboratory variability is observed in testing the caspofungin susceptibility of Candida species by both the CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methodologies. We evaluated the influence of treated versus untreated polystyrene microtiter trays on caspofungin MICs using 209 isolates of four Candida species, including 16 C. albicans and 11 C. glabrata isolates with defined FKS mutations. Caspofungin MICs were also determined using the commercially available YeastOne and Etest assays and 102 isolates. All C. glabrata isolates had caspofungin MICs of ≥0.5 μg/ml, the clinical breakpoint for caspofungin resistance in this species, measured using trays made of treated polystyrene, regardless of the FKS status. In contrast, susceptible isolates could readily be distinguished from resistant/non-wild-type isolates when caspofungin MICs were measured using untreated polystyrene trays and both the YeastOne and Etest assays. Similar results were also observed for C. krusei isolates, as all isolates had caspofungin MICs above the threshold for resistance measured using treated polystyrene trays. In contrast, C. albicans isolates could be correctly identified as susceptible or resistant when caspofungin MICs were measured with treated or untreated trays and with the YeastOne and Etest assays. MICs falsely elevated above the resistance breakpoint were also not observed for C. tropicalis isolates. These results demonstrated that the use of treated polystyrene may be one factor that leads to falsely elevated caspofungin in vitro susceptibility results and that this may also be a greater issue for some Candida species than for others.

  12. The synthetic killer peptide KP impairs Candida albicans biofilm in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Paulone, Simona; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Tavanti, Arianna; Piccinelli, Serena; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Lupetti, Antonella; Colombari, Bruna; Pericolini, Eva; Polonelli, Luciano; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Posteraro, Brunella; Cermelli, Claudio; Peppoloni, Samuele

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal organism, commonly inhabiting mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, as a part of the resident microbiota. However, in susceptible hosts, especially hospitalized and/or immunocompromised patients, it may cause a wide range of infections. The presence of abiotic substrates, such as central venous or urinary catheters, provides an additional niche for Candida attachment and persistence, particularly via biofilm development. Furthermore, Candida biofilm is poorly susceptible to most antifungals, including azoles. Here we investigated the effects of a synthetic killer peptide (KP), known to be active in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo against different pathogens, on C. albicans biofilm. Together with a scrambled peptide used as a negative control, KP was tested against Candida biofilm at different stages of development. A reference strain, two fluconazole-resistant and two fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans clinical isolates were used. KP-induced C. albicans oxidative stress response and membrane permeability were also analysed. Moreover, the effect of KP on transcriptional profiles of C. albicans genes involved in different stages of biofilm development, such as cell adhesion, hyphal development and extracellular matrix production, was evaluated. Our results clearly show that the treatment with KP strongly affected the capacity of C. albicans to form biofilm and significantly impairs preformed mature biofilm. KP treatment resulted in an increase in C. albicans oxidative stress response and membrane permeability; also, biofilm-related genes expression was significantly reduced. Comparable inhibitory effects were observed in all the strains employed, irrespective of their resistance or susceptibility to fluconazole. Finally, KP-mediated inhibitory effects were observed also against a catheter-associated C. albicans biofilm. This study provides the first evidence on the KP effectiveness against C. albicans biofilm, suggesting that KP may

  13. The synthetic killer peptide KP impairs Candida albicans biofilm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Paulone, Simona; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Tavanti, Arianna; Piccinelli, Serena; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Lupetti, Antonella; Colombari, Bruna; Pericolini, Eva; Polonelli, Luciano; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Posteraro, Brunella; Cermelli, Claudio; Blasi, Elisabetta; Peppoloni, Samuele

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal organism, commonly inhabiting mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, as a part of the resident microbiota. However, in susceptible hosts, especially hospitalized and/or immunocompromised patients, it may cause a wide range of infections. The presence of abiotic substrates, such as central venous or urinary catheters, provides an additional niche for Candida attachment and persistence, particularly via biofilm development. Furthermore, Candida biofilm is poorly susceptible to most antifungals, including azoles. Here we investigated the effects of a synthetic killer peptide (KP), known to be active in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo against different pathogens, on C. albicans biofilm. Together with a scrambled peptide used as a negative control, KP was tested against Candida biofilm at different stages of development. A reference strain, two fluconazole-resistant and two fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans clinical isolates were used. KP-induced C. albicans oxidative stress response and membrane permeability were also analysed. Moreover, the effect of KP on transcriptional profiles of C. albicans genes involved in different stages of biofilm development, such as cell adhesion, hyphal development and extracellular matrix production, was evaluated. Our results clearly show that the treatment with KP strongly affected the capacity of C. albicans to form biofilm and significantly impairs preformed mature biofilm. KP treatment resulted in an increase in C. albicans oxidative stress response and membrane permeability; also, biofilm-related genes expression was significantly reduced. Comparable inhibitory effects were observed in all the strains employed, irrespective of their resistance or susceptibility to fluconazole. Finally, KP-mediated inhibitory effects were observed also against a catheter-associated C. albicans biofilm. This study provides the first evidence on the KP effectiveness against C. albicans biofilm, suggesting that KP may

  14. Analysis and in vitro anti-Candida antifungal activity of Cuminum cyminum and Salvadora persica herbs extracts against pathogenic Candida strains.

    PubMed

    Naeini, A; Naderi, N Jalayer; Shokri, H

    2014-03-01

    The in vitro antifungal activities of essential oil from Cuminum cyminum (C. cyminum) and alcoholic extract from Salvadora persica (S. persica) were investigated in order to evaluate their efficacy against C. albicans ATCC 14053, C. dubliniensis ATCC CD60, C. glabrata ATCC 90030, C. krusei ATCC 6258 and C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019. The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation in a Clevenger apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). The disc diffusion and broth macrodilution methods were used as antifungal susceptibility tests. The GC/MS analysis allowed 17 components to be determined; the main constituents of C. cyminum essential oil were α-pinene (30%), limonene (21%) and 1,8-cineole (18.5%). C. cyminum oil had a broad-spectrum antifungal activity against different pathogenic Candida species. Inhibition zone values ranged from 7 to 50mm for C. cyminum and 0 to 10mm for S. persica against the organisms tested. The best minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of C. cyminum oil was associated with C. albicans and C. dubliniensis (289 mg/L) and the MICs of S. persica extract were 4.9 mg/mL and 20mg/mL against C. albicans and C. dubliniensis, respectively. The results suggested the potential substitution of the antifungal chemicals by C. cyminum essential oil and S. persica alcoholic extract as natural inhibitors to control the growth of the most important pathogenic Candida species and alternative therapies for candidiasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Oral Candida albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals have similar in vitro biofilm-forming ability and pathogenicity as invasive Candida isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Candida can cause mucocutaneous and/or systemic infections in hospitalized and immunosuppressed patients. Most individuals are colonized by Candida spp. as part of the oral flora and the intestinal tract. We compared oral and systemic isolates for the capacity to form biofilm in an in vitro biofilm model and pathogenicity in the Galleria mellonella infection model. The oral Candida strains were isolated from the HIV patients and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, C. norvegensis, and C. dubliniensis. The systemic strains were isolated from patients with invasive candidiasis and included species of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. lusitaniae, and C. kefyr. For each of the acquired strains, biofilm formation was evaluated on standardized samples of silicone pads and acrylic resin. We assessed the pathogenicity of the strains by infecting G. mellonella animals with Candida strains and observing survival. Results The biofilm formation and pathogenicity in Galleria was similar between oral and systemic isolates. The quantity of biofilm formed and the virulence in G. mellonella were different for each of the species studied. On silicone pads, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis produced more biofilm (1.12 to 6.61 mg) than the other species (0.25 to 3.66 mg). However, all Candida species produced a similar biofilm on acrylic resin, material used in dental prostheses. C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis were the most virulent species in G. mellonella with 100% of mortality, followed by C. lusitaniae (87%), C. novergensis (37%), C. krusei (25%), C. glabrata (20%), and C. kefyr (12%). Conclusions We found that on silicone pads as well as in the Galleria model, biofilm formation and virulence depends on the Candida species. Importantly, for C. albicans the pathogenicity of oral Candida isolates was similar to systemic Candida isolates, suggesting that Candida

  16. Comparison of microdilution and disc diffusion methods in assessing the in vitro activity of fluconazole and Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against vaginal Candida isolates.

    PubMed

    Ergin, A; Arikan, S

    2002-10-01

    The in vitro activity of fluconazole and Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil was evaluated against 99 vaginal Candida strains by the broth microdilution and disc diffusion methods. The microdilution method was performed in accordance with NCCLS-M27A guidelines. An investigational method was used for the disc diffusion test. Fluconazole and tea tree oil minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) obtained at 48 h tended to increase 1- to 2-fold or remain the same compared to 24 h readings for most of the isolates tested. C. krusei and C. norvegensis had significantly higher MICs and smaller inhibition zones for fluconazole compared to other species. Tea tree oil MICs were found to be similar, in general, for all Candida spp. tested. The geometric mean MIC of tea tree oil for all isolates was 2.2% (range, 0.25-4%) at 24 h and 3.0% (range, 1-8%) at 48 h. Tea tree oil mean inhibition zone diameter was 24 mm (range, 14-42 mm) at 24 h and 15.8 mm (range, 10-35 mm) at 48 h. In vitro activity of tea tree oil against fluconazole-resistant Candida strains was of particular interest. The isolates had similar tea tree oil MICs and inhibition zone diameters regardless of their fluconazole susceptibility profile. Tea tree oil MIC ranges (inhibition zone diameter ranges) were 2-4% (12-21 mm) and 2% (35 mm) at 48 h for C. krusei and C. norvegensis, respectively. These results suggest that tea tree oil MICs of the fluconazole-resistant isolates are comparable to those of fluconazole-susceptible isolates. This in vitro finding is promising for potential use of topical tea tree oil formulations in the treatment of candidiasis due to fluconazole-resistant strains.

  17. Effect of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on the in vitro growth of Candida albicans and its protective effect in an oral candidiasis model.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Sanae A; Hayama, Kazumi; Burton, Jeremy P; Reid, Gregor; Okada, Masashi; Matsushita, Yuji; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is often accompanied by severe inflammation, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of immunosuppressed individuals and elderly people. To develop a new oral therapeutic option for candidiasis, a nonpathogenic commensal oral probiotic microorganism, Streptococcus salivarius K12, was evaluated for its ability to modulate Candida albicans growth in vitro, and its therapeutic activity in an experimental oral candidiasis model was tested. In vitro inhibition of mycelial growth of C. albicans was determined by plate assay and fluorescence microscopy. Addition of S. salivarius K12 to modified RPMI 1640 culture medium inhibited the adherence of C. albicans to the plastic petri dish in a dose-dependent manner. Preculture of S. salivarius K12 potentiated its inhibitory activity for adherence of C. albicans. Interestingly, S. salivarius K12 was not directly fungicidal but appeared to inhibit Candida adhesion to the substratum by preferentially binding to hyphae rather than yeast. To determine the potentially anti-infective attributes of S. salivarius K12 in oral candidiasis, the probiotic was administered to mice with orally induced candidiasis. Oral treatment with S. salivarius K12 significantly protected the mice from severe candidiasis. These findings suggest that S. salivarius K12 may inhibit the process of invasion of C. albicans into mucous surfaces or its adhesion to denture acrylic resins by mechanisms not associated with the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin. S. salivarius K12 may be useful as a probiotic as a protective tool for oral care, especially with regard to candidiasis.

  18. Effect of Streptococcus salivarius K12 on the In Vitro Growth of Candida albicans and Its Protective Effect in an Oral Candidiasis Model

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Kazumi; Burton, Jeremy P.; Reid, Gregor; Okada, Masashi; Matsushita, Yuji; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is often accompanied by severe inflammation, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of immunosuppressed individuals and elderly people. To develop a new oral therapeutic option for candidiasis, a nonpathogenic commensal oral probiotic microorganism, Streptococcus salivarius K12, was evaluated for its ability to modulate Candida albicans growth in vitro, and its therapeutic activity in an experimental oral candidiasis model was tested. In vitro inhibition of mycelial growth of C. albicans was determined by plate assay and fluorescence microscopy. Addition of S. salivarius K12 to modified RPMI 1640 culture medium inhibited the adherence of C. albicans to the plastic petri dish in a dose-dependent manner. Preculture of S. salivarius K12 potentiated its inhibitory activity for adherence of C. albicans. Interestingly, S. salivarius K12 was not directly fungicidal but appeared to inhibit Candida adhesion to the substratum by preferentially binding to hyphae rather than yeast. To determine the potentially anti-infective attributes of S. salivarius K12 in oral candidiasis, the probiotic was administered to mice with orally induced candidiasis. Oral treatment with S. salivarius K12 significantly protected the mice from severe candidiasis. These findings suggest that S. salivarius K12 may inhibit the process of invasion of C. albicans into mucous surfaces or its adhesion to denture acrylic resins by mechanisms not associated with the antimicrobial activity of the bacteriocin. S. salivarius K12 may be useful as a probiotic as a protective tool for oral care, especially with regard to candidiasis. PMID:22267663

  19. In Vitro Analyses of the Effects of Heparin and Parabens on Candida albicans Biofilms and Planktonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Marisa H.; Bernardo, Stella M.; Ku, T. S. Neil; Walraven, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Infections and thromboses are the most common complications associated with central venous catheters. Suggested strategies for prevention and management of these complications include the use of heparin-coated catheters, heparin locks, and antimicrobial lock therapy. However, the effects of heparin on Candida albicans biofilms and planktonic cells have not been previously studied. Therefore, we sought to determine the in vitro effect of a heparin sodium preparation (HP) on biofilms and planktonic cells of C. albicans. Because HP contains two preservatives, methyl paraben (MP) and propyl paraben (PP), these compounds and heparin sodium without preservatives (Pure-H) were also tested individually. The metabolic activity of the mature biofilm after treatment was assessed using XTT [2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction and microscopy. Pure-H, MP, and PP caused up to 75, 85, and 60% reductions of metabolic activity of the mature preformed C. albicans biofilms, respectively. Maximal efficacy against the mature biofilm was observed with HP (up to 90%) compared to the individual compounds (P < 0.0001). Pure-H, MP, and PP each inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation up to 90%. A complete inhibition of biofilm formation was observed with HP at 5,000 U/ml and higher. When tested against planktonic cells, each compound inhibited growth in a dose-dependent manner. These data indicated that HP, MP, PP, and Pure-H have in vitro antifungal activity against C. albicans mature biofilms, formation of biofilms, and planktonic cells. Investigation of high-dose heparin-based strategies (e.g., heparin locks) in combination with traditional antifungal agents for the treatment and/or prevention of C. albicans biofilms is warranted. PMID:21986822

  20. In Vitro Susceptibility and Trailing Growth Effect of Clinical Isolates of Candida Species to Azole Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Bandegani, Azadeh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Pakshir, Keyvan; Alinejhad, Navvab; Poostforoush Fard, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergence of resistance to respective antifungal drugs is a primary concern for the treatment of candidiasis. Hence, determining antifungal susceptibility of the isolated yeasts is of special importance for effective therapy. For this purpose, the clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) has introduced a broth microdilution method to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). However, the so-called “Trailing effect” phenomenon might sometimes pose ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. Objectives: The present study aimed to determine the in vitro susceptibility of clinical isolates of Candida against azoles and the frequency of the Trailing effect. Materials and Methods: A total of 193 Candida isolates were prospectively collected and identified through the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Using a broth microdilution test, according to the guidelines of CLSI M27-A3, antifungal susceptibilities of the isolated yeasts against Fluconazole (FLU), Itraconazole (ITR), Ketoconazole (KET) and Voriconazole (VOR) were assessed. Moreover, trailing growth was determined when a susceptible MIC was incubated for 24 hours, and turned into a resistant one after 48 hours of incubation. Results: Among the tested antifungal drugs in this study, the highest rate of resistance was observed against ITR (28.5%) followed by VOR (26.4%), FLU (20.8%) and KET (1.5%). The trailing effect was induced in 27 isolates (14.0%) by VOR, in 26 isolates (13.5%) by ITR, in 24 isolates (12.4%) by FLU, and in 19 isolates (9.8%) by KET. Conclusions: The monitoring of antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from clinical sources is highly recommended for the efficient management of patients. Moreover, the trailing effect should be taken into consideration once the interpretation of the results is intended. PMID:27127587

  1. [In vitro antifungal resistance in Candida albicans from HIV-infected patients with and without oral candidosis.].

    PubMed

    Ceballos Salobreña, A; Gaitán Cepeda, L A; Orihuela Cañada, F; Olea Barrionuevo, D; Ceballos García, L; Quindós, G

    1999-12-01

    The main purpose of this study has been to determine the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of clinical isolates from HIV-infected or AIDS patients, depending on the presence of oral candidosis. The oral cavity of 307 HIV-infected or AIDS patients was examined and an oral swab was cultured on Sabouraud glucose agar and studied by conventional mycological methods. In vitro antifungal susceptibility to amphotericin B, nystatin, fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole was tested by disk diffusion with Neo-Sensitabs tablets (Rosco Diagnostica, Dinamarca). One hundred and thirty five Candida albicans isolates (91 serotype A, 38 serotype B, three C. albicans variety stellatoidea and three untyped isolates), three Candida krusei and two Candida glabrata were obtained. All the isolates were susceptible to nystatin and amphotericin B. However, 7.9% isolates were resistant to fluconazole and 2.9% isolates were resistant to ketoconazole or itraconazole. Nearly all C. krusei and C. glabrata isolates, 31% patients with candidosis and 20% Candida-colonized patients showed decreased susceptibility to azoles. This study shows that polyenes had a great in vitro efficacy against clinical isolates from HIV-infected patients and that in vitro resistance to azoles is not as high as observed in other countries.

  2. Synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole derivatives and in vitro antifungal evaluation on Candida strains.

    PubMed

    Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G; Cavalcante, Nery N M; Srivastava, Rajendra M; Mendonça Junior, Francisco J B; Wanderley, Almir G; Neves, Rejane P; dos Anjos, Janaína V

    2012-05-16

    1,2,3-Triazoles have been extensively studied as compounds possessing important biological activities. In this work, we describe the synthesis of ten 2-(1-aryl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)propan-2-ols via copper catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAc or click chemistry). Next the in vitro antifungal activity of these ten compounds was evaluated using the microdilution broth method against 42 isolates of four different Candida species. Among all tested compounds, the halogen substituted triazole 2-[1-(4-chlorophenyl)-1H-(1,2,3)triazol-4-yl]propan-2-ol, revealed the best antifungal profile, showing that further modifications could be done in the structure to obtain a better drug candidate in the future.

  3. Chemical characterization by GC-MS and in vitro activity against Candida albicans of volatile fractions prepared from Artemisia dracunculus, Artemisia abrotanum, Artemisia absinthium and Artemisia vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Obistioiu, Diana; Cristina, Romeo T; Schmerold, Ivo; Chizzola, Remigius; Stolze, Klaus; Nichita, Ileana; Chiurciu, Viorica

    2014-01-29

    A large number of essential oils is reported to have significant activity against Candida albicans. But the different chemical composition influences the degree of their activity. The intention of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and the activity against Candida albicans of volatile oils obtained from Artemisia dracunculus, A. abrotanum, A. absinthium and A. vulgaris (Asteraceae). The aim of the study was to identify new chemical compounds that have effect against C. albicans.The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation or extraction with dichloromethane (a new procedure we developed trying to obtain better, more separated compounds) from air dried above ground plant material and analyzed by GC-MS. Additionally commercial essential oils from the same species were tested. The Candida albicans inhibition studies were carried out by the paper disc diffusion method. The essential oils shared common components but presented differences in composition and showed variable antifungal activity. Davanone and derivatives thereof, compounds with silphiperfolane skeleton, estragole, davanone oil, β-thujone, sabinyl acetate, herniarin, cis-chrysanthenyl acetate, 1,8-cineol, and terpineol were the main components of Artemisia volatiles. Among the volatile fractions tested those from A. abrotanum containing davanone or silphiperfolane derivatives showed the highest antifungal activity. The in vitro tests revealed that the Artemisia oils are promising candidates for further research to develop novel anti-candida drugs.

  4. Chemical characterization by GC-MS and in vitro activity against Candida albicans of volatile fractions prepared from Artemisia dracunculus, Artemisia abrotanum, Artemisia absinthium and Artemisia vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A large number of essential oils is reported to have significant activity against Candida albicans. But the different chemical composition influences the degree of their activity. The intention of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and the activity against Candida albicans of volatile oils obtained from Artemisia dracunculus, A. abrotanum, A. absinthium and A. vulgaris (Asteraceae). The aim of the study was to identify new chemical compounds that have effect against C. albicans. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation or extraction with dichloromethane (a new procedure we developed trying to obtain better, more separated compounds) from air dried above ground plant material and analyzed by GC-MS. Additionally commercial essential oils from the same species were tested. The Candida albicans inhibition studies were carried out by the paper disc diffusion method. Results The essential oils shared common components but presented differences in composition and showed variable antifungal activity. Davanone and derivatives thereof, compounds with silphiperfolane skeleton, estragole, davanone oil, β-thujone, sabinyl acetate, herniarin, cis-chrysanthenyl acetate, 1,8-cineol, and terpineol were the main components of Artemisia volatiles. Conclusions Among the volatile fractions tested those from A. abrotanum containing davanone or silphiperfolane derivatives showed the highest antifungal activity. The in vitro tests revealed that the Artemisia oils are promising candidates for further research to develop novel anti-candida drugs. PMID:24475951

  5. Glycerol inhibition of ruminal lipolysis in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Supplemental glycerol inhibits rumen lipolysis, a prerequisite for rumen biohydrogenation, which is responsible for the saturation of dietary fatty acids consumed by ruminant animals. Feeding excess glycerol, however, adversely affects dry matter digestibility. To more clearly define the effect of...

  6. In vitro interaction between amphotericin B and azoles in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, J A; Arganoza, M T; Vaishampayan, J K; Akins, R A

    1996-01-01

    The use of azole prophylaxis as a measure to prevent invasive fungal infections in high-risk patients is increasing and is now the standard of care in many institutions. Previous studies disagree on whether preexposure of Candida albicans to azoles affects their subsequent susceptibility to amphotericin B (AmB). The present in vitro study indicates that azole exposure generates a subpopulation of cells that are not affected by subsequent exposure to AmB. These cells that are phenotypically resistant to AmB tolerated by most cells not exposed to azole. The percentage of cells that convert to phenotypic resistance to AmB varies with the concentration and the azole. Itraconazole is more effective than fluconazole in generating cells that are phenotypically resistant to AmB and that tolerate an otherwise lethal transient exposure to AmB. Until cells that are not exposed to fluconazole are simultaneously challenged with AmB, they are not protected to a significant extent from killing by AmB. Cells that are challenged with continuous exposure to AmB also acquire phenotypic resistance to AmB at increased frequencies by azole preexposure, but this requires that the azole be continuously present during incubation with AmB. In addition, Candida cells taken from mature colonies that are not actively growing are not susceptible to the short-term killing effects of AmB without azole preexposure. The adaptive responses of C. albicans to AmB and potentially other antifungal agents that may result from prior exposure to azoles in vitro or potentially in microenvironments in vivo that induce physiological changes may have major clinical implications. PMID:8913455

  7. Xylitol inhibits carcinogenic acetaldehyde production by Candida species.

    PubMed

    Uittamo, Johanna; Nieminen, Mikko T; Kaihovaara, Pertti; Bowyer, Paul; Salaspuro, Mikko; Rautemaa, Riina

    2011-10-15

    Acetaldehyde is a highly toxic and mutagenic product of alcohol fermentation and metabolism which has been classified as a Class I carcinogen for humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer of the World Health Organisation (WHO). Many Candida species representing oral microbiota have been shown to be capable of marked acetaldehyde production. The aim of our study was to examine the effects of various sugar alcohols and sugars on microbial acetaldehyde production. The study hypothesis was that xylitol could reduce the amount of acetaldehyde produced by Candida. Laboratory and clinical isolates of seven Candida species were selected for the study. The isolates were incubated in 12 mM ethanol and 110 mM glucose, fructose or xylitol at 37°C for 30 min and the formed acetaldehyde was measured by gas chromatography. Xylitol significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced the amount of acetaldehyde produced from ethanol by 84%. In the absence of xylitol, the mean acetaldehyde production in ethanol incubation was 220.5 μM and in ethanol-xylitol incubation 32.8 μM. This was found to be mediated by inhibition of the alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme activity. Coincubation with glucose reduced the amount of produced acetaldehyde by 23% and coincubation with fructose by 29%. At concentrations that are representative of those found in the oral cavity during the intake of proprietary xylitol products, xylitol was found to reduce the production of carcinogenic acetaldehyde from ethanol by Candida below the mutagenic level of 40-100 μM.

  8. Resveratrol inhibits periodontal pathogens in vitro.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, D J; Wong, R W K; Rabie, A B M

    2011-11-01

    The gram-negative anaerobic bacteria A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and P. gingivalis (Pg) are key components in the aetiology of periodontal disease, and associated hard-tissue destruction. Resveratrol is a phytoalexin, produced naturally by several plants when under attack by bacterial or fungal pathogens. It is found in many foods including mulberries, peanuts and the skin of labrusca and muscadine grapes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on the in vitro growth of periodontal pathogens Aa and Pg. For comparison, resveratrol's effect on a variety of other oral microorganisms was also evaluated. Resveratrol demonstrates a poor solubility in water, thus different concentrations of resveratrol in the solvent dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) were added to calibrated suspensions of Aa and Pg. As a control, a parallel series of dilutions containing the vehicle DMSO alone was made to measure the effect of the solvent. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of the periodontal pathogens were calculated. All suspensions were incubated for 1, 3, 6 and 24 h in an anaerobic chamber at 37 °C. At each time interval, selected dilutions from each culture broth were plated on blood agar plates. Colonies appearing on blood agar plates were visually counted at 3 days for Aa, and at 5 days for Pg. The periodontal bacteria showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in viable counts after 1 h, whilst no colony forming units could be observed after 24 h. The results suggest that resveratrol possesses significant antimicrobial properties on periodontal pathogens in vitro. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus inhibits virulence factors and promotes metabolic changes in Candida yeast.

    PubMed

    El Assal, Flávio Ezeddinne; Paula, Joelma Abadia Marciano; Capeletti, Leonardo Silva; Abrão, Fernando Yano; Ataídes, Fábio Silvestre; Sá, Fabyola Amaral da Silva; Costa, Carolina Rodrigues; Fernandes, Orionalda de Fátima Lisboa; Souza, Lúcia Kioko Hasimoto; Silva, Maria do Rosario Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    This is the first study to examine the in vitro susceptibility and the expression of virulence factors in Candida species in the presence of Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus (Gomes) L.R. Landrum (Myrtaceae), a Brazilian plant known as paucravo. Additionally, the mechanisms of action of the crude ethanol extract and the ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions of this plant were investigated. The in vitro susceptibility of Candida was tested using the broth microdilution method, whereas an XTT reduction assay was used for biofilms. Adherence was determined by counting the number of yeast cells that adhered to 100 oral epithelial cells, and hyphal formation was verified in the hyphal induction medium M199. Flow cytometry with propidium iodide and FUN-1 was performed to assess the mechanism of action. The results revealed that the crude ethanol extract and the ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions of P. pseudocaryophyllus inhibited the growth of Candida isolates at a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 64 to 256 µg/mL, whereas the 50% sessile minimal inhibitory concentration (SMIC50) ranged from 512 to >1,024 µg/mL. Adherence and hyphal formation were significantly reduced in the presence of the crude ethanol extract and both fractions. Although cell membrane injury was detected, the predominant mechanism of action appeared to be the alteration of yeast metabolism, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. Our results indicated that antifungal activity reduced the expression of virulence factors in yeast via the alteration of yeast metabolism, suggesting that the crude extract of P. pseudocaryophyllus and its fractions may contain novel antifungal agents.

  10. In vitro activity of tea tree oil against Candida albicans mycelial conversion and other pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    D'Auria, F D; Laino, L; Strippoli, V; Tecca, M; Salvatore, G; Battinelli, L; Mazzanti, G

    2001-08-01

    The antifungal activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Maiden (Myrtaceae) essential oil against yeasts (Candida spp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Debaryomyces hansenii) and dermatophytes (Microsporum spp. and Tricophyton spp.) is reported. We focused on the ability of tea tree oil to inhibit Candida albicans conversion from the yeast to the pathogenic mycelial form. Moreover we carried out broth microdilution test and contact tests to evaluate the killing time. M. alternifolia essential oil inhibited the conversion of C. albicans from yeast to the mycelial form at a concentration of 0.16% (v/v). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranged from 0.12% to 0.50% (v/v) for yeasts and 0.12% to 1% (v/v) for dermatophytes; the cytocidal activity was generally expressed at the same concentration. These results, if considered along with the lipophilic nature of the oil which enables it to penetrate the skin, suggest it may be suitable for topical therapeutic use in the treatment of fungal mucosal and cutaneous infections.

  11. A novel renal epithelial cell in vitro assay to assess Candida albicans virulence.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Edina K; Maccallum, Donna M

    2014-02-15

    Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, can cause severe systemic infections in susceptible patient groups. Systemic candidiasis is mainly studied in the mouse intravenous challenge model, where progressive infection correlates with increased early renal chemokine levels. To develop a new in vitro assay to assess C. albicans virulence, which reflects the events occurring in the murine infection model, renal M-1 cortical collecting duct epithelial cells were evaluated as the early producers of cytokines in response to C. albicans. We show that renal epithelial cells respond only to live C. albicans cells capable of forming hyphae, producing chemokines KC and MIP-2, with levels correlating with epithelial cell damage. By assaying epithelial cell responses to strains of known virulence in the murine intravenous challenge model we demonstrate that renal epithelial cells can discriminate between virulent and attenuated strains. This simple, novel assay is a useful initial screen for altered virulence of C. albicans mutants or clinical isolates in vitro and provides an alternative to the mouse systemic infection model.

  12. Efficient association of in vitro translation products with purified stable Candida tropicalis peroxisomes.

    PubMed Central

    Small, G M; Imanaka, T; Shio, H; Lazarow, P B

    1987-01-01

    Newly synthesized peroxisomal proteins enter preexisting peroxisomes posttranslationally in vivo, generally without proteolytic processing. An efficient reconstitution of this process in vitro together with cloned DNAs for peroxisomal proteins would make possible investigation of the molecular information that targets proteins to peroxisomes. We have previously reported the isolation of clones for Candida tropicalis peroxisomal proteins; here we describe the association (and possible import) of peroxisomal proteins with peroxisomes in vitro. C. tropicalis was grown in a medium containing Brij 35, resulting in the induction of a moderate number of medium-sized peroxisomes. These peroxisomes, isolated in a sucrose gradient, had a catalase latency of 54% and were sufficiently stable to be concentrated and used in an import assay. The reticulocyte lysate translation products of total RNA from oleate-grown cells were incubated with the peroxisomes at 26 degrees C in the presence of 50 mM KCl, protease inhibitors, 0.5 M sucrose, 2.5 mM MOPS (morpholinepropanesulfonic acid) (pH 7.2), and 0.5 mM EDTA. Ten major translation products (which could be immunoprecipitated with antiserum against peroxisomal protein) became progressively associated with the peroxisomes during the first 30 min of incubation (some up to approximately 70%). These include acyl coenzyme A oxidase and the trifunctional protein hydratase-dehydrogenase-epimerase. This association did not occur at 4 degrees C nor did it occur if the peroxisomes were replaced with mitochondria. Images PMID:3600648

  13. Disinfection of flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopes after in vitro contamination with Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dennis; Florea, Andrew; Rowe, Mark; Seiberling, Kristin A

    2012-02-01

    To determine the efficacy of various cleaning and disinfective methods in reducing bacterial and fungal load on flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopes (FFLs). In vitro model. Flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopes contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Contamination with S aureus and C albicans was separately induced on FFLs, which were then disinfected with different protocols: 20-, 15-, 10-, and 5-minute soaks in ortho-phthalaldehyde (Cidex OPA; Johnson & Johnson) with or without presoaking in an enzymatic soap solution for 5 minutes; an isolated 5-minute soak in an enzymatic soap solution; a 30-second wipe with antibacterial soap and water; a 30-second wipe with isopropyl alcohol; a 30-second wipe with antibacterial soap, followed by a 30-second scrub with isopropyl alcohol; and a 30-second wipe with germicidal cloth, all accompanied by previous rinsing with 30 seconds of running tap water. All protocols except the isolated 5-minute soak in enzymatic soap solution were successful in completely disinfecting the FFLs after experimental contamination with S aureus or C albicans. Various different cleaning methods appeared to properly disinfect FFLs after inoculation with S aureus and C albicans in an in vitro model.

  14. In vitro antifungal and antibiofilm activities of halogenated quinoline analogues against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ran; Garrison, Aaron T; Basak, Akash; Zhang, Peilan; Huigens, Robert W; Ding, Yousong

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing prevalence of fungal infections coupled with emerging drug resistance, there is an urgent need for new and effective antifungal agents. Here we report the antifungal activities of 19 diverse halogenated quinoline (HQ) small molecules against Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Four HQ analogues inhibited C. albicans growth with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 100 nM, whilst 16 analogues effectively inhibited C. neoformans at MICs of 50-780 nM. Remarkably, two HQ analogues eradicated mature C. albicans and C. neoformans biofilms [minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) = 6.25-62.5 µM]. Several active HQs were found to penetrate into fungal cells, whilst one inactive analogue was unable to, suggesting that HQs elicit their antifungal activities through an intracellular mode of action. HQs are a promising class of small molecules that may be useful in future antifungal treatments.

  15. Candida albicans alters the bacterial microbiome of early in vitro oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Janus, M. M.; Crielaard, W.; Volgenant, C. M. C.; van der Veen, M. H.; Brandt, B. W.; Krom, B. P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The yeast Candida albicans is an oral commensal microorganism, occurring in the oral cavity of 50–70% of healthy individuals. Its effect on oral ecology has mostly been studied using dual-species models, which disregards the complex nature of oral biofilms. The aim of this study was to culture C. albicans in a complex model to study its effect on oral biofilms. Biofilms, inoculated using pooled stimulated saliva with or without addition of C. albicans, were grown under anaerobic, aerobic, or aerobic +5% CO2 conditions. Red autofluorescence was quantified using a spectrophotometer and visualized in fluorescence photographs. The microbiome of 5 h biofilms was determined using 16S rDNA sequencing. C. albicans was only able to proliferate in biofilms grown under aerobic conditions. After 48 h, C. albicans did not induce differences in total biofilm formation, lactic acid accumulation (cariogenic phenotype) or protease activity (periodontitis phenotype). In vitro, anaerobically grown biofilms developed red autofluorescence, irrespective of inoculum. However, under aerobic conditions, only C. albicans–containing biofilms showed red autofluorescence. Facultative or strict anaerobic Veillonella, Prevotella, Leptotrichia, and Fusobacterium genera were significantly more abundant in biofilms with C. albicans. Biofilms without C. albicans contained more of the aerobic and facultative anaerobic genera Neisseria, Rothia, and Streptococcus. The presence of C. albicans alters the bacterial microbiome in early in vitro oral biofilms, resulting in the presence of strictly anaerobic bacteria under oxygen-rich conditions. This in vitro study illustrates that C. albicans should not be disregarded in healthy oral ecosystems, as it has the potential to influence bacteria significantly. PMID:28326152

  16. Effects of Candida norvegensis Live Cells on In vitro Oat Straw Rumen Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Oscar; Castillo, Yamicela; Arzola, Claudio; Burrola, Eduviges; Salinas, Jaime; Corral, Agustín; Hume, Michael E.; Murillo, Manuel; Itza, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Candida norvegensis (C. norvegensis) viable yeast culture on in vitro ruminal fermentation of oat straw. Ruminal fluid was mixed with buffer solution (1:2) and anaerobically incubated with or without yeast at 39°C for 0, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h. A fully randomized design was used. There was a decrease in lactic acid (quadratic, p = 0.01), pH, (quadratic, p = 0.02), and yeasts counts (linear, p<0.01) across fermentation times. However, in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) and ammonia-N increased across fermentation times (quadratic; p<0.01 and p<0.02, respectively). Addition of yeast cells caused a decrease in pH values compared over all fermentation times (p<0.01), and lactic acid decreased at 12 h (p = 0.05). Meanwhile, yeast counts increased (p = 0.01) at 12 h. C. norvegensis increased ammonia-N at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01), and IVDMD of oat straw increased at 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01) of fermentation. Yeast cells increased acetate (p<0.01), propionate (p<0.03), and butyrate (p<0.03) at 8 h, while valeriate and isovaleriate increased at 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01). The yeast did not affect cellulolytic bacteria (p = 0.05), but cellulolytic fungi increased at 4 and 8 h (p<0.01), whereas production of methane decreased (p<0.01) at 8 h. It is concluded that addition of C. norvegensis to in vitro oat straw fermentation increased ruminal fermentation parameters as well as microbial growth with reduction of methane production. Additionally, yeast inoculum also improved IVDMD. PMID:26732446

  17. Effects of Candida norvegensis Live Cells on In vitro Oat Straw Rumen Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Oscar; Castillo, Yamicela; Arzola, Claudio; Burrola, Eduviges; Salinas, Jaime; Corral, Agustín; Hume, Michael E; Murillo, Manuel; Itza, Mateo

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of Candida norvegensis (C. norvegensis) viable yeast culture on in vitro ruminal fermentation of oat straw. Ruminal fluid was mixed with buffer solution (1:2) and anaerobically incubated with or without yeast at 39°C for 0, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h. A fully randomized design was used. There was a decrease in lactic acid (quadratic, p = 0.01), pH, (quadratic, p = 0.02), and yeasts counts (linear, p<0.01) across fermentation times. However, in vitro dry matter disappearance (IVDMD) and ammonia-N increased across fermentation times (quadratic; p<0.01 and p<0.02, respectively). Addition of yeast cells caused a decrease in pH values compared over all fermentation times (p<0.01), and lactic acid decreased at 12 h (p = 0.05). Meanwhile, yeast counts increased (p = 0.01) at 12 h. C. norvegensis increased ammonia-N at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01), and IVDMD of oat straw increased at 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01) of fermentation. Yeast cells increased acetate (p<0.01), propionate (p<0.03), and butyrate (p<0.03) at 8 h, while valeriate and isovaleriate increased at 8, 12, and 24 h (p<0.01). The yeast did not affect cellulolytic bacteria (p = 0.05), but cellulolytic fungi increased at 4 and 8 h (p<0.01), whereas production of methane decreased (p<0.01) at 8 h. It is concluded that addition of C. norvegensis to in vitro oat straw fermentation increased ruminal fermentation parameters as well as microbial growth with reduction of methane production. Additionally, yeast inoculum also improved IVDMD.

  18. Skin surface lipids inhibit adherence of Candida albicans to stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Law, S; Fotos, P G; Wertz, P W

    1997-01-01

    Candida albicans (CA) infections represent a significant threat to the health of immunocompromised individuals. The initial step in the establishment of a CA infection is adherence of the organism to an epithelial surface. An in vitro model for studies on adherence of CA to keratinized surfaces has been developed and used to test the hypothesis that specific lipids can modulate adherence of this organism. Porcine stratum corneum (SC) disks were incubated with candidal suspensions, after which unattached cells were washed away. Adherent cells were stained and counted using light microscopy. Attachment of three pathogenic CA isolates was significantly greater than attachment of commensal strains of either CA or Candida parapsilosis. Removal of lipid from the SC lead to a doubling of the number of adherent organisms, whereas additional skin lipid inhibited adherence. Squalene, wax esters, cholesterol esters and triglycerides had no effect on adherence, but fatty acids, sterols and ceramides inhibited adherence significantly. Specific epithelial lipids can modulate adherence of CA to keratinized epithelial surfaces.

  19. Inhibition of Candida albicans virulence factors by novel levofloxacin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shafreen, Raja Mohamed Beema; Raja Mohamed, Beema Shafreen; Muthamil, Subramanian; Subramanian, Muthamil; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Shunmugiah, Karutha Pandian

    2014-08-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen, responsible for biofilm associated infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antibiofilm properties of novel levofloxacin derivatives on C. albicans biofilms. The levofloxacin derivatives at their Biofilm Inhibitory Concentrations (BIC) were able to inhibit the biofilms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphal transition and were also able to disrupt their mature biofilms. Furthermore, Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene (ERG11) and the efflux pump-encoding genes (CDR1 and MDR1) was decreased upon treatment with the levofloxacin derivatives. The total ergosterol content quantified using UV spectrophotomer showed decrease in ergosterol in the presence of levofloxacin derivatives. Overall, levofloxacin derivatives (6a, 6c and 7d) are capable of inhibiting C. albicans virulence factors. Therefore, these compounds with potential therapeutic implications can be used as new strategy to treat biofilm-related candidal infections.

  20. In vitro sensitivity of Candida spp. to hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether-mediated photodynamic inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yucheng; Wang, Ying; Wu, Sumin; Gu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Background: An increasing prevalence of Candida infections has emerged with the wide use of immune-suppressants and antibiotics. Current antifungal drugs exhibit low efficiency and high toxicity to the normal organs. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) provides an alternative therapeutic strategy involving the use of photosensitizer (PS) and light irradiation. This study evaluated PDI effects against strains of C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei and C. glabrata, using the PS of hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), which is a second-generation PS clinically approved in China. Methods: Suspensions (~106 CFU/ml) were incubated with seven HMME concentrations (0.25~50 μM) for 30 min followed by 532-nm laser irradiation for 10 min at 40 mW/cm2. Viability of cells was assayed by CFU counting. Furthermore, fetal calf serum (10%) and singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide (100mM) were respectively added to the suspension of C. krusei to evaluate their roles in PDI process. Results: Among the four species, C. albicans was the most sensitive to PDI; 4 log10 killing was achieved at the concentration of 7.5 μM. C. glabrata was the most resistant; 3 log10 killing was not obtained even at PS concentration of 50 μM. PDI effects against C. krusei were inhibited by both serum and sodium azide. Conclusions: HMME-mediated PDI was able to effectively kill Candida in our experimental conditions, mainly through a Type Ⅱ photoprocess. However, the effects could be intensively reversed by the presence of serum. Thus, there might be a long way before HMME can be used in fighting against Candida in real infectious foci.

  1. Characterization of In Vitro Resistance Development to the Novel Echinocandin CD101 in Candida Species.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Almaguer, Amanda L; Zuill, Douglas E; Bartizal, Ken

    2016-10-01

    CD101 is a novel echinocandin with a long half-life undergoing clinical development for treatment of candidemia/invasive candidiasis and vulvovaginal candidiasis. The potential for and mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to CD101 in Candida species were investigated by using spontaneous resistance and serial passage selection methodologies. Four Candida spp. (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei) were chosen for resistance characterization with CD101, anidulafungin, and caspofungin. The frequency of spontaneous, single-step mutations conferring reduced susceptibility to CD101 at 1× the agar growth inhibition concentration was low across all species, with median frequencies ranging from 1.35 × 10(-8) to 3.86 × 10(-9), similar to ranges generated for anidulafungin and caspofungin. Serial passage of Candida spp. on agar plates containing drug gradients demonstrated a low potential for resistance development, with passage 20 CD101-selected strains possessing increases in MICs equivalent to or lower than those for the majority of strains generated under selection with anidulafungin and caspofungin. A total of 12 fks "hot spot" mutations were identified, typically in strains with the highest MIC shifts. Cross-resistance was broadly observed among the 3 echinocandins evaluated, with no CD101-selected mutants (with or without fks hot spot mutations) exhibiting reduced susceptibility to CD101 but not also to anidulafungin and/or caspofungin. Consistent with currently approved echinocandins, CD101 demonstrates a low potential for resistance development, which could be further enhanced in vivo by the high maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax)/area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) plasma drug exposure achieved with once-weekly dosing of CD101. Copyright © 2016 Locke et al.

  2. Characterization of In Vitro Resistance Development to the Novel Echinocandin CD101 in Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Almaguer, Amanda L.; Zuill, Douglas E.; Bartizal, Ken

    2016-01-01

    CD101 is a novel echinocandin with a long half-life undergoing clinical development for treatment of candidemia/invasive candidiasis and vulvovaginal candidiasis. The potential for and mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to CD101 in Candida species were investigated by using spontaneous resistance and serial passage selection methodologies. Four Candida spp. (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei) were chosen for resistance characterization with CD101, anidulafungin, and caspofungin. The frequency of spontaneous, single-step mutations conferring reduced susceptibility to CD101 at 1× the agar growth inhibition concentration was low across all species, with median frequencies ranging from 1.35 × 10−8 to 3.86 × 10−9, similar to ranges generated for anidulafungin and caspofungin. Serial passage of Candida spp. on agar plates containing drug gradients demonstrated a low potential for resistance development, with passage 20 CD101-selected strains possessing increases in MICs equivalent to or lower than those for the majority of strains generated under selection with anidulafungin and caspofungin. A total of 12 fks “hot spot” mutations were identified, typically in strains with the highest MIC shifts. Cross-resistance was broadly observed among the 3 echinocandins evaluated, with no CD101-selected mutants (with or without fks hot spot mutations) exhibiting reduced susceptibility to CD101 but not also to anidulafungin and/or caspofungin. Consistent with currently approved echinocandins, CD101 demonstrates a low potential for resistance development, which could be further enhanced in vivo by the high maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax)/area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) plasma drug exposure achieved with once-weekly dosing of CD101. PMID:27480852

  3. In Vitro Fungicidal Activities of Anidulafungin, Caspofungin, and Micafungin against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis Evaluated by Time-Kill Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Cantón, Emilia; Eraso, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin killing activities against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis were evaluated by the time-kill methodology. The concentrations assayed were 0.06, 0.125, and 0.5 μg/ml, which are achieved in serum. Anidulafungin and micafungin required between 13 and 26 h to reach the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% killing) against C. glabrata and C. bracarensis. All echinocandins were less active against C. nivariensis. PMID:25801575

  4. In vitro activity of xanthorrhizol against Candida glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Han, Sunghwa; Yong, Dongeun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    The formation of Candida biofilms has important clinical ramifications, because these biofilms exhibit increased resistance to conventional antifungal therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity of xanthorrhizol on biofilms produced by non-C. albicans Candida (NCAC) species, including C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis. NCAC biofilms were generated in flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates and quantified using the XTT (2, 3 - bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide) reduction assay. The NCAC biofilms at adherent, intermediate, and mature growth phases were treated with 0.5-512 μg/ml of xanthorrhizol for 24 h. The ranges of sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) of xanthorrhizol against C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms were 8-32 μg/ml, 8-16 μg/ml, and 8-64 μg/ml, respectively. Xanthorrhizol affected cell density that had an indirect effect on the biofilm OD(490). The compound eradicated the viable cells of the C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis biofilms at the adherent growth phase at 16 μg/ml and that of C. guilliermondii at 8 μg/ml. Treatment with 128 μg/ml of xanthorrhizol reduced the OD(490) of C. glabrata, C. guilliermondii, and C. parapsilosis biofilms at the mature growth phase by 77.8%, 88.5%, and 64.5%, respectively. These results indicate that xanthorrhizol exhibits potent activity against NCAC biofilms in vitro. Therefore, xanthorrhizol has potential therapeutic value in treating biofilm-associated NCAC infections and should be further evaluated in vivo.

  5. Lactobacillus fermentum ATCC 23271 Displays In vitro Inhibitory Activities against Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo, Monique S.; Noronha, Francisca M. F.; Arruda, Mariana O.; Costa, Ênnio P. da Silva; Bomfim, Maria R. Q.; Monteiro, Andrea S.; Ferro, Thiago A. F.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.; Girón, Jorge A.; Monteiro-Neto, Valério

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli are involved in the microbial homeostasis in the female genital tract. Due to the high prevalence of many bacterial diseases of the female genital tract and the resistance of microorganisms to various antimicrobial agents, alternative means to control these infections are necessary. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the probiotic properties of well-characterized Lactobacillus species, including L. acidophilus (ATCC 4356), L. brevis (ATCC 367), L. delbrueckii ssp. delbrueckii (ATCC 9645), L. fermentum (ATCC 23271), L. paracasei (ATCC 335), L. plantarum (ATCC 8014), and L. rhamnosus (ATCC 9595), against Candida albicans (ATCC 18804), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (ATCC 9826), and Streptococcus agalactiae (ATCC 13813). The probiotic potential was investigated by using the following criteria: (i) adhesion to host epithelial cells and mucus, (ii) biofilm formation, (iii) co-aggregation with bacterial pathogens, (iv) inhibition of pathogen adhesion to mucus and HeLa cells, and (v) antimicrobial activity. Tested lactobacilli adhered to mucin, co-aggregated with all genital microorganisms, and displayed antimicrobial activity. With the exception of L. acidophilus and L. paracasei, they adhered to HeLa cells. However, only L. fermentum produced a moderate biofilm and a higher level of co-aggregation and mucin binding. The displacement assay demonstrated that all Lactobacillus strains inhibit C. albicans binding to mucin (p < 0.001), likely due to the production of substances with antimicrobial activity. Clinical isolates belonging to the most common Candida species associated to vaginal candidiasis were inhibited by L. fermentum. Collectively, our data suggest that L. fermentum ATCC 23271 is a potential probiotic candidate, particularly to complement candidiasis treatment, since presented with the best probiotic profile in comparison with the other tested lactobacilli strains. PMID:27833605

  6. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inhibits Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Endang W; Bachtiar, Boy M; Jarosz, Lucja M; Amir, Lisa R; Sunarto, Hari; Ganin, Hadas; Meijler, Michael M; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2014-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2), synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  7. Dectin-1 mediates in vitro phagocytosis of Candida albicans yeast cells by retinal microglia.

    PubMed

    Maneu, Victoria; Yáñez, Alberto; Murciano, Celia; Molina, Andrés; Gil, María Luisa; Gozalbo, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the expression of TLR2 and Dectin-1 in retinal microglia and their involvement in Candida albicans phagocytosis using a cytometric approach. The expression of both receptors has been demonstrated in CD11b(+) retinal cells. Phagocytosis of pHrodo-labelled C. albicans yeasts by microglial CD11b(+) cells of C57BL/6 mice was inhibited both by the Dectin-1 antagonist laminarin and anti-Dectin-1 antibodies, whereas phagocytosis of yeasts by retinal microglia of TLR2 KO mice was unaffected. These data indicate that phagocytosis of C. albicans yeasts by retinal microglia is mediated by Dectin-1, whereas TLR2 does not play a significant role in this process.

  8. Studying the Prevalence, Species Distribution, and Detection of In vitro Production of Phospholipase from Candida Isolated from Cases of Invasive Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Yukti; Chumber, Susheel Kumar; Kaur, Mandeep

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aim: Candida spp. have emerged as successful pathogens both in invasive and mucosal infections. C. albicans is the sixth cause of most common nosocomial infections according to studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A shift toward non-albicans species has been reported. There is a dearth of knowledge regarding the virulence factors of Candida, especially from this part of India. The aim was to study the prevalence of Candida, speciate, and determine antifungal sensitivity along with the detection of in vitro production of phospholipases in 100 Candida isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 Candida isolates from various clinical specimens were studied (February 1, 2015–May 31, 2015; 4 months). Speciation was done by conventional methods and antifungal drugs fluconazole and voriconazole tested. Phospholipase activity (Pz value) was determined. Results: Of the 100 Candida spp., 35% were C. albicans and 65% were nonalbicans Candida (NAC). Species spectrum was of the 100 isolates as follows: 35 were C. albicans, 17 Candida tropicalis, 6 Candida glabrata, 8 Candida guilliermondi, 1 Candida kefyr, 6 Candida krusei, 14 Candida parapsilosis, 2 Candida lusitaniae, and 1 Trichosporon and 10 Candida spp. (not speciated). Phospholipase production was seen in 81 (81%) of the total isolates. The majority (63%) of phospholipase producers were NAC. Among NAC spp., the maximum phospholipase activity was seen in C. tropicalis (30%) and C. parapsilosis (24%). Of these, 60% of Candida was from patients admitted to the hospital. Sensitivity rates of C. albicans for fluconazole and voriconazole were 89.5% and 90.5%, respectively. Conclusion: Increasing usage of devices, total parenteral nutrition, broad-spectrum antibiotics, chemotherapies, and transplantation are factors contributing to the increase of candidal infections. Recent studies underline the increasing frequency of infections by NAC. The present study showcases the increased

  9. Gymnemic Acids Inhibit Hyphal Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  10. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine.

  11. In vivo and in vitro acquisition of resistance to voriconazole by Candida krusei.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Elisabete; Miranda, Isabel M; Faria-Ramos, Isabel; Silva, Raquel M; Rodrigues, Acácio Gonçalves; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2014-08-01

    Candida krusei is an important agent of opportunistic infections that often displays resistance to several antifungals. We describe here the in vivo acquisition of resistance to voriconazole (VRC) by C. krusei isolates recovered from a leukemia patient during a long period of VRC therapy. In order to mimic the in vivo development of VRC resistance, a susceptible C. krusei isolate was exposed daily to 1 μg/ml of VRC in vitro. Interestingly, after 5 days of exposure to VRC, a MIC of 4 μg/ml was achieved; this value remained constant after 25 additional days of treatment with VRC and also after 30 consecutive days of incubation in VRC-free medium. Our objective was to determine the associated molecular resistance mechanisms, such as expression of efflux pump genes and ERG11 gene mutations, among the resistant strains. Synergistic effects between the efflux blocker tacrolimus (FK506) and VRC were found in all of the resistant strains. Moreover, ABC1 gene expression increased over time in both the in vivo- and in vitro-induced resistant strains, in contrast to the ABC2 and ERG11 genes, whose expression was invariably lower and constant. ERG11 gene sequencing showed two different types of mutations, i.e., heterozygosity at T1389T/C, corresponding to synonymous mutations, in C. krusei strains and a missense mutation at position T418C, resulting in a change from Tyr to His, among resistant C. krusei clinical isolates. This study highlights the relevance of ATP-dependent efflux pump (namely, Abc1p) activity in VRC resistance and describes new mutations in the ERG11 gene among resistant C. krusei clinical isolates.

  12. Therapies against murine Candida guilliermondii infection, relationship between in vitro antifungal pharmacodynamics and outcome.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Katihuska; Pastor, Francisco Javier; Capilla, Javier; Sutton, Deanna A; Mayayo, Emilio; Fothergill, Annette W; Guarro, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Candida guilliermondii has been recognized as an emerging pathogen showing a decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and considerably high echinocandin MICs. Evaluate the in vitro activity of anidulafungin in comparison to amphotericin B and fluconazole against different isolates of C. guilliermondii, and their efficacy in an immunosuppressed murine model of disseminated infection. The in vitro susceptibility of four strains against amphotericin B, fluconazole and anidulafungin was performed by using a reference broth microdilution method and time-kill curves. The in vivo efficacy was evaluated by determination of fungal load reduction in kidneys of infected animals receiving deoxycholate AMB at 0,8 mg/kg i.v., liposomal amphotericin B at 10 mg/kg i.v., fluconazole at 50 mg/kg, or anidulafungin at 10 mg/kg. Amphotericin B and anidulafungin showed fungicidal activity, while fluconazole was fungistatic for all the strains. In the murine model, liposomal amphotericin B at 10 mg/kg/day was effective in reducing the tissue burden in kidneys of mice infected with any of the tested strains. However, amphotericin B, anidulafungin and fluconazole were only effective against those strains showing low MIC values. Liposomal amphotericin B showed the higher activity and efficacy against the two strains of C. guilliermondii, in contrast to the poor effect of fluconazole and anidulafungin. Further studies with more isolates of C. guilliermondii representing a wider range of MICs should be carried out to assess whether there is any relationship between MIC values and anidulafungin efficacy. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro synergy of pseudolaric acid B and fluconazole against clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Na; Ling, Guanghui; Liang, Xiaoying; Jin, Jing; Fan, Junwen; Qiu, Jiazhang; Song, Yu; Huang, Ning; Wu, Xiuping; Wang, Xuelin; Deng, Xuming; Deng, Xuliang; Yu, Lu

    2011-09-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen in humans. The emergence of resistance to azole antifungals has raised the issue of using such antifungals in combination to optimise therapeutic outcome. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro synergy of pseudolaric acid B (PAB) and fluconazole (FLC) against clinical isolates of C. albicans. The in vitro antifungal activity of PAB, a diterpene acid from Pseudolarix kaempferi Gordon, was evaluated alone and in combination with FLC against 22 FLC-resistant (FLC-R) and 12 FLC-susceptible (FLC-S) C. albicans using the chequerboard microdilution method and time-killing test assays. Synergism was observed in all 22 (100%) FLC-R strains tested as determined by both fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) with values ranging from 0.02 to 0.13 and bliss independence (BI) models. Synergism was observed in two of 12 (17%) FLC-S strains as determined by FICI model with values ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 and in three of 12 (18%) FLC-S strains as determined by BI model. For FLC-R strains, the drug concentrations of FLC and PAB, where synergistic interactions were found, ranged from 0.06 to 4 μg ml(-1) and 0.5 to 4 μg ml(-1) respectively. For FLC-S strains, the drug concentrations of FLC and PAB were 1-8 μg ml(-1) and 0.5-4 μg ml(-1) respectively. The BI model gave results consistent with FICI, but no antagonistic activity was observed in any of the strains tested. These interactions between PAB and FLC were confirmed using the time-killing test for the selected strains. Fluconazole and PAB exhibited a good synergism against azole-R isolates of C. albicans. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. In Vitro Activities of Six Antifungal Drugs Against Candida glabrata Isolates: An Emerging Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Amirrajab, Nasrin; Badali, Hamid; Didehdar, Mojtaba; Afsarian, Mohammad Hosein; Mohammadi, Rasoul; Lotfi, Nazanin; Shokohi, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Background Candida glabrata is a pathogenic yeast with several unique biological features and associated with an increased incidence rate of candidiasis. It exhibits a great degree of variation in its pathogenicity and antifungal susceptibility. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibilities of the following six antifungal drugs against clinical C. glabrata strains: amphotericin B (AmB), ketoconazole (KTZ), fluconazole (FCZ), itraconazole (ITZ), voriconazole (VCZ), and caspofungin (CASP). Materials and Methods Forty clinical C. glabrata strains were investigated using DNA sequencing. The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined as described in clinical laboratory standard institute (CLSI) documents (M27-A3 and M27-S4). Results The sequence analysis of the isolate confirmed as C. glabrata and deposited on NCBI GenBank under the accession number no. KT763084-KT763123. The geometric mean MICs against all the tested strains were as follows, in increasing order: CASP (0.17 g/mL), VCZ (0.67 g/mL), AmB (1.1 g/mL), ITZ (1.82 g/mL), KTZ (1.85 g/mL), and FCZ (6.7 g/mL). The resistance rates of the isolates to CASP, FCZ, ITZ, VZ, KTZ, and AmB were 5%, 10%, 72.5%, 37.5%, 47.5%, and 27.5%, respectively. Conclusions These findings confirm that CASP, compared to the other antifungals, is the potent agent for treating candidiasis caused by C. glabrata. However, the clinical efficacy of these novel antifungals remains to be determined. PMID:27540459

  15. Suppression of polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocyte-mediated inhibition of Candida albicans growth by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Djeu, J.Y.; Parapanios, A.; Halkias, D.; Friedman, H.

    1986-03-05

    This study was an in vitro attempt to identify the effector cells responsible for growth inhibition of the opportunistic fungus, candida albicans, and to determine if THC or another marijuana derivatives, 11-hydroxyTHC, would adversely affect their function. Using a 24h radiolabel assay, the authors found that growth inhibition of C. albicans was primarily mediated by PMN and monocytes that could be isolated normal human peripheral blood. Both effector cell types caused almost complete inhibition of Candida growth at effector/target ratio of 300/1 and inhibition was often still seen at 30/1-. Incubation of PMN, PBL, or monocytes for 1 hr at 37C with THC or 11-hydroxyTHC caused a marked suppression of function in all 3 cell populations. Maximal suppression was obtained with 7.5-10..mu..g/ml of the drugs in medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or with 2-4..mu..g/ml in 1% FBS. These drug concentrations did not affect lymphoid cell viability or candida growth in the absence of lymphoid effector cells. Marijuana derivatives, therefore, are doubly dangerous in that opportunistic fungi such as C. albicans can grow in their presence while the effector cells that control fungal growth are readily inactivated.

  16. Cyclodextrin-functionalized biomaterials loaded with miconazole prevent Candida albicans biofilm formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nava-Ortiz, Cesar A B; Burillo, Guillermina; Concheiro, Angel; Bucio, Emilio; Matthijs, Nele; Nelis, Hans; Coenye, Tom; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2010-04-01

    Polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) were functionalized at their surfaces with cyclodextrins (CDs) in order to prevent the adhesion and proliferation of Candida albicans on medical devices made from these polymers. The surface functionalization involved the grafting of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) after oxidative gamma-ray pre-irradiation, followed by the attachment of beta-CD and HP-beta-CD to PE-g-GMA and PP-g-GMA surfaces. The yield of CD functionalization directly depended on the amount of GMA grafted. The presence of CDs on the surface of the polymers did not compromise their cell compatibility, but remarkably changed their protein adsorption profile. In contrast to unmodified PE and PP that adsorb significant amounts of fibrinogen ( approximately 0.047 mg cm(-2)) but not albumin, the CD-modified polyethers promoted the adsorption of albumin (between 0.015 and 0.155 mg cm(-2)) and reduced the adsorption of fibrinogen. Furthermore, functionalization with CDs provided PE and PP with the capability to incorporate the anti-fungal drug miconazole (up to 0.27 mg cm(-2)), leading to reduced biofilm formation by C. albicans in an in vitro biofilm model system. Overall, the results of the work indicate that the novel approach for functionalization of PE and PP is potentially useful to reduce the likelihood of foreign body-related infections. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Candida albicans RHO1 is required for cell viability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan E; Csank, Csilla; Reyes, Guadalupe; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Berlin, Vivian

    2002-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rho1p plays an important role in cell wall integrity by regulating beta-1,3-glucan synthase, Pkc1p and the actin cytoskeleton. To determine the physiological role of Rho1p in the dimorphic fungus Candida albicans, the major human fungal pathogen, we constructed mutants that conditionally express Rho1p from the glucose-repressible phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter (pPCK1). We examined the growth of these cells in a range of conditions. Depletion of Rho1p from yeast cells resulted in cell death, lysis, and aggregation. The Rho1p conditional mutant was inviable on 10% serum indicating that Rho1p was also required for hyphal viability. Furthermore, in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis, strains dependent on pPCK1-driven RHO1 expression failed to colonise the kidneys and establish disease, suggesting that the level of glucose in serum was sufficient to repress the pPCK1 and that Rho1p-depleted strains were inviable within the host. Therefore, Rho1p is essential for the viability of C. albicans in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Olive leaf extract activity against Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis - the in vitro viability study.

    PubMed

    Zorić, Nataša; Kopjar, Nevenka; Kraljić, Klara; Oršolić, Nada; Tomić, Siniša; Kosalec, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Olive leaf extract is characterized by a high content of polyphenols (oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol and their derivatives), which is associated with its therapeutic properties. The objective of the present research was to evaluate the antifungal activity of olive leaf extract against Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and C. dubliniensis CBS 7987 strains. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the extract were determined by several in vitro assays. The extract showed a concentration depended effect on the viability of C. albicans with MIC value of 46.875 mg mL-1 and C. dubliniensis with MIC value 62.5 mg mL-1. Most sensitive methods for testing the antifungal effect of the extracts were the trypan blue exclusion method and fluorescent dye exclusion method while MIC could not be determined by the method according to the EUCAST recommendation suggesting that herbal preparations contain compounds that may interfere with this susceptibility testing. The fluorescent dye exclusion method was also used for the assessment of morphological changes in the nuclei of treated cells. According to the obtained results, olive leaf extract is less effective against the tested strains than hydroxytyrosol, an olive plant constituent tested in our previous study.

  19. Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits ovarian cancer progression in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Kae; Morishige, Ken-ichirou . E-mail: mken@gyne.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ogata, Seiji; Tahara, Masahiro; Shimizu, Shoko; Sakata, Masahiro; Tasaka, Keiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2007-04-27

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an isoprenoid compound, is an anti-ulcer drug developed in Japan. In our previous study, GGA was shown to inhibit ovarian cancer invasion by attenuating Rho activation [K. Hashimoto, K. Morishige, K. Sawada, M. Tahara, S. Shimizu, M. Sakata, K. Tasaka, Y. Murata, Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced invasion of human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro. Cancer 103 (2005) 1529-1536.]. In the present study, GGA treatment inhibited ovarian cancer progression in vitro and suppressed the tumor growth and ascites in the in vivo ovarian cancer model. In vitro analysis, treatment of cancer cells by GGA resulted in the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, the inactivation of Ras, and the suppression of tyrosine phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In conclusion, this is the first report that GGA inhibited ovarian cancer progression and the anti-tumor effect by GGA is, at least in part, derived not only from the suppression of Rho activation but also Ras-MAPK activation.

  20. Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits ovarian cancer progression in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kae; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ogata, Seiji; Tahara, Masahiro; Shimizu, Shoko; Sakata, Masahiro; Tasaka, Keiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2007-04-27

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an isoprenoid compound, is an anti-ulcer drug developed in Japan. In our previous study, GGA was shown to inhibit ovarian cancer invasion by attenuating Rho activation [K. Hashimoto, K. Morishige, K. Sawada, M. Tahara, S. Shimizu, M. Sakata, K. Tasaka, Y. Murata, Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced invasion of human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro. Cancer 103 (2005) 1529-1536.]. In the present study, GGA treatment inhibited ovarian cancer progression in vitro and suppressed the tumor growth and ascites in the in vivo ovarian cancer model. In vitro analysis, treatment of cancer cells by GGA resulted in the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, the inactivation of Ras, and the suppression of tyrosine phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In conclusion, this is the first report that GGA inhibited ovarian cancer progression and the anti-tumor effect by GGA is, at least in part, derived not only from the suppression of Rho activation but also Ras-MAPK activation.

  1. Clodronate inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, D; Maruotti, N; Nico, B; Longo, V; Mangieri, D; Vacca, A; Cantatore, F P

    2008-05-01

    The effects of amino-bisphosphonate clodronate on endothelial cell functions involved in angiogenesis, namely proliferation and morphogenesis on matrigel were tested in vitro, whereas its effects on angiogenesis were studied in vivo. This was performed by using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. In vitro, clodronate inhibited the endothelial cell proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, peaking at 30 microM. At the same concentration, clodronate inhibited the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-induced capillary-like tube formation in the morphogenesis assay on matrigel. In vivo, when tested with the CAM assay, clodronate again displayed the capability to inhibit FGF-2-induced angiogenesis. Overall, these results suggest that antiangiogenesis by clodronate can be used to treat a wide spectrum of angiogenesis-dependent diseases, including certain chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer.

  2. In vitro fungicidal activities of anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis evaluated by time-kill studies.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Cantón, Emilia; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin killing activities against Candida glabrata, Candida bracarensis, and Candida nivariensis were evaluated by the time-kill methodology. The concentrations assayed were 0.06, 0.125, and 0.5 μg/ml, which are achieved in serum. Anidulafungin and micafungin required between 13 and 26 h to reach the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% killing) against C. glabrata and C. bracarensis. All echinocandins were less active against C. nivariensis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. In vitro antimicrobial properties of coconut oil on Candida species in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogbolu, D O; Oni, A A; Daini, O A; Oloko, A P

    2007-06-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance, coupled with the availability of fewer antifungal agents with fungicidal actions, prompted this present study to characterize Candida species in our environment and determine the effectiveness of virgin coconut oil as an antifungal agent on these species. In 2004, 52 recent isolates of Candida species were obtained from clinical specimens sent to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Their susceptibilities to virgin coconut oil and fluconazole were studied by using the agar-well diffusion technique. Candida albicans was the most common isolate from clinical specimens (17); others were Candida glabrata (nine), Candida tropicalis (seven), Candida parapsilosis (seven), Candida stellatoidea (six), and Candida krusei (six). C. albicans had the highest susceptibility to coconut oil (100%), with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 25% (1:4 dilution), while fluconazole had 100% susceptibility at an MIC of 64 microg/mL (1:2 dilution). C. krusei showed the highest resistance to coconut oil with an MIC of 100% (undiluted), while fluconazole had an MIC of > 128 microg/mL. It is noteworthy that coconut oil was active against species of Candida at 100% concentration compared to fluconazole. Coconut oil should be used in the treatment of fungal infections in view of emerging drug-resistant Candida species.

  4. In vitro effects of Salvia officinalis L. essential oil on Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sookto, Tularat; Srithavaj, Theerathavaj; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Shrestha, Binit

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the anticandidal activities of Salvia officinalis L. (S. officinalis) essential oil against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and the inhibitory effects on the adhesion of C. albicans to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin surface. Methods Disc diffusion method was first used to test the anticandidal activities of the S. officinalis L. essential oil against the reference strain (ATCC 90028) and 2 clinical strains of C. albicans. Then the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal lethal concentration (MLC) were determined by modified membrane method. The adhesion of C. albicans to PMMA resin surface was assessed after immersion with S. officinalis L. essential oil at various concentrations of 1×MIC, 0.5×MIC and 0.25×MIC at room temperature for 30 min. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the Candida cell adhesion with the pretreatment agents and Tukey's test was used for multiple comparisons. Results S. officinalis L. essential oil exhibited anticandidal activity against all strains of C. albicans with inhibition zone ranging from 40.5 mm to 19.5 mm. The MIC and MLC of the oil were determined as 2.780 g/L against all test strains. According to the effects on C. albicans adhesion to PMMA resin surface, it was found that immersion in the essential oil at concentrations of 1×MIC (2.780 g/L), 0.5×MIC (1.390 g/L) and 0.25×MIC (0.695 g/L) for 30 min significantly reduced the adhesion of all 3 test strains to PMMA resin surface in a dose dependent manner (P<0.05). Conclusions S. officinalis L. essential oil exhibited anticandidal activities against C. albicans and had inhibitory effects on the adhesion of the cells to PMMA resin surface. With further testing and development, S. officinalis essential oil may be used as an antifungal denture cleanser to prevent candidal adhesion and thus reduce the risk of candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:23646301

  5. [Effect of Mexican propolis extracts from Apis mellifera on Candida albicans in vitro growth].

    PubMed

    Quintero-Mora, María Leonor; Londoño-Orozco, Amparo; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Manzano-Gayosso, Patricia; López-Martínez, Rubén; Soto-Zárate, Carlos Ignacio; Carrillo-Miranda, Liborio; Penieres-Carrillo, Guillermo; García-Tovar, Carlos Gerardo; Cruz-Sánchez, Tonatiuh A

    2008-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous substance collected by bees (Apis mellifera) from different trees and bushes. Due to its antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral and antiparasitic properties, it has continued to be very popular throughout the time showing variable activity depending on its geographical origin. In Mexico, information about this product is very limited. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antifungal activity of four propolis ethanolic extracts from three different Mexican states, and four commercial extracts on Candida albicans growth. A reference strain (ATCC 10231) and 36 clinical isolates of C. albicans were used. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined by the dilution on agar method. Growth curves on Sabouraud Dextrose broth with and without different propolis ethanolic extracts concentrations were performed. In addition, whether the effect was fungistatic or fungicide was determined. The propolis ethanolic extract obtained from Cuautitlán Izcalli, State of Mexico, showed the best biological activity, inhibiting 94.4% from the clinical isolates at 0.8 mg/ml; the reference strain was inhibited at 0.6 mg/ml. The propolis effect was fungistatic in low concentrations and fungicide in concentrations higher to MIC. The Mexican propolis ethanolic extract could be further investigated for its alternative use for the treatment of some C. albicans infections.

  6. Novel hydroxamates potentiated in vitro activity of fluconazole against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Hariharan, Periasamy; Bharani, Thirunavukkarasu; Franklyne, Jonathan S.; Selvakumar, Thangapazham; Bharathimohan, Kuppusamy; Kumar, Chenniappan Vinoth; Kachhadia, Virendra; Narayanan, Shridhar; Rajagopal, Sridharan; Balasubramanian, Gopalan

    2017-01-01

    A set of 12 novel hydroxamate compounds (NHCs), structurally designed as inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzyme, were synthesized at our facility. These were adamantane derivatives with N-hydroxyacetamide as pharmacophore, and each of these compounds was tested for potentiating activity on fluconazole. The concentration of fluconazole which completely inhibited (concentration of complete inhibition [CCI]) the growth of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550 was determined by micro-dilution method in the absence and presence of NHCs. The CCI of fluconazole without the NHC combination was 64 μg/ml and 1024 μg/ml against C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 64550, respectively. The majority of the NHCs potentiated the fluconazole activity markedly as CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 90028 reduced to 0.25 μg/ml. Similarly, CCI of fluconazole against C. albicans ATCC 64550 reduced to 4–8 μg/ml in combination with majority of NHCs while the best activity was displayed by the compound 1 with a reduction of CCI to 0.5 μg/ml. The study results revealed the potential usage of hydroxamate derivatives, structurally designed as HDAC inhibitors to enhance the activity of fluconazole against C. albicans. PMID:28250687

  7. Antifungal activity of naphthoquinoidal compounds in vitro against fluconazole-resistant strains of different Candida species: a special emphasis on mechanisms of action on Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Neto, João B A; da Silva, Cecília R; Neta, Maria A S; Campos, Rosana S; Siebra, Janaína T; Silva, Rose A C; Gaspar, Danielle M; Magalhães, Hemerson I F; de Moraes, Manoel O; Lobo, Marina D P; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Carvalho, Tatiane S C; Diogo, Emilay B T; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N; Rodrigues, Felipe A R; Cavalcanti, Bruno C; Júnior, Hélio V N

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the incidence of candidemia in tertiary hospitals worldwide has substantially increased. These infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality; in addition, they prolong hospital stays and raise the costs associated with treatment. Studies have reported a significant increase in infections by non-albicans Candida species, especially C. tropicalis. The number of antifungal drugs on the market is small in comparison to the number of antibacterial agents available. The limited number of treatment options, coupled with the increasing frequency of cross-resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the antifungal activities of three semisynthetic naphthofuranquinone molecules against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. These results allowed to us to evaluate the antifungal effects of three naphthofuranquinones on fluconazole-resistant C. tropicalis. The toxicity of these compounds was manifested as increased intracellular ROS, which resulted in membrane damage and changes in cell size/granularity, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and DNA damage (including oxidation and strand breakage). In conclusion, the tested naphthofuranquinones (compounds 1-3) exhibited in vitro cytotoxicity against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains.

  8. Antifungal Activity of Naphthoquinoidal Compounds In Vitro against Fluconazole-Resistant Strains of Different Candida Species: A Special Emphasis on Mechanisms of Action on Candida tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Neto, João B. A.; da Silva, Cecília R.; Neta, Maria A. S.; Campos, Rosana S.; Siebra, Janaína T.; Silva, Rose A. C.; Gaspar, Danielle M.; Magalhães, Hemerson I. F.; de Moraes, Manoel O.; Lobo, Marina D. P.; Grangeiro, Thalles B.; Carvalho, Tatiane S. C.; Diogo, Emilay B. T.; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N.; Rodrigues, Felipe A. R.; Cavalcanti, Bruno C.; Júnior, Hélio V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the incidence of candidemia in tertiary hospitals worldwide has substantially increased. These infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality; in addition, they prolong hospital stays and raise the costs associated with treatment. Studies have reported a significant increase in infections by non-albicans Candida species, especially C. tropicalis. The number of antifungal drugs on the market is small in comparison to the number of antibacterial agents available. The limited number of treatment options, coupled with the increasing frequency of cross-resistance, makes it necessary to develop new therapeutic strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the antifungal activities of three semisynthetic naphthofuranquinone molecules against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. These results allowed to us to evaluate the antifungal effects of three naphthofuranquinones on fluconazole-resistant C. tropicalis. The toxicity of these compounds was manifested as increased intracellular ROS, which resulted in membrane damage and changes in cell size/granularity, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and DNA damage (including oxidation and strand breakage). In conclusion, the tested naphthofuranquinones (compounds 1–3) exhibited in vitro cytotoxicity against fluconazole-resistant Candida spp. strains. PMID:24817320

  9. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Candida albicans: In vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Chen, Jia; Wang, Yucheng; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Murray, Clinton K.; Vrahas, Mark S.; Hooper, David C.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Dai, Tianhong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal infections are a common cause of morbidity, mortality and cost in critical care populations. The increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistance necessitates the development of new therapeutic approaches for fungal infections. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of an innovative approach, antimicrobial blue light (aBL), for inactivation of Candida albicans in vitro and in infected mouse burns. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to aBL (415 nm) were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocytes. The potential development of aBL resistance by C. albicans was investigated via 10 serial passages of C. albicans on aBL exposure. For the animal study, a mouse model of thermal burn infected with the bioluminescent C. albicans strain was used. aBL was delivered to mouse burns approximately 12 h after fungal inoculation. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time the extent of infection in mice. The results obtained from the studies demonstrated that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to aBL than human keratinocytes. Serial passaging of C. albicans on aBL exposure implied a tendency of reduced aBL susceptibility of C. albicans with increasing numbers of passages; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the post-aBL survival rate of C. albicans between the first and the last passage (P>0.05). A single exposure of 432 J/cm2 aBL reduced the fungal burden in infected mouse burns by 1.75-log10 (P=0.015). Taken together, our findings suggest aBL is a potential therapeutic for C. albicans infections. PMID:26909654

  10. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Candida albicans: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Chen, Jia; Wang, Yucheng; Sherwood, Margaret E; Murray, Clinton K; Vrahas, Mark S; Hooper, David C; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2016-07-03

    Fungal infections are a common cause of morbidity, mortality and cost in critical care populations. The increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistance necessitates the development of new therapeutic approaches for fungal infections. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of an innovative approach, antimicrobial blue light (aBL), for inactivation of Candida albicans in vitro and in infected mouse burns. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to aBL (415 nm) were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocytes. The potential development of aBL resistance by C. albicans was investigated via 10 serial passages of C. albicans on aBL exposure. For the animal study, a mouse model of thermal burn infected with the bioluminescent C. albicans strain was used. aBL was delivered to mouse burns approximately 12 h after fungal inoculation. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time the extent of infection in mice. The results obtained from the studies demonstrated that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to aBL than human keratinocytes. Serial passaging of C. albicans on aBL exposure implied a tendency of reduced aBL susceptibility of C. albicans with increasing numbers of passages; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the post-aBL survival rate of C. albicans between the first and the last passage (P>0.05). A single exposure of 432 J/cm(2) aBL reduced the fungal burden in infected mouse burns by 1.75-log10 (P=0.015). Taken together, our findings suggest aBL is a potential therapeutic for C. albicans infections.

  11. In vitro expression of Candida albicans alcohol dehydrogenase genes involved in acetaldehyde metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakri, M M; Rich, A M; Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for oral cancer, possibly via its conversion to acetaldehyde, a known carcinogen. The oral commensal yeast Candida albicans may be one of the agents responsible for this conversion intra-orally. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) family of enzymes are involved in acetaldehyde metabolism in yeast but, for C. albicans it is not known which family member is responsible for the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. In this study we determined the expression of mRNAs from three C. albicans Adh genes (CaADH1, CaADH2 and CaCDH3) for cells grown in different culture media at different growth phases by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. CaADH1 was constitutively expressed under all growth conditions but there was differential expression of CaADH2. CaADH3 expression was not detected. To investigate whether CaAdh1p or CaAdh2p can contribute to alcohol catabolism in C. albicans, each gene from the reference strain C. albicans SC5314 was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cell extracts from an CaAdh1p-expressing S. cerevisiae recombinant, but not an CaAdh2p-expressing recombinant, or an empty vector control strain, possessed ethanol-utilizing Adh activity above endogenous S. cerevisiae activity. Furthermore, expression of C. albicans Adh1p in a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain in which the endogenous ScADH2 gene (known to convert ethanol to acetaldehyde in this yeast) had been deleted, conferred an NAD-dependent ethanol-utilizing, and so acetaldehyde-producing, Adh activity. We conclude that CaAdh1p is the enzyme responsible for ethanol use under in vitro growth conditions, and may contribute to the intra-oral production of acetaldehyde.

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Antifungal Activity of Lichochalcone-A against Candida albicans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Seleem, Dalia; Benso, Bruna; Noguti, Juliana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is an opportunistic fungal infection with high prevalence among immunocompromised patients. Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen responsible for OC, often manifested in denture stomatitis and oral thrush. Virulence factors, such as biofilms formation and secretion of proteolytic enzymes, are key components in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Given the limited number of available antifungal therapies and the increase in antifungal resistance, demand the search for new safe and effective antifungal treatments. Lichochalcone-A is a polyphenol natural compound, known for its broad protective activities, as an antimicrobial agent. In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity of lichochalcone-A against C. albicans biofilms both in vitro and in vivo. Lichochalcone-A (625 μM; equivalent to 10x MIC) significantly reduced C. albicans (MYA 2876) biofilm growth compared to the vehicle control group (1% ethanol), as indicated by the reduction in the colony formation unit (CFU)/ml/g of biofilm dry weight. Furthermore, proteolytic enzymatic activities of proteinases and phospholipases, secreted by C. albicans were significantly decreased in the lichochalcone-A treated biofilms. In vivo model utilized longitudinal imaging of OC fungal load using a bioluminescent-engineered C. albicans (SKCa23-ActgLUC) and coelenterazine substrate. Mice treated with lichochalcone-A topical treatments exhibited a significant reduction in total photon flux over 4 and 5 days post-infection. Similarly, ex vivo analysis of tongue samples, showed a significant decrease in CFU/ml/mg in tongue tissue sample of lichochalcone-A treated group, which suggest the potential of lichochalcone-A as a novel antifungal agent for future clinical use.

  13. [In vitro susceptibility of vaginal Candida albicans to antifungal drugs in Abidjan (Ivory Coast)].

    PubMed

    Djohan, V; Angora, K E; Vanga-Bosson, A H; Konaté, A; Kassi, F K; Yavo, W; Kiki-Barro, P C; Menan, H; Koné, M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro susceptibility of vaginal Candida albicans to common antifungal drugs in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. From January to September 2008, 150 women with leucorrhoea were sampled for vaginal mycosis at the Pasteur Institute (Ivory Coast). Samples were analyzed by direct examination, Sabouraud-chloramphenicol and Sabouraud-chloramphenicol-actidione culture. C. albicans was identified after blastesis, chlamydosporulation and auxanogram tests. The susceptibility of this fungus to amphotericine B, 5-fluorocytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole was evaluated by a semi-solid medium microdilution technique: ATB(®) Fungus 3. Among 62 yeasts strains isolated, C. albicans represented 45 cases or 72.6%. Vaginal itching (P=0.04) and urinary burning (P=0.002) was statistically correlated with vaginal candidosis. We observed a range of susceptibility of C. albicans strains to antifungals: 100% to amphotericine B (CMI90=0.5μg/mL); 98% to 5-fluorocytosine (CMI90=4μg/mL); 86.7% to voriconazole (CMI50=0.06μg/mL) and 80% to fluconazole (CMI50=2μg/mL and CMI90=32μg/mL). However, only 46.7% of C. albicans strains were sensitive to itraconazole (CMI50=0.125μg/mL). These results show that vaginal C. albicans remain sensitive to the most commonly antifungal drugs used in Abidjan. However, this susceptibility should be regularly monitored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Antifungal Activity of Lichochalcone-A against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Seleem, Dalia; Benso, Bruna; Noguti, Juliana; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is an opportunistic fungal infection with high prevalence among immunocompromised patients. Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen responsible for OC, often manifested in denture stomatitis and oral thrush. Virulence factors, such as biofilms formation and secretion of proteolytic enzymes, are key components in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Given the limited number of available antifungal therapies and the increase in antifungal resistance, demand the search for new safe and effective antifungal treatments. Lichochalcone-A is a polyphenol natural compound, known for its broad protective activities, as an antimicrobial agent. In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity of lichochalcone-A against C. albicans biofilms both in vitro and in vivo. Lichochalcone-A (625 μM; equivalent to 10x MIC) significantly reduced C. albicans (MYA 2876) biofilm growth compared to the vehicle control group (1% ethanol), as indicated by the reduction in the colony formation unit (CFU)/ml/g of biofilm dry weight. Furthermore, proteolytic enzymatic activities of proteinases and phospholipases, secreted by C. albicans were significantly decreased in the lichochalcone-A treated biofilms. In vivo model utilized longitudinal imaging of OC fungal load using a bioluminescent-engineered C. albicans (SKCa23-ActgLUC) and coelenterazine substrate. Mice treated with lichochalcone-A topical treatments exhibited a significant reduction in total photon flux over 4 and 5 days post-infection. Similarly, ex vivo analysis of tongue samples, showed a significant decrease in CFU/ml/mg in tongue tissue sample of lichochalcone-A treated group, which suggest the potential of lichochalcone-A as a novel antifungal agent for future clinical use. PMID:27284694

  15. In vitro evaluation of antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Seleem, Dalia; Chen, Emily; Benso, Bruna; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro M

    2016-01-01

    Monolaurin (also known as glycerol monolaurate) is a natural compound found in coconut oil and is known for its protective biological activities as an antimicrobial agent. The nature of oral candidiasis and the increased antifungal resistance demand the search for novel antifungal therapeutic agents. In this study, we examine the antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms (strain ATCC:SC5314/MYA2876) in vitro and investigate whether monolaurin can alter gene expression of host inflammatory cytokines, IL-1α and IL-1β. In a co-culture model, oral fibroblast cells were cultured simultaneously with C. albicans for 24 hrs followed by the exposure to treatments of monolaurin (3.9-2,500 µM), positive control fluconazole (32.2 µM), and vehicle control group (1% ethanol), which was a model used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of monolaurin on fibroblasts as well as to analyze morphological characteristics of biofilms through fluorescence microscopy. In addition, the co-culture model was used for RNA extraction of oral fibroblasts to assess gene expression of host inflammatory cytokines, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed the MIC and MFC of monolaurin were in the range 62.5-125 µM and 125-250 µM, respectively. Biofilm antifungal assay showed significant reduction in Log (CFU/ml) of biofilms treated with 1,250 and 2,500 µM of 1-monolaurin when compared to the control groups . There was also a significant down-regulation of IL-1α and IL-1β in the co-culture treated with monolaurin. It can be concluded that monolaurin has a potential antifungal activity against C. albicans and can modulate the pro-inflammatory response of the host.

  16. In vitro evaluation of antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Benso, Bruna; Pardi, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Monolaurin (also known as glycerol monolaurate) is a natural compound found in coconut oil and is known for its protective biological activities as an antimicrobial agent. The nature of oral candidiasis and the increased antifungal resistance demand the search for novel antifungal therapeutic agents. In this study, we examine the antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms (strain ATCC:SC5314/MYA2876) in vitro and investigate whether monolaurin can alter gene expression of host inflammatory cytokines, IL-1α and IL-1β. In a co-culture model, oral fibroblast cells were cultured simultaneously with C. albicans for 24 hrs followed by the exposure to treatments of monolaurin (3.9–2,500 µM), positive control fluconazole (32.2 µM), and vehicle control group (1% ethanol), which was a model used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of monolaurin on fibroblasts as well as to analyze morphological characteristics of biofilms through fluorescence microscopy. In addition, the co-culture model was used for RNA extraction of oral fibroblasts to assess gene expression of host inflammatory cytokines, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed the MIC and MFC of monolaurin were in the range 62.5–125 µM and 125–250 µM, respectively. Biofilm antifungal assay showed significant reduction in Log (CFU/ml) of biofilms treated with 1,250 and 2,500 µM of 1-monolaurin when compared to the control groups . There was also a significant down-regulation of IL-1α and IL-1β in the co-culture treated with monolaurin. It can be concluded that monolaurin has a potential antifungal activity against C. albicans and can modulate the pro-inflammatory response of the host. PMID:27366648

  17. Real time optical coherence tomography monitoring of Candida albicans biofilm in vitro during photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Luis Cláudio; Araujo Prates, Renato; Raele, Marcus Paulo; Zanardi di Freitas, Anderson; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2010-04-01

    The biofilm formed by Candida albicans is the mainly cause of infections associated to medical devices such as catheters. Studies have shown that photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAT) has lethal effect on C. albicans, and it is based on photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of low intensity light to generate reactive oxygen species in biological systems. The aim of this study was to analyze in real time, by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), the alterations in C. albicans biofilm in vitro during PAT using methylene blue (MB) as a PS and red light. An OCT system with working at 930nm was used, sequential images of 2000×512 pixels were generated at the frame rate of 2.5frames/sec. The dimension of the analyzed sample was 6000μm wide by 1170μm of depth corrected by refraction index of 1.35. We recorded 1min. before and after the irradiation with LED for PAT, generating 8min. of video. For biofilm formation, discs were made from elastomeric silicone catheters. The PS was dissolved in PBS solution, and a final concentration of 1mM MB was applied on biofilm, followed by a red LED irradiation (λ=630nm+/-20nm) during 6min. We performed a curve of survival fraction versus time of irradiation and it was reduced by 100% following 6min. of irradiation. OCT was performed for measurement of biofilm thickness of 110μm when biofilm was formed. During irradiation, the variation of biofilm thickness was ~70μm. We conclude that OCT system is able to show real time optical changes provided by PAT in yeasts organized in biofilm.

  18. Caspofungin-induced in-vitro post-antifungal effect and its impact on adhesion related traits of oral Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans isolates.

    PubMed

    Ellepola, Arjuna Nishantha Bandara; Chandy, Rachel; Khan, Zia Uddin; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (BEC) and denture acrylic surfaces (DAS), germ tube (GT) formation and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) are all virulence traits involved in the pathogenicity of Candida. Post-antifungal effect (PAFE) also have a bearing on pathogenicity and virulence of Candida. Candida dubliniensis is associated with oral and systemic candidosis, which can be managed with caspofungin. There is no published information on caspofungin-induced PAFE and its impact on adhesion traits of C. dubliniensis isolates. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the in vitro duration of PAFE on 20 C. dubliniensis isolates following transient exposure to caspofungin. Furthermore the impacts of caspofungin-induced PAFE on adhesion to BEC and DAS, GT formation and CSH of these isolates were also determined. After establishing the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of caspofungin, C. dubliniensis isolates were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations (×3 MIC) of caspofungin for 1 hr. Thereafter the duration of PAFE, adhesion to BEC and DAS, GT formation and CSH were determined by previously described in-vitro assays. MIC (μg/mL) of C. dubliniensis isolates to caspofungin ranged from 0.004 to 0.19. Caspofungin-induced mean PAFE on C. dubliniensis isolates was 2.17 hr. Exposure to caspofungin suppressed the ability of C. dubliniensis isolates to adhere to BEC and DAS, form GT and CSH by 69.97%, 71.95%, 90.06% and 32.29% (P < 0.001 for all), respectively. Thus, transient exposure of C. dubliniensis isolates to caspofungin produces an antifungal effect not only by suppressing its growth but also by altering its adhesion traits. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Self-assembled amphotericin B-loaded polyglutamic acid nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and in vitro potential against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Zia, Qamar; Khan, Aijaz Ahmed; Swaleha, Zubair; Owais, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we developed a self-assembled biodegradable polyglutamic acid (PGA)-based formulation of amphotericin B (AmB) and evaluated its in vitro antifungal potential against Candida albicans. The AmB-loaded PGA nanoparticles were prepared in-house and had a mean size dimension of around 98±2 nm with a zeta potential of −35.2±7.3 mV. Spectroscopic studies revealed that the drug predominantly acquires an aggregated form inside the formulation with an aggregation ratio above 2. The PGA-based AmB formulation was shown to be highly stable in phosphate-buffered saline as well as in serum (only 10%–20% of the drug was released after 10 days). The AmB–PGA nanoparticles were less toxic to red blood cells (<15% lysis at an AmB concentration of 100 μg/mL after 24 hours) when compared with Fungizone®, a commercial antifungal product. An MTT assay showed that the viability of mammalian cells (KB and RAW 264.7) was negligibly affected at AmB concentrations as high as 200 μg/mL. Histopathological examination of mouse kidney revealed no signs of tissue necrosis. The AmB–PGA formulation showed potent antimicrobial activity similar to that of Fungizone against C. albicans. Interestingly, AmB-bearing PGA nanoparticles were found to inhibit biofilm formation to a considerable extent. In summary, AmB–PGA nanoparticles showed highly attenuated toxicity when compared with Fungizone, while retaining equivalent active antifungal properties. This study indicates that the AmB–PGA preparation could be a promising treatment for various fungal infections. PMID:25784804

  20. Comparative efficacy of herbal essences with amphotricin B and ketoconazole on Candida albicans in the in vitro condition.

    PubMed

    Gavanji, Shahin; Zaker, Sayed R; Nejad, Zahra G; Bakhtari, Azizollah; Bidabadi, Elham S; Larki, Behrouz

    2015-06-01

    The Candida species are the most important factors of fungal infections in humans and animals. It is necessary to prepare antifungal or antimicrobial drugs because of increasing drug resistance. The natural treatment of diseases of bacterial origin using medicinal plants is important. In this study the effect of antimicrobial medicinal herbal essential oils and conventional antifungal drugs were evaluated on Candida albicans in vitro. Disc diffusion assay and the microbroth dilution method were used to investigate the anticandidal effects of Foeniculum vulgare Mill, Satureja hortensis L, Cuminum cyminum, and Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oils. The anticandidal effect of these essential oils was compared with that of amphotricin B and ketoconazole in vitro. We then measured the chemical composition of the studied essential oils using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Z. multiflora Boiss essential oil at the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 34 μg/mL and minimal lethal concentration [i.e., minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC)] of 64 μg/mL had more powerful anti-Candida activity than the other essential oils. C. cyminum essential oil showed the least effect on the tested fungus. A comparison of the effect of the studied essential oils and antifungal drugs showed that the antifungal effect on the C. albicans fungus was better with the fungicides than with the essential oils. In the present study, essential oils with different components showed antifungal activity (especially Z. multiflora Boiss essential oil). They can therefore be used as new antifungal substances.

  1. Different effects of native Candida albicans mannan and mannan-derived oligosaccharides on antigen-stimulated lymphoproliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Podzorski, R P; Gray, G R; Nelson, R D

    1990-01-15

    Yeast cell wall mannan polysaccharide has been proposed to contribute to immune dysfunction associated with chronic infections involving Candida albicans. This influence of mannan has been suggested based partially upon studies of the in vitro immunoinhibitory effects of mannans prepared from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or C. albicans by precipitation with Fehling's reagent, which provides a structurally modified product contaminated with copper. We have therefore evaluated the immunoinhibitory influence of a more native C. albicans mannan prepared by complexation with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). CTAB mannan was a potent stimulator of lymphoproliferation when added to human PMBC from donors responsive to Candida; it has no inhibitory influence on lympho-proliferation induced by Candida or other Ag. In contrast, members of a family of mannose oligosaccharides (disaccharide through hexasaccharide) derived from the CTAB mannan by weak alkaline degradation did not stimulate lymphoproliferation, but were potent inhibitors of lymphoproliferation stimulated by Candida and other Ag. Fifty percent inhibitory doses were 260 to 34 microM, respectively. Compositional analyses of these immunoinhibitory oligomers showed them to be composed of mannose and free of contaminating protein. We propose that mannan-derived oligosaccharides produced by catabolism of mannan in vivo are immunoinhibitory and contribute to the deficit in cell-mediated immune function associated with chronic candidiasis.

  2. Effect of pH on In Vitro Susceptibility of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans to 11 Antifungal Agents and Implications for Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Danby, Claire S.; Boikov, Dina; Rautemaa-Richardson, Rina

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) due to Candida glabrata is challenging, with limited therapeutic options. Unexplained disappointing clinical efficacy has been reported with systemic and topical azole antifungal agents in spite of in vitro susceptibility. Given that the vaginal pH of patients with VVC is unchanged at 4 to 4.5, we studied the effect of pH on the in vitro activity of 11 antifungal agents against 40 C. glabrata isolates and compared activity against 15 fluconazole-sensitive and 10 reduced-fluconazole-susceptibility C. albicans strains. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ciclopirox olamine, amphotericin B, and caspofungin was determined using the CLSI method for yeast susceptibility testing. Test media were buffered to pHs of 7, 6, 5, and 4. Under conditions of reduced pH, C. glabrata isolates remained susceptible to caspofungin and flucytosine; however, there was a dramatic increase in the MIC90 for amphotericin B and every azole drug tested. Although susceptible to other azole drugs tested at pH 7, C. albicans strains with reduced fluconazole susceptibility also demonstrated reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B and all azoles at pH 4. In contrast, fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates remained susceptible at low pH to azoles, in keeping with clinical observations. In selecting agents for treatment of recurrent C. glabrata vaginitis, clinicians should recognize the limitations of in vitro susceptibility testing utilizing pH 7.0. PMID:22232293

  3. Effect of pH on in vitro susceptibility of Candida glabrata and Candida albicans to 11 antifungal agents and implications for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Danby, Claire S; Boikov, Dina; Rautemaa-Richardson, Rina; Sobel, Jack D

    2012-03-01

    The treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) due to Candida glabrata is challenging, with limited therapeutic options. Unexplained disappointing clinical efficacy has been reported with systemic and topical azole antifungal agents in spite of in vitro susceptibility. Given that the vaginal pH of patients with VVC is unchanged at 4 to 4.5, we studied the effect of pH on the in vitro activity of 11 antifungal agents against 40 C. glabrata isolates and compared activity against 15 fluconazole-sensitive and 10 reduced-fluconazole-susceptibility C. albicans strains. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, clotrimazole, miconazole, ciclopirox olamine, amphotericin B, and caspofungin was determined using the CLSI method for yeast susceptibility testing. Test media were buffered to pHs of 7, 6, 5, and 4. Under conditions of reduced pH, C. glabrata isolates remained susceptible to caspofungin and flucytosine; however, there was a dramatic increase in the MIC(90) for amphotericin B and every azole drug tested. Although susceptible to other azole drugs tested at pH 7, C. albicans strains with reduced fluconazole susceptibility also demonstrated reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B and all azoles at pH 4. In contrast, fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates remained susceptible at low pH to azoles, in keeping with clinical observations. In selecting agents for treatment of recurrent C. glabrata vaginitis, clinicians should recognize the limitations of in vitro susceptibility testing utilizing pH 7.0.

  4. Comparison of the in vitro activity of echinocandins against Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, and Candida africana by time-kill curves.

    PubMed

    Gil-Alonso, Sandra; Jauregizar, Nerea; Cantón, Emilia; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    Candida albicans remains the most common fungal pathogen. This species is closely related to 2 phenotypically similar cryptic species, Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana. This study aims to compare the antifungal activities of echinocandins against 7 C. albicans, 5 C. dubliniensis, and 2 C. africana strains by time-kill methodology. MIC values were similar for the 3 species; however, differences in killing activity were observed among species, isolates, and echinocandins. Echinocandins produced weak killing activity against the 3 species. In all drugs, the fungicidal endpoint (99.9% mortality) was reached at ≤31 h with ≥0.5 μg/mL for anidulafungin in 4 C. albicans and 1 C. dubliniensis, for caspofungin in 1 C. albicans and 2 C. dubliniensis, and for micafungin in 4 C. albicans and 1 C. dubliniensis. None of echinocandins showed lethality against C. africana. Identification of these new cryptic species and time-kill studies would be recommendable when echinocandin treatment fails.

  5. Fatty Acid Synthase Impacts the Pathobiology of Candida parapsilosis In Vitro and during Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Long Nam; Trofa, David; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2009-01-01

    Cytosolic fungal fatty acid synthase is composed of two subunits α and β, which are encoded by Fas1 and Fas2 genes. In this study, the Fas2 genes of the human pathogen Candida parapsilosis were deleted using a modified SAT1 flipper technique. CpFas2 was essential in media lacking exogenous fatty acids and the growth of Fas2 disruptants (Fas2 KO) was regulated by the supplementation of different long chain fatty acids, such as myristic acid (14∶0), palmitic acid (16∶0), and Tween 80, in a dose-specific manner. Lipidomic analysis revealed that Fas2 KO cells were severely restricted in production of unsaturated fatty acids. The Fas2 KO strains were unable to form normal biofilms and were more efficiently killed by murine-like macrophages, J774.16, than the wild type, heterozygous and reconstituted strains. Furthermore, Fas2 KO yeast were significantly less virulent in a systemic murine infection model. The Fas2 KO cells were also hypersensitive to human serum, and inhibition of CpFas2 in WT C. parapsilosis by cerulenin significantly decreased fungal growth in human serum. This study demonstrates that CpFas2 is essential for C. parapsilosis growth in the absence of exogenous fatty acids, is involved in unsaturated fatty acid production, influences fungal virulence, and represents a promising antifungal drug target. PMID:20027295

  6. The comparative study of antifungal activity of Syzygium aromaticum, Punica granatum and nystatin on Candida albicans; an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mansourian, A; Boojarpour, N; Ashnagar, S; Momen Beitollahi, J; Shamshiri, A R

    2014-12-01

    Candida species are opportunistic fungi, among which, Candida albicans is the most important species responsible for infections in immunocompromised patients with invasive fungal disease. Resistance of Candida species to antifungal drugs has led scientists to pay more attention to traditional medicine herbs. Due to the limitations in the treatment of fungal diseases such as shortages, high prices, antifungal side effects and drug resistance or reduced susceptibility to fungal drugs we decided to study the antifungal effects of herbal extracts of Syzygium aromaticum and Punica granatum. Twenty-one isolates of oral C. albicans in patients with denture stomatitis referred to prosthesis department, Dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were prepared and cultured. Plant extracts were prepared from the herbs market. Tests on patient samples and standard strains 5027ATCC (PTCC10231) yeast C. albicans were performed via well diffusion method. In addition, nystatin and methanol were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Finally, the antifungal effect of extracts using Statistical Repeated measurement ANOVA test was investigated. Both S. aromaticum and P. granatum showed noticeable antifungal activity in well method. Syzygium aromaticum showed better anti candida activity than nystatin (P<0.001). Due to increasing problems with fungal diseases, these findings suggest that the plant extracts of S. aromaticum and P. granatum showed good antifungal effects (P-value<0.001). S. aromaticum (inhibition zone diameter: 29.62) showed better antifungal effects than nystatin (inhibition zone diameter: 28.48). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Aluminum Trichloride Inhibits the Rat Osteoblasts Mineralization In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Miao; Huo, Hui; Cao, Zheng; Han, Yanfei; Gao, Li

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is an accumulative toxic metal. Excessive Al accumulation inhibits osteoblasts mineralization and induces osteoporosis. However, the inhibition mechanism of Al on the mineralization is not fully understood. Thus, in this study, the rat osteoblasts were cultured and exposed to 0 mmol L(-1) (control group, CG) and 0.52 mmol L(-1) aluminum trichloride (AlCl3, treatment group, TG) for 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. We found that mineralized matrix nodules, the activity of bone alkaline phosphatase, the concentration of extracellular calcium, the mRNA expression of type-I collagen, the mRNA and protein expressions of osteopontin, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein were all decreased, while the concentration of extracellular phosphorus was increased in TG compared with CG with time prolonged. Taken together, these results indicated that AlCl3 inhibited osteoblasts mineralization in vitro.

  8. The European Confederation of Medical Mycology (ECMM) survey of candidaemia in Italy: in vitro susceptibility of 375 Candida albicans isolates and biofilm production.

    PubMed

    Tortorano, Anna Maria; Prigitano, Anna; Biraghi, Emanuela; Viviani, Maria Anna

    2005-10-01

    To investigate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility pattern of 375 Candida albicans bloodstream isolates recovered during the European Confederation of Medical Mycology survey of candidaemia performed in Lombardia, Italy and to test the ability to form biofilm. In vitro susceptibility to flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin was performed by broth microdilution following the NCCLS guidelines. Biofilm production was measured using the XTT reduction assay in 59 isolates selected as representative of different patterns of susceptibility to flucytosine and azoles. MICs (mg/L) at which 90% of the strains were inhibited were < or =0.25 for flucytosine, 0.25 for caspofungin, 4 for fluconazole and 0.06 for itraconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole. Flucytosine resistance was detected in five isolates and was associated with serotype B in 2/29 and serotype A in 3/346. Resistance to fluconazole was detected in 10 isolates; nine of these exhibited reduced susceptibility to the other azoles. Among the 10 patients with fluconazole-resistant C. albicans bloodstream infection, only one, an AIDS patient, had been previously treated with fluconazole. Biofilm production was observed in 23 isolates (39%) and was significantly associated with serotype B. No relationship was detected with the pattern of antifungal susceptibility. Resistance is uncommon in C. albicans isolates recovered from blood cultures, while biofilm production is a relatively frequent event. Periodic surveillance is warranted to monitor the incidence of in vitro antifungal resistance as well as of biofilm production.

  9. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-08

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  10. The effect of parenteral alimentation fluid, undiluted with saline or fresh sera, on the growth of Candida albicans in vitro at 37 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Lederer, T; Rippon, J; Baldwin, S; Pachman, L M

    1975-02-28

    Parenteral alimentation is often complicated by Candida albicans infection which may be fatal. This study investigated the effect of alimentation fluid (Aminosol) on C. albicans' growth in vitro. It was found that concentrated Aminosol (1400 millisomoles) maintained C. albicans in a viable state but inhibited replication. Dilution of alimentation fluid to physiological concentrations (300 milliosmoles) with either saline or aged pooled normal sera promoted in vitro growth of C. albicans which was equivalent to that obtained in BHI broth and was slightly less than that obtained in Sabouraud's broth. The effects of fresh sera with full complement activity were also investigated. In fresh sera appropriately diluted with physiological saline, some clumping of the yeasts was observed and all formed germ tubes. Growth as defined by budding or the formation of hyphae was inhibited. When Aminosol was diluted to 300 milliosomoles with fresh sera, all yeasts were noted to be in clumps with germ tubes as well as continually growing hyphae. Growth was approximately equal to that seen in Aminosol similarly diluted with saline.

  11. Sodium ascorbate kills Candida albicans in vitro via iron-catalyzed Fenton reaction: importance of oxygenation and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Avci, Pinar; Freire, Fernanda; Banvolgyi, Andras; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Wikonkal, Norbert M; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-12-01

    Ascorbate can inhibit growth and even decrease viability of various microbial species including Candida albicans. However the optimum conditions and the mechanism of action are unclear. Materials/methodology: Candida albicans shaken for 90 min in a buffered solution of ascorbate (90 mM) gave a 5-log reduction of cell viability, while there was no killing without shaking, in growth media with different carbon sources or at 4°C. Killing was inhibited by the iron chelator 2,2'-bipyridyl. Hydroxyphenyl fluorescein probe showed the intracellular generation of hydroxyl radicals. Ascorbate-mediated killing of C. albicans depends on oxygenation and metabolism, involves iron-catalyzed generation of hydroxyl radicals via Fenton reaction and depletion of intracellular NADH. Ascorbate could serve as a component of a topical antifungal therapy.

  12. Nitric oxide inhibition of coxsackievirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, C; Ocampo, C J; Saura, M; McMillan, A; Lowenstein, C J

    1997-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a radical molecule with antibacterial, -parasitic, and -viral properties. We investigated the mechanism of NO inhibition of Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) replication in vitro by determining the effect of NO upon a single replicative cycle of CVB3 grown in HeLa cells. Transfection of inducible NO synthase cDNA into HeLa cells reduces the number of viral particles produced during a single cycle of growth. Similarly, a noncytotoxic concentration of the NO donor S-nitroso-amino-penicillamine reduces the number of viral particles in a dose-dependent manner. To explore the mechanisms by which NO exerts its antiviral effect, we assayed the attachment, replication, and translation steps of the CVB3 life cycle. NO does not affect the attachment of CVB3 to HeLa cells. However, NO inhibits CVB3 RNA synthesis, as shown by a [3H]uridine incorporation assay, reverse transcription-PCR, and Northern analysis. In addition, NO inhibits CVB3 protein synthesis, as shown by [35S]methionine protein labeling and Western blot analysis of infected cells. Thus, NO inhibits CVB3 replication in part by inhibiting viral RNA synthesis by an unknown mechanism. PMID:9312175

  13. Trichostatin a inhibits corneal haze in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay; Mehan, Maneesh M; Sinha, Sunilima; Cowden, John W; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2009-06-01

    Trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, has been shown to suppress TGF-beta-induced fibrogenesis in many nonocular tissues. The authors evaluated TSA cytotoxicity and its antifibrogenic activity on TGF-beta-driven fibrosis in the cornea with the use of in vitro and in vivo models. Human corneal fibroblasts (HSFs) were used for in vitro studies, and New Zealand White rabbits were used for in vivo studies. Haze in the rabbit cornea was produced with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using excimer laser. Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays evaluated TSA cytotoxicity to the cornea. Density of haze in the rabbit eye was graded with slit lamp biomicroscopy. Real-time PCR, immunoblotting, or immunocytochemistry was used to measure alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), fibronectin, and collagen type IV mRNA or protein levels. TUNEL assay was used to detect cell death. TSA concentrations of 250 nM or less were noncytotoxic and did not alter normal HSF morphology or proliferation. TGF-beta1 treatment of HSF significantly increased mRNA and protein levels of SMA (9-fold), fibronectin (2.5-fold), and collagen type IV (2-fold). TSA treatment showed 60% to 75% decreases in TGF-beta1-induced SMA and fibronectin mRNA levels and 1.5- to 3.0-fold decreases in protein levels but had no effect on collagen type IV mRNA or protein levels in vitro. Two-minute topical treatment of TSA on rabbit corneas subjected to -9 D PRK significantly decreased corneal haze in vivo. TSA inhibits TGF-beta1-induced accumulation of extracellular matrix and myofibroblast formation in the human cornea in vitro and markedly decreases haze in rabbit cornea in vivo.

  14. Inhibition of AIDS virus replication by acemannan in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kahlon, J B; Kemp, M C; Carpenter, R H; McAnalley, B H; McDaniel, H R; Shannon, W M

    1991-09-01

    Acemannan (ACE-M), a beta-(1,4)-linked acetylated mannan, was evaluated for in vitro activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Castanospermine (CAS), deoxymannojirimycin (DMN), swainsonine (SWS), azidothymidine (AZT), and dideoxythymidine (DDC) were tested in parallel as control compounds. In vitro antiviral efficacy of ACE-M was evaluated in a variety of cell lines including human peripheral mononuclear, CEM-SS1 and MT-2(2) cells. The virus strain, number of infectious units per cell, and target cell line were important factors in determining the degree of inhibition of viral cytopathic effect in the presence of ACE-M and other control compounds tested. Maximum inhibitory effect was observed in CEM-SS cells infected with the RFII strain of HIV-1. This inhibitory effect was determined to be concentration-dependent. Assay design included primary screening to measure cell viabilities of infected target cells in the presence and absence of test compounds. When tested on HIV-1/RFII-infected CEM-SS cells, the 50% inhibitory effect of CAS (IC50 = 28), an inhibitor of alpha-glucosidase I, was determined to be similar to that observed for ACE-M (IC50 = 45). However, DMN and SWS, inhibitors of mannosidase I and II, tested in parallel to CAS and ACE-M, exhibited no IC50 values. Antiviral potential of ACE-M as an inhibitor of syncytia formation was also explored using CEM-SS cells. Suppression of syncytia formation was observed at an ACE-M concentration of 31.25 micrograms/ml, and complete inhibition was observed at 62.5 micrograms/ml. In addition, HIV-1 RNA levels were studied to establish the antiviral potential of ACE-M in vitro.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Essential Oil from the Seed of Anethum graveolens L. against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hong; Tian, Jun; Zheng, Yuechen; Ban, Xiaoquan; Zeng, Jingsi; Mao, Yehong; Wang, Youwei

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil produced from the seed of Anethum graveolens L. (Umbelliferae) was tested in vitro and in vivo anti-Candida activity. The microbroth dilution method was used in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), according to M27-A3 of the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI). And then, efficacy evaluation of essential oil in the prophylaxis and treatment of experimental vaginal candidiasis was performed in immunosuppressed mice. The anti-Candida activity was analyzed by microbiological and histological techniques and was compared with that of fluconazole (FCZ). The results showed essential oil was active in vitro against all tested strains, with MICs ranging from 0.312 μL/mL (for C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei) to 0.625 μL/mL (for 6 isolated C. albicans strains). Essential oil (2% v/v) was highly efficacious in accelerating C. albicans 09-1555 clearance from experimentally infected mice vagina by prophylaxis and therapeutic treatments. In both therapeutic efficacy and prophylaxis studies, the histological findings confirmed the microbiological results. The experimental results revealed that the tested essential oil is effective against vulvovaginal candidiasis in immunosuppressed mice.

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Essential Oil from the Seed of Anethum graveolens L. against Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hong; Tian, Jun; Zheng, Yuechen; Ban, Xiaoquan; Zeng, Jingsi; Mao, Yehong; Wang, Youwei

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil produced from the seed of Anethum graveolens L. (Umbelliferae) was tested in vitro and in vivo anti-Candida activity. The microbroth dilution method was used in the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), according to M27-A3 of the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI). And then, efficacy evaluation of essential oil in the prophylaxis and treatment of experimental vaginal candidiasis was performed in immunosuppressed mice. The anti-Candida activity was analyzed by microbiological and histological techniques and was compared with that of fluconazole (FCZ). The results showed essential oil was active in vitro against all tested strains, with MICs ranging from 0.312 μL/mL (for C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. krusei) to 0.625 μL/mL (for 6 isolated C. albicans strains). Essential oil (2% v/v) was highly efficacious in accelerating C. albicans 09-1555 clearance from experimentally infected mice vagina by prophylaxis and therapeutic treatments. In both therapeutic efficacy and prophylaxis studies, the histological findings confirmed the microbiological results. The experimental results revealed that the tested essential oil is effective against vulvovaginal candidiasis in immunosuppressed mice. PMID:21716714

  17. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid inhibits Candida albicans growth.

    PubMed

    Baker, Andrew; Northrop, Frederick D; Miedema, Hendrik; Devine, Gary R; Davies, Julia M

    2002-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug niflumic acid was found to inhibit growth of the yeast form of Candida albicans. Niflumic acid inhibited respiratory oxygen uptake and it is hypothesised that this was achieved by cytosolic acidification and block of glycolysis. Inhibitory concentrations are compatible with current practice of topical application.

  18. The inhibition of Candida albicans by selected essential oils and their major components.

    PubMed

    Tampieri, Maria Paola; Galuppi, Roberta; Macchioni, Fabio; Carelle, Maria Stella; Falcioni, Laura; Cioni, Pier Luigi; Morelli, Ivano

    2005-04-01

    Many volatile oils are known to possess antifungal properties and are potentially applicable as antimycotic agents. By studying the efficacy of essential oils against different pathogenic mycetes, we have evaluated the in-vitro inhibiting activity of some essential oils and their main constituents against a strain of Candida albicans. Sixteen commercial essential oils and forty-two pure constituents (alcohols, aldehydes, ketons, phenols and hydrocarbons), were tested by using a semisolid agar antifungal susceptibility (SAAS) method. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analyses of the oils tested were performed. The essential oils of Origanum vulgare, Satureja montana, Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum verum, Cymbopogon flexuosus showed maximum inhibitory activity (MIC = 500 ppm) after 7 days. According to the results of the examination of pure constituents, beta-phellandrene proved to be the most interesting component among cyclic monoterpenic hydrocarbons as it showed a strong activity (MIC = 50 ppm). The most active of phenols was carvacrol (MIC 100 ppm). The open-chain alcohol 1-decanol was the most active of alcohols at 50 ppm. Finally, among aldehydes, a strong activity was shown by trans-cynnamaldehyde (MIC 50 ppm).

  19. In Vitro Susceptibility of Breakthrough Candida Bloodstream Isolates Correlates with Daily and Cumulative Doses of Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Cornelius J.; Staley, Benjamin; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2006-01-01

    We determined MICs for 28 Candida isolates recovered from patients who developed breakthrough candidemia while receiving fluconazole. MICs correlated with daily and cumulative doses of fluconazole. Patients receiving ≥2,000 mg cumulatively or >200 mg daily were more likely to be infected with isolates that were not fluconazole susceptible. PMID:17005842

  20. In vitro photodynamic inactivation of Candida spp. by different doses of low power laser light.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, A S; Trajano, V N; Lima, E O; Ferreira, A F M; Queiroga, A S; Limeira, F A

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of PDT in photoinactivation of Candida species using methylene blue (MB) and irradiation with a diode laser (660nm, 40mW). Suspensions of Candida species were obtained containing 10(6)cfu/ml, transferred to 96-holes plates and exposed to 03 doses of laser light (60J/cm(2), 120J/cm(2), 180J/cm(2)) in the presence of MB. Additional suspensions were treated with only the MB, the laser light or with 0.85% saline (control groups). After the treatments, 1μl aliquot of the suspensions was plated in duplicate on SDA. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48h and after this period there was the counting of colonies (cfu/ml). The three evaluated doses determined meaningful inactivation of Candida spp. (p<0.05). The 180J/cm(2) dose was the most effective, inactivating 78% of cfu/ml. At a dose of 180J/cm(2)C. albicans was the most susceptible specie. PDT has demonstrated effectiveness in the inactivation of Candida spp.

  1. Comparative study of agar diffusion test and the NCCLS macrobroth method for in vitro susceptibility testing of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Soni, L M; Burattini, M N; Pignatari, A C; Gompertz, O F; Colombo, A L

    1999-01-01

    We performed a prospective double-blind study to evaluate the correlation between inhibition zones obtained by a disk-diffusion test, using Neo-sensitabs of fluconazole (Rosco Diagnostica), and the MICs generated by the NCCLS macrobroth dilution assay. Eighty clinical isolates, representing 5 of the clinically relevant species of Candida, were tested simultaneously by both methods. A clear inverse correlation was found between the results obtained by both tests (r = -0.69). In addition, there was high degree of agreement between methods in the identification of susceptible isolates. However, the resistance definition by disk-diffusion test had a positive predictive value of only 17%. Our data support the hypothesis that Rosco Fluconazole Neo-sensitabs have potential as a screening test for the identification of Candida isolates susceptible to fluconazole. Resistant isolates should be further investigated by standardized broth procedures.

  2. In vitro antifungal activity of cassia fistula extracts against fluconazole resistant strains of Candida species from HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Sony, P; Kalyani, M; Jeyakumari, D; Kannan, I; Sukumar, R G

    2017-08-21

    Candida species is the fourth common cause of blood stream infections all over the world which is life threatening. Invasive candidiasis leads to increased mortality and morbidity especially in immunosuppressed. The antifungal resistance pattern in high-risk patients is major concern. The present study was to access the anticandidal activity of leaves, bark and seeds of Cassia fistula against fluconazole resistant Candida species, C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. kefyr and C. parapsilosis isolated from HIV patients. The predominant phytochemical component responsible for fungicidal activity was to be accessed. Ethanol, chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts of leaves, bark and seeds of C. fistula linn. was evaluated against Microbial type culture collection (MTCC) Candida strains and 21 fluconazole resistant clinical isolates. Antifungal activity was evaluated by agar diffusion and broth dilution techniques. The active phytochemical component present in the ethanol extract of seeds was accessed by high performance thin layer chromatography. The docking study was done with lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, the azole drug target with the predominant phytochemical from the extract having antifungal activity. All the extracts of C. fistula showed excellent anticandidal activity. Ethanol extract of C. fistula seed exhibited the most inhibitory activity. C. krusei and C. parapsilosis were the most inhibited and C. kefyr was the least inhibited species. The predominant phytochemical active component of the ethanol extract of seed was gallic acid. Gallic acid showed excellent binding with lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase. The present study reports the antifungal activity of various extracts of Cassia fistula for the first time against fluconazole resistant Candida isolates. We can conclude that the polyphenolic compound gallic acid is a potent natural antifungal agent. Further research is needed to assess the pharmacokinetic

  3. Apigenin inhibits African swine fever virus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, Astghik; Arabyan, Erik; Avetisyan, Aida; Abroyan, Liana; Hakobyan, Lina; Zakaryan, Hovakim

    2016-12-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is one of the most devastating diseases of domestic pigs for which no effective vaccines are available. Flavonoids, natural products isolated from plants, have been reported to have significant in vitro and in vivo antiviral activity against different viruses. Here, we tested the antiviral effect of five flavonoids on the replication of ASFV in Vero cells. Our results showed a potent, dose-dependent anti-ASFV effect of apigenin in vitro. Time-of-addition experiments revealed that apigenin was highly effective at the early stages of infection. Apigenin reduced the ASFV yield by more than 99.99 % when it was added at 1 hpi. The antiviral activity of apigenin was further investigated by evaluation of ASFV protein synthesis and viral factories. This flavonoid inhibited ASFV-specific protein synthesis and viral factory formation. ASFV-infected cells continuously treated with apigenin did not display a cytopathic effect. Further studies addressing the use of apigenin in vivo are needed.

  4. Poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro: structural elements and antibody inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, B.L.; Hanecak, R.; Dorner, L.F.; Anderson, C.W.; Wimmer, E.

    1983-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA polymerase complex has been analyzed by immunoautoradiography using antibody probes derived from purified replicase (P3) region viral polypeptides. Antibody preparations made against the polio RNA polymerase, P3-4b, detected a previously unreported cellular protein that copurifies with the RNA polymerase. An IgG fraction purified from rabbit antiserum to polypeptide P3-2, a precursor fo the RNA polymerase, specifically inhibits poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro. The authors have also immunoprecipitated a 60,000-dalton protein (P3-4a) with antiserum to protein P3-4b and have determined the precise genomic map position of this protein by automated Edman degradation. Protein P3-4a originates by cleavage of the RNA polymerase precursor at a glutamine-glucine amino acid pair not previously reported to be a viral cleavage site.

  5. Inhibition of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Medihoney in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R; Jenkins, L; Hooper, S

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been linked to chronic wound infections, where its ability to form biofilms and to tolerate antimicrobial agents helps to facilitate its persistence. This study aimed to investigate the susceptibility of biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Medihoney in vitro. Biofilms were cultivated in microtitre plates with and without a range of concentrations of Medihoney, and effects on biofilm were monitored by optical density (at 650nm), biomass (by staining with crystal violet), metabolic activity (using an esterase assay) and viability (by determining total cell counts). Structural effects on established biofilms were examined by scanning electron microscopy and epifluorescence following staining by LIVE/DEAD® BacLight, which also showed effects on vitality. The lowest concentration of Medihoney found to prevent biofilm formation was 17%(w/v), whereas on average 35.5%(w/v) of Medihoney was required to inhibit established biofilms. Susceptibility did not vary with length of biofilm establishment between 24 and 72 hours. Extensive structural changes in established biofilms were seen in the sample with less than or equal to 30%(w/v) Medihoney using scanning electron microscopy and loss of viability was found in test samples with less than or equal to 20%(w/v) Medihoney concentration using fluorescent staining, together with loss of biofilm structure. Using a range of methods to evaluate biofilm integrity, this study demonstrates that Medihoney inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in vitro at concentrations that are attainable in clinical use. Whether Medihoney has the potential to disrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cutaneous wounds must now be tested in patients. This study was sponsored by Derma Sciences Inc, NJ. An unrestricted grant was provided and the sponsors were not involved in the design of the experiments or the preparation of this manuscript.

  6. Experimental investigation of HGF inhibiting glial scar in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Wu, Zu-ze; Shu, Cui-li; Li, Ding-feng; Zeng, Yan-jun; Cui, Qiu; Jiang, Wei-hao

    2011-03-01

    To study the inhibitory effect of Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on the responsive hyperplasia of damaged astrocytes in vitro. We prepared damaged model of astrocytes to simulate the responsive hyperplasia of damaged astrocytes in vivo by culturing astrocytes in vitro; After the first day of Ad-HGF transfection, astrocytes were scratched, then after the first, the third, and the fifth day of scratch, we detect the expression amount of astrocytes specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the ratio of S-phase cells with flow cytometry, both of which can reflect the proliferation status of damaged astrocytes; After HGF was added in scratched astrocytes, the activity of SPK and MAPK (P42/44) were detected by autoradiography and immunoblotting test; After adding different concentrations of HGF protein in astrocytes cultured in different serum concentrations and adding diverse concentrations of HGF protein, SPK and SPK inhibitor DMS in scratched astrocytes, we detect cell proliferation with 3H-TDR incorporation. The first day after Ad-HGF transfected astrocytes were scratched, the amount of GFAP secreted by astrocytes were decreased significantly (P < 0.05), and the cells in S phase were declined obviously. HGF has bidirectional regulation on SPK of scratched astrocytes: increases the SPK activity when HGF in low dose, while inhibits when in high dose. In addition, DMS can block the signal passage; HGF had no effects on MAPK (P42/44) of damaged astrocytes cells. In conclusion, after the transfection of Ad-HGF, it can inhibit the responsive hyperplasia of damaged astrocytes by the means of blocking SPK passage.

  7. Voriconazole inhibits biofilm formation in different species of the genus Candida.

    PubMed

    Valentín, A; Cantón, E; Pemán, J; Martínez, J P

    2012-10-01

    To determine the ability of voriconazole to inhibit the formation of biofilms. A total of 38 blood isolates of Candida spp. (8 Candida albicans, 10 Candida tropicalis, 10 Candida glabrata, 7 Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto and 3 Candida orthopsilosis) and C. albicans ATCC 90028 and ATCC 64548 were assessed. Biofilm formation was quantified using XTT reduction assays. The inhibition of biofilm formation was determined (i) in the presence of 0.06 and 0.25 mg/L voriconazole, and (ii) on surfaces previously coated with 0.06, 0.25, 1, 4 and 16 mg/L voriconazole. Voriconazole reduced biofilm formation under both conditions, the extent depending on the species, isolate and drug concentration. In the presence of 0.25 mg/L, the highest reduction was found for C. parapsilosis (79% ± 8.6%), followed by C. albicans (64.5% ± 6.3%), C. tropicalis (53.3% ± 13.1%) and C. glabrata (23.8% ± 11.2%). This reduction was significant (P < 0.05) for all isolates tested. After coating the wells with voriconazole, biofilm formation was reduced in all Candida spp. examined, C. albicans being the species with the highest reduction (68.8% with 16 mg/L) and C. parapsilosis complex and C. glabrata the lowest. As voriconazole reduces biofilm formation it may be a good candidate for the prevention of Candida biofilm-related infections although further studies using voriconazole-impregnated catheter tubing or prostheses are required to confirm these results.

  8. Comparison between efficacy of allicin and fluconazole against Candida albicans in vitro and in a systemic candidiasis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Khodavandi, Alireza; Alizadeh, Fahimeh; Harmal, Nabil S; Sidik, Shiran M; Othman, Fauziah; Sekawi, Zamberi; Jahromi, Mohammad Ali Farboodniay; Ng, Kee-Peng; Chong, Pei Pei

    2011-02-01

    The efficacy of allicin compared with fluconazole in alleviating systemic Candida albicans infections was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo through a systemic candidiasis mouse model. Determination of in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for different C. albicans isolates revealed that both allicin and fluconazole showed different MICs that ranged from 0.05 to 12.5 μg mL(-1) and 0.25 to 16 μg mL(-1) , respectively. A time-kill study showed a significant effect of allicin (P<0.01) against C. albicans, comparable to that of fluconazole. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed that, similar to fluconazole, allicin produced structural destruction of C. albicans cell surface at low MIC and lysis or puncture at high MIC concentrations. Treatment of BALB/c mice systemically infected with C. albicans showed that although the allicin treatment (at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) ) was slightly less efficacious than fluconazole treatment in terms of the fungal load reduction and host survival time, it was still effective against C. albicans in terms of mean survival time, which increased from 8.4 to 15.8 days. These results demonstrate the efficacy of anticandidal effects of allicin both in vitro and in an animal model of candidiasis and affirm the potential of allicin as an adjuvant therapy to fluconazole.

  9. In vitro adherence of Candida albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Adriana Gadotti; KOMIYAMA, Edson Yukio; dos SANTOS, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; BRIGHENTI, Fernanda Lourenção; KOGA-ITO, Cristiane Yumi

    2011-01-01

    Adherence is considered an extremely important virulence factor in yeast. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the adherence to epithelial cells of C. albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis in comparison to healthy patients. Material and methods Candida albicans cells isolated from individuals with chronic periodontitis (n=25) and healthy controls (n=25) were included in this study. Suspensions of C. albicans (106 cells/mL) and epithelial cells (105 cells/mL) were mixed and incubated at 37ºC for 1 h. The number of yeasts adhered to 25 epithelial cells was counted. Results The number of C. albicans cells adhered to epithelial cells was statistically higher in the chronic periodontitis group than in the control group (Student's t-test, p=0.000). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest a higher Candida adherence of samples isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:21710096

  10. Minocycline Inhibits Candida albicans Budded-to-Hyphal-Form Transition and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Kurakado, Sanae; Takatori, Kazuhiko; Sugita, Takashi

    2017-09-25

    Candida albicans frequently causes bloodstream infections; its budded-to-hyphalform transition (BHT) and biofilm formation are major contributors to virulence. During an analysis of antibacterial compounds that inhibit C. albicans BHT, we found that the tetracycline derivative minocycline inhibited BHT and subsequent biofilm formation. Minocycline decreased expression of hypha-specific genes HWP1 and ECE1, and adhesion factor gene ALS3 of C. albicans. In addition, minocycline decreased cell surface hydrophobicity and the extracellular β-glucan level in biofilms. Minocycline has been widely used for catheter antibiotic lock therapy to prevent bacterial infection; this compound may also be prophylactically effective against Candida infection.

  11. Prevalence of Candida spp. in cervical-vaginal samples and the in vitro susceptibility of isolates.

    PubMed

    Brandolt, Tchana Martinez; Klafke, Gabriel Baracy; Gonçalves, Carla Vitola; Bitencourt, Laura Riffel; Martinez, Ana Maria Barral de; Mendes, Josiara Furtado; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection of the genital mucosa caused by different species of the genus Candida. Considering the lack of data on this topic in the south of Brazil, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of Candida spp. in the cervical-vaginal mucosa of patients treated at a university hospital in southern Rio Grande do Sul, as well as the etiology and the susceptibility of the isolates against fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole and nystatin. Samples were collected at the gynecology clinic of the Federal Hospital of the University of Rio Grande, and the isolates were identified using phenotypic and biochemical tests. The susceptibility analysis was performed according to the CLSI M27-A2 protocol. Of the 263 patients included, Candida spp. was isolated in 27%, corresponding to a prevalence of approximately 15% for both VVC and colonization. More than 60% of the isolates were identified as Candida albicans; C. non-albicans was isolated at a rate of 8.6% in symptomatic patients and 14.3% in asymptomatic patients. The prevalence of resistance against fluconazole and itraconazole was 42% and 48%, respectively; the minimal inhibitory concentration of miconazole ranged from 0.031 to 8μg/mL, and that of nystatin ranged from 2 to >16μg/mL. The high rate of resistance to triazoles observed in our study suggests the necessity of the association of laboratory exams to clinical diagnosis to minimize the practice of empirical treatments that can contribute to the development of resistance in the isolates.

  12. In vitro antifungal activity of Myracrodruon urundeuva Allemão against human vaginal Candida species.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Fernando A DE; Rorato, Vanessa C; Almeida-Apolonio, Adriana A; Rodrigues, Allan B; Barros, Aline L DE; Sangalli, Andréia; Arena, Arielle C; Mota, Jonas S; Grisolia, Alexéia B; Oliveira, Kelly M P DE

    2017-07-24

    Myracrodruon urundeuva is a plant native to Brazil, which is used by the indigenous population for the treatment of candidiasis. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antifungal activity of extract against human vaginal Candida species and evaluate the possible toxicological activities of M. urundeuva. Initially, ethanol extracts, ethyl acetate fractions, and hydroalcoholic fractions of the bark and leaf of M. urundeuva were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration. The extracts that showed antifungal activity were characterized by liquid chromatography and subjected to toxicity assessment. Toxic, cytotoxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic testing were performed using Allium cepa and Ames assays with the ethanol extracts of the bark and leaves. Hemolytic activity was evaluated in erythrocytes and acute toxicity in rats. The ethanol bark extracts showed best activity against Candida albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis ATCC (4-512 µg/mL). Chemical characterization indicated the presence of flavonoids and tannins in the extracts. Hemolytic activity, genotoxicity, and mutagenicity were not observed. The results of the Ames and A. cepa tests were also in agreement, ethanol bark extracts and ethanol leaf extracts of M. urundeuva showed absence of mutagenic activity. Similar results were observed in the A. cepa assay and acute toxicity test in rats. M. urundeuva bark extracts showed potential for the treatment of vaginal infections caused Candida species, as a topical.

  13. In vitro inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory rate by antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2012-09-18

    Mitochondria represent a possible drug target with unexplored therapeutic and toxicological potential. The possibility was suggested that antidepressants, mood stabilizers and other drugs may show some therapeutic and/or toxic effects through their action on mitochondrial functions. There are no sufficient data about the effect of these drugs on mitochondrial respiration in the brain. We investigated the in vitro effects of amitriptyline, fluoxetine, tianeptine, ketamine, lithium, valproate, olanzapine, chlorpromazine and propranolol on mitochondrial respiration in crude mitochondrial fractions of pig brains. Respiration was energized using substrates of complex I or complex II and dose dependent drug-induced changes in mitochondrial respiratory rate were measured by high-resolution respirometry. Antidepressants, but not mood stabilizers, ketamine and propranolol were found to inhibit mitochondrial respiratory rate. The effective dose of antidepressants reaching half the maximal respiratory rate was in the range of 0.07-0.46 mmol/L. Partial inhibition was found for all inhibitors. Differences between individual drugs with similar physicochemical properties indicate selectivity of drug-induced changes in mitochondrial respiratory rate. Our findings suggest that mood stabilizers do not interfere with brain mitochondrial respiration, whereas direct mitochondrial targeting is involved in mechanisms of action of pharmacologically different antidepressants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An In-vitro Evaluation of Retention, Colonization and Penetration of Commonly Used Denture Lining Materials By Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hallikerimath, Rajendra B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Colonization of the surface by Candida albicans and related Candida species is one of the major concerns of denture lining materials. Aim We evaluated retention, colonization and penetration of the four denture lining materials namely Molloplast B, Permaflex, GC Soft Liner and Ufi Gel Hard C by Candida albicans. Material and Methods a) Evaluation of retention: Five test discs of each material with smooth surface on one side and rough on the other were prepared and surface roughness (Ra) was measured with profilometer. Retention of C. albicans to discs was monitored after one hour of incubation (37°C) with standardized (2.8 x 106 cfu/ml) washed cell suspension. Discs were stained with acridine orange and attached cells were counted using inverted microscope; b) Evaluation of colonization and penetration: Eight test discs of each material in sterile artificial saliva, were inoculated with C. albicans and incubated for six weeks. Two sections were cut across each test disc to provide three replicate samples. Candida cells on cut disc sections were fixed, dehydrated, air dried and viewed via fluorescence microscope; c) Evaluation of antifungal action: Two test discs of each material were placed onto diagnostic sensitivity testing the agar plate. After incubation at 37°C for 24 hours, the zone of inhibition formed around the samples were measured at four places, and the mean calculated. Results a) All rough surfaces showed higher retention of C. albicans than smooth surfaces. Among the smooth surfaces, Molloplast B and GC Soft Liner showed highest and lowest retention of C. albicans respectively (p=0.0090). Among the rough surfaces, the variation in the retention of C. albicans was not statistically significant; b) Penetration of C. albicans was observed through all three sections of the test discs of each material. There was no statistically significant difference among the test materials; c) Molloplast B and Permaflex produced a mean zone of inhibition

  15. An In-vitro Evaluation of Retention, Colonization and Penetration of Commonly Used Denture Lining Materials By Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Sushma; Hallikerimath, Rajendra B

    2016-10-01

    Colonization of the surface by Candida albicans and related Candida species is one of the major concerns of denture lining materials. We evaluated retention, colonization and penetration of the four denture lining materials namely Molloplast B, Permaflex, GC Soft Liner and Ufi Gel Hard C by Candida albicans. a) Evaluation of retention: Five test discs of each material with smooth surface on one side and rough on the other were prepared and surface roughness (Ra) was measured with profilometer. Retention of C. albicans to discs was monitored after one hour of incubation (37°C) with standardized (2.8 x 10(6) cfu/ml) washed cell suspension. Discs were stained with acridine orange and attached cells were counted using inverted microscope; b) Evaluation of colonization and penetration: Eight test discs of each material in sterile artificial saliva, were inoculated with C. albicans and incubated for six weeks. Two sections were cut across each test disc to provide three replicate samples. Candida cells on cut disc sections were fixed, dehydrated, air dried and viewed via fluorescence microscope; c) Evaluation of antifungal action: Two test discs of each material were placed onto diagnostic sensitivity testing the agar plate. After incubation at 37°C for 24 hours, the zone of inhibition formed around the samples were measured at four places, and the mean calculated. a) All rough surfaces showed higher retention of C. albicans than smooth surfaces. Among the smooth surfaces, Molloplast B and GC Soft Liner showed highest and lowest retention of C. albicans respectively (p=0.0090). Among the rough surfaces, the variation in the retention of C. albicans was not statistically significant; b) Penetration of C. albicans was observed through all three sections of the test discs of each material. There was no statistically significant difference among the test materials; c) Molloplast B and Permaflex produced a mean zone of inhibition of 16.9±4.8mm and 14.80±3.8mm respectively

  16. Selective inhibition of 14 alpha-desmethyl sterol synthesis in Candida albicans by terconazole, a new triazole antimycotic.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, D M; Tolman, E L; Tobia, A J; Rosenthale, M E; McGuire, J L; Vanden Bossche, H; Janssen, P A

    1988-03-01

    Terconazole, a new broad spectrum antimycotic triazole derivative, has been shown to have potent activity against Candida albicans in vitro and to be effective in animal models of yeast infections. The present study explored a possible mechanism of anticandidal activity of terconazole. The compound inhibited production of 14 alpha-desmethyl sterols (e.g. ergosterol) in C. albicans at concentrations (IC50 = 3-6 x 10(-9) M) lower than those inhibiting the in-vitro growth of the yeast. There was concomitant accumulation of methylated sterols, (e.g. lanosterol), which are considered detrimental to normal yeast cell membrane function. Terconazole stimulated incorporation of 14C-acetate into triglycerides, but had no other effect on C. albicans lipid metabolism. At concentrations greater than or equal to 10(-6)M terconazole inhibited the oxidation of 14C-acetate into 14CO2 in C. albicans although the mechanism for this effect remains unclear. These data indicate that terconazole is a specific inhibitor of yeast C-14 desmethyl sterol production in C. albicans. Furthermore, terconazole reduced cytochrome P-450 levels in yeast microsomes at concentrations 10,000-fold below those at which it showed effects on rabbit liver microsomes. These data indicate a species specificity for the biochemical actions of terconazole. The C-14 alpha-desmethylase system in yeast cell membranes is cytochrome P-450 associated. Thus, terconazole, was a potent inhibitor of C-14 desmethyl sterol synthesis. This effect could contribute to the anticandidal activity of the drug.

  17. In vitro photodynamic properties of methylene blue in a combination with laser illumination at 630 nm concerning Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pasyechnikova, Nataliya; Zborovskaya, Olexandra; Kustrin, Taras

    2009-01-01

    The study had to define influence of combined applications of laser radiation and methylene blue (MB) on pathogenic culture of Candida albicans in vitro. The experimental study was done at standard techniques of method of cultivations in a broth. The laser irradiation of cultures was done at once after addition of MB in concentration 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.2%. During studying action of MB in dark, influence of MB to the growth of test-shtam without laser radiation, were prepared fluid Gissa's broth with glucose without Andrede's indicator. Activation of MB was done by laser with wave length 630 nm during 3 or 5 min. All experiments were passed in 4 parallels and 3 repeats. Maximal suppression of growth of microorganisms was noted in group with using 0.1% MB with laser radiation 3 minutes without centrifugation after 24 hours. Maximal suppression of growth was noted in group after centrifugation with 0.05% MB with exposure of laser 3 min. after 48 hours. Sensitivity of pathogenic culture of Candida albicans to application of B and laser raises accordingly to increase of concentration of MB.

  18. In vitro activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil against bacterial and Candida spp. isolates from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Banes-Marshall, L; Cawley, P; Phillips, C A

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro activity of tea tree oil (TTO) against a range of wild strains of microorganisms isolated from clinical specimens of leg ulcers and pressure sores. The antimicrobial effectiveness of TTO is determined in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) or minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). The isolates include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), S. aureus, faecal streptococci, beta-haemolytic streptococci, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Pseudomonas spp. and coliform bacilli. Eleven Candida spp. isolates from skin and vaginal swabs also are tested. Using an agar dilution assay, the MICs of TTO in 88 out of 90 isolates was 0.5-1.0% (v/v), whilst with P. aeruginosa it was >2% (v/v). A broth microdilution method was used to determine MIC and minimum cidal concentration (MCC) of 80 isolates. In 64 isolates, TTO produced an inhibitory and cidal effect at 3% and 4% (v/v), respectively. S. aureus and Candida spp. were the most susceptible to TTO, with MICs and MBCs of 0.5% and 1%, respectively. P. aeruginosa and the faecal streptococci isolates, with MICs and MBCs of >8%, were resistant to TTO.

  19. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Candida Isolates with the EUCAST Methodology, a New Method for ECOFF Determination.

    PubMed

    Meletiadis, J; Curfs-Breuker, I; Meis, J F; Mouton, J W

    2017-04-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 1,099 molecularly identified clinical Candida isolates against 8 antifungal drugs were determined using the EUCAST microdilution method. A new simple, objective, and mathematically solid method for determining epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) was developed by derivatizing the MIC distribution and determining the derivatized ECOFF (dECOFF) as the highest MIC with the maximum second derivative. The dECOFFs were similar (95% agreement within 1 dilution) to the EUCAST ECOFFs. Overall, low non-wild-type/resistance rates were found. The highest rates were found for azoles with C. parapsilosis (2.7 to 9.8%), C. albicans (7%), and C. glabrata (1.7 to 2.3%) and for echinocandins with C. krusei (3.3%), C. albicans (1%), and C. tropicalis (1.7%). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. In Vitro Interactions between Aspirin and Amphotericin B against Planktonic Cells and Biofilm Cells of Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yabin; Wang, Ganggang; Li, Yutang; Liu, Yang; Song, Yu; Zheng, Wenshuai; Zhang, Ning; Hu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Shikun

    2012-01-01

    The increase in drug resistance and invasion caused by biofilm formation brings enormous challenges to the management of Candida infection. Aspirin's antibiofilm activity in vitro was discovered recently. The spectrophotometric method and the XTT {2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide} reduction assay used for data generation make it possible to evaluate fungal biofilm growth accurately. The combined use of the most commonly used methods, the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) and a newly developed method, the ΔE model, which uses the concentration-effect relationship over the whole concentration range instead of using the MIC index alone, makes the interpretation of results more reliable. As an attractive tool for studying the pharmacodynamics of antimicrobial agents, time-kill curves can provide detailed information about antimicrobial efficacy as a function of both time and concentration. In the present study, in vitro interactions between aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid [ASA]) and amphotericin B (AMB) against planktonic cells and biofilm cells of Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis were evaluated by the checkerboard microdilution method and the time-kill test. Synergistic and indifferent effects were found for the combination of ASA and AMB against planktonic cells, while strong synergy was found against biofilm cells analyzed by FICI. The ΔE model gave more consistent results with FICI. The positive interactions in concentration were also confirmed by the time-kill test. Moreover, this approach also revealed the pharmacodynamics changes of ASA and synergistic action on time. Our findings suggest a potential clinical use for combination therapy with ASA and AMB to augment activity against biofilm-associated infections. PMID:22391539

  1. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm by pure selenium nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation in liquids.

    PubMed

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Lara, Humberto H; Mendoza-Cruz, Ruben; Naranjo, Guillermo; Vincent, Brandy A; Peralta, Xomalin G; Nash, Kelly L

    2016-10-25

    Selenoproteins play an important role in the human body by accomplishing essential biological functions like oxido-reductions, antioxidant defense, thyroid hormone metabolism and immune response; therefore, the possibility to synthesize selenium nanoparticles free of any contaminants is exciting for future nano-medical applications. This paper reports the first synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by femtosecond pulsed laser ablation in de-ionized water. Those pure nanoparticles have been successfully used to inhibit the formation of Candida albicans biofilms. Advanced electron microscopy images showed that selenium nanoparticles easily adhere on the biofilm, then penetrate into the pathogen, and consequently damage the cell structure by substituting with sulfur. 50% inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm was obtained at only 25 ppm. Finally, the two physical parameters proved to affect strongly the viability of Candida albicans are the crystallinity and particle size.

  2. In Vitro Killing of Candida albicans by Fatty Acids and Monoglycerides

    PubMed Central

    Bergsson, Gudmundur; Arnfinnsson, Jóhann; Steingrímsson, Ólafur; Thormar, Halldor

    2001-01-01

    The susceptibility of Candida albicans to several fatty acids and their 1-monoglycerides was tested with a short inactivation time, and ultrathin sections were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after treatment with capric acid. The results show that capric acid, a 10-carbon saturated fatty acid, causes the fastest and most effective killing of all three strains of C. albicans tested, leaving the cytoplasm disorganized and shrunken because of a disrupted or disintegrated plasma membrane. Lauric acid, a 12-carbon saturated fatty acid, was the most active at lower concentrations and after a longer incubation time. PMID:11600381

  3. Growth inhibition of Candida species by Wickerhamomyces anomalus mycocin and a lactone compound of Aureobasidium pullulans.

    PubMed

    Tay, Sun-Tee; Lim, Su-Lin; Tan, Hui-Wee

    2014-11-08

    The increasing resistance of Candida yeasts towards antifungal compounds and the limited choice of therapeutic drugs have spurred great interest amongst the scientific community to search for alternative anti-Candida compounds. Mycocins and fungal metabolites have been reported to have the potential for treatment of fungal infections. In this study, the growth inhibition of Candida species by a mycocin produced by Wickerhamomyces anomalus and a lactone compound from Aureobasidium pullulans were investigated. Mycocin was purified from the culture supernatant of an environmental isolate of W. anomalus using Sephadex G-75 gel filtration column chromatography. The mycocin preparation was subjected to SDS-PAGE analysis followed by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The thermal and temperature stability of the mycocin were determined. The glucanase activity of the mycocin was investigated by substrate staining of the mycocin with 4-methyl-umbelliferyl-ß-D-glucoside (MUG). Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) analysis was used to identify anti-Candida metabolite in the culture supernatant of an environmental isolate of Aureobasidium pullulans. The inhibitory effects of the anti-Candida compound against planktonic and biofilm cultures of various Candida species were determined using broth microdilution and biofilm quantitation methods. A mycocin active against Candida mesorugosa but not C. albicans, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei was isolated from the culture supernatant of W. anomalus in this study. The mycocin, identified as exo-ß-1,3 glucanase by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, was stable at pH 3-6 and temperature ranging from 4-37°C. The glucanase activity of the mycocin was confirmed by substrate staining with MUG. 5-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid lactone (HDCL) was identified from the culture supernatant of A. pullulans. Using a commercial source of HDCL, the planktonic and biofilm MICs of HDCL against various Candida species were determined in this study

  4. Biofilm formation by Candida species on silicone surfaces and latex pacifier nipples: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Luiz Cezar; Charone, Senda; Maia, Lucianne Cople; Soares, Rosangela Maria de Araújo; Portela, Maristela Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    The present study assessed the growth and development of biofilm formation by isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis on silicone and latex pacifier nipples. The silicone and latex surfaces were evaluated by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The plastic component of the nipple also seems to be an important factor regarding the biofilm formation by Candida spp. The biofilm growth was measured using the MTT reduction reaction. C. albicans was found to have a slightly greater capacity of forming biofilm compared to the other Candida species. Analysis of the pattern of biofilm development by C. albicans, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis on latex and silicon pacifier shields showed an increased biofilm formation regarding the latter substrate. Silicone was shown to be more resistant to fungal colonization, particularly in the case of C. parapsilosis, despite the lack of any statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). In addition, silicone has a smoother surface compared to latex, whose surface was found to be rugose and irregular.

  5. In vitro susceptibility of 137 Candida sp. isolates from HIV positive patients to several antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Magaldi, S; Mata, S; Hartung, C; Verde, G; Deibis, L; Roldán, Y; Marcano, C

    2001-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis caused by various species of Candida is one of the most common infections in HIV seropositive or AIDS patients. Drug resistance among these yeasts is an increasing problem. We studied the frequency of resistance profile to fluconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, amphotericin B and terbinafine of 137 isolates of Candida sp. From HIV positive or AIDS patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis at Instituto de Inmunología, U.C.V. and the Hospital "Jose Ignacio Baldó", Caracas Venezuela, using the well diffusion susceptibility test (Magaldi et al.). We found that nearly 10% of C. albicans isolates were primarily fluconazole resistant, 45% of C. albicans isolates from patients with previous treatment were resistant to fluconazole, of which 93% showed cross-resistance to itraconazole, and even about 30% of C. tropicalis (n = 13) were resistant to fluconazole and/or itraconazole. To this respect, several recent reports have been described antifungal cross-resistance among azoles. Therefore, we consider that C. tropicalis should be added to the growing list of yeast in which antifungal drug resistance is common. This report could be useful for therapeutic aspect in AIDS patients with oral candidiasis.

  6. In vitro susceptibilities of bloodstream isolates of Candida spp.: results from a multicenter active surveillance program in Andalusia.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Carmen; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Ruiz, Maite; Cisneros, José Miguel; Herrero, Marta; García, M Victoria; García, Ma Victoria; Márquez, Manuel; Porras, José; Martín, Patricia; Gamero, Carmen; Castón, Juan José

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antifungal drug susceptibilities of Candida bloodstream isolates in Andalusia, obtained through a multicenter active laboratory-based surveillance between October 2005 and September 2006. One hundred and ninety-seven Candida isolates were collected. The MICs of amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were established using the Sensititre YeastOne panel. The MICs of posaconazole and caspofungin were determined by Etest. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species (49.2%), followed by C. parapsilosis (17.3%), C. tropicalis (15.2%), C. glabrata (13.7%) and C. krusei (3.6%). All strains were inhibited at MICs of inhibited at MICs of < or = 1 mg/L of posaconazole. A total of 8 isolates (4.1%) were classified as resistant to fluconazole (MIC > or = 64 mg/L) and 7 (3.6%) were considered resistant to itraconazole (MIC > or = 1 mg/L). All the isolates were susceptible to voriconazole and caspofungin. In our study C. krusei and C. glabrata were identified in over 18% of cases of candidemia. Most clinical isolates of these species are resistant or susceptible-dose-dependent to fluconazole but susceptible to voriconazole and caspofungin. These agents must be used in the empiric treatment of candidemia rather than fluconazole.

  7. Inhibition of alcoholic fermentation by substrate and ethanol. [Candida pseudotropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Maulin, H.B.; Galzy, P.

    1980-11-01

    The effect of ethanol and sugars on rates of fermentation was studied. A strain of Candida pseudotropicalis was used. The specific rate of fermentation was determined by using the Warburg manometer. The effect of ethanol was formulated as an exponential function of ethanol concentration, but the empirical constant was different when glucose or lactose was used as a substrate. The effects of both ethanol and substrate were formulated. It was demonstrated that when lactose and glucose were present in the medium with a small amount of alcohol, a synergistic effect on the rate of fermentation appeared. This phenomenon considerably limits the rate of fermentation.

  8. Quercetin inhibits rhinovirus replication in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shyamala; Faris, Andrea N.; Comstock, Adam T.; Wang, Qiong; Nanua, Suparna; Hershenson, Marc B.; Sajjan, Uma S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rhinovirus (RV), which is responsible for the majority of common colds, also causes exacerbations in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. So far, there are no drugs available for treatment of rhinovirus infection. We examined the effect of quercetin, a plant flavanol on RV infection in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of airway epithelial cells with quercetin decreased Akt phosphosphorylation, viral endocytosis and IL-8 responses. Addition of quercetin 6 h after RV infection (after viral endocytosis) reduced viral load, IL-8 and IFN responses in airway epithelial cells. This was associated with decreased levels of negative and positive strand viral RNA, and RV capsid protein, abrogation of RV-induced eIF4GI cleavage and increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. In mice infected with RV, quercetin treatment decreased viral replication as well as expression of chemokines and cytokines. Quercetin treatment also attenuated RV-induced airway cholinergic hyperresponsiveness. Together, our results suggest that quercetin inhibits RV endocytosis and replication in airway epithelial cells at multiple stages of the RV life cycle. Quercetin also decreases expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and improves lung function in RV-infected mice. Based on these observations, further studies examining the potential benefits of quercetin in the prevention and treatment of RV infection are warranted. PMID:22465313

  9. Further evidence that naphthoquinone inhibits Toxoplasma gondii growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luciana Lemos Rangel; Portes, Juliana de Araujo; de Araújo, Marlon Heggdorne; Silva, Jéssica Lays Sant'ana; Rennó, Magdalena Nascimento; Netto, Chaquip Daher; da Silva, Alcides José Monteiro; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; De Souza, Wanderley; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; DaMatta, Renato Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely disseminated disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan parasite. Standard treatment causes many side effects, such as depletion of bone marrow cells, skin rashes and gastrointestinal implications. Therefore, it is necessary to find chemotherapeutic alternatives for the treatment of this disease. It was shown that a naphthoquinone derivative compound is active against T. gondii, RH strain, with an IC50 around 2.5 μM. Here, three different naphthoquinone derivative compounds with activity against leukemia cells and breast carcinoma cell were tested against T. gondii (RH strain) infected LLC-MK2 cell line. All the compounds were able to inhibit parasite growth in vitro, but one of them showed an IC50 activity below 1 μM after 48 h of treatment. The compounds showed low toxicity to the host cell. In addition, these compounds were able to induce tachyzoite-bradyzoite conversion confirmed by morphological changes, Dolichus biflorus lectin cyst wall labeling and characterization of amylopectin granules in the parasites by electron microscopy analysis using the Thierry technique. Furthermore, the compounds induced alterations on the ultrastructure of the parasite. Taken together, our results point to the naphthoquinone derivative (LQB 151) as a potential compound for the development of new drugs for the treatment of toxoplasmosis.

  10. Overexpression of KAI1 inhibits retinoblastoma metastasis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hui; Ji, Xunda; Li, Jing; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Peiquan

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of cluster of differentiation 82 (KAI1), a gene involved in the suppression of tumor metastasis, in human retinoblastoma (RB) tissue and to study the effect of KAI1 expression on RB cell migration and invasion. KAI1 expression was examined in 26 patients with non-invasive and invasive retinoblastoma using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. A lentiviral vector containing KAI1 cDNA was used to transfect the two RB cell lines, HXO-Rb44-Gl and Y79. Following successful transfection, the migratory and invasive capacity of the two RB cell lines was evaluated using a Transwell® migration assay. KAI1 expression was observed to be downregulated in invasive RB compared to non-invasive RB. The migratory and invasive capacities of KAI1 transfected cell lines were significantly decreased compared to those of the control cells. KAI1 may be involved in retinoblastoma metastasis, and increased expression of KAI1 significantly inhibits the metastatic ability of RB cells in vitro. PMID:28356965

  11. Biofilm inhibition by Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils in the strains of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2012-03-27

    Oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum have been used in traditional medicine to treat fungal infections of skin, mouth, urinary and vaginal tract in Asian countries particularly India and other developing countries. To evaluate essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum for their anti-biofilm activity against strong biofilm forming strains of Candida albicans. XTT reduction assay, Time kill assays, light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to determine the effect of test oils on the Candida albicans biofilms. Most of the Candida albicans strains tested displayed formation of moderate to strong biofilms. Preformed Candida biofilms showed ≥1024 times increased resistance to antifungal drugs, 2 times to Syzygium aromaticum, but no increased tolerance for Cymbopogon citratus. Test oils were more active against preformed biofilms compared to amphotericin B and fluconazole. At 0.5× MIC, Cymbopogon citratus followed by Syzygium aromaticum were most inhibitory against biofilm formation. Light and electron microscopic studies revealed the deformity of three dimensional structures of biofilms formed in the presence of sub-MICs of Cymbopogon citratus. The cell membranes appeared to be the target site of compounds in sessile cells as displayed by SEM observations. Our data had demonstrated promising in vitro anti-biofilm activity by Cymbopogon citratus and Syzygium aromaticum and confirm the ethnopharmacological use of these oils in muco-cutaneous Candida infections. Furthermore, it suggests exploitation of these oils as new anti-biofilm products to deal with the problem of drug-resistance and recurrent infection associated with biofilm mode of growth of Candida spp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli promotes the invasion and tissue damage of enterocytes infected with Candida albicans in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiming; Zhou, Yanjun; Wu, Chunrong; Tang, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    The principal aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro co-infection of Caco-2 cells with Candida albicans and enterohemorrhage Escherichia coli (EHEC). The ability of both species to colonize or invade the Caco-2 cells was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence and inverted microscopy. The damage to Caco-2 cells was evaluated by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. C. albicans virulence gene expression (HWP1, ALS3, PLB1, SAP4, and EFG1) was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Compared to single infections with enterohemorrhage Escherichia coli or C. albicans, a co-infection colonized or invaded Caco-2 cells more quickly, and C. albicans tended to accumulate more easily, accompanied by the upregulation of related genes. In addition, the LDH activity in the co-infected group was higher than in cells infected with C. albicans or with enterohemorrhage Escherichia coli, accompanied by the upregulation of toxicity-related genes. Using Caco-2 cells as an infection model, this study demonstrated that co-infecting in vitro enterocytes with C. albicans and enterohemorrhage Escherichia coli enhanced the invasiveness and tissue damaging effects of C. albicans. PMID:27874093

  13. Establishment of an In vitro System to Study Intracellular Behavior of Candida glabrata in Human THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Maruti Nandan; Borah, Sapan; Gorityala, Neelima; Kaur, Rupinder

    2013-01-01

    A cell culture model system, if a close mimic of host environmental conditions, can serve as an inexpensive, reproducible and easily manipulatable alternative to animal model systems for the study of a specific step of microbial pathogen infection. A human monocytic cell line THP-1 which, upon phorbol ester treatment, is differentiated into macrophages, has previously been used to study virulence strategies of many intracellular pathogens including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we discuss a protocol to enact an in vitro cell culture model system using THP-1 macrophages to delineate the interaction of an opportunistic human yeast pathogen Candida glabrata with host phagocytic cells. This model system is simple, fast, amenable to high-throughput mutant screens, and requires no sophisticated equipment. A typical THP-1 macrophage infection experiment takes approximately 24 hr with an additional 24-48 hr to allow recovered intracellular yeast to grow on rich medium for colony forming unit-based viability analysis. Like other in vitro model systems, a possible limitation of this approach is difficulty in extrapolating the results obtained to a highly complex immune cell circuitry existing in the human host. However, despite this, the current protocol is very useful to elucidate the strategies that a fungal pathogen may employ to evade/counteract antimicrobial response and survive, adapt, and proliferate in the nutrient-poor environment of host immune cells. PMID:24378622

  14. Effectiveness of Different Cleaning Agents against the Colonization of Candida spp and the in Vitro Detection of the Adherence of These Yeast Cells to Denture Acrylic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kalkanci, Ayse; Filiz, Banu; Kustimur, Semra

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to examine the effect Klorhex and Fittydent, which are used as cleaning agents on the adhesion of Candida on the surfaces of acrylic denture and palatal mucosa. In addition, ability of yeasts to adhere to acrylic strips was evaluated after applying these agents in vitro. Materials and Methods Each group of 15 patients cleaned their dentures with either Klorhex or with Fittydent. The control group cleaned their dentures with water. Results It was found that 62.2% of the patients had colonies of Candida species on their palatal mucosa which was reduced to 51.1% after using these cleaning agents. The colonization rate with Candida spp on their dentures was reduces from 82.2% to 68.8% using these cleaning agents. The mean adhesion value of the Candida strains isolated from the acrylic strips were found to be 75 cell/strip prior to applying the Klorhex and Fittydent and 37.5 cell/strip and 15 cell/strip after applying these agents, respectively. Conclusion These results showed that Klorhex and Fittydent have a certain preventive effect on the colonization rate of Candida spp on the surface of these dentures, the palatal mucosa, as well as on the acrylic strips in vitro. PMID:18729309

  15. Effect of CAWS, a mannoprotein-beta-glucan complex of Candida albicans, on leukocyte, endothelial cell, and platelet functions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Shingo, Yuko; Miura, Noriko N; Horie, Shuichi; Usui, Yukio; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Yadomae, Toshiro; Ohno, Naohito

    2003-02-01

    Candida albicans is a medically important fungus which induces a disseminated candidasis and candidemia in immunocompromised hosts, and releases a polysaccharide fraction into the blood. We recently found that C. albicans released a water-soluble polysaccharide fraction (CAWS) into synthetic medium and demonstrated that CAWS was mainly composed of a complex of mannan and beta-glucan. In the murine system, CAWS showed a lethality resembling anaphylactic shock when administered i.v., and induced coronary arteritis similar to Kawasaki Disease (KD) when given i.p. In the present study, we examined the biological activity of CAWS in the cell culture and found the following: i) CAWS slightly induced production of IFN-gamma and IL-6 by splenocytes at lower dose (ca. 10 micro g/ml), but at a higher dose strongly inhibited the proliferation of splenocytes induced by a B cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a T cell mitogen, concanavalin A. ii) The viability of these splenocytes monitored by propidium iodide staining was significantly reduced. iii) The addition of CAWS to a culture of monophage RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced cellular growth rate dose dependently. iv) The LPS-mediated synthesis of cytokines by RAW264.7 cells was significantly inhibited by CAWS. v) CAWS induced an aggregation of platelets in human platelet-rich plasma, and vi) CAWS inhibited the production of thrombomodulin by human umbilical endothelial cells and acted synergistically with TNF-alpha. Thus, CAWS strongly inhibited the cellular functions of leukocytes in vitro, partly through direct cytotoxicity. The enhanced production in injured cells of the vascular endothelium would be related to the local inflammatory response in the coronary artery.

  16. Effect of aqueous extract of miswak on the in vitro growth of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    al-Bagieh, N H; Idowu, A; Salako, N O

    1994-01-01

    Chewing sticks (miswak) which are the roots of Salvadora persica plant have been used for centuries as oral hygiene tools in many parts of the world particularly in Saudi Arabia. Many studies have demonstrated the antiplaque, antiperiopathic, anticaries and antibacterial effect of these sticks. This study was designed to investigate the antimycotic effect, if any, of the aqueous extract of the plant roots. Various concentrations of aqueous extract of miswak prepared with Sabouraud medium were inoculated with Candida albicans (oral isolate). These were incubated at 37 degrees C and the turbidity was determined by OD at 600 nm wavelength measured at specific intervals over a period of 48 h. Data show that the extract at a concentration of 15% and above, has a fungistatic effect for up to 48 h. This antimycotic effect was probably due to one or more of the root contents which included chlorine, trimethylamine, and alkaloid resin, and sulphur compounds.

  17. In vitro and in vivo effects of 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11) depletion in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, H; Nakayama, N; Arisawa, M; Aoki, Y

    2001-11-01

    Sterol 14alpha-demethylase (ERG11) is the target enzyme of azole antifungals that are widely used for the treatment of fungal infections. Candida glabrata is known to be less susceptible to fluconazole than most Candida albicans strains, and the incidence of C. glabrata infection has been increasing mostly in conjunction with the use of azole antifungals. Recently, it has been reported that C. glabrata can rescue the defect of ergosterol biosynthesis by incorporating cholesterol from serum. To explore the effect of inactivating Erg11p in C. glabrata, we generated mutant strains in which the ERG11 gene was placed under the control of tetracycline-regulatable promoters. In these mutants, expression of the ERG11 gene can be repressed by doxycycline (DOX). All mutants showed a growth defect in the presence of DOX. The numbers of CFU of the mutants were lowered by only 1/10 with DOX treatment. In these mutants, accumulation of 4,14-dimethylzymosterol, which differs from an accumulated abnormal sterol detected in C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated with fluconazole, was observed by DOX treatment. Although such phenotypes were also observed in serum-containing media by DOX treatment, they were alleviated. Furthermore, the mutant could grow in DOX-treated mice without a severe reduction in the number of cells. Thus, depleting the expression of the ERG11 gene lowered the number of CFU by only 1/10 due to the accumulation of 4,14-demethylzymosterol in vitro, and it did not result in the defective growth of fungal cells in mice. These results suggested that Erg11p is not an ideal target molecule of antifungals for C. glabrata.

  18. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis. PMID:26416861

  19. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa Vieira Machado; Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Rozental, Sonia; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-12-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis.

  20. In vitro studies of a new antifungal triazole, D0870, against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and other pathogenic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Peng, T; Galgiani, J N

    1993-10-01

    We investigated the effects of various assay conditions on the activity of D0870 against seven species of fungi in the broth macrodilution testing procedure proposed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that endpoint definition, starting inoculum size, medium composition, type of buffer, and length of incubation, but not pH or temperature, had significant effects on results. Increasing the inoculum from 10(2) to 10(5) yeast cells/ml raised the MICs for all isolates up to > 75,000 fold. This effect was greatest when endpoints corresponded to a 90% reduction in visually determined turbidity (MIC90), was less prominent with an 80% inhibition visual endpoint (MIC80), and was nearly absent with a 50% endpoint measured by a spectrophotometer (IC1/2). Differences due to medium composition were attributable to antibiotic medium 3 with RPMI and yeast nitrogen base media performing nearly identically. Under standardized conditions as specified in NCCLS document M27-P (Reference Method for Broth Dilution Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Yeasts; Proposed Standard, 1992), 79 strains (5 to 25 strains for each species) demonstrated median MIC80s of 0.0037 and 0.0075 microgram/ml for Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, respectively. In contrast, Candida krusei and Torulopsis glabrata had a median MIC80 of 1.0 microgram/ml. Our studies indicate that the pathogenic yeasts C. albicans and C. neoformans are more susceptible to D0870 than other pathogenic yeasts.

  1. The in vitro and in vivo efficacy of fluconazole in combination with farnesol against Candida albicans isolates using a murine vulvovaginitis model.

    PubMed

    Bozó, Aliz; Domán, Marianna; Majoros, László; Kardos, Gábor; Varga, István; Kovács, Renátó

    2016-11-01

    Farnesol is a quorum-sensing molecule that inhibits biofilm formation in Candida albicans. Previous in vitro data suggest that, in combination with certain antifungals, farnesol may have an adjuvant anti-biofilm agent. However, the in vivo efficacy of farnesol is very questionable. Therefore, the in vitro and in vivo activity of fluconazole combined with farnesol was evaluated against C. albicans biofilms using fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) determination, time-kill experiments and a murine vulvovaginitis model. The median biofilm MICs of fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates ranged between 4 -> 512 mg/L and 150-300 μM for fluconazole and farnesol, respectively. These values were 512 -> 512 mg/L and > 300 μM for fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates. Farnesol decreased the median MICs of fluconazole by 2-64-fold for biofilms. Based on FICI, synergistic interaction was observed only in the case of the sessile SC5314 reference strain (FICIs: 0.16-0.27). In time-kill studies, only the 512 mg/L fluconazole and 512 mg/L fluconazole + 75 μM farnesol reduced biofilm mass significantly at each time point in the case of all isolates. The combination reduced the metabolic activity of biofilms for all isolates in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Our findings revealed that farnesol alone was not protective in a murine vulvovaginitis model. Farnesol was not beneficial in combination with fluconazole for fluconazole-susceptible isolates, but partially increased fluconazole activity against one fluconazole-resistant isolate, but not the other one.

  2. In vitro analysis of flufenamic acid activity against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A; Jahng, Maximillian; Rane, Hallie S; Asare, Kingsley; Kulkarny, Vibhati V; Bernardo, Stella M; Lee, Samuel A

    2014-01-01

    In a recent high-throughput screen against specific Candida albicans drug targets, several compounds that exhibited non-specific antifungal activity were identified, including the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flufenamic acid (FFA). This study sought to determine the effect of different doses of FFA, alone or in combination with fixed concentrations of the standard antifungal agents amphotericin B (AmB), caspofungin (CAS) or fluconazole (FLU), for the prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Biofilms were formed in a 96-well microplate followed by evaluation of antifungal activity using the XTT assay. FFA concentrations of ≥512mg/L demonstrated >80% prevention of biofilm formation. FFA concentrations of 1024mg/L demonstrated >85% reduction of mature biofilms. When FFA (≥8mg/L) was used in combination with FLU (32mg/L), antifungal activity increased to 99% for the prevention of biofilm formation. Similarly, when a FFA concentration of ≥8mg/L was used in combination with either AmB (0.25mg/L) or CAS (0.125mg/L), antifungal activity also increased up to 99% for the prevention of biofilm formation. The inhibitory effect of FFA on C. albicans biofilms has not been reported previously, therefore these findings suggest that FFA in combination with traditional antifungals might be useful for the treatment and prevention of C. albicans biofilms.

  3. Dynamics of in vitro acquisition of resistance by Candida parapsilosis to different azoles.

    PubMed

    Pinto e Silva, Ana Teresa; Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Silva-Dias, Ana; Pina-Vaz, Cidália; Rodrigues, Acácio Gonçalves

    2009-06-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a common isolate from clinical fungal infectious episodes. Resistance of C. parapsilosis to azoles has been increasingly reported. To analyse the development of resistance in C. parapsilosis, four azole-susceptible clinical strains and one American Type Culture Collection type strain were cultured in the presence of fluconazole, voriconazole and posaconazole at different concentrations. The isolates developed variable degrees of azole resistance according to the antifungal used. Fluconazole was the fastest inducer while posaconazole was the slowest. Fluconazole and voriconazole induced resistance to themselves and each other, but not to posaconazole. Posaconazole induced resistance to all azoles. Developed resistance was stable; it could be confirmed after 30 days of subculture in drug-free medium. Azole-resistant isolates revealed a homogeneous population structure; the role of azole transporter efflux pumps was minor after evaluation by microdilution and cytometric assays with efflux pump blockers (verapamil, ibuprofen and carbonyl cyanide 3-chloro-phenylhydrazone). We conclude that the rapid development of azole resistance occurs by a mechanism that might involve mutation of genes responsible for ergosterol biosynthesis pathway, stressed by exposure to antifungals.

  4. Inhibition of Candida albicans yeast-hyphal transition and biofilm formation by Solidago virgaurea water extracts.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Marlène; Medioni, Etienne; Prêcheur, Isabelle

    2012-07-01

    Xerostomia is a decrease of saliva secretion, which can unbalance the oral microflora, mainly to the benefit of Candida albicans. The aim of the present study was to find a plant extract that could create an unfavourable environment for Candida, and would, therefore, be appropriate for use in a dry-mouth daily-care mouthwash. Water extract from the herbaceous plant Solidago virgaurea (Goldenrod) was selected due to its saponin content (plant detergents). Saponin concentrations reached 0.7 and 0.95 mg ml(-1) in S. virgaurea subsp. virgaurea and S. virgaurea subsp. alpestris extracts, respectively. C. albicans was grown in liquid medium and cells were counted by microscopic examination after 0, 4 and 24 h of incubation. Solidago extracts did not inhibit the growth of C. albicans (four strains), Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius or Enterococcus faecalis. When inocula were incubated with Solidago extract for 4 and 24 h, we observed a decrease in Candida yeast-hyphal transition. Candida biofilms were then prepared in microtitre plates and treated with plant extracts at 0 h, to estimate biofilm formation, or at 18 h to estimate the effect of the saponin on pre-formed biofilms. Biofilm formation and pre-formed biofilms were both strongly inhibited. In conclusion, the S. virgaurea extract was efficient against two key virulence factors of C. albicans: the yeast-hyphal transition phase and biofilm formation.

  5. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F.; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  6. Specific Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase 8 Reduces Gene Expression and Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Vitro and in Vivo*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suzhao; Fossati, Gianluca; Marchetti, Carlo; Modena, Daniela; Pozzi, Pietro; Reznikov, Leonid L.; Moras, Maria Luisa; Azam, Tania; Abbate, Antonio; Mascagni, Paolo; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    ITF2357 (generic givinostat) is an orally active, hydroxamic-containing histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor with broad anti-inflammatory properties, which has been used to treat children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. ITF2357 inhibits both Class I and II HDACs and reduces caspase-1 activity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the secretion of IL-1β and other cytokines at 25–100 nm; at concentrations >200 nm, ITF2357 is toxic in vitro. ITF3056, an analog of ITF2357, inhibits only HDAC8 (IC50 of 285 nm). Here we compared the production of IL-1β, IL-1α, TNFα, and IL-6 by ITF2357 with that of ITF3056 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-killed Candida albicans, or anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies. ITF3056 reduced LPS-induced cytokines from 100 to 1000 nm; at 1000 nm, the secretion of IL-1β was reduced by 76%, secretion of TNFα was reduced by 88%, and secretion of IL-6 was reduced by 61%. The intracellular levels of IL-1α were 30% lower. There was no evidence of cell toxicity at ITF3056 concentrations of 100–1000 nm. Gene expression of TNFα was markedly reduced (80%), whereas IL-6 gene expression was 40% lower. Although anti-CD3/28 and Candida stimulation of IL-1β and TNFα was modestly reduced, IFNγ production was 75% lower. Mechanistically, ITF3056 reduced the secretion of processed IL-1β independent of inhibition of caspase-1 activity; however, synthesis of the IL-1β precursor was reduced by 40% without significant decrease in IL-1β mRNA levels. In mice, ITF3056 reduced LPS-induced serum TNFα by 85% and reduced IL-1β by 88%. These data suggest that specific inhibition of HDAC8 results in reduced inflammation without cell toxicity. PMID:25451941

  7. Specific inhibition of histone deacetylase 8 reduces gene expression and production of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Suzhao; Fossati, Gianluca; Marchetti, Carlo; Modena, Daniela; Pozzi, Pietro; Reznikov, Leonid L; Moras, Maria Luisa; Azam, Tania; Abbate, Antonio; Mascagni, Paolo; Dinarello, Charles A

    2015-01-23

    ITF2357 (generic givinostat) is an orally active, hydroxamic-containing histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor with broad anti-inflammatory properties, which has been used to treat children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. ITF2357 inhibits both Class I and II HDACs and reduces caspase-1 activity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the secretion of IL-1β and other cytokines at 25-100 nm; at concentrations >200 nm, ITF2357 is toxic in vitro. ITF3056, an analog of ITF2357, inhibits only HDAC8 (IC50 of 285 nm). Here we compared the production of IL-1β, IL-1α, TNFα, and IL-6 by ITF2357 with that of ITF3056 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-killed Candida albicans, or anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies. ITF3056 reduced LPS-induced cytokines from 100 to 1000 nm; at 1000 nm, the secretion of IL-1β was reduced by 76%, secretion of TNFα was reduced by 88%, and secretion of IL-6 was reduced by 61%. The intracellular levels of IL-1α were 30% lower. There was no evidence of cell toxicity at ITF3056 concentrations of 100-1000 nm. Gene expression of TNFα was markedly reduced (80%), whereas IL-6 gene expression was 40% lower. Although anti-CD3/28 and Candida stimulation of IL-1β and TNFα was modestly reduced, IFNγ production was 75% lower. Mechanistically, ITF3056 reduced the secretion of processed IL-1β independent of inhibition of caspase-1 activity; however, synthesis of the IL-1β precursor was reduced by 40% without significant decrease in IL-1β mRNA levels. In mice, ITF3056 reduced LPS-induced serum TNFα by 85% and reduced IL-1β by 88%. These data suggest that specific inhibition of HDAC8 results in reduced inflammation without cell toxicity.

  8. Demonstration of synergy with fluconazole and either ibuprofen, sodium salicylate, or propylparaben against Candida albicans in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, E M; Tariq, V N; McCrory, R M

    1995-01-01

    The combination of fluconazole with either ibuprofen, sodium salicylate, or propylparaben resulted in synergistic activity (fractional inhibitory index, < 0.5) against Candida albicans NCYC 620 in a microdilution checkerboard assay. Synergism between miconazole and ibuprofen was also demonstrated. In three or four clinical isolates of C. albicans from AIDS patients, the combination of fluconazole and ibuprofen was synergistic. Preparation of the inoculum and the growth conditions used were those recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards for susceptibility testing. A visual estimation of total inhibition of growth and determination of an 80% reduction in the optical density at 492 nm compared with those for the control were taken as endpoints for the calculation of synergy, and a good correlation between both estimates was demonstrated. PMID:8592988

  9. Study on chemical analysis, antioxidant and in vitro antifungal activities of essential oil from wild Vitex agnus-castus L. seeds growing in area of Argan Tree of Morocco against clinical strains of Candida responsible for nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Asdadi, A; Hamdouch, A; Oukacha, A; Moutaj, R; Gharby, S; Harhar, H; El Hadek, M; Chebli, B; Idrissi Hassani, L M

    2015-12-01

    To study the composition, the antioxidant activity and the in vitro antifungal action anti-Candida species of essential oils extracted from seeds of Vite xagnus-castus L. The essential oils were extracted using Clevenger-type apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The antioxidant activity was analyzed using the DPPH free radical-scavenging method. Susceptibility tests for Candida albicans (12), C. dubliniensis (1), C. glabrata (3), C. krusei (3), C. parapsilosis (6), C. lusitaniae (1), C. famata (1) and C. tropicalis (3) were expressed as inhibition zone by the disc-diffusion method and as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) by the broth macrodilution method, compared to amphotricin B and fluconazol as standard drugs. Major components were: 1,8-cineole (19.61%), sabinene (14.57%), α-pinene (9.76%), β-farnesene (6.04%), β-caryophyllene oxide (5.83%) and β-caryophyllene (5.02%). A low antioxidant activity was found (IC50=1.072mg/ml), but it can be exploited. V. agnus-castus seeds essential oils disosed a 35-58mm zone of inhibition (mean: 49mm) against all 30 isolates tested. In broth macrodilution method, all the tested Candida species were susceptible to the essential oils and this activity was concentration-dependent. MIC values varied from 0.13 to 2.13mg/ml V. agnus-castus seeds essential oils. Results of this study indicated that the oils of plant origin could be used as potential anti-Candida species causative agents of nosocomial infections. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. The natural antifungal substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they may represent alternative therapies for candidiasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of Four Distinct Genotypes of Candida dubliniensis and Detection of Microevolution In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Sarah F.; Joly, Sophie; Soll, David R.; Meis, Jacques F. G. M.; Verweij, Paul E.; Polacheck, Itzhack; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates further the population structure of Candida dubliniensis and its ability to exhibit microevolution. Using 98 isolates (including 80 oral isolates) from 94 patients in 15 countries, we confirmed the existence of two distinct populations within the species C. dubliniensis, designated Cd25 group I and Cd25 group II, respectively, on the basis of DNA fingerprints generated with the C. dubliniensis-specific probe Cd25. The majority of Cd25 group I isolates (48 of 71, 67.6%) were from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, whereas the majority of Cd25 group II isolates (19 of 27, 70.4%) were from HIV-negative individuals (P ≤ 0.001). Nucleotide sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rRNA genes from 19 representative isolates revealed the presence of four separate genotypes. All of the Cd25 group I isolates tested belonged to genotype 1, while the Cd25 group II population was comprised of three distinct genotypes (genotypes 2 to 4), which corresponded to distinct clades within the Cd25 group II population. These findings were confirmed using genotype-specific PCR primers with 70 isolates. We also showed that C. dubliniensis can exhibit microevolution in vivo and in vitro as occurs in other yeast species. DNA fingerprinting using the C. dubliniensis probes Cd25, Cd24, and Cd1 and karyotype analysis of multiple oral isolates recovered from the same specimen from each of eight separate patients revealed microevolution in six of eight of the clonal populations. Similarly, sequential clonal isolates from various anatomical sites in two separate patients exhibited microevolution. Microevolution was also shown to occur when two clinical isolates susceptible to fluconazole were exposed to the drug in vitro. The epidemiological significance of the four C. dubliniensis genotypes and the ability of C. dubliniensis to undergo microevolution has yet to be established. PMID:11825972

  11. In vitro antifungal activity of baicalin against Candida albicans biofilms via apoptotic induction.

    PubMed

    Wang, TianMing; Shi, GaoXiang; Shao, Jing; Wu, DaQiang; Yan, YuanYuan; Zhang, MengXiang; Cui, YanYan; Wang, ChangZhong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activity of baicalin and its potential mechanism of action against Candida albicans biofilms. The standard techniques including microdilution method and checkerboard assay were employed to evaluate the susceptibilities of baicalin alone and in combination with fluconazole against planktonic and biofilm cells of C. albicans. Transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), fluorescent microscope and flow cytometry were used to assess the apoptotic incidences induced by baicalin in biofilm cells. The expressions of four genes (RAS1, CAP1, PDE2 and TPK1) related to Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway were also analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results showed that minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and sessile minimum inhibitory concentration (SMIC50) of baicalin were 500 and 2000 μg/mL with fractional inhibitory concentration indexs (FICIs) ranging from 0.28 to 0.75. A series of events related to apoptosis were observed in baicalin-treated C. albicans biofilms, including extensive chromatin condensation along the nuclear envelope, ROS accumulation, MMP reduction, PS externalization, nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, metacaspase activation and Cyt C release. Additionally, the expressions of RAS1 and TPK1 were up-regulated by 3.2 and 2.9 folds respectively, while those of CAP1 and PDE2 were down-regulated by 3.3 and 6.6 folds respectively after exposure to baicalin in biofilm cells. In conclusion, baicalin can suppress the development of C. albicans biofilms most likely due to inducing cell death via apoptosis.

  12. In vitro activity of essential oils extracted from condiments against fluconazole-resistant and -sensitive Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Soares, I H; Loreto, É S; Rossato, L; Mario, D N; Venturini, T P; Baldissera, F; Santurio, J M; Alves, S H

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the antifungal activity of essential oils obtained from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon), Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano), Thymus vulgaris (thyme), Salvia officinalis (sage), Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary), Ocimum basilicum (basil) and Zingiber officinale (ginger) were assessed against Candida glabrata isolates. One group contained 30 fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata isolates, and the second group contained fluconazole-resistant isolates derived from the first group after the in vitro induction of fluconazole-resistance, for a total of 60 tested isolates. The broth microdilution methodology was used. Concentrations of 50μg/mL, 100μg/mL, 200μg/mL, 400μg/mL, 800μg/mL, 1600μg/mL and 3200μg/mL of the essential oils were used, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were determined. Thyme, sage, rosemary, basil and ginger essential oils showed no antifungal activity at the tested concentrations. Antimicrobial activity less than or equal to 3200μg/mL was observed for oregano, Mexican oregano and cinnamon essential oils. Both the oregano and Mexican oregano essential oils showed high levels of antifungal activity against the fluconazole-susceptible C. glabrata group, whereas the cinnamon essential oil showed the best antifungal activity against the fluconazole-resistant C. glabrata isolates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Candida albicans is able to use M cells as a portal of entry across the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albac, Sandrine; Schmitz, Antonin; Lopez-Alayon, Carolina; d'Enfert, Christophe; Sautour, Marc; Ducreux, Amandine; Labruère-Chazal, Catherine; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent yeast responsible for systemic infections in humans. These infections mainly originate from the gastrointestinal tract where C. albicans can invade the gut epithelial barrier to gain access to the bloodstream. Along the gut, pathogens can use Microfold (M) cells as a portal of entry to cross the epithelial barrier. M cells are specialized cells mainly located in the follicule-associated epithelium of Peyer patches. In this study, we used scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy, adhesion and invasion assays and fungal mutants to investigate the interactions of C. albicans with M cells obtained in an established in vitro model whereby enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells co-cultured with the Raji B cell line undergo a phenotypic switch to morphologically and functionally resembling M cells. Our data demonstrate that C. albicans co-localizes with and invades preferentially M cells, providing evidence that the fungus can use M cells as a portal of entry into the intestinal barrier. In addition to active penetration, F-actin dependent endocytosis contributes to internalization of the fungus into M cells through a mechanism involving hypha-associated invasins including Ssa1 and Als3. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Pasha, Hajar; Sefidgar, Ali Asghar; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Adib Rad, Hajar; Shirkhani, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of candidiasis infections is an important problem in the health care system. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of lavender essential oil and clotrimazole on isolated C. albicans from vaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods. In this clinical trial, C. albicans isolated from the vaginal discharge samples was obtained. Results. The pairwise comparison showed that lavender and clotrimazole had a significant difference; this difference in the lavender group was lower than clotrimazole. But, after 48 hours, there was no difference seen between groups. There was a significant difference between clotrimazole and DMSO groups. Comparing the changes between groups based on the same dilution, at 24 h and 48 h in clotrimazole group, showed a significant difference two times in the fungal cell count that its average during 48 h was less than 24 h. A significant difference was observed between the two periods in lavender group, only at the dilutions of 1/20 and 1/80. The average fungal cell count after 48 h was also lower in lavender group. Conclusions. Given that the lavender has antifungal activity, this can be used as an antifungal agent. However, more clinical studies are necessary to validate its use in candida infection.

  15. In vitro activity of xanthorrhizol isolated from the rhizome of Javanese turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.) against Candida albicans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rukayadi, Yaya; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the activity of xanthorrhizol isolated from Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. on Candida albicans biofilms at adherent, intermediate, and mature phase of growth. C. albicans biofilms were formed in flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates. The biofilms of C. albicans at different phases of development were exposed to xanthorrhizol at different concentrations (0.5 µg/mL-256 µg/mL) for 24 h. The metabolic activity of cells within the biofilms was quantified using the XTT reduction assay. Sessile minimum inhibitory concentrations (SMICs) were determined at 50% and 80% reduction in the biofilm OD₄₉₀ compared to the control wells. The SMIC₅₀ and SMIC₈₀ of xanthorrhizol against 18 C. albicans biofilms were 4--16 µg/mL and 8--32 µg/mL, respectively. The results demonstrated that the activity of xanthorrhizol in reducing C. albicans biofilms OD₄₉₀ was dependent on the concentration and the phase of growth of biofilm. Xanthorrhizol at concentration of 8 µg/mL completely reduced in biofilm referring to XTT-colorimetric readings at adherent phase, whereas 32 µg/mL of xanthorrhizol reduced 87.95% and 67.48 % of biofilm referring to XTT-colorimetric readings at intermediate and mature phases, respectively. Xanthorrhizol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro and therefore might have potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections.

  16. Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Behmanesh, Fereshteh; Pasha, Hajar; Sefidgar, Ali Asghar; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Adib Rad, Hajar; Shirkhani, Leyla

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of candidiasis infections is an important problem in the health care system. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of lavender essential oil and clotrimazole on isolated C. albicans from vaginal candidiasis. Materials and Methods. In this clinical trial, C. albicans isolated from the vaginal discharge samples was obtained. Results. The pairwise comparison showed that lavender and clotrimazole had a significant difference; this difference in the lavender group was lower than clotrimazole. But, after 48 hours, there was no difference seen between groups. There was a significant difference between clotrimazole and DMSO groups. Comparing the changes between groups based on the same dilution, at 24 h and 48 h in clotrimazole group, showed a significant difference two times in the fungal cell count that its average during 48 h was less than 24 h. A significant difference was observed between the two periods in lavender group, only at the dilutions of 1/20 and 1/80. The average fungal cell count after 48 h was also lower in lavender group. Conclusions. Given that the lavender has antifungal activity, this can be used as an antifungal agent. However, more clinical studies are necessary to validate its use in candida infection. PMID:26550521

  17. [Prokaryotic expression and purification of antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and the inhibiting effect against Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Huo, Y; Wang, F; Sun, B; Yin, L R; Zhang, P P; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, B M

    2016-02-01

    To study the inhibitory effect of antimicrobial peptide LL-37 on Candida albicans through its ability to promote the secretion of immune factors by vaginal epithelial cells. (1) LL-37 prokaryotic expression vector pET-Duet/LL-37 was constructed and its expression was induced in Escherichia coli M15. The expressed LL-37 fusion protein was purified and identified by western blot. Antifungal activity of the purified protein was initially identified by Kirby-Bauer (K-B) method. (2) Purified LL-37 protein was added to human vaginal epithelial cells co-cultured with Candida, and inhibitory effect on Candida growth was determined by the glucose consumption method. Interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 10 (IL-10) concentration and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio were measured by ELISA at different time points. (1) LL-37 fusion protein was purified to 96% purity at a concentration of 433.92 μg/ml, and was shown to possess anti-fungal activity confirmed by the K-B method. (2) A Candida-vaginal epithelial cells co-culture system was successfully constructed. LL-37 recombinant protein inhibited the growth of Candida with absorbance values significantly higher in the treatment group compared to the control group at all measured time points (12-hour: 3.008±0.003 versus 2.967±0.003, 24-hour: 2.941±0.003 versus 2.601±0.003, 48-hour: 2.893 ± 0.004 versus 2.409 ± 0.003; all P<0.01). Furthermore, the rate of decrease was also much slower compared to the control group. In both control and experimental groups, IFN-γ and IL-10 secretion levels were observed to rise at first peaking at 24 hours and subsequently decrease. For each time period, IFN-γ concentration in the experimental group was significantly higher at 24 hours compared to the control group [(104.00 ± 1.07) versus (85.17 ± 0.28) pg/ml,P<0.01]. In contrast, IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower than the control group at all time points (P<0.01). IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio was also observed to be significantly higher than the

  18. Nisin Z inhibits the growth of Candida albicans and its transition from blastospore to hyphal form.

    PubMed

    Le Lay, C; Akerey, B; Fliss, I; Subirade, M; Rouabhia, M

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of nisin Z, an antimicrobial peptide produced by certain strains of Lactococcus lactis against Candida albicans growth and transition. Candida albicans was cultured in the presence of various concentrations of nisin Z (1000, 500, and 100 microg ml(-1)) for different time points. Candida albicans growth was determined using the Alamar Blue assay. The yeast's transition from blastospore to hyphal form was assessed through optical microscope observations. The effect of nisin Z on C. albicans ultrastructure was followed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Our results show that nisin Z inhibited C. albicans growth beginning at 500 microg ml(-1). This inhibition was both time- and dose-dependent. Nisin Z was also active against C. albicans transition by significantly inhibiting the transformation of C. albicans from the blastospore to hyphal form. Treatments with nisin Z lead to ultrastructural disturbances of C. albicans. Our findings indicate that nisin Z significantly reduced C. albicans growth and transition. These effects may have occurred through ultrastructural modifications of this yeast. For the first time, effect of nisin Z on C. albicans was investigated. These results therefore suggest that nisin Z may have antifungal properties, and could be used as an antifungal molecule.

  19. Evaluation of Antimicrobial and Antifungal Efficacy of Inter Appointment Intracanal Medicaments against Enterococcus and Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shubh Prabhat; Bhati, Manisha; Jhajharia, Kapil; Patel, Hardik; Paliwal, Ashutosh; Franklin, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    Background: Microorganisms and their by-products in pulpal and periapical diseases are to be considered as the primary etiological agents of the pulpal necrosis and apical periodontitis. Enterococcus faecalis, which is the most common organism isolated from failed root canals, is a Gram-positive facultative anaerobe. Yeasts can be detected in 7-18% of infected root canals. Materials and Methods: Designed to evaluate the antimicrobial and antifungal efficacy of chlorhexidine gutta-percha (CHX-GP), and calcium hydroxide GP points against E. faecalis and Candida albicans. The test materials used are divided into 3 groups; Group A - Control, Regular GP, Group B – CHX-GP, Group C - Calcium hydroxide GP. Detail Method is explained in the article. Results: There was a significant difference in the inhibition of E. faecalis, in different materials at each time interval period (P < 0.05). Similarly, the inhibition of C. albicans in the different materials at each time period was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Calcium hydroxide GP did not exhibit any antimicrobial effect on any of tested microorganisms for all the time periods. Conclusion: CHX-GP had the maximum effect on the test microorganisms, with the maximum efficacy on E. faecalis followed by C. albicans. Regular GP also had a significant efficacy on test microorganisms, with the maximum efficacy on E. faecalis followed by C. albicans. Calcium hydroxide GP did not have any effect on any test microorganisms during the entire test periods. PMID:26124609

  20. The expression of the β-defensins hBD-2 and hBD-3 is differentially regulated by NF-κB and MAPK/AP-1 pathways in an in vitro model of Candida esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Steubesand, Nadine; Kiehne, Karlheinz; Brunke, Gabriele; Pahl, Rene; Reiss, Karina; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Schubert, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Fölsch, Ulrich R; Rosenstiel, Philip; Arlt, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Background Candida albicans resides on epithelial surfaces as part of the physiological microflora. However, under certain conditions it may cause life-threatening infections like Candida sepsis. Human β-defensins (hBDs) are critical components of host defense at mucosal surfaces and we have recently shown that hBD-2 and hBD-3 are upregulated in Candida esophagitis. We therefore studied the role of Candidate signalling pathways in order to understand the mechanisms involved in regulation of hBD-expression by C. albicans. We used the esophageal cell line OE21 and analysed the role of paracrine signals from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in an in vitro model of esophageal candidiasis. Results Supernatants of C. albicans or indirect coculture with C. albicans induces upregulation of hBD-2 and hBD-3 expression. PMNs strongly amplifies C. albicans-mediated induction of hBDs. By EMSA we demonstrate that C. albicans activates NF-κB and AP-1 in OE21 cells. Inhibition of these pathways revealed that hBD-2 expression is synergistically regulated by both NF-κB and AP-1. In contrast hBD-3 expression is independent of NF-κB and relies solely on an EGFR/MAPK/AP-1-dependent pathway. Conclusion Our analysis of signal transduction events demonstrate a functional interaction of epithelial cells with PMNs in response to Candida infection involving divergent signalling events that differentially govern hBD-2 and hBD-3 expression. PMID:19523197

  1. Comparison of continuous versus pulsed photodynamic antimicrobial therapy for inhibition of fungal keratitis isolates in vitro (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Nicholas; Durkee, Heather A.; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Arboleda, Alejandro; Relhan, Nidhi; Martinez, Anna; Rowaan, Cornelis; Gonzalez, Alex; Alawa, Karam A.; Amescua, Guillermo; Flynn, Harry W.; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    2017-02-01

    Fungal keratitis can lead to pain and impaired vision. Current treatment options include antifungal agents and therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. An emerging option for the management of keratitis is photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PDAT) which uses a photosensitizer rose bengal activated with green light. Utilizing a pulsed irradiation, rather than the standard continuous irradiation may have a similar antimicrobial effect with less total energy. This study is to compare pulsed and continuous rose bengal mediated PDAT for inhibition of six fungal isolates on agar plates: Fusarium solani, Fusarium keratoplasticum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, Paecilomyces variotti, and Pseudoallescheria boydii. Isolates were mixed with 0.1% rose bengal and exposed to three irradiation conditions: (1) 30-minute continuous (10.8J/cm2), (2) 15-minute continuous (5.4J/cm2), (3) 30-minute pulsed (5.4J/cm2). Plates were photographed at 72 hours and analyzed with custom software. At 72 hours, 30-minute continuous rose bengal mediated PDAT inhibited all six fungal species. Fungal inhibition was analogous between 30-minute continuous and 30-minute pulsed test groups, with the exception of A. fumigatus. The 15-minute continuous irradiation was less effective when compared to both 30-minute continuous and 30-minute pulsed groups. These in vitro results demonstrate the potential strength of pulsed rose bengal mediated PDAT as an adjunct treatment modality for fungal keratitis.

  2. 4-methylumbelliferone inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    García-Vilas, Javier A; Quesada, Ana R; Medina, Miguel Ángel

    2013-05-01

    4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) is a hyaluronic acid biosynthesis inhibitor with antitumoral and antimetastatic effects. The objective of the present study was to determine the potential of 4-MU as an antiangiogenic compound. To fulfill this aim, cultured endothelial cells were used to perform an array of in vitro assays, as well as two different in vivo angiogenesis assays. This study demonstrates that, in fact, 4-MU behaves as a new inhibitor of both in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis. In vitro, 4-MU affects several key steps of angiogenesis, including endothelial cell proliferation, adhesion, tube formation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) values in the proliferation assay were 0.65 ± 0.04 and 0.37 ± 0.03 mM for HMEC and RF-24 endothelial cells, respectively. 4-MU (2 mM) treatment for 24 h induced apoptosis in 13% of HMEC and 5% of RF-24 cells. The number of adherent endothelial cells decreased by >20% after 24 h of treatment with 1 mM 4-MU. Minimal inhibitory concentrations in the tube formation assay were 2 and 0.5 mM 4-MU for HMEC and RF-24, respectively. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression was differentially altered upon 4-MU treatment in both tested endothelial cell lines. Taken together, the results suggest that 4-MU may have potential as a new candidate multitargeted bioactive compound for antiangiogenic therapy.

  3. Cells of Candida utilis for in vitro (R)-phenylacetylcarbinol production in an aqueous/octanol two-phase reactor.

    PubMed

    Rosche, Bettina; Breuer, Michael; Hauer, Bernhard; Rogers, Peter L

    2005-04-01

    (R)-Phenylacetylcarbinol (PAC), a pharmaceutical precursor, was produced from benzaldehyde and pyruvate by pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) of Candida utilis in an aqueous/organic two-phase emulsion reactor. When the partially purified enzyme in this previously established in vitro process was replaced with C. utilis cells and the temperature was increased from 4 to 21 degrees C, a screen of several 1-alcohols (C4-C9) confirmed the suitability of 1-octanol as the organic phase. Benzyl alcohol, the major by-product in the commercial in vivo conversion of benzaldehyde and sugar to PAC by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was not formed. With a phase volume ratio of 1:1 and 5.6 g C. utilis l-1 (PDC activity 2.5 U ml-1), PAC levels of 103 g l-1 in the octanol phase and 12.8 g l-1 in the aqueous phase were produced in 15 h at 21 degrees C. In comparison to our previously published process with partially purified PDC in an aqueous/octanol emulsion at 4 degrees C, PAC was produced at a 4-times increased specific rate (1.54 versus 0.39 mg U-1 h-1) with simplified catalyst production and reduced cooling cost. Compared to traditional in vivo whole cell PAC production, the yield on benzaldehyde was 26% higher, the product concentration increased 3.9-fold (or 6.9-fold based on the organic phase), the productivity improved 3.1-fold (3.9 g l-1 h-1) and the catalyst was 6.9-fold more efficient (PAC/dry cell mass 10.3 g g-1).

  4. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Zunino, S.; Hudig, D.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.

  5. Isolation and identification of Candida species in patients with orogastric cancer: susceptibility to antifungal drugs, attributes of virulence in vitro and immune response phenotype.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Lourimar Viana Nascimento F; Santos, Vera Lúcia; de Souza Monteiro, Andrea; Dias-Souza, Marcus Vinicíus; Marques, Sirlei Garcia; de Faria, Elaine Speziali; Assunção, Elaine Alves de Oliveira; Dos Santos, Simone Gonçalves; Zonis, Juan Moises; de Alvarenga, Daniel Gomes; de Holanda, Rodrigo Assunção; de Sousa, Jaqueline Gontijo; Dos Santos, Kênia Valéria; Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida de Resende

    2016-02-23

    Because of the inherent immunosuppression of cancer patients opportunistic infections by Candida spp, occur frequently. This study aimed to identify Candida species in the oral mucosa of 59 patients with orogastric cancer (OGC) and to analyze the immunological phenotype of these patients. The yeasts were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS). For all isolates, we performed phospholipases and proteinases assays, in vitro adherence to buccal epithelial cells (BEC), minimum inhibitory concentration of antifungal drugs and determined the cytokine profile by Cytometric Bead Array flow citometry assay. C. albicans was the most prevalent species in OGC patients (51.6 %) and control group (66.7 %). Candida spp. strains isolated from OGC patients exhibited better adherence to BEC (p = 0.05) than did the control group. Phospholipases production by Candida strains from OGC patients was lower (51.6 %) than in the control group (61.9 %). Proteinases were detected in 41.9 % and 4.8 % of the yeasts from OGC patients and control group, respectively. Significant differences were found in the serum of OGC patients compared to the control group for IL-2, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17. The results of this work suggest increased virulence of yeasts isolated from OGC patients and, that this may interfere with the immune phenotype.

  6. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Petrus L. B.; Carvalho, Letícia T.; Paschoal, Marco A. B.; de Sousa, Eduardo M.; Moffa, Eduardo B.; da Silva, Marcos A. dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p < 0.05), which made the MIC sufficient to reduce approximately 90% of cells (p < 0.0001). The exposure of LGE after biofilm maturation also had a significant antifungal effect at all concentrations (p < 0.05). When compared to the control group, the exposure of PBMC to LGE at MIC resulted in similar viability (p > 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use. PMID:27446818

  7. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Petrus L B; Carvalho, Letícia T; Paschoal, Marco A B; de Sousa, Eduardo M; Moffa, Eduardo B; da Silva, Marcos A Dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p < 0.05), which made the MIC sufficient to reduce approximately 90% of cells (p < 0.0001). The exposure of LGE after biofilm maturation also had a significant antifungal effect at all concentrations (p < 0.05). When compared to the control group, the exposure of PBMC to LGE at MIC resulted in similar viability (p > 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use.

  8. In Vitro and In Vivo Phlebovirus Inhibition by Ribavirin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    inhibitori in vitro to Adames and Balliet strains of Punta Tooi virus 411TV). a Phlebot’irltN related to Rift V’alle% fexer and sandfiv lever viruses . By...Panama in 1966. This virus , \\\\ as plaque purified twice as’ Alenquer. (’andirti. and Punta Toro viruses 114). 14. 23. 251. described above, its...cells. reductions of 2.7 log,,, unit,, in the Adames virus strain experiment, a group of 2M0 female mice (age. 3 weeks: yield and 1.0 log... units in the

  9. Lactate dehydrogenase activity is inhibited by methylmalonate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saad, Laura O; Mirandola, Sandra R; Maciel, Evelise N; Castilho, Roger F

    2006-04-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMAemia) is an inherited metabolic disorder of branched amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism, involving a defect in the conversion of methylmalonyl-coenzyme A to succinyl-coenzyme A. Systemic and neurological manifestations in this disease are thought to be associated with the accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) in tissues and biological fluids with consequent impairment of energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In the present work we studied the effect of MMA and two other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II (malonate and 3-nitropropionate) on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in tissue homogenates from adult rats. MMA potently inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in liver and brain homogenates as well as in a purified bovine heart LDH preparation. LDH was about one order of magnitude less sensitive to inhibition by MMA when catalyzing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of brain LDH indicated that MMA inhibits this enzyme competitively with lactate as a substrate (K (i)=3.02+/-0.59 mM). Malonate and 3-nitropropionate also strongly inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in brain homogenates, while no inhibition was observed by succinate or propionate, when present in concentrations of up to 25 mM. We propose that inhibition of the lactate/pyruvate conversion by MMA contributes to lactate accumulation in blood, metabolic acidemia and inhibition of gluconeogenesis observed in patients with MMAemia. Moreover, the inhibition of LDH in the central nervous system may also impair the lactate shuttle between astrocytes and neurons, compromising neuronal energy metabolism.

  10. Mechanisms involved in the inhibition of glycolysis by cyanide and antimycin A in Candida albicans and its reversal by hydrogen peroxide. A common feature in Candida species.

    PubMed

    Peña, Antonio; Sánchez, Norma Silvia; González-López, Omar; Calahorra, Martha

    2015-12-01

    In Candida albicans, cyanide and antimycin A inhibited K(+) transport, not only with ethanol-O2 as the substrate, but also with glucose. The reason for this was that they inhibited not only respiration, but also fermentation, decreasing ATP production. Measurements of oxygen levels in cell suspensions allowed identification of the electron pathways involved. NADH fluorescence levels increased in the presence of the inhibitors, indirectly indicating lower levels of NAD(+) and so pointing to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as the limiting step responsible for the inhibition of glycolysis, which was confirmed by the levels of glycolytic intermediaries. The cyanide effect could be reversed by hydrogen peroxide, mainly due to an activity by which H2O2 can be reduced by electrons flowing from NADH through a pathway that can be inhibited by antimycin A, and appears to be a cytochrome c peroxidase. Therefore, the inhibition of glycolysis by the respiratory inhibitors seems to be due to the decreased availability of NAD(+), resulting in a decreased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Compartmentalization of pyridine nucleotides in favor of the mitochondria can contribute to explaining the low fermentation capacity of C. albicans. Similar results were obtained with three C. albicans strains, Candida dubliniensis and, to a lower degree, Candida parapsilosis.

  11. In vitro susceptibility of oral Candida albicans strains to different pH levels and calcium hydroxide saturated aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Weckwerth, Paulo Henrique; Carnietto, Cristiane; Weckwerth, Ana Carolina Villas Boas; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is present in the oral cavity and in the whole digestive tract of humans and other animals, being frequently related to endodontic treatment failure. The present study determined the incidence of C. albicans in the oral cavity and the susceptibility of isolates to different pH values and saturated calcium hydroxide aqueous solution at pH 12.5. Sixty-five patients attending the Endodontic Clinic at the Sagrado Coração University participated in the study. The collected samples were cultivated in selective media for C. albicans and the isolates were tested in terms of resistance to both alkaline pH and saturated aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide. In relation to time variables, yeast viability was assessed by the Sabouraud's agar culture and fluorescein diacetate and ethidium bromide fluorescent staining method. Results from the different pHs and experimental times, including those from different techniques measuring fungal viability, were compared using the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests (α=0.05). The yeasts became completely inviable after 48 h of contact with the calcium hydroxide solution. On the other hand, when exposed to the alkaline culture broth, the yeasts were found to be viable at pHs 9.5 and 10.5 for up to 7 days. In conclusion, C. albicans can only be completely inhibited by direct contact with saturated calcium hydroxide aqueous solution after 48 h of exposure.

  12. In Vitro Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition by Type A Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R.; Quinn, L. Y.

    1967-01-01

    Type A botulinum toxin was studied for its ability to inhibit the action of acetyl-cholinesterase. The chromogenic substrate, indophenyl acetate, was used for assay of enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme function was detected through use of both 6.6 × 10−6 mg (20 ld50) and 6.6 × 10−10 mg (2 × 10−3ld50) of type A botulinal toxin. Control assays were performed by use of both homologous antitoxin and heterologous antitoxins (types B and E). Enzyme inhibition was effectively prevented by use of homologous antitoxin only. The inhibition noted was specific and reproducible for given substrate, enzyme, and toxin concentrations. PMID:4860916

  13. Inhibition of in vitro cholesterol synthesis by fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, M; Endo, A

    1976-01-18

    Inhibitory effect of 44 species of fatty acids on cholesterol synthesis has been examined with a rat liver enzyme system. In the case of saturated fatty acids, the inhibitory activity increased with chain length to a maximum at 11 to 14 carbons, after which activity decreased rapidly. The inhibition increased with the degree of unsaturation of fatty acids. Introduction of a hydroxy group at the alpha-position of fatty acids abolished the inhibition, while the inhibition was enhanced by the presence of a hydroxy group located in an intermediate position of the chain. Branched chain fatty acids having a methyl group at the terminal showed much higher activity than the corresponding saturated straight chain fatty acids with the same number of carbons. With respect to the mechanism for inhibition, tridecanoate was found to inhibit acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase specifically without affecting the other reaction steps in the cholesterol synthetic pathway. The highly unsaturated fatty acids, arachidonate and linoleate, were specific inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA synthase. On the other hand, ricinoleate (hydroxy acid) and phytanate (branched-chain acid) diminished the conversion of mevalonate to sterols by inhibiting a step or steps between squalene and lanosterol.

  14. Synthetic polyphosphate inhibits endogenous coagulation and platelet aggregation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Wan, Mengjie; Liang, Ting; Peng, Minyuan; Chen, Fangping

    2017-01-01

    Platelet-derived polyphosphate has previously been indicated to induce coagulation. However, industrially synthesized polyphosphate has been found to have different effects from those of the platelet-derived form. The present study investigated whether synthetic sodium polyphosphate inhibits coagulation using routine coagulation tests and thromboelastography. Synthetic polyphosphate was found to inhibit adenosine diphosphate-, epinephrine-, arachidonic acid-, ristocetin-, thrombin-, oxytocin- and pituitrin-induced platelet aggregation. The effects of synthetic polyphosphate in clotting inhibition were revealed by the analysis of clotting factor activity and platelet aggregation tests. Synthetic polyphosphate may inhibit platelet aggregation by reducing platelet calcium levels, as indicated by the results of flow cytometric analysis and high-throughput fluorescent screening. Furthermore, analysis of thromboxane (TX)B2 by ELISA indicated that synthetic polyphosphate reduces platelet aggregation by inhibiting the TXA2 signaling pathway. In conclusion, synthetic polyphosphate inhibits clotting factor activity and endogenous coagulation by reducing the levels of calcium ions and TXA2 to curb platelet aggregation. PMID:28123708

  15. Artemisinins Inhibit Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense In Vitro Growth▿

    PubMed Central

    Mishina, Yuliya V.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Haynes, Richard K.; Meade, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Artemisinin compounds inhibit in vitro growth of cultured Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Artemisinin also inhibits calcium-dependent ATPase activity in T. cruzi membranes, suggesting a mode of action via membrane pumps. Artemisinins merit further investigation as chemotherapeutic options for these pathogens. PMID:17339374

  16. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  17. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    EPA Science Inventory

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  18. Development of an In Vitro Model for the Multi-Parametric Quantification of the Cellular Interactions between Candida Yeasts and Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Noël, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    We developed a new in vitro model for a multi-parameter characterization of the time course interaction of Candida fungal cells with J774 murine macrophages and human neutrophils, based on the use of combined microscopy, fluorometry, flow cytometry and viability assays. Using fluorochromes specific to phagocytes and yeasts, we could accurately quantify various parameters simultaneously in a single infection experiment: at the individual cell level, we measured the association of phagocytes to fungal cells and phagocyte survival, and monitored in parallel the overall phagocytosis process by measuring the part of ingested fungal cells among the total fungal biomass that changed over time. Candida albicans, C. glabrata, and C. lusitaniae were used as a proof of concept: they exhibited species-specific differences in their association rate with phagocytes. The fungal biomass uptaken by the phagocytes differed significantly according to the Candida species. The measure of the survival of fungal and immune cells during the interaction showed that C. albicans was the more aggressive yeast in vitro, destroying the vast majority of the phagocytes within five hours. All three species of Candida were able to survive and to escape macrophage phagocytosis either by the intraphagocytic yeast-to-hyphae transition (C. albicans) and the fungal cell multiplication until phagocytes burst (C. glabrata, C. lusitaniae), or by the avoidance of phagocytosis (C. lusitaniae). We demonstrated that our model was sensitive enough to quantify small variations of the parameters of the interaction. The method has been conceived to be amenable to the high-throughput screening of mutants in order to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction between yeasts and host phagocytes. PMID:22479332

  19. Ethanol inhibits human bone cell proliferation and function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Friday, K.E.; Howard, G.A. )

    1991-06-01

    The direct effects of ethanol on human bone cell proliferation and function were studied in vitro. Normal human osteoblasts from trabecular bone chips were prepared by collagenase digestion. Exposure of these osteoblasts to ethanol in concentrations of 0.05% to 1% for 22 hours induced a dose-dependent reduction in bone cell DNA synthesis as assessed by incorporation of 3H-thymidine. After 72 hours of ethanol exposure in concentrations of 0.01% to 1%, protein synthesis as measured by 3H-proline incorporation into trichbroacetic acid (TCA)-precipitable material was reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Human bone cell protein concentrations and alkaline phosphatase total activity were significantly reduced after exposure to 1% ethanol for 72 hours, but not with lower concentrations of ethanol. This reduction in osteoblast proliferation and activity may partially explain the development of osteopenia in humans consuming excessive amounts of ethanol.

  20. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  1. Intra- and Interlaboratory Agreement in Assessing the In Vitro Activity of Micafungin against Common and Rare Candida Species with the EUCAST, CLSI, and Etest Methods

    PubMed Central

    Geertsen, E.; Curfs-Breuker, I.; Mouton, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of resistant strains among common and rare Candida species necessitates continuous monitoring of the in vitro susceptibilities of those isolates. We therefore assessed the in vitro activities of micafungin against 1,099 molecularly identified isolates belonging to 5 common and 20 rare Candida species by the EUCAST, CLSI, and Etest methods, assessing both the intralaboratory agreement and the interlaboratory agreement for two centers. The median micafungin EUCAST MICs were as follows, from the lowest to the highest: for Candida albicans, 0.004 mg/liter; for C. glabrata, 0.016 mg/liter; for C. tropicalis, 0.031 mg/liter; for C. krusei, 0.125 mg/liter; for C. parapsilosis, 2 mg/liter. Among rare Candida species, high MICs were found for C. guilliermondii, C. lipolytica, C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. fermentati. No resistant isolates were found by the CLSI method, whereas resistance rates of 1 to 2% were found by the EUCAST method. Overall, the EUCAST method resulted in MICs 1 to 2 dilutions higher than those found by the CLSI and Etest methods. The intra- and interlaboratory agreement between methods was >92%, except for the interlaboratory agreement between the EUCAST and CLSI methods (81%), where 17 to 31% of the differences were >2 2-fold dilutions for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and other rare Candida species and <6% for C. parapsilosis and C. krusei. For the other interlaboratory comparisons, the EUCAST method resulted in higher MICs than the Etest method for all species, but <7% of these differences were >2 2-fold dilutions. Overall, the CLSI method resulted in lower MICs than the Etest method, with 11% of all isolates demonstrating >2 2-fold-dilution differences (6 to 20% for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and rare Candida species; <5% for C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis) and smaller differences found after 24 h. Despite these differences, categorical agreement was excellent (>97%), with only 1 to 2% very major

  2. Intra- and Interlaboratory Agreement in Assessing the In Vitro Activity of Micafungin against Common and Rare Candida Species with the EUCAST, CLSI, and Etest Methods.

    PubMed

    Meletiadis, J; Geertsen, E; Curfs-Breuker, I; Meis, J F; Mouton, J W

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of resistant strains among common and rare Candida species necessitates continuous monitoring of the in vitro susceptibilities of those isolates. We therefore assessed the in vitro activities of micafungin against 1,099 molecularly identified isolates belonging to 5 common and 20 rare Candida species by the EUCAST, CLSI, and Etest methods, assessing both the intralaboratory agreement and the interlaboratory agreement for two centers. The median micafungin EUCAST MICs were as follows, from the lowest to the highest: for Candida albicans, 0.004 mg/liter; for C. glabrata, 0.016 mg/liter; for C. tropicalis, 0.031 mg/liter; for C. krusei, 0.125 mg/liter; for C. parapsilosis, 2 mg/liter. Among rare Candida species, high MICs were found for C. guilliermondii, C. lipolytica, C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. fermentati. No resistant isolates were found by the CLSI method, whereas resistance rates of 1 to 2% were found by the EUCAST method. Overall, the EUCAST method resulted in MICs 1 to 2 dilutions higher than those found by the CLSI and Etest methods. The intra- and interlaboratory agreement between methods was >92%, except for the interlaboratory agreement between the EUCAST and CLSI methods (81%), where 17 to 31% of the differences were >2 2-fold dilutions for C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and other rare Candida species and <6% for C. parapsilosis and C. krusei For the other interlaboratory comparisons, the EUCAST method resulted in higher MICs than the Etest method for all species, but <7% of these differences were >2 2-fold dilutions. Overall, the CLSI method resulted in lower MICs than the Etest method, with 11% of all isolates demonstrating >2 2-fold-dilution differences (6 to 20% for C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and rare Candida species; <5% for C. glabrata, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis) and smaller differences found after 24 h. Despite these differences, categorical agreement was excellent (>97%), with only 1 to 2% very major

  3. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Mori, Y; Murakami, S; Sagae, T; Hayashi, H; Sakata, M; Sagai, M; Kumagai, Y

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular antioxidant, was investigated because H2O2 is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl-,Br-, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH3COO- or SO4-, and cations such as K+, Na+, Mg2+, or Fe2+, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H2O2 generated from cells in addition to that of O2- generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen.

  4. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Glucose-induced inhibition of in vitro bone mineralization.

    PubMed

    Balint, E; Szabo, P; Marshall, C F; Sprague, S M

    2001-01-01

    Patients with diabetes tend to have an increased incidence of osteopenia that may be related to hyperglycemia. However, little is known about how glucose may alter bone formation and osteoblast maturation. To determine whether glucose affects osteoblastic calcium deposition, MC3T3-E1 cells were incubated in media containing either a normal (5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose concentration (15 mmol/L) or mannitol (15 mmol/L), and bone nodule formation was examined. Net calcium flux was measured thrice weekly and cumulative calcium uptake was determined. Compared with control incubations, glucose significantly inhibited daily and cumulative calcium uptake into the nodules. At the time of matrix maturation, cultures undergo a rapid phase of increased calcium deposition; this was significantly inhibited by the presence of glucose. Total calcium uptake, determined by acid digestion, was also significantly inhibited by glucose. Area and number of nodules were quantitated at the end of the incubation period (day 30) by staining with Alizarin Red S calcium stain. Compared with both control and mannitol-treated cultures, the number of nodules was increased by incubation with glucose. Furthermore, both the average total nodular area and calcified nodular area of large nodules were increased by glucose. Cellular proliferation as well as the release of markers of osteoblast activity (osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase) were determined at the end of the experimental period (day 30). Cellular proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased in the presence of glucose, however, the release of osteocalcin into culture media was similar in all three groups. In conclusion, the present study shows that elevated glucose concentration present throughout the development of murine osteoblasts stimulates cellular proliferation while inhibiting calcium uptake. The result of glucose inhibition of calcium uptake suggests that bone could be structurally altered in

  6. Phorbol diesters inhibit enzymatic hydrolysis of diacylglycerols in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Chabbott, H; Cabot, M C

    1986-01-01

    The effect of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on diacylglycerol lipase activity was examined in rat serum, tissue, and cellular preparations by using di[14C]oleoylglycerol, [3H]palmitoylacetylglycerol, and membrane-resident phospholipase C-generated diacylglycerols as substrates. These experiments were conducted to address whether phorbol esters can mimic diacylglycerols in interacting with enzymes other than protein kinase C. Serum hydrolysis of palmitoylacetylglycerol, assayed by the formation of [3H]palmitic acid, was inhibited by PMA, 4-O-methyl-PMA, or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (in order of decreasing potency). The hydrolysis of palmitoylacetylglycerol was inhibited more than 40% by the addition of PMA at a 1:1 molar ratio with substrate. The inhibition resembled the competitive type, with a Ki of approximately 2.7 microM. PMA in the 10-60 microM range also inhibited hydrolysis of palmitoylacetylglycerol by lipases from rat brain microsomes and by homogenates of C3H/10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts. PMA was likewise inhibitory when assayed in an intramembrane enzyme-substrate milieu in which diacylglycerols were generated, in situ, by treatment of [3H]palmitate-labeled cell homogenates with phospholipase C. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PMA, which is now thought to act by mimicry of diacylglycerols, can inhibit the action of diacylglycerol lipase. It is possible that such a mechanism is linked to the multiplicity of responses elicited by phorbol diesters and that other agents may function by means of enzyme interactions (post-phospholipase C) to influence the levels of the cellular diacylglycerol mediators. PMID:3458169

  7. Inhibition of rat liver microsomal fatty acid chain elongation by gemfibrozil in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R M; Viñals, M; Alegret, M; Vázquez, M; Adzet, T; Merlos, M; Laguna, J C

    1992-03-23

    Gemfibrozil, a hypolipidemic drug mainly used in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemic states, strongly inhibits the rat hepatic microsomal fatty acid chain elongation system in vitro. The inhibition is independent on the reducing cofactor used in the assay. Furthermore, gemfibrozil seems to act by inhibiting the rate-limiting step of the elongation process, the condensing reaction, without discriminating among the proposed three different condensing enzymes, devoted to condensation of saturated, mono-unsaturated and polyunsaturated acyl-CoA substrates.

  8. In vitro activities of terbinafine in combination with fluconazole and itraconazole against isolates of Candida albicans with reduced susceptibility to azoles.

    PubMed Central

    Barchiesi, F; Falconi Di Francesco, L; Scalise, G

    1997-01-01

    A checkerboard microdilution method was applied to study the in vitro interaction of terbinafine with either fluconazole and itraconazole against 30 strains of Candida albicans. Synergy was observed in 40% of the terbinafine-fluconazole interactions and in 43% of the terbinafine-itraconazole interactions, while antagonism was not observed. Even when only additivity was achieved, the combinations still showed beneficial effects since at least twofold reductions in the MICs of both drugs were found in 100% of the terbinafine-fluconazole interactions and in 76% of the terbinafine-itraconazole interactions. PMID:9257768

  9. DNase inhibits Gardnerella vaginalis biofilms in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hymes, Saul R; Randis, Tara M; Sun, Thomas Yang; Ratner, Adam J

    2013-05-15

    Bacterial vaginosis is a highly prevalent and poorly understood polymicrobial disorder of the vaginal microbiota, with significant adverse sequelae. Gardnerella vaginalis predominates in bacterial vaginosis. Biofilms of G. vaginalis are present in human infections and are implicated in persistent disease, treatment failure, and transmission. Here we demonstrate that G. vaginalis biofilms contain extracellular DNA, which is essential to their structural integrity. Enzymatic disruption of this DNA specifically inhibits biofilms, acting on both newly forming and established biofilms. DNase liberates bacteria from the biofilm to supernatant fractions and potentiates the activity of metronidazole, an antimicrobial agent used in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Using a new murine vaginal colonization model for G. vaginalis, we demonstrate >10-fold inhibition of G. vaginalis colonization by DNase. We conclude that DNase merits investigation as a potential nonantibiotic adjunct to existing bacterial vaginosis therapies in order to decrease the risk of chronic infection, recurrence, and associated morbidities.

  10. Inhibition of adenovirus replication in vitro by trifluridine.

    PubMed

    Lennette, D A; Eiferman, R A

    1978-09-01

    At present, there is no effective chemotherapeutic agent available for the treatment of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis. Recent evidence suggests that trifluridine (3FT) may effectively inhibit the replication of some adenovirus serotypes known to cause keratoconjunctivitis. The ability of 3FT to inhibit two reference strains of adenoviruses, type 8 and type 19, was examined using cell cultures. Two second-passage isolates of adenoviruses, identified as serotype 13, were also tested. Compared with untreated, virusinfected cell cultures, drug-treated cell cultures developed a lesser degree of cytopathic effect following infection with all three serotypes. Virus production was reduced in the drug-treated cell cultures: approximately tenfold for type 8, more than 1,000-fold for type 19, and 5,000-fold for the type 13 isolates.

  11. DNase Inhibits Gardnerella vaginalis Biofilms In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hymes, Saul R.; Randis, Tara M.; Sun, Thomas Yang; Ratner, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a highly prevalent and poorly understood polymicrobial disorder of the vaginal microbiota, with significant adverse sequelae. Gardnerella vaginalis predominates in bacterial vaginosis. Biofilms of G. vaginalis are present in human infections and are implicated in persistent disease, treatment failure, and transmission. Here we demonstrate that G. vaginalis biofilms contain extracellular DNA, which is essential to their structural integrity. Enzymatic disruption of this DNA specifically inhibits biofilms, acting on both newly forming and established biofilms. DNase liberates bacteria from the biofilm to supernatant fractions and potentiates the activity of metronidazole, an antimicrobial agent used in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis. Using a new murine vaginal colonization model for G. vaginalis, we demonstrate >10-fold inhibition of G. vaginalis colonization by DNase. We conclude that DNase merits investigation as a potential nonantibiotic adjunct to existing bacterial vaginosis therapies in order to decrease the risk of chronic infection, recurrence, and associated morbidities. PMID:23431033

  12. Vitamin E inhibits retinal pigment epithelium cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mojon, D; Boscoboinik, D; Haas, A; Bohnke, M; Azzi, A

    1994-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells migrating through the damaged retina play an important role in the pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). We found that alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) inhibits proliferation of human RPE in culture without exerting cytotoxic effects. Maximal inhibition was achieved with 100 microM alpha-tocopherol. Our result could explain the observation that vitamin E supplements have an adverse effect on light-damaged retina and on the course of retinitis pigmentosa. Since it has been shown that supplemental oral administrations of vitamin E can raise the RPE concentration of alpha-tocopherol well above 100 microM and supplementation is not associated with any clinical relevant adverse effect, we believe that vitamin E could be beneficial in the treatment of PVR.

  13. An Optimized Lock Solution Containing Micafungin, Ethanol and Doxycycline Inhibits Candida albicans and Mixed C. albicans – Staphyloccoccus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lown, Livia; Peters, Brian M.; Walraven, Carla J.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to the propensity of C. albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms, the current standard of care includes catheter removal; however, reinsertion may be technically challenging or risky. Prolonged exposure of an antifungal lock solution within the catheter in conjunction with systemic therapy has been experimentally attempted for catheter salvage. Previously, we demonstrated excellent in vitro activity of micafungin, ethanol, and high-dose doxycycline as single agents for prevention and treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Thus, we sought to investigate optimal combinations of micafungin, ethanol, and/or doxycycline as a lock solution. We performed two- and three-drug checkerboard assays to determine the in vitro activity of pairwise or three agents in combination for prevention or treatment of C. albicans biofilms. Optimal lock solutions were tested for activity against C. albicans clinical isolates, reference strains and polymicrobial C. albicans-S. aureus biofilms. A solution containing 20% (v/v) ethanol, 0.01565 μg/mL micafungin, and 800 μg/mL doxycycline demonstrated a reduction of 98% metabolic activity and no fungal regrowth when used to prevent fungal biofilm formation; however there was no advantage over 20% ethanol alone. This solution was also successful in inhibiting the regrowth of C. albicans from mature polymicrobial biofilms, although it was not fully bactericidal. Solutions containing 5% ethanol with low concentrations of micafungin and doxycycline demonstrated synergistic activity when used to prevent monomicrobial C. albicans biofilm formation. A combined solution of micafungin, ethanol and doxycycline is highly effective for the prevention of C. albicans biofilm formation but did not demonstrate an advantage over 20% ethanol alone in these studies. PMID:27428310

  14. Selected Essential Oils as Antifungal Agents Against Antibiotic-Resistant Candida spp.: In Vitro Study on Clinical and Food-Borne Isolates.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Kunicka-Styczyńska, Alina; Maroszyńska, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Candida spp. cause significant health problems, inducing various types of superficial and deep-seated mycoses in humans. As a result of the increasing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic yeasts, the interest in alternative agents of antifungal activity is growing. This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of selected essential oils (EOs) against Candida clinical and food-borne strains, including antibiotic-resistant isolates, in relation to yeast cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH). Candida strains showed different range of susceptibility to tea tree, thyme, peppermint, and clove oils, and peppermint oil demonstrated the lowest anticandidal activity with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.03-8.0% v/v. MIC values for thyme and clove oils ranged from 0.03% to 0.25% v/v, and for tea tree oil-from 0.12% to 2.0% v/v. The exception was Candida tropicalis food-borne strain, the growth of which was inhibited after application of EOs at concentration of 8% v/v. Due to diverse yeast susceptibility to EOs, isolates were divided into five clusters in a principal component analysis model, each containing both clinical and food-borne strains. Hydrophobic properties of yeast were also diversified, and 37% of clinical and 50% of food-borne strains exhibited high hydrophobicity. The study indicates high homology of clinical and food-borne Candida isolates in relation to their susceptibility to anticandidal agents and hydrophobic properties. The susceptibility of yeasts to EOs could be partially related to their CSH. High antifungal activity of examined EOs, also against antibiotic-resistant isolates, indicates their usefulness as agents preventing the development of Candida strains of different origin.

  15. Downregulation of amyloid precursor protein inhibits neurite outgrowth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein expressed in several cell types. In the nervous system, APP is expressed by glial and neuronal cells, and several lines of evidence suggest that it plays a role in normal and pathological phenomena. To address the question of the actual function of APP in normal developing neurons, we undertook a study aimed at blocking APP expression using antisense oligonucleotides. Oligonucleotide internalization was achieved by linking them to a vector peptide that translocates through biological membranes. This original technique, which is very efficient and gives direct access to the cell cytosol and nucleus, allowed us to work with extracellular oligonucleotide concentrations between 40 and 200 nM. Internalization of antisense oligonucleotides overlapping the origin of translation resulted in a marked but transient decrease in APP neosynthesis that was not observed with the vector peptide alone, or with sense oligonucleotides. Although transient, the decrease in APP neosynthesis was sufficient to provoke a distinct decrease in axon and dendrite outgrowth by embryonic cortical neurons developing in vitro. The latter decrease was not accompanied by changes in the spreading of the cell bodies. A single exposure to coupled antisense oligonucleotides at the onset of the culture was sufficient to produce significant morphological effects 6, 18, and 24 h later, but by 42 h, there were no remaining significant morphologic changes. This report thus demonstrates that amyloid precursor protein plays an important function in the morphological differentiation of cortical neurons in primary culture. PMID:7876315

  16. Growth hormone inhibits apoptosis in in vitro produced bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Kölle, Sabine; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Boie, Gudrun; Wolf, Eckhard; Sinowatz, Fred

    2002-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to exert distinct effects on the differentiation and metabolism of early embryos. Up to now, however, it is not clear whether GH is able to modulate apoptosis during early embryogenesis. Differential cell staining of 8-day-old bovine embryos cultured with 100 ng bovine recombinant GH (rbGH) per ml medium (synthetic oviduct fluid-polyvinylalcohol) demonstrated that GH significantly increased the number of inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm cells in bovine expanded blastocysts. As shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP labeling (TUNEL) supplementation of bGH decreased the percentage of 8-day-old embryos showing at least one apoptotic cell from 58 to 21%. The percentage of apoptotic cells in one blastocyst was significantly (P < 0.01) reduced from 4.6 to 1.1% by GH treatment. Incubation of the embryos with 150 mM vanillylnonanamide induced apoptosis in all embryos. Whereas in control embryos 14% of the embryonic cells were TUNEL-positive, the percentage of apoptotic cells declined to 2.7% in the GH treated embryos. Expression of immunoreactive bcl-2 in blastocysts was not affected by GH treatment. Synthesis of the bax protein which is known to promote apoptosis was reduced in embryos cultured with GH. Our results suggest that GH acts as survival factor during in vitro culture and reduces apoptosis by altering the bax to bcl-2 ratio during early embryogenesis.

  17. Bafetinib inhibits functional responses of human eosinophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Milara, Javier; Martinez-Losa, Maleles; Sanz, Celia; Almudéver, Patricia; Peiró, Teresa; Serrano, Adela; Morcillo, Esteban Jesus; Zaragozá, Cristóbal; Cortijo, Julio

    2013-09-05

    Eosinophils play a prominent role in the process of allergic inflammation. Non-receptor associated Lyn tyrosine kinases generate key initial signals in eosinophils. Bafetinib, a specific Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor has shown a potent antiproliferative activity in leukemic cells, but its effects on eosinophils have not been reported. Therefore, we studied the effects of bafetinib on functional and mechanistic responses of isolated human eosinophils. Bafetinib was more potent than non-specific tyrosin kinase comparators genistein and tyrphostin inhibiting superoxide anion triggered by N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF; 100 nM) (-log IC50=7.25 ± 0.04 M; 6.1 ± 0.04 M; and 6.55 ± 0.03 M, respectively). Bafetinib, genistein and tyrphostin did not modify the [Ca(2+)]i responses to fMLF. Bafetinib inhibited the release of EPO induced by fMLF with higher potency than genistein and tyrphostin (-log IC50=7.24 ± 0.09 M; 5.36 ± 0.28 M; and 5.37 ± 0.19 M, respectively), and nearly suppressed LTC4, ECP and chemotaxis. Bafetinib, genistein and tyrphostin did not change constitutive apoptosis. However bafetinib inhibited the ability of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor to prevent apoptosis. The activation of Lyn tyrosine kinase, p-ERK1/2 and p-38 induced by fMLF was suppressed by bafetinib and attenuated by genistein and tyrphostin. In conclusion, bafetinib inhibits oxidative burst and generation of inflammatory mediators, and reverses the eosinophil survival. Therefore, future anti-allergic therapies based on bafetinib, could help to suppress excessive inflammatory response of eosinophils at inflammatory sites.

  18. Lactoperoxidase inhibits glucosyltransferases from Streptococcus mutans in vitro.

    PubMed

    Korpela, A; Yu, X; Loimaranta, V; Lenander-Lumikari, M; Vacca-Smith, A; Wunder, D; Bowen, W H; Tenovuo, J

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the possible effect of the antimicrobial peroxidase system on the activity of streptococcal glucosyltransferases B, C and D (GtfB, GtfC and GtfD), either in solution (GtfB and GtfC) or when adsorbed to hydroxyapatite (GtfC and GtfD) at pH 6.5. The lactoperoxidase (LP) system (LP, H(2)O(2), SCN(-)) had no effect on the activity of dissolved GtfC, but the activity of dissolved GtfB was enhanced. The LP system, however, strongly inhibited the activities of both GtfC and GtfD in their adsorbed form. LP enzyme, without its substrates, inhibited all three Gtf enzymes: GtfB and GtfC in concentrations between 10 and 100 microg/ml in liquid phase and adsorbed GtfC and GtfD in concentrations between 25 and 50 microg/ml. This inhibition was in part abolished in liquid phase, but not in solid phase, if the substrates of LP were added. This study shows that the lactoperoxidase system can exert inhibitory activity against streptococcal Gtfs without generating oxidizing agents. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Polymicrobial Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Fighting In Vitro Candida albicans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms with Antifungal-Antibacterial Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria E; Lopes, Susana P; Pereira, Cláudia R; Azevedo, Nuno F; Lourenço, Anália; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria O

    2017-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is now evident, with mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms colonizing the VAP endotracheal tube (ETT) surface. The microbial interplay within this infection may contribute for enhanced pathogenesis and exert impact towards antimicrobial therapy. Consequently, the high mortality/morbidity rates associated to VAP and the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance has promoted the search for novel therapeutic strategies to fight VAP polymicrobial infections. Under this scope, this work aimed to assess the activity of mono- vs combinational antimicrobial therapy using one antibiotic (Polymyxin B; PolyB) and one antifungal (Amphotericin B; AmB) agent against polymicrobial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The action of isolated antimicrobials was firstly evaluated in single- and polymicrobial cultures, with AmB being more effective against C. albicans and PolyB against P. aeruginosa. Mixed planktonic cultures required equal or higher antimicrobial concentrations. In biofilms, only PolyB at relatively high concentrations could reduce P. aeruginosa in both monospecies and polymicrobial populations, with C. albicans displaying only punctual disturbances. PolyB and AmB exhibited a synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans mixed planktonic cultures, but only high doses (256 mg L-1) of PolyB were able to eradicate polymicrobial biofilms, with P. aeruginosa showing loss of cultivability (but not viability) at 2 h post-treatment, whilst C. albicans only started to be inhibited after 14 h. In conclusion, combination therapy involving an antibiotic and an antifungal agent holds an attractive therapeutic option to treat severe bacterial-fungal polymicrobial infections. Nevertheless, optimization of antimicrobial doses and further clinical pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and toxicodynamics studies underpinning the optimal use of these drugs are urgently required to improve therapy

  20. Polymicrobial Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Fighting In Vitro Candida albicans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms with Antifungal-Antibacterial Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cláudia R.; Azevedo, Nuno F.; Lourenço, Anália; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria O.

    2017-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is now evident, with mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms colonizing the VAP endotracheal tube (ETT) surface. The microbial interplay within this infection may contribute for enhanced pathogenesis and exert impact towards antimicrobial therapy. Consequently, the high mortality/morbidity rates associated to VAP and the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance has promoted the search for novel therapeutic strategies to fight VAP polymicrobial infections. Under this scope, this work aimed to assess the activity of mono- vs combinational antimicrobial therapy using one antibiotic (Polymyxin B; PolyB) and one antifungal (Amphotericin B; AmB) agent against polymicrobial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The action of isolated antimicrobials was firstly evaluated in single- and polymicrobial cultures, with AmB being more effective against C. albicans and PolyB against P. aeruginosa. Mixed planktonic cultures required equal or higher antimicrobial concentrations. In biofilms, only PolyB at relatively high concentrations could reduce P. aeruginosa in both monospecies and polymicrobial populations, with C. albicans displaying only punctual disturbances. PolyB and AmB exhibited a synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans mixed planktonic cultures, but only high doses (256 mg L-1) of PolyB were able to eradicate polymicrobial biofilms, with P. aeruginosa showing loss of cultivability (but not viability) at 2 h post-treatment, whilst C. albicans only started to be inhibited after 14 h. In conclusion, combination therapy involving an antibiotic and an antifungal agent holds an attractive therapeutic option to treat severe bacterial-fungal polymicrobial infections. Nevertheless, optimization of antimicrobial doses and further clinical pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and toxicodynamics studies underpinning the optimal use of these drugs are urgently required to improve therapy

  1. Synergistic in vitro activity of sodium houttuyfonate with fluconazole against clinical Candida albicans strains under planktonic growing conditions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jing; Cui, YanYan; Zhang, MengXiang; Wang, TianMing; Wu, DaQiang; Wang, ChangZhong

    2017-12-01

    Fluconazole resistance is an intractable problem of treating Candida albicans, calling for more antifungal agents to enhance the activity of fluconazole. This work investigates the anti-C. albicans activities of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) and/or fluconazole and the associated mechanism. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of SH and fluconazole both ranging from 0.5 to 1024 μg/mL were determined by broth microdilution method in 19 C. albicans isolates, and their fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) was evaluated by checkerboard assay. After MICSH and/or MICfluconazole treatments, the expressions of IFD6, PHR1, ZAP1, ADH5, BGL2, XOG1 and FKS1 were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in C. albicans 1601. The MICs of SH alone ranged from 32 to 256 μg/mL and decreased 2-16-fold in combination. SH showed strong synergism with fluconazole with FICI <0.13-0.5. In C. albicans 1601, we observed that (i) the expression of the seven genes increased notably in a range between 3.71- and 12.63-fold (p < 0.05) when SH was used alone, (ii) the combined use of SH and fluconazole slightly inhibited the expression of IFD6 and PHR1 by 1.23- and 1.35-fold (p > 0.05), but promoted evidently the expression of ZAP1, ADH5, XOG1 and FKS1 by 1.98-, 3.56-, 4.10- and 2.86-fold (p < 0.05). The results suggested SH to be a potential synergist to enhance the antifungal activity of fluconazole in C. albicans resistant isolates, and the underlying mechanism may be associated with β-1,3-glucan synthesis and transportation.

  2. Arsenic(III) species inhibit oxidative protein folding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Danny; Rancy, Pumtiwitt C; Nagarkar, Radhika P; Schneider, Joel P; Thorpe, Colin

    2009-01-20

    The success of arsenic trioxide in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia has renewed interest in the cellular targets of As(III) species. The effects of arsenicals are usually attributed to their ability to bind vicinal thiols or thiol selenols in prefolded proteins thereby compromising cellular function. The present studies suggest an additional, more pleiotropic, contribution to the biological effects of arsenicals. As(III) species, by avid coordination to the cysteine residues of unfolded reduced proteins, can compromise protein folding pathways. Three representative As(III) compounds (arsenite, monomethylarsenous acid (MMA), and an aryl arsenical (PSAO)) have been tested with three reduced secreted proteins (lysozyme, ribonuclease A, and riboflavin binding protein (RfBP)). Using absorbance, fluorescence, and pre-steady-state methods, we show that arsenicals bind tightly to low micromolar concentrations of these unfolded proteins with stoichiometries of 1 As(III) per 2 thiols for MMA and PSAO and 1 As(III) for every 3 thiols with arsenite. Arsenicals, at 10 microM, strongly disrupt the oxidative folding of RfBP even in the presence of 5 mM reduced glutathione, a competing ligand for As(III) species. MMA catalyzes the formation of amyloid-like monodisperse fibrils using reduced RNase. These in vitro data show that As(III) species can slow, or even derail, protein folding pathways. In vivo, the propensity of As(III) species to bind to unfolded cysteine-containing proteins may contribute to oxidative and protein folding stresses that are prominent features of the cellular response to arsenic exposure.

  3. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  4. In vitro growth inhibition of mastitis pathogens by bovine teat skin normal flora.

    PubMed

    Woodward, W D; Besser, T E; Ward, A C; Corbeil, L B

    1987-01-01

    One factor contributing to differences in the susceptibility of cows to mastitis may be differences in the teat skin normal flora, which could inhibit or enhance the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Using in vitro cross-streaking methods, we found that 25% of the isolates of teat normal flora of non-lactating heifers inhibited the growth of selected mastitis pathogens, but enhancers were not detected. Gram-positive pathogens were inhibited to a greater extent than Gram-negative pathogens. Inhibition was not a characteristic of specific genera or species of normal flora, but rather a property of certain variants within a species. This phenomenon of inhibition of mastitis pathogens in vitro by normal flora may be useful as an in vivo biological control method to reduce the incidence of mastitis.

  5. Strontium Promotes Cementoblasts Differentiation through Inhibiting Sclerostin Expression In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xingfu; Liu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yi; Cui, Yue; Yao, Jindan

    2014-01-01

    Cementogenesis, performed by cementoblasts, is important for the repair of root resorption caused by orthodontic treatment. Based on recent studies, strontium has been applied for osteoporosis treatment due to its positive effect on osteoblasts. Although promising, the effect of strontium on cementoblasts is still unclear. So the aim of this research was to clarify and investigate the effect of strontium on cementogenesis via employing cementoblasts as model. A series of experiments including MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene analysis, alizarin red staining, and western blot were carried out to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation of cementoblasts. In addition, expression of sclerostin was checked to analyze the possible mechanism. Our results show that strontium inhibits the proliferation of cementoblasts with a dose dependent manner; however, it can promote the differentiation of cementoblasts via downregulating sclerostin expression. Taking together, strontium may facilitate cementogenesis and benefit the treatment of root resorption at a low dose. PMID:25003114

  6. Strontium promotes cementoblasts differentiation through inhibiting sclerostin expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xingfu; Liu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yi; Cui, Yue; Yao, Jindan; Hu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Cementogenesis, performed by cementoblasts, is important for the repair of root resorption caused by orthodontic treatment. Based on recent studies, strontium has been applied for osteoporosis treatment due to its positive effect on osteoblasts. Although promising, the effect of strontium on cementoblasts is still unclear. So the aim of this research was to clarify and investigate the effect of strontium on cementogenesis via employing cementoblasts as model. A series of experiments including MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene analysis, alizarin red staining, and western blot were carried out to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation of cementoblasts. In addition, expression of sclerostin was checked to analyze the possible mechanism. Our results show that strontium inhibits the proliferation of cementoblasts with a dose dependent manner; however, it can promote the differentiation of cementoblasts via downregulating sclerostin expression. Taking together, strontium may facilitate cementogenesis and benefit the treatment of root resorption at a low dose.

  7. In vitro inhibition of oocyte nuclear maturation in the bovine.

    PubMed

    Sirard, M A; First, N L

    1988-09-01

    Bovine follicular oocytes (N = 5991) were exposed to an analog of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) (2.5, 5, and 10 mM), the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutyl methyl xanthine (IBMX, 0.2 mM), or the purine, hypoxanthine (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mM), and the nucleoside, adenosine (0.05, 0.1, 0.2 mM), for 6 or 21 h to assess their effects on oocyte nuclear maturation. Potential effects of bovine follicular fluid (BFF) were also evaluated after different preculture washing procedures. In a separate experiment, denuded oocytes were used to study the effect of cumulus removal on meiotic inhibition. Db-cAMP decreased the frequency of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) at 6 h (88% for control and 51%, 45%, and 32% for 2.5, 5, and 10 mM concentrations, respectively). IBMX had a comparable effect with only 41% of the oocytes resuming meiosis. Hypoxanthine and adenosine alone or in combinations also decreased the number of oocytes undergoing GVBD at 6 h. Only 22% GVBD occurred when the combined highest concentration of both substances was used compared to 88% in controls. If oocytes were incubated in 50% BFF after a wash in control medium during processing, 56% would resume meiosis at 6 h vs. 35% if the washing procedure included inhibitors (db-cAMP + IBMX). Total BFF (100%) during washing and maturation prevented 72% of the oocytes from resuming meiosis. Db-cAMP and IMBX combined or BFF also inhibited meiotic resumption of denuded oocytes. At 21 h, the inhibitory effects were less pronounced, with most oocytes only delayed in completing the first reduction division.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. In Vitro Evaluation of the Inhibitory Activity of Thymoquinone in Combatting Candida albicans in Denture Stomatitis Prevention.

    PubMed

    Al-Thobity, Ahmad M; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa S; Gad, Mohammed M; Al-Hariri, Mohammed; Ali, Aiman A; Alnassar, Talal

    2017-07-08

    Candida albicans adhesion and proliferation on denture bases may lead to denture stomatitis, which is a common and recurrent problem in denture wearers. The goal of this study was to assess the inhibitory effect of thymoquinone incorporated in the polymethyl methacrylate denture base material against Candida albicans. Eighty acrylic resin specimens were fabricated and divided into eight groups (n = 10) according to thymoquinone concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, 1.5%, 2%, 2.5%, 3%, and 5% of acrylic powder. Two methods were used to evaluate the effect of thymoquinone on Candida albicans: the slide count and the serial dilution test. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and the post-hoc Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test were performed to compare the difference of means between the observations taken at various intervals with baseline. The p value was statistically significant at ≤0.05. According to the slide count and the serial dilution test, the mean number of adhered Candida albicans in the control group was 5436.9 ± 266 and 4691.4 ± 176.8; however, this number dramatically decreased to 0 ± 0 and 32.4 ± 1.7 in group 8 (concentration 5%). These results suggest that the incorporation of thymoquinone into the acrylic resin denture base material might be effective in preventing Candida albicans adhesion.

  9. The antibacterial agent, moxifloxacin inhibits virulence factors of Candida albicans through multitargeting.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Ashwini; Bansode, Bhagyashree; Phule, Datta; Shelar, Amruta; Patil, Rajendra; Gade, Wasudev; Kharat, Kiran; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2017-05-01

    Fluoroquinolines are broad spectrum fourth generation antibiotics. Some of the Fluoroquinolines exhibit antifungal activity. We are reporting the potential mechanism of action of a fluoroquinoline antibiotic, moxifloxacin on the growth, morphogenesis and biofilm formation of the human pathogen Candida albicans. Moxifloxacin was found to be Candidacidal in nature. Moxifloxacin seems to inhibit the yeast to Hyphal morphogenesis by affecting signaling pathways. It arrested the cell cycle of C. albicans at S phase. Docking of moxifloxacin with predicted structure of C. albicans DNA Topoisomerase II suggests that moxifloxacin may bind and inhibit the activity of DNA Topoisomerase II in C. albicans. Moxifloxacin could be used as a dual purpose antibiotic for treating mixed infections caused by bacteria as well as C. albicans. In addition chances of developing moxifloxacin resistance in C. albicans are less considering the fact that moxifloxacin may target multiple steps in yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans.

  10. Pseudorabies virus infection inhibits autophagy in permissive cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxia; Hou, Linlin; Tang, Yan-dong; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Shujie; Wang, Jingfei; Shen, Nan; An, Tongqing; Tian, Zhijun; Cai, Xuehui

    2017-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that autophagy is involved in the infection processes of different pathogens. Autophagy is now recognized as an essential component of innate and adaptive immunity. Several herpesviruses have developed various strategies to evade this antiviral mechanism. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a swine herpesvirus with a broad host range that causes devastating disease in infected pigs. In this study, we described the interaction between PRV and autophagy for the first time. PRV infection had a dual effect on the cell autophagy response; during the early period of infection, PRV virions induced autophagy without viral replication, and with viral protein expression, PRV reduced the basal level of autophagy in several permissive cells. We observed that inhibit the level of autophagy could increase the titer of infectious PRV. We also found that the conserved alphaherpesvirus US3 tegument protein may reduce the level of autophagy via activation of the AKT/mTOR pathways in PRV infected cells. These findings suggest that autophagy likely contributes to clearance of PRV, and that the virus has evolved strategies to antagonize this pathway. PMID:28059118

  11. [Determination of in vitro susceptibility of Candida species to amphotericin B by E-test and previously proposed MIC breakpoints on two different media].

    PubMed

    Alp, Sehnaz; Sancak, Banu; Arikan, Sevtap

    2008-04-01

    Although much work has concentrated on defining a reliable and reproducible method for determining in vitro susceptibility of Candida species to amphotericin B, there still has been limitations of the proposed techniques. In this study, amphotericin B minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and susceptibility categories of 212 Candida strains (57 C. glabrata, 53 C. lusitaniae, 51 C. krusei and 51 C. tropicalis) were determined by E-test on RPMI agar (RPG) and antibiotic medium 3 agar (AM3) both supplemented with 2% glucose. The results were interpreted according to the proposed MIC breakpoints (> or = 0.38 microg/ml on RPG, >1 microg/ml on AM3) and discrepancies between susceptibility categories were investigated. While all Candida strains included in the study were determined to be susceptible on AM3 by amphotericin B E-test at 48h, 36.3% of the isolates were classified as resistant on RPG at 48 hours. On RPG, C. krusei strains showed the highest resistance rate (94.1% at 48 h), followed by C. tropicalis (35.3% at 48 h) and C. glabrata (17.5% at 48h). At 48h of incubation, 98.1% of C. lusitaniae isolates were found to be susceptible on RPG. The categorical agreement rates between the results obtained on two media and for C. lusitaniae and C. glabrata were 98.1% and 82.5% at 48 hours. For C. tropicalis and C. krusei, the rates of agreement were 64.7% and 5.9% at 48 hours. Conclusively, according to the previously proposed MIC breakpoints for amphotericin B E-test on RPG and AM3, discrepancies between susceptibility categories of Candida species were of remarkable significance.

  12. In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida blood isolates and evaluation of the E-test method.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jang-Jih; Lee, Shih-Yi; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi

    2004-12-01

    Fungal infections have dramatically increased in recent years, along with the increase of drug-resistant isolates in immunocompromised patients. Ninety eight Candida species obtained from blood cultures at the Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan, from 1998 to 2000 were studied. These included 50 Candida albicans, 13 Candida glabrata, 24 Candida tropicalis and 11 Candida parapsilosis isolates. To investigate their susceptibility to commonly used antifungal drugs, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of amphotericin B, fluconazole, flucytosine, and ketoconazole were determined. Both the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards reference broth macrodilution method and E-test were used in parallel. Ninety five isolates (95/98, 96.94%) were susceptible to amphotericin B at a concentration < or = 1 microg/mL. All isolates (100%, 98/98) were susceptible to flucytosine. Approximately 30% of these Candida isolates were resistant to fluconazole. The MIC for 90% of isolates (MIC90) values for both methods for these isolates were 0.5 microg/mL for amphotericin B, 32 microg/mL for fluconazole, 0.25 microg/mL for flucytosine (0.125 microg/mL by E-test method), and 4 microg/mL for ketoconazole. MIC for 50% of isolates (MIC50) values for these agents were 0.25, 2, 0.06, and 0.06 microg/mL, respectively. The essential agreement of MIC values within 2 dilutions for the 2 methods was 99.0% for amphotericin B, 90.8% for ketoconazole, 92.9% for fluconazole, and 91.8% for flucytosine. This study showed that E-test has equivalent performance to the broth macrodilution method and can be used as an alternative MIC technique for antifungal susceptibility testing.

  13. In vitro inhibition of Eimeria tenella invasion by indigenous chicken Lactobacillus species.

    PubMed

    Tierney, J; Gowing, H; Van Sinderen, D; Flynn, S; Stanley, L; McHardy, N; Hallahan, S; Mulcahy, G

    2004-07-14

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of indigenous chicken Lactobacillus species isolates from different parts of the gastrointestinal tract on Eimeria tenella invasion in vitro and to characterise the nature of inhibition, if any. The effects of competitive exclusion, steric interference and bacterial extracellular factors on E. tenella invasion were examined in an MDBK cell model. Several Lactobacillus species were initially isolated from chickens and identified by biochemical characteristics and 16S-rRNA. All Lactobacillus species isolates tested, significantly inhibited E. tenella invasion. Steric interference did not affect parasite invasion. Extracellular metabolic factors secreted by Lactobacillus species isolates into the surrounding media were shown to inhibit parasite invasion and these factors appeared to be heat stable. These results show that the natural microflora of poultry can provide a source of E. tenella-inhibiting Lactobacillus species in vitro, and thus may contribute to the control of Eimeria infection.

  14. Quiescin-sulfhydryl oxidase inhibits prion formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jue; Zeng, Liang; Dang, Johnny; Camacho Martinez, Manuel; Wang, Zerui; Mikol, Jacqueline; Lehmann, Sylvain; Bu, Shizhong; Steyaert, Jan; Cui, Li; Petersen, Robert B.; Kong, Qingzhong; Wang, Gong-Xiang; Wohlkonig, Alexandre; Zou, Wen-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Prions are infectious proteins that cause a group of fatal transmissible diseases in animals and humans. The scrapie isoform (PrPSc) of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) is the only known component of the prion. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the formation and molecular features of PrPSc are associated with an abnormal unfolding/refolding process. Quiescin-sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) plays a role in protein folding by introducing disulfides into unfolded reduced proteins. Here we report that QSOX inhibits human prion propagation in protein misfolding cyclic amplification reactions and murine prion propagation in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells. Moreover, QSOX preferentially binds PrPSc from prion-infected human or animal brains, but not PrPC from uninfected brains. Surface plasmon resonance of the recombinant mouse PrP (moPrP) demonstrates that the affinity of QSOX for monomer is significantly lower than that for octamer (312 nM vs 1.7 nM). QSOX exhibits much lower affinity for N-terminally truncated moPrP (PrP89-230) than for the full-length moPrP (PrP23-231) (312 nM vs 2 nM), suggesting that the N-terminal region of PrP is critical for the interaction of PrP with QSOX. Our study indicates that QSOX may play a role in prion formation, which may open new therapeutic avenues for treating prion diseases. PMID:27959866

  15. Inhibition of dentin demineralization by fluoride in vitro.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, J M; Damen, J J; Buijs, M J

    1998-01-01

    Compared with the knowledge accumulated on enamel-fluoride interactions, relatively little data is available regarding fluoride effects on dentin. This applies to both laboratory and clinical studies into the efficacy of fluoride schemes for the prevention of root surface caries. This study aimed to determine the effects of fluoride and pH on the demineralization of dentin, such as to provide information necessary to develop preventive programmes. Bovine dentin blocks were subjected to undersaturated calcium- and phosphate-containing solutions in the pH range 4.0-6.0 with fluoride added at concentrations between 0.5 and 10 ppm. Non-fluoride solutions served as controls. Mineral loss was assessed chemically and by transversal microradiography. Comparisons were made with similar studies on enamel demineralization. The results showed that demineralization of dentin depends on both pH and fluoride concentration in the demineralizing solution. Inhibition of demineralization that could be relevant from a clinical point of view was found at fluoride values 5-10 times the corresponding values for enamel. Also rapid depletion of fluoride from the solutions was observed, indicating the high uptake capacity of dentin for fluoride. Lesion depth depended on pH of the solution while the fluoride levels were associated with the surface layer, both in mineral content and depth. For dentin we propose a demineralization mechanism where acid penetrates rapidly into the tissue, presumably through the tubules, after which the released calcium and phosphate is partly trapped by the inward diffusing fluoride. This leads to the formation of a surface layer, which may even be hypermineralized compared to sound dentin.

  16. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL TESTIS
    Chad R. Blystone1, 2, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Box 7633, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA and 2U.S. Envi...

  17. In VitroInhibition of Microsomal Calcium Atpase from Eggshell Gland of Mallard Duck.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    shell gland homogenate. Previous studies have shown DDT-induced eggshell thinning to be due to decreased calcium content of eggshells . Since calcium...ATPase has been shown to be associated with calcium transport in eggshell gland, the inhibition of this enzyme in vitro offers a possible explanation for DDT-induced eggshell thinning.

  18. Disulfiram inhibits the in vitro growth of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M; Malloy, G; Nedunchezian, D; Lukrec, A; Howard, R G

    1991-01-01

    Several antibiotics have disulfiram-like effects; we evaluated disulfiram for its antibiotic-like effects. Disulfiram inhibited the in vitro growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, with an MIC of 1.33 micrograms/ml, but was not effective against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae or Pseudomonas species. PMID:2069390

  19. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL TESTIS
    Chad R. Blystone1, 2, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Box 7633, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA and 2U.S. Envi...

  20. Roscovitine inhibits extrusion of second polar body and induces apoptosis in rat eggs cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anima; Chaube, Shail K

    2015-10-01

    Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) may result in meiotic cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in rat eggs in vitro. We aimed to find out whether roscovitine, a Cdk inhibitor, inhibits extrusion of second polar body (II PB) and induced egg apoptosis in vitro. The metaphase-II (M-II) arrested eggs were collected from oviduct and exposed to various concentrations of roscovitine for 3h in vitro. The morphological changes, phosphorylation status of Cdk1, cyclin B1 level, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), p53, Bax, Bcl2 and cytochrome c expressions, caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation were analyzed. We showed that the lower concentrations of roscovitine significantly reduced Thr-161 phosphorylated Cdk1 level and inhibited extrusion of II PB. The higher concentrations of roscovitine significantly reduced Thr-161 phosphorylated Cdk1 level but total Cdk as well as cyclin B1 levels remained high. Higher concentrations of roscovitine increased H2O2 level and expressions of p53, Bax and cytochrome c in treated eggs. The increased proapoptotic factors induced capsase-3 activity and thereby DNA fragmentation that finally resulted in cytoplasmic fragmentation, a morphological apoptotic feature. Our data suggest that roscovitine inhibited II PB extrusion possibly by reducing Thr-161 phosphorylated Cdk1 level and induced apoptosis through mitochondria-caspase-mediated apoptotic pathway in rat eggs cultured in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Cinnamon extract inhibits tau aggregation associated with Alzheimer’s Disease in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An aqueous extract of Ceylon cinnamon (C. zeylanicum) was found to inhibit tau aggregation and filament formation, hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in vitro using brain cells taken from patients who died with AD. The extract also promoted complete disassembly of recombinant tau filaments, and ...

  2. An extract of Morinda citrifolia interferes with the serum-induced formation of filamentous structures in Candida albicans and inhibits germination of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saswati; Johnson, Andrew D; Csiszar, Katalin; Wansley, Daniel L; McGeady, Paul

    2006-01-01

    An aqueous extract of Morinda citrifolia was shown to interfere with the serum-induced morphological conversion of Candida albicans from a cellular yeast to a filamentous form in vitro. The conversion of C. albicans from a cellular yeast to a filamentous form in vivo is associated with pathogenicity. No significant effect on growth in serum-free media was seen at the concentrations used to interfere with the morphological change. The same extract also inhibited the germination of Apergillus nidulans spores. These results demonstrate that M. citrifolia contains a water-soluble component or components that interfere with the morphological conversion of C. albicans and the germination of A. nidulans and may have potential therapeutic value with regard to candidiasis and aspergillosis.

  3. [In vitro antifungal activity of anidulafungin].

    PubMed

    Quindós, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena

    2008-06-01

    Anidulafungin is a new and very useful pharmacological tool for the treatment of invasive mycoses. The antifungal spectrum of anidulafungin reaches the most common pathogenic fungi. Anidulafungin is especially active against the genera Candida and Aspergillus. Its antifungal mechanism is based on the inhibition of the beta-1,3-D-glucan synthesis, an essential molecule for the cell wall architecture, with different consequences for Candida and Aspergillus, being anidulafungin fungicide for the former and fungistatic for the latter. This review describes the in vitro antifungal spectrum of anidulafungin based in the scientific and medical literature of recent years. We can underline that most than 99% of Candida isolates are susceptible to < or = 2 microg/ml of anidulafungin. MIC are very low (< or =0.125 microg/ml) for most clinical isolates of the species Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei while Candida parapsilosis and Candida guilliermondii isolates are susceptible to anidulafungin concentrations < or = 2 microg/ml. An excellent activity of anidulafungin has been also described against Aspergillus, Pneumocystis and other fungi. However, its activity is very low against Cryptococcus and the Zygomycetes. The excellent activity of anidulafungin has made this antifungal a first line therapeutic indication for candidemia and invasive candidiasis in non-neutropenic patients.

  4. Exogenous tyrosol inhibits planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida species and enhances their susceptibility to antifungals.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de A; Teixeira, Carlos E C; Brilhante, Raimunda S N; Castelo-Branco, Débora S C M; Alencar, Lucas P; de Oliveira, Jonathas S; Monteiro, André J; Bandeira, Tereza J P G; Sidrim, José J C; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Rocha, Marcos F G

    2015-06-01

    Tyrosol is a quorum-sensing molecule of Candida albicans able to induce hyphal development in the early and intermediate stages of biofilm growth. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of high concentrations of exogenous tyrosol on planktonic cells and biofilms of C. albicans (n = 10) and C. tropicalis (n = 10), and investigated whether tyrosol could be synergic to antifungals that target cellular ergosterol. Antifungal susceptibility and drug interaction against planktonic cells were investigated by the broth microdilution method. Tyrosol was able to inhibit planktonic cells, with MIC values ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 mM for both species. Synergism was observed between tyrosol/amphotericin B (11/20 strains), tyrosol/itraconazole (18/20 strains) and tyrosol/fluconazole (18/20 strains). Exogenous tyrosol alone or combined with antifungals at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC were able to reduce biofilm of both Candida species. Mature biofilms were susceptible to tyrosol alone at 50 × MIC or combined with amphotericin at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC. On the other hand, tyrosol plus azoles at both 10 × MIC and 50 × MIC enhanced biofilm growth.

  5. Catechin inhibits Candida albicans dimorphism by disrupting Cek1 phosphorylation and cAMP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hideo; Tamura, Muneaki; Imai, Kenichi; Ishigami, Tomohiko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2013-03-01

    Candida albicans is a fungal pathogen that undergoes dimorphism (transformation from a yeast form to a hyphal form), wherein, the yeast form is identified as a disseminating form that plays a critical role in the early stages of Candida disease progression, while the hyphal form is found to exert additional pathogenicity by adapting to various environmental conditions. Here, we elucidated the effects of catechin on C. albicans hyphal formation. Flow cytometry analysis showed catechin inhibited FCS-induced hyphal formation. Moreover, hypha-specific gene expression in MAP kinase cascade and cAMP pathway was decreased ascribable to catechin. Furthermore, through Western blotting and cAMP synthesis analysis, we found catechin obstructs Cek1 phosphorylation in MAP kinase cascade and suppresses cAMP synthesis. These results suggest that catechin possesses anti-dimorphism activity by interfering with in vitro signal transduction. Similarly, this highlights the possible application of catechin in clinical therapy for the management and prevention of candidosis.

  6. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm formation by antimycotics released from modified polydimethyl siloxane.

    PubMed

    De Prijck, Kristof; De Smet, Nele; Honraet, Kris; Christiaen, Steven; Coenye, Tom; Schacht, Etienne; Nelis, Hans J

    2010-03-01

    Unlike various disinfectants, antifungals have not been commonly incorporated so far in medical devices, such as catheters or prostheses, to prevent biofilm formation by Candida spp. In the present study, five antimycotics were added to polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) disks via admixture (nystatin) or impregnation (trimethylsilyl-nystatin (TMS-nystatin), miconazole, tea tree oil (TTO), zinc pyrithione). Nystatin-medicated PDMS disks exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on biofilm formation in a microtiter plate (MTP) but not in a Modified Robbins Device (MRD). This observation, together with HPLC data and agar diffusion tests, indicates that a small fraction of free nystatin is released, which kills Candida albicans cells in the limited volume of a MTP well. In contrast, biofilm inhibition amounted to more than one log unit in the MRD on disks impregnated with miconazole, TTO, and zinc pyrithione. It is hypothesized that the reduction in biofilm formation by these compounds in a flow system occurs through a contact-dependent effect.

  7. Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Induce Cell Death in Candida albicans Yeast and Hyphal Cells, Preventing Biofilm Formation In Vitro and in a Rodent Central Venous Catheter Model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mohammed S.; Lee, Hiu Ham; Sanchez, David A.; Friedman, Adam J.; Tar, Moses T.; Davies, Kelvin P.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading nosocomial pathogen. Today, candidal biofilms are a significant cause of catheter infections, and such infections are becoming increasingly responsible for the failure of medical-implanted devices. C. albicans forms biofilms in which fungal cells are encased in an autoproduced extracellular polysaccharide matrix. Consequently, the enclosed fungi are protected from antimicrobial agents and host cells, providing a unique niche conducive to robust microbial growth and a harbor for recurring infections. Here we demonstrate that a recently developed platform comprised of nanoparticles that release therapeutic levels of nitric oxide (NO-np) inhibits candidal biofilm formation, destroys the extracellular polysaccharide matrices of mature fungal biofilms, and hinders biofilm development on surface biomaterials such as the lumen of catheters. We found NO-np to decrease both the metabolic activity of biofilms and the cell viability of C. albicans in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis found NO-np to induce apoptosis in biofilm yeast cells in vitro. Moreover, NO-np behave synergistically when used in combination with established antifungal drug therapies. Here we propose NO-np as a novel treatment modality, especially in combination with standard antifungals, for the prevention and/or remediation of fungal biofilms on central venous catheters and other medical devices. PMID:26810653

  8. Inhibition of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro by ginger extracts.

    PubMed

    Gunathilake, K D Prasanna P; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is thought to play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Currently, there is a renewed interest in ginger because of its antioxidants and cardioprotective properties. The effects of ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane solvent extracts of ginger and pure major ginger constituents on Cu(2+)-induced oxidation of human LDL in vitro were examined. The LDL oxidation inhibition by ethanol, methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane extracts of ginger was 71%, 76%, 67%, and 67%, respectively, at their optimum extraction conditions. Inhibition of LDL oxidation by water extracts of ginger, which was prepared by ultrasonic-assisted extraction conditions of 52°C for 15 min, was about 43%. Phenolic bioactives of ginger-6-gingerols, 8-gingerols, 10-gingerols, and 6-shogaol-seem to be strong inhibitors of Cu(+2)-induced LDL oxidation. Overall, ginger extracts, including the water extract possess the antioxidant activities to inhibit human LDL oxidation in vitro.

  9. Failure to Inhibit In Vitro or In Vivo Acetycholinesterase with Botulinum Toxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Lance L.; Morimoto, Hiromi

    1969-01-01

    An attempt has been made to replicate an earlier finding that type A botulinum toxin can inhibit the in vitro activity of acetylcholinesterase. Two methods of enzyme assay were employed, but with neither technique were we able to reproduce the finding of in vitro enzyme inhibition. In fact, an examination of the data from the previous report leads us to question the possibility of the observations that were given. Furthermore, an investigation was carried out to determine if botulinum toxin can exert an inhibiting effect on acetylcholinesterase that is situated in the biological tissue. The answer again is negative. The experimental observations, coupled with several mathematical computations, do not support the notion that botulinum toxin is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. PMID:5773011

  10. [In vitro inhibition of celastrol on spermatozoa fertilization ability of guinea pig].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y Y; Gu, Z P; Shi, Q X; Qin, G W; Xu, R S; Cao, L

    1995-01-01

    The effects of celastrol (Cel), isolated from Tripterygium wilfordii, on guinea pig sperm forward motility (FM), capacitation (Cap), the acrosome reaction (AR) and sperm penetration assay (SPA) were assessed in vitro. Cel (5 micrograms.ml-1) was found to inhibit these spermatozoal functions, and the inhibitions were proportional to the concentrations of Cel used. The potency of inhibition of Cel on the fertilizing ability in guinea pig spermatozoa in vitro seems to follow the order: Cap > FM > SPA > AR. The inhibitory effect appeared to be reversible after washing away Cel if the duration of exposure of spermatozoa to Cel was shorter than 3 h. In a comparative study, the inhibitory effects of Cel on guinea pig sperm FM and AR were significantly stronger than those of gossypol acetic acid.

  11. Selective inhibition of in vitro synthesis of cancer DNA by alkaloids of beta-carboline class.

    PubMed

    Beljanski, M; Beljanski, M S

    1982-01-01

    The high template in vitro activity of native DNA from cancerous mammalian and plant tissues, compared to DNA from healthy tissues, enabled us to select substances which selectively inhibit cancer DNA synthesis. Among them, alstonine, serpentine, sempervirine and flavopereirine, all alkaloids which belong to the Beta-carboline class, distinguish cancer DNA from healthy tissue DNA inhibit DNA in vitro synthesis when native DNA from different cancerous tissues or cells is used as template. They have practically no effect on DNA from healthy tissues. The inhibitory effect of alkaloids is due to their capacity to form an 'alkaloid-cancer DNA' complex which has been characterized by use of the Sephadex column. Evidence is presented showing that these alkaloids inhibit the initiation of DNA synthesis but not chain elongation. The stimulating action caused by carcinogens during cancer DNA in vitro synthesis may be prevented and reversed by alkaloids. Furthermore, the stimulating action of steroids during in vitro synthesis of hormone target tissue DNA might be neutralized by alkaloids. However, at relatively high doses, steroids reversibly compete with alkaloids for binding sites on breast cancer DNA. This is not observed with DNA from nonhormone target tissues.

  12. The inhibition of DNA synthesis in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cells by chlorambucil in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, D. P.; Blackmore, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The inhibition of 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia by chlorambucil was measured in vitro and the results related to clinical drug resistance. The assay proved to be both sensitive and specific showing a clear separation of those patients with responsive disease from those with disease resistant to treatment. There was evidence of primary drug resistance in untreated patients. In almost all patients who received treatment this led to increasing resistance to chlorambucil in vitro. The assay is predictive of clinical responsiveness and provides a potential means whereby new therapeutic agents and treatment modifiers may be investigated. PMID:1739612

  13. A practical in vitro growth inhibition assay for the evaluation of TB vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kolibab, Kristopher; Parra, Marcela; Yang, Amy L; Perera, Liyanage P; Derrick, Steven C; Morris, Sheldon L

    2009-12-11

    New vaccines and novel immunization strategies are needed to improve the control of the global tuberculosis epidemic. To facilitate vaccine development, we have been creating in vitro mycobacterial intra-macrophage growth inhibition assays. Here we describe the development of an in vitro assay designed for BSL-2 laboratories which measures the capacity of vaccine-induced immune splenocytes to control the growth of isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium bovis BCG (INH(r) BCG). The use of the INH(r) BCG as the infecting organism allows the discrimination of BCG bacilli used in murine vaccinations from BCG used in the in vitro assay. In this study, we showed that protective immune responses evoked by four different types of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines [BCG, an ESAT6/Antigen 85B fusion protein formulated in DDA/MPL adjuvant, a DNA vaccine expressing the same fusion protein, and a TB Modified Vaccinia Ankara construct expressing four TB antigens (MVA-4TB)] were detected. Importantly, the levels of vaccine-induced protective immunity seen in the in vitro assay correlated with the results from in vivo protection studies in the mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Furthermore, the growth inhibition data for the INH(r) BCG assay was similar to the previously reported results for a M. tuberculosis infection assay. The cytokine expression profiles at day 7 of the INH(r) BCG growth inhibition studies were also similar but not identical to the cytokine patterns detected in earlier M. tuberculosis co-culture assays. Overall, we have shown that a BSL-2 compatible in vitro growth inhibition assay using INH(r) BCG as the intra-macrophage target organism should be useful in developing and evaluating new TB immunization strategies.

  14. In vitro inhibition of CYP3A4 by herbal remedies frequently used by cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Engdal, Silje; Nilsen, Odd Georg

    2009-07-01

    The herbal remedies Natto K2, Agaricus, mistletoe, noni juice, green tea and garlic, frequently used by cancer patients, were investigated for their in vitro inhibition potential of cytochrome P-450 3A4 (CYP3A4) metabolism. To our knowledge, only garlic and green tea had available data on the possible inhibition of CYP3A4 metabolism. Metabolic studies were performed with human c-DNA baculovirus expressed CYP3A4. Testosterone was used as a substrate and ketoconazole as a positive quantitative inhibition control. The formation of 6-beta-OH-testosterone was quantified by a validated HPLC methodology. Green tea was the most potent inhibitor of CYP3A4 metabolism (IC(50): 73 microg/mL), followed by Agaricus, mistletoe and noni juice (1324, 3594, >10 000 microg/mL, respectively). All IC(50) values were high compared with those determined for crude extracts of other herbal remedies. The IC(50)/IC(25) ratios for the inhibiting herbal remedies ranged from 2.15 to 2.67, indicating similar inhibition profiles of the herbal inhibitors of CYP3A4. Garlic and Natto K2 were classified as non-inhibitors. Although Agaricus, noni juice, mistletoe and green tea inhibited CYP3A4 metabolism in vitro, clinically relevant systemic or intestinal interactions with CYP3A4 were considered unlikely, except for a probable inhibition of intestinal CYP3A4 by the green tea product. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Inhibition of adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to a resin composite restorative dental material by salivary secretory IgA and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Elguezabal, N; Maza, J L; Pontón, J

    2004-03-01

    The attachment of Candida to oral surfaces is a crucial step in the colonization of the oral cavity and the eventual development of oral diseases caused by this microorganism. Inhibition of adhesion is one of the strategies currently studied to prevent Candida infections. The main objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of the human salivary components on the adherence of Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis to Herculite, a widely used resin composite restorative dental material. We have also investigated the influence on the adherence of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against C. albicans cell wall antigens. The adhesion of three strains of C. albicans and one strain of C. dubliniensis was studied by a visual method after incubating the fungus and the resin in presence and in absence of human whole saliva, secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and three mAbs directed against C. albicans cell wall surface antigens. Adherence of C. albicans was inhibited by whole saliva (41.7%), salivary sIgA (55.7%) and the salivary components that bind to the cell wall (36.7%). Whole saliva significantly reduced the adhesion of C. dubliniensis to Herculite to 45.3% of the control level. Saliva previously adsorbed with fungal cells or sIgA depleted saliva had no effect on adherence. An inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis to Herculite similar to that shown by whole saliva was also observed when mAbs C7 and 26G7 were used. However, mAb 21E6 increased adhesion of all the strains to Herculite. The results suggest that sIgA, as well as whole saliva, are important in blocking adherence of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis to Herculite and that this effect can be reproduced with mAbs directed against the cell wall surface of C. albicans.

  16. In vitro antifungal activity of fluconazole and voriconazole against non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Mandras, Narcisa; Roana, Janira; Scalas, Daniela; Fucale, Giacomo; Allizond, Valeria; Banche, Giuliana; Barbui, Anna; Li Vigni, Nicolò; Newell, Vance A; Cuffini, Anna Maria; Tullio, Vivian

    2015-10-01

    The risk of opportunistic infections caused by non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi is increasingly common, mainly in immunocompromised patients. Appropriate first-line therapy has not been defined and standardized, mainly due to the low number of cases reported. To improve empirical treatment guidelines, we describe the susceptibility profile to fluconazole and voriconazole of 176 non-Candida yeasts and yeast-like fungi collected from hospitals in Piedmont, North West Italy from January 2009 to December 2013. The results showed that most isolates are susceptible to voriconazole (94%), but less susceptible to fluconazole (78%), suggesting that voriconazole could be used as first-line therapy in infections caused by these fungi.

  17. Candida albicans Inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Suppression of Pyochelin and Pyoverdine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Fan, Di; Coughlin, Laura A.; Ho, Evi X.; Lamont, Iain L.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Hooper, Lora V.; Koh, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-fungal interactions have important physiologic and medical ramifications, but the mechanisms of these interactions are poorly understood. The gut is host to trillions of microorganisms, and bacterial-fungal interactions are likely to be important. Using a neutropenic mouse model of microbial gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination, we show that the fungus Candida albicans inhibits the virulence of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by inhibiting P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine gene expression, which plays a critical role in iron acquisition and virulence. Accordingly, deletion of both P. aeruginosa pyochelin and pyoverdine genes attenuates P. aeruginosa virulence. Heat-killed C. albicans has no effect on P. aeruginosa, whereas C. albicans secreted proteins directly suppress P. aeruginosa pyoverdine and pyochelin expression and inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in mice. Interestingly, suppression or deletion of pyochelin and pyoverdine genes has no effect on P. aeruginosa’s ability to colonize the GI tract but does decrease P. aeruginosa’s cytotoxic effect on cultured colonocytes. Finally, oral iron supplementation restores P. aeruginosa virulence in P. aeruginosa and C. albicans colonized mice. Together, our findings provide insight into how a bacterial-fungal interaction can modulate bacterial virulence in the intestine. Previously described bacterial-fungal antagonistic interactions have focused on growth inhibition or colonization inhibition/modulation, yet here we describe a novel observation of fungal-inhibition of bacterial effectors critical for virulence but not important for colonization. These findings validate the use of a mammalian model system to explore the complexities of polymicrobial, polykingdom infections in order to identify new therapeutic targets for preventing microbial disease. PMID:26313907

  18. In vitro activity of inexpensive topical alternatives against Candida spp. isolated from the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Rana S; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A

    2008-03-01

    The use of inexpensive topical alternatives, e.g. oil of melaleuca (tea tree oil (TTO)), chlorhexidine (CHX), povidone iodine (PI) and gentian violet (GV), to treat oral candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients has been proposed in resource-poor countries. However, pre-clinical studies comparing the antifungal activity of these agents are lacking. This study compared the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of TTO, GV, PI, CHX and fluconazole (FLZ) against 91 clinical Candida strains using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) methodology. Isolates were obtained from the oral cavity of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Among the topical agents examined, GV showed the most potent activity against all Candida isolates tested (MIC range, MIC for 50% of the organisms (MIC(50)) and MIC for 90% of the organisms (MIC(90)) of 0.03-0.25 microg/mL, 0.06 microg/mL and 0.1 2microg/mL, respectively). CHX was 64 times less active than GV (MIC range, MIC(50) and MIC(90) of 0.5-16 microg/mL, 4 microg/mL and 8 microg/mL, respectively). The lowest antifungal activity was seen for PI (MIC(90)=0.25%). Moreover, GV, unlike the other topical agents tested, was fungicidal (minimum fungicidal concentration=1 microg/mL) against Candida albicans isolates (n=83). In addition, GV showed activity against FLZ-resistant C. albicans (n=3). The combination of GV and FLZ was not antagonistic and there was no interaction between the two compounds. GV possesses potent antifungal activity against FLZ-susceptible and -resistant Candida strains and is not antagonistic when used in combination with FLZ. In vivo evaluation is warranted.

  19. Inhibition of glycation of albumin and hemoglobin by acetylation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rendell, M; Nierenberg, J; Brannan, C; Valentine, J L; Stephen, P M; Dodds, S; Mercer, P; Smith, P K; Walder, J

    1986-10-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid or ASA) is known to inhibit glycosylation (glycation) of albumin in vitro. The mechanism has been presumed to be acetylation, but this has never been validated. The new affinity aminophenylboronic acid procedure for determination of glycosylated albumin was used to demonstrate inhibition of glycosylation by aspirin. ASA, but not salicylic acid, inhibited glycation. The inhibition of glycation by equimolar acetic anhydride was greater than that by ASA. Pretreatment of albumin with ASA in the absence of glucose demonstrated that inhibition was extremely rapid, occurring in a matter of minutes. However, the inhibition by ASA could not be prevented by massive acceleration of glycation induced by borohydride reduction. Glycation of hemoglobin was also inhibited by ASA, but the dose requirement was considerably higher. Various analogues of ASA were evaluated for inhibition of glycation. Only acetyl-5-ethylsalicylic acid was more effective than ASA in inhibiting albumin glycation. None of these agents was more potent than ASA in inhibiting glycation of hemoglobin. ASA was fed to diabetic rats in a long-term experiment. Glycohemoglobin and glycoalbumin levels were decreased by ASA administration. We conclude that ASA inhibits glycation by a very rapid acetylation process. This process is apparently quite selective in terms of the protein involved, presumably because of the local environment of affected lysine groups. The phenomenon can be produced in vivo by administration of ASA.

  20. In vitro susceptibility of amphotericin-B, voriconazole and caspofungin against Candida guilliermondii biofilms, isolated from dentals units water pipes, under different growth phases.

    PubMed

    Mazari, W; Boucherit-Otmani, Z; Boucherit, K

    2015-03-01

    The dental units water pipes are a favorable medium for biofilms formation because of the small diameter of the pipe and the duration of water stagnation, but the question which arises is the nature of the biofilms which are formed inside? This article gives a progress report on the nature of this microbial contamination and precisely the fungal biofilms formation by examining their susceptibility to antifungal agents under different growth phases. Sixteen samples of dental units water pipes were taken from public dental clinic and from stomatology unit at the university hospital of Tlemcen (Algeria). The isolated strains were identified by the conventional mycological methods and were analyzed to determine their minimal concentrations inhibiting their growth (planktonic and sessile forms) using three antifungal agents. Five strains type Candida guilliermondii were identified and analyzed for their resistance to antifungal agents. Antifungal susceptibility testing demonstrated the sensitivity of all planktonic Candida guilliermondii cells against amphotericin-B, voriconzole and caspofungin but the sessile cells of these strains revealed a less susceptibility to antifungal agents and even a resistance when the biofilm made mature. Several types of yeast contaminated the dental units water pipes and especially Candida guilliermondii that was the most founded. This specie was susceptible to antifungal agents under planctonic forms and resistance where the biofilm made mature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Serum factors from infected baboons inhibit oviposition and cause unpairing of Schistosoma mansoni in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bosshardt, S C; Damian, R T

    1986-08-01

    A reliable in vitro fecundity assay for Schistosoma mansoni was established. The main features that reduced variability in in vitro oviposition were pre-selection and randomization of worm pairs producing moderate numbers of eggs in initial 2-day culture, and short pre-incubation in serumless medium prior to addition of test sera to the cultures. In 4 of 6 total experiments testing the effects of serum from chronically infected baboons, significant (P less than or equal to 0.025) fecundity reduction ranging from 29 to 82% was found. Chronically infected baboon serum also caused consistently higher unpairing than normal serum. These results demonstrate the existence of serum factors which inhibit egg production and maintenance of the paired status of Schistosoma mansoni in vitro.

  2. Inhibition of benzodiazepine binding in vitro by amentoflavone, a constituent of various species of Hypericum.

    PubMed

    Baureithel, K H; Büter, K B; Engesser, A; Burkard, W; Schaffner, W

    1997-06-01

    Flower extracts of Hypericum perforatum, Hypericum hirsutum, Hypericum patulum and Hypericum olympicum efficiently inhibited binding of [3H]flumazenil to rat brain benzodiazepine binding sites of the GABAA-receptor in vitro with IC50 values of 6.83, 6.97, 13.2 and 6.14 micrograms/ml, respectively. Single constituents of the extracts like hypericin, the flavones quercetin and luteolin, the glycosylated flavonoides rutin, hyperoside and quercitrin and the biflavone 13, II8-biapigenin did not inhibit binding up to concentrations of 1 microM. In contrast, amentoflavone revealed an IC50 = 14.9 +/- 1.9 nM on benzodiazepine binding in vitro. Comparative HPLC analyses of hypericin and amentoflavone in extracts of different Hypericum species revealed a possible correlation between the amentoflavone concentration and the inhibition of flumazenil binding. For hypericin no such correlation was observed. Our experimental data demonstrate that amentoflavone, in contrast to hypericin, presents a very active compound with regard to the inhibition of [3H]-flumazenil binding in vitro and thus might be involved in the antidepressant effects of Hypericum perforatum extracts.

  3. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth and adherence to gastric mucosal cells by Pycnogenol.

    PubMed

    Rohdewald, Peter; Beil, Winfried

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains has necessitated the identification of alternative additive therapies for the treatment of this infection. The study tested whether a specific pine bark extract (Pycnogenol is effective in inhibiting the growth and adherence of H. pylori in vitro. Inhibition of H. pylori growth by Pycnogenol was tested in liquid medium as well as in an in vitro model by using sessile bacteria attached to AGS cells. Adherence was determined by co-incubation of gastric cells with Pycnogenol and H. pylori in vitro. Pycnogenol inhibited H. pylori growth in suspension with an MIC(50) of 12.5 microg/mL. Growth of H. pylori in infected cells was reduced to 10% of the control value by 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. Adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells was reduced by 70% after 3 h incubation with 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. The results show a significant, yet limited inhibition of growth and adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells by Pycnogenol. In vivo studies have to demonstrate the clinical relevance of these findings.

  4. Mechanism of inhibition defines CETP activity: a mathematical model for CETP in vitro.

    PubMed

    Potter, Laura K; Sprecher, Dennis L; Walker, Max C; Tobin, Frank L

    2009-11-01

    Because cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibition is a potential HDL-raising therapy, interest has been raised in the mechanisms and consequences of CETP activity. To explore these mechanisms and the dynamics of CETP in vitro, a mechanistic mathematical model was developed based upon the shuttle mechanism for lipid transfer. Model parameters were estimated from eight published experimental datasets, and the resulting model captures observed dynamics of CETP in vitro. Simulations suggest the shuttle mechanism yields behaviors consistent with experimental observations. Three key findings predicted from model simulations are: 1) net CE transfer activity from HDL to VLDL and LDL can be significantly altered by changing the balance of homoexchange versus heteroexchange of neutral lipids via CETP; 2) lipemia-induced increases in CETP activity are more likely caused by increases in lipoprotein particle size than particle number; and 3) the inhibition mechanisms of the CETP inhibitors torcetrapib and JTT-705 are significantly more potent than a classic competitive inhibition mechanism with the irreversible binding mechanism having the most robust response. In summary, the model provides a plausible representation of CETP activity in vitro, corroborates strong evidence for the shuttle hypothesis, and provides new insights into the consequences of CETP activity and inhibition on lipoproteins.

  5. A 5′ UTR-mediated Translational Efficiency Mechanism Inhibits the Candida albicans Morphological Transition

    PubMed Central

    Childers, Delma S.; Mundodi, Vasanthakrishna; Banerjee, Mohua; Kadosh, David

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY While virulence properties of Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, are controlled by transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms, considerably little is known about the role of post-transcriptional, and particularly translational, mechanisms. We demonstrate that UME6, a key filament-specific transcriptional regulator whose expression level is sufficient to determine C. albicans morphology and promote virulence, has one of the longest 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) identified in fungi to date, which is predicted to form a complex and extremely stable secondary structure. The 5′ UTR inhibits the ability of UME6, when expressed at constitutive high levels, to drive complete hyphal growth, but does not cause a reduction in UME6 transcript. Deletion of the 5′ UTR increases C. albicans filamentation under a variety of conditions but does not affect UME6 transcript level or induction kinetics. We show that the 5′ UTR functions to inhibit Ume6 protein expression under several filament-inducing conditions and specifically reduces association of the UME6 transcript with polysomes. Overall, our findings suggest that translational efficiency mechanisms, known to regulate diverse biological processes in bacterial and viral pathogens as well as higher eukaryotes, have evolved to inhibit and fine-tune morphogenesis, a key virulence trait of many human fungal pathogens. PMID:24601998

  6. Decontamination efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet and diode laser light on oral Candida albicans isolates of a 5-day in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Sennhenn-Kirchner, Sabine; Schwarz, Peter; Schliephake, Henning; Konietschke, Frank; Brunner, Edgar; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete

    2009-05-01

    The different forms of superficial and systemic candidiasis are often associated with biofilm formation on surfaces of host tissues or medical devices. The biofilm formation of Candida spp., in general, necessitates significantly increased amounts of antifungal agents for therapy. Often the therapeutic effect is doubtful. A 5-day biofilm model with oral Candida isolates was established according to Chandra et al. (J Dent Res 80:903-908, 2001) on glass and titanium surfaces and was modified by Sennhenn-Kirchner et al. (Z Zahnärztl Implantol 3:45-51, 2007) to investigate different aspects unanswered in the field of dentistry. In this model, the efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) light (2940 nm, 100 mJ, 10 Hz, 300 micros pulsed mode applied for 80 s) and diode laser light (810 nm, 1 W, continuous wave mode applied for 20 s with four repetitions after 30 s pauses each) was evaluated and compared to untreated controls. The photometric evaluation of the samples was completed by observations on morphological changes of yeast cells grown in the biofilm. Compared to the untreated controls Candida cells grown in mature in vitro biofilms were significantly reduced by both wavelengths investigated. Comparison between the different methods of laser treatment additionally revealed a significantly greater effect of the Er:YAG over the diode laser. Scanning electron microscopy findings proved that the diode laser light was effective in direct contact mode. In contrast, in the areas without direct contact, the fungal cells were left almost unchanged. The Er:YAG laser damaged the fungal cells to a great extent wherever it was applied.

  7. Inhibition of mycobacterial growth in vitro following primary but not secondary vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Helen A; Tanner, Rachel; Wallis, Robert S; Meyer, Joel; Manjaly, Zita-Rose; Harris, Stephanie; Satti, Iman; Silver, Richard F; Hoft, Dan; Kampmann, Beate; Walker, K Barry; Dockrell, Hazel M; Fruth, Uli; Barker, Lew; Brennan, Michael J; McShane, Helen

    2013-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine, there are more than 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year, and there is an urgent need for better TB vaccines. TB vaccine candidates are selected for evaluation based in part on the detection of an antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ) response. The measurement of mycobacterial growth in blood specimens obtained from subjects immunized with investigational TB vaccines may be a better in vitro correlate of in vivo vaccine efficacy. We performed a clinical study with 30 United Kingdom adults who were followed for 6 months to evaluate the abilities of both a whole-blood- and a novel peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based mycobacterial growth inhibition assay to measure a response to primary vaccination and revaccination with BCG. Using cryopreserved PBMCs, we observed a significant improvement in mycobacterial growth inhibition following primary vaccination but no improvement in growth inhibition following revaccination with BCG (P < 0.05). Mycobacterial growth inhibition following primary BCG vaccination was not correlated with purified protein derivative (PPD) antigen-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) responses. We demonstrate that a mycobacterial growth inhibition assay can detect improved capacity to control growth following primary immunization, but not revaccination, with BCG. This is the first study to demonstrate that an in vitro growth inhibition assay can identify a difference in vaccine responses by comparing both primary and secondary BCG vaccinations, suggesting that in vitro growth inhibition assays may serve as better surrogates of clinical efficacy than the assays currently used for the assessment of candidate TB vaccines.

  8. Endostatin inhibits VEGF-A induced osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sipola, Annina; Nelo, Katri; Hautala, Timo; Ilvesaro, Joanna; Tuukkanen, Juha

    2006-01-01

    Background Endostatin is a C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII which is a component of basement membranes with the structural properties of both collagens and proteoglycans. Endostatin has a major role in angiogenesis which is intimately associated with bone development and remodeling. Signaling between the endothelial cells and the bone cells, for example, may have a role in recruitment of osteoclastic precursor cells. Our study aims at exploring a possibility that endostatin, either as a part of basement membrane or as a soluble molecule, may control osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro. Methods Rat pit formation assay was employed in order to examine the effect of endostatin alone or in combination with vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) on bone resorption in vitro. Effect of these agents on osteoclast differentiation in vitro was also tested. Osteoclastogenesis and the number of osteoclasts were followed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) staining and resorption was evaluated by measuring the area of excavated pits. Results Endostatin inhibited the VEGF-A stimulated osteoclastic bone resorption, whereas endostatin alone had no effect on the basal resorption level in the absence of VEGF-A. In addition, endostatin could inhibit osteoclast differentiation in vitro independent of VEGF-A. Conclusion Our in vitro data indicate that collagen XVIII/endostatin can suppress VEGF-A induced osteoclastic bone resorption to the basal level. Osteoclastogenesis is also inhibited by endostatin. The regulatory effect of endostatin, however, is not critical since endostatin alone does not modify the basal bone resorption. PMID:16839420

  9. Synergistic inhibition of glycinergic transmission in vitro and in vivo by flavonoids and strychnine.

    PubMed

    Raafat, Karim; Breitinger, Ulrike; Mahran, Laila; Ayoub, Nahla; Breitinger, Hans-Georg

    2010-11-01

    The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) is a key mediator of synaptic signaling in spinal cord, brain stem, and higher central nervous system regions. The flavonoids quercetin and genistein have been identified previously as promising GlyR antagonists in vitro, but their detailed mechanism of action was not known. Here, inhibition of recombinant human α1 GlyRs in HEK 293 cells by genistein, quercetin, and strychnine was studied using whole-cell recording techniques. The interaction of several inhibitors applied alone or in combination was analyzed using a minimum mechanism of receptor activation and inhibition. Receptor inhibition in vivo was studied in a mouse model of strychnine toxicity. Genistein, quercetin, and strychnine were noncompetitive GlyR inhibitors. The inhibitory potency of one flavonoid (either genistein or quercetin) was not affected by simultaneous application of the other, suggesting that both flavonoids target the same site on the receptor. In combination with strychnine, flavonoid inhibition was augmented, indicating that strychnine binds to a position on the receptor physically distant from the flavonoid site. Potentiation of strychnine inhibition by flavonoids was also observed in vivo, where harmless doses of flavonoids enhanced strychnine toxicity in mice. Thus, in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated a true synergism between flavonoids and strychnine for GlyR inhibition. The mechanism-based approach used here allows a rapid analysis of the effects of single drugs versus drug combinations.

  10. PAC-1 activates procaspase-3 in vitro through relief of zinc-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Quinn P; Goode, David R; West, Diana C; Ramsey, Kara N; Lee, Joy J Y; Hergenrother, Paul J

    2009-04-24

    The direct induction of apoptosis has emerged as a powerful anticancer strategy, and small molecules that either inhibit or activate certain proteins in the apoptotic pathway have great potential as novel chemotherapeutic agents. Central to apoptosis is the activation of the zymogen procaspase-3 to caspase-3. Caspase-3 is the key "executioner" caspase, catalyzing the hydrolysis of a multitude of protein substrates within the cell. Interestingly, procaspase-3 levels are often elevated in cancer cells, suggesting a compound that directly stimulates the activation of procaspase-3 to caspase-3 could selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. We recently reported the discovery of a compound, PAC-1, which enhances procaspase-3 activity in vitro and induces apoptotic death in cancer cells in culture and in mouse xenograft models. Described herein is the mechanism by which PAC-1 activates procaspase-3 in vitro. We show that zinc inhibits the enzymatic activity of procaspase-3 and that PAC-1 strongly activates procaspase-3 in buffers that contain zinc. PAC-1 and zinc form a tight complex with one another, with a dissociation constant of approximately 42 nM. The combined data indicate that PAC-1 activates procaspase-3 in vitro by sequestering inhibitory zinc ions, thus allowing procaspase-3 to autoactivate itself to caspase-3. The small-molecule-mediated activation of procaspases has great therapeutic potential and thus this discovery of the in vitro mechanism of action of PAC-1 is critical to the development and optimization of other procaspase-activating compounds.

  11. [Perspectives of inhibition of multidrug resistance during cancer chemotherapy, in vitro and in vivo experiments].

    PubMed

    Engi, Helga

    2009-03-29

    The development of pharmacological agents able to counteract the mechanisms of multidrug resistance in oncology has remained a major goal for the past ten years. Our purpose was to find multidrug resistance reversal agents less toxic than verapamil among various synthetic compounds: cinnamylidene ketones; 1,4-dihydropyridines; phenothiazines; heat shock 90 inhibitor peptides; betti base derivative of tylosin and among some naturally occurring plant derived jatrophane and lathyrane-type diterpenes. The first part of this thesis presents the inhibition of multidrug resistance through inhibition of the P-glycoprotein efflux pump in various cell lines. In general, the newly identified multidrug resistance modifiers were able to enhance the antiproliferative activity of selected anticancer drugs in a synergistic or additive way in in vitro experiments. The in vitro activity of betti base derivative of tylosin was confirmed by further in vivo efficacy studies in DBA/2 mice. As an alternative way of antitumor effect, apoptosis inductions of resistance modifiers were studied. The substituted dihydropyridine 13 was the most promising apoptosis inducer on mouse lymphoma cells. Human cytomegalovirus was used in a modified in vitro model for characterizing lathyrane compounds with antipromotion effect on human lung cancer cells. All the six macrocyclic lathyrane-type diterpenoids reduced the promotion in vitro , except latilagascene D, decreased IE-antigen expression of cytomegalovirus to prevent progression of tumor malignancy.

  12. G-protein ligands inhibit in vitro reactions of vacuole inheritance

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    During budding in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, maternal vacuole material is delivered into the growing daughter cell via tubular or vesicular structures. One of the late steps in vacuole inheritance is the fusion in the bud of vesicles derived from the maternal vacuole. This process has been reconstituted in vitro and requires isolated vacuoles, a physiological temperature, cytosolic factors, and ATP (Conradt, B., J. Shaw, T. Vida, S. Emr, and W. Wickner. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 119:1469- 1479). We now report a simple and reliable assay to quantify vacuole-to- vacuole fusion in vitro. This assay is based on the maturation and activation of vacuole membrane-bound pro-alkaline phosphatase by vacuolar proteinase A after vacuole-to-vacuole fusion. In vitro fusion allowed maturation of 30 to 60% of pro-alkaline phosphatase. Vacuoles prepared from a mutant defective in vacuole inheritance in vivo (vac2- 1) were inactive in this assay. Vacuole fusion in vitro required a vacuole membrane potential. Inhibition by nonhydrolyzable guanosine derivatives, mastoparans, and benzalkonium chloride suggest that GTP- hydrolyzing G proteins may play a key role in the in vitro fusion events. PMID:8027189

  13. [In vitro antimicrobial, antiadherent and antifungal activity of Brazilian medicinal plants on oral biofilm microorganisms and strains of the genus Candida].

    PubMed

    Alves, Pollianna Muniz; Queiroz, Lélia Maria Guedes; Pereira, Jozinete Vieira; Pereira, Maria do Socorro Vieira

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial, antifungal and antiadherent activity of aroeira-do-sertão, mallow and guava tree on oral biofilm microorganisms and oral candidiasis was evaluated in vitro. The extracts were shown to be effective in inhibiting the growth of bacteria of the oral biofilm and fungi of oral candidiasis, thus suggesting that these extracts can be used as alternative means of dental therapy.

  14. In vitro activities of new triazole antifungal agents, posaconazole and voriconazole, against oral Candida isolates from patients suffering from denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Arias, Cristina; Eraso, Elena; Madariaga, Lucila; Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Quindós, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is often treated with antifungal agents but recurrences or new episodes are common, and certain episodes can be resistant. New triazoles, such as posaconazole and voriconazole, may represent useful alternatives for management. In vitro activities of amphotericin B, nystatin, miconazole, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole against 150 oral Candida (101 C. albicans, 18 C. tropicalis, 12 C. glabrata, 11 C. guilliermondii, 4 C. parapsilosis, 2 Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 1 C. dubliniensis and 1 C. krusei) from 100 denture wearers were tested by the CLSI M27-A3 method. Resistant isolates were retested by Sensititre YeastOne and Etest. Most antifungal agents were very active. However, 4 C. glabrata (33.3%), 2 C. tropicalis (11.1%), 6 C. albicans (5.6%) and 1 C. krusei were resistant to itraconazole. Posaconazole was active against 143 yeast isolates (95.3%): 6 C. albicans (5.9%) and 1 C. tropicalis (5.6%) were resistant. Geometric mean MICs were 0.036 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis, 0.062 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.085 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.387 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii and 0.498 μg/ml for C. glabrata. Voriconazole was active against 148 isolates (98.7%) with geometric mean MICs ranging from 0.030 μg/ml for C. parapsilosis, 0.042 μg/ml for C. albicans, 0.048 μg/ml for C. tropicalis, 0.082 μg/ml for C. guilliermondii, to 0.137 μg/ml for C. glabrata. Only 2 C. albicans (2%) were resistant to voriconazole showing cross-resistance to other azoles. Posaconazole and voriconazole have excellent in vitro activities against all Candida isolates and could represent useful alternatives for recalcitrant or recurrent candidiasis.

  15. In vitro inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 by Aronia melanocarpa constituents.

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, Marie; Christensen, Hege; Johannesen, Siri; Slimestad, Rune; Wangensteen, Helle; Malterud, Karl E; Barsett, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    Extracts, subfractions, isolated anthocyanins and procyanidins, and two phenolic acids from aronia [Aronia melanocarpa] were investigated for their CYP3A4 inhibitory effects, using midazolam as the probe substrate and recombinant insect cell microsomes expressing CYP3A4 as the enzyme source. Procyanidin B5 was a considerably stronger CYP3A4 inhibitor in vitro than the isomeric procyanidin B2 and comparable to bergamottin, a known CYP3A4 inhibitor from grapefruit juice. The inhibitory activity of proanthocyanidin-containing fractions was correlated to the degree of polymerization. Among the anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-arabinoside showed stronger CYP3A4 inhibition than cyanidin 3-galactoside and cyanidin 3-glucoside. Thus, the ability to inhibit CYP3A4 in vitro seems to be influenced by the sugar unit linked to the anthocyanidin. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Ets2 knockdown inhibits tumorigenesis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liqiang; Zhang, Yanting; Ma, Shanshan; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Bo; Guan, Fangxia

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of Ets2 is reported upregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma tissue. However, the function of Ets2 in carcinogenesis of ESCC is poorly understood. Here, the rise of Ets2 was confirmed in ESCC cells and Ets2 depletion by RNA interference promotes cell apoptosis, inhibits cell proliferation, attenuates cell invasion and induces cell cycle G0/G1 arrest in vitro. Moreover, in vivo, Xenograft mouse model studies showed Ets2 knockdown inhibits tumor formation and metastasis significantly. Furthermore, Ets2 depletion inactivates the mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that a critical role of Ets2 in human ESCC pathogenesis via the inactivation of the mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. PMID:27556183

  17. In Vitro Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum Rosette Formation by Curdlan Sulfate▿

    PubMed Central

    Kyriacou, Helen M.; Steen, Katie E.; Raza, Ahmed; Arman, Monica; Warimwe, George; Bull, Peter C.; Havlik, Ivan; Rowe, J. Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous binding of infected erythrocytes to uninfected erythrocytes to form rosettes is a property of some strains of Plasmodium falciparum that is linked to severe complications of malaria. Curdlan sulfate (CRDS) is a sulfated glycoconjugate compound that is chemically similar to known rosette-inhibiting drugs such as heparin. CRDS has previously been shown to have antimalarial activity in vitro and is safe for clinical use. Here we show that CRDS at therapeutic levels (10 to 100 μg/ml) significantly reduces rosette formation in vitro in seven P. falciparum laboratory strains and in a group of 18 African clinical isolates. The strong ability to inhibit rosetting suggests that CRDS has the potential to reduce the severe complications and mortality rates from P. falciparum malaria among African children. Our data support further clinical trials of CRDS. PMID:17283200

  18. Comparison of two alternative microdilution procedures with the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards reference macrodilution method M27-P for in vitro testing of fluconazole-resistant and -susceptible isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Rodríguez-Tudela, J L; Martínez-Suárez, J V

    1995-01-01

    The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has proposed a reference broth macrodilution method for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of yeasts (the M27-P method). This method is cumbersome and time-consuming and includes MIC endpoint determination by the visual and subjective inspection of growth inhibition after 48 h of incubation. Two alternative microdilution procedures for MIC endpoint determination, a spectrophotometric MIC endpoint test that evaluates 80% growth inhibition by the drug and a colorimetric method with an oxidation-reduction indicator (Alamar Blue), were compared with the M27-P method for fluconazole susceptibility testing of 45 susceptible and resistant isolates of Candida albicans. The spectrophotometric method was performed with RPMI 1640 medium with 2% glucose, and the other two tests were performed with plain RPMI 1640 medium. All tests were incubated at 35 degrees C. Excellent agreement was demonstrated between the M27-P method and both 24-h microdilution tests (97.7%) as well as between the two microdilution tests (95.5%). Also, there was agreement in the detection in vivo of fluconazole resistance by the three methods. These preliminary data indicate that both microdilution methods may serve as less subjective alternatives to the M27-P method for the determination of fluconazole MIC endpoints. PMID:8586692

  19. A Trypsin Inhibitor from Tecoma stans Leaves Inhibits Growth and Promotes ATP Depletion and Lipid Peroxidation in Candida albicans and Candida krusei

    PubMed Central

    Patriota, Leydianne L. S.; Procópio, Thamara F.; de Souza, Maria F. D.; de Oliveira, Ana Patrícia S.; Carvalho, Lidiane V. N.; Pitta, Maira G. R.; Rego, Moacyr J. B. M.; Paiva, Patrícia M. G.; Pontual, Emmanuel V.; Napoleão, Thiago H.

    2016-01-01

    Tecoma stans (yellow elder) has shown medicinal properties and antimicrobial activity. Previous reports on antifungal activity of T. stans preparations and presence of trypsin inhibitor activity from T. stans leaves stimulated the investigation reported here. In this work, we proceeded to the purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor (TesTI), which was investigated for anti-Candida activity. Finally, in order to determine the potential of TesTI as a new natural chemotherapeutic product, its cytotoxicity to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was evaluated. TesTI was isolated from saline extract by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatographies. Antifungal activity was evaluated by determining the minimal inhibitory (MIC) and fungicide (MFC) concentrations using fungal cultures containing only yeast form or both yeast and hyphal forms. Candida cells treated with TesTI were evaluated for intracellular ATP levels and lipid peroxidation. Cytotoxicity of TesTI to PBMCs was evaluated by MTT assay. TesTI (39.8 kDa, pI 3.41, Ki 43 nM) inhibited similarly the growth of both C. albicans and C. krusei culture types at MIC of 100 μg/mL. The MFCs were 200 μg/mL for C. albicans and C. krusei. Time-response curves revealed that TesTI (at MIC) was more effective at inhibiting the replication of C. albicans cells. At MIC, TesTI promoted reduction of ATP levels and lipid peroxidation in the Candida cells, being not cytotoxic to PBMCs. In conclusion, TesTI is an antifungal agent against C. albicans and C. krusei, without toxicity to human cells. PMID:27199940

  20. Glucosamine prevents in vitro collagen degradation in chondrocytes by inhibiting advanced lipoxidation reactions and protein oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Tiku, Moti L; Narla, Haritha; Jain, Mohit; Yalamanchili, Praveen

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) affects a large segment of the aging population and is a major cause of pain and disability. At present, there is no specific treatment available to prevent or retard the cartilage destruction that occurs in OA. Recently, glucosamine sulfate has received attention as a putative agent that may retard cartilage degradation in OA. The precise mechanism of action of glucosamine is not known. We investigated the effect of glucosamine in an in vitro model of cartilage collagen degradation in which collagen degradation induced by activated chondrocytes is mediated by lipid peroxidation reaction. Lipid peroxidation in chondrocytes was measured by conjugated diene formation. Protein oxidation and aldehydic adduct formation were studied by immunoblot assays. Antioxidant effect of glucosamine was also tested on malondialdehyde (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS]) formation on purified lipoprotein oxidation for comparison. Glucosamine sulfate and glucosamine hydrochloride in millimolar (0.1 to 50) concentrations specifically and significantly inhibited collagen degradation induced by calcium ionophore-activated chondrocytes. Glucosamine hydrochloride did not inhibit lipid peroxidation reaction in either activated chondrocytes or in copper-induced oxidation of purified lipoproteins as measured by conjugated diene formation. Glucosamine hydrochloride, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited malondialdehyde (TBARS) formation by oxidized lipoproteins. Moreover, we show that glucosamine hydrochloride prevents lipoprotein protein oxidation and inhibits malondialdehyde adduct formation in chondrocyte cell matrix, suggesting that it inhibits advanced lipoxidation reactions. Together, the data suggest that the mechanism of decreasing collagen degradation in this in vitro model system by glucosamine may be mediated by the inhibition of advanced lipoxidation reaction, preventing the oxidation and loss of collagen matrix from labeled chondrocyte matrix

  1. Paeonia lactiflora Inhibits Cell Wall Synthesis and Triggers Membrane Depolarization in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung-Shick; Kim, Younhee

    2017-02-28

    Fungal cell walls and cell membranes are the main targets of antifungals. In this study, we report on the antifungal activity of an ethanol extract from Paeonia lactiflora against Candida albicans, showing that the antifungal activity is associated with the synergistic actions of preventing cell wall synthesis, enabling membrane depolarization, and compromising permeability. First, it was shown that the ethanol extract from P. lactiflora was involved in damaging the integrity of cell walls in C. albicans. In isotonic media, cell bursts of C. albicans by the P. lactiflora ethanol extract could be restored, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the P. lactiflora ethanol extract against C. albicans cells increased 4-fold. In addition, synthesis of (1,3)-β-D-glucan polymer was inhibited by 87% and 83% following treatment of C. albicans microsomes with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract at their 1× MIC and 2× MIC, respectively. Second, the ethanol extract from P. lactiflora influenced the function of C. albicans cell membranes. C. albicans cells treated with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract formed red aggregates by staining with a membrane-impermeable dye, propidium iodide. Membrane depolarization manifested as increased fluorescence intensity by staining P. lactiflora-treated C. albicans cells with a membrane-potential marker, DiBAC4(3) ((bis-1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol). Membrane permeability was assessed by crystal violet assay, and C. albicans cells treated with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract exhibited significant uptake of crystal violet in a concentration-dependent manner. The findings suggest that P. lactiflora ethanol extract is a viable and effective candidate for the development of new antifungal agents to treat Candida-associated diseases.

  2. Salidroside inhibits the growth of human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Shi, Aiping; Fan, Zhimin; Du, Ye

    2015-05-01

    Salidroside has been identified as one of the most potent compounds isolated from the plant Rhodiola rosea, and was found to have several important biological properties, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity; however, its anticancer effects are poorly understood. Thus, the present study focused on evaluating the effects of purified salidroside on the growth of human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo, and on further investigating its possible molecular mechanisms. The human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was incubated with various concentrations of salidroside, and cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, migration and invasion were assayed by several in vitro approaches. As a result, it was found that salidroside treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, as well as induced cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in vitro. In addition, we also evaluated the effect of salidroside on tumor growth in a nude mouse model, and found that salidroside treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. We also further disclosed that salidroside treatment significantly inhibited the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and MAPK pathway activation, which may contribute to the inhibition of tumor growth of breast cancer and reduction of oxidative stress. In conclusion, these findings suggest that salidroside may be a promising candidate target for the prevention and treatment of human breast cancer.

  3. Parsley extract inhibits in vitro and ex vivo platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time in rats.

    PubMed

    Gadi, Dounia; Bnouham, Mohamed; Aziz, Mohammed; Ziyyat, Abderrahim; Legssyer, Abdelkhaleq; Legrand, Chantal; Lafeve, Françoise Fauvel; Mekhfi, Hassane

    2009-08-17

    Many cardiovascular diseases are associated with an increase in blood platelet activity. In Morocco, parsley (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) is one of the medicinal herbs used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as arterial hypertension. In this study, crude aqueous extract (CAE) of parsley was evaluated for its anti-platelet activity in experimental animals on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo; and on bleeding time in vivo. The in vitro aggregation was monitored after pre-incubation of platelets with CAE. The bleeding time and ex vivo aggregation were performed after oral treatment. CAE inhibited dose dependently platelet aggregation in vitro induced by thrombin, ADP, collagen and epinephrine. The oral administration of CAE (3g/kg) inhibited significantly (p<0.001) platelet aggregation ex vivo and prolonged bleeding time (p<0.001) without changes in the platelet amount. The prolongation of bleeding time by CAE may be attributed to the observed inhibition of platelet aggregation. These effects could be related in part to the polyphenolic compounds present in the extract. These results support the hypothesis that the dietary intake of parsley may be benefit in the normalization of platelet hyperactivation, in the nutritional prevention of cardiovascular diseases and are potentially interesting in the development of new prevention strategies.

  4. The Effect of Cyclooxygenase Inhibition on Tendon-Bone Healing in an In Vitro Coculture Model

    PubMed Central

    Schwarting, Tim; Pretzsch, Sebastian; Debus, Florian; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Lechler, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition following the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament remain unclear. We examined the effects of selective COX-2 and nonselective COX inhibition on bone-tendon integration in an in vitro model. We measured the dose-dependent effects of ibuprofen and parecoxib on the viability of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated and unstimulated mouse MC3T3-E1 and 3T3 cells, the influence on gene expression at the osteoblast, interface, and fibroblast regions measured by quantitative PCR, and cellular outgrowth assessed on histological sections. Ibuprofen led to a dose-dependent suppression of MC3T3 cell viability, while parecoxib reduced the viability of 3T3 cultures. Exposure to ibuprofen significantly suppressed expression of Alpl (P < 0.01), Bglap (P < 0.001), and Runx2 (P < 0.01), and although parecoxib reduced expression of Alpl (P < 0.001), Fmod (P < 0.001), and Runx2 (P < 0.01), the expression of Bglap was increased (P < 0.01). Microscopic analysis showed a reduction in cellular outgrowth in LPS-stimulated cultures following exposure to ibuprofen and parecoxib. Nonselective COX inhibition and the specific inhibition of COX-2 led to region-specific reductions in markers of calcification and cell viability. We suggest further in vitro and in vivo studies examining the biologic and biomechanical effects of selective and nonselective COX inhibition. PMID:26063979

  5. Phloroglucinol Inhibits the in vitro Differentiation Potential of CD34 Positive Cells into Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yi-Hong; Lee, Jun-Hee; Jung, Seok-Yun; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Kyu-Sup; Lee, Boo-Yong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2012-01-01

    Inhibiting the bioactivities of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) results in significant inhibition of neovessel formation during tumor angiogenesis. To investigate the potential effect of phloroglucinol as an EPC inhibitor, we performed several in vitro functional assays using CD34+ cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB). Although a high treatment dose of phloroglucinol did not show any cell toxicity, it specifically induced the cell death of EPCs under serum free conditions through apoptosis. In the EPC colony-forming assay (EPC-CFA), we observed a significant decreased in the small EPC-CFUs for the phloroglucinol group, implying that phloroglucinol inhibited the early stage of EPC commitment. In addition, in the in vitro expansion assay using CD34+ cells, treatment with phloroglucinol was shown to inhibit endothelial lineage commitment, as demonstrated by the decrease in endothelial surface markers of EPCs including CD34+, CD34+/CD133+, CD34+/CD31+ and CD34+/CXCR4+. This is the first report to demonstrate that phloroglucinol can inhibit the functional bioactivities of EPCs, indicating that phloroglucinol may be used as an EPC inhibitor in the development of biosafe anti-tumor drugs that target tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24116289

  6. Apple peel bioactive rich extracts effectively inhibit in vitro human LDL cholesterol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Thilakarathna, Surangi H; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Needs, Paul W

    2013-05-01

    Apple peels are rich in antioxidant bioactives and hence can possess the ability to inhibit human low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) oxidation. LDL-C oxidation is known to initiate atherosclerotic plaque formation. Unique quercetin-rich (QAE) and triterpene-rich (TAE) apple peel extracts, their constituent compounds and three in vivo quercetin metabolites were investigated for in vitro LDL-C oxidation inhibition. Both extracts effectively inhibited Cu(2+)-induced LDL-C oxidation. IC(50) of QAE and TAE for LDL-C oxidation products were 0.06-8.29 mg/L and 29.58-95.49 mg/L, respectively. Quercetin compounds, chlorogenic acid and phloridzin could contribute more to the effectiveness of QAE at physiological concentrations. The three in vivo quercetin metabolites; quercetin-3'-sulfate, quercetin-3-glucuronic acid and isorhamnetin-3-glucuronic acid were effective at physiological concentrations and therefore, QAE can be effective in LDL-C oxidation inhibition under physiological conditions. Constituent TAE compounds did not perform well under Cu(2+)-induction. Overall, both extracts effectively inhibited LDL-C oxidation in vitro. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Terpenoids of plant origin inhibit morphogenesis, adhesion, and biofilm formation by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Raut, Jayant S; Shinde, Ravikumar B; Chauhan, Nitin M; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections caused by Candida albicans and associated drug resistant micro-organisms are serious problems for immunocompromised populations. Molecules which can prevent or remove biofilms are needed. Twenty-eight terpenoids of plant origin were analysed for their activity against growth, virulence attributes, and biofilms of C. albicans. Eighteen molecules exhibited minimum inhibitory concentrations of <2 mg ml(-1) for planktonic growth. Selected molecules inhibited yeast to hyphal dimorphism at low concentrations (0.031-0.5 mg ml(-1)), while adhesion to a solid surface was prevented at 0.5-2 mg ml(-1). Treatment with 14 terpenoids resulted in significant (p < 0.05) inhibition of biofilm formation, and of these, linalool, nerol, isopulegol, menthol, carvone, α-thujone, and farnesol exhibited biofilm-specific activity. Eight terpenoids were identified as inhibitors of mature biofilms. This study demonstrated the antibiofilm potential of terpenoids, which need to be further explored as therapeutic strategy against biofilm associated infections of C. albicans.

  8. Bismuth oxide aqueous colloidal nanoparticles inhibit Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Martinez-Sanmiguel, Juan Jose; Diaz, David; Zumeta-Dube, Inti; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Multiresistance among microorganisms to common antimicrobials has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanomaterials are a new alternative to successfully treat the multiresistant microorganisms. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the bactericidal activity of zero-valent bismuth colloidal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Streptococcus mutans; however the antimycotic potential of bismuth nanostructured derivatives has not yet been studied. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the fungicidal activity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles against Candida albicans, and their antibiofilm capabilities. Our results showed that aqueous colloidal bismuth oxide nanoparticles displayed antimicrobial activity against C. albicans growth (reducing colony size by 85%) and a complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are better than those obtained with chlorhexidine, nystatin, and terbinafine, the most effective oral antiseptic and commercial antifungal agents. In this work, we also compared the antimycotic activities of bulk bismuth oxide and bismuth nitrate, the precursor metallic salt. These results suggest that bismuth oxide colloidal nanoparticles could be a very interesting candidate as a fungicidal agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic. Additionally, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration for the synthesized aqueous colloidal Bi2O3 nanoparticles.

  9. Bismuth oxide aqueous colloidal nanoparticles inhibit Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Martinez-Sanmiguel, Juan Jose; Diaz, David; Zumeta-Dube, Inti; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Multiresistance among microorganisms to common antimicrobials has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanomaterials are a new alternative to successfully treat the multiresistant microorganisms. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the bactericidal activity of zero-valent bismuth colloidal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Streptococcus mutans; however the antimycotic potential of bismuth nanostructured derivatives has not yet been studied. The main objective of this investigation was to analyze the fungicidal activity of bismuth oxide nanoparticles against Candida albicans, and their antibiofilm capabilities. Our results showed that aqueous colloidal bismuth oxide nanoparticles displayed antimicrobial activity against C. albicans growth (reducing colony size by 85%) and a complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are better than those obtained with chlorhexidine, nystatin, and terbinafine, the most effective oral antiseptic and commercial antifungal agents. In this work, we also compared the antimycotic activities of bulk bismuth oxide and bismuth nitrate, the precursor metallic salt. These results suggest that bismuth oxide colloidal nanoparticles could be a very interesting candidate as a fungicidal agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic. Additionally, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration for the synthesized aqueous colloidal Bi2O3 nanoparticles. PMID:23637533

  10. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xu-feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-bo; Feng, Da-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  11. Inhibition of in Vitro Pollen Tube Growth by Isolated S-Glycoproteins of Nicotiana alata.

    PubMed Central

    Jahnen, W.; Lush, W. M.; Clarke, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Pollen from three S-genotypes of Nicotiana alata was grown in vitro in the presence of S-glycoproteins isolated from styles of the same three genotypes. Pollen germination was not affected by the presence of the S-glycoproteins, but pollen tube growth of all genotypes was inhibited. S2 pollen was preferentially inhibited by the S2-glycoprotein and S3 pollen by the S3-glycoprotein. The S6-glycoprotein preferentially inhibited growth of both S2 and S6 pollen over S3 pollen. Heat treatment dramatically increased the inhibitory activity of the S-glycoproteins as inhibitors both of pollen germination and tube growth; after heat treatment, S-allele specificity of pollen tube inhibition was not detected. PMID:12359898

  12. Molecular basis of alpha-tocopherol inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boscoboinik, D; Chatelain, E; Bartoli, G M; Azzi, A

    1992-01-01

    The molecular events responsible for the inhibition of cell proliferation by alpha-tocopherol have been investigated. Smooth muscle cells in vitro have been shown to be specifically inhibited by alpha-tocopherol with a concomitant inhibition of protein kinase C activity. beta-Tocopherol was inactive, despite its similar radical scavenging activity. The point of inhibition of alpha-tocopherol relative to the cell cycle was localized in the late G1 phase. A second effect of alpha-tocopherol observed with smooth muscle cells was the stimulation of protein kinase C biosynthesis in both the S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. The implications of these findings for the onset of arteriosclerosis are discussed.

  13. Vitamin E inhibits proliferation of human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Haas, A L; Boscoboinik, D; Mojon, D S; Böhnke, M; Azzi, A

    1996-01-01

    Failure of glaucoma surgery is mostly due to fibrocellular scar formation, derived from Tenon's capsule fibroblasts. In high-risk cases, postoperative Tenon's capsule fibroblast proliferation is inhibited by mitomycin C or 5-fluorouracil. Toxicity to other ocular cell types and the risk of ocular hypotony limits the use of these agents. We have found that d-alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) was able to inhibit proliferation of in vitro human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts obtained from seven different donors. At 48 h, inhibition of cell proliferation was 30-78% (mean 60%) for 50 microM d-alpha-tocopherol and 46-97% (mean 77%) for 100 microM d-alpha-tocopherol. This inhibition was statistically significant. No cytotoxic effects were observed.

  14. In vitro inhibition of human papillomavirus following use of a carrageenan-containing vaginal gel.

    PubMed

    Novetsky, Akiva P; Keller, Marla J; Gradissimo, Ana; Chen, Zigui; Morgan, Stephanie L; Xue, Xiaonan; Strickler, Howard D; Fernández-Romero, José A; Burk, Robert; Einstein, Mark H

    2016-11-01

    To assess in vitro efficacy of Divine 9, a carrageenan-based vaginal lubricant that is being studied as a microbicide to inhibit HPV16 pseudovirus (PsV) infection. Sexually active US women between 19 and 35years without prior HPV vaccination or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia were instructed to use Divine 9 vaginally with an applicator either before sex only or before and after intercourse. Women who applied a single dose of gel returned for cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) collection 1, 4 or 8-12h after intercourse versus those who applied gel before and after intercourse returned 1, 4 or 8-12h after the second gel dose. Carrageenan concentrations were assessed using an ELISA assay and the inhibitory activity was assessed using a PsV-based neutralization assay against HPV16 infection. Carrageenan concentrations and the percentage of PsV16 inhibition were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Thirteen women were enrolled and thirty specimens from different time-points were assessed. 87% of CVL samples had detectable carrageenans with levels decreasing over time from intercourse. 93% of CVL samples had detectable PsV16 inhibition with median inhibition of 97.5%. PsV16 inhibition decreased over time, but remained high, with median inhibition of 98.1%, 97.4% and 83.4% at 1, 4 and 8-12h, respectively. Higher carrageenan concentrations were associated with higher levels of PsV16 inhibition (rho=0.69). This is the first report of a human study investigating in vitro HPV inhibition of a carrageenan-based vaginal lubricant with CVL collected after sexual intercourse. We demonstrate excellent efficacy in preventing PsV16 infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antifungal relative inhibition factors: BAY l-9139, bifonazole, butoconazole, isoconazole, itraconazole (R 51211), oxiconazole, Ro 14-4767/002, sulconazole, terconazole and vibunazole (BAY n-7133) compared in vitro with nine established antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Odds, F C; Webster, C E; Abbott, A B

    1984-08-01

    Nine new antifungal agents were tested for their activity in vitro in terms of relative inhibition factors (RIFs) against 26 isolates of Candida species, eight isolates of Aspergillus species and six isolates of dermatophyte fungi. Eight of the new compounds were azole antifungals, the ninth was a phenylmorpholine derivative. Against Candida species, all the novel compounds gave RIFs that were of a similar order to RIFs for established imidazole compounds. Two topical antifungals, butoconazole and terconazole, and two systemic antifungals, itraconazole and vibunazole, gave mean RIFs less than 60% in tests with Candida species, and therefore matched clotrimazole, ketoconazole and tioconazole in terms of RIF. However, none of the new compounds gave RIFs as low as amphotericin B against the Candida isolates. Against Aspergillus isolates, itraconazole, with a mean RIF of 25%, was even more active in vitro than amphotericin B. Vibunazole was as active as ketoconazole against Aspergillus isolates. All the new antifungals except Bay l-9139 gave very low RIFs against dermatophyte isolates, and thus matched established imidazole antifungals for inhibitory effects in vitro. In terms of RIF data, all the nine new compounds tested appear to offer reasonable potential for antifungal chemotherapy in vivo. A similar conclusion would not have been drawn from minimal inhibitory concentration data, which tended to show most of the new antifungals in a very poor light. Tests with amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine and ketoconazole showed that RIF can vary substantially with the pH of the test medium. For amphotericin B and ketoconazole the best activity was seen at neutral pH values; for 5-fluorocytosine the greatest inhibitory activity was found at lower pH values.

  16. Inhibition of cholesterol synthesis by squalene synthase inhibitors does not induce myotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Flint, O P; Masters, B A; Gregg, R E; Durham, S K

    1997-07-01

    The cholesterol-lowering HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (HMGRI), pravastatin and lovastatin, have been associated with skeletal myopathy in humans and in rats. In a previous in vitro study, HMGRI-induced changes in neonatal rat skeletal muscle cells were characterized by reversible inhibition of protein synthesis and loss of differentiated myotubes at concentrations markedly lower than those inducing enzyme leakage. Myotoxicity was determined to be directly related to inhibition of HMG CoA reductase, since mevalonate, the immediate product of HMG CoA reductase metabolism, abrogated the drug-induced changes. Farnesol, geranylgeraniol, and squalene are metabolites of mevalonate. Squalene, formed from farnesol by squalene synthase, is the first metabolite solely committed to cholesterol synthesis. In contrast, geranylgeraniol, formed by the addition of an isoprene group to farnesol, is the first metabolite uncommitted to cholesterol synthesis. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in HMGRI-induced in vitro myotoxicity. HMGRI-treated neonatal rat skeletal muscle cultures were supplemented with farnesol and geranylgeraniol, and in another study, muscle cultures were exposed to two squalene synthase inhibitors (SSI), BMS-187745 and its prodrug ester, BMS-188494. Endpoints evaluated for both studies included protein synthesis ([3H]leucine incorporation), total cellular protein (a measure of cell loss), intra- and extracellular lactate dehydrogenase activity (a measure of membrane integrity), cholesterol biosynthesis ([14C]acetate incorporation), and morphology. HMG CoA reductase inhibitor-induced morphologic changes and inhibition of protein synthesis were significantly ameliorated by supplementation with farnesol and geranylgeraniol. In contrast to HMGRI-induced in vitro myotoxicity, SSI induced an irreversible, minimal cytotoxicity at close to maximum soluble concentrations. These results indicate that

  17. Green tea extract and aged garlic extract inhibit anion transport and sickle cell dehydration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, S T; Ohnishi, T; Ogunmola, G B

    2001-01-01

    Both green tea extract (GTE or tea polyphenols) and aged garlic extract (AGE) effectively inhibited in vitro dehydration of sickle red blood cells induced by K-Cl cotransport or red cell storage. For K-Cl cotransport induced by 500 mM urea, 0.3 mg/ml EGCg (epigallocatechin gallate; a major component in GTE) almost completely inhibited dehydration, and 6 mg/ml AGE inhibited dehydration to 30% of the control level. Both vitamins E and C had no effect at the level of 2 mM. Different tea extracts had different degrees of inhibition, but the inhibitory activity increased when the number of hydroxyl groups in the compounds increased. With storage of sickle cells at 4 degrees C for 6 days, the cells started to undergo spontaneous dehydration when incubated at 37 degrees C. Neither inhibitors for Ca-induced K efflux nor K-Cl cotransport could inhibit cell dehydration of stored sickle cells, but both GTE and AGE effectively inhibited it. Chloride efflux measurements using a chloride electrode demonstrated that both GTE and AGE inhibited anion transport in red blood cells. The inhibitory mechanism of these compounds may be related to anion transport inhibition, although involvement of their antioxidant activities can not yet be ruled out. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  18. Harmaline and hispidin from Peganum harmala and Inonotus hispidus with binding affinity to Candida rugosa lipase: In silico and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Benarous, Khedidja; Bombarda, Isabelle; Iriepa, Isabel; Moraleda, Ignacio; Gaetan, Herbette; Linani, Abderrahmane; Tahri, Djillali; Sebaa, Mohamed; Yousfi, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    The inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds and alkaloids of Inonotus hispidus and Peganum harmala on Candida rugosa lipase was investigated, also, their antioxidant activities using DPPH, ABTS and phosphomolybdenum were studied in this paper. The phenolic extracts have shown a stronger antiradical activity than the alkaloids extracts. The enzymatic inhibition produced by these extracts is described here for the first time. The results have shown that the phenolic and the alkaloid extracts are good inhibitors of C. rugosa lipase. Thus, the inhibitor molecules (harmaline and hispidin) have been isolated from P. harmala and I. hispidus. Their structures were elucidated by (1)H NMR analysis. Molecular docking has been achieved using AutoDock Vina program to discuss the nature of interactions and the mechanism of inhibition. Therefore, these isolated molecules could be used in the treatment of candidiasis.

  19. A new small molecule inhibits streptococcus mutans biofilms in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wenting; Fan, Mingwen; Wu, Hui; Melander, Christian; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study is to identify new small molecules that can inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilms by in-vitro and in-vivo model. Methods and Results We evaluated the effect of a small molecule 2-amino-imidazole/triazole conjugate (2-AI/T) on the formation of S. mutans biofilms by culturing in 96-well plates. Toxicity was assessed through cell culture and intragastrically administering to mice. The anti-biofilm and anti-caries effects were investigated in vivo. The inhibitive mechanism was detected by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (itraq) and RT-QPCR. In vitro and in vivo study revealed that 2-AI/T significantly inhibited biofilm formation of S. mutans and is more so than inhibiting planktonic cells without toxicity. The ribosome and histidine metabolism pathways of S. mutans were significantly regulated by this compound. Conclusions These results suggest that the 2-AI/T conjugate is a potent inhibitor that can be potentially developed into a new drug to treat and prevent dental caries. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first study to use small molecule from marine natural products, to protect from dental cariesin vivo. It has potential broad range application in clinical caries prevention, or as a bioactive ingredient for food applications. PMID:26294263

  20. In vitro evidence of baicalein's inhibition of the metabolism of zidovudine (AZT).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Cun; Yang, Hai-Yan; Kong, Ling-Ting; Yu, Feng-Xia

    2014-03-01

    Herb-drug interaction (HDI) has been regarded as a key factor limiting the clinical application of herbs and drugs. Potential baicalein-zidovudine (AZT) interaction was predicted in the present study. In vitro evaluation of baicalein's inhibition towards human liver microsomes (HLMs)-catalyzed metabolism of zidovudine (AZT) was performed. Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plots were used to determine the inhibition kinetic type, and second plot with the slopes from Lineweaver-Burk plot versus the concentrations of baicalein was employed to calculate the inhibition parameter (Ki). In combination with the in vivo concentration of baicalein, in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) was carried out to predict in vivo baicalein-AZT interaction. Competitive inhibition of baicalein towards AZT metabolism was demonstrated, and the Ki value was calculated to be 101.2 µM. The value of AUCi/AUC was calculated to be 2. Potential baicalein-AZT interaction was indicated in the present study, indicating the need for monitoring when AZT is co-administrated with baicalein or baicalein-containing herbs.

  1. Potassium humate inhibits complement activation and the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Naude, P.J.

    2009-08-15

    The effects of brown coal derived potassium humate on lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production and complement activation were investigated in vitro. Potassium humate increased lymphocyte proliferation of phytohaemaglutinin A (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated mononuclear lymphocytes (MNL) in vitro from concentrations of 20 to 80 {mu} g/ml, in a dose dependant manner. On the other hand potassium humate, at 40 {mu} g/ml, significantly inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 by PHA stimulated MNL. Regarding complement activation it was found that potassium humate inhibits the activation of both the alternative and classical pathways without affecting the stability of the red blood cell membranes. These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory potential of potassium humate could be partially due to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for the initiation of these reactions as well as inhibition of complement activation. The increased lymphocyte proliferation observed, might be due to increased IL-2 production as previously been documented.

  2. DTD, an anti-inflammatory ditriazine, inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Poveda, Beatriz; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón; Riguera, Ricardo; Fernández, Antonio; Medina, Miguel Angel; Quesada, Ana R

    2008-08-01

    The ditriazine derivative DTD (4,10-dichloropyrido[5,6:4,5]thieno[3,2-d':3,2-d]-1,2,3-ditriazine) has been previously reported to reduce the degree of granulomatous inflammation and vascular density in a murine air pouch granuloma model. The aim of this study was to test whether DTD affects angiogenesis. Our results show that DTD inhibits in vivo angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay at doses equal or lower than 0.3 nmol/egg. Different in vitro assays were used to study the potential effects of this compound on key steps of angiogenesis, namely, a colorimetric assay of cell proliferation/viability, a morphogenesis on Matrigel assay, zymographic assays for gelatinases and nuclear morphology and cell cycle analysis for apoptosis induction. Our data indicate that DTD inhibits proliferation but does not induce apoptosis in endothelial cells in vitro. DTD suppresses the endothelial capillary-like chord formation at concentrations lower than those required to inhibit proliferation. DTD treatment inhibits the matrix metalloproteinase-2 production in endothelial and fibrosarcoma cells, but does not affect the cyclooxygenase-2 expression in endothelial cells, as assessed by western blot analysis. Taken together, results here presented indicate that DTD exhibits an anti-angiogenic activity that is independent of inflammatory processes and make it a promising drug for further evaluation in the treatment of angiogenesis-related pathologies.

  3. Amygdalin-mediated inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qian, Liyu; Xie, Bo; Wang, Yaguo; Qian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor claiming the highest fatality worldwide for a long period of time. Unfortunately, most of the current treatment methods are still based on the characteristics of cancer cells in the primary lesion and the prognosis is often much poorer in patients with metastatic cancers. Amygdalin, a natural product of glycosides and lots of evidence shows that amygdalin can inhibit the proliferation of some kinds of cancer cells. In this study, we first obtained the highly metastatic NSCLC cell lines H1299/M and PA/M and further treated these cells with amygdalin. We found that the in vitro proliferability of H1299/M and PA/M was inhibited, but such inhibition required higher concentration of amygdalin. When lower concentration of amygdalin was used for the experiments, we observed that the in vitro invasive and migration capacities of H1299/M and PA/M were significantly inhibited. These results strongly suggested that amygdalin was likely to have anti-metastatic NSCLC effect. This study offers information of the role of amygdalin that may be useful as a therapeutic target in lung tumors.

  4. In vitro inhibition of superoxide anion production and superoxide dismutase activity by zinc in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Gavella, M; Lipovac, V; Vucić, M; Sverko, V

    1999-08-01

    The in vitro effect of zinc on superoxide anion (O2-) generation and on SOD-like activity in spermatozoa of infertile men was investigated. The formation of superoxide anion was stimulated by NADPH and the level of superoxide anion was measured by the reduction of ferricytochrome c. Both Percoll-isolated (n = 14) and washed spermatozoa (n = 14) exposed to 1 mmol/L zinc (60 min, 37 degrees C), released less (p < 0.002 and p < 0.04, respectively) superoxide anions than did zinc-untreated spermatozoa. These results implicate a possible role for zinc as a scavenger of excessive superoxide anions produced by defective spermatozoa in semen after ejaculation. Additionally, zinc was found to dose-dependently inhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity of spermatozoa in vitro. The inhibition of SOD-like activity by an equal concentration of zinc (1 mmol/L) was less pronounced in oligospermic (p < 0.002; n = 16) and asthenozoospermic (p < 0.0005; n = 20) than in normozoospermic samples (p < 0.0001; n = 20). This differential ability of zinc to inhibit SOD-like activity may be relevant to the physiological function of spermatozoa in fertilization. The evidence that zinc may elicit an inhibition of both superoxide anion production and SOD-like activity in human spermatozoa, indicate the existence of novel, zinc-related mechanism(s) involved in the oxidative events occurring after ejaculation, with a possible modulatory effect on germ cell function.

  5. Sulforaphane, a natural component of broccoli, inhibits vestibular schwannoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Fujita, Takeshi; Stankovic, Konstantina M.; Welling, D. Bradley; Moon, In Seok; Choi, Jae Young; Yun, Jieun; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Jong Dae

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) is an intracranial tumor that causes significant morbidity, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and possibly even death from brainstem compression. However, FDA-approved pharmacologic treatments for VS do not exist. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, with potent chemoprotective effects in several cell types. Our objective was to determine whether SFN is effective against VS in vitro and in vivo. Human primary VS cells, HEI-193 schwannoma cells, and SC4 Nf2−/− Schwann cells were used to investigate the inhibitory effects of SFN in vitro. Cell proliferation was assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and cell viability and metabolic activity was calculated by MTT assay. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and Western blot for cleaved caspases. A mouse model with a murine schwannoma allograft was also used to examine the antitumor activity of SFN. SFN exhibited significant antiproliferative activity in schwannoma cells in vitro, via the inhibition of HDAC activity and the activation of ERK. SFN treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. SFN also significantly inhibited schwannoma growth in vivo. Our preclinical studies motivate a future prospective clinical study of SFN for the treatment of VS. PMID:27805058

  6. Noscapine inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma growth through inducing apoptosis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, G; Niu, Z; Dong, J; Zhao, Y; Zhang, Y; Li, X

    2016-01-01

    Noscapine, a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been demonstrated as a promising anti-tumor compound against various cancers. However, the anti-cancer activity of noscapine in hepatocellular carcinoma has not been defined. In this study, we investigate the inhibitive effects of noscapine on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using both in vitro and in vivo models. In vitro proliferation assay showed that noscapine suppressed HepG2 and Huh7 cells in dose- and time-dependent manners. With a mouse xenograft model, noscapine showed notable inhibition on HCC tumor growth in vivo without suppression of body weight. Moreover, apoptotic induction and regulation of related signalings by noscapine were examined by nuclear DNA staining, TUNEL, and western blotting assays. Results showed that noscapine induced apoptosis in HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Further studies indicated that noscapine induced antive-capsase-3, cleavage PARP, and decreased the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. Hence, these data indicates that noscapine selectively suppresses HCC cell growth through apoptosis induction, providing evidence for application of noscapine as a novel agent against human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. EV-077 in vitro inhibits platelet aggregation in type-2 diabetics on aspirin.

    PubMed

    Sakariassen, Kjell S; Femia, Eti A; Daray, Federico M; Podda, Gian M; Razzari, Cristina; Pugliano, Mariateresa; Errasti, Andrea E; Armesto, Arnaldo R; Nowak, Wanda; Alberts, Pēteris; Meyer, Jean-Philippe; Sorensen, Alexandra S; Cattaneo, Marco; Rothlin, Rodolfo P

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to characterize the in vitro effect of EV-077, a compound that antagonises the binding of prostanoids and isoprostanes to the thromboxane receptor (TP) and inhibits the thromboxane synthase (TS), on platelet aggregation of patients with type-2 diabetes and coronary artery disease (CAD) on chronic aspirin treatment. The effect of EV-077 on 8-iso-PGE(2)-mediated TP receptor contraction of human arteries was also investigated. Fifty-two type-2 diabetics with CAD on chronic aspirin (100 mg) treatment were studied. Arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation was measured by impedance aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood anticoagulated with hirudin, and by light transmission aggregometry in citrate-anticoagulated PRP following 10-min in vitro exposure to EV-077 (100 nmol/l) or control. The effect of EV-077 was measured on isometric contraction of 24 human umbilical arteries induced by isoprostane 8-iso-PGE(2). Arachidonic acid (1 mmol/l) induced substantial aggregation in hirudin-anticoagulated whole blood (63 ± 4 AU), which was significantly reduced by in vitro exposure to EV-077 (38 ± 3 AU, P<0.001). Virtually no arachidonic acid-induced aggregation in citrate-anticoagulated or hirudin-anticoagulated PRP was observed. EV-077 potently, competitively and reversibly inhibited TP mediated contraction of umbilical arteries by 8-iso-PGE(2) (P<0.01). Aspirin did not completely inhibit arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood from type-2 diabetics with CAD. This aggregation is likely induced by prostanoids and/or isoprostanes produced by leukocytes, because it was significantly reduced by EV-077. The TP receptor-mediated contraction of human arteries induced by isoprostane 8-iso-PGE(2) was effectively inhibited by EV-077. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nucleosomes inhibit both transcriptional initiation and elongation by RNA polymerase III in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, R H

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effect of nucleosomes on in vitro transcription, purified chicken erythrocyte core histones and plasmid DNA bearing the Xenopus 5S RNA gene were assembled into nucleosomes and used as templates for transcription in a Xenopus oocyte nuclear extract. Plasmids having a nucleosome incorporating a specific region of the gene were selected by treating the reconstituted molecules with restriction endonucleases. In this way, it was shown that a nucleosome on or close to the internal control region of the 5S RNA gene inhibits transcription. Furthermore, experiments with 5S maxigenes showed that RNA polymerase III, in contrast to SP6 RNA polymerase, will not transcribe through a nucleosome in vitro. Images PMID:2792088

  9. Milk Thistle Extract and Silymarin Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide Induced Lamellar Separation of Hoof Explants in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reisinger, Nicole; Schaumberger, Simone; Nagl, Veronika; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of laminitis is not completely identified and the role of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in this process remains unclear. Phytogenic substances, like milk thistle (MT) and silymarin, are known for their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and might therefore have the potential to counteract endotoxin induced effects on the hoof lamellar tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of endotoxins on lamellar tissue integrity and to test if MT and silymarin are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced effects in an in vitro/ex vivo model. In preliminary tests, LPS neutralization efficiency of these phytogenics was determined in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, tissue explants gained from hooves of slaughter horses were tested for lamellar separation after incubation with different concentrations of LPS. By combined incubation of explants with LPS and either Polymyxin B (PMB; positive control), MT or silymarin, the influence of these substances on LPS-induced effects was assessed. In the in vitro neutralization assay, MT and silymarin reduced LPS concentrations by 64% and 75%, respectively, in comparison PMB reduced 98% of the LPS concentration. In hoof explants, LPS led to a concentration dependent separation. Accordantly, separation force was significantly decreased by 10 µg/mL LPS. PMB, MT and silymarin could significantly improve tissue integrity of explants incubated with 10 µg/mL LPS. This study showed that LPS had a negative influence on the structure of hoof explants in vitro. MT and silymarin reduced endotoxin activity and inhibited LPS-induced effects on the lamellar tissue. Hence, MT and silymarin might be used to support the prevention of laminitis and should be further evaluated for this application. PMID:25290524

  10. Milk thistle extract and silymarin inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced lamellar separation of hoof explants in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Nicole; Schaumberger, Simone; Nagl, Veronika; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2014-10-06

    The pathogenesis of laminitis is not completely identified and the role of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in this process remains unclear. Phytogenic substances, like milk thistle (MT) and silymarin, are known for their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and might therefore have the potential to counteract endotoxin induced effects on the hoof lamellar tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of endotoxins on lamellar tissue integrity and to test if MT and silymarin are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced effects in an in vitro/ex vivo model. In preliminary tests, LPS neutralization efficiency of these phytogenics was determined in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, tissue explants gained from hooves of slaughter horses were tested for lamellar separation after incubation with different concentrations of LPS. By combined incubation of explants with LPS and either Polymyxin B (PMB; positive control), MT or silymarin, the influence of these substances on LPS-induced effects was assessed. In the in vitro neutralization assay, MT and silymarin reduced LPS concentrations by 64% and 75%, respectively, in comparison PMB reduced 98% of the LPS concentration. In hoof explants, LPS led to a concentration dependent separation. Accordantly, separation force was significantly decreased by 10 µg/mL LPS. PMB, MT and silymarin could significantly improve tissue integrity of explants incubated with 10 µg/mL LPS. This study showed that LPS had a negative influence on the structure of hoof explants in vitro. MT and silymarin reduced endotoxin activity and inhibited LPS-induced effects on the lamellar tissue. Hence, MT and silymarin might be used to support the prevention of laminitis and should be further evaluated for this application.

  11. In vitro inhibition and induction of human liver cytochrome p450 enzymes by milnacipran.

    PubMed

    Paris, Brandy L; Ogilvie, Brian W; Scheinkoenig, Julie A; Ndikum-Moffor, Florence; Gibson, Remi; Parkinson, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Milnacipran (Savella) inhibits both norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake and is distinguished by a nearly 3-fold greater potency in inhibiting norepinephrine reuptake in vitro compared with serotonin. We evaluated the ability of milnacipran to inhibit and induce human cytochrome P450 enzymes in vitro. In human liver microsomes, milnacipran did not inhibit CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, or 2D6 (IC(50) >or= 100 microM); whereas, a comparator with dual reuptake properties [duloxetine (Cymbalta)] inhibited CYP2D6 (IC(50) = 7 microM) and CYP2B6 (IC(50) = 15 microM) with a relatively high potency. Milnacipran inhibited CYP3A4/5 in a substrate-dependent manner (i.e., midazolam 1'-hydroxylation IC(50) approximately 30 microM; testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation IC(50) approximately 100 microM); whereas, duloxetine inhibited both CYP3A4/5 activities with equal potency (IC(50) = 37 and 38 microM, respectively). Milnacipran produced no time-dependent inhibition (<10%) of P450 activity, whereas duloxetine produced time-dependent inhibition of CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C19, and 3A4/5. To evaluate P450 induction, freshly isolated human hepatocytes (n = 3) were cultured and treated once daily for 3 days with milnacipran (3, 10, and 30 microM), after which microsomal P450 activities were measured. Whereas positive controls (omeprazole, phenobarbital, and rifampin) caused anticipated P450 induction, milnacipran had minimal effect on CYP1A2, 2C8, 2C9, or 2C19 activity. The highest concentration of milnacipran (30 microM; >10 times plasma C(max)) produced 2.6- and 2.2-fold increases in CYP2B6 and CYP3A4/5 activity (making it 26 and 34% as effective as phenobarbital and rifampin, respectively). Given these results, milnacipran is not expected to cause clinically significant P450 inhibition or induction.

  12. Zinc binds to and directly inhibits protein phosphatase 2A in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Luo, Dan-Ju; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Qiu, Mei; Yang, Yang; Yan, Xiong; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Ye, Qi-Fa; Liu, Rong

    2015-06-01

    Zinc induces protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inactivation and tau hyperphosphorylation through PP2A (tyrosine 307) phosphorylation in cells and the brain, but whether Zn(2+) has a direct inhibitory effect on PP2A is not clear. Here we explored the effect of Zn(2+) on PP2A and their direct interaction in vitro. The results showed that Zn(2+) mimicked the inhibitory effect of okadaic acid on protein phosphatase and prevented tau dephosphorylation in N2a cell lysates. PP2A activity assays indicated that a low concentration (10 μmol/L) of Zn(2+) inhibited PP2A directly. Further Zn(2+)-IDA-agarose affinity binding assays showed that Zn(2+) bound to and inhibited PP2Ac(51-270) but not PP2Ac(1-50) or PP2Ac(271-309). Taken together, Zn(2+) inhibits PP2A directly through binding to PP2Ac(51-270) in vitro.

  13. Cadmium restores in vitro splicing activity inhibited by zinc-depletion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Jin; Ayaki, Hitoshi; Goji, Junko; Kitamura, Keiko; Nishio, Hisahide

    2006-10-01

    Zinc (Zn)-depletion inhibits the second step of RNA splicing, namely exon-ligation. To investigate the effects of cadmium (Cd) and other metal ions on RNA splicing inhibited by Zn-depletion, we measured in vitro splicing activities in the presence of these metals. Zn-depletion in the splicing reaction mixture was achieved by addition of a Zn-chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline. Cd(II) at 1, 5 and 10 microM restored the splicing activity to 2, 24 and 72% of that in the control reaction mixture, while higher concentrations of Cd(II) decreased the splicing activity, and more than 50 microM Cd(II) showed a complete absence of spliced products. Hg(II) also restored the splicing activity, albeit to a lesser extent, since 5 and 10 microM Hg(II) restored the splicing activity to 3 and 4% of the control value. The other metal ions examined in this study, Co(II), Cu(II), Mg(II) and Mn(II), did not show any restoration of the splicing activity. We concluded that Cd(II) could restore the in vitro splicing activity inhibited by Zn-depletion, although higher concentrations of Cd(II) prevented progress of the RNA splicing reaction. These results suggest that Cd(II) has a bifunctional property regarding RNA splicing, and is stimulatory at low concentrations and inhibitory at high concentrations.

  14. The Aplidin analogs PM01215 and PM02781 inhibit angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Borjan, Bojana; Steiner, Normann; Karbon, Silvia; Kern, Johann; Francesch, Andrés; Hermann, Martin; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Untergasser, Gerold

    2015-10-19

    Novel synthesized analogs of Aplidin, PM01215 and PM02781, were tested for antiangiogenic effects on primary human endothelial cells in vitro and for inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo. Antiangiogenic activity of both derivatives was evaluated by real-time cell proliferation, capillary tube formation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced spheroid sprouting assays. Distribution of endothelial cells in the different phases of the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Aplidin analogs were tested in vivo in chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Both derivatives inhibited angiogenic capacities of human endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro at low nanomolar concentrations. Antiangiogenic effects of both analogs were observed in the CAM. In addition, growth of human multiple myeloma xenografts in vivo in CAM was significantly reduced after application of both analogs. On the molecular level, both derivatives induced cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. This growth arrest of endothelial cells correlated with induction of the cell cycle inhibitor p16(INK4A) and increased senescence-associated beta galactosidase activity. In addition, Aplidin analogs induced oxidative stress and decreased production of the vascular maturation factors Vasohibin-1 and Dickkopf-3. From these findings we conclude that both analogs are promising agents for the development of antiangiogenic drugs acting independent on classical inhibition of VEGF signaling.

  15. Mullerian Inhibiting Substance Suppresses Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy in Endometriosis Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Borahay, Mostafa A.; Lu, Fangxian; Ozpolat, Bulent; Tekedereli, Ibrahim; Gurates, Bilgin; Karipcin, Sinem; Kilic, Gokhan S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the effects of Mullerian inhibiting substance (MIS) treatment on endometriosis cells through study of apoptosis and autophagy. Design. Experimental in vitro study. Setting. University research laboratory. Cell Line. CRL-7566 endometriosis cell line. This line was established from a benign ovarian cyst taken from a patient with endometriosis. Interventions. In vitro treatment with MIS. Main Outcome Measures. The main outcome measures were cellular viability, proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis and autophagy in endometriotic cells. Results. MIS treatment inhibited proliferation of endometriosis cells and induced apoptosis, as indicated by Annexin V staining, and induced caspase-9 cleavage and cell-cycle arrest, as evidenced by increased expression of p27 CDK-inhibitor. MIS treatment also induced autophagy in endometriosis cells as demonstrated by a significant increase in LC3-II induction, a hallmark of autophagy. Conclusions. MIS inhibits cell growth and induces autophagy, as well as apoptosis, in ectopic endometrial cell lines. Our results suggest that MIS may have a potential as a novel approach for medical treatment of endometriosis. Further studies may be needed to test the efficacy of MIS treatment in animal models and to develop MIS treatment specifically targeted to the endometriosis. PMID:23853725

  16. In vitro inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum by pyrazofurin, an inhibitor of pyrimidine biosynthesis de novo.

    PubMed

    Scott, H V; Gero, A M; O'Sullivan, W J

    1986-01-01

    The effect of pyrazofurin, an inhibitor of UMP synthesis, on Plasmodium falciparum growth in vitro has been studied. ID50 values (concentration of compound causing 50% inhibition of [3H]hypoxanthine incorporation) for the FCQ-27, FCI-1 and K-1 (chloroquine-resistant) isolates were 10 +/- 8.7, 6.4 +/- 5.3 and 6.3 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively. Comparative ID50 values for chloroquine were 13.5 +/- 4.2, 22.8 +/- 7.6 and 343 +/- 114 microM, respectively. Over the 48-h intraerythrocytic cycle of tightly synchronized parasites, pyrazofurin both reduced the parasitemia and retarded the maturation of trophozoites and schizonts. Addition of uracil or uridine to the in vitro culture did not decrease the anti-parasitic activity of pyrazofurin. Chloroquine reduced the parasitemia, but did not retard development of the remaining viable parasites. Pyrazofurin (20 microM) caused a 50% inhibition of parasite orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (E.C. 2.4.2.10) and, in the presence of adenosine kinase and ATP, a 73% inhibition of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase (E.C. 4.1.1.23).

  17. Fucoidan inhibits LPS-induced inflammation in vitro and during the acute response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, Jisang; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Choi, Kyung-Min; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Han, Kang Min; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2017-02-01

    Studies have been focused on natural products with antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities, such as fucoidan. Many in vivo studies have evaluated the effect of fucoidan on tumor growth, diabetes, obesity, ischemia reperfusion, and oxidative stress. However, the effects of fucoidan on bacteria-induced gingival inflammation and periodontitis have not been reported. We previously characterized the anti-inflammatory effect of fucoidan in vitro. Here, we confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of fucoidan in a macrophage cell line in terms of its inhibition of the expression of inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, we confirmed the ability of fucoidan to inhibit gingival inflammation, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and neutrophil recruitment in the gingival tissue of mice injected with LPS prepared from P. gingivalis. Interestingly, however, fucoidan did not inhibit the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in a P. gingivalis-infected mouse model of periodontitis. Additionally, fucoidan treatment did not lead to clearance of P. gingivalis or improvement of P. gingivalis infection-mediated bone loss in the periodontitis model. We conclude that fucoidan exerts anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo, together with a limited antibacterial effect in vivo.

  18. A natural small molecule voacangine inhibits angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yonghyo; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Voacangine exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Voacangine inhibits tumor-induced angiogenesis by suppressing HIF-1{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Voacangine could be the basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, plays a critical role in normal and pathological phenotypes, including solid tumor growth and metastasis. Accordingly, the development of new anti-angiogenic agents is considered an efficient strategy for the treatment of cancer and other human diseases linked with angiogenesis. We have identified voacangine, isolated from Voacanga africana, as a novel anti-angiogenic agent. Voacangine inhibits the proliferation of HUVECs at an IC{sub 50} of 18 {mu}M with no cytotoxic effects. Voacangine significantly suppressed in vitro angiogenesis, such as VEGF-induced tube formation and chemoinvasion. Moreover, the compound inhibits in vivo angiogenesis in the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. In addition, voacangine decreased the expression levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} and its target gene, VEGF, in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that the naturally occurring compound, voacangine, is a novel anti-angiogenic compound.

  19. TQ inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo via repression of Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiquan; Zhao, Yan; Lu, Xinlan; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Yuanyuan; Ren, Mudan; Lu, Guifang; Zhang, Dan; Sun, Zhenguo; Xu, Zhipeng; Song, Jee Hoon; Cheng, Yulan; Meltzer, Stephen J.; He, Shuixiang

    2015-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) has been reported to possess anti-tumor activity in various types of cancer. However, its effects and molecular mechanism of action in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still not completely understood. We observed that TQ inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro, where treatment with TQ arrested the cell cycle in G1 by upregulating p21 and downregulating cyclinD1 and CDK2 expression; moreover, TQ induced apoptosis by decreasing expression of Bcl-2 and increasing expression of Bax. Simultaneously, TQ demonstrated a suppressive impact on the Notch pathway, where overexpression of NICD1 reversed the inhibitory effect of TQ on cell proliferation, thereby attenuating the repressive effects of TQ on the Notch pathway, cyclinD1, CDK2 and Bcl-2, and also diminishing upregulation of p21 and Bax. In a xenograft model, TQ inhibited HCC growth in nude mice; this inhibitory effect in vivo, as well as of HCC cell growth in vitro, was associated with a discernible decline in NICD1 and Bcl-2 levels and a dramatic rise in p21 expression. In conclusion, TQ inhibits HCC cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, achieving these effects by repression of the Notch signaling pathway, suggesting that TQ represents a potential preventive or therapeutic agent in HCC patients. PMID:26416455

  20. The HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir inhibits Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Ikoma, Minako; Gachelet, Eliora; Gray, Matthew; Geballe, Adam P; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael; Vieira, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common HIV-associated cancer worldwide and is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality in some regions. Antiretroviral (ARV) combination regimens have had mixed results for KS progression and resolution. Anecdotal case reports suggest that protease inhibitors (PIs) may have effects against KS that are independent of their effect on HIV infection. As such, we evaluated whether PIs or other ARVs directly inhibit replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the gammaherpesvirus that causes KS. Among a broad panel of ARVs tested, only the PI nelfinavir consistently displayed potent inhibitory activity against KSHV in vitro as demonstrated by an efficient quantitative assay for infectious KSHV using a recombinant virus, rKSHV.294, which expresses the secreted alkaline phosphatase. This inhibitory activity of nelfinavir against KSHV replication was confirmed using virus derived from a second primary effusion lymphoma cell line. Nelfinavir was similarly found to inhibit in vitro replication of an alphaherpesvirus (herpes simplex virus) and a betaherpesvirus (human cytomegalovirus). No activity was observed with nelfinavir against vaccinia virus or adenovirus. Nelfinavir may provide unique benefits for the prevention or treatment of HIV-associated KS and potentially other human herpesviruses by direct inhibition of replication.

  1. In vitro actinomycete biofilm development and inhibition by the polyene antibiotic, nystatin, on IUD copper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Francis, Arumugam Lency; Kavitha, Senthil; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy

    2012-01-01

    The presence of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) gives a solid surface for attachment and an ideal niche for biofilm to form and flourish. Pelvic actinomycosis is often associated with the use of IUDs. Treatment of IUD-associated pelvic actinomycosis requires the immediate removal of the IUD. Therefore, this article presents in vitro evidence to support the use of novel antibiotics in the treatment of actinomycete biofilms. Twenty one clinical actinomycetes isolates from endocervical swabs of IUD wearers were assessed for their biofilm forming ability. An in vitro biofilm model with three isolates, Streptomyces strain A4, Nocardia strain C15 and Nocardia strain C17 was subjected to treatment with nystatin. Inhibition of biofilm formation by nystatin was found to be concentration dependent, with MBIC50 values in the range 0.08-0.16 mg ml(-1). Furthermore, at a concentration of 0.16 mg ml(-1), nystatin inhibited the twitching motility of the isolates, providing evidence for a possible mechanism of biofilm inhibition.

  2. Inhibition of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli cell adhesion in-vitro by designed peptides.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepika; Sarkar, Subendu; Sharma, Monica; Thapa, B R; Chakraborti, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) bears remarkable capacity to adhere the host intestinal mucosal surface and results in acute or persistent childhood diarrhea worldwide. In this study, an attempt has been made to inhibit EAEC cell adherence in-vitro using synthetic peptides. E. coli isolates (n = 54) were isolated from the stool samples of clinically diagnosed pediatric diarrheal patients. 92.8% isolates showed different types of aggregative adherence patterns with HEp-2 cells. AAF-II (Aggregative Adherence Fimbriae-II) EAEC exhibited the maximum ability to form biofilm and intracellular survival. Peptides were designed against the high antigenic epitopic regions of AAF-II adhesin of EAEC O42 using prediction algorithms like BcePred and ProPred software to block the EAEC cell adhesion in-vitro. Peptides P2 (DITITPATNRDVNV) and P3 (MRIKAWGEANHGQL) demonstrated higher inhibition of EAEC cell adhesion than P1 (GMQGSITPAIPLRPG). Interestingly, increasing the pre-incubation time of the peptides with HEp-2 cells from 1 h to 2 h showed the maximum inhibition. The data suggested the potential role of P2 and P3 peptides in successfully blocking the binding of AAF-II EAEC with HEp-2 cell receptors. Hence, the peptides may be efficacious in designing new chemotherapeutic for the management of EAEC mediated diarrhea.

  3. Syntheses and in vitro evaluations of uncharged reactivators for human acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Renou, Julien; Mercey, Guillaume; Verdelet, Tristan; Păunescu, Emilia; Gillon, Emilie; Arboléas, Mélanie; Loiodice, Mélanie; Kliachyna, Maria; Baati, Rachid; Nachon, Florian; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2013-03-25

    Organophosphorus nerve agents (OPNAs) are highly toxic compounds that represent a threat to both military and civilian populations. They cause an irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), by the formation of a covalent P-O bond with the catalytic serine. Among the present treatment of nerve agents poisoning, pyridinium and bis-pyridinium aldoximes are used to reactivate this inhibited enzyme but these compounds do not readily cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) due to their permanent cationic charge and thus cannot efficiently reactivate cholinesterases in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, a series of seven new uncharged oximes reactivators have been synthesized and their in vitro ability to reactivate VX and tabun-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) has been evaluated. The dissociation constant K(D) of inhibited enzyme-oxime complex, the reactivity rate constant kr and the second order reactivation rate constant k(r2) have been determined and have been compared to reference oximes HI-6, Obidoxime and 2-Pralidoxime (2-PAM). Regarding the reactivation of VX-inhibited hAChE, all compounds show a better reactivation potency than those of 2-PAM, nevertheless they are less efficient than obidoxime and HI-6. Moreover, one of seven described compounds presents an ability to reactivate tabun-inhibited hAChE equivalent to those of 2-PAM. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Shino, Beena; Peedikayil, Faizal C; Jaiprakash, Shyamala R; Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole.

  5. Comparison of Antimicrobial Activity of Chlorhexidine, Coconut Oil, Probiotics, and Ketoconazole on Candida albicans Isolated in Children with Early Childhood Caries: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Bijapur, Gufran; Kottayi, Soni; Jose, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries (ECC) is associated with early colonisation and high levels of cariogenic microorganisms. With C. albicans being one of those, there is a need to determine the effectiveness of various chemotherapeutic agents against it. The study is aimed at isolating Candida species in children with ECC and at studying the antifungal effect of coconut oil, probiotics, Lactobacillus, and 0.2% chlorhexidine on C. albicans in comparison with ketoconazole. Materials and Methods. Samples were collected using sterile cotton swabs, swabbed on the tooth surfaces from children with ECC of 3 to 6 yrs and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar (HI Media) plates and incubated in a 5% CO2 enriched atmosphere at 37°C for 24 hours. Candida was isolated and its susceptibility to probiotics, chlorhexidine, ketoconazole, and coconut oil was determined using Disc Diffusion method. Results. The mean zone of inhibition for chlorhexidine was 21.8 mm, whereas for coconut oil it was 16.8 mm, for probiotics it was 13.5 mm, and for ketoconazole it was 22.3 mm. The difference between the groups was not statistically significant (Chi-square value 7.42, P value 0.06). Conclusion. Chlorhexidine and coconut oil have shown significant antifungal activity which is comparable with ketoconazole. PMID:27051559

  6. Proanthocyanidin-rich extracts from cranberry fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) selectively inhibit the growth of human pathogenic fungi Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kunal D; Scarano, Frank J; Kondo, Miwako; Hurta, Robert A R; Neto, Catherine C

    2011-12-28

    Cranberry ( Vaccinium macrocarpon ) has been shown in clinical studies to reduce infections caused by Escherichia coli and other bacteria, and proanthocyanidins are believed to play a role. The ability of cranberry to inhibit the growth of opportunistic human fungal pathogens that cause oral, skin, respiratory, and systemic infections has not been well-studied. Fractions from whole cranberry fruit were screened for inhibition of five Candida species and Cryptococcus neoformans , a causative agent of fungal meningitis. Candida glabrata , Candida lusitaniae , Candida krusei , and Cryptococcus neoformans showed significant susceptibility to treatment with cranberry proanthocyanidin fractions in a broth microdilution assay, with minimum inhibitory concentrations as low as 1 μg/mL. MALDI-TOF MS analysis of subfractions detected epicatechin oligomers of up to 12 degrees of polymerization. Those containing larger oligomers caused the strongest inhibition. This study suggests that cranberry has potential as an antifungal agent.

  7. Inhibition of electron transport chain assembly and function promotes photodynamic killing of Candida

    PubMed Central

    Chabrier-Roselló, Yeissa; Giesselman, Benjamin R.; De Jesús-Andino, Francisco J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Mitra, Soumya; Haidaris, Constantine G.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory deficiency increases the sensitivity of the pathogenic fungi Candida albicans and C. glabrata to oxidative stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT) sensitized by the cationic porphyrin meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP-1363). Since disruption of electron transport chain (ETC) function increases intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species in yeast, we determined whether interference with ETC assembly or function increased sensitivity to TMP-1363-PDT in C. albicans, C. glabrata and the non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Metabolic inhibitor antimycin A and defined genetic mutants were used to identify ETC components that contribute to the sensitivity to PDT. Inhibition of cytochrome bc1 (Complex III) with antimycin A increases mitochondrial levels of reactive oxygen species. PDT performed following pretreatment with antimycin A reduced colony forming units (CFU) of C. albicans and C. glabrata by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to PDT alone. A S. cerevisiae mitochondrial glutaredoxin grx5 mutant, defective in assembly of Fe-S clusters critical for Complex III function, displayed increased sensitivity to PDT. Furthermore, C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae mutants in cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV) synthesis and assembly were also significantly more sensitive to PDT. These included suv3, encoding an ATP-dependent RNA helicase critical for maturation of cytochrome c oxidase subunit transcripts, and pet117, encoding an essential cytochrome c oxidase assembly factor. Following PDT, the reduction in CFU of these mutants was one to two orders of magnitude greater than in their respective parental strains. The data demonstrate that selective inhibition of ETC Complexes III and IV significantly increases the sensitivity of C. albicans, C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae to PDT sensitized with TMP-1363. PMID:20381373

  8. An Engineered Arginase FC Protein Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihua; Wang, Yan; Chen, Jun; Cheng, Bi; Hu, Jiehua; Zhou, Yuehua; Gao, Xin; Gao, Liucun; Mei, Xifan; Sun, Meiyan; Zhang, Zhuomei; Song, Haifeng

    2013-01-01

    Arginine is a semiessential amino acid required for the growth of melanoma and hepatocellular carcinoma, and the enzymatic removal of arginine by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI) or arginase is being tested clinically. Here, we report a genetically engineered arginase FC fusion protein exhibiting a prolonged half-life and enhanced efficacy. The use of this enzyme to treat different tumor lines both inhibited cell proliferation and impaired cellular migration in vitro and in vivo. Our data reinforce the hypothesis that nutritional depletion is a key strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:23737831

  9. In vitro inhibition of sperm motility by some local mineral water drinks.

    PubMed

    Oyelola, O O; Ayangade, S O; Amole, F

    1987-10-01

    The effect of eight common local mineral water drinks in Ile-Ife, Nigeria (seven cola and one lemon-based) on sperm motility in vitro was carried out. There was no significant difference in the pH values of all the drinks, the pH ranged between 2.30-2.50. After one minute, Pepsi-Cola had the least inhibitory effect on sperm motility, Bitter-lemon had the strongest effect, while the other brands had varying effects between the two extremes. The percentage motility inhibition by the mineral water drinks is also a function of the initial total sperm count in the semen.

  10. Flavonoid Ampelopsin Inhibits the Growth and Metastasis of Prostate Cancer In Vitro and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Feng; Gong, Yi; Li, Linglin; Abdolmaleky, Hamid M.; Zhou, Jin-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of a novel flavonoid, ampelopsin (AMP) on the growth and metastasis of prostate cancer cells. AMP showed the more potent activity in inhibiting the proliferation of androgen-sensitive LNCaP and, to less extent, androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, primarily by induction of apoptosis associated with down-regulation of bcl-2. On the other hand, AMP showed much less activity in inhibiting the proliferation of normal prostate epithelial cells than that of prostate cancer cell lines. AMP also inhibited the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells in vitro associated with down-regulation of CXCR4 expression. In the animal study using an orthotopic prostate tumor model, AMP (150 and 300 mg/kg body weight) inhibited the growth of PC-3 tumors and lymph node and lung metastases in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the control mice, mice treated with AMP at 300 mg/kg BW had reduced final tumor weight by 49.2% (P<0.05), lymph node metastases by 54.5% (P = 0.3) and lung metastases by 93% (P<0.05), but had no apparent alteration on food intake or body weight. The in vivo anti-growth and anti-metastasis activities of AMP were associated with induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation of prostate cancer cells, reduction of prostate tumor angiogenesis, and reduction of CXCR4 expression. Our results provide supporting evidence to warrant further investigation to develop AMP as a novel efficacious and safe candidate agent against progression and metastasis of prostate cancer. PMID:22693649

  11. QSAR modeling of in vitro inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    Mao, Boryeu; Gozalbes, Rafael; Barbosa, Frédérique; Migeon, Jacques; Merrick, Sandra; Kamm, Kelly; Wong, Eric; Costales, Chester; Shi, Wei; Wu, Cheryl; Froloff, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    We report the QSAR modeling of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) enzyme inhibition using four large data sets of in vitro data. These data sets consist of marketed drugs and drug-like compounds all tested in four assays measuring the inhibition of the metabolism of four different substrates by the CYP3A4 enzyme. The four probe substrates are benzyloxycoumarin, testosterone, benzyloxyresorufin, and midazolam. We first show that using state-of-the-art QSAR modeling approaches applied to only one of these four data sets does not lead to predictive models that would be useful for in silico filtering of chemical libraries. We then present the development and the testing of a multiple pharmacophore hypothesis (MPH) that is formulated as a conceptual extension of the traditional QSAR approach to modeling the promiscuous binding of a large variety of drugs to CYP3A4. In the simplest form, the MPH approach takes advantage of the multiple substrate data sets and identifies the binding of test compounds as either proximal or distal relative to that of a given substrate. Application of the approach to the in silico filtering of test compounds for potential inhibitors of CYP3A4 is also presented. In addition to an improvement in the QSAR modeling for the inhibition of CYP3A4, the results from this modeling approach provide structural insights into the drug-enzyme interactions. The existence of multiple inhibition data sets in the BioPrint database motivates the original development of the concept of a multiple pharmacophore hypothesis and provides a unique opportunity for formulating alternative strategies of QSAR modeling of the inhibition of the in vitro metabolism of CYP3A4.

  12. Equol inhibits growth, induces atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of mouse antral follicles in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Sharada; Gao, Liying; Gonnering, Marni; Helferich, William; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2016-01-01

    Equol is a non-steroidal estrogen metabolite produced by microbial conversion of daidzein, a major soy isoflavone, in the gut of some humans and many animal species. Isoflavones and their metabolites can affect endogenous estradiol production, action, and metabolism, potentially influencing ovarian follicle function. However, no studies have examined the effects of equol on intact ovarian antral follicles, which are responsible for sex steroid synthesis and further development into ovulatory follicles. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that equol inhibits antral follicle growth, increases follicle atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis in the adult mouse ovary. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles isolated from adult CD-1 mice were cultured with vehicle control (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or equol (600 nM, 6 μM, 36 μM, 100 μM) for 48 and 96 h. Every 24 h, follicle diameters were measured to monitor growth. At 48 and 96 h, the culture medium was subjected to measurement of hormone levels, and the cultured follicles were subjected to gene expression analysis. Additionally, follicles were histologically evaluated for signs of atresia after 96 h of culture. The results indicate that equol (100 μM) inhibited follicle growth, altered the mRNA levels of bcl2-associated X protein and B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2, and induced follicle atresia. Further, equol decreased the levels of estradiol, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone, and it decreased mRNA levels of cholesterol side-chain cleavage, steroid 17-α-hydroxalase, and aromatase. Collectively, these data indicate that equol inhibits growth, increases atresia, and inhibits steroidogenesis of cultured mouse antral follicles. PMID:26876617

  13. Antifungal activity of amphotericin B and voriconazole against the biofilms and biofilm-dispersed cells of Candida albicans employing a newly developed in vitro pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    El-Azizi, Mohamed; Farag, Noha; Khardori, Nancy

    2015-04-03

    Candida albicans is a common cause of a variety of superficial and invasive disseminated infections the majority of which are associated with biofilm growth on implanted devices. The aim of the study is to evaluate the activity of amphotericin B and voriconazole against the biofilm and the biofilm-dispersed cells of Candida albicans using a newly developed in vitro pharmacokinetic model which simulates the clinical situation when the antifungal agents are administered intermittently. RPMI medium containing 1-5 X 10(6) CFU/ml of C. albicans was continuously delivered to the device at 30 ml/h for 2 hours. The planktonic cells were removed and biofilms on the catheter were kept under continuous flow of RPMI medium at 10 ml/h. Five doses of amphotericin B or voriconazole were delivered to 2, 5 and 10 day-old biofilms at initial concentrations (2 and 3 μg/ml respectively) that were exponentially diluted. Dispersed cells in effluents from the device were counted and the adherent cells on the catheter were evaluated after 48 h of the last dose. The minimum inhibitory concentration of voriconazole and amphotericin B against the tested isolate was 0.0325 and 0.25 μg/ml respectively. Amphotericin B significantly reduced the dispersion of C. albicans cells from the biofilm. The log10 reduction in the dispersed cells was 2.54-3.54, 2.30-3.55, and 1.94-2.50 following addition of 5 doses of amphotericin B to 2-, 5- and 10-day old biofilms respectively. The number of the viable cells within the biofilm was reduced by 18 (±7.63), 5 and 4% following addition of the 5 doses of amphotericin B to the biofilms respectively. Voriconazole showed no significant effect on the viability of C. albicans within the biofilm. Both antifungal agents failed to eradicate C. albicans biofilm or stop cell dispersion from them and the resistance progressed with maturation of the biofilm. These findings go along with the need for removal of devices in spite of antifungal therapy in patients

  14. In vitro synergistic efficacy of combination of amphotericin B with Myrtus communis essential oil against clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, M; Ghazian Bidgoli, F

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we evaluated the antifungal activity of the essential oil from Myrtus communis (myrtle) leaves against Candida albicans (eight clinical isolates and one ATCC type strains) and different species of Aspergillus sp (A. niger, A. parasiticus, six isolates of Aspergillus flavus) using broth micro dilution assay. In addition, we evaluated the synergistic effect between the essential oil and the antifungal compound amphotericin B by checkboard micro titer assay. The essential oil was obtained from myrtle leaves by hydrodistillation method and the oil was analyzed by GC and GC-MS methods. Chemical analysis of oil revealed the presence of 70 components, representing 99.23% of the total oil. 1,8-cineole (36.1%), alpha-pinene (22.5%), linalool (8.4%), bornyl acetate (5.2%), alpha-terpineol (4.4%), linalyl acetate (4.2%) and limonene (3.8%) were found to be the major components of the oil. The antifungal evaluating showed that myrtle oil exhibited good antifungal activity against fungi. Myrtle oil showed significant antifungal activity when combined with amphotericin B.

  15. Antifungal Efficacy during Candida krusei Infection in Non-Conventional Models Correlates with the Yeast In Vitro Susceptibility Profile

    PubMed Central

    Scorzoni, Liliana; de Lucas, Maria Pilar; Mesa-Arango, Ana Cecilia; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Lozano, Encarnación; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Mendes-Giannini, Maria Jose; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of opportunistic fungal infections has increased in recent decades due to the growing proportion of immunocompromised patients in our society. Candida krusei has been described as a causative agent of disseminated fungal infections in susceptible patients. Although its prevalence remains low among yeast infections (2–5%), its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole makes this yeast important from epidemiologic aspects. Non mammalian organisms are feasible models to study fungal virulence and drug efficacy. In this work we have used the lepidopteran Galleria mellonella and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as models to assess antifungal efficacy during infection by C. krusei. This yeast killed G. mellonella at 25, 30 and 37°C and reduced haemocytic density. Infected larvae melanized in a dose-dependent manner. Fluconazole did not protect against C. krusei infection, in contrast to amphotericin B, voriconazole or caspofungin. However, the doses of these antifungals required to obtain larvae protection were always higher during C. krusei infection than during C. albicans infection. Similar results were found in the model host C. elegans. Our work demonstrates that non mammalian models are useful tools to investigate in vivo antifungal efficacy and virulence of C. krusei. PMID:23555877

  16. The Candida albicans phospholipomannan induces in vitro production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha from human and murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Jouault, T; Bernigaud, A; Lepage, G; Trinel, P A; Poulain, D

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified a Candida albicans 14,000-18,000 MW antigen reacting with anti-beta-1,2-linked oligomannosides antibodies as being a phospholipomannan (PLM). Because of the structural similarities between the C. albicans PLM and lipophosphoglycans from various microbial pathogens known to be potent tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) inducers, we investigated the PLM ability to induce TNF-alpha. Incubation of human monocytic cells THP-1 with PLM led to dose-dependent production of TNF-alpha that was significantly increased by prestimulation of the cells with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). Production of TNF-alpha by macrophages under PLM stimulation was confirmed by using macrophages elicited from the mouse peritoneal cavity. In all investigated conditions, PLM-induced TNF-alpha production differed significantly in both kinetics and dose dependence from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induction used as control. It appears, therefore, that the C. albicans PLM shares functional homologies with microbial lipophosphoglycans identified as pathogenicity factors, although prestimulation of the target cells was required for the PLM-derived opportunistic pathogen to trigger the cytokine network. PMID:7835946

  17. Inhibition of Candida albicans Biofilm Formation by the Synthetic Lactoferricin Derived Peptide hLF1-11

    PubMed Central

    Morici, Paola; Fais, Roberta; Rizzato, Cosmeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of the synthetic peptide hLF1-11 against biofilm produced by clinical isolates of Candida albicans with different fluconazole susceptibility. The antibiofilm activity of the peptide hLF1-11 was assessed in terms of reduction of biofilm cellular density, metabolic activity and sessile cell viability. The extent of morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms was also investigated microscopically. Transcription levels of genes related to cell adhesion, hyphal development and extracellular matrix production were analysed by qRT-PCR in hLF1-11 treated and untreated biofilms. Exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) was used to rescue morphogenesis in cells exposed to the peptide. The results revealed that hLF1-11 exhibited an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by all C. albicans isolates tested in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of their fluconazole susceptibility. Visual inspection of treated or untreated biofilm cells with an inverted microscope revealed a significant reduction in hyphal formation by hLF1-11 treated cells, as early as 3 hours of incubation. Moreover, hLF1-11 showed a reduced activity on preadherent cells. hLF1-11 induced the down-regulation of biofilm and hyphal-associated genes, which were predominantly regulated via the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Indeed, exogenous db-cAMP restored morphogenesis in hLF1-11 treated cells. The hLF1-11 peptide significantly inhibited biofilm formation by C. albicans mainly at early stages, interfering with biofilm cellular density and metabolic activity, and affected morphogenesis through the Ras1-cAMP-Efg1 pathway. Our findings provide the first evidence that hLF1-11 could represent a potential candidate for the prevention of biofilm formation by C. albicans. PMID:27902776

  18. Selective inhibition of human acetylcholinesterase by xanthine derivatives: in vitro inhibition and molecular modeling investigations.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Tarek; Osman, Wesseem; Tin, Gary; Rao, Praveen P N

    2013-08-01

    The commonly used beverage and psychostimulant caffeine is known to inhibit human acetylcholinesterase enzyme. This pharmacological activity of caffeine is partly responsible for its cognition enhancing properties. However, the exact mechanisms of its binding to human cholinesterases (acetyl and butyrylcholinesterase; hAChE and hBuChE) are not well known. In this study, we investigated the cholinesterase inhibition by the xanthine derivatives caffeine, pentoxifylline, and propentofylline. Among them, propentofylline was the most potent AChE inhibitor (hAChE IC₅₀=6.40 μM). The hAChE inhibitory potency was of the order: caffeine (hAChE IC₅₀=7.25 μM)inhibition of hAChE with no inhibition of hBuChE (IC₅₀>50 μM) relative to the reference agent donepezil (hBuChE IC₅₀=13.60 μM). Molecular modeling investigations indicate that caffeine binds primarily in the catalytic site (Ser203, Glu334 and His447) region of hAChE whereas pentoxifylline and propentofylline are able to bind to both the catalytic site and peripheral anionic site due to their increased bulk/size, thereby exhibiting superior AChE inhibition relative to caffeine. In contrast, their lack of hBuChE inhibition is due to a larger binding site and lack of key aromatic amino acids. In summary, our study has important implications in the development of novel caffeine derivatives as selective AChE inhibitors with potential application as cognitive enhancers and to treat various forms of dementia.

  19. Kaempferol inhibits the growth and metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qin, Youyou; Cui, Wu; Yang, Xuewei; Tong, Baifeng

    2016-03-01

    Kaempferol is a flavonoid that has been reported to exhibit antitumor activity in various malignant tumors. However, the role of kaempferol on cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is largely unknown. In this article, we found that kaempferol inhibited proliferation, reduced colony formation ability, and induced apoptosis in HCCC9810 and QBC939 cells in vitro. Results from transwell assay and wound-healing assay demonstrated that kaempferol significantly suppressed the migration and invasion abilities of HCCC9810 and QBC939 cells in vitro. Kaempferol was found to decrease the expression of Bcl-2 and increase the expressions of Bax, Fas, cleaved-caspase 3, cleaved-caspase 8, cleaved-caspase 9, and cleaved-PARP. In addition, kaempferol also downregulated the levels of phosphorylated AKT, TIMP2, and MMP2. In vivo, it was found that the volume of subcutaneous xenograft (0.15 cm(3)) in the kaempferol-treated group was smaller than that (0.6 cm(3)) in the control group. Kaempferol also suppressed the number and volume of metastasis foci in the lung metastasis model, with no marked effects on body weight of mice. Immunohistochemistry assay showed that the number of Ki-67-positive cells was lower in the kaempferol-treated group than that in the control group. We further confirmed that the changes of apoptosis- and invasion-related proteins after kaempferol treatment in vivo were similar to the results in vitro. These data suggest that kaempferol may be a promising candidate agent for the treatment of CCA.

  20. The influence of haemoglobin and iron on in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Rachel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; White, Andrew D.; Müller, Julius; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Matsumiya, Magali; Dennis, Mike J.; Parizotto, Eneida A.; Harris, Stephanie; Stylianou, Elena; Naranbhai, Vivek; Bettencourt, Paulo; Drakesmith, Hal; Sharpe, Sally; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The current vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG, has variable efficacy, but development of an effective alternative is severely hampered by the lack of an immune correlate of protection. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in functional in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIAs), which provide a measure of a range of different immune mechanisms and their interactions. We identified a positive correlation between mean corpuscular haemoglobin and in vitro growth of BCG in whole blood from healthy UK human volunteers. Mycobacterial growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both humans and macaques was increased following the experimental addition of haemoglobin (Hb) or ferric iron, and reduced following addition of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO). Expression of Hb genes correlated positively with mycobacterial growth in whole blood from UK/Asian adults and, to a lesser extent, in PBMC from South African infants. Taken together our data indicate an association between Hb/iron levels and BCG growth in vitro, which may in part explain differences in findings between whole blood and PBMC MGIAs and should be considered when using such assays. PMID:28256545

  1. Wu-Ling-San formula inhibits the crystallization of calcium oxalate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Ho, Chien-Yi; Chen, Lieh-Der; Hsu, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Wen-Chi

    2007-01-01

    Urinary stone disease is a common disease and has a high rate of recurrence. There is no ideal long-term medical treatment to prevent the recurrence of urinary stones. Wu-Ling-San (WLS) formula has been used for centuries in China for long-term treatment of urological diseases. However, no pharmacological studies have been conducted to evaluate its effect on urinary stone disease. Therefore, using a photospectrometer, we studied the effects of WLS on nucleation, growth and aggregation of calcium oxalate in vitro. The results showed that WLS extract significantly slowed the speed of calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystal nucleation. WLS extracts at concentrations of 6.25, 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/ml inhibited nucleation of calcium oxalate crystallization by 344, 387, 543, and 943%, respectively. WLS extracts did not inhibit the growth of CaOx crystallization; however, WLS extracts at concentrations of 12.5 and 25 mg/ml significantly inhibited the aggregation of CaOx crystallization by 74.24% and 75.05%, respectively. WLS extract at a concentration of 50 mg/ml inhibited CaOx aggregation by 92.49%. In conclusion, our results indicate that WLS extract inhibited calcium oxalate nucleation and aggregation, and may have the potential to prevent stone recurrence.

  2. Antibiotic drug tigecycline reduces neuroblastoma cells proliferation by inhibiting Akt activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Erhu; Tang, Chunling; Zhang, Weibo; Tan, Juan; Dong, Zhen; Ding, Han-Fei; Cui, Hongjuan

    2016-06-01

    As the first member of glycylcycline bacteriostatic agents, tigecycline is approved as a novel expanded-spectrum antibiotic, which is clinically available. However, accumulating evidence indicated that tigecycline was provided with the potential application in cancer therapy. In this paper, tigecycline was shown to exert an anti-proliferative effect on neuroblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, it was found that tigecycline induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest instead of apoptosis by means of Akt pathway inhibition. In neuroblastoma cell lines, the Akt activator insulin-like growth factor-1 (hereafter referred to as IGF-1) reversed tigecycline-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, tigecycline inhibited colony formation and suppressed neuroblastoma cells xenograft formation and growth. After tigecycline treatment in vivo, the Akt pathway inhibition was confirmed as well. Collectively, our data provided strong evidences that tigecycline inhibited neuroblastoma cells growth and proliferation through the Akt pathway inhibition in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results were supported by previous studies concerning the application of tigecycline in human tumors treatment, suggesting that tigecycline might act as a potential candidate agent for neuroblastoma treatment.

  3. New indole-isoxazolone derivatives: Synthesis, characterisation and in vitro SIRT1 inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Panathur, Naveen; Gokhale, Nikhila; Dalimba, Udayakumar; Koushik, Pulla Venkat; Yogeeswari, Perumal; Sriram, Dharmarajan

    2015-07-15

    A new series of indole-isoxazolone hybrids bearing substituted amide, substituted [(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)methoxy]methyl group or substituted benzylic ether at position-2 of the indole nucleus was synthesised using a facile synthetic route and the molecules were characterised using spectroscopic techniques. The molecules were screened against three human cancer cell lines to evaluate their in vitro cytotoxic property. Most of the trifluoromethyl substituted derivatives exhibited better growth inhibition activity than their methyl substituted analogues. The SIRT1 inhibition activity of two potent molecules (I17 and I18) was investigated and the SIRT1 IC50 values are 35.25 and 37.36 μM, respectively for I17 and I18. The molecular docking studies with SIRT1 enzyme revealed favourable interactions of the molecule I17 with the amino acids constituting the receptor enzyme.

  4. Phentolamine inhibits angiogenesis in vitro: Suppression of proliferation migration and differentiation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liangli; Liu, Chenyang; Kong, Yanan; Piao, Zhengguo; Cheng, Biao

    2016-06-16

    It is widely known that the β-adrenergic receptor (AR) blocker (propranolol) inhibits human endothelial cell (EC) angiogenesis in vitro, but how the α-AR antagonist (phentolamine) affects human EC angiogenesis has not yet been studied. Here, we show for the first time that both human dermal microvascular ECs (HDMECs) and human brain microvascular ECs (HBMECs) express α-ARs. Moreover, our results indicate that phentolamine inhibits the proliferation, migration, and tubulogenesis of HDMECs and HBMECs. Finally, VEGFR-2 and Ang1/2 expression of HDMECs was suppressed by phentolamine. Together, these results indicate that phentolamine impairs several critical events of neovascularization, and α-ARs, as well as the VEGF/VEGFR-2 and Ang/Tie-2 signaling pathways, may be involved in these processes. Our results suggest a novel therapeutic strategy for the use of α-blockers in the treatment of human angiogenesis-dependent diseases.

  5. Transintestinal secretion of ciprofloxacin, grepafloxacin and sparfloxacin: in vitro and in situ inhibition studies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ibáñez, M; Nalda-Molina, R; Montalar-Montero, M; Bermejo, M V; Merino, V; Garrigues, T M

    2003-03-01

    The influence of the secretion process on the absorption of ciprofloxacin, grepafloxacin and sparfloxacin has been evaluated by means of inhibition studies. Two well known P-glycoprotein inhibitors (cyclosporine, verapamil), a mixed inhibitor of P-glycoprotein and the organic cation transporter OCT1 (quinidine) and a well established MRP substrate (p-aminohipuric acid) have been selected in order to distinguish the possible carriers implicated. An in situ rat gut perfusion model and CACO-2 permeability studies are used. Both methods suggest the involvement of several types of efflux transporters for every fluoroquinolone. The relevance of the secretory pathway depends on the intrinsic permeability of the quinolone. The in vitro model seems to be more suitable for discriminating mechanisms underlying the absorption process, while in situ studies are less sensitive to inhibition studies.

  6. Momilactone B Inhibits Ketosis In Vitro by Regulating the ANGPTL3-LPL Pathway and Inhibiting HMGCS2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Young; S P, Nipin; Darvin, Pramod; Joung, Youn Hee; Byun, Hyo Joo; Do, Chang Hee; Park, Kyung Do; Park, Mi Na; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Yang, Young Mok

    2016-11-22

    Ketogenesis is the production of ketone bodies, which provide energy when the body lacks glucose. Under ketogenic conditions, the body switches from primarily carbohydrate to fat metabolism to maintain energy balance. However, accumulation of high levels of ketone bodies in the blood results in ketosis. Treating ketosis with natural substances is preferable, because they are unlikely to cause side-effects. Momilactone B is an active compound isolated from Korean rice. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that momilactone B could inhibit ketosis. We constructed an in vitro ketosis model by glucose starvation. We used this model to test the anti-ketosis effects of momilactone B. A primary target for treating ketosis is angiopoietin-like-3 (ANGPTL3), which modulates lipoprotein metabolism by inhibiting lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a multifunctional enzyme that breaks down stored fat to produce triglycerides. We showed that momilactone B could regulate the ANGPTL3-LPL pathway. However, a strong anti-ketosis candidate drug should also inhibit ketogenesis. Ketogenesis can be suppressed by inhibiting the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase-2 (HMGCS2), a mitochondrial enzyme that converts acetyl-CoA to ketone bodies. We found that momilactone B suppressed the expression of HMGCS2 through the increased expression of STAT5b. We also elucidated the relationship of STAT5b to ANGPTL3 and LPL expression.

  7. Baicalein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and the Quorum Sensing System In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Tangjuan; Wang, Ke; Hou, Changchun; Cai, Shuangqi; Huang, Yingying; Du, Zhongye; Huang, Hong; Kong, Jinliang; Chen, Yiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formed by Staphylococcus aureus significantly enhances antibiotic resistance by inhibiting the penetration of antibiotics, resulting in an increasingly serious situation. This study aimed to assess whether baicalein can prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic bactericidal effects with antibiotics in vitro. To do this, we used a clinically isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus 17546 (t037) for biofilm formation. Virulence factors were detected following treatment with baicalein, and the molecular mechanism of its antibiofilm activity was studied. Plate counting, crystal violet staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein clearly inhibited 3- and 7-day biofilm formation in vitro. Moreover, colony forming unit count, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that vancomycin (VCM) and baicalein generally enhanced destruction of biofilms, while VCM alone did not. Western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (RTQ-PCR) confirmed that baicalein treatment reduced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and α-hemolysin (hla) levels. Most strikingly, real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein downregulated the quorum-sensing system regulators agrA, RNAIII, and sarA, and gene expression of ica, but 16 μg/mL baicalein had no effect. In summary, baicalein inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, destroyed biofilms, increased the permeability of vancomycin, reduced the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A and α-hemolysin, and inhibited the quorum sensing system. These results support baicalein as a novel drug candidate and an effective treatment strategy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  8. β-catenin knockdown inhibits the proliferation of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    WANG, ZHONG; CHEN, QIANXUE

    2016-01-01

    β-catenin is a crucial oncogene that is capable of regulating cancer progression. The aim of the present study was to clarify whether β-catenin was associated with the proliferation and progress of glioma. In order to knockdown the expression of β-catenin in human U251 glioma cells, three pairs of small interfering (si)RNA were designed and synthesized and the most effective siRNA was selected and used for silencing the endogenous β-catenin, which was detected by western blot analysis and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Proliferation was subsequently detected using a methylthiazolyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and the results demonstrated that knockdown of β-catenin significantly inhibited the proliferation of U251 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). Cell apoptosis rate was analyzed using flow cytometry and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining demonstrated that β-catenin siRNA significantly increased the apoptosis of U251 cells (P<0.01). Furthermore, the results of an in vitro scratch assay demonstrated that β-catenin silencing suppressed the proliferation of U251 cells, as compared with the control group (P<0.01). In vivo, β-catenin expression levels in U251 cells were significantly inhibited (P<0.01) following β-catenin short hairpin (sh)RNA lentiviral-vector transfection, as detected by western blot analysis and RT-qPCR. Tumorigenicity experiments demonstrated that β-catenin inhibition significantly increased the survival rate of nude mice. The results of the present study demonstrated that knockdown of β-catenin expression significantly inhibited the progression of human glioma cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo; thus suggesting that β-catenin silencing may be a novel therapy for the treatment of human glioma. PMID:26998037

  9. Amphiphilic suramin dissolves Matrigel, causing an 'inhibition' artefact within in vitro angiogenesis assays.

    PubMed

    Prigozhina, Natalie L; Heisel, Andrew J; Seldeen, Jordan R; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Price, Jeffrey H

    2013-12-01

    The field of study concerning promotion and/or inhibition of angiogenesis has gathered much attention in the scientific community. A great deal of work has been invested towards defining reproducible assays to gauge for promotion or inhibition of angiogenesis in response to drug treatments or growth conditions. Two common components of these assays were noted by our group to have an unexpected and previously unreported interaction. Suramin is a commercially available compound, commonly used as a positive control for in vitro angiogenic inhibition assays. Matrigel is a popular extracellular substrate that supports angiogenic network formation when endothelial cells are cultured on its surface. However, our group demonstrated that suramin alone (without the presence of cells) will actively dissolve Matrigel, causing the extracellular matrix to transition from the gel-like physical state to a more liquid state. This causes cells on the Matrigel to congregate and sink to the bottom of the well. Therefore, previous observations of inhibition of endothelial cell angiogenesis through the incubation with suramin (including previous observations made by our group) are, largely, an artefact caused by suramin and matrix interaction rather than suramin and cells interaction, as previously reported. Our results suggest that the presence of sulphate groups and amphiphilic properties of suramin are likely responsible for the disruption of the matrix layer. We believe that this information is of prime importance to anyone using similar in vitro models, or employing suramin in any therapy or drug development assays. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2013 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  10. Development of fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum for in vitro growth inhibition assays.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Danny W; Crabb, Brendan S; Beeson, James G

    2010-06-03

    Plasmodium falciparum in vitro growth inhibition assays are widely used to evaluate and quantify the functional activity of acquired and vaccine-induced antibodies and the anti-malarial activity of known drugs and novel compounds. However, several constraints have limited the use of these assays in large-scale population studies, vaccine trials and compound screening for drug discovery and development. The D10 P. falciparum line was transfected to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). In vitro growth inhibition assays were performed over one or two cycles of P. falciparum asexual replication using inhibitory polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody, human serum samples, and anti-malarials. Parasitaemia was evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Transfected parasites expressed GFP throughout all asexual stages and were clearly detectable by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Measurement of parasite growth inhibition was the same when determined by detection of GFP fluorescence or staining with ethidium bromide. There was no difference in the inhibitory activity of samples when tested against the transfected parasites compared to the parental line. The level of fluorescence of GFP-expressing parasites increased throughout the course of asexual development. Among ring-stages, GFP-fluorescent parasites were readily separated from uninfected erythrocytes by flow cytometry, whereas this was less clear using ethidium bromide staining. Inhibition by serum and antibody samples was consistently higher when tested over two cycles of growth compared to one, and when using a 1 in 10 sample dilution compared to 1 in 20, but there was no difference detected when using a different starting parasitaemia to set-up growth assays. Flow cytometry based measurements of parasitaemia proved more reproducible than microscopy counts. Flow cytometry based assays using GFP-fluorescent parasites proved sensitive and highly reproducible for

  11. Development of fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum for in vitro growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum in vitro growth inhibition assays are widely used to evaluate and quantify the functional activity of acquired and vaccine-induced antibodies and the anti-malarial activity of known drugs and novel compounds. However, several constraints have limited the use of these assays in large-scale population studies, vaccine trials and compound screening for drug discovery and development. Methods The D10 P. falciparum line was transfected to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). In vitro growth inhibition assays were performed over one or two cycles of P. falciparum asexual replication using inhibitory polyclonal antibodies raised in rabbits, an inhibitory monoclonal antibody, human serum samples, and anti-malarials. Parasitaemia was evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Results Transfected parasites expressed GFP throughout all asexual stages and were clearly detectable by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Measurement of parasite growth inhibition was the same when determined by detection of GFP fluorescence or staining with ethidium bromide. There was no difference in the inhibitory activity of samples when tested against the transfected parasites compared to the parental line. The level of fluorescence of GFP-expressing parasites increased throughout the course of asexual development. Among ring-stages, GFP-fluorescent parasites were readily separated from uninfected erythrocytes by flow cytometry, whereas this was less clear using ethidium bromide staining. Inhibition by serum and antibody samples was consistently higher when tested over two cycles of growth compared to one, and when using a 1 in 10 sample dilution compared to 1 in 20, but there was no difference detected when using a different starting parasitaemia to set-up growth assays. Flow cytometry based measurements of parasitaemia proved more reproducible than microscopy counts. Conclusions Flow cytometry based assays using GFP-fluorescent parasites proved

  12. Effects of salvianolic acid B on in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of retinoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing-An

    2012-01-01

    AIM To observe the effects of salvianolic acid B (SalB) on in vitro growth inhibition and apoptosis induction of retinoblastoma HXO-RB44 cells. METHODS The effects of SalB on the HXO-RB44 cells proliferation in vitro were observed by MTT colorimetric method. The morphological changes of apoptosis before and after the treatment of SalB were observed by Hoechst 33258 fluorescent staining method. Apoptosis rate and cell cycle changes of HXO-RB44 cells were detected by flow cytometer at 48 hours after treated by SalB. The expression changes of Caspase-3 protein in HXO-RB44 cells were detected by Western Blot. RESULTS SalB significantly inhibited the growth of HXO-RB44 cells, while the inhibition was in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The results of fluorescent staining method indicated that HXO-RB44 cells showed significant phenomenon of apoptosis including karyorrhexis, fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies, etc. after 24, 48 and 72 hours co-culturing of SalB and HXO-RB44 cells. The results of flow cytometer showed that the apoptosis rate and the proportion of cells in S phase were gradually increased at 48 hours and 72 hours after treated by different concentrations of SalB. Western Blot strip showed that the expression of Caspase-3 protein in HXO-RB44 cells was gradually increased with the increase of the concentration of SalB. CONCLUSION SalB can significantly affect on HXO-RB44 cells growth inhibition and apoptosis induction which may be achieved through the up-regulation of Caspase-3 expression and the induction of cell cycle arrest. PMID:22773971

  13. In vitro inhibition of Eimeria tenella sporozoite invasion into host cells by probiotics.

    PubMed

    Hessenberger, S; Schatzmayr, G; Teichmann, K

    2016-10-15

    The aim was to study the effects of probiotics isolated from the intestinal tract of livestock animals on Eimeria tenella invasion into Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells in vitro. E. tenella sporozoites were purified and labeled with 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester before seeding on cell cultures, and invasion was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. Two protocols (A and B) were used. In protocol A, Enterococcus faecium # 589 or Lactobacillus salivarius subsp. salivarius # 505 were added together with sporozoites to MDBK cell cultures and invasion was evaluated after incubation for approximately 20h. Viable, dead, or spent culture supernatants of probiotics were tested. In protocol B, viable probiotics were incubated with MDBK cells for one hour before sporozoites were added and invasion was evaluated after two more hours of incubation. Parasite invasion of viable, dead, or spent culture supernatant of E. faecium # 589 was assessed. Using protocol A, it was shown that parasite invasion was inhibited by viable (80%) or dead (75%) E. faecium # 589. While inhibition by viable L. salivarius subsp. salivarius # 505 was not valid at the highest concentration and not significant at the other test concentrations, dead cells inhibited parasite invasion up to 45%. Spent culture supernatants of both probiotics had no influence on parasite invasion. Using protocol B, it was shown that viable Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. animalis # 503, E. faecium # 497, E. faecium # 589, L. reuteri # 514, L. salivarius subsp. salivarius # 505, and Bacillus subtilis # 588 inhibited parasite invasion into MDBK cells up to 80%. Anticoccidial activity was strain-specific for E. faecium strains, and the strongest effect was shown by E. faecium # 589. Anticoccidial effects of some of the tested probiotics have already been shown in vivo, which makes them candidates to prevent coccidiosis. These findings have now been confirmed in vitro. The used parasite invasion

  14. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Growth and Biofilm Formation by Probiotics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, Falk; Korte, Franziska; Dörfer, Christof E; Kneist, Susanne; Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim; Paris, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    To exert anticaries effects, probiotics are described to inhibit growth and biofilm formation of cariogenic bacteria such as Streptococcus mutans (SM). We screened 8 probiotics and assessed how SM growth or biofilm formation inhibition affects cariogenicity of probiotic-SM mixed-species biofilms in vitro. Growth inhibition was assessed by cocultivating probiotics and 2 SM strains (ATCC 20532/25175) on agar. Probiotics were either precultured before SM cultivation (exclusion), or SM precultured prior to probiotic cultivation (displacement). Inhibition of SM culture growth was assessed visually. Inhibition of SM biofilm formation on bovine enamel was assessed using a continuous-flow short-term biofilm model, again in exclusion or displacement mode. The cariogenicity of mixed-species biofilms of SM with the most promising growth and biofilm formation inhibiting probiotic strains was assessed using an artificial mouth model, and enamel mineral loss (ΔZ) was measured microradiographically. We found limited differences in SM growth inhibition in exclusion versus displacement mode, and in inhibition of SM 20532 versus 25175. Results were therefore pooled. Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 inhibited significantly more SM culture growth than most other probiotics. L. casei LC-11 inhibited SM biofilm formation similarly to other alternatives but showed the highest retention of probiotics in the biofilms (p < 0.05). Mineral loss from SM monospecies biofilms (ΔZ = 9,772, 25th/75th percentiles: 6,277/13,558 vol% × µm) was significantly lower than from mixed-species SM × LA-5 biofilms (ΔZ = 24,578, 25th/75th percentiles: 19,081/28,768 vol% × µm; p < 0.01) but significantly higher than from SM × LC-11 biofilms (ΔZ = 4,835, 25th/75th percentiles: 263/7,865 vol% × µm; p < 0.05). Probiotics inhibiting SM culture growth do not necessarily reduce the cariogenicity of SM-probiotic biofilms. Nevertheless, SM biofilm formation inhibition may be relevant in the reduction of

  15. Properties of silver and copper nanoparticle-containing aqueous solutions and evaluation of their in vitro activity against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes Aguirre, Melissa Mariluz

    Most microorganisms grow on surfaces as biofilms rather than as individual planktonic cells, and cells within biofilms show high levels of resistance against antimicrobial drugs. Thereby biofilm formation complicates treatment and contributes to high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infections. This study explores the physical, optical, and nano-structural properties of selected nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous solutions (nanoparticulate colloidal water or nanofluids) and examines their in vitro activity against microbial biofilms. Silver and copper nanofluids of various concentrations were prepared and studied. Their surface energies, surface charge and surface plasmonic resonance properties were obtained using contact angle measurement, zeta potential and optical spectrometer, respectively. The temperature dependence of the surface plasmon resonance behavior was also determined for the selected nanoparticulate aqueous solutions. A model of biofilm formation on the wells of microtiter plates was used to determine the in vitro activity of the nanoparticle preparations against both fungal (Candida albicans) and bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus) biofilms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the nanoparticle interactions with microbial cells. Results show that silver nanofluid has higher surface energy than that of the copper, the surface energy increases as the concentration of silver nanoparticles increases; and both nanoparticles in liquid are positively charged. The interaction between silver nanoparticles and water molecules produces notable changes on the usual temperature properties of water. Altogether, effectiveness of silver nanoparticle-containing liquids in controlling biofilm formation is observed and reported. For a given size of silver nanoparticles studied, it is found that the effective concentrations of silver nanoparticles against microbial biofilms are far lower than their cytotoxic concentrations, indicating an

  16. Persea americana Glycolic Extract: In Vitro Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Candida albicans Biofilm and Cytotoxicity Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, D; Oliveira, J R; Oliveira, F E; Higa, K C; Junqueira, J C; Jorge, A O C; Back-Brito, G N; Oliveira, L D

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the antifungal activity of Persea americana extract on Candida albicans biofilm and its cytotoxicity in macrophage culture (RAW 264.7). To determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), microdilution in broth (CLSI M27-S4 protocol) was performed. Thereafter, the concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/mL (n = 10) with 5 min exposure were analyzed on mature biofilm in microplate wells for 48 h. Saline was used as control (n = 10). After treatment, biofilm cells were scraped off and dilutions were plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. After incubation (37°C/48 h), the values of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) were converted to log10 and analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%). The cytotoxicity of the P. americana extract was evaluated on macrophages by MTT assay. The MIC of the extract was 6.25 mg/mL and with 12.5 mg/mL there was elimination of 100% of planktonic cultures. Regarding the biofilms, a significant reduction (P < 0.001) of the biofilm at concentrations of 50 (0.580 ± 0.209 log10), 100 (0.998 ± 0.508 log10), and 200 mg/mL (1.093 ± 0.462 log10) was observed. The concentrations of 200 and 100 mg/mL were cytotoxic for macrophages, while the concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/mL showed viability higher than 55%.

  17. Treatment of plastic and extracellular matrix components with chlorhexidine or benzalkonium chloride: effect on Candida albicans adherence capacity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Christine; Lassy, Edith; Daniault, Gyslaine; Jacquemin, Jean-Louis; Rodier, Marie-Hélène

    2003-02-01

    This study investigates the influence of treatment of plastic and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with chlorhexidine or benzalkonium chloride on subsequent adherence of Candida albicans. Three concentrations were tested for each antiseptic: (i) chlorhexidine, MIC (6.25-12.5 mg/L), 80 x MIC and 800 x MIC; and (ii) benzalkonium chloride, MIC (3.12 mg/L), 40 x MIC and 1600 x MIC. Chlorhexidine and benzalkonium chloride activities were correlated with the tested concentrations. Antiseptics used at MIC were unable to modify the adherence to plastic or ECM proteins. Chlorhexidine (80 x MIC) induced a decrease in plastic adherence of 31% of the 15 strains used and an increase in ECM protein adherence of 13% of strains. Benzalkonium chloride (40 x MIC) induced a decrease in adherence to ECM proteins or plastic of 13-27% of strains. Our results indicated that the treatment with 1600 x MIC benzalkonium chloride could induce the opposite effect on adherence, depending on the surface: 60% of the strains showed an increase in their adherence to ECM proteins, whereas 93% of the strains showed a decrease in their adherence to plastic. A similar phenomenon was observed after treatment with 800 x MIC chlorhexidine: 60% of the strains showed an increase in their adherence to ECM proteins, whereas 67% showed a decrease in adherence to plastic. Treatment of medical devices with at least 5000 mg/L of chlorhexidine or benzalkonium chloride could therefore reduce C. albicans adherence to plastic surfaces, but would be unable to prevent fungal adherence to ECM proteins.

  18. Candida albicans strain-dependent modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine release by in vitro oral and vaginal mucosal models.

    PubMed

    Whiley, Robert A; Cruchley, Alan T; Gore, Carelyn; Hagi-Pavli, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal organism at several sites and is a versatile, opportunistic pathogen. The underlying factors of pathogen and host associated with commensalism and pathogenicity in C. albicans are complex and their importance is largely unknown. We aimed to study the responses of oral epithelial (OEM) and vaginal epithelial models (VEM) to infection by oral and vaginal C. albicans strains to obtain evidence of inter-strain differences in pathogenicity and of site-specificity. Following inoculation of models, proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release were monitored and histological staining undertaken. Striking differences in strain behaviour and epithelial responses were observed. IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-8 release were significantly increased from the OEM in response to denture stomatitis strain NCYC 1467. Increased IL-8 release also followed infection of the OEM with both vaginal strains. Overall the VEM was relatively unresponsive to infection with either oral or vaginal strains under these conditions. Adherence and hyphal development were observed for all strains on both models although extensive, uniform tissue penetration was seen only with stomatitis strain NCYC 1467 on the OEM. Candidal strains were assayed for phospholipase (PL) and secreted aspartyl proteinase (SAP) activities where phospholipase (PL) activity was highest for strain NCYC 1467 although highest SAP activity was observed for vaginal strain NCPF 8112 in this assay. This is the first study to concurrently investigate cytokine production from oral and epithelial models using candidal strains originating from these respective mucosal sites from healthy and disease states. These data demonstrate significant differences in inflammatory responses of host epithelia to individual C. albicans strains.

  19. In vitro antimicrobial activity of auxiliary chemical substances and natural extracts on Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis in root canals

    PubMed Central

    VALERA, Marcia Carneiro; MAEKAWA, Lilian Eiko; de OLIVEIRA, Luciane Dias; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; SHYGEI, Érika; CARVALHO, Cláudio Antonio Talge

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of auxiliary chemical substances and natural extracts on Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals. Material and Methods: Seventy-two human tooth roots were contaminated with C. albicans and E. faecalis for 21 days. The groups were divided according to the auxiliary chemical substance into: G1) 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), G2) 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX), G3) castor oil, G4) glycolic Aloe vera extract, G5) glycolic ginger extract, and G6) sterile saline (control). The samples of the root canal were collected at different intervals: confirmation collection, at 21 days after contamination; 1st collection, after instrumentation; and 2nd collection, seven days after instrumentation. Microbiological samples were grown in culture medium and incubated at 37º C for 48 hours. Results: The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn (5%) statistical tests. NaOCl and CHX completely eliminated the microorganisms of the root canals. Castor oil and ginger significantly reduced the number of CFU of the tested bacteria. Reduction of CFU/mL at the 1st and 2nd collections for groups G1, G2, G3 and G4 was greater in comparison to groups G5 and G6. Conclusion: It was concluded that 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine gel were more effective in eliminating C. albicans and E. faecalis, followed by the castor oil and glycolic ginger extract. The Aloe vera extract showed no antimicrobial activity. PMID:23739849

  20. Persea americana Glycolic Extract: In Vitro Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Candida albicans Biofilm and Cytotoxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, D.; Oliveira, J. R.; Oliveira, F. E.; Higa, K. C.; Junqueira, J. C.; Jorge, A. O. C.; Back-Brito, G. N.; Oliveira, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the antifungal activity of Persea americana extract on Candida albicans biofilm and its cytotoxicity in macrophage culture (RAW 264.7). To determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), microdilution in broth (CLSI M27-S4 protocol) was performed. Thereafter, the concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/mL (n = 10) with 5 min exposure were analyzed on mature biofilm in microplate wells for 48 h. Saline was used as control (n = 10). After treatment, biofilm cells were scraped off and dilutions were plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. After incubation (37°C/48 h), the values of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) were converted to log10 and analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%). The cytotoxicity of the P. americana extract was evaluated on macrophages by MTT assay. The MIC of the extract was 6.25 mg/mL and with 12.5 mg/mL there was elimination of 100% of planktonic cultures. Regarding the biofilms, a significant reduction (P < 0.001) of the biofilm at concentrations of 50 (0.580 ± 0.209 log10), 100 (0.998 ± 0.508 log10), and 200 mg/mL (1.093 ± 0.462 log10) was observed. The concentrations of 200 and 100 mg/mL were cytotoxic for macrophages, while the concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/mL showed viability higher than 55%. PMID:26605376

  1. In vitro antimicrobial activity of auxiliary chemical substances and natural extracts on Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis in root canals.

    PubMed

    Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Maekawa, Lilian Eiko; de Oliveira, Luciane Dias; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Shygei, Érika; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of auxiliary chemical substances and natural extracts on Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis inoculated in root canals. Seventy-two human tooth roots were contaminated with C. albicans and E. faecalis for 21 days. The groups were divided according to the auxiliary chemical substance into: G1) 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), G2) 2% chlorhexidine gel (CHX), G3) castor oil, G4) glycolic Aloe vera extract, G5) glycolic ginger extract, and G6) sterile saline (control). The samples of the root canal were collected at different intervals: confirmation collection, at 21 days after contamination; 1st collection, after instrumentation; and 2nd collection, seven days after instrumentation. Microbiological samples were grown in culture medium and incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. The results were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn (5%) statistical tests. NaOCl and CHX completely eliminated the microorganisms of the root canals. Castor oil and ginger significantly reduced the number of CFU of the tested bacteria. Reduction of CFU/mL at the 1st and 2nd collections for groups G1, G2, G3 and G4 was greater in comparison to groups G5 and G6. It was concluded that 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine gel were more effective in eliminating C. albicans and E. faecalis, followed by the castor oil and glycolic ginger extract. The Aloe vera extract showed no antimicrobial activity.

  2. A cortical astrocyte subpopulation inhibits axon growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Gou, Lin; Xu, Hanpeng

    2015-08-01

    Astrocytes are the most heterogeneous and predominant glial cell type in the central nervous system. However, the functional significance of this heterogeneity remains to be elucidated. Following injury, damaged astrocytes inhibit axonal regeneration in vivo and in vitro. Cultured primary astrocytes are commonly considered good supportive substrates for neuron attachment and axon regeneration. However, it is not known whether different populations of cells in the heterogeneous astrocyte culture affect neuron behavior in the same way. In the present study, the effect of astrocyte heterogeneity on neuronal attachment and neurite outgrowth was examined using an in vitro and in vivo coculture system. In vitro, neonatal cortical astrocytes were co-cultured with purified dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and astrocyte growth morphology, neuron attachment and neurite growth were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the heterogeneous astrocyte cells showed two different types of growth pattern, typical and atypical. Typical astrocytes were supportive to neuron attachment and neurite growth, which was consistent with previous studies, whereas atypical astrocytes inhibited neuron attachment and neurite growth. These inhibitory astrocytes exhibited a special growth pattern with various shapes and sizes, a high cell density, few oligodendrocytes on the top layer and occupied a smaller growth area compared with typical astrocytes. Neurites extended freely on typical supportive astrocyte populations, however, moved away when they reached atypical astrocyte growth pattern. Neurons growing on the atypical astrocyte pattern demonstrated minimal neurite outgrowth and these neurites had a dystrophic appearance, however, neuronal survival was unaffected. Immunocytochemistry studies demonstrated that these atypical inhibitory astrocytes were glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive cells. The existence of inhibitory astrocyte subpopulations in normal astrocytes reflects the

  3. Alpha interferon and not gamma interferon inhibits salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Guo, Tz-Chun; Mutoloki, Stephen; Haugland, Øyvind; Marjara, Inderjit S; Evensen, Øystein

    2010-09-01

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is an emerging virus in salmonid aquaculture, with SAV-3 being the only subtype found in Norway. Until now, there has been little focus on the alpha interferon (IFN-alpha)-induced antiviral responses during virus infection in vivo or in vitro in fish. The possible involvement of IFN-gamma in the response to SAV-3 is also not known. In this study, the two IFNs were cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins (recombinant IFN-alpha [rIFN-alpha] and rIFN-gamma) and used for in vitro studies. SAV-3 infection in a permissive salmon cell line (TO cells) results in IFN-alpha and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) mRNA upregulation. Preinfection treatment (4 to 24 h prior to infection) with salmon rIFN-alpha induces an antiviral state that inhibits the replication of SAV-3 and protects the cells against virus-induced cytopathic effects (CPE). The antiviral state coincides with a strong expression of Mx and ISG15 mRNA and Mx protein expression. When rIFN-alpha is administered at the time of infection and up to 24 h postinfection, virus replication is not inhibited, and cells are not protected against virus-induced CPE. By 40 h postinfection, the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2alpha) is phosphorylated concomitant with the expression of the E2 protein as assessed by Western blotting. Postinfection treatment with rIFN-alpha results in a moderate reduction in E2 expression levels in accordance with a moderate downregulation of cellular protein synthesis, an approximately 65% reduction by 60 h postinfection. rIFN-gamma has only a minor inhibitory effect on SAV-3 replication in vitro. SAV-3 is sensitive to the preinfection antiviral state induced by rIFN-alpha, while postinfection antiviral responses or postinfection treatment with rIFN-alpha is not able to limit viral replication.

  4. Salicylanilide pyrazinoates inhibit in vitro multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, atypical mycobacteria and isocitrate lyase.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Novotná, Eva; Stolaříková, Jiřina

    2014-03-12

    The development of antimicrobial agents represents an up-to-date topic. This study investigated in vitro antimycobacterial activity, mycobacterial isocitrate lyase inhibition and cytotoxicity of salicylanilide pyrazinoates. They may be considered being mutual prodrugs of both antimycobacterial active salicylanilides and pyrazinoic acid (POA), an active metabolite of pyrazinamide, in which these esters are likely hydrolysed without presence of pyrazinamidase/nicotinamidase. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the esters were within the range 0.5-8 μmol/l for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 1-32 μmol/l for nontuberculous mycobacteria (Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium kansasii). All esters showed a weak inhibition (8-17%) of isocitrate lyase at the concentration of 10 μmol/l. The most active pyrazinoates showed MICs for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains in the range of 0.125-2 μmol/l and no cross-resistance with clinically used drugs, thus being the most in vitro efficacious salicylanilide esters with 4-chloro-2-{[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]carbamoyl}phenyl pyrazine-2-carboxylate superiority (MICs⩽0.25 μmol/l). This promising activity is likely due to an additive or synergistic effect of released POA and salicylanilides. Selectivity indexes for the most active salicylanilide pyrazinoates ranged up to 64, making some derivatives being attractive candidates for the next research; 4-bromo-2-{[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]carbamoyl}phenyl pyrazine-2-carboxylate showed the most convenient toxicity profile.

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) treatment in vitro inhibits adipogenesis in human omental but not subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rice, S P L; Zhang, L; Grennan-Jones, F; Agarwal, N; Lewis, M D; Rees, D A; Ludgate, M

    2010-05-14

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a precursor sex steroid, circulates in sulphated form (DHEAS). Serum DHEAS concentrations are inversely correlated with metabolic syndrome components and in vivo/in vitro studies suggest a role in modulating adipose mass. To investigate further, we assessed the in vitro biological effect of DHEA in white (3T3-L1) and brown (PAZ6) preadipocyte cell lines and human primary preadipocytes. DHEA (from 10(-8)M) caused concentration-dependent proliferation inhibition of 3T3-L1 and PAZ6 preadipocytes. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated unaltered apoptosis but indicated blockade at G1/S or G2/M in 3T3-L1 and PAZ6, respectively. Preadipocyte cell-line adipogenesis was not affected. In human primary subcutaneous and omental preadipocytes, DHEA significantly inhibited proliferation from 10(-8)M. DHEA 10(-7)M had opposing effects on adipogenesis in the two fat depots. Subcutaneous preadipocyte differentiation was unaffected or increased whereas omental preadipocytes showed significantly reduced adipogenesis. We conclude that DHEA exerts fat depot-specific differences which modulate body composition by limiting omental fat production.

  6. Aged black garlic extract induces inhibition of gastric cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Jiao, Fei; Wang, Qin-Wen; Wang, Juan; Yang, Ke; Hu, Rong-Rong; Liu, Han-Chen; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wang, Yi-Shan

    2012-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that garlic extracts possess significant anticancer actions. However, no studies have been reported on the effects of aged black garlic extracts (ABGE) on gastric cancer in vitro or in vivo. To examine the potential action of ABGE against gastric cancer, the present study evaluated its effect on the inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells. Additionally, we performed an in vivo study by inoculating the murine foregastric carcinoma cell line in Kunming mice and treating them with various doses of ABGE (0, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) for 2 weeks. Dose-dependent apoptosis was detected in ABGE-treated cells in in vitro studies. In tumor-bearing mice, significant antitumor effects of ABGE were observed, such as growth inhibition of inoculated tumors. Further investigation of serum superoxide dismutases, glutathione peroxidase, interleukin-2 and the increased indices of spleen and thymus indicated that the anticancer action of ABGE may be partly due to its antioxidant and immunomodulative effects.

  7. Terminalia bellirica Extract Inhibits Low-Density Lipoprotein Oxidation and Macrophage Inflammatory Response in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Miori; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Saita, Emi; Suzuki-Sugihara, Norie; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Taguchi, Chie; Iida, Kaoruko; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The deciduous tree Terminalia bellirica found in Southeast Asia is extensively used in traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of hypertension, rheumatism, and diabetes. The anti-atherogenic effect of Terminalia bellirica fruit has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of Terminalia bellirica extract (TBE) on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and inflammation in macrophages. TBE showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (EC50: 7.2 ± 1.2 μg/mL) and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity. TBE also significantly inhibited free radical-induced LDL oxidation compared to the solvent control in vitro. In THP-1 macrophages, TBE treatment resulted in significant decreases of the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1). TBE also reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in THP-1 macrophages. These results show that TBE has the inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation and macrophage inflammatory response in vitro, suggesting that its in vivo use might inhibit atherosclerosis plaque progression. PMID:27314393

  8. In vitro transcription and translation inhibition via DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, J.; de la Fuente, J. M.; Baptista, P. V.

    2010-12-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum as vectors for gene silencing strategies, combining the AuNPs' ease of functionalization with DNA and/or siRNA, high loading capacity and fast uptake by target cells. Here, we used AuNP functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides to specifically inhibit transcription in vitro, demonstrating the synergetic effect between AuNPs and a specific antisense sequence that blocks the T7 promoter region. Also, AuNPs efficiently protect the antisense oligonucleotide against nuclease degradation, which can thus retain its inhibitory potential. In addition, we demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with a thiolated oligonucleotide complementary to the ribosome binding site and the start codon, effectively shut down in vitro translation. Together, these two approaches can provide for a simple yet robust experimental set up to test for efficient gene silencing of AuNP-DNA conjugates. What is more, these results show that appropriate functionalization of AuNPs can be used as a dual targeting approach to an enhanced control of gene expression—inhibition of both transcription and translation.

  9. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Coh, Ye-Rin; Lee, Hee-Woo; Shin, Il-Seob; Kang, Sung-Keun; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2015-01-01

    The effects of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) on the growth of human malignancies, including melanoma, are controversial and the underlying mechanisms are not yet-well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor effects of human AT-MSCs on human melanoma. The inhibitory effect of AT-MSC-conditioned medium (AT-MSC-CM) on the growth of A375SM and A375P (human melanoma) cells was evaluated using a cell viability assay. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in melanoma cells were investigated by flow cytometry and western blot analysis. To evaluate the in vivo anti-tumor effect of AT-MSCs, CM-DiI-labeled AT-MSCs were circumtumorally injected in tumor-bearing athymic mice and tumor size was measured. AT-MSC-CM inhibited melanoma growth by altering cell-cycle distribution and inducing apoptosis in vitro. AT-MSCs suppressed tumor growth in tumor-bearing athymic mice and fluorescence analysis showed that AT-MSCs migrated efficiently to tumor tissues. AT-MSCs inhibit the growth of melanoma suggesting promise as a novel therapeutic agent for melanoma. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of adenovirus multiplication by inosine pranobex and interferon α in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, Witold; Janyst, Michał; Młynarczyk, Grażyna

    2016-01-01

    There are no specific antivirals designed for adenoviral infections. Due to many cases of adenovirus infections worldwide, epidemic nature of some types of adenoviruses, and growing number of patients with severe adenoviral infections resulting from dysfunction the immune system, the need for searching an effective and safe therapy is increasing. Inosine pranobex exerts antiviral effects which are both direct and secondary to immunomodulatory activity. In the present study we evaluated in vitro effect of inosine pranobex and interferon α (IFN-α) on replication of HAdV-2 and HAdV-5. The effectiveness of inosine pranobex under these conditions has not been previously reported. In conducted study we reported that inosine pranobex reduced the titer of infectious HAdV-2 and HAdV-5 in vitro. Higher concentrations of IP strongly inhibited multiplication of viruses. Combination of inosine pranobex and IFN-α display higher efficacy than either treatment alone and suggest that both agents may increase therapeutic effectiveness without augmenting toxic effects. Combination index calculations showed that inosine pranobex and INF-α synergistically inhibit HAdV-2 and HAdV-5 titers in A549 cells. PMID:26862302

  11. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-04-22

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin's effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity.

  12. Sinusoidal electromagnetic fields promote bone formation and inhibit bone resorption in rat femoral tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Gao, Yu-Hai; Yan, Juan-Li; Shi, Wen-Gui; Xian, Cory J; Chen, Ke-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Effects of sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (SEMFs) on bone metabolism have not yet been well defined. The present study investigated SEMF effects on bone formation and resorption in rat femur bone tissues in vitro. Cultured femur diaphyseal (cortical bone) and metaphyseal (trabecular bone) tissues were treated with 50 Hz 1.8 mT SEMFs 1.5 h per day for up to 12 days and treatment effects on bone formation and resorption markers and associated gene expression were examined. Treatment with SEMFs caused a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and inhibited the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) activity in the femoral diaphyseal or metaphyseal tissues. SEMFs also significantly increased levels of mRNA expression of osterix (OSX), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and ALP in the bone tissues. SEMF treatment decreased glucose content and increased lactic acid contents in the culture conditioned medium. In addition, treatment with SEMFs decreased mRNA expression levels of bone resorption-related genes TRACP, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and cathepsin K (CTSK) in the cultured bone tissues. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that treatment with 1.8 mT SEMFs at 1.5 h per day promoted bone formation, increased metabolism and inhibited resorption in both metaphyseal and diaphyseal bone tissues in vitro.

  13. Inhibition of the adenine nucleotide translocator by N-acetyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Timothy M. Oliveira, Paulo J.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-03-01

    N-alkyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides have been widely used as surfactants on fabrics and papers, fire retardants, and anti-corrosion agents, among many other commercial applications. The global distribution and environmental persistence of these compounds has generated considerable interest regarding potential toxic effects. We have previously reported that perfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate (FOSAA) and N-ethylperfluorooctanesulfonamidoacetate (N-EtFOSAA) induce the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in vitro. In this study we tested the hypothesis that FOSAA and N-EtFOSAA interact with the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) resulting in a functional inhibition of the translocator and induction of the MPT. Respiration and membrane potential of freshly isolated liver mitochondria from Sprague-Dawley rats were measured using an oxygen electrode and a tetraphenylphosphonium-selective (TPP{sup +}) electrode, respectively. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically. The ANT ligands bongkregkic acid (BKA) and carboxyatractyloside (cATR) inhibited uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration caused by 10 {mu}M N-EtFOSAA, 40 {mu}M FOSAA, and the positive control 8 {mu}M oleic acid. ADP-stimulated respiration and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential were inhibited by cATR, FOSAA, N-EtFOSAA, and oleic acid, but not by FCCP. BKA inhibited calcium-dependent mitochondrial swelling induced by FOSAA, N-EtFOSAA, and oleic acid. Seventy-five micromolar ADP also inhibited swelling induced by the test compounds, but cATR induced swelling was not inhibited by ADP. Results of this investigation indicate that N-acetyl perfluorooctane sulfonamides interact directly with the ANT to inhibit ADP translocation and induce the MPT, one or both of which may account for the metabolic dysfunction observed in vivo.

  14. Production of mouse monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; Petri, W A; Murphy, C F; Smith, R D

    1986-01-01

    Adherence by axenic Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to mammalian cells is mediated by an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-inhibitable adhesin on the surface of the parasite. We isolated 35 hybridoma cell lines producing antibodies to E. histolytica as indicated by ELISA with sonicated amebic protein or by immunofluorescence assay with fixed whole trophozoites. Tissue culture supernatants were further screened for subcloning by the ability to bind to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells which were first exposed to a partially purified soluble preparation of the amebic GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. Eight tissue culture supernatants were positive in this assay. Antibodies from four subcloned cell lines (D3-14, H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence to CHO cells (P less than 0.01). Of the original 35 tissue culture supernatants, 3 also inhibited amebic adherence (P less than 0.01; F1, F14, and J10); monoclonal antibodies in these supernatants did not bind to lectin-exposed CHO cells. Three purified monoclonal antibodies (H8-5, I12-2, and I1-21) inhibited amebic adherence at greater than or equal to 2 micrograms/10(4) amebae (P less than 0.05). None of these inhibitory monoclonal antibodies immunoprecipitated with a soluble amebic protein preparation following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. Monoclonal antibodies which inhibit in vitro adherence by E. histolytica will be useful in purification of the GalNAc-inhibitable lectin. PMID:2873102

  15. The nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors didanosine, lamivudine, stavudine and zidovudine show little effect on the virulence of Candida albicans in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahmadou Ahidjo, Bintou; Veale, Rob; Dusé, Adriano G; Becker, Piet; Marais, Else

    2008-08-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are used in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Since the analogue 5-fluorouracil increases Candida albicans virulence in vitro, and zidovudine therapy is associated with enhanced C. albicans adherence and biofilm formation, we investigated the effects of commonly used NRTIs on the virulence of C. albicans isolated from 21 antiretroviral-naïve HIV/AIDS patients. The isolates were exposed to didanosine, lamivudine, stavudine and zidovudine at their expected patient serum peak levels and at one-half and two times these levels for 24h and 72 h. Assays assessing changes in adherence, proliferation, biofilm formation and antifungal susceptibility were performed. No differences in these virulence characteristics of isolates exposed to NRTIs were noted in most cases. However, at 24h and 72 h a significant increase in the rate of proliferation was observed in response to two-fold the peak concentration of lamivudine. The results suggest a limited effect of NRTIs on C. albicans virulence.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide inhibits Candida albicans hyphae formation and alters gene expression during biofilm development.