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Sample records for inhibits kcc2 transporter

  1. Neuronal K+/Cl- co-transporter (KCC2) transgenes lacking neurone restrictive silencer element recapitulate CNS neurone-specific expression and developmental up-regulation of endogenous KCC2 gene.

    PubMed

    Uvarov, Pavel; Pruunsild, Priit; Timmusk, Tõnis; Airaksinen, Matti S

    2005-11-01

    The K+/Cl- co-transporter KCC2 maintains the low intracellular chloride concentration required for fast synaptic inhibition and is exclusively expressed in neurones of the CNS. Here, we show that the KCC2 gene (alias SLC12a5) has multiple transcription start sites and characterize the activity of 6.8 kb of mouse KCC2 gene regulatory sequence (spanning 1.4 kb upstream from exon 1 to exon 2) using luciferase reporters. Overexpression of neurone-restrictive silencer factor repressed the reporter activity in vitro, apparently via a neurone restrictive silencer element (NRSE(KCC2)) within intron 1 of the mouse KCC2 gene. In transgenic mice, however, KCC2 reporters with or without deletion of the NRSE(KCC2) were expressed exclusively in neurones and predominantly in the CNS with a similar pattern and developmental up-regulation as endogenous KCC2. Moreover, a third transgene with just a 1.4-kb KCC2 promoter region lacking the NRSE(KCC2)-bearing intron 1 was still expressed predominantly in neural tissues. Thus, developmental up-regulation of the KCC2 gene does not require NRSE(KCC2) and the 1.4-kb KCC2 promoter is largely sufficient for neurone-specific expression of KCC2.

  2. Compromising KCC2 transporter activity enhances the development of continuous seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Matthew R.; Deeb, Tarek Z.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Dunlop, John; Davies, Paul A.; Moss, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired neuronal inhibition has long been associated with the increased probability of seizure occurrence and heightened seizure severity. Fast synaptic inhibition in the brain is primarily mediated by the type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs), ligand-gated ion channels that can mediate Cl− influx resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and the restriction of neuronal firing. In most adult brain neurons, the K+/Cl− co-transporter-2 (KCC2) establishes hyperpolarizing GABAergic inhibition by maintaining low [Cl−]i. In this study, we sought to understand how decreased KCC2 transport function affects seizure event severity. We impaired KCC2 transport in the 0-Mg2+ ACSF and 4-aminopyridine in vitro models of epileptiform activity in acute mouse brain slices. Experiments with the selective KCC2 inhibitor VU0463271 demonstrated that reduced KCC2 transport increased the duration of SLEs, resulting in non-terminating discharges of clonic-like activity. We also investigated slices obtained from the KCC2-Ser940Ala (S940A) point-mutant mouse, which has a mutation at a known functional phosphorylation site causing behavioral and cellular deficits under hyperexcitable conditions. We recorded from the entorhinal cortex of S940A mouse brain slices in both 0-Mg2+ ACSF and 4-aminopyridine, and demonstrated that loss of the S940 residue increased the susceptibility of continuous clonic-like discharges, an in vitro form of status epilepticus. Our experiments revealed KCC2 transport activity is a critical factor in seizure event duration and mechanisms of termination. Our results highlight the need for therapeutic strategies that potentiate KCC2 transport function in order to decrease seizure event severity and prevent the development of status epilepticus. PMID:27108931

  3. APP modulates KCC2 expression and function in hippocampal GABAergic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Jinzhao; Jiang, Jinxiang; Zheng, Xingzhi; Justice, Nicholas J; Wang, Kun; Ran, Xiangqian; Li, Yi; Huo, Qingwei; Zhang, Jiajia; Li, Hongmei; Lu, Nannan; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Hui; Long, Cheng; Yang, Li

    2017-01-05

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is enriched at the synapse, but its synaptic function is still poorly understood. We previously showed that GABAergic short-term plasticity is impaired in App knock-out (App(-/-)) animals, but the precise mechanism by which APP regulates GABAergic synaptic transmission has remained elusive. Using electrophysiological, biochemical, moleculobiological, and pharmacological analysis, here we show that APP can physically interact with KCC2, a neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter that is essential for Cl(-) homeostasis and fast GABAergic inhibition. APP deficiency results in significant reductions in both total and membrane KCC2 levels, leading to a depolarizing shift in the GABA reversal potential (EGABA). Simultaneous measurement of presynaptic action potentials and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in hippocampal neurons reveals impaired unitary IPSC amplitudes attributable to a reduction in α1 subunit levels of GABAAR. Importantly, restoration of normal KCC2 expression and function in App(-/-) mice rescues EGABA, GABAAR α1 levels and GABAAR mediated phasic inhibition. We show that APP functions to limit tyrosine-phosphorylation and ubiquitination and thus subsequent degradation of KCC2, providing a mechanism by which APP influences KCC2 abundance. Together, these experiments elucidate a novel molecular pathway in which APP regulates, via protein-protein interaction with KCC2, GABAAR mediated inhibition in the hippocampus.

  4. APP modulates KCC2 expression and function in hippocampal GABAergic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Jinzhao; Jiang, Jinxiang; Zheng, Xingzhi; Justice, Nicholas J; Wang, Kun; Ran, Xiangqian; Li, Yi; Huo, Qingwei; Zhang, Jiajia; Li, Hongmei; Lu, Nannan; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Hui; Long, Cheng; Yang, Li

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is enriched at the synapse, but its synaptic function is still poorly understood. We previously showed that GABAergic short-term plasticity is impaired in App knock-out (App-/-) animals, but the precise mechanism by which APP regulates GABAergic synaptic transmission has remained elusive. Using electrophysiological, biochemical, moleculobiological, and pharmacological analysis, here we show that APP can physically interact with KCC2, a neuron-specific K+-Cl- cotransporter that is essential for Cl- homeostasis and fast GABAergic inhibition. APP deficiency results in significant reductions in both total and membrane KCC2 levels, leading to a depolarizing shift in the GABA reversal potential (EGABA). Simultaneous measurement of presynaptic action potentials and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in hippocampal neurons reveals impaired unitary IPSC amplitudes attributable to a reduction in α1 subunit levels of GABAAR. Importantly, restoration of normal KCC2 expression and function in App-/- mice rescues EGABA, GABAAR α1 levels and GABAAR mediated phasic inhibition. We show that APP functions to limit tyrosine-phosphorylation and ubiquitination and thus subsequent degradation of KCC2, providing a mechanism by which APP influences KCC2 abundance. Together, these experiments elucidate a novel molecular pathway in which APP regulates, via protein-protein interaction with KCC2, GABAAR mediated inhibition in the hippocampus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20142.001 PMID:28054918

  5. Selective Inhibition of KCC2 Leads to Hyperexcitability and Epileptiform Discharges in Hippocampal Slices and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Cardarelli, Ross A.; Maguire, Jamie; Kelley, Matt R.; Silayeva, Liliya; Morrow, Danielle H.; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Moore, Yvonne E.; Mather, Robert J.; Duggan, Mark E.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Dunlop, John; Zicha, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors form Cl− permeable channels that mediate the majority of fast synaptic inhibition in the brain. The K+/Cl− cotransporter KCC2 is the main mechanism by which neurons establish low intracellular Cl− levels, which is thought to enable GABAergic inhibitory control of neuronal activity. However, the widely used KCC2 inhibitor furosemide is nonselective with antiseizure efficacy in slices and in vivo, leading to a conflicting scheme of how KCC2 influences GABAergic control of neuronal synchronization. Here we used the selective KCC2 inhibitor VU0463271 [N-cyclopropyl-N-(4-methyl-2-thiazolyl)-2-[(6-phenyl-3-pyridazinyl)thio]acetamide] to investigate the influence of KCC2 function. Application of VU0463271 caused a reversible depolarizing shift in EGABA values and increased spiking of cultured hippocampal neurons. Application of VU0463271 to mouse hippocampal slices under low-Mg2+ conditions induced unremitting recurrent epileptiform discharges. Finally, microinfusion of VU0463271 alone directly into the mouse dorsal hippocampus rapidly caused epileptiform discharges. Our findings indicated that KCC2 function was a critical inhibitory factor ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:26019342

  6. Nitric oxide signaling modulates synaptic inhibition in the superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN) via cGMP-dependent suppression of KCC2

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Lina; Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; Asraf, Hila; Grothe, Benedikt; Hershfinkel, Michal; Forsythe, Ian D.; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Glycinergic inhibition plays a central role in the auditory brainstem circuitries involved in sound localization and in the encoding of temporal action potential firing patterns. Modulation of this inhibition has the potential to fine-tune information processing in these networks. Here we show that nitric oxide (NO) signaling in the auditory brainstem (where activity-dependent generation of NO is documented) modulates the strength of inhibition by changing the chloride equilibrium potential. Recent evidence demonstrates that large inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in neurons of the superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN) are enhanced by a very low intracellular chloride concentration, generated by the neuronal potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2) expressed in the postsynaptic neurons. Our data show that modulation by NO caused a 15 mV depolarizing shift of the IPSC reversal potential, reducing the strength of inhibition in SPN neurons, without changing the threshold for action potential firing. Regulating inhibitory strength, through cGMP-dependent changes in the efficacy of KCC2 in the target neuron provides a postsynaptic mechanism for rapidly controlling the inhibitory drive, without altering the timing or pattern of the afferent spike train. Therefore, this NO-mediated suppression of KCC2 can modulate inhibition in one target nucleus (SPN), without influencing inhibitory strength of other target nuclei (MSO, LSO) even though they are each receiving collaterals from the same afferent nucleus (a projection from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, MNTB). PMID:24987336

  7. The membrane trafficking and functionality of the K+-Cl− co-transporter KCC2 is regulated by TGF-β2

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Jan Manuel; Chudotvorova, Ilona; Khakipoor, Shokoufeh; Rivera, Claudio; Krieglstein, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Functional activation of the neuronal K+-Cl− co-transporter KCC2 (also known as SLC12A5) is a prerequisite for shifting GABAA responses from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing during development. Here, we introduce transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) as a new regulator of KCC2 membrane trafficking and functional activation. TGF-β2 controls membrane trafficking, surface expression and activity of KCC2 in developing and mature mouse primary hippocampal neurons, as determined by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, biotinylation of surface proteins and KCC2-mediated Cl− extrusion. We also identify the signaling pathway from TGF-β2 to cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) and Ras-associated binding protein 11b (Rab11b) as the underlying mechanism for TGF-β2-mediated KCC2 trafficking and functional activation. TGF-β2 increases colocalization and interaction of KCC2 with Rab11b, as determined by 3D stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively, induces CREB phosphorylation, and enhances Rab11b gene expression. Loss of function of either CREB1 or Rab11b suppressed TGF-β2-dependent KCC2 trafficking, surface expression and functionality. Thus, TGF-β2 is a new regulatory factor for KCC2 functional activation and membrane trafficking, and a putative indispensable molecular determinant for the developmental shift of GABAergic transmission. PMID:27505893

  8. Regulatory domain or CpG site variation in SLC12A5, encoding the chloride transporter KCC2, in human autism and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Merner, Nancy D.; Chandler, Madison R.; Bourassa, Cynthia; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun R.; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A.; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Many encoded gene products responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) like autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ), intellectual disability (ID), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) converge on networks controlling synaptic function. An increase in KCC2 (SLC12A5) Cl− transporter activity drives the developmental GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence, but the role of KCC2 in human NDs is essentially unknown. Here, we report two rare, non-synonymous (NS), functionally-impairing variants in the KCC2 C-terminal regulatory domain (CTRD) in human ASD (R952H and R1049C) and SCZ (R952H) previously linked with IGE and familial febrile seizures, and another novel NS KCC2 variant in ASD (R1048W) with highly-predicted pathogenicity. Exome data from 2517 simplex families in the ASD Simon Simplex Collection (SSC) revealed significantly more KCC2 CTRD variants in ASD cases than controls, and interestingly, these were more often synonymous and predicted to disrupt or introduce a CpG site. Furthermore, full gene analysis showed ASD cases are more likely to contain rare KCC2 variants affecting CpG sites than controls. These data suggest genetically-encoded dysregulation of KCC2-dependent GABA signaling may contribute to multiple human NDs. PMID:26528127

  9. Differential distribution of the KCl cotransporter KCC2 in thalamic relay and reticular nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Barthó, P.; Payne, J. A.; Freund, T. F.; Acsády, L.

    2009-01-01

    In the thalamus of the rat the reversal potential of GABA-induced anion currents is more negative in relay cells than in neurones of the reticular nucleus (nRt) due to different chloride extrusion mechanisms operating in these cells. The distribution of KCl cotransporter type 2 (KCC2), the major neuronal chloride transporter that may underlie this effect, is unknown in the thalamus. In this study the precise regional and ultrastructural localization of KCC2 was examined in the thalamus using immunocytochemical methods. The neuropil of all relay nuclei was found to display intense KCC2 immunostaining to varying degrees. In sharp contrast, the majority of the nRt was negative for KCC2. In the anterior and dorsal part of the nRt, however, KCC2 immunostaining was similar to relay nuclei and parvalbumin and calretinin were found to colocalize with KCC2. At the ultrastructural level, KCC2 immunoreactivity was mainly located in the extrasynaptic membranes of thick and thin dendrites and the somata of relay cells but was also found in close association with asymmetrical synapses formed by cortical afferents. Quantitative evaluation of KCC2 distribution at the electron microscopic level demonstrated that the density of KCC2 did not correlate with dendritic diameter or synaptic coverage but is 1.7 times higher on perisynaptic membrane surfaces than on extrasynaptic membranes. Our data demonstrate that the regional distribution of KCC2 is compatible with the difference in GABA-A reversal potential between relay and reticular nuclei. At the ultrastructural level, abundant extrasynaptic KCC2 expression will probably play a role in the regulation of extrasynaptic GABA-A receptor-mediated inhibition. PMID:15305865

  10. Decreased Immunoreactivities of the Chloride Transporters, KCC2 and NKCC1, in the Lateral Superior Olive Neurons of Kanamycin-treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Myung-Whan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives From our previous study about the weak expressions of potassium-chloride (KCC2) and sodium-potassium-2 chloride (NKCC1) co-transporters in the lateral superior olive (LSO) in circling mice, we hypothesized that partially damaged cochlea of circling mice might be a cause of the weak expressions of KCC2 or NKCC1. To test this possibility, we reproduced the altered expressions of KCC2 and NKCC1 in the LSO of rats, whose cochleae were partially destroyed with kanamycin. Methods Rat pups were treated with kanamycin from postnatal (P)3 to P8 (700 mg/kg, subcutaneous injection, twice a day) and sacrificed for immunohistochemical analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and auditory brain stem response. Results The SEM study revealed partially missing hair cells in P9 rats treated with kanamycin, and the hearing threshold was elevated to 63.8±2.5 dB SPL (4 ears) at P16. Both KCC2 and NKCC1 immunoreactivities were more prominent in control rats on P16. On 9 paired slices, the mean densities of NKCC1 immunoreactivities were 118.0±1.0 (control) and 112.2±1.2 (kanamycin treated), whereas those of KCC2 were 115.7±1.5 (control) and 112.0±0.8 (kanamycin treated). Conclusion We concluded that weak expressions of KCC2 and NKCC1 in circling mice were due to partial destruction of cochleae. PMID:22977707

  11. Postnatal development of Na+-K+-2Cl− co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) and K+-Cl−co-transporter 2 (KCC2) immunoreactivity in multiple brain stem respiratory nuclei of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiuli; Wong-Riley, Margaret T.T.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that in rats, GABAA and glycine receptor immunoreactivity increased markedly in multiple brain stem respiratory nuclei around postnatal days (P) 12–13, a critical period when abrupt neurochemical, metabolic, ventilatory, and electrophysiological changes occur in the respiratory network and when the system is under greater inhibition than excitation. Since Na+-K+-2Cl− co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) and K+-Cl− co-transporter 2 (KCC2) play pivotal roles in determining the responses of GABAA and glycine receptors, we hypothesized that NKCC1 and KCC2 undergo significant changes during the critical period. An in-depth immunohistochemical and single neuron optical densitometric study of neurons in seven respiratory-related nuclei (the pre-Bötzinger complex [PBC], nucleus ambiguus [Amb], hypoglossal nucleus [XII], ventrolateral subnucleus of solitary tract nucleus [NTSVL], retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group [RTN/pFRG], dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve [DMNX], and inferior olivary nucleus [IO]) and a non-respiratory cuneate nucleus (CN, an internal control) was undertaken in P0–21 rats. Our data revealed that: (1) NKCC1 immunoreactivity exhibited a developmental decrease from P0 to P21 in all eight nuclei examined, being relatively high during the first 1½ postnatal weeks and decreased thereafter. The decrease was abrupt and statistically significant at P12 in the PBC, Amb, and XII; (2) KCC2 immunoreactivity in these eight nuclei showed a developmental increase from P0 to P21; and (3) the significant reduction in NKCC1 and the greater dominance of KCC2 around P12 in multiple respiratory nuclei of the brain stem may form the basis of an enhanced inhibition in the respiratory network during the critical period before the system stabilizes to a more mature state. PMID:22441038

  12. Disruption of Kcc2-dependent inhibition of olfactory bulb output neurons suggests its importance in odour discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Gödde, Kathrin; Gschwend, Olivier; Puchkov, Dmytro; Pfeffer, Carsten K.; Carleton, Alan; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition in the olfactory bulb (OB), the first relay station of olfactory information, is believed to be important for odour discrimination. We interfered with GABAergic inhibition of mitral and tufted cells (M/T cells), the principal neurons of the OB, by disrupting their potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (Kcc2). Roughly, 70% of mice died around 3 weeks, but surviving mice appeared normal. In these mice, the resulting increase in the intracellular Cl− concentration nearly abolished GABA-induced hyperpolarization of mitral cells (MCs) and unexpectedly increased the number of perisomatic synapses on MCs. In vivo analysis of odorant-induced OB electrical activity revealed increased M/T cell firing rate, altered phasing of action potentials in the breath cycle and disrupted separation of odour-induced M/T cell activity patterns. Mice also demonstrated a severely impaired ability to discriminate chemically similar odorants or odorant mixtures. Our work suggests that precisely tuned GABAergic inhibition onto M/T cells is crucial for M/T cell spike pattern separation needed to distinguish closely similar odours. PMID:27389623

  13. Kinase-KCC2 coupling: Cl− rheostasis, disease susceptibility, therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of Cl− ([Cl−]i) in neurons is a highly regulated variable that is established and modulated by the finely tuned activity of the KCC2 cotransporter. Despite the importance of KCC2 for neurophysiology and its role in multiple neuropsychiatric diseases, our knowledge of the transporter's regulatory mechanisms is incomplete. Recent studies suggest that the phosphorylation state of KCC2 at specific residues in its cytoplasmic COOH terminus, such as Ser940 and Thr906/Thr1007, encodes discrete levels of transporter activity that elicit graded changes in neuronal Cl− extrusion to modulate the strength of synaptic inhibition via Cl−-permeable GABAA receptors. In this review, we propose that the functional and physical coupling of KCC2 to Cl−-sensitive kinase(s), such as the WNK1-SPAK kinase complex, constitutes a molecular “rheostat” that regulates [Cl−]i and thereby influences the functional plasticity of GABA. The rapid reversibility of (de)phosphorylation facilitates regulatory precision, and multisite phosphorylation allows for the control of KCC2 activity by different inputs via distinct or partially overlapping upstream signaling cascades that may become more or less important depending on the physiological context. While this adaptation mechanism is highly suited to maintaining homeostasis, its adjustable set points may render it vulnerable to perturbation and dysregulation. Finally, we suggest that pharmacological modulation of this kinase-KCC2 rheostat might be a particularly efficacious strategy to enhance Cl− extrusion and therapeutically restore GABA inhibition. PMID:26510764

  14. Current view on the functional regulation of the neuronal K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Igor; Friedel, Perrine; Rivera, Claudio; Kahle, Kristopher T.; Kourdougli, Nazim; Uvarov, Pavel; Pellegrino, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the inhibitory strength of chloride (Cl−)-permeable GABAA and glycine receptors (GABAAR and GlyR) depends on the intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i). Lowering [Cl−]i enhances inhibition, whereas raising [Cl−]i facilitates neuronal activity. A neuron's basal level of [Cl−]i, as well as its Cl− extrusion capacity, is critically dependent on the activity of the electroneutral K+-Cl− cotransporter KCC2, a member of the SLC12 cation-Cl− cotransporter (CCC) family. KCC2 deficiency compromises neuronal migration, formation and the maturation of GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic connections, and results in network hyperexcitability and seizure activity. Several neurological disorders including multiple epilepsy subtypes, neuropathic pain, and schizophrenia, as well as various insults such as trauma and ischemia, are associated with significant decreases in the Cl− extrusion capacity of KCC2 that result in increases of [Cl−]i and the subsequent hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. Accordingly, identifying the key upstream molecular mediators governing the functional regulation of KCC2, and modifying these signaling pathways with small molecules, might constitute a novel neurotherapeutic strategy for multiple diseases. Here, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms regulating KCC2 activity, and of the role these mechanisms play in neuronal Cl− homeostasis and GABAergic neurotransmission. As KCC2 mediates electroneutral transport, the experimental recording of its activity constitutes an important research challenge; we therefore also, provide an overview of the different methodological approaches utilized to monitor function of KCC2 in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24567703

  15. Decreased Immunoreactivities and Functions of the Chloride Transporters, KCC2 and NKCC1, in the Lateral Superior Olive Neurons of Circling Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Jonu; Maskey, Dhiraj; Park, Ki Sup; Kim, Myeung Ju

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We tested the possibility of differential expression and function of the potassium-chloride (KCC2) and sodium-potassium-2 chloride (NKCC1) co-transporters in the lateral superior olive (LSO) of heterozygous (+/cir) or homozygous (cir/cir) mice. Methods Mice pups aged from postnatal (P) day 9 to 16 were used. Tails from mice were cut for DNA typing. For Immunohistochemical analysis, rabbit polyclonal anti-KCC2 or rabbit polyclonal anti-NKCC1 was used and the density of immunolabelings was evaluated using the NIH image program. For functional analysis, whole cell voltage clamp technique was used in brain stem slices and the changes of reversal potentials were evaluated at various membrane potentials. Results Immunohistochemical analysis revealed both KCC2 and NKCC1 immunoreactivities were more prominent in heterozygous (+/cir) than homozygous (cir/cir) mice on P day 16. In P9-P12 heterozygous (+/cir) mice, the reversal potential (Egly) of glycine-induced currents was shifted to a more negative potential by 50 µM bumetanide, a known NKCC1 blocker, and the negatively shifted Egly was restored by additional application of 1 mM furosemide, a KCC2 blocker (-58.9±2.6 mV to -66.0±1.5 mV [bumetanide], -66.0±1.5 mV to -59.8±2.8 mV [furosemide+bumetanide], n=11). However, only bumetanide was weakly, but significantly effective (-60.1±2.9 mV to -62.7±2.6 mV [bumetanide], -62.7±2.6 mV to -62.1±2.5 mV [furosemide+bumetanide], n=7) in P9-P12 homozygous (cir/cir) mice. Conclusion The less prominent immunoreactivities and weak or absent responses to bumetanide or furosemide suggest impaired function or delayed development of both transporters in homozygous (cir/cir) mice. PMID:21461058

  16. High Salt Intake Increases Blood Pressure via BDNF-Mediated Downregulation of KCC2 and Impaired Baroreflex Inhibition of Vasopressin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Katrina Y.; Han, Su Y.; Gaub, Perrine; Shell, Brent; Voisin, Daniel L.; Knapp, Blayne A.; Barker, Philip A.; Brown, Colin H.; Cunningham, J. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms by which dietary salt promotes hypertension are unknown. Previous work established that plasma [Na+] and osmolality rise in proportion with salt intake and thus promote release of vasopressin (VP) from the neurohypophysis. Although high levels of circulating VP can increase blood pressure, this effect is normally prevented by a potent GABAergic inhibition of VP neurons by aortic baroreceptors. Here we show that chronic high salt intake impairs baroreceptor inhibition of rat VP neurons through a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent activation of TrkB receptors and downregulation of KCC2 expression, which prevents inhibitory GABAergic signaling. We show that high salt intake increases the spontaneous firing rate of VP neurons in vivo and that circulating VP contributes significantly to the elevation of arterial pressure under these conditions. These results provide the first demonstration that dietary salt can affect blood pressure through neurotrophin-induced plasticity in a central homeostatic circuit. PMID:25619659

  17. Enhanced Synaptic Activity and Epileptiform Events in the Embryonic KCC2 Deficient Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Khalilov, Ilgam; Chazal, Geneviève; Chudotvorova, Ilona; Pellegrino, Christophe; Corby, Séverine; Ferrand, Nadine; Gubkina, Olena; Nardou, Romain; Tyzio, Roman; Yamamoto, Sumii; Jentsch, Thomas J; Hübner, Christian A; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Medina, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The neuronal potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 [indicated thereafter as KCC2 (for protein) and Kcc2 (for gene)] is thought to play an important role in the post natal excitatory to inhibitory switch of GABA actions in the rodent hippocampus. Here, by studying hippocampi of wild-type (Kcc2(+/+)) and Kcc2 deficient (Kcc2(-/-)) mouse embryos, we unexpectedly found increased spontaneous neuronal network activity at E18.5, a developmental stage when KCC2 is thought not to be functional in the hippocampus. Embryonic Kcc2(-/-) hippocampi have also an augmented synapse density and a higher frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic and GABA-ergic postsynaptic currents than naïve age matched neurons. However, intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl(-)](i)) and the reversal potential of GABA-mediated currents (E(GABA)) were similar in embryonic Kcc2(+/+) and Kcc2(-/-) CA3 neurons. In addition, KCC2 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic in the majority of neurons suggesting that the molecule is not functional as a plasma membrane chloride co-transporter. Collectively, our results show that already at an embryonic stage, KCC2 controls the formation of synapses and, when deleted, the hippocampus has a higher density of GABA-ergic and glutamatergic synapses and generates spontaneous and evoked epileptiform activities. These results may be explained either by a small population of orchestrating neurons in which KCC2 operates early as a chloride exporter or by transporter independent actions of KCC2 that are instrumental in synapse formation and networks construction.

  18. Enhanced Synaptic Activity and Epileptiform Events in the Embryonic KCC2 Deficient Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Khalilov, Ilgam; Chazal, Geneviève; Chudotvorova, Ilona; Pellegrino, Christophe; Corby, Séverine; Ferrand, Nadine; Gubkina, Olena; Nardou, Romain; Tyzio, Roman; Yamamoto, Sumii; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Hübner, Christian A.; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Medina, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The neuronal potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 [indicated thereafter as KCC2 (for protein) and Kcc2 (for gene)] is thought to play an important role in the post natal excitatory to inhibitory switch of GABA actions in the rodent hippocampus. Here, by studying hippocampi of wild-type (Kcc2+/+) and Kcc2 deficient (Kcc2−/−) mouse embryos, we unexpectedly found increased spontaneous neuronal network activity at E18.5, a developmental stage when KCC2 is thought not to be functional in the hippocampus. Embryonic Kcc2−/− hippocampi have also an augmented synapse density and a higher frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic and GABA-ergic postsynaptic currents than naïve age matched neurons. However, intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl−]i) and the reversal potential of GABA-mediated currents (EGABA) were similar in embryonic Kcc2+/+ and Kcc2−/− CA3 neurons. In addition, KCC2 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic in the majority of neurons suggesting that the molecule is not functional as a plasma membrane chloride co-transporter. Collectively, our results show that already at an embryonic stage, KCC2 controls the formation of synapses and, when deleted, the hippocampus has a higher density of GABA-ergic and glutamatergic synapses and generates spontaneous and evoked epileptiform activities. These results may be explained either by a small population of orchestrating neurons in which KCC2 operates early as a chloride exporter or by transporter independent actions of KCC2 that are instrumental in synapse formation and networks construction. PMID:22065950

  19. KCC2 Gates Activity-Driven AMPA Receptor Traffic through Cofilin Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chevy, Quentin; Heubl, Martin; Goutierre, Marie; Backer, Stéphanie; Moutkine, Imane; Eugène, Emmanuel; Bloch-Gallego, Evelyne; Lévi, Sabine; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2015-12-02

    Expression of the neuronal K/Cl transporter KCC2 is tightly regulated throughout development and by both normal and pathological neuronal activity. Changes in KCC2 expression have often been associated with altered chloride homeostasis and GABA signaling. However, recent evidence supports a role of KCC2 in the development and function of glutamatergic synapses through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here we show that suppressing KCC2 expression in rat hippocampal neurons precludes long-term potentiation of glutamatergic synapses specifically by preventing activity-driven membrane delivery of AMPA receptors. This effect is independent of KCC2 transporter function and can be accounted for by increased Rac1/PAK- and LIMK-dependent cofilin phosphorylation and actin polymerization in dendritic spines. Our results demonstrate that KCC2 plays a critical role in the regulation of spine actin cytoskeleton and gates long-term plasticity at excitatory synapses in cortical neurons.

  20. BDNF regulates spontaneous correlated activity at early developmental stages by increasing synaptogenesis and expression of the K+/Cl- co-transporter KCC2.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Fernando; Carmona, Maria A; Pozas, Esther; Aguiló, Agustín; Martínez-Guijarro, Francisco J; Alcantara, Soledad; Borrell, Victor; Yuste, Rafael; Ibañez, Carlos F; Soriano, Eduardo

    2003-04-01

    Spontaneous neural activity is a basic property of the developing brain, which regulates key developmental processes, including migration, neural differentiation and formation and refinement of connections. The mechanisms regulating spontaneous activity are not known. By using transgenic embryos that overexpress BDNF under the control of the nestin promoter, we show here that BDNF controls the emergence and robustness of spontaneous activity in embryonic hippocampal slices. Further, BDNF dramatically increases spontaneous co-active network activity, which is believed to synchronize gene expression and synaptogenesis in vast numbers of neurons. In fact, BDNF raises the spontaneous activity of E18 hippocampal neurons to levels that are typical of postnatal slices. We also show that BDNF overexpression increases the number of synapses at much earlier stages (E18) than those reported previously. Most of these synapses were GABAergic, and GABAergic interneurons showed hypertrophy and a 3-fold increase in GAD expression. Interestingly, whereas BDNF does not alter the expression of GABA and glutamate ionotropic receptors, it does raise the expression of the recently cloned K(+)/Cl(-) KCC2 co-transporter, which is responsible for the conversion of GABA responses from depolarizing to inhibitory, through the control of the Cl(-) potential. Together, results indicate that both the presynaptic and postsynaptic machineries of GABAergic circuits may be essential targets of BDNF actions to control spontaneous activity. The data indicate that BDNF is a potent regulator of spontaneous activity and co-active networks, which is a new level of regulation of neurotrophins. Given that BDNF itself is regulated by neuronal activity, we suggest that BDNF acts as a homeostatic factor controlling the emergence, complexity and networking properties of spontaneous networks.

  1. KCC2 rescues functional deficits in human neurons derived from patients with Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Kim, Julie; Zhou, Li; Wengert, Eric; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson R.; Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Gage, Fred H.; Chen, Gong

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe form of autism spectrum disorder, mainly caused by mutations of a single gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on the X chromosome. Patients with Rett syndrome exhibit a period of normal development followed by regression of brain function and the emergence of autistic behaviors. However, the mechanism behind the delayed onset of symptoms is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that neuron-specific K+-Cl− cotransporter2 (KCC2) is a critical downstream gene target of MeCP2. We found that human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Rett syndrome showed a significant deficit in KCC2 expression and consequently a delayed GABA functional switch from excitation to inhibition. Interestingly, overexpression of KCC2 in MeCP2-deficient neurons rescued GABA functional deficits, suggesting an important role of KCC2 in Rett syndrome. We further identified that RE1-silencing transcriptional factor, REST, a neuronal gene repressor, mediates the MeCP2 regulation of KCC2. Because KCC2 is a slow onset molecule with expression level reaching maximum later in development, the functional deficit of KCC2 may offer an explanation for the delayed onset of Rett symptoms. Our studies suggest that restoring KCC2 function in Rett neurons may lead to a potential treatment for Rett syndrome. PMID:26733678

  2. KCC2 rescues functional deficits in human neurons derived from patients with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xin; Kim, Julie; Zhou, Li; Wengert, Eric; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zheng; Carromeu, Cassiano; Muotri, Alysson R; Marchetto, Maria C N; Gage, Fred H; Chen, Gong

    2016-01-19

    Rett syndrome is a severe form of autism spectrum disorder, mainly caused by mutations of a single gene methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) on the X chromosome. Patients with Rett syndrome exhibit a period of normal development followed by regression of brain function and the emergence of autistic behaviors. However, the mechanism behind the delayed onset of symptoms is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter2 (KCC2) is a critical downstream gene target of MeCP2. We found that human neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with Rett syndrome showed a significant deficit in KCC2 expression and consequently a delayed GABA functional switch from excitation to inhibition. Interestingly, overexpression of KCC2 in MeCP2-deficient neurons rescued GABA functional deficits, suggesting an important role of KCC2 in Rett syndrome. We further identified that RE1-silencing transcriptional factor, REST, a neuronal gene repressor, mediates the MeCP2 regulation of KCC2. Because KCC2 is a slow onset molecule with expression level reaching maximum later in development, the functional deficit of KCC2 may offer an explanation for the delayed onset of Rett symptoms. Our studies suggest that restoring KCC2 function in Rett neurons may lead to a potential treatment for Rett syndrome.

  3. Mild KCC2 Hypofunction Causes Inconspicuous Chloride Dysregulation that Degrades Neural Coding

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Nicolas; Prescott, Steven A.; De Koninck, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Disinhibition caused by Cl− dysregulation is implicated in several neurological disorders. This form of disinhibition, which stems primarily from impaired Cl− extrusion through the co-transporter KCC2, is typically identified by a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential (EGABA). Here we show, using computer simulations, that intracellular [Cl−] exhibits exaggerated fluctuations during transient Cl− loads and recovers more slowly to baseline when KCC2 level is even modestly reduced. Using information theory and signal detection theory, we show that increased Cl− lability and settling time degrade neural coding. Importantly, these deleterious effects manifest after less KCC2 reduction than needed to produce the gross changes in EGABA required for detection by most experiments, which assess KCC2 function under weak Cl− load conditions. By demonstrating the existence and functional consequences of “occult” Cl− dysregulation, these results suggest that modest KCC2 hypofunction plays a greater role in neurological disorders than previously believed. PMID:26858607

  4. KCC2-mediated regulation of respiration-related rhythmic activity during postnatal development in mouse medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Akihito; Shimizu-Okabe, Chigusa; Arata, Akiko; Konishi, Shiro; Fukuda, Atsuo; Takayama, Chitoshi

    2015-03-19

    GABA acts as inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system but as excitatory neurotransmitter during early postnatal development. This shift in GABA's action from excitation to inhibition is caused by a decrease in intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl(-)]i), which in turn is caused by changes in the relative expression levels of the K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter (KCC2) and the Na(+), K(+)-2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC1) proteins. Previous studies have used slices containing the medullary pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) to record respiration-related rhythmic activity (RRA) from the hypoglossal nucleus (12 N). The role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of medullary RRA neonatally, however, is yet to be determined. Here, we examined how GABA and chloride co-transporters contribute to RRA during development in the 12 N where inspiratory neurons reside. We recorded extracellular RRA in medullary slices obtained from postnatal day (P) 0-7 mice. RRA was induced by soaking slices in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) containing 8mM-K(+). Application of GABA significantly increased the frequency of RRA after P3, whereas application of a KCC2 blocker (R (+)-[(2-n-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-2,3-dihydro-1-oxo-1H-indenyl-5-yl)oxy]acetic acid (DIOA)) significantly decreased the frequency of RRA after P1. In addition, dense KCC2 immunolabeling was seen in the superior longitudinalis (SL) of the 12 N, which is responsible for retraction of the tongue, from P0 and P7. These results indicate that GABA administration can increase RRA frequency during the first week following birth. This in turn suggests that decreasing [Cl(-)]i levels caused by increasing KCC2 levels in the 12 N could play important roles in regulating the frequency of RRA during development.

  5. KCC2 regulates actin dynamics in dendritic spines via interaction with β-PIX

    PubMed Central

    Llano, Olaya; Smirnov, Sergey; Soni, Shetal; Golubtsov, Andrey; Guillemin, Isabelle; Hotulainen, Pirta; Medina, Igor; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Chloride extrusion in mature neurons is largely mediated by the neuron-specific potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2. In addition, independently of its chloride transport function, KCC2 regulates the development and morphology of dendritic spines through structural interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of this effect remains largely unknown. In this paper, we show a novel pathway for KCC2-mediated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons. We found that KCC2, through interaction with the b isoform of Rac/Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor β-PIX, regulates the activity of Rac1 GTPase and the phosphorylation of one of the major actin-regulating proteins, cofilin-1. KCC2-deficient neurons had abnormally high levels of phosphorylated cofilin-1. Consistently, dendritic spines of these neurons exhibited a large pool of stable actin, resulting in reduced spine motility and diminished density of functional synapses. In conclusion, we describe a novel signaling pathway that couples KCC2 to the cytoskeleton and regulates the formation of glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26056138

  6. The KCl cotransporter, KCC2, is highly expressed in the vicinity of excitatory synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, A I; Sík, A; Payne, J A; Kaila, K; Freund, T F

    2001-06-01

    Immunocytochemical visualization of the neuron-specific K+/Cl- cotransporter, KCC2, at the cellular and subcellular level revealed an area- and layer-specific diffuse labelling, and a discrete staining outlining the somata and dendrites of some interneurons in all areas of the rat hippocampus. KCC2 was highly expressed in parvalbumin-containing interneurons, as well as in subsets of calbindin, calretinin and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a-immunoreactive interneurons. During the first 2 postnatal weeks, an increase of KCC2 staining was observed in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, correlating temporally with the arrival of entorhinal cortical inputs. Subcellular localization demonstrated KCC2 in the plasma membranes. Immunoreactivity in principal cells was responsible for the diffuse staining found in the neuropil. In these cells, KCC2 was detected primarily in dendritic spine heads, at the origin of spines and, at a much lower level on the somata and dendritic shafts. KCC2 expression was considerably higher in the somata and dendrites of interneurons, most notably of parvalbumin-containing cells, as well as in the thorny excrescences of CA3 pyramidal cells and in the spines of spiny hilar and stratum lucidum interneurons. The data indicate that KCC2 is highly expressed in the vicinity of excitatory inputs in the hippocampus, perhaps in close association with extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. A high level of excitation is known to lead to a simultaneous net influx of Na+ and Cl-, as evidenced by dendritic swelling. KCC2 located in the same microenvironment may provide a Cl- extrusion mechanism to deal with both ion and water homeostasis in addition to its role in setting the driving force of Cl- currents involved in fast postsynaptic inhibition.

  7. Reactive Neurogenesis and Down-Regulation of the Potassium-Chloride Cotransporter KCC2 in the Cochlear Nuclei after Cochlear Deafferentation

    PubMed Central

    Tighilet, Brahim; Dutheil, Sophie; Siponen, Marina I.; Noreña, Arnaud J.

    2016-01-01

    While many studies have been devoted to investigating the homeostatic plasticity triggered by cochlear hearing loss, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in these central changes remain elusive. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of reactive neurogenesis after unilateral cochlear nerve section in the cochlear nucleus (CN) of cats. We found a strong cell proliferation in all the CN sub-divisions ipsilateral to the lesion. Most of the newly generated cells survive up to 1 month after cochlear deafferentation in all cochlear nuclei (except the dorsal CN) and give rise to a variety of cell types, i.e., microglial cells, astrocytes, and neurons. Interestingly, many of the newborn neurons had an inhibitory (GABAergic) phenotype. This result is intriguing since sensory deafferentation is usually accompanied by enhanced excitation, consistent with a reduction in central inhibition. The membrane potential effect of GABA depends, however, on the intra-cellular chloride concentration, which is maintained at low levels in adults by the potassium chloride co-transporter KCC2. The KCC2 density on the plasma membrane of neurons was then assessed after cochlear deafferentation in the cochlear nuclei ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion. Cochlear deafferentation is accompanied by a strong down-regulation of KCC2 ipsilateral to the lesion at 3 and 30 days post-lesion. This study suggests that reactive neurogenesis and down-regulation of KCC2 is part of the vast repertoire involved in homeostatic plasticity triggered by hearing loss. These central changes may also play a role in the generation of tinnitus and hyperacusis. PMID:27630564

  8. Differences in the Large Extracellular Loop between the K+-Cl− Cotransporters KCC2 and KCC4*

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Wenz, Meike; Mercado, Adriana; Störger, Christof; Mount, David B.; Friauf, Eckhard; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2010-01-01

    K+Cl− cotransporters (KCCs) play fundamental physiological roles in processes such as inhibitory neurotransmission and cell volume regulation. Mammalian genomes encode four distinct KCC paralogs, which share basic transport characteristics but differ significantly in ion affinity, pharmacology, and relative sensitivity to cell volume. Studies to identify divergence in functional characteristics have thus far focused on the cytoplasmic termini. Here, we investigated sequence requirements of the large extracellular loop (LEL) for function in KCC2 and KCC4. Mutation of all four evolutionarily conserved cysteines abolished KCC2 transport activity. This behavior differs from that of its closest relative, KCC4, which is insensitive to this mutation. Chimeras supported the differences in the LEL of the two cotransporters, because swapping wild-type LEL resulted in functional KCC2 but rendered KCC4 inactive. Insertion of the quadruple cysteine substitution mutant of the KCC4 loop, which was functional in the parental isoform, abolished transport activity in KCC2. Dose-response curves of wild-type and chimeric KCCs revealed that the LEL contributes to the different sensitivity to loop diuretics; a KCC2 chimera containing the KCC4 LEL displayed an IC50 of 396.5 μm for furosemide, which was closer to KCC4 (548.8 μm) than to KCC2 (184.4 μm). Cell surface labeling and immunocytochemistry indicated that mutations do not affect trafficking to the plasma membrane. Taken together, our results show a dramatic and unexpected difference in the sequence requirements of the LEL between the closely related KCC2 and KCC4. Furthermore, they demonstrate that evolutionarily highly conserved amino acids can have different functions within KCC members. PMID:20516068

  9. Impaired neuronal KCC2 function by biallelic SLC12A5 mutations in migrating focal seizures and severe developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Watanabe, Miho; Akita, Tenpei; Ohba, Chihiro; Sugai, Kenji; Ong, Winnie Peitee; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Yuasa, Shota; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Beng, Khoo Teik; Saitoh, Shinji; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Fukuda, Atsuo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) is one of the early-onset epileptic syndromes characterized by migrating polymorphous focal seizures. Whole exome sequencing (WES) in ten sporadic and one familial case of EIMFS revealed compound heterozygous SLC12A5 (encoding the neuronal K+-Cl− co-transporter KCC2) mutations in two families: c.279 + 1G > C causing skipping of exon 3 in the transcript (p.E50_Q93del) and c.572 C >T (p.A191V) in individuals 1 and 2, and c.967T > C (p.S323P) and c.1243 A > G (p.M415V) in individual 3. Another patient (individual 4) with migrating multifocal seizures and compound heterozygous mutations [c.953G > C (p.W318S) and c.2242_2244del (p.S748del)] was identified by searching WES data from 526 patients and SLC12A5-targeted resequencing data from 141 patients with infantile epilepsy. Gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp analysis demonstrated strongly suppressed Cl− extrusion function of E50_Q93del and M415V mutants, with mildly impaired function of A191V and S323P mutants. Cell surface expression levels of these KCC2 mutants were similar to wildtype KCC2. Heterologous expression of two KCC2 mutants, mimicking the patient status, produced a significantly greater intracellular Cl− level than with wildtype KCC2, but less than without KCC2. These data clearly demonstrated that partially disrupted neuronal Cl− extrusion, mediated by two types of differentially impaired KCC2 mutant in an individual, causes EIMFS. PMID:27436767

  10. SNARE-dependent upregulation of KCC2 activity following metabotropic zinc receptor (mZnR/GPR39) activation in rat cortical neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Robert A.; He, Kai; Hartnett, Karen A.; Kandler, Karl; Hershfinkel, Michal; Aizenman, Elias

    2012-01-01

    The major outward chloride transporter in neurons is the potassium chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2), critical for maintaining an inhibitory reversal potential for GABAA receptor channels. In a recent study, we showed that Zn2+ regulates GABAA reversal potentials in the hippocampus by enhancing the activity of KCC2 via an increase in its surface expression. Zn2+ initiates this process by activating the Gq-coupled metabotropic Zn2+ receptor mZnR/GPR39. Here, we first demonstrated that mZnR/GPR39 is functional in cortical neurons in culture and then tested the hypothesis that the increase in KCC2 activity is mediated through a SNARE-dependent process. We established the presence of functional mZnR in rat cultured cortical neurons by loading cells with a Ca2+ indicator and exposing cells to Zn2+, which triggered consistent Ca2+ responses that were blocked by the Gq antagonist YM-254890, but not by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist MCPG. Importantly, Zn2+ treatment under these conditions did not increase the intracellular concentrations of Zn2+ itself. We then measured KCC2 activity by monitoring both the rate and relative amount of furosemide-sensitive NH4+ influx via the co-transporter using an intracellular pH sensitive fluorescent indicator. We observed that Zn2+ pretreatment induced a Ca2+-dependent increase in KCC2 activity. The effects of Zn2+ on KCC2 activity were also observed in wild-type mouse cortical neurons in culture, but not in neurons obtained from mZnR/GPR39−/− mice, suggesting that Zn2+ acts via mZnR/GPR39 activation to upregulate KCC2 activity. We next transfected rat cortical neurons with a plasmid encoding botulinum toxin C1 (Botox C1), which cleaves the SNARE proteins syntaxin 1 and SNAP-25. Basal KCC2 activity was similar in both transfected and non-transfected neurons. Non-transfected cells, or cells transfected with marker vector alone, showed a Zn2+-dependent increase in KCC2 activity. In contrast, KCC2 activity in neurons

  11. Effects of essential amino acid deficiency: down-regulation of KCC2 and the GABAA receptor; disinhibition in the anterior piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharp, James W; Ross-Inta, Catherine M; Baccelli, Irène; Payne, John A; Rudell, John B; Gietzen, Dorothy W

    2013-11-01

    The anterior piriform cortex (APC) is activated by, and is the brain area most sensitive to, essential (indispensable) amino acid (IAA) deficiency. The APC is required for the rapid (20 min) behavioral rejection of IAA deficient diets and increased foraging, both crucial adaptive functions supporting IAA homeostasis in omnivores. The biochemical mechanisms signaling IAA deficiency in the APC block initiation of translation in protein synthesis via uncharged tRNA and the general amino acid control kinase, general control nonderepressing kinase 2. Yet, how inhibition of protein synthesis activates the APC is unknown. The neuronal K(+) Cl(-) cotransporter, neural potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2), and GABAA receptors are essential inhibitory elements in the APC with short plasmalemmal half-lives that maintain control in this highly excitable circuitry. After a single IAA deficient meal both proteins were reduced (vs. basal diet controls) in western blots of APC (but not neocortex or cerebellum) and in immunohistochemistry of APC. Furthermore, electrophysiological analyses support loss of inhibitory elements such as the GABAA receptor in this model. As the crucial inhibitory function of the GABAA receptor depends on KCC2 and the Cl(-) transmembrane gradient it establishes, these results suggest that loss of such inhibitory elements contributes to disinhibition of the APC in IAA deficiency. The circuitry of the anterior piriform cortex (APC) is finely balanced between excitatory (glutamate, +) and inhibitory (GABA, -) transmission. GABAA receptors use Cl(-), requiring the neural potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2). Both are rapidly turning-over proteins, dependent on protein synthesis for repletion. In IAA (indispensable amino acid) deficiency, within 20 min, blockade of protein synthesis prevents restoration of these inhibitors; they are diminished; disinhibition ensues. GCN2 = general control non-derepressing kinase 2, eIF2α = α-subunit of the eukaryotic

  12. Two developmental switches in GABAergic signalling: the K+–Cl− cotransporter KCC2 and carbonic anhydrase CAVII

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Claudio; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2005-01-01

    GABAergic signalling has the unique property of ‘ionic plasticity’, which is based on short-term and long-term changes in the Cl− and HCO3− ion concentrations in the postsynaptic neurones. While short-term ionic plasticity is caused by activity-dependent, channel-mediated anion shifts, long-term ionic plasticity depends on changes in the expression patterns and kinetic regulation of molecules involved in anion homeostasis. During development the efficacy and also the qualitative nature (depolarization/excitation versus hyperpolarization/inhibition) of GABAergic transmission is influenced by the neuronal expression of two key molecules: the chloride-extruding K+–Cl− cotransporter KCC2, and the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoform CAVII. In rat hippocampal pyramidal neurones, a steep up-regulation of KCC2 accounts for the ‘developmental switch’, which converts depolarizing and excitatory GABA responses of immature neurones to classical hyperpolarizing inhibition by the end of the second postnatal week. The immature hippocampus generates large-scale network activity, which is abolished in parallel by the up-regulation of KCC2 and the consequent increase in the efficacy of neuronal Cl− extrusion. At around postnatal day 12 (P12), an abrupt, steep increase in intrapyramidal CAVII expression takes place, promoting excitatory responses evoked by intense GABAergic activity. This is largely caused by a GABAergic potassium transient resulting in spatially widespread neuronal depolarization and synchronous spike discharges. These facts point to CAVII as a putative target of CA inhibitors that are used as antiepileptic drugs. KCC2 expression in adult rat neurones is down-regulated following epileptiform activity and/or neuronal damage by BDNF/TrkB signalling. The lifetime of membrane-associated KCC2 is very short, in the range of tens of minutes, which makes KCC2 ideally suited for mediating GABAergic ionic plasticity. In addition, factors influencing

  13. Upregulation of KCC2 Activity by Zinc-Mediated Neurotransmission via the mZnR/GPR39 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chorin, Ehud; Vinograd, Ofir; Fleidervish, Ilya; Gilad, David; Herrmann, Sharon; Sekler, Israel; Aizenman, Elias; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular Zn2+ regulates postsynaptic neuronal excitability upon its corelease with glutamate. We previously demonstrated that synaptic Zn2+ acts via a distinct metabotropic zinc-sensing receptor (mZnR) in neurons to trigger Ca2+ responses in the hippocampus. Here, we show that physiological activation of mZnR signaling induces enhanced K+/Cl− cotransporter 2 (KCC2) activity and surface expression. As KCC2 is the major Cl− outward transporter in neurons, Zn2+ also triggers a pronounced hyperpolarizing shift in the GABAA reversal potential. Mossy fiber stimulation-dependent upregulation of KCC2 activity is eliminated in slices from Zn2+ transporter 3-deficient animals, which lack synaptic Zn2+. Importantly, activity-dependent ZnR signaling and subsequent enhancement of KCC2 activity are also absent in slices from mice lacking the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR39, identifying this protein as the functional neuronal mZnR. Our work elucidates a fundamentally important role for synaptically released Zn2+ acting as a neurotransmitter signal via activation of a mZnR to increase Cl− transport, thereby enhancing inhibitory tone in postsynaptic cells. PMID:21900570

  14. Long-term alcohol exposure elicits hippocampal nonsynaptic epileptiform activity changes associated with expression and functional changes in NKCC1, KCC2 co-transporters and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luiz E C; Rodrigues, Antônio M; Lopes, Mariana R; Costa, Victor D C; Scorza, Carla A; Scorza, Fulvio A; Cavalheiro, Esper A; Almeida, Antônio-Carlos G

    2017-01-06

    Nonsynaptic mechanism changes, particularly the enhancement of NKCC1 expression in the dentate gyrus (DG) after 4weeks of ethanol consumption, motivate the present work, in which rats were submitted to a period of chronic consumption (12weeks). Four groups of six animals (6-week-old male Wistar rats) were formed, including the control (C), ethanol 1 (E1), ethanol 2 (E2) and ethanol 3 (E3) groups. The rats in the E1, E2 and E3 groups were treated daily with a 30% v/v solution of ethanol, administered via oral gavage (1.0, 2.0 and 3.0g/kg, respectively). Nonsynaptic epileptiform activities (NEA) were induced by means of the zero-Ca(2+) and high-K(+) model using hippocampal slices and were recorded in the DG. The presence of NKCC1, KCC2, α1-Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and GFAP immunoreactivity was analyzed. The results demonstrate that alcohol consumption changes NEA, and these changes are more prominent at the lower dosage. An increase in the DC shifts associated with epileptiform discharges was present with the low dose. This increase was correlated with the increment of NKCC1 expression. Confocal microscopy images indicate the NKCC1 increase was pronounced in the initial axonal segment of granule cells. The blockage of these cotransporters during NEA induction with bumetanide suppressed the DC shift increase and diminished all parameters of NEA that were quantified for all groups treated with ethanol. Therefore, the increase in NKCC1 expression and the effective activity of this cotransporter, which were observed in the treated groups, suggest that drugs that act for block NKCC1 represent promising strategies for diminishing the effects of alcohol damage on the brain.

  15. Transcript-Specific Associations of SLC12A5 (KCC2) in Human Prefrontal Cortex with Development, Schizophrenia, and Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ran; Li, Chao; Newburn, Erin N.; Ye, Tianzhang; Lipska, Barbara K.; Herman, Mary M.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Kleinman, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    The neuron-specific K+-Cl− cotransporter SLC12A5, also known as KCC2, helps mediate the electrophysiological effects of GABA. The pattern of KCC2 expression during early brain development suggests that its upregulation drives the postsynaptic switch of GABA from excitation to inhibition. We previously found decreased expression of full-length KCC2 in the postmortem hippocampus of patients with schizophrenia, but not in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Using PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends, we discovered several previously unrecognized alternative KCC2 transcripts in both human adult and fetal brain in addition to the previously identified full-length (NM_020708.3) and truncated (AK098371) transcripts. We measured the expression levels of four relatively abundant truncated splice variants, including three novel transcripts (ΔEXON6, EXON2B, and EXON6B) and one previously described transcript (AK098371), in a large human cohort of nonpsychiatric controls across the lifespan, and in patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders. In SH-SY5Y cell lines, these transcripts were translated into proteins and expressed at their predicted sizes. Expression of the EXON6B transcript is increased in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia (p = 0.03) but decreased in patients with major depression (p = 0.04). The expression of AK098371 is associated with a GAD1 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs3749034) that previously has been associated with GAD67 expression and risk for schizophrenia. Our data confirm the developmental regulation of KCC2 expression, and provide evidence that KCC2 transcripts are differentially expressed in schizophrenia and affective disorders. Alternate transcripts from KCC2 may participate in the abnormal GABA signaling in the DLPFC associated with schizophrenia. PMID:22496567

  16. Effects of SPAK knockout on sensorimotor gating, novelty exploration, and brain area-dependent expressions of NKCC1 and KCC2 in a mouse model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Sen; Huang, Chuen-Lin; Chen, Huei-E; Tung, Che-Se; Shih, Han-Peng; Liu, Yia-Ping

    2015-08-03

    SPAK (Sterile 20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) is a protein kinase belonging to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily that has been found to be extensively distributed across the body. The SPAK downstream substrates NKCC1 and KCC2 in the central nervous system are important in the interpretation of developmental mental disorders. The present study aimed to clarify the role of SPAK-NKCC1/KCC2 using a rodent schizophrenia-like model. The mouse paradigm of isolation rearing (IR) was employed, as it simulates the sensorimotor gating abnormalities of schizophrenia. SPAK transgenic mice were used and were divided into four groups: social-wild type, social-SPAK(-/-), isolation-wild type, and isolation-SPAK(-/-). The prepulse inhibition (PPI) test and the novel object recognition test (NORT) were used to measure schizophrenia-associated dysfunctions in gating ability and the novelty recognition, respectively. Finally, the protein expressions of NKCC1/KCC2 in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were detected to determine correlations with the behavioral data. Our results demonstrated that SPAK-null mice had superior PPI and novelty recognition relative to wild type controls, with a concomitant increase in KCC2 in the prefrontal cortex. IR disrupted PPI and NORT performances with an associated increase in KCC2. Furthermore, rearing environment and gene manipulation had mutually interactive effects, as the IR-induced effects on PPI and NORT were reversed by SPAK knockout, and the increase in KCC2 and the decreased in the NKCC1/KCC2 ratio in the prefrontal cortex induced by SPAK knockout were reversed by IR. Our data supported the gene-environment hypothesis and demonstrated the potential value of SPAK manipulation in future schizophrenia studies.

  17. WNK1/HSN2 mutation in human peripheral neuropathy deregulates KCC2 expression and posterior lateral line development in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Valérie; Brustein, Edna; Liao, Meijiang; Dion, Patrick A; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Rouleau, Guy A; Drapeau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSNAII) is a rare pathology characterized by an early onset of severe sensory loss (all modalities) in the distal limbs. It is due to autosomal recessive mutations confined to exon "HSN2" of the WNK1 (with-no-lysine protein kinase 1) serine-threonine kinase. While this kinase is well studied in the kidneys, little is known about its role in the nervous system. We hypothesized that the truncating mutations present in the neural-specific HSN2 exon lead to a loss-of-function of the WNK1 kinase, impairing development of the peripheral sensory system. To investigate the mechanisms by which the loss of WNK1/HSN2 isoform function causes HSANII, we used the embryonic zebrafish model and observed strong expression of WNK1/HSN2 in neuromasts of the peripheral lateral line (PLL) system by immunohistochemistry. Knocking down wnk1/hsn2 in embryos using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides led to improper PLL development. We then investigated the reported interaction between the WNK1 kinase and neuronal potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, as this transporter is a target of WNK1 phosphorylation. In situ hybridization revealed kcc2 expression in mature neuromasts of the PLL and semi-quantitative RT-PCR of wnk1/hsn2 knockdown embryos showed an increased expression of kcc2 mRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of human KCC2 mRNA in embryos replicated the wnk1/hsn2 knockdown phenotype. We validated these results by obtaining double knockdown embryos, both for wnk1/hsn2 and kcc2, which alleviated the PLL defects. Interestingly, overexpression of inactive mutant KCC2-C568A, which does not extrude ions, allowed a phenocopy of the PLL defects. These results suggest a pathway in which WNK1/HSN2 interacts with KCC2, producing a novel regulation of its transcription independent of KCC2's activation, where a loss-of-function mutation in WNK1 induces an overexpression of KCC2 and hinders proper peripheral sensory nerve development, a

  18. Prevention of NKCC1 phosphorylation avoids downregulation of KCC2 in central sensory pathways and reduces neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Mòdol, Laura; Cobianchi, Stefano; Navarro, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury is characterized by loss of inhibition in both peripheral and central pain pathways. In the adult nervous system, the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) (NKCC1) and neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) (KCC2) cotransporters are involved in setting the strength and polarity of GABAergic/glycinergic transmission. After nerve injury, the balance between these cotransporters changes, leading to a decrease in the inhibitory tone. However, the role that NKCC1 and KCC2 play in pain-processing brain areas is unknown. Our goal was to study the effects of peripheral nerve injury on NKCC1 and KCC2 expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), spinal cord, ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus, and primary somatosensory (S1) cortex. After sciatic nerve section and suture in adult rats, assessment of mechanical and thermal pain thresholds showed evidence of hyperalgesia during the following 2 months. We also found an increase in NKCC1 expression in the DRG and a downregulation of KCC2 in spinal cord after injury, accompanied by later decrease of KCC2 levels in higher projection areas (VPL and S1) from 2 weeks postinjury, correlating with neuropathic pain signs. Administration of bumetanide (30 mg/kg) during 2 weeks following sciatic nerve lesion prevented the previously observed changes in the spinothalamic tract projecting areas and the appearance of hyperalgesia. In conclusion, the present results indicate that changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 in DRG, spinal cord, and central pain areas may contribute to development of neuropathic pain.

  19. Sexually dimorphic expression of KCC2 and GABA function

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2008-01-01

    GABAA receptors have an age-adapted function in the brain. During early development, they mediate depolarizing effects, which result in activation of calcium-sensitive signaling processes that are important for the differentiation of the brain. In more mature stages of development and in adults, GABAA receptors acquire their classical hyperpolarizing signaling. The switch from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing GABAA-ergic signaling is triggered through the developmental shift in the balance of chloride cotransporters that either increase (ie NKCC1) or decrease (ie KCC2) intracellular chloride. The maturation of GABAA signaling follows sex-specific patterns, which correlate with the developmental expression profiles of chloride cotransporters. This has first been demonstrated in the substantia nigra, where the switch occurs earlier in females than in males. As a result, there are sensitive periods during development when drugs or conditions that activate GABAA receptors mediate different transcriptional effects in males and females. Furthermore, neurons with depolarizing or hyperpolarizing GABAA-ergic signaling respond differently to neurotrophic factors like estrogens. Consequently, during sensitive developmental periods, GABAA receptors may act as broadcasters of sexually differentiating signals, promoting gender-appropriate brain development. This has particular implications in epilepsy, where both the pathophysiology and treatment of epileptic seizures involve GABAA receptor activation. It is important therefore to study separately the effects of these factors not only on the course of epilepsy but also design new treatments that may not necessarily disturb the gender-appropriate brain development. PMID:18524541

  20. Ketogenic diet does not change NKCC1 and KCC2 expression in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lira, Gisela; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta Griselda; Granados-Rojas, Leticia

    2011-09-01

    In control rats, we examined the effects of ketogenic diet on NKCC1 and KCC2 expression levels in hippocampus. Neither the number of NKCC1 immunoreactive cells nor the intensity of labeling of KCC2 was found to modify in hippocampus of the rats after ketogenic diet treatment. These results indicate that ketogenic diet by itself does not modify the expression of these cation chloride cotransporters.

  1. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations.

  2. NKCC1 cotransporter inactivation underlies embryonic development of chloride-mediated inhibition in mouse spinal motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Delpy, Alain; Allain, Anne-Emilie; Meyrand, Pierre; Branchereau, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Early in development, GABA and glycine exert excitatory action that turns to inhibition due to modification of the chloride equilibrium potential (ECl) controlled by the KCC2 and NKCC1 transporters. This switch is thought to be due to a late expression of KCC2 associated with a NKCC1 down-regulation. Here, we show in mouse embryonic spinal cord that both KCC2 and NKCC1 are expressed and functional early in development (E11.5–E13.5) when GABAA receptor activation induces strong excitatory action. After E15.5, a switch occurs rendering GABA unable to provide excitation. At these subsequent stages, NKCC1 becomes both inactive and less abundant in motoneurons while KCC2 remains functional and hyperpolarizes ECl. In conclusion, in contrast to other systems, the cotransporters are concomitantly expressed early in the development of the mouse spinal cord. Moreover, whereas NKCC1 follows a classical functional extinction, KCC2 is highly expressed throughout both early and late embryonic life. PMID:18096599

  3. Diminished KCC2 confounds synapse-specificity of LTP during senescence

    PubMed Central

    Ferando, Isabella; Faas, Guido; Mody, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Synapse-specificity of LTP ensures that no interference arises from inputs irrelevant to the memory to be encoded. In hippocampi of aged (21-28 months-old) mice LTP was relayed to unstimulated synapses blemishing its synapse-specificity. Diminished levels of the K+/Cl– cotransporter KCC2 and a depolarizing GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic component following LTP were the most likely causes for spreading the potentiation, unveiling novel mechanisms hindering information storage in the aged brain, and identifying KCC2 as a potential target for intervention. PMID:27500406

  4. Differential effects on KCC2 expression and spasticity of ALS and traumatic injuries to motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Mòdol, Laura; Mancuso, Renzo; Alé, Albert; Francos-Quijorna, Isaac; Navarro, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease manifested by progressive muscle atrophy and paralysis due to the loss of upper and lower motoneurons (MN). Spasticity appears in ALS patients leading to further disabling consequences. Loss of the inhibitory tone induced by downregulation of the potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) in MN has been proposed to importantly contribute to the spastic behavior after spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to test whether the alterations in the expression of KCC2 are linked to the appearance of spasticity in the SODG93A ALS murine model. We compared SODG93A mice to wild type mice subjected to SCI to mimic the spinal MN disconnection from motor descending pathways, and to sciatic nerve lesion to mimic the loss of MN connectivity to muscle. Electrophysiological results show that loss of motor function is observed at presymptomatic stage (8 weeks) in SODG93A mice but hyperreflexia and spasticity do not appear until a late stage (16 weeks). However, KCC2 was not downregulated despite MN suffered disconnection both from muscles and upper MNs. Further experiments revealed decreased gephyrin expression, as a general marker of inhibitory systems, accompanied by a reduction in the number of Renshaw interneurons. Moreover, 5-HT fibers were increased in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord at late stage of disease progression in SOD1G93A mice. Taken together, the present results indicate that spasticity appears late in the ALS model, and may be mediated by a decrease in inhibitory interneurons and an increase of 5-HT transmission, while the absence of down-regulation of KCC2 could rather indicate an inability of MNs to respond to insults. PMID:24478630

  5. The Timing of the Excitatory-to-Inhibitory GABA Switch Is Regulated by the Oxytocin Receptor via KCC2

    PubMed Central

    Leonzino, Marianna; Busnelli, Marta; Antonucci, Flavia; Verderio, Claudia; Mazzanti, Michele; Chini, Bice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oxytocin and its receptor (Oxtr) play a crucial role in the postnatal transition of neuronal GABA neurotransmission from excitatory to inhibitory, a developmental process known as the GABA switch. Using hippocampal neurons from Oxtr-null mice, we show that (1) Oxtr is necessary for the correct timing of the GABA switch by upregulating activity of the chloride cotransporter KCC2, (2) Oxtr, in a very early and narrow time window, directly modulates the functional activity of KCC2 by promoting its phosphorylation and insertion/stabilization at the neuronal surface, and (3) in the absence of Oxtr, electrophysiological alterations are recorded in mature neurons, a finding consistent with a reduced level of KCC2 and increased susceptibility to seizures observed in adult Oxtr-null mice. These data identify KCC2 as a key target of oxytocin in postnatal events that may be linked to pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27052180

  6. Early expression of KCC2 in rat hippocampal cultures augments expression of functional GABA synapses

    PubMed Central

    Chudotvorova, Ilona; Ivanov, Anton; Rama, Sylvain; Hübner, Christian A; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Medina, Igor

    2005-01-01

    The development of GABAergic synapses is associated with an excitatory to inhibitory shift of the actions of GABA because of a reduction of [Cl−]i. This is due to a delayed postnatal expression of the K+–Cl− cotransporter KCC2, which has low levels at birth and peaks during the first few postnatal weeks. Whether the expression of the cotransporter and the excitatory to inhibitory shift have other consequences on the operation of GABAA receptors and synapses is not yet known. We have now expressed KCC2 in immature neurones at an early developmental stage and determined the consequences on the formation of GABA and glutamate synapses. We report that early expression of the cotransporter selectively enhances GABAergic synapses: there is a significant increase of the density of GABAA receptors and synapses and an increase of the frequency of GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents. The density of glutamate synapses and frequency of AMPA miniature postsynaptic currents are not affected. We conclude that the expression of KCC2 and the reduction of [Cl−]i play a critical role in the construction of GABAergic networks that extends beyond the excitatory to inhibitory shift of the actions of GABA. PMID:15961425

  7. Early expression of KCC2 in rat hippocampal cultures augments expression of functional GABA synapses.

    PubMed

    Chudotvorova, Ilona; Ivanov, Anton; Rama, Sylvain; Hübner, Christian A; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Medina, Igor

    2005-08-01

    The development of GABAergic synapses is associated with an excitatory to inhibitory shift of the actions of GABA because of a reduction of [Cl-]i. This is due to a delayed postnatal expression of the K+ -Cl- cotransporter KCC2, which has low levels at birth and peaks during the first few postnatal weeks. Whether the expression of the cotransporter and the excitatory to inhibitory shift have other consequences on the operation of GABA(A) receptors and synapses is not yet known. We have now expressed KCC2 in immature neurones at an early developmental stage and determined the consequences on the formation of GABA and glutamate synapses. We report that early expression of the cotransporter selectively enhances GABAergic synapses: there is a significant increase of the density of GABA(A) receptors and synapses and an increase of the frequency of GABAergic miniature postsynaptic currents. The density of glutamate synapses and frequency of AMPA miniature postsynaptic currents are not affected. We conclude that the expression of KCC2 and the reduction of [Cl-]i play a critical role in the construction of GABAergic networks that extends beyond the excitatory to inhibitory shift of the actions of GABA.

  8. Engagement of the GABA to KCC2 Signaling Pathway Contributes to the Analgesic Effects of A3AR Agonists in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Amanda; Castonguay, Annie; Cottet, Martin; Little, Joshua W.; Chen, Zhoumou; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M.; Doyle, Timothy; Egan, Terrance M.; Vanderah, Todd W.; De Konnick, Yves; Tosh, Dilip K.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 1.5 billion people worldwide suffer from chronic pain, yet current treatment strategies often lack efficacy or have deleterious side effects in patients. Adenosine is an inhibitory neuromodulator that was previously thought to mediate antinociception through the A1 and A2A receptor subtypes. We have since demonstrated that A3AR agonists have potent analgesic actions in preclinical rodent models of neuropathic pain and that A3AR analgesia is independent of adenosine A1 or A2A unwanted effects. Herein, we explored the contribution of the GABA inhibitory system to A3AR-mediated analgesia using well-characterized mouse and rat models of chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain. The deregulation of GABA signaling in pathophysiological pain states is well established: GABA signaling can be hampered by a reduction in extracellular GABA synthesis by GAD65 and enhanced extracellular GABA reuptake via the GABA transporter, GAT-1. In neuropathic pain, GABAAR-mediated signaling can be further disrupted by the loss of the KCC2 chloride anion gradient. Here, we demonstrate that A3AR agonists (IB-MECA and MRS5698) reverse neuropathic pain via a spinal mechanism of action that modulates GABA activity. Spinal administration of the GABAA antagonist, bicuculline, disrupted A3AR-mediated analgesia. Furthermore, A3AR-mediated analgesia was associated with reductions in CCI-related GAD65 and GAT-1 serine dephosphorylation as well as an enhancement of KCC2 serine phosphorylation and activity. Our results suggest that A3AR-mediated reversal of neuropathic pain increases modulation of GABA inhibitory neurotransmission both directly and indirectly through protection of KCC2 function, underscoring the unique utility of A3AR agonists in chronic pain. PMID:25878279

  9. Neurogenic role of the depolarizing chloride gradient revealed by global overexpression of KCC2 from the onset of development.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Annie; Brustein, Edna; Liao, Meijiang; Mercado, Adriana; Babilonia, Elisa; Mount, David B; Drapeau, Pierre

    2008-02-13

    GABA- and glycine-induced depolarization is thought to provide important developmental signals, but the role of the underlying chloride gradient has not been examined from the onset of development. We therefore overexpressed globally the potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) in newly fertilized zebrafish embryos to reverse the chloride gradient. This rendered glycine hyperpolarizing in all neurons, tested at the time that motor behaviors (but not native KCC2) first appear. KCC2 overexpression resulted in fewer mature spontaneously active spinal neurons, more immature silent neurons, and disrupted motor activity. We observed fewer motoneurons and interneurons, a reduction in the elaboration of axonal tracts, and smaller brains and spinal cords. However, we observed no increased apoptosis and a normal complement of sensory neurons, glia, and progenitors. These results suggest that chloride-mediated excitation plays a crucial role in promoting neurogenesis from the earliest stages of embryonic development.

  10. Prenatal Hypoxia–Ischemia Induces Abnormalities in CA3 Microstructure, Potassium Chloride Co-Transporter 2 Expression and Inhibitory Tone

    PubMed Central

    Jantzie, Lauren L.; Getsy, Paulina M.; Denson, Jesse L.; Firl, Daniel J.; Maxwell, Jessie R.; Rogers, Danny A.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Robinson, Shenandoah

    2015-01-01

    Infants who suffer perinatal brain injury, including those with encephalopathy of prematurity, are prone to chronic neurological deficits, including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, and behavioral problems, such as anxiety, inattention, and poor social interaction. These deficits, especially in combination, pose the greatest hindrance to these children becoming independent adults. Cerebral function depends on adequate development of essential inhibitory neural circuits and the appropriate amount of excitation and inhibition at specific stages of maturation. Early neuronal synaptic responses to γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) are initially excitatory. During the early postnatal period, GABAAR responses switch to inhibitory with the upregulation of potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2. With extrusion of chloride by KCC2, the Cl− reversal potential shifts and GABA and glycine responses become inhibitory. We hypothesized that prenatal hypoxic–ischemic brain injury chronically impairs the developmental upregulation of KCC2 that is essential for cerebral circuit formation. Following late gestation hypoxia–ischemia (HI), diffusion tensor imaging in juvenile rats shows poor microstructural integrity in the hippocampal CA3 subfield, with reduced fractional anisotropy and elevated radial diffusivity. The loss of microstructure correlates with early reduced KCC2 expression on NeuN-positive pyramidal neurons, and decreased monomeric and oligomeric KCC2 protein expression in the CA3 subfield. Together with decreased inhibitory post-synaptic currents during a critical window of development, we document for the first time that prenatal transient systemic HI in rats impairs hippocampal CA3 inhibitory tone. Failure of timely development of inhibitory tone likely contributes to a lower seizure threshold and impaired cognitive function in children who suffer perinatal brain injury. PMID:26388734

  11. Erythropoietin attenuates loss of potassium chloride co-transporters following prenatal brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jantzie, L L; Getsy, P M; Firl, D J; Wilson, C G; Miller, R H; Robinson, S

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic agents that restore the inhibitory actions of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) by modulating intracellular chloride concentrations will provide novel avenues to treat stroke, chronic pain, epilepsy, autism, and neurodegenerative and cognitive disorders. During development, upregulation of the potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2, and the resultant switch from excitatory to inhibitory responses to GABA guide the formation of essential inhibitory circuits. Importantly, maturation of inhibitory mechanisms is also central to the development of excitatory circuits and proper balance between excitatory and inhibitory networks in the developing brain. Loss of KCC2 expression occurs in postmortem samples from human preterm infant brains with white matter lesions. Here we show that late gestation brain injury in a rat model of extreme prematurity impairs the developmental upregulation of potassium chloride co-transporters during a critical postnatal period of circuit maturation in CA3 hippocampus by inducing a sustained loss of oligomeric KCC2 via a calpain-dependent mechanism. Further, administration of erythropoietin (EPO) in a clinically relevant postnatal dosing regimen following the prenatal injury protects the developing brain by reducing calpain activity, restoring oligomeric KCC2 expression and attenuating KCC2 fragmentation, thus providing the first report of a safe therapy to address deficits in KCC2 expression. Together, these data indicate it is possible to reverse abnormalities in KCC2 expression during the postnatal period, and potentially reverse deficits in inhibitory circuit formation central to cognitive impairment and epileptogenesis.

  12. Fructose-1,6-diphosphate protects against epileptogenesis by modifying cation-chloride co-transporters in a model of amygdaloid-kindling temporal epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yao; Wang, Shan; Jiang, Yan; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Manman; Guo, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Mei-ping

    2013-11-20

    Fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP) shifts the metabolism of glucose from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway and has anticonvulsant activity in several acute seizure animal models. In the present study, we investigated the anti-epileptogenic effects of FDP in an amygdaloid-kindling seizure model, which is an animal model of the most common form of human temporal lobe epilepsy. We found that 1.0 g/kg FDP slowed seizure progression and shortened the corresponding after-discharge duration (ADD). FDP increased the number of stimulations needed to reach seizure stages 2-5 and prolonged the cumulative ADD prior to reaching stages 3-5. It also shortened staying days and cumulative ADD in stages 4-5. However, it demonstrated no significant protective effect when administered after the animals were fully kindled. In hippocampal neurons, cation-chloride co-transporters (CCCs) are suggested to play interesting roles in epilepsy by modulating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic activity through controlling GABAA receptor-mediated reversal potential. We examined the potential link between FDP and the hippocampal expression of two main members of the CCCs: the neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-)co-transporter 2 (KCC2) and Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-)co-transporter 1 (NKCC1). FDP inhibited the kindling-induced downregulation of KCC2 expression and decreased NKCC1 expression during the kindling session. Taken together, our data reveal that FDP may have protective activity against epileptogenesis, from partial to generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the FDP-induced imbalance between KCC2 and NKCC1 expression may be involved in the neuroprotective effect.

  13. Purinergic inhibition of glucose transport in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Y; Becker, C; Löken, C

    1999-01-08

    ATP is known to act as an extracellular signal in many organs. In the heart, extracellular ATP modulates ionic processes and contractile function. This study describes a novel, metabolic effect of exogenous ATP in isolated rat cardiomyocytes. In these quiescent (i.e. noncontracting) cells, micromolar concentrations of ATP depressed the rate of basal, catecholamine-stimulated, or insulin-stimulated glucose transport by up to 60% (IC50 for inhibition of insulin-dependent glucose transport, 4 microM). ATP decreased the amount of glucose transporters (GLUT1 and GLUT4) in the plasma membrane, with a concomitant increase in intracellular microsomal membranes. A similar glucose transport inhibition was produced by P2 purinergic agonists with the following rank of potencies: ATP approximately ATPgammaS approximately 2-methylthio-ATP (P2Y-selective) > ADP > alpha,betameATP (P2X-selective), whereas the P1 purinoceptor agonist adenosine was ineffective. The effect of ATP was suppressed by the poorly subtype-selective P2 antagonist pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulfonic acid but, surprisingly, not by the nonselective antagonist suramin nor by the P2Y-specific Reactive Blue 2. Glucose transport inhibition by ATP was not affected by a drastic reduction of the extracellular concentrations of calcium (down to 10(-9) M) or sodium (down to 0 mM), and it was not mimicked by a potassium-induced depolarization, indicating that purinoceptors of the P2X family (which are nonselective cation channels whose activation leads to a depolarizing sodium and calcium influx) are not involved. Inhibition was specific for the transmembrane transport of glucose because ATP did not inhibit (i) the rate of glycolysis under conditions where the transport step is no longer rate-limiting nor (ii) the rate of [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation. In conclusion, extracellular ATP markedly inhibits glucose transport in rat cardiomyocytes by promoting a redistribution of glucose transporters from the

  14. The effect of propofol postconditioning on the expression of K(+)-Cl(-)-co-transporter 2 in GABAergic inhibitory interneurons of acute ischemia/reperfusion injury rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbai; Liu, Shuying; Wang, Haiyun; Wang, Guolin; Zhu, Ai

    2015-02-09

    It has been shown in our previous study that propofol postconditioning enhanced the activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and prevented the internalization of GluR2 subunit of α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, thus provided neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Regarding inhibitory system in CNS, K(+)-Cl(-)-co-transporter 2 (KCC2), a Cl(-) extruder, plays a critical role in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory effect in mature central neurons. However, the effect of propofol postconditioning on the expression of KCC2 in GABAergic interneurons is unclear. Therefore, in this article we describe the role of KCC2 in GABAergic interneurons in the ipsilateral hippocampal CA1 region of adult rats and the effects of propofol postconditioning on this region. Herein we demonstrate that propofol postconditioning (20mg/kg/h, 2h) improved rats' neurobehavioral abilities, increased the number of survival neurons, and up-regulated neuronal KCC2 expression in glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expressing GABAergic interneurons in hippocampal CA1 region at 24h after I/R. In contrast, when rats were injected with the KCC2 antagonist, [(dihydroindenyl)oxy] alkanoic acid (DIOA), the neuroprotective effects induced by propofol postconditioning were reversed. Our study indicated that propofol postconditioning increased the expression of KCC2 in inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, thus providing acute neuroprotection to rats who had undergone cerebral I/R injury.

  15. Lipophilic chelator inhibition of electron transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Crane, R T; Sun, I L; Crane, F L

    1975-01-01

    The lipophilic chelator bathophenanthroline inhibits electron transport in membranes from Escherichia coli. The less lipophilic 1,10-phenanthroline, bathophenanthroline sulfonate, and alpha,alpha-dipyridyl have little effect. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase is more sensitive to bathophenanthroline inhibition than lactate oxidase activity. Evidence for two sites of inhibition comes from the fact that both reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide menadione reductase and duroquinol oxidase activities are inhibited. Addition of uncouplers of phosphorylation before bathophenanthroline protects against inhibition. PMID:1092663

  16. Synaptic Inhibition in Avian Interaural Level Difference Sound Localizing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Synaptic inhibition plays a fundamental role in the neural computation of the interaural level difference (ILD), an important cue for the localization of high-frequency sound. Here, we studied the inhibitory synaptic currents in the chicken posterior portion of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (LLDp), the first binaural level difference encoder of the avian auditory pathway. Using whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we provide the first evidence confirming a monosynaptic inhibition driven by direct electrical and chemical stimulation of the contralateral LLDp, establishing the reciprocal inhibitory connection between the two LLDps, a long-standing assumption in the field. This inhibition was largely mediated by GABAA receptors; however, functional glycine receptors were also identified. The reversal potential for the Cl− channels measured with gramicidin-perforated patch recordings was hyperpolarizing (−88 mV), corresponding to a low intracellular Cl− concentration (5.2 mm). Pharmacological manipulations of KCC2 (outwardly Cl− transporter) activity demonstrate that LLDp neurons can maintain a low intracellular Cl− concentration under a high Cl− load, allowing for the maintenance of hyperpolarizing inhibition. We further demonstrate that hyperpolarizing inhibition was more effective at regulating cellular excitability than depolarizing inhibition in LLDp neurons. PMID:28032116

  17. Inhibition of carbonic anhydrase augments GABAA receptor-mediated analgesia via a spinal mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Asiedu, Marina N.; Mejia, Galo L.; Hübner, Christian A.; Kaila, Kai; Price, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury negatively influences spinal GABAergic networks via a reduction in the neuron-specific K+-Cl- cotransporter KCC2. This process has been linked to the emergence of neuropathic allodynia. In vivo pharmacological and modeling studies show that a loss of KCC2 function results in a decrease in the efficacy of GABAA -mediated spinal inhibition. One potential strategy to mitigate this effect entails inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity to reduce HCO3- -dependent depolarization via GABAA receptors when KCC2 function is compromised. We have tested this hypothesis here. Our results show that, similarly to when KCC2 is pharmacologically blocked, peripheral nerve injury causes a loss of analgesic effect for neurosteroid GABAA allosteric modulators at maximally effective doses in naïve mice in the tail flick test. Remarkably, inhibition of carbonic anhydrase activity with intrathecal acetazolamide rapidly restores an analgesic effect for these compounds suggesting an important role of carbonic anhydrase activity in regulating GABAA -mediated analgesia after peripheral nerve injury. Moreover, spinal acetazolamide administration leads to a profound reduction in the mouse formalin pain test indicating that spinal carbonic anhydrase inhibition produces analgesia when primary afferent activity is driven by chemical mediators. Finally, we demonstrate that systemic administration of acetazolamide to rats with peripheral nerve injury produces an anti-allodynia effect by itself and an enhancement of the peak analgesic effect with a change in the shape of the dose response curve of the α1-sparing benzodiazepine L-838,417. Thus, carbonic anhydrase inhibition mitigates the negative effects of loss of KCC2 function after nerve injury in multiple species and through multiple administration routes resulting in an enhancement of analgesic effects for several GABAA allosteric modulators. We suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, many of which are clinically

  18. Arachidonic acid inhibits glycine transport in cultured glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, F; Alcantara, R; Gomeza, J; Aragon, C; Gimenez, C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid on glycine uptake, exchange and efflux in C6 glioma cells were investigated. Arachidonic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of high-affinity glycine uptake. This effect was not due to a simple detergent-like action on membranes, as the inhibition of glycine transport was most pronounced with cis-unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, whereas saturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids had relatively little or no effect. Endogenous unsaturated non-esterified fatty acids may exert a similar inhibitory effect on the transport of glycine. The mechanism for this inhibitory effect has been examined in a plasma membrane vesicle preparation derived from C6 cells, which avoids metabolic or compartmentation interferences. The results suggest that part of the selective inhibition of glycine transport by arachidonic acid could be due to the effects of the arachidonic acid on the lipid domain surrounding the carrier. PMID:2121132

  19. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin R; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2010-02-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (K(i) = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [(3)H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC(50) = 0.65 microM; I(max) = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC(50) = 0.42 microM, I(max) = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for

  20. Ascorbic acid participates in a general mechanism for concerted glucose transport inhibition and lactate transport stimulation.

    PubMed

    Castro, Maite A; Angulo, Constanza; Brauchi, Sebastián; Nualart, Francisco; Concha, Ilona I

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel function for ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid is an important water-soluble antioxidant and cofactor in various enzyme systems. We have previously demonstrated that an increase in neuronal intracellular ascorbic acid is able to inhibit glucose transport in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Because of the presence of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters, ascorbic acid is highly concentrated in brain, testis, lung, and adrenal glands. In this work, we explored how ascorbic acid affects glucose and lactate uptake in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Using immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, the expression of glucose and ascorbic acid transporters in non-neuronal cells was studied. Like neurons, HEK293 cells expressed GLUT1, GLUT3, and SVCT2. With radioisotope-based methods, only intracellular ascorbic acid, but not extracellular, inhibits 2-deoxyglucose transport in HEK293 cells. As monocarboxylates such as pyruvate and lactate, are important metabolic sources, we analyzed the ascorbic acid effect on lactate transport in cultured neurons and HEK293 cells. Intracellular ascorbic acid was able to stimulate lactate transport in both cell types. Extracellular ascorbic acid did not affect this transport. Our data show that ascorbic acid inhibits glucose transport and stimulates lactate transport in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Mammalian cells frequently present functional glucose and monocarboxylate transporters, and we describe here a general effect in which ascorbic acid functions like a glucose/monocarboxylate uptake switch in tissues expressing ascorbic acid transporters.

  1. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Leesha K; Alabi, Ola D; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Gunnink, Stephen M; Schuiteman, Sam J; Strohbehn, Lauren E; Hamilton, Kathryn E; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin's inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin.

  2. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Leesha K.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Schuiteman, Sam J.; Strohbehn, Lauren E.; Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin’s inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  3. Inhibition of Intestinal Thiamin Transport in Rat Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Catherine S.; Zhu, Ercheng; Fang, Liwei; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thiamin deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with sepsis, but the mechanism by which sepsis induces thiamin deficiency is unknown. This study aimed to determine the influence of various severity of sepsis on carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake, level of expressions of thiamin transporters (thiamin transporter-1 (THTR-1) and thiamin transporter-2 (THTR-2)), and mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (MTPPT). Design Randomized, controlled study Setting Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Subjects Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into controls, mild, moderate and severe sepsis with equal number of animals in each group. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture with the cecum ligated below the cecal valve at 25 %, 50 % and 75 % of cecal length, defined as severe, moderate and mild sepsis, respectively. Control animals underwent laparotomy only. After 2 days of induced sepsis, carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake was measured using [3H]thiamin. Expressions of THTR-1, THTR-2, and MTPPT proteins and mRNA were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were also measured. Sepsis inhibited [3H]thiamin uptake and the inhibition was a function of sepsis severity. Both cell membranes thiamin transporters and MTPPT expression levels were suppressed; also levels of ATP in the intestine of animals with moderate and severe sepsis were significantly lower than that of sham operated controls. Conclusions For the first time we demonstrated that sepsis inhibited carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake as a function of sepsis severity, suppressed thiamin transporters and MTPPT, leading to ATP depletion. PMID:27065466

  4. Choline inhibition of amino acid transport in preimplantation mouse blastocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, A.L.; Haghighat, N.; Gorman, J.; Van Winkle, L.J.

    1987-05-01

    Addition of 70 mM choline chloride to Brinster's medium (140 mM Na/sup +/) inhibited uptake of approx. 1 ..mu..M (/sup 3/H)glycine, leucine, lysine and alanine in blastocysts by about 50% each during a five-minute incubation period at 37/sup 0/C, whereas 70 mM LiCl, sodium acetate and NaCl or 140 mM mannitol had no effect. They attribute the apparent linear relationship between Gly transport in blastocysts and the square of the (Na/sup +/), observed when choline was substituted for Na/sup +/ in Brinster's medium, to concomitant, concentration-dependent enhancement and inhibition of transport by Na/sup +/ and choline, respectively. As expected, Gly uptake and the (Na/sup +/) were linearly related up to 116 mM Na/sup +/, when Na/sup +/ was replaced with Li/sup +/. The rates of Na/sup +/-independent Gly and Ala uptake were <5% and <2% of the total, respectively, and similar when either Li/sup +/ or choline replaced Na/sup +/. Therefore, neither Li/sup +/ nor choline appears to substitute for Na/sup +/ in supporting Na/sup +/-dependent transport in blastocysts. Na/sup +/-independent Leu uptake was 20 times faster than Gly or Ala uptake and appeared to be inhibited by choline in blastocysts since it was about 37% slower when choline instead of Li/sup +/ was substituted for Na/sup +/. In contrast to blastocysts, choline had no effect on amino acid transport in cleavage-stage mouse embryos. The unexpected sensitivity of transport to choline in blastocysts underscores the importance of testing the effects of this substance when it is used to replace Na/sup +/ in new transport studies.

  5. Inhibition of Monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT1) by AZD3965 enhances radiosensitivity by reducing lactate transport

    PubMed Central

    Bola, Becky M.; Chadwick, Amy L.; Michopoulos, Filippos; Blount, Kathryn G.; Telfer, Brian A.; Williams, Kaye J.; Smith, Paul D; Critchlow, Susan E.; Stratford, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 by AZD3965 results in an increase in glycolysis in human tumour cell lines and xenografts. This is indicated by changes in the levels of specific glycolytic metabolites and in changes in glycolytic enzyme kinetics. These drug-induced metabolic changes translate into an inhibition of tumour growth in vivo. Thus, we combined AZD3965 with fractionated radiation to treat SCLC xenografts and showed that the combination provided a significantly greater therapeutic effect than the use of either modality alone. These results strongly support the notion of combining MCT1 inhibition with radiotherapy in the treatment of SCLC and other solid tumours. PMID:25281618

  6. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela; Said, Hamid M

    2015-07-15

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines.

  7. Salmonella infection inhibits intestinal biotin transport: cellular and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Jellbauer, Stefan; Kapadia, Rubina; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the nontyphoidal Salmonella is a common cause of food-borne disease that leads to acute gastroenteritis/diarrhea. Severe/prolonged cases of Salmonella infection could also impact host nutritional status, but little is known about its effect on intestinal absorption of vitamins, including biotin. We examined the effect of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) infection on intestinal biotin uptake using in vivo (streptomycin-pretreated mice) and in vitro [mouse (YAMC) and human (NCM460) colonic epithelial cells, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells] models. The results showed that infecting mice with wild-type S. typhimurium, but not with its nonpathogenic isogenic invA spiB mutant, leads to a significant inhibition in jejunal/colonic biotin uptake and in level of expression of the biotin transporter, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter. In contrast, infecting YAMC, NCM460, and Caco-2 cells with S. typhimurium did not affect biotin uptake. These findings suggest that the effect of S. typhimurium infection is indirect and is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, the levels of which were markedly induced in the intestine of S. typhimurium-infected mice. Consistent with this hypothesis, exposure of NCM460 cells to the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ led to a significant inhibition of biotin uptake, sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter expression, and activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. The latter effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via the NF-κB signaling pathway. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium infection inhibits intestinal biotin uptake, and that the inhibition is mediated via the action of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:25999427

  8. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  9. Inhibition of the MDR1 transporter by new phenothiazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kónya, Attila; Andor, Attila; Sátorhelyi, Péter; Németh, Klára; Kurucz, István

    2006-07-21

    The MDR1 transporter mediated efflux of different xenobiotics out of the cells serves as the most important mechanisms of the multidrug resistance in cancer cells, thus inhibition of the MDR1 transporter may increase the efficiency of anticancer drugs in the therapy. Here we describe some new phenothiazine derivatives, which possess strong in vitro MDR1 inhibitory activity. The effectiveness of the compounds on the MDR1 mediated calcein-AM efflux, ATPase activity, and colchicine resistance was proven by microplate assays and flow cytometry using recombinant and control cell lines. Some of these derivatives were more active than verapamil and one of them was at least as active as cyclosporin A. According to our results the new structural elements built in these phenothiazine type compounds increased their MDR1 inhibitory activity, which may serve as a basis of the development of an effective MDR1 inhibitor drug.

  10. Age- and sex-dependent susceptibility to phenobarbital-resistant neonatal seizures: role of chloride co-transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Kyu; Markowitz, Geoffrey J.; Kim, Shin Tae; Johnston, Michael V.; Kadam, Shilpa D.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia in the immature brain is an important cause of neonatal seizures. Temporal evolution of acquired neonatal seizures and their response to anticonvulsants are of great interest, given the unreliability of the clinical correlates and poor efficacy of first-line anti-seizure drugs. The expression and function of the electroneutral chloride co-transporters KCC2 and NKCC1 influence the anti-seizure efficacy of GABAA-agonists. To investigate ischemia-induced seizure susceptibility and efficacy of the GABAA-agonist phenobarbital (PB), with NKCC1 antagonist bumetanide (BTN) as an adjunct treatment, we utilized permanent unilateral carotid-ligation to produce acute ischemic-seizures in post-natal day 7, 10, and 12 CD1 mice. Immediate post-ligation video-electroencephalograms (EEGs) quantitatively evaluated baseline and post-treatment seizure burdens. Brains were examined for stroke-injury and western blot analyses to evaluate the expression of KCC2 and NKCC1. Severity of acute ischemic seizures post-ligation was highest at P7. PB was an efficacious anti-seizure agent at P10 and P12, but not at P7. BTN failed as an adjunct, at all ages tested and significantly blunted PB-efficacy at P10. Significant acute post-ischemic downregulation of KCC2 was detected at all ages. At P7, males displayed higher age-dependent seizure susceptibility, associated with a significant developmental lag in their KCC2 expression. This study established a novel neonatal mouse model of PB-resistant seizures that demonstrates age/sex-dependent susceptibility. The age-dependent profile of KCC2 expression and its post-insult downregulation may underlie the PB-resistance reported in this model. Blocking NKCC1 with low-dose BTN following PB treatment failed to improve PB-efficacy. PMID:26029047

  11. Photon-Inhibited Topological Transport in Quantum Well Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Aaron; Pereg-Barnea, T

    2015-09-04

    Here we provide a picture of transport in quantum well heterostructures with a periodic driving field in terms of a probabilistic occupation of the topologically protected edge states in the system. This is done by generalizing methods from the field of photon-assisted tunneling. We show that the time dependent field dresses the underlying Hamiltonian of the heterostructure and splits the system into sidebands. Each of these sidebands is occupied with a certain probability which depends on the drive frequency and strength. This leads to a reduction in the topological transport signatures of the system because of the probability to absorb or emit a photon. Therefore when the voltage is tuned to the bulk gap the conductance is smaller than the expected 2e(2)/h. We refer to this as photon-inhibited topological transport. Nevertheless, the edge modes reveal their topological origin in the robustness of the edge conductance to disorder and changes in model parameters. In this work the analogy with photon-assisted tunneling allows us to interpret the calculated conductivity and explain the sum rule observed by Kundu and Seradjeh.

  12. Chloride extrusion enhancers as novel therapeutics for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Martin; Bergeron, Marc J; Lavertu, Guillaume; Castonguay, Annie; Tripathy, Sasmita; Bonin, Robert P; Perez-Sanchez, Jimena; Boudreau, Dominic; Wang, Bin; Dumas, Lionel; Valade, Isabelle; Bachand, Karine; Jacob-Wagner, Mariève; Tardif, Christian; Kianicka, Irenej; Isenring, Paul; Attardo, Giorgio; Coull, Jeffrey A M; De Koninck, Yves

    2013-11-01

    The K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter KCC2 is responsible for maintaining low Cl(-) concentration in neurons of the central nervous system (CNS), which is essential for postsynaptic inhibition through GABA(A) and glycine receptors. Although no CNS disorders have been associated with KCC2 mutations, loss of activity of this transporter has emerged as a key mechanism underlying several neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, motor spasticity, stress, anxiety, schizophrenia, morphine-induced hyperalgesia and chronic pain. Recent reports indicate that enhancing KCC2 activity may be the favored therapeutic strategy to restore inhibition and normal function in pathological conditions involving impaired Cl(-) transport. We designed an assay for high-throughput screening that led to the identification of KCC2 activators that reduce intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl(-)]i). Optimization of a first-in-class arylmethylidine family of compounds resulted in a KCC2-selective analog (CLP257) that lowers [Cl(-)]i. CLP257 restored impaired Cl(-) transport in neurons with diminished KCC2 activity. The compound rescued KCC2 plasma membrane expression, renormalized stimulus-evoked responses in spinal nociceptive pathways sensitized after nerve injury and alleviated hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Oral efficacy for analgesia equivalent to that of pregabalin but without motor impairment was achievable with a CLP257 prodrug. These results validate KCC2 as a druggable target for CNS diseases.

  13. Dopamine transporter occupancy by RTI-55, inhibition of dopamine transport and stimulation of locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Gifford, A.N.; Volkow, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    Cocaine analogs such as RTI-55 (or {beta}CIT) with a higher affinity for the DAT are potentially useful as therapeutic drugs in cocaine abuse as well as for radiopharmaceutical use. Previously we showed that in mice RTI-55 (2 mg/Kg, i/p) reduced H-3 cocaine striatum-to-cerebellum ratios (St/Cb, {lg_bullet}) from 1.6 to 1.2 at 3 h after administration, with recovery by 12 h. In the present study we demonstrate a very similar time-course for transport {triangle} measured in striatal homo within 2 min of sacrifice. The maximum inhibition of uptake at about 1 h corresponded to about 80% of the control uptake rate, similar to the percent reduction in St/Cb. The time-course of the effect of this dose of RTI-55 on locomotor activity ({sq_bullet}) was complex, with a drop in the activity measure at 7 h, after a further injection of RTI-55, but activity remained higher than in saline controls. In spite of this complexity, which may be associated with stereotypies and/or exhaustion, the duration of increased activity is consistent with the duration of transporter blockade. These experiments support the notion that PET/SPECT measures of transporter occupancy accurately reflect transporter inhibition.

  14. Caulis Sinomenii extracts activate DA/NE transporter and inhibit 5HT transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Bi, Cheng; Qin, Guo-Wei; Guo, Li-He

    2009-08-01

    Caulis Sinomenii (QFT) has analgesic, sedative, and anxiolytic-like actions, and is proven effective for improving drug dependence that is known to be associated with abnormal monoaminergic transmission. We assessed whether QFT would be biologically active in functionally regulating monoamine transporters using CHO cells expressing dopamine transporter (DAT), norepinephrine transporter (NET), or serotonin transporter (SERT) (i.e. D8, N1, or S6 cells, respectively). Here, we showed that its primary extracts, such as QA, QC, QE, QD, and QB (QFT ethanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, alkaloid-free chloroform, and alkaloid-containing chloroform extract, respectively), and secondary extracts, such as QE-2, - 3, - 5, - 7, QD-1, - 2, - 3, - 4, - 5, and QB-1, - 2, - 3, - 4, - 5 (fractioned from QE, QD, and QB, respectively), in differing degrees, either increased DA/ NE uptake by corresponding D8/N1 cells or decreased 5HT uptake by S6 cells; wherein, QE-2, QD-3, and QE-7 were potent DA/NE uptake activators while both QE-7 and QB-5 were potent 5HT uptake inhibitors. Furthermore, the enhancement of DA/NE uptake was dependent of DAT/NET activity, and the inhibition of 5HT uptake was typical of competition. Thus, QFT extracts, especially QE-2 and QE-7 (both with stronger potencies), are novel monoamine transporter modulators functioning as DAT/ NET activators and/or SERT inhibitors, and would likely improve neuropsychological disorders through regulating monoamine transporters.

  15. Mutations in SLC12A5 in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Stödberg, Tommy; McTague, Amy; Ruiz, Arnaud J.; Hirata, Hiromi; Zhen, Juan; Long, Philip; Farabella, Irene; Meyer, Esther; Kawahara, Atsuo; Vassallo, Grace; Stivaros, Stavros M.; Bjursell, Magnus K.; Stranneheim, Henrik; Tigerschiöld, Stephanie; Persson, Bengt; Bangash, Iftikhar; Das, Krishna; Hughes, Deborah; Lesko, Nicole; Lundeberg, Joakim; Scott, Rod C.; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Smith, Holly; Gissen, Paul; Schorge, Stephanie; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Topf, Maya; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Harvey, Robert J.; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A.

    2015-01-01

    The potassium-chloride co-transporter KCC2, encoded by SLC12A5, plays a fundamental role in fast synaptic inhibition by maintaining a hyperpolarizing gradient for chloride ions. KCC2 dysfunction has been implicated in human epilepsy, but to date, no monogenic KCC2-related epilepsy disorders have been described. Here we show recessive loss-of-function SLC12A5 mutations in patients with a severe infantile-onset pharmacoresistant epilepsy syndrome, epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS). Decreased KCC2 surface expression, reduced protein glycosylation and impaired chloride extrusion contribute to loss of KCC2 activity, thereby impairing normal synaptic inhibition and promoting neuronal excitability in this early-onset epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:26333769

  16. Inhibition of ABC Transporters Abolishes Antimony Resistance in Leishmania Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Mookerjee Basu, Jayati; Mookerjee, Ananda; Banerjee, Rajdeep; Saha, Manik; Singh, Subhankar; Naskar, Ksudiram; Tripathy, Gayetri; Sinha, Prabhat K.; Pandey, Krishna; Sundar, Shyam; Bimal, Sanjeev; Das, Pradip K.; Choudhuri, Soumitra K.; Roy, Syamal

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of antimony (Sb) resistance has jeopardized the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in various countries. Previous studies have considered the part played by leishmanial parasites in antimony resistance, but the involvement of host factors in the clinical scenario remained to be investigated. Here we show that unlike infection with Sb-sensitive (Sbs) Leishmania donovani, infection with Sb-resistant (Sbr) L. donovani induces the upregulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) in host cells, resulting in a nonaccumulation of intracellular Sb following treatment with sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) favoring parasite replication. The inhibition of MRP1 and P-gp with resistance-modifying agents such as lovastatin allows Sb accumulation and parasite killing within macrophages and offers protection in an animal model in which infection with Sbr L. donovani is otherwise lethal. The occurrence of a similar scenario in clinical cases is supported by the findings that unlike monocytes from SAG-sensitive kala-azar (KA) patients, monocytes from SAG-unresponsive KA patients overexpress P-gp and MRP1 and fail to accumulate Sb following in vitro SAG treatment unless pretreated with inhibitors of ABC transporters. Thus, the expression status of MRP1 and P-gp in blood monocytes may be used as a diagnostic marker for Sb resistance and the treatment strategy can be designed accordingly. Our results also indicate that lovastatin, which can inhibit both P-gp and MRP1, might be beneficial for reverting Sb resistance in leishmaniasis as well as drug resistance in other clinical situations, including cancer. PMID:18056276

  17. Methylene blue inhibits function of the 5-HT transporter

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Murat; Isaev, Dmytro; Lorke, Dietrich E; Hasan, Muhammed; Petroianu, Georg; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methylene blue (MB) is commonly employed as a treatment for methaemoglobinaemia, malaria and vasoplegic shock. An increasing number of studies indicate that MB can cause 5-HT toxicity when administered with a 5-HT reuptake inhibitor. MB is a potent inhibitor of monoamine oxidases, but other targets that may contribute to MB toxicity have not been identified. Given the role of the 5-HT transporter (SERT) in the regulation of extracellular 5-HT concentrations, the present study aimed to characterize the effect of MB on SERT. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Live cell imaging, in conjunction with the fluorescent SERT substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium (ASP+), [3H]5-HT uptake and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to examine the effects of MB on SERT function. KEY RESULTS In EM4 cells expressing GFP-tagged human SERT (hSERT), MB concentration-dependently inhibited ASP+ accumulation (IC50: 1.4 ± 0.3 µM). A similar effect was observed in N2A cells. Uptake of [3H]5-HT was decreased by MB pretreatment. Furthermore, patch-clamp studies in hSERT expressing cells indicated that MB significantly inhibited 5-HT-evoked ion currents. Pretreatment with 8-Br-cGMP did not alter the inhibitory effect of MB on hSERT activity, and intracellular Ca2+ levels remained unchanged during MB application. Further experiments revealed that ASP+ binding to cell surface hSERT was reduced after MB treatment. In whole-cell radioligand experiments, exposure to MB (10 µM; 10 min) did not alter surface binding of the SERT ligand [125I]RTI-55. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MB modulated SERT function and suggested that SERT may be an additional target upon which MB acts to produce 5-HT toxicity. PMID:21542830

  18. The mechanistic basis for noncompetitive ibogaine inhibition of serotonin and dopamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Bulling, Simon; Schicker, Klaus; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Steinkellner, Thomas; Stockner, Thomas; Gruber, Christian W; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-05-25

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid proposed as a treatment for opiate withdrawal, has been shown to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively, in contrast to all other known inhibitors, which are competitive with substrate. Ibogaine binding to SERT increases accessibility in the permeation pathway connecting the substrate-binding site with the cytoplasm. Because of the structural similarity between ibogaine and serotonin, it had been suggested that ibogaine binds to the substrate site of SERT. The results presented here show that ibogaine binds to a distinct site, accessible from the cell exterior, to inhibit both serotonin transport and serotonin-induced ionic currents. Ibogaine noncompetitively inhibited transport by both SERT and the homologous dopamine transporter (DAT). Ibogaine blocked substrate-induced currents also in DAT and increased accessibility of the DAT cytoplasmic permeation pathway. When present on the cell exterior, ibogaine inhibited SERT substrate-induced currents, but not when it was introduced into the cytoplasm through the patch electrode. Similar to noncompetitive transport inhibition, the current block was not reversed by increasing substrate concentration. The kinetics of inhibitor binding and dissociation, as determined by their effect on SERT currents, indicated that ibogaine does not inhibit by forming a long-lived complex with SERT, but rather binds directly to the transporter in an inward-open conformation. A kinetic model for transport describing the noncompetitive action of ibogaine and the competitive action of cocaine accounts well for the results of the present study.

  19. The Mechanistic Basis for Noncompetitive Ibogaine Inhibition of Serotonin and Dopamine Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Bulling, Simon; Schicker, Klaus; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Steinkellner, Thomas; Stockner, Thomas; Gruber, Christian W.; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H.; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid proposed as a treatment for opiate withdrawal, has been shown to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively, in contrast to all other known inhibitors, which are competitive with substrate. Ibogaine binding to SERT increases accessibility in the permeation pathway connecting the substrate-binding site with the cytoplasm. Because of the structural similarity between ibogaine and serotonin, it had been suggested that ibogaine binds to the substrate site of SERT. The results presented here show that ibogaine binds to a distinct site, accessible from the cell exterior, to inhibit both serotonin transport and serotonin-induced ionic currents. Ibogaine noncompetitively inhibited transport by both SERT and the homologous dopamine transporter (DAT). Ibogaine blocked substrate-induced currents also in DAT and increased accessibility of the DAT cytoplasmic permeation pathway. When present on the cell exterior, ibogaine inhibited SERT substrate-induced currents, but not when it was introduced into the cytoplasm through the patch electrode. Similar to noncompetitive transport inhibition, the current block was not reversed by increasing substrate concentration. The kinetics of inhibitor binding and dissociation, as determined by their effect on SERT currents, indicated that ibogaine does not inhibit by forming a long-lived complex with SERT, but rather binds directly to the transporter in an inward-open conformation. A kinetic model for transport describing the noncompetitive action of ibogaine and the competitive action of cocaine accounts well for the results of the present study. PMID:22451652

  20. Organic Anion Transporter 1 Is Inhibited by Multiple Mechanisms and Shows a Transport Mode Independent of Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Adam G; Gao, Tiandai; Khan, Usman; Berrigan, Liam; Li, Mansong; Ingraham, Leslie; Pelis, Ryan M

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism by which drugs inhibit organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1) was examined. OAT1 was stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and para-aminohippurate (PAH) and 6-carboxyfluorescein were the substrates. Most compounds (10 of 14) inhibited competitively, increasing the Michaelis constant (Km) without affecting the maximal transport rate (Jmax). Others were mixed-type (lowering Jmax and increasing Km) or noncompetitive (lowering Jmax only) inhibitors. The interaction of a noncompetitive inhibitor (telmisartan) with OAT1 was examined further. Binding of telmisartan to OAT1 was observed, but translocation was not. Telmisartan did not alter the plasma membrane expression of OAT1, indicating that it lowers Jmax by reducing the turnover number. PAH transport after telmisartan treatment and its washout recovered faster in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum in the washout buffer, indicating that binding of telmisartan to OAT1 and its inhibitory effect are reversible. Together, these data suggest that telmisartan binds reversibly to a site distinct from substrate and stabilizes the transporter in a conformation unfavorable for translocation. In the absence of an exchangeable extracellular substrate, PAH efflux from CHO-OAT1 cells was relatively rapid. Telmisartan slowed PAH efflux, suggesting that some transporter-mediated efflux occurs independent of exchange. Although drug-drug interaction predictions at OAT1 assume competitive inhibition, these data show that OAT1 can be inhibited by other mechanisms, which could influence the accuracy of drug-drug interaction predictions at the transporter. Telmisartan was useful for examining how a noncompetitive inhibitor can alter OAT1 transport activity and for uncovering a transport mode independent of exchange.

  1. Inhibition of Human Drug Transporter Activities by the Pyrethroid Pesticides Allethrin and Tetramethrin

    PubMed Central

    Chedik, Lisa; Bruyere, Arnaud; Le Vee, Marc; Stieger, Bruno; Denizot, Claire; Parmentier, Yannick; Potin, Sophie; Fardel, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Pyrethroids are widely-used chemical insecticides, to which humans are commonly exposed, and known to alter functional expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Limited data have additionally suggested that drug transporters, that constitute key-actors of the drug detoxification system, may also be targeted by pyrethroids. The present study was therefore designed to analyze the potential regulatory effects of these pesticides towards activities of main ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) drug transporters, using transporter-overexpressing cells. The pyrethroids allethrin and tetramethrin were found to inhibit various ABC and SLC drug transporters, including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2, breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), organic anion transporter polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, organic anion transporter (OAT) 3, multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter (MATE) 1, organic cation transporter (OCT) 1 and OCT2, with IC50 values however ranging from 2.6 μM (OCT1 inhibition by allethrin) to 77.6 μM (OAT3 inhibition by tetramethrin) and thus much higher than pyrethroid concentrations (in the nM range) reached in environmentally pyrethroid-exposed humans. By contrast, allethrin and tetramethrin cis-stimulated OATP2B1 activity and failed to alter activities of OATP1B3, OAT1 and MATE2-K, whereas P-glycoprotein activity was additionally moderately inhibited. Twelve other pyrethoids used at 100 μM did not block activities of the various investigated transporters, or only moderately inhibited some of them (inhibition by less than 50%). In silico analysis of structure-activity relationships next revealed that molecular parameters, including molecular weight and lipophilicity, are associated with transporter inhibition by allethrin/tetramethrin and successfully predicted transporter inhibition by the pyrethroids imiprothrin and prallethrin. Taken together, these data fully demonstrated that two pyrethoids, i.e., allethrin and tetramethrin, can

  2. A1 adenosine receptors inhibit chloride transport in the shark rectal gland. Dissociation of inhibition and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, G G; Poeschla, E M; Barron, H V; Forrest, J N

    1990-01-01

    In the in vitro perfused rectal gland of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), the adenosine analogue 2-chloroadenosine (2Clado) completely and reversibly inhibited forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion with an IC50 of 5 nM. Other A1 receptor agonists including cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), N-ethylcarboxamideadenosine (NECA) and R-phenylisopropyl-adenosine (R-PIA) also completely inhibited forskolin stimulated chloride secretion. The "S" stereoisomer of PIA (S-PIA) was a less potent inhibitor of forskolin stimulated chloride secretion, consistent with the affinity profile of PIA stereoisomers for an A1 receptor. The adenosine receptor antagonists 8-phenyltheophylline and 8-cyclopentyltheophylline completely blocked the effect of 2Clado to inhibit forskolin-stimulated chloride secretion. When chloride secretion and tissue cyclic (c)AMP content were determined simultaneously in perfused glands, 2Clado completely inhibited secretion but only inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation by 34-40%, indicating that the mechanism of inhibition of secretion by 2Clado is at least partially cAMP independent. Consistent with these results, A1 receptor agonists only modestly inhibited (9-15%) forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and 2Clado markedly inhibited chloride secretion stimulated by a permeant cAMP analogue, 8-chlorophenylthio cAMP (8CPT cAMP). These findings provide the first evidence for a high affinity A1 adenosine receptor that inhibits hormone stimulated ion transport in a model epithelia. A major portion of this inhibition occurs by a mechanism that is independent of the cAMP messenger system. PMID:1970583

  3. Estradiol augments while progesterone inhibits arginine transport in human endothelial cells through modulation of cationic amino acid transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Bentur, Ohad S; Schwartz, Doron; Chernichovski, Tamara; Ingbir, Merav; Weinstein, Talia; Chernin, Gil; Schwartz, Idit F

    2015-08-15

    Decreased generation of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) characterizes endothelial dysfunction (ECD). Delivery of arginine to eNOS by cationic amino acid transporter-1 (CAT-1) was shown to modulate eNOS activity. We found in female rats, but not in males, that CAT-1 activity is preserved with age and in chronic renal failure, two experimental models of ECD. In contrast, during pregnancy CAT-1 is inhibited. We hypothesize that female sex hormones regulate arginine transport. Arginine uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) was determined following incubation with either 17β-estradiol (E2) or progesterone. Exposure to E2 (50 and 100 nM) for 30 min resulted in a significant increase in arginine transport and reduction in phosphorylated CAT-1 (the inactive form) protein content. This was coupled with a decrease in phosphorylated MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Progesterone (1 and 100 pM for 30 min) attenuated arginine uptake and increased phosphorylated CAT-1, phosphorylated protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein content. GO-6976 (PKCα inhibitor) prevented the progesterone-induced decrease in arginine transport. Coincubation with both progesterone and estrogen for 30 min resulted in attenuated arginine transport. While estradiol increases arginine transport and CAT-1 activity through modulation of constitutive signaling transduction pathways involving ERK, progesterone inhibits arginine transport and CAT-1 via both PKCα and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, an effect that predominates over estradiol.

  4. Molecular mechanism: the human dopamine transporter histidine 547 regulates basal and HIV-1 Tat protein-inhibited dopamine transport

    PubMed Central

    Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicated as a risk determinant of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. HIV-1 Tat protein increases synaptic dopamine (DA) levels by directly inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) activity, ultimately leading to dopaminergic neuron damage. Through integrated computational modeling prediction and experimental validation, we identified that histidine547 on human DAT (hDAT) is critical for regulation of basal DA uptake and Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport. Compared to wild type hDAT (WT hDAT), mutation of histidine547 (H547A) displayed a 196% increase in DA uptake. Other substitutions of histidine547 showed that DA uptake was not altered in H547R but decreased by 99% in H547P and 60% in H547D, respectively. These mutants did not alter DAT surface expression or surface DAT binding sites. H547 mutants attenuated Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport observed in WT hDAT. H547A displays a differential sensitivity to PMA- or BIM-induced activation or inhibition of DAT function relative to WT hDAT, indicating a change in basal PKC activity in H547A. These findings demonstrate that histidine547 on hDAT plays a crucial role in stabilizing basal DA transport and Tat-DAT interaction. This study provides mechanistic insights into identifying targets on DAT for Tat binding and improving DAT-mediated dysfunction of DA transmission. PMID:27966610

  5. Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide inhibit cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Jiang, Wei; Wu, Bing; Yu, Jing; Yu, Haiyan; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Cherr, Gary N

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of graphene and graphene oxide (GO) are considered to be environmentally safe. In this study, we analyzed the potential effects of graphene and GO at relatively low concentrations on cellular xenobiotic defense system mediated by efflux transporters. The results showed that graphene (<0.5 μg/mL) and GO (<20 μg/mL) did not decrease cell viability, generate reactive oxygen species, or disrupt mitochondrial function. However, graphene and GO at the nontoxic concentrations could increase calcein-AM (CAM, an indicator of membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter) activity) accumulation, indicating inhibition of ABC transporters' efflux capabilities. This inhibition was observed even at 0.005 μg/mL graphene and 0.05 μg/mL GO, which are 100 times and 400 times lower than their lowest toxic concentration from cytotoxicity experiments, respectively. The inhibition of ABC transporters significantly increased the toxicity of paraquat and arsenic, known substrates of ABC transporters. The inhibition of ABC transporters was found to be based on graphene and GO damaging the plasma membrane structure and fluidity, thus altering functions of transmembrane ABC transporters. This study demonstrates that low levels of graphene and GO are not environmentally safe since they can significantly make cell more susceptible to other xenobiotics, and this chemosensitizing activity should be considered in the risk assessment of graphene and GO.

  6. Inhibition of human GLUT1 and GLUT5 by plant carbohydrate products; insights into transport specificity

    PubMed Central

    George Thompson, Alayna M.; Iancu, Cristina V.; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hanh; Kim, Doman; Choe, Jun-yong

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporters GLUT1 (transports glucose) and GLUT5 (transports fructose), in addition to their functions in normal metabolism, have been implicated in several diseases including cancer and diabetes. While GLUT1 has several inhibitors, none have been described for GLUT5. By transport activity assays we found two plant products, rubusoside (from Rubus suavissimus) and astragalin-6-glucoside (a glycosylated derivative of astragalin, from Phytolacca americana) that inhibited human GLUT5. These plants are utilized in traditional medicine: R. suavissimus for weight loss and P. americana for cancer treatment, but the molecular interactions of these products are unknown. Rubusoside also inhibited human GLUT1, but astragalin-6-glucoside did not. In silico analysis of rubusoside:protein interactions pinpointed a major difference in substrate cavity between these transporters, a residue that is a tryptophan in GLUT1 but an alanine in GLUT5. Investigation of mutant proteins supported the importance of this position in ligand specificity. GLUT1W388A became susceptible to inhibition by astragalin-6-glucoside and resistant to rubusoside. GLUT5A396W transported fructose and also glucose, and maintained inhibition by rubusoside and astragalin-6-glucoside. Astragalin-6-glucoside can serve as a starting point in the design of specific inhibitors for GLUT5. The application of these studies to understanding glucose transporters and their interaction with substrates and ligands is discussed. PMID:26306809

  7. Antipsychotics inhibit glucose transport: Determination of olanzapine binding site in Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose/H(+) symporter.

    PubMed

    Babkin, Petr; George Thompson, Alayna M; Iancu, Cristina V; Walters, D Eric; Choe, Jun-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The antipsychotic drug olanzapine is widely prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, it often causes unwanted side effects, including diabetes, due to disruption of insulin-dependant glucose metabolism through a mechanism yet to be elucidated. To determine if olanzapine can affect the first step in glucose metabolism - glucose transport inside cells - we investigated the effect of this drug on the transport activity of a model glucose transporter. The glucose transporter from Staphylococcus epidermidis (GlcPSe) is specific for glucose, inhibited by various human glucose transporter (GLUT) inhibitors, has high sequence and structure homology to GLUTs, and is readily amenable to transport assay, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. We found that olanzapine inhibits glucose transport of GlcPSe with an IC50 0.9 ± 0.1 mM. Computational docking of olanzapine to the GlcPSe structure revealed potential binding sites that were further examined through mutagenesis and transport assay to identify residues important for olanzapine inhibition. These investigations suggest that olanzapine binds in a polar region of the cytosolic part of the transporter, and interacts with residues R129, strictly conserved in all GLUTs, and N136, conserved in only a few GLUTs, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4. We propose that olanzapine inhibits GlcPSe by impeding the alternating opening and closing of the substrate cavity necessary for glucose transport. It accomplishes this by disrupting a key salt bridge formed by conserved residues R129 and E362, that stabilizes the outward-facing conformation of the transporter.

  8. Mechanism of Paroxetine (Paxil) Inhibition of the Serotonin Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Bruce A.; Nagarajan, Anu; Forrest, Lucy R.; Singh, Satinder K.

    2016-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is an integral membrane protein that exploits preexisting sodium-, chloride-, and potassium ion gradients to catalyze the thermodynamically unfavorable movement of synaptic serotonin into the presynaptic neuron. SERT has garnered significant clinical attention partly because it is the target of multiple psychoactive agents, including the antidepressant paroxetine (Paxil), the most potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor known. However, the binding site and orientation of paroxetine in SERT remain controversial. To provide molecular insight, we constructed SERT homology models based on the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter and docked paroxetine to these models. We tested the predicted binding configurations with a combination of radioligand binding and flux assays on wild-type and mutant SERTs. Our data suggest that the orientation of paroxetine, specifically its fluorophenyl ring, in SERT’s substrate binding site directly depends on this pocket’s charge distribution, and thereby provide an avenue toward understanding and enhancing high-affinity antidepressant activity. PMID:27032980

  9. Developing Hypothetical Inhibition Mechanism of Novel Urea Transporter B Inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Tou, Weng Ieong; Zhou, Hong; Li, Fei; Ren, Huiwen; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian; Yang, Baoxue

    2014-07-01

    Urea transporter B (UT-B) is a membrane channel protein that specifically transports urea. UT-B null mouse exhibited urea selective urine concentrating ability deficiency, which suggests the potential clinical applications of the UT-B inhibitors as novel diuretics. Primary high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS) of 50000 small-molecular drug-like compounds identified 2319 hit compounds. These 2319 compounds were screened by high-throughput screening using an erythrocyte osmotic lysis assay. Based on the pharmacological data, putative UT-B binding sites were identified by structure-based drug design and validated by ligand-based and QSAR model. Additionally, UT-B structural and functional characteristics under inhibitors treated and untreated conditions were simulated by molecular dynamics (MD). As the result, we identified four classes of compounds with UT-B inhibitory activity and predicted a human UT-B model, based on which computative binding sites were identified and validated. A novel potential mechanism of UT-B inhibitory activity was discovered by comparing UT-B from different species. Results suggest residue PHE198 in rat and mouse UT-B might block the inhibitor migration pathway. Inhibitory mechanisms of UT-B inhibitors and the functions of key residues in UT-B were proposed. The binding site analysis provides a structural basis for lead identification and optimization of UT-B inhibitors.

  10. Developing Hypothetical Inhibition Mechanism of Novel Urea Transporter B Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Tou, Weng Ieong; Zhou, Hong; Li, Fei; Ren, Huiwen; Chen, Calvin Yu-Chian; Yang, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    Urea transporter B (UT-B) is a membrane channel protein that specifically transports urea. UT-B null mouse exhibited urea selective urine concentrating ability deficiency, which suggests the potential clinical applications of the UT-B inhibitors as novel diuretics. Primary high-throughput virtual screening (HTVS) of 50000 small-molecular drug-like compounds identified 2319 hit compounds. These 2319 compounds were screened by high-throughput screening using an erythrocyte osmotic lysis assay. Based on the pharmacological data, putative UT-B binding sites were identified by structure-based drug design and validated by ligand-based and QSAR model. Additionally, UT-B structural and functional characteristics under inhibitors treated and untreated conditions were simulated by molecular dynamics (MD). As the result, we identified four classes of compounds with UT-B inhibitory activity and predicted a human UT-B model, based on which computative binding sites were identified and validated. A novel potential mechanism of UT-B inhibitory activity was discovered by comparing UT-B from different species. Results suggest residue PHE198 in rat and mouse UT-B might block the inhibitor migration pathway. Inhibitory mechanisms of UT-B inhibitors and the functions of key residues in UT-B were proposed. The binding site analysis provides a structural basis for lead identification and optimization of UT-B inhibitors. PMID:25047372

  11. Inhibition of retrograde transport protects mice from lethal ricin challenge.

    PubMed

    Stechmann, Bahne; Bai, Siau-Kun; Gobbo, Emilie; Lopez, Roman; Merer, Goulven; Pinchard, Suzy; Panigai, Laetitia; Tenza, Danièle; Raposo, Graça; Beaumelle, Bruno; Sauvaire, Didier; Gillet, Daniel; Johannes, Ludger; Barbier, Julien

    2010-04-16

    Bacterial Shiga-like toxins are virulence factors that constitute a significant public health threat worldwide, and the plant toxin ricin is a potential bioterror weapon. To gain access to their cytosolic target, ribosomal RNA, these toxins follow the retrograde transport route from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, via endosomes and the Golgi apparatus. Here, we used high-throughput screening to identify small molecule inhibitors that protect cells from ricin and Shiga-like toxins. We identified two compounds that selectively block retrograde toxin trafficking at the early endosome-TGN interface, without affecting compartment morphology, endogenous retrograde cargos, or other trafficking steps, demonstrating an unexpected degree of selectivity and lack of toxicity. In mice, one compound clearly protects from lethal nasal exposure to ricin. Our work discovers the first small molecule that shows efficacy against ricin in animal experiments and identifies the retrograde route as a potential therapeutic target.

  12. Caffeine inhibits glucose transport by binding at the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jay M; Cura, Anthony J; Lloyd, Kenneth P; Carruthers, Anthony

    2015-05-15

    Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) is the primary glucose transport protein of the cardiovascular system and astroglia. A recent study proposes that caffeine uncompetitive inhibition of GLUT1 results from interactions at an exofacial GLUT1 site. Intracellular ATP is also an uncompetitive GLUT1 inhibitor and shares structural similarities with caffeine, suggesting that caffeine acts at the previously characterized endofacial GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site. We tested this by confirming that caffeine uncompetitively inhibits GLUT1-mediated 3-O-methylglucose uptake in human erythrocytes [Vmax and Km for transport are reduced fourfold; Ki(app) = 3.5 mM caffeine]. ATP and AMP antagonize caffeine inhibition of 3-O-methylglucose uptake in erythrocyte ghosts by increasing Ki(app) for caffeine inhibition of transport from 0.9 ± 0.3 mM in the absence of intracellular nucleotides to 2.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.5 mM in the presence of 5 mM intracellular ATP or AMP, respectively. Extracellular ATP has no effect on sugar uptake or its inhibition by caffeine. Caffeine and ATP displace the fluorescent ATP derivative, trinitrophenyl-ATP, from the GLUT1 nucleotide-binding site, but d-glucose and the transport inhibitor cytochalasin B do not. Caffeine, but not ATP, inhibits cytochalasin B binding to GLUT1. Like ATP, caffeine renders the GLUT1 carboxy-terminus less accessible to peptide-directed antibodies, but cytochalasin B and d-glucose do not. These results suggest that the caffeine-binding site bridges two nonoverlapping GLUT1 endofacial sites-the regulatory, nucleotide-binding site and the cytochalasin B-binding site. Caffeine binding to GLUT1 mimics the action of ATP but not cytochalasin B on sugar transport. Molecular docking studies support this hypothesis.

  13. Substrate-Dependent Ligand Inhibition of the Human Organic Cation Transporter OCT2

    PubMed Central

    Belzer, Mathew; Morales, Mark; Jagadish, Bhumasamudram; Mash, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    Organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) mediates the initial step in renal secretion of organic cations: uptake from the blood, across the basolateral membrane, and into the renal proximal tubule cells. Because of its potential as a target for unwanted drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considerable attention has been directed toward understanding the basis of OCT2 selectivity. These studies typically assess selectivity based on ligand inhibition profiles for OCT2-mediated transport of a probe substrate. However, little attention has been given to the potential influence of the substrate on the profile of ligand inhibition. Here we compared the IC50 values obtained for a set of structurally distinct inhibitors against OCT2-mediated transport of three structurally distinct substrates: 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP); metformin; and a novel fluorescent substrate, N,N,N-trimethyl-2-[methyl(7-nitrobenzo[c][l,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)amino]ethanaminium iodide (NBD-MTMA). The median IC50 value for inhibition of MPP transport was 9-fold higher than that for inhibition of metformin transport. Similarly, the median IC50 value for inhibition of MPP transport was 5-fold higher than that for NBD-MTMA transport. However, this was not a systematic difference in inhibitory efficacy; the ratio of IC50 values, MPP versus NBD-MTMA, ranged from 88-fold (ipratropium) to 0.3-fold (metformin). These data show that 1) the choice of OCT2 substrate significantly influences both quantitative and qualitative inhibitory interactions with cationic drugs; and 2) ligand interactions with OCT2 are not restricted to competition for a common ligand binding site, consistent with a binding surface characterized by multiple, possibly overlapping interaction sites. Development of predictive models of DDIs with OCT2 must take into account the substrate dependence of ligand interaction with this protein. PMID:23709117

  14. Functional mutations in mouse norepinephrine transporter reduce sensitivity to cocaine inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Hill, Erik R; Gu, Howard H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The transporters of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are molecular targets of cocaine, amphetamine, and therapeutic antidepressants. The residues involved in binding these drugs are unknown. We have performed several rounds of random and site-directed mutagenesis in the mouse norepinephrine transporter and screened for mutants with altered sensitivity to cocaine inhibition of substrate uptake. We have identified a triple mutation that retains close to wild-type transport function but displays a 37-fold decrease in cocaine sensitivity and 24-fold decrease in desipramine sensitivity. In contrast, the mutant’s sensitivities to amphetamine, methamphetamine, and methylphenidate are only slightly changed. Our data reveal critical residues contributing to the potent uptake inhibitions by these important drugs. Furthermore, this drug-resistant triple mutant can be used to generate a unique knock-in mouse line to study the role of norepinephrine transporter in the addictive effects of cocaine and the therapeutic effects of desipramine. PMID:18824182

  15. Thienoquinolins exert diuresis by strongly inhibiting UT-A urea transporters.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huiwen; Wang, Yanhua; Xing, Yongning; Ran, Jianhua; Liu, Ming; Lei, Tianluo; Zhou, Hong; Li, Runtao; Sands, Jeff M; Yang, Baoxue

    2014-12-15

    Urea transporters (UT) play an important role in the urine concentration mechanism by mediating intrarenal urea recycling, suggesting that UT inhibitors could have therapeutic use as a novel class of diuretic. Recently, we found a thienoquinolin UT inhibitor, PU-14, that exhibited diuretic activity. The purpose of this study was to identify more potent UT inhibitors that strongly inhibit UT-A isoforms in the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD). Efficient thienoquinolin UT inhibitors were identified by structure-activity relationship analysis. Urea transport inhibition activity was assayed in perfused rat terminal IMCDs. Diuretic activity of the compound was determined in rats and mice using metabolic cages. The results show that the compound PU-48 exhibited potent UT-A inhibition activity. The inhibition was 69.5% with an IC50 of 0.32 μM. PU-48 significantly inhibited urea transport in perfused rat terminal IMCDs. PU-48 caused significant diuresis in UT-B null mice, which indicates that UT-A is the target of PU-48. The diuresis caused by PU-48 did not change blood Na(+), K(+), or Cl(-) levels or nonurea solute excretion in rats and mice. No toxicity was detected in cells or animals treated with PU-48. The results indicate that thienoquinolin UT inhibitors induce a diuresis by inhibiting UT-A in the IMCD. This suggests that they may have the potential to be developed as a novel class of diuretics with fewer side effects than classical diuretics.

  16. Interplay between inhibited transport and reaction in nanoporous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, David Michael

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a detailed formulation of reaction and diffusion dynamics of molecules in confined pores such as mesoporous silica and zeolites. A general reaction-diffusion model and discrete Monte Carlo simulations are presented. Both transient and steady state behavior is covered. Failure of previous mean-field models for these systems is explained and discussed. A coarse-grained, generalized hydrodynamic model is developed that accurately captures the interplay between reaction and restricted transport in these systems. This method incorporates the non-uniform chemical diffusion behavior present in finite pores with multi-component diffusion. Two methods of calculating these diffusion values are developed: a random walk based approach and a driven diffusion model based on an extension of Fick's law. The effects of reaction, diffusion, pore length, and catalytic site distribution are investigated. In addition to strictly single file motion, quasi-single file diffusion is incorporated into the model to match a range of experimental systems. The connection between these experimental systems and model parameters is made through Langevin dynamics modeling of particles in confined pores.

  17. Manganese Toxicity Inhibited Root Growth by Disrupting Auxin Biosynthesis and Transport in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingjing; Wang, Wenying; Zhou, Huakun; Wang, Ruling; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Huichun; Pan, Xiangliang; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mn toxicity inhibits both primary root (PR) growth and lateral root development. However, the mechanism underlying Mn-mediated root growth inhibition remains to be further elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of auxin in Mn-mediated inhibition of PR growth in Arabidopsis using physiological and genetic approaches. Mn toxicity inhibits PR elongation by reducing meristematic cell division potential. Mn toxicity also reduced auxin levels in root tips by reducing IAA biosynthesis and down-regulating the expression of auxin efflux carriers PIN4 and PIN7. Loss of function pin4 and pin7 mutants showed less inhibition of root growth than col-0 seedlings. These results indicated that this inhibitory effect of Mn toxicity on PR growth was mediated by affecting auxin biosynthesis and the expression of auxin efflux transporters PIN4 and PIN7. PMID:28316607

  18. Manganese Toxicity Inhibited Root Growth by Disrupting Auxin Biosynthesis and Transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Wang, Wenying; Zhou, Huakun; Wang, Ruling; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Huichun; Pan, Xiangliang; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mn toxicity inhibits both primary root (PR) growth and lateral root development. However, the mechanism underlying Mn-mediated root growth inhibition remains to be further elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of auxin in Mn-mediated inhibition of PR growth in Arabidopsis using physiological and genetic approaches. Mn toxicity inhibits PR elongation by reducing meristematic cell division potential. Mn toxicity also reduced auxin levels in root tips by reducing IAA biosynthesis and down-regulating the expression of auxin efflux carriers PIN4 and PIN7. Loss of function pin4 and pin7 mutants showed less inhibition of root growth than col-0 seedlings. These results indicated that this inhibitory effect of Mn toxicity on PR growth was mediated by affecting auxin biosynthesis and the expression of auxin efflux transporters PIN4 and PIN7.

  19. Trypanocidal Effect of Isotretinoin through the Inhibition of Polyamine and Amino Acid Transporters in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Reigada, Chantal; Valera-Vera, Edward A; Sayé, Melisa; Errasti, Andrea E; Avila, Carla C; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2017-03-01

    Polyamines are essential compounds to all living organisms and in the specific case of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, they are exclusively obtained through transport processes since this parasite is auxotrophic for polyamines. Previous works reported that retinol acetate inhibits Leishmania growth and decreases its intracellular polyamine concentration. The present work describes a combined strategy of drug repositioning by virtual screening followed by in vitro assays to find drugs able to inhibit TcPAT12, the only polyamine transporter described in T. cruzi. After a screening of 3000 FDA-approved drugs, 7 retinoids with medical use were retrieved and used for molecular docking assays with TcPAT12. From the docked molecules, isotretinoin, a well-known drug used for acne treatment, showed the best interaction score with TcPAT12 and was selected for further in vitro studies. Isotretinoin inhibited the polyamine transport, as well as other amino acid transporters from the same protein family (TcAAAP), with calculated IC50 values in the range of 4.6-10.3 μM. It also showed a strong inhibition of trypomastigote burst from infected cells, with calculated IC50 of 130 nM (SI = 920) being significantly less effective on the epimastigote stage (IC50 = 30.6 μM). The effect of isotretinoin on the parasites plasma membrane permeability and on mammalian cell viability was tested, and no change was observed. Autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies were detected as part of the mechanisms of isotretinoin-induced death indicating that the inhibition of transporters by isotretinoin causes nutrient starvation that triggers autophagic and apoptotic processes. In conclusion, isotretinoin is a promising trypanocidal drug since it is a multi-target inhibitor of essential metabolites transporters, in addition to being an FDA-approved drug largely used in humans, which could reduce significantly the requirements for its possible application in the treatment of

  20. Trypanocidal Effect of Isotretinoin through the Inhibition of Polyamine and Amino Acid Transporters in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Reigada, Chantal; Valera-Vera, Edward A.; Sayé, Melisa; Errasti, Andrea E.; Avila, Carla C.; Miranda, Mariana R.; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2017-01-01

    Polyamines are essential compounds to all living organisms and in the specific case of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, they are exclusively obtained through transport processes since this parasite is auxotrophic for polyamines. Previous works reported that retinol acetate inhibits Leishmania growth and decreases its intracellular polyamine concentration. The present work describes a combined strategy of drug repositioning by virtual screening followed by in vitro assays to find drugs able to inhibit TcPAT12, the only polyamine transporter described in T. cruzi. After a screening of 3000 FDA-approved drugs, 7 retinoids with medical use were retrieved and used for molecular docking assays with TcPAT12. From the docked molecules, isotretinoin, a well-known drug used for acne treatment, showed the best interaction score with TcPAT12 and was selected for further in vitro studies. Isotretinoin inhibited the polyamine transport, as well as other amino acid transporters from the same protein family (TcAAAP), with calculated IC50 values in the range of 4.6–10.3 μM. It also showed a strong inhibition of trypomastigote burst from infected cells, with calculated IC50 of 130 nM (SI = 920) being significantly less effective on the epimastigote stage (IC50 = 30.6 μM). The effect of isotretinoin on the parasites plasma membrane permeability and on mammalian cell viability was tested, and no change was observed. Autophagosomes and apoptotic bodies were detected as part of the mechanisms of isotretinoin-induced death indicating that the inhibition of transporters by isotretinoin causes nutrient starvation that triggers autophagic and apoptotic processes. In conclusion, isotretinoin is a promising trypanocidal drug since it is a multi-target inhibitor of essential metabolites transporters, in addition to being an FDA-approved drug largely used in humans, which could reduce significantly the requirements for its possible application in the treatment of

  1. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ricin toxin retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-04-08

    Ricin is a member of the ubiquitous family of plant and bacterial AB toxins that gain entry into the cytosol of host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and retrograde traffic through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). While a few ricin toxin-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been identified, the mechanisms by which these antibodies prevent toxin-induced cell death are largely unknown. Using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and a TGN-specific sulfation assay, we demonstrate that 24B11, a MAb against ricin's binding subunit (RTB), associates with ricin in solution or when prebound to cell surfaces and then markedly enhances toxin uptake into host cells. Following endocytosis, however, toxin-antibody complexes failed to reach the TGN; instead, they were shunted to Rab7-positive late endosomes and LAMP-1-positive lysosomes. Monovalent 24B11 Fab fragments also interfered with toxin retrograde transport, indicating that neither cross-linking of membrane glycoproteins/glycolipids nor the recently identified intracellular Fc receptor is required to derail ricin en route to the TGN. Identification of the mechanism(s) by which antibodies like 24B11 neutralize ricin will advance our fundamental understanding of protein trafficking in mammalian cells and may lead to the discovery of new classes of toxin inhibitors and therapeutics for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Ricin is the prototypic member of the AB family of medically important plant and bacterial toxins that includes cholera and Shiga toxins. Ricin is also a category B biothreat agent. Despite ongoing efforts to develop vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against ricin, very little is known about the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize this toxin. In general, it is thought that antibodies simply prevent toxins from attaching to cell surface receptors or promote their clearance through Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated uptake

  2. Manassantin B inhibits melanosome transport in melanocytes by disrupting the melanophilin-myosin Va interaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huikyoung; Choi, Hyunjung; Joo, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Daegun; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2012-11-01

    Human skin hyperpigmentation disorders occur when the synthesis and/or distribution of melanin increases. The distribution of melanin in the skin is achieved by melanosome transport and transfer. The transport of melanosomes, the organelles where melanin is made, in a melanocyte precedes the transfer of the melanosomes to a keratinocyte. Therefore, hyperpigmentation can be regulated by decreasing melanosome transport. In this study, we found that an extract of Saururus chinensis Baill (ESCB) and one of its components, manassantin B, inhibited melanosome transport in Melan-a melanocytes and normal human melanocytes (NHMs). Manassantin B disturbed melanosome transport by disrupting the interaction between melanophilin and myosin Va. Manassantin B is neither a direct nor an indirect inhibitor of tyrosinase. The total melanin content was not reduced when melanosome transport was inhibited in a Melan-a melanocyte monoculture by manassantin B. Manassantin B decreased melanin content only when Melan-a melanocytes were co-cultured with SP-1 keratinocytes or stimulated by α-MSH. Therefore, we propose that specific inhibitors of melanosome transport, such as manassantin B, are potential candidate or lead compounds for the development of agents to treat undesirable hyperpigmentation of the skin.

  3. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  4. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport.

    PubMed

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T C; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-08-09

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax.

  5. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T.C.; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax. PMID:27283492

  6. Common drugs inhibit human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1)-mediated neurotransmitter uptake.

    PubMed

    Boxberger, Kelli H; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Lampe, Jed N

    2014-06-01

    The human organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is a polyspecific transporter involved in the uptake of positively charged and neutral small molecules in the liver. To date, few endogenous compounds have been identified as OCT1 substrates; more importantly, the effect of drugs on endogenous substrate transport has not been examined. In this study, we established monoamine neurotransmitters as substrates for OCT1, specifically characterizing serotonin transport in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Kinetic analysis yielded a Km of 197 micomolar and a Vmax of 561 pmol/mg protein/minute for serotonin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that serotonin uptake was inhibited by diphenhydramine, fluoxetine, imatinib, and verapamil, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. These results were recapitulated in primary human hepatocytes, suggesting that OCT1 plays a significant role in hepatic elimination of serotonin and that xenobiotics may alter the elimination of endogenous compounds as a result of interactions at the transporter level.

  7. Mangiferin Inhibits Renal Urate Reabsorption by Modulating Urate Transporters in Experimental Hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Gao, Lihui; Niu, Yanfen; Zhou, Yuanfang; Lin, Hua; Jiang, Jing; Kong, Xiangfu; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Mangiferin, a natural glucosyl xanthone from the leaves of Mangifera indica L., was previously shown to exert potent hypouricemic effects associated with inhibition of the activity of xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase. The present study aimed to evaluate its uricosuric effect and possible molecular mechanisms underlying the renal urate transporters responsible for urate reabsorption in vivo. Mangiferin (1.5-24.0 mg/kg) was administered intragastrically to hyperuricemic mice and rats induced by the intraperitoneal injection of uric acid and potassium oxonate, respectively. The uricosuric effect was evaluated by determining the serum and urinary urate levels as well as fractional excretion of uric acid (FEUA). The mRNA and protein levels of renal urate-anion transporter 1 (URAT1), organic anion transporter 10 (OAT10), glucose transporter 9 (GLUT9), and PDZ domain-containing protein (PDZK1) were analyzed. The administration of mangiferin significantly decreased the serum urate levels in hyperuricemic mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In hyperuricemic rats, mangiferin also reduced the serum urate levels and increased the urinary urate levels and FEUA. These results indicate that mangiferin has uricosuric effects. Further examination showed that mangiferin markedly inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of renal URAT1, OAT10, and GLUT9 in hyperuricemic rats, but did not interfere with PDZK1 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that mangiferin promotes urate excretion by the kidney, which may be related to the inhibition of urate reabsorption via downregulation of renal urate transporters.

  8. Potent and Selective Inhibition of Plasma Membrane Monoamine Transporter by HIV Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Haichuan; Hu, Tao; Foti, Robert S.; Pan, Yongmei; Swaan, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a major uptake-2 monoamine transporter that shares extensive substrate and inhibitor overlap with organic cation transporters 1–3 (OCT1–3). Currently, there are no PMAT-specific inhibitors available that can be used in in vitro and in vivo studies to differentiate between PMAT and OCT activities. In this study, we showed that IDT307 (4-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium iodide), a fluorescent analog of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), is a transportable substrate for PMAT and that IDT307-based fluorescence assay can be used to rapidly identify and characterize PMAT inhibitors. Using the fluorescent substrate-based assays, we analyzed the interactions of eight human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) with human PMAT and OCT1–3 in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells stably transfected with individual transporters. Our data revealed that PMAT and OCTs exhibit distinct sensitivity and inhibition patterns toward HIV PIs. PMAT is most sensitive to PI inhibition whereas OCT2 and OCT3 are resistant. OCT1 showed an intermediate sensitivity and a distinct inhibition profile from PMAT. Importantly, lopinavir is a potent PMAT inhibitor and exhibited >120 fold selectivity toward PMAT (IC50 = 1.4 ± 0.2 µM) over OCT1 (IC50 = 174 ± 40 µM). Lopinavir has no inhibitory effect on OCT2 or OCT3 at maximal tested concentrations. Lopinavir also exhibited no or much weaker interactions with uptake-1 monoamine transporters. Together, our results reveal that PMAT and OCTs have distinct specificity exemplified by their differential interaction with HIV PIs. Further, we demonstrate that lopinavir can be used as a selective PMAT inhibitor to differentiate PMAT-mediated monoamine and organic cation transport from those mediated by OCT1–3. PMID:26285765

  9. Extracellular ATP inhibits root gravitropism at concentrations that inhibit polar auxin transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Wenqiang; Brady, Shari R.; Sun, Yu; Muday, Gloria K.; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Raising the level of extracellular ATP to mM concentrations similar to those found inside cells can block gravitropism of Arabidopsis roots. When plants are grown in Murashige and Skoog medium supplied with 1 mM ATP, their roots grow horizontally instead of growing straight down. Medium with 2 mM ATP induces root curling, and 3 mM ATP stimulates lateral root growth. When plants are transferred to medium containing exogenous ATP, the gravity response is reduced or in some cases completely blocked by ATP. Equivalent concentrations of ADP or inorganic phosphate have slight but usually statistically insignificant effects, suggesting the specificity of ATP in these responses. The ATP effects may be attributable to the disturbance of auxin distribution in roots by exogenously applied ATP, because extracellular ATP can alter the pattern of auxin-induced gene expression in DR5-beta-glucuronidase transgenic plants and increase the response sensitivity of plant roots to exogenously added auxin. The presence of extracellular ATP also decreases basipetal auxin transport in a dose-dependent fashion in both maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis roots and increases the retention of [(3)H]indole-3-acetic acid in root tips of maize. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effects of extracellular ATP on auxin distribution may happen at the level of auxin export. The potential role of the trans-plasma membrane ATP gradient in auxin export and plant root gravitropism is discussed.

  10. Systems pharmacology modeling of drug‐induced hyperbilirubinemia: Differentiating hepatotoxicity and inhibition of enzymes/transporters

    PubMed Central

    Battista, C; Woodhead, JL; Stahl, SH; Mettetal, JT; Watkins, PB; Siler, SQ; Howell, BA

    2017-01-01

    Elevations in serum bilirubin during drug treatment may indicate global liver dysfunction and a high risk of liver failure. However, drugs also can increase serum bilirubin in the absence of hepatic injury by inhibiting specific enzymes/transporters. We constructed a mechanistic model of bilirubin disposition based on known functional polymorphisms in bilirubin metabolism/transport. Using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model‐predicted drug exposure and enzyme/transporter inhibition constants determined in vitro, our model correctly predicted indinavir‐mediated hyperbilirubinemia in humans and rats. Nelfinavir was predicted not to cause hyperbilirubinemia, consistent with clinical observations. We next examined a new drug candidate that caused both elevations in serum bilirubin and biochemical evidence of liver injury in rats. Simulations suggest that bilirubin elevation primarily resulted from inhibition of transporters rather than global liver dysfunction. We conclude that mechanistic modeling of bilirubin can help elucidate underlying mechanisms of drug‐induced hyperbilirubinemia, and thereby distinguish benign from clinically important elevations in serum bilirubin. PMID:28074467

  11. Inhibition of cholesterol transport in an intestine cell model by pine-derived phytosterols.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jinsoo; Knudsen, Tine A; Nielsen, Anne-Louise; Duelund, Lars; Christensen, Morten; Hervella, Pablo; Needham, David; Mouritsen, Ole G

    2016-10-01

    We have quantified the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol transport by pine-derived phytosterols using an HT29-MTX intestine cell model that forms a mucus layer similar to that in the intestine. An artificial intestinal fluid consisting of digested fat, bile salt, cholesterol, and phytosterols was formulated in order to mimic the conditions in the intestine. The apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of the positive control, i.e., 0.1mM of cholesterol solubilized in the artificial intestine fluid, was found to be 0.33 (±0.17)×10(-6)cm/s. When 0.1mM β-sitosterol was solubilized alongside, Papp was effectively zero, corresponding to a total inhibition of cholesterol transport. A similar strong inhibition was found when commercial pine-derived phytosterols, PinVita™ FSP DuPont, were co-solubilized with cholesterol in the dietary model micelles, leading to Papp=0.06 (±0.06)×10(-6)cm/s, i.e., 5.5 times lower than the cholesterol positive control. Additionally, the effect of potential oral administration formulations generated by the pine-derived phytosterols was also characterized. The formulations were produced as a liquid formulation of the cholesterol-containing artificial intestine fluid. Six liquid formulations were tested of which four displayed a Papp in the range of 0-0.09×10(-6)cm/s. The remaining two formulations did not show any inhibition effect on cholesterol transport and even enhanced cholesterol transport. It was furthermore observed that the phytosterols were found in the collected intestine cells but not transported to the basolateral region in the intestinal cell model system.

  12. meso-Transdiene analogs inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Norrholm, Seth D; Culver, John P; Hojahmat, Marhaba; Beckmann, Joshua S; Harrod, Steven B; Deaciuc, Agripina G; Bardo, Michael T; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-03-01

    Lobeline, a nicotinic receptor antagonist and neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor, is a candidate pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse. meso-Transdiene (MTD), a lobeline analog, lacks nicotinic receptor affinity, retains affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), and, surprisingly, has enhanced affinity for dopamine (DA) and serotonin transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT), respectively]. In the current study, MTD was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration in rats relative to food-maintained responding. MTD specifically decreased methamphetamine self-administration, extending our previous work. Classical structure-activity relationships revealed that more conformationally restricted MTD analogs enhanced VMAT2 selectivity and drug likeness, whereas affinity at the dihydrotetrabenazine binding and DA uptake sites on VMAT2 was not altered. Generally, MTD analogs exhibited 50- to 1000-fold lower affinity for DAT and were equipotent or had 10-fold higher affinity for SERT, compared with MTD. Representative analogs from the series potently and competitively inhibited [(3)H]DA uptake at VMAT2. (3Z,5Z)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-106), the 3Z,5Z-2,4-dichlorophenyl MTD analog, had improved selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT and importantly inhibited methamphetamine-evoked DA release from striatal slices. In contrast, (3Z,5E)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-105), the 3Z,5E-geometrical isomer, inhibited DA uptake at VMAT2, but did not inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that these geometrical isomers interact at alternate sites on VMAT2, which are associated with distinct pharmacophores. Thus, structural modification of the MTD molecule resulted in analogs exhibiting improved drug likeness and improved selectivity for VMAT2, as well as the ability to decrease methamphetamine-evoked DA release

  13. Excitotoxic oligodendrocyte death and axonal damage induced by glutamate transporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Domercq, María; Etxebarria, Estibaliz; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2005-10-01

    Glutamate uptake is crucial to terminate glutamate signaling and to prevent excitotoxicity. The present study describes the expression of functional glutamate transporters GLAST and GLT-1 in oligodendrocytes by means of electrophysiology, uptake assays, and immunocytochemistry. Inhibition of glutamate uptake, both in oligodendrocyte cultures and in isolated optic nerves, increases glutamate levels and causes oligodendrocyte excitotoxicity, which is prevented by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) and kainate receptor antagonists. Furthermore, glutamate transporter inhibitors or antisense oligonucleotides applied onto the optic nerve in vivo lead to oligodendroglial loss, massive demyelination, and severe axonal damage. Overall, these results demonstrate that the integrity of oligodendrocytes and white matter depends on proper glutamate transporter function. Deregulated transporter activity may contribute to acute and chronic white matter damage.

  14. Serotonin transporter knockout rats show improved strategy set-shifting and reduced latent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Nonkes, Lourens J P; van de Vondervoort, Ilse I G M; de Leeuw, Mark J C; Wijlaars, Linda P; Maes, Joseph H R; Homberg, Judith R

    2012-04-13

    Behavioral flexibility is a cognitive process depending on prefrontal areas allowing adaptive responses to environmental changes. Serotonin transporter knockout (5-HTT(-/-)) rodents show improved reversal learning in addition to orbitofrontal cortex changes. Another form of behavioral flexibility, extradimensional strategy set-shifting (EDSS), heavily depends on the medial prefrontal cortex. This region shows functional changes in 5-HTT(-/-) rodents as well. Here we subjected 5-HTT(-/-) rats and their wild-type counterparts to an EDSS paradigm and a supplementary latent inhibition task. Results indicate that 5-HTT(-/-) rats also show improved EDSS, and indicate that reduced latent inhibition may contribute as an underlying mechanism.

  15. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin corrects the BDNF transport defect in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Jose R; Pardo, Raúl; Zala, Diana; Yu, Hua; Humbert, Sandrine; Saudou, Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurogenerative disease caused by an abnormal expansion of glutamine repeats in the huntingtin protein. There is currently no treatment to prevent the neurodegeneration caused by this devastating disorder. Huntingtin has been shown to be a positive regulator of vesicular transport, particularly for neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This function is lost in patients with HD, resulting in a decrease in neurotrophic support and subsequent neuronal death. One promising line of treatment is therefore the restoration of huntingtin function in BDNF transport. Results The phosphorylation of huntingtin at serine 421 (S421) restores its function in axonal transport. We therefore investigated whether inhibition of calcineurin, the bona fide huntingtin S421 phosphatase, restored the transport defects observed in HD. We found that pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin by FK506 led to sustained phosphorylation of mutant huntingtin at S421. FK506 restored BDNF transport in two complementary models: rat primary neuronal cultures expressing mutant huntingtin and mouse cortical neurons from HdhQ111/Q111 HD knock-in mice. This effect was the result of specific calcineurin inhibition, as calcineurin silencing restored both anterograde and retrograde transport in neurons from HdhQ111/Q111 mice. We also observed a specific increase in calcineurin activity in the brain of HdhQ111/Q111 mice potentially accounting for the selective loss of huntingtin phosphorylation and contributing to neuronal cell death in HD. Conclusion Our results validate calcineurin as a target for the treatment of HD and provide the first demonstration of the restoration of huntingtin function by an FDA-approved compound. PMID:19860865

  16. Assessment of gadoxetate DCE-MRI as a biomarker of hepatobiliary transporter inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Jose L; Stahl, Simone; Yates, James; Woodhouse, Neil; Kenna, J Gerry; Jones, Huw B; Waterton, John C; Hockings, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a clinically important adverse drug reaction, which prevents the development of many otherwise safe and effective new drugs. Currently, there is a lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers that can be used to predict, assess and manage this toxicity. The aim of this work was to evaluate gadoxetate-enhanced MRI as a potential novel biomarker of hepatobiliary transporter inhibition in the rat. Initially, the volume fraction of extracellular space in the liver was determined using gadopentetate to enable an estimation of the gadoxetate concentration in hepatocytes. Using this information, a compartmental model was developed to characterise the pharmacokinetics of hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of gadoxetate. Subsequently, we explored the impact of an investigational hepatobiliary transporter inhibitor on the parameters of the model in vivo in rats. The investigational hepatobiliary transporter inhibitor reduced both the rate of uptake of gadoxetate into the hepatocyte, k1, and the Michaelis–Menten constant, Vmax, characterising its excretion into bile, whereas KM values for biliary efflux were increased. These effects were dose dependent and correlated with effects on plasma chemistry markers of liver dysfunction, in particular bilirubin and bile acids. These results indicate that gadoxetate-enhanced MRI provides a novel functional biomarker of inhibition of transporter-mediated hepatic uptake and clearance in the rat. Since gadoxetate is used clinically, the technology has the potential to provide a translatable biomarker of drug-induced perturbation of hepatic transporters that may also be useful in humans to explore deleterious functional alterations caused by transporter inhibition. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23564602

  17. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA) binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Liu, Song; Kim, Kwang-Min; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn) for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA), a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 μg/mL (250 μM). Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia.

  18. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA) binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Pothineni, Venkata Raveendra; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Liu, Song; Kim, Kwang-Min; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn) for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA), a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 μg/mL (250 μM). Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia. PMID:25709405

  19. Intracellular dehydroascorbic acid inhibits SVCT2-dependent transport of ascorbic acid in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fiorani, Mara; Azzolini, Catia; Guidarelli, Andrea; Cerioni, Liana; Scotti, Maddalena; Cantoni, Orazio

    2015-09-01

    Exposure of U937 cells to low concentrations of L-ascorbic acid (AA) is associated with a prompt cellular uptake and a further mitochondrial accumulation of the vitamin. Under the same conditions, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) uptake was followed by rapid reduction and accumulation of identical intracellular levels of AA, however, in the absence of significant mitochondrial uptake. This event was instead observed after exposure to remarkably greater concentrations of DHA. Furthermore, experiments performed in isolated mitochondria revealed that DHA transport through hexose transporters and Na(+) -dependent transport of AA were very similar. These results suggest that the different subcellular compartmentalization of the vitamin is mediated by events promoting inhibition of mitochondrial AA transport, possibly triggered by low levels of DHA. We obtained results in line with this notion in intact cells, and more direct evidence in isolated mitochondria. This inhibitory effect was promptly reversible after DHA removal and comparable with that mediated by established inhibitors, as quercetin. The results presented collectively indicate that low intracellular concentrations of DHA, because of its rapid reduction back to AA, are a poor substrate for direct mitochondrial uptake. DHA concentrations, however, appear sufficiently high to mediate inhibition of mitochondrial transport of AA/DHA-derived AA.

  20. Mutant SOD1 inhibits ER-Golgi transport in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Julie D; Farg, Manal A; Soo, Kai Ying; Walker, Adam K; Halloran, Mark; Turner, Bradley J; Nagley, Phillip; Horne, Malcolm K

    2014-04-01

    Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase is misfolded in familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but it is not clear how this triggers endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress or other pathogenic processes. Here, we demonstrate that mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) is predominantly found in the cytoplasm in neuronal cells. Furthermore, we show that mSOD1 inhibits secretory protein transport from the ER to Golgi apparatus. ER-Golgi transport is linked to ER stress, Golgi fragmentation and axonal transport and we also show that inhibition of ER-Golgi trafficking preceded ER stress, Golgi fragmentation, protein aggregation and apoptosis in cells expressing mSOD1. Restoration of ER-Golgi transport by over-expression of coatomer coat protein II subunit Sar1 protected against inclusion formation and apoptosis, thus linking dysfunction in ER-Golgi transport to cellular pathology. These findings thus link several cellular events in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis into a single mechanism occurring early in mSOD1 expressing cells.

  1. Inhibition of ileal bile acid transporter: An emerging therapeutic strategy for chronic idiopathic constipation.

    PubMed

    Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2015-06-28

    Chronic idiopathic constipation is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that encompasses a wide profile of symptoms. Current treatment options for chronic idiopathic constipation are of limited value; therefore, a novel strategy is necessary with an increased effectiveness and safety. Recently, the inhibition of the ileal bile acid transporter has become a promising target for constipation-associated diseases. Enhanced delivery of bile acids into the colon achieves an accelerated colonic transit, increased stool frequency, and relief of constipation-related symptoms. This article provides insight into the mechanism of action of ileal bile acid transporter inhibitors and discusses their potential clinical use for pharmacotherapy of constipation in chronic idiopathic constipation.

  2. EP3 receptors inhibit antidiuretic-hormone-dependent sodium transport across frog skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Rytved, K A; Nielsen, R

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on antidiuretic hormone (ADH)-dependent Na+ transport and cAMP production in isolated frog skin epithelium. ADH caused an increase in transepithelial Na+ transport and a decrease in cellular potential, indicating an increase in apical Na+ permeability. Subsequent addition of PGE2 decreased Na+ transport and repolarised the cells. The PGE2 receptor EP1/3-selective analogue sulprostone and the PGE2 receptor EP2/3-selective analogue misoprostol were able to mimic the effect of PGE2. ADH increased cellular cAMP levels, whereas PGE2, sulprostone and misoprostol were able to reduce the ADH-dependent cAMP production. Measurements of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) revealed that it was unaffected by both PGE2 and sulprostone. The inhibitory effect of PGE2 on ADH-dependent Na+ transport was also observed in Ca2+-depleted epithelia. We conclude that ADH stimulates transepithelial Na+ transport by increasing cellular cAMP levels, whereas PGE2 inhibits ADH-dependent Na+ transport by activating EP3-type receptors, which decrease cellular cAMP levels. We have found no evidence that [Ca2+]i is involved in the regulation of ADH-dependent Na+ transport by PGE2.

  3. Thiamine transport in Escherichia coli: the mechanism of inhibition by the sulfhydryl-specific modifier N-ethylmaleimide.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Andrew D; Dickson, Kimberly A; Washabaugh, Michael W

    2002-08-31

    Active transport of thiamin (vitamin B(1)) into Escherichia coli occurs through a member of the superfamily of transporters known as ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Although it was demonstrated that the sulfhydryl-specific modifier N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) inhibited thiamin transport, the exact mechanism of this inhibition is unknown. Therefore, we have carried out a kinetic analysis of thiamin transport to determine the mechanism of inhibition by NEM. Thiamin transport in vivo exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics with K(M)=15 nM and V(max)=46 U mg(-1). Treatment of intact E. coli KG33 with saturating NEM exhibited apparent noncompetitive inhibition, decreasing V(max) by approximately 50% without effecting K(M) or the apparent first-order rate constant (k(obsd)). Apparent noncompetitive inhibition is consistent with an irreversible covalent modification of a cysteine(s) that is critical for the transport process. A primary amino acid analysis of the subunits of the thiamin permease combined with our kinetic analysis suggests that inhibition of thiamin transport by NEM is different from other ABC transporters and occurs at the level of protein-protein interactions between the membrane-bound carrier protein and the ATPase subunit.

  4. Iron, copper, and zinc transport: inhibition of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) by shRNA.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Alejandra; Le Blanc, Solange; Olivares, Manuel; Pizarro, Fernando; Ruz, Manuel; Arredondo, Miguel

    2012-05-01

    Iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) fulfill various essential biological functions and are vital for all living organisms. They play important roles in oxygen transport, cell growth and differentiation, neurotransmitter synthesis, myelination, and synaptic transmission. Because of their role in many critical functions, they are commonly used in food fortification and supplementation strategies globally. To determine the involvement of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) on Fe, Cu, and Zn uptake, Caco-2 cells were transfected with four different shRNA plasmids to selectively inhibit DMT1 or hCTR1 transporter expression. Fe and Cu uptake and total Zn content measurements were performed in shRNA-DMT1 and shRNA-hCTR1 cells. Both shRNA-DMT1 and shRNA-hCTR1 cells had lower apical Fe uptake (a decrease of 51% and 41%, respectively), Cu uptake (a decrease of 25.8% and 38.5%, respectively), and Zn content (a decrease of 23.1% and 22.7%, respectively) compared to control cells. These results confirm that DMT1 is involved in active transport of Fe, Cu, and Zn although Zn showed a different relative capacity. These results also show that hCTR1 is able to transport Fe and Zn.

  5. Cercospora beticola Toxin Inhibits Vanadate-Sensitive H+ Transport in Corn Root Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Blein, Jean-Pierre; Bourdil, Isabelle; Rossignol, Michel; Scalla, René

    1988-01-01

    The effect of Cercospora beticola toxin on the transport of protons by vanadate-sensitive ATPase was studied with corn (Zea mays) root microsomal vesicles prepared by differential centrifugation, sedimentation through a sucrose cushion, and washing with Triton X-100 plus KBr. In these preparations, addition of ATP induced intravesicular H+-accumulation as evidenced by a rapid quenching of the fluorescence of 9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxy acridine. This quenching was relatively unaffected by inhibitors of mitochondrial and tonoplast-type ATPases, but was strongly reduced by inhibitors of plasma membrane H+-ATPase. C. beticola toxin markedly inhibited ATP dependent H+-transport, and this effect increased with the length of preincubation with the toxin. The same observations were made concerning ATPase activity. Inhibition of H+-transport was greater at pH 7.3 than at pH 5.7. Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis showed that inhibition kinetics were competitive with respect to ATP. These data suggest a direct effect of C. beticola toxin on vanadate-sensitive ATPase presumed to be associated with the plasma membrane. PMID:16666321

  6. Atropine-induced inhibition of sperm and semen transport impairs fertility in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Ban, Yoshiki; Uchida, Miki; Gondo, Eri; Yamamoto, Masakatsu; Sekiguchi, Yoshiko; Sakaue, Akiko; Kemi, Masayuki; Nakatsuka, Toshio

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies revealed that atropine reduced male fertility in rats without any effects on mating performance, sperm production and motility, and testicular morphology. The present study was conducted to investigate whether the impairment of male fertility induced by atropine was related to the inhibition of sperm and semen transports from the vas deferens and seminal vesicle to the urethra during the process of emission. Male rats were treated with atropine at 125 mg/kg/day for 10-17 days prior to mating with untreated females. After confirmation of mating, male rats were euthanized and sperm number in the vas deferens and weights of the seminal vesicle and copulatory plug were determined as indicators of inhibition of sperm and semen transports, respectively. Reproductive status of mated females was determined on gestation days 15-17. A low pregnancy rate associated with a decreased number of implants was observed in females that mated with the atropine-treated males. The average number of sperm in the vas deferens was increased in the atropine-treated males. The average seminal vesicle weight in the atropine-treated males was greater than that of controls. The copulatory plug weights were decreased in the atropine-treated males. These results suggest that inhibitions of sperm and semen transports from the vas deferens and seminal vesicle to the urethra during the process of emission result in reduced male fertility in rats.

  7. Expression of Mutant Dynamin Inhibits Toxicity and Transport of Endocytosed Ricin to the Golgi Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Llorente, Alicia; Rapak, Andrzej; Schmid, Sandra L.; van Deurs, Bo; Sandvig, Kirsten

    1998-01-01

    Endocytosis and intracellular transport of ricin were studied in stable transfected HeLa cells where overexpression of wild-type (WT) or mutant dynamin is regulated by tetracycline. Overexpression of the temperature-sensitive mutant dynG273D at the nonpermissive temperature or the dynK44A mutant inhibits clathrin-dependent endocytosis (Damke, H., T. Baba, A.M. van der Blieck, and S.L. Schmid. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 131: 69–80; Damke, H., T. Baba, D.E. Warnock, and S.L. Schmid. 1994. J. Cell Biol. 127:915–934). Under these conditions, ricin was endocytosed at a normal level. Surprisingly, overexpression of both mutants made the cells less sensitive to ricin. Butyric acid and trichostatin A treatment enhanced dynamin overexpression and increased the difference in toxin sensitivity between cells with normal and mutant dynamin. Intoxication with ricin seems to require toxin transport to the Golgi apparatus (Sandirg, K., and B. van Deurs. 1996. Physiol. Rev. 76:949–966), and this process was monitored by measuring the incorporation of radioactive sulfate into a modified ricin molecule containing a tyrosine sulfation site. The sulfation of ricin was much greater in cells expressing dynWT than in cells expressing dynK44A. Ultrastructural analysis using a ricin-HRP conjugate confirmed that transport to the Golgi apparatus was severely inhibited in cells expressing dynK44A. In contrast, ricin transport to lysosomes as measured by degradation of 125I-ricin was essentially unchanged in cells expressing dynK44A. These data demonstrate that although ricin is internalized by clathrin-independent endocytosis in cells expressing mutant dynamin, there is a strong and apparently selective inhibition of ricin transport to the Golgi apparatus. Also, in cells with mutant dynamin, there is a redistribution of the mannose-6-phosphate receptor. PMID:9456316

  8. The polar auxin transport inhibitor TIBA inhibits endoreduplication in dark grown spinach hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Amijima, Makoto; Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu; Mishiba, Kei-Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    We addressed the question of whether an additional round of endoreduplication in dark-grown hypocotyls is a common feature in dicotyledonous plants having endopolyploid tissues. Ploidy distributions of hypocotyl tissues derived from in vitro-grown spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Atlas) seedlings grown under different light conditions were analyzed by flow cytometry. An additional round of endoreduplication (represented by 32C cells) was found in the dark-grown hypocotyl tissues. This response was inhibited by light, the intensity of which is a crucial factor for the inhibition of endoreduplication. The higher ploidy cells in cortical tissues of the dark-grown hypocotyls had larger cell sizes, suggesting that the additional round of endoreduplication contributes to hypocotyl elongation. More importantly, a polar auxin transport inhibitor, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), strongly inhibits endoreduplication, not only in spinach but also in Arabidopsis. Because other polar auxin transport inhibitors or an auxin antagonist show no or mild effects, TIBA may have a specific feature that inhibits endoreduplication.

  9. Pharmacological inhibitions of glutamate transporters EAAT1 and EAAT2 compromise glutamate transport in photoreceptor to ON- bipolar cell synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Dennis Y.; Chung, Inyoung; Wu, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    To maintain reliable signal transmission across a synapse, free synaptic neurotransmitters must be removed from the cleft in a timely manner. In the first visual synapse, this critical task is mainly undertaken by glutamate transporters (EAATs). Here we study the differential roles of the EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT5 subtypes in glutamate (GLU) uptake at the photoreceptor-to-depolarizing bipolar cell synapse in intact dark-adapted retina. Various doses of EAAT blockers and/or GLU were injected into the eye before the electroretinogram (ERG) was measured. Their effectiveness and potency in inhibiting the ERG b-wave were studied to determine their relative contributions to the GLU clearing activity at the synapse. The results showed that EAAT1 and EAAT2 plays different roles. Selectively blocking glial EAAT1 alone using UCPH101 inhibited the b-wave 2–24 hours following injection, suggesting a dominating role of EAAT1 in the overall GLU clearing capacity in the synaptic cleft. Selectively blocking EAAT2 on photoreceptor terminals had no significant effect on the b-wave, but increased the potency of exogenous GLU in inhibiting the b-wave. These suggest that EAAT2 play a secondary yet significant role in the GLU reuptake activity at the rod and the cone output synapses. Additionally, we have verified our electrophysiological findings with double-label immunohistochemistry, and extend the literature on the spatial distribution of EAAT2 splice variants in the mouse retina. PMID:25152321

  10. Nimesulide binding site in the B0AT1 (SLC6A19) amino acid transporter. Mechanism of inhibition revealed by proteoliposome transport assay and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Pochini, Lorena; Seidita, Angela; Sensi, Cristina; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Eberini, Ivano; Indiveri, Cesare

    2014-06-01

    The effect of pharmaceutical compounds on the rat kidney B0AT1 transporter in proteoliposomes has been screened. To this aim, inhibition of the transport activity by the different compounds was measured on Na(+)-[(3)H]glutamine co-transport in the presence of membrane potential positive outside. Most of the tested drugs had no effect on the transport activity. Some compounds exhibited inhibitory effects from 5 to 88% at concentration of 300μM. Among the tested compounds, only the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide exerted potent inhibition on B0AT1. From dose response analysis, an IC50 value of 23μM was found. Inhibition kinetic analysis was performed: noncompetitive inhibition of the glutamine transport was observed while competitive behaviour was found when the inhibition was analyzed with respect to the Na(+) concentration. Several molecules harbouring functional groups of nimesulide (analogues) were tested as inhibitors. None among the tested molecules has the capacity to inhibit the transport with the exception of the compound NS-398, whose chemical structure is very close to that of whole nimesulide. The IC50 for this compound was 131μM. Inhibition kinetics showed behaviour of NS-398 identical to that of nimesulide, i.e., noncompetitive inhibition respect to glutamine and competitive inhibition respect to Na(+). Molecular docking of nimesulide suggested that this drug is able to bind B0AT1 in an external dedicated binding site and that its binding produces a steric hindrance effect of the protein translocation path abolishing the transporter activity.

  11. A microRNA negative feedback loop downregulates vesicle transport and inhibits fear memory

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Rebecca S; Tatarakis, Antonis; Rudenko, Andrii; Johnson-Venkatesh, Erin M; Yang, Yawei J; Murphy, Elisabeth A; Todd, Travis P; Schepers, Scott T; Siuti, Nertila; Martorell, Anthony J; Falls, William A; Hammack, Sayamwong E; Walsh, Christopher A; Tsai, Li-Huei; Umemori, Hisashi; Bouton, Mark E; Moazed, Danesh

    2016-01-01

    The SNARE-mediated vesicular transport pathway plays major roles in synaptic remodeling associated with formation of long-term memories, but the mechanisms that regulate this pathway during memory acquisition are not fully understood. Here we identify miRNAs that are up-regulated in the rodent hippocampus upon contextual fear-conditioning and identify the vesicular transport and synaptogenesis pathways as the major targets of the fear-induced miRNAs. We demonstrate that miR-153, a member of this group, inhibits the expression of key components of the vesicular transport machinery, and down-regulates Glutamate receptor A1 trafficking and neurotransmitter release. MiR-153 expression is specifically induced during LTP induction in hippocampal slices and its knockdown in the hippocampus of adult mice results in enhanced fear memory. Our results suggest that miR-153, and possibly other fear-induced miRNAs, act as components of a negative feedback loop that blocks neuronal hyperactivity at least partly through the inhibition of the vesicular transport pathway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22467.001 PMID:28001126

  12. ATP regulation of calcium transport in back-inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

    PubMed

    de Meis, L; Sorenson, M M

    1989-09-18

    At high concentrations of ATP, ATP hydrolysis and Ca2+ transport by the (Ca2+ + MG2+)-ATPase of intact sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles exhibit a secondary activation that varies with the extent of back-inhibition by Ca2+ accumulated within the vesicles. When the internal ionized Ca2+ is clamped at low and intermediate levels by the use of Ca-precipitating anions, the apparent Km values for activation by ATP are lower than in fully back-inhibited vesicles (high internal Ca2+). In leaky vesicles unable to accumulate Ca2+, raising Ca2+ in the assay medium from 20-30 microM to 5 mM abolishes the activation of hydrolysis by high concentrations of ATP. The level of [32P]phosphoenzyme formed during ATP hydrolysis from [32P]phosphate added to the medium also varies with the extent of back-inhibition; it is highest when Ca2+ is raised to a level that saturates the internal, low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites. In intact vesicles, increasing the ATP concentration from 10 to 400 microM competitively inhibits the reaction of inorganic phosphate with the enzyme but does not change the rate of hydrolysis. In a previous report (De Meis, L., Gomez-Puyou, M.T. and Gomez-Puyou, A. (1988) Eur. J. Biochem. 171, 343-349), it has been shown that the hydrophobic molecules trifluoperazine and iron bathophenanthroline compete for the catalytic site of the Pi-reactive form of the enzyme. Here it is shown that inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by these compounds is reduced or abolished when Ca2+ binds to the low-affinity Ca2+ binding sites of the enzyme. Since inhibition by these agents is indifferent to activation of hydrolysis by high concentrations of ATP, it is suggested that the second Km for ATP and the inhibition by hydrophobic molecules involve two different Ca-free forms of the enzyme.

  13. Analysis of the inhibition potential of zosuquidar derivatives on selected bacterial and fungal ABC transporters.

    PubMed

    Infed, Nacera; Smits, Sander H J; Dittrich, Torsten; Braun, Manfred; Driessen, Arnold J M; Hanekop, Nils; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-03-01

    The increasing number of multidrug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms is a serious public health issue. Among the multitude of mechanisms that lead to multidrug resistance, the active extrusion of toxic compounds, mediated by MDR efflux pumps, plays an important role. In our study we analyzed the inhibitory capability of 26 synthesized zosuquidar derivatives on three ABC-type MDR efflux pumps, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pdr5 as well as Lactococcus lactis LmrA and LmrCD. For Pdr5, five compounds could be identified that inhibited rhodamine 6G transport more efficiently than zosuquidar. One of these is a compound with a new catechol acetal structure that might represent a new lead compound. Furthermore, the determination of IC(50) values for rhodamine 6G transport of Pdr5 with representative compounds reveals values between 0.3 and 0.9 μM. Thus the identified compounds are among the most potent inhibitors known for Pdr5. For the ABC-type efflux pumps LmrA and LmrCD from L. lactis, seven and three compounds, which inhibit the transport activity more than the lead compound zosuquidar, were found. Interestingly, transport inhibition for LmrCD was very specific, with a drastic reduction by one compound while its diastereomers showed hardly an effect. Thus, the present study reveals new potent inhibitors for the ABC-type MDR efflux pumps studied with the inhibitors of Pdr5 and LmrCD being of particular interest as these proteins are well known model systems for their homologs in pathogenic fungi and Gram-positive bacteria.

  14. Monensin and FCCP inhibit the intracellular transport of alphavirus membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kääriäinen, L; Hashimoto, K; Saraste, J; Virtanen, I; Penttinen, K

    1980-12-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of semliki forest virus (SFV) and sindbis virus (SIN) were used to study the intracellular transport of virus membrane glycoproteins in infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. When antisera against purified glycoproteins and (125)I- labeled protein A from staphylococcus aureus were used only small amounts of virus glycoproteins were detected at the surface of SFV ts-1 and SIN Ts-10 infected cells incubated at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C). When the mutant-infected cells were shifted to the permissive temperature (28 degrees C), in the presence of cycloheximide, increasing amounts of virus glycoproteins appeared at the cell surface from 20 to 80 min after the shift. Both monensin (10muM) and carbonylcyanide-p- trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP; 10-20 muM) inhibited the appearance of virus membrane glycoproteins at the cell surface. Vinblastine sulfate (10 mug/ml) inhibited the transport by approximately 50 percent, whereas cytochalasin B (1 mug/ml) had only a marginal effect. Intracellular distribution of virus glycoproteins in the mutant-infected cells was visualized in double-fluorescence studies using lectins as markers for endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. At 39 degrees C, the virus membrane glycoproteins were located at the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas after shift to 28 degrees C, a bright juxtanuclear reticular fluorescence was seen in the location of the Golgi apparatus. In the presence of monensin, the virus glycoproteins could migrate to the Golgi apparatus, although transport to the cell surface did not take place. When the shift was carried out in the presence of FCCP, negligible fluorescence was seen in the Golgi apparatus and the glycoproteins apparently remained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. A rapid inhibition in the accumulation of virus glycoproteins at the cell surface was obtained when FCCP was added during the active transport period, whereas with monensin there was a delay of

  15. Oleoyl-L-carnitine inhibits glycine transport by GlyT2

    PubMed Central

    Carland, JE; Mansfield, RE; Ryan, RM; Vandenberg, RJ

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Concentrations of extracellular glycine in the CNS are regulated by two Na+/Cl–-dependent glycine transporters, GlyT1 and GlyT2. Selective inhibitors of GlyT1 have been developed for the treatment of schizophrenia, whilst selective inhibitors of GlyT2 are analgesic in animal models of pain. We have assessed a series of endogenous lipids as inhibitors of GlyT1 and GlyT2. Experimental Approach Human GlyT1 and GlyT2 were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and the inhibitory actions of a series of acylcarnitines on glycine transport were measured using electrophysiological techniques. Key Results Oleoyl-l-carnitine inhibited glycine transport by GlyT2, with an IC50 of 340 nM, which is 15-fold more potent than the previously identified lipid inhibitor N-arachidonyl-glycine. Oleoyl-l-carnitine had a slow onset of inhibition and a slow washout. Using a series of chimeric GlyT1/2 transporters and point mutant transporters, we have identified an isoleucine residue in extracellular loop 4 of GlyT2 that conferred differences in sensitivity to oleoyl-l-carnitine between GlyT2 and GlyT1. Conclusions and Implications Oleoyl-l-carnitine is a potent non-competitive inhibitor of GlyT2. Previously identified GlyT2 inhibitors show potential as analgesics and the identification of oleoyl-l-carnitine as a novel GlyT2 inhibitor may lead to new ways of treating pain. PMID:22978602

  16. Pentagalloylglucose Blocks the Nuclear Transport and the Process of Nucleocapsid Egress to Inhibit HSV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fujun; Ma, Kaiqi; Chen, Maoyun; Zou, Muping; Wu, Yanting; Li, Feng; Wang, Yifei

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a widespread virus, causes a variety of human viral diseases worldwide. The serious threat of drug-resistance highlights the extreme urgency to develop novel antiviral drugs with different mechanisms of action. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with significant anti-HSV activity; however, the mechanisms underlying its antiviral activity need to be defined by further studies. In this study, we found that PGG treatment delays the nuclear transport process of HSV-1 particles by inhibiting the upregulation of dynein (a cellular major motor protein) induced by HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, PGG treatment affects the nucleocapsid egress of HSV-1 by inhibiting the expression and disrupting the cellular localization of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34, which are indispensable for HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress from the nucleus. However, the over-expression of pEGFP-UL31 and pEGFP-UL34 could decrease the antiviral effect of PGG. In this study, for the first time, the antiviral activity of PGG against acyclovir-resistant virus was demonstrated in vitro, and the possible mechanisms of its anti-HSV activities were identified based on the inhibition of nuclear transport and nucleocapsid egress in HSV-1. It was further confirmed that PGG could be a promising candidate for HSV therapy, especially for drug-resistant strains.

  17. Downregulating the sucrose transporter VpSUT1 in Verbascum phoeniceum does not inhibit phloem loading

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cankui; Turgeon, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Sucrose is loaded into the phloem in the minor veins of leaves before export. Two active, species-specific loading mechanisms have been proposed. One involves transporter-mediated sucrose transfer from the apoplast into the sieve element-companion cell complex, so-called apoplastic loading. In the putative second mechanism, sucrose follows an entirely symplastic pathway, and the solute concentration is elevated by the synthesis of raffinose and stachyose in the phloem, not by transporter activity. Several sucrose-transporting plants have been shown to be apoplastic loaders by downregulating sucrose transporter 1 (SUT1), leading to accumulation of sugars and leaf chlorosis. In this study we compared the effect of downregulating SUT1 in Nicotiana tabacum, a sucrose transporter, and Verbascum phoeniceum, a species that transports raffinose and stachyose. To test the effectiveness of RNAi downregulation, we measured SUT1 mRNA levels and sucrose-H+ symport in leaf discs. Mild NtSUT1 downregulation in N. tabacum resulted in the pronounced phenotype associated with loading inhibition. In contrast, no such phenotype developed when VpSUT1 was downregulated in V. phoeniceum, leaving minimal sucrose transport activity. Only those plants with the most severe VpSUT1 downregulation accumulated more carbohydrate than usual and these plants were normal by other criteria: growth rate, photosynthesis, and ability to clear starch during the night. The results provide direct evidence that the mechanism of phloem loading in V. phoeniceum does not require active sucrose uptake from the apoplast and strongly supports the conclusion that the loading pathway is symplastic in this species. PMID:19846784

  18. Characterization of electrogenic bromosulfophthalein transport in carnation petal microsomes and its inhibition by antibodies against bilitranslocase.

    PubMed

    Passamonti, Sabina; Cocolo, Alessandra; Braidot, Enrico; Petrussa, Elisa; Peresson, Carlo; Medic, Nevenka; Macri, Francesco; Vianello, Angelo

    2005-07-01

    Bilitranslocase is a rat liver plasma membrane carrier, displaying a high-affinity binding site for bilirubin. It is competitively inhibited by grape anthocyanins, including aglycones and their mono- and di-glycosylated derivatives. In plant cells, anthocyanins are synthesized in the cytoplasm and then translocated into the central vacuole, by mechanisms yet to be fully characterized. The aim of this work was to determine whether a homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase is expressed in carnation petals, where it might play a role in the membrane transport of anthocyanins. The bromosulfophthalein-based assay of rat liver bilitranslocase transport activity was implemented in subcellular membrane fractions, leading to the identification of a bromosulfophthalein carrier (K(M) = 5.3 microm), which is competitively inhibited by cyanidine 3-glucoside (Ki = 51.6 microm) and mainly noncompetitively by cyanidin (Ki = 88.3 microm). Two antisequence antibodies against bilitranslocase inhibited this carrier. In analogy to liver bilitranslocase, one antibody identified a bilirubin-binding site (Kd = 1.7 nm) in the carnation carrier. The other antibody identified a high-affinity binding site for cyanidine 3-glucoside (Kd = 1.7 microm) on the carnation carrier only, and a high-affinity bilirubin-binding site (Kd = 0.33 nm) on the liver carrier only. Immunoblots showed a putative homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase in both plasma membrane and tonoplast fractions, isolated from carnation petals. Furthermore, only epidermal cells were immunolabeled in petal sections examined by microscopy. In conclusion, carnation petals express a homologue of rat liver bilitranslocase, with a putative function in the membrane transport of secondary metabolites.

  19. Piracetam and TRH analogues antagonise inhibition by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and galanin of human erythrocyte D-glucose transport

    PubMed Central

    Naftalin, Richard J; Cunningham, Philip; Afzal-Ahmed, Iram

    2004-01-01

    Nootropic drugs increase glucose uptake into anaesthetised brain and into Alzheimer's diseased brain. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, which has a chemical structure similar to nootropics increases cerebellar uptake of glucose in murine rolling ataxia. This paper shows that nootropic drugs like piracetam (2-oxo 1 pyrrolidine acetamide) and levetiracetam and neuropeptides like TRH antagonise the inhibition of glucose transport by barbiturates, diazepam, melatonin and endogenous neuropeptide galanin in human erythrocytes in vitro. The potencies of nootropic drugs in opposing scopolamine-induced memory loss correlate with their potencies in antagonising pentobarbital inhibition of erythrocyte glucose transport in vitro (P<0.01). Less potent nootropics, D-levetiracetam and D-pyroglutamate, have higher antagonist Ki's against pentobarbital inhibition of glucose transport than more potent L-stereoisomers (P<0.001). Piracetam and TRH have no direct effects on net glucose transport, but competitively antagonise hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport. Other nootropics, like aniracetam and levetiracetam, while antagonising pentobarbital action, also inhibit glucose transport. Analeptics like bemigride and methamphetamine are more potent inhibitors of glucose transport than antagonists of hypnotic action on glucose transport. There are similarities between amino-acid sequences in human glucose transport protein isoform 1 (GLUT1) and the benzodiazepine-binding domains of GABAA (gamma amino butyric acid) receptor subunits. Mapped on a 3D template of GLUT1, these homologies suggest that the site of diazepam and piracetam interaction is a pocket outside the central hydrophilic pore region. Nootropic pyrrolidone antagonism of hypnotic drug inhibition of glucose transport in vitro may be an analogue of TRH antagonism of galanin-induced narcosis. PMID:15148255

  20. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, R. V.; Sanders, M. M.; Saraceno, M.; Sundaram, B.

    1989-01-01

    A new quantum mechanism for the suppression of chaotic ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms explains the appearance of anomalously stable states in the microwave ionization experiments of Koch et al. A novel phase-space representation of the perturbed wave functions reveals that the inhibition of quantum transport is due to the selective excitation of wave functions that are highly localized near unstable periodic orbits in the chaotic classical phase space. The 'scarred' wave functions provide a new basis for the quantum description of a variety of classically chaotic systems.

  1. Inhibition of hexose transport by glucose in a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Pascual, C; Romay, C; Herrera, L; Kotyk, A

    1989-01-01

    The rate of hexose transport was approximately 60% lower for both the high- and the low-affinity components of hexose uptake when a glucose-6-phosphate isomerase mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was preincubated with glucose, as compared with preincubation with water. Similarly the Jmax value of the high-affinity system of the mutant was 25-35% of the corresponding Jmax value for normal cells incubated with glucose. Accumulation of glucose 6-phosphate or of some other metabolite, such as fructose 6-phosphate or trehalose, may be responsible for this striking inhibition.

  2. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    SciTech Connect

    Jaña, Fabián; Faini, Francesca; Lapier, Michel; Pavani, Mario; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Morello, Antonio; Maya, Juan Diego; Jara, José; Parra, Eduardo; Ferreira, Jorge

    2013-10-15

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  3. Glutamate transporter GLT-1 mediates N-acetylcysteine inhibition of cocaine reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Reissner, Kathryn J; Gipson, Cassandra D; Tran, Phuong K; Knackstedt, Lori A; Scofield, Michael D; Kalivas, Peter W

    2015-03-01

    Both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may be useful in treating relapse to addictive drug use. Cocaine self-administration in rats reduces both cystine-glutamate exchange and glutamate transport via GLT-1 in the nucleus accumbens, and NAC treatment normalizes these two glial processes critical for maintaining glutamate homeostasis. However, it is not known if one or both of these actions by NAC is needed to inhibit relapse to cocaine seeking. To determine whether the restoration of GLT-1 and/or cystine-glutamate exchange is required for NAC to inhibit cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking, we utilized the rat self-administration/extinction/reinstatement model of cocaine relapse. Rats were pre-treated in the nucleus accumbens with vivo-morpholino antisense oligomers targeting either GLT-1 or xCT (catalytic subunit of the cystine-glutamate exchanger) overlapping with daily NAC administration during extinction (100 mg/kg, i.p. for the last 5 days). Rats then underwent cue-induced reinstatement of active lever pressing in the absence of NAC, to determine if preventing NAC-induced restoration of one or the other protein was sufficient to block the capacity of chronic NAC to inhibit reinstatement. The vivo-morpholino suppression of xCT reduced cystine-glutamate exchange but did not affect NAC-induced reduction of reinstated cocaine seeking. In contrast, suppressing NAC-induced restoration of GLT-1 not only prevented NAC from inhibiting reinstatement, but augmented the capacity of cues to reinstate cocaine seeking. We hypothesized that the increased reinstatement after inhibiting NAC induction of GLT-1 resulted from increased extracellular glutamate, and show that augmented reinstatement is prevented by blocking mGluR5. Restoring GLT-1, not cystine-glutamate exchange, is a key mechanism whereby daily NAC reduces cue-induced cocaine reinstatement.

  4. Inhibition of epithelial Na sup + transport by atriopeptin, protein kinase c, and pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrmann, M.; Cantiello, H.F.; Ausiello, D.A. )

    1987-08-01

    The authors have recently shown the selective inhibition of an amiloride-sensitive, conductive pathway for Na{sup +} by atrial natriuretic peptide and 8-bromoguanosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP) in the renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PK{sub i}. Using {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes, they further investigated the modulation of Na{sup +} transport by atrial natriuretic peptide and by agents that increase cGMP production, activate protein kinase c, or modulate guanine nucleotide regulatory protein function. Sodium nitroprusside increases intracellular cGMP concentrations without affecting cAMP concentrations and completely inhibits amiloride-sensitive Na{sup +} uptake in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Oleoyl 2-acetylglycerol and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, activators of protein kinase c, inhibit Na{sup +} uptake by 93 {plus minus} 13 and 51 {plus minus} 10%, respectively. Prolonged incubation with phorbol ester results in the downregulation of protein kinase c activity and reduces the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide, suggesting that the action of this peptide involves stimulation of protein kinase c. Pertussis toxin, which induces the ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kDa guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in LLC-PK{sub i} cells, inhibits {sup 22}Na{sup +} influx to the same extent as amiloride. Thus, increasing cGMP, activating protein kinase c, and ADP-ribosylating a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein all inhibit Na{sup +} uptake. These events may be sequentially involved in the action of atrial natriuretic peptide.

  5. Computational models for drug inhibition of the human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid reabsorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, and a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested, and their K(i) values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or nonpotent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors.

  6. Computational Models for Drug Inhibition of the Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Ekins, Sean; Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Polli, James E.

    2009-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2) is the primary mechanism for intestinal bile acid re-absorption. In the colon, secondary bile acids increase the risk of cancer. Therefore, drugs that inhibit ASBT have the potential to increase the risk of colon cancer. The objectives of this study were to identify FDA-approved drugs that inhibit ASBT and to derive computational models for ASBT inhibition. Inhibition was evaluated using ASBT-MDCK monolayers and taurocholate as the model substrate. Computational modeling employed a HipHop qualitative approach, a Hypogen quantitative approach, as well as a modified Laplacian Bayesian modeling method using 2D descriptors. Initially, 30 compounds were screened for ASBT inhibition. A qualitative pharmacophore was developed using the most potent 11 compounds and applied to search a drug database, yielding 58 hits. Additional compounds were tested and their Ki values were measured. A 3D-QSAR and a Bayesian model were developed using 38 molecules. The quantitative pharmacophore consisted of one hydrogen bond acceptor, three hydrophobic features, and five excluded volumes. Each model was further validated with two external test sets of 30 and 19 molecules. Validation analysis showed both models exhibited good predictability in determining whether a drug is a potent or non-potent ASBT inhibitor. The Bayesian model correctly ranked the most active compounds. In summary, using a combined in vitro and computational approach, we found that many FDA-approved drugs from diverse classes, such as the dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors, are ASBT inhibitors. PMID:19673539

  7. Pyruvate fuels mitochondrial respiration and proliferation of breast cancer cells: effect of monocarboxylate transporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Diers, Anne R; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Chang, Ching-Fang; Hogg, Neil

    2012-06-15

    Recent studies have highlighted the fact that cancer cells have an altered metabolic phenotype, and this metabolic reprogramming is required to drive the biosynthesis pathways necessary for rapid replication and proliferation. Specifically, the importance of citric acid cycle-generated intermediates in the regulation of cancer cell proliferation has been recently appreciated. One function of MCTs (monocarboxylate transporters) is to transport the citric acid cycle substrate pyruvate across the plasma membrane and into mitochondria, and inhibition of MCTs has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to target metabolic pathways in cancer. In the present paper, we examined the effect of different metabolic substrates (glucose and pyruvate) on mitochondrial function and proliferation in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that cancer cells proliferate more rapidly in the presence of exogenous pyruvate when compared with lactate. Pyruvate supplementation fuelled mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the reserve respiratory capacity, and this increase in mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. In addition, inhibition of cellular pyruvate uptake using the MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased cell growth. These data demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in proliferative responses and highlight a novel mechanism of action for MCT inhibitors through suppression of pyruvate-fuelled mitochondrial respiration.

  8. Monensin and FCCP inhibit the intracellular transport of alphavirus membrane glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Kaariainen, L; Hashimoto, K; Saraste, J; Virtanen, I; Penttinen, K

    1980-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of semliki forest virus (SFV) and sindbis virus (SIN) were used to study the intracellular transport of virus membrane glycoproteins in infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. When antisera against purified glycoproteins and (125)I- labeled protein A from staphylococcus aureus were used only small amounts of virus glycoproteins were detected at the surface of SFV ts-1 and SIN Ts-10 infected cells incubated at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C). When the mutant-infected cells were shifted to the permissive temperature (28 degrees C), in the presence of cycloheximide, increasing amounts of virus glycoproteins appeared at the cell surface from 20 to 80 min after the shift. Both monensin (10muM) and carbonylcyanide-p- trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP; 10-20 muM) inhibited the appearance of virus membrane glycoproteins at the cell surface. Vinblastine sulfate (10 μg/ml) inhibited the transport by approximately 50 percent, whereas cytochalasin B (1 μg/ml) had only a marginal effect. Intracellular distribution of virus glycoproteins in the mutant-infected cells was visualized in double-fluorescence studies using lectins as markers for endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. At 39 degrees C, the virus membrane glycoproteins were located at the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas after shift to 28 degrees C, a bright juxtanuclear reticular fluorescence was seen in the location of the Golgi apparatus. In the presence of monensin, the virus glycoproteins could migrate to the Golgi apparatus, although transport to the cell surface did not take place. When the shift was carried out in the presence of FCCP, negligible fluorescence was seen in the Golgi apparatus and the glycoproteins apparently remained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. A rapid inhibition in the accumulation of virus glycoproteins at the cell surface was obtained when FCCP was added during the active transport period, whereas with monensin there was a delay of

  9. Inhibition by Levorphanol and Related Drugs of Amino Acid Transport by Isolated Membrane Vesicles from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Mary J. C.; Simon, Eric J.

    1975-01-01

    Levorphanol inhibits the transport of the amino acids proline and lysine by cytoplasmic membrane vesicles derived from Escherichia coli. The degree of inhibition increases with increasing levorphanol concentration and ranges from 26% at 10−6 M levorphanol to 92% at 10−3 M levorphanol. The effect is independent of the energy source, since levorphanol inhibits proline uptake to the same extent in the presence of 20 mM d-lactate or 20 mM succinate and in the absence of an exogenous energy source. Levorphanol does not irreversibly alter the ability of membrane vesicles to transport proline, since incubation of membrane vesicles for 15 min in the presence of 0.25 mM levorphanol, a concentration which inhibits proline transport by more than 75%, has no effect on the rate of proline transport by these vesicles once the drug is removed. Both the maximum velocity and the Km of proline transport are modified by levorphanol, hence, the type of inhibition produced by levorphanol is mixed. The inhibitor constant (Ki) for levorphanol inhibition of proline transport is approximately 3 × 10−4 M. Membrane vesicles incubated in the presence of levorphanol accumulate much less proline at the steady state than do control vesicles. Furthermore, the addition of levorphanol to membrane vesicles preloaded to the steady state with proline produces a marked net efflux of proline. Levorphanol does not block either temperature-induced efflux or exchange of external proline with [14C]proline present in the intravesicular pool. Dextrorphan, the enantiomorph of levorphanol, and levallorphan, the N-allyl analogue of levorphanol, inhibit proline and lysine transport in a similar manner. Possible mechanisms of the effects of these drugs on cell membranes are discussed. PMID:1096802

  10. Local Anesthetics and Antipsychotic Phenothiazines Interact Nonspecifically with Membranes and Inhibit Hexose Transporters in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Uesono, Yukifumi; Toh-e, Akio; Kikuchi, Yoshiko; Araki, Tomoyuki; Hachiya, Takushi; Watanabe, Chihiro K.; Noguchi, Ko; Terashima, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Action mechanisms of anesthetics remain unclear because of difficulty in explaining how structurally different anesthetics cause similar effects. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, local anesthetics and antipsychotic phenothiazines induced responses similar to those caused by glucose starvation, and they eventually inhibited cell growth. These drugs inhibited glucose uptake, but additional glucose conferred resistance to their effects; hence, the primary action of the drugs is to cause glucose starvation. In hxt0 strains with all hexose transporter (HXT) genes deleted, a strain harboring a single copy of HXT1 (HXT1s) was more sensitive to tetracaine than a strain harboring multiple copies (HXT1m), which indicates that quantitative reduction of HXT1 increases tetracaine sensitivity. However, additional glucose rather than the overexpression of HXT1/2 conferred tetracaine resistance to wild-type yeast; therefore, Hxts that actively transport hexoses apparently confer tetracaine resistance. Additional glucose alleviated sensitivity to local anesthetics and phenothiazines in the HXT1m strain but not the HXT1s strain; thus, the glucose-induced effects required a certain amount of Hxt1. At low concentrations, fluorescent phenothiazines were distributed in various membranes. At higher concentrations, they destroyed the membranes and thereby delocalized Hxt1-GFP from the plasma membrane, similar to local anesthetics. These results suggest that the aforementioned drugs affect various membrane targets via nonspecific interactions with membranes. However, the drugs preferentially inhibit the function of abundant Hxts, resulting in glucose starvation. When Hxts are scarce, this preference is lost, thereby mitigating the alleviation by additional glucose. These results provide a mechanism that explains how different compounds induce similar effects based on lipid theory. PMID:26757771

  11. Specific inhibition of the ABCG2 transporter could improve the efficacy of photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bebes, Attila; Nagy, Tünde; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos; Dobozy, Attila; Széll, Márta

    2011-11-03

    Photodynamic therapy is based on the selective accumulation of a photosensitizer in tumors, followed by destruction of the target tissue by a light source. Protoporphyrin IX, a well-known photosensitizer, was recently reported as an endogenous substrate for the multidrug transporter ABCG2. We investigated the role of ABCG2 protein in the porphyrin extrusion ability of keratinocytes, with regard to the impact of the specific inhibition of ABCG2 by a non-toxic fumitremorgin C analog, Ko-134, on photodynamic therapy efficacy. We studied the level of porphyrin accumulation in response to delta-aminolevulinic acid pretreatment in proliferating and highly differentiated HaCaT keratinocytes. An in vitro model of photodynamic therapy on HaCaT cells was established with a therapeutically approved narrow-bandwidth red-light source. The porphyrin extrusion ability of HaCaT cells proved to correlate with their ABCG2 expression which was higher in proliferating cells than in differentiated cells. Moreover, the specific inhibition of ABCG2 by Ko-134 enhanced the sensitivity of keratinocytes to photodynamic therapy in vitro. These results suggest that ABCG2 may serve as a target molecule via which to improve the photodynamic therapy of skin lesions: its inhibition by the non-toxic Ko-134 is a promising therapeutic modality.

  12. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  13. Mechanisms Underlying Food-Drug Interactions: Inhibition of Intestinal Metabolism and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Won, Christina S.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Paine, Mary F.

    2012-01-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively. PMID:22884524

  14. Mechanisms underlying food-drug interactions: inhibition of intestinal metabolism and transport.

    PubMed

    Won, Christina S; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Paine, Mary F

    2012-11-01

    Food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. These interactions often reflect prandial-associated changes in the extent and/or rate of systemic drug exposure. Physiologic and physicochemical mechanisms underlying food effects on drug disposition are well-characterized. However, biochemical mechanisms involving drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins remain underexplored. Several plant-derived beverages have been shown to modulate enzymes and transporters in the intestine, leading to altered pharmacokinetic (PK) and potentially negative pharmacodynamic (PD) outcomes. Commonly consumed fruit juices, teas, and alcoholic drinks contain phytochemicals that inhibit intestinal cytochrome P450 and phase II conjugation enzymes, as well as uptake and efflux transport proteins. Whereas myriad phytochemicals have been shown to inhibit these processes in vitro, translation to the clinic has been deemed insignificant or undetermined. An overlooked prerequisite for elucidating food effects on drug PK is thorough knowledge of causative bioactive ingredients. Substantial variability in bioactive ingredient composition and activity of a given dietary substance poses a challenge in conducting robust food-drug interaction studies. This confounding factor can be addressed by identifying and characterizing specific components, which could be used as marker compounds to improve clinical trial design and quantitatively predict food effects. Interpretation and integration of data from in vitro, in vivo, and in silico studies require collaborative expertise from multiple disciplines, from botany to clinical pharmacology (i.e., plant to patient). Development of more systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining drug-dietary substance interactions prospectively.

  15. Effect of Efflux Transporter Inhibition on the Distribution of Fluconazole in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zheng, Na; Zhang, Jiatang; Huang, Xusheng; Yu, Shengyuan

    2017-03-24

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and organic anion transporters (OATs) are expressed on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), preventing the entry of or the pumping out of numerous molecules. Fluconazole is widely used to treat fungal meningoencephalitis. The effect of these transporters on the distribution of fluconazole in the brain is unclear. We used microdialysis to compare the distribution of fluconazole in the rat brain with and without co-administration of probenecid, a MRP and OAT inhibitor. Additionally, we also observed the difference in fluconazole distribution between the two barriers. The results showed that probenecid increased the penetration of fluconazole into the BBB but did not alter the penetration of fluconazole into the BCSFB of rats. The penetration of the BBB and BCSFB by fluconazole did not statistically differ according to physiological condition. These results demonstrate that transporters that can be inhibited by probenecid may be involved in fluconazole resistance at the BBB and provide a laboratory basis for predicting brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentration using the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of fluconazole.

  16. Diabetes Impairs Wnt3 Protein-induced Neurogenesis in Olfactory Bulbs via Glutamate Transporter 1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Tamami; Hidaka, Ryo; Fujimaki, Shin; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes is associated with impaired cognitive function. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats exhibit a loss of neurogenesis and deficits in behavioral tasks involving spatial learning and memory; thus, impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to diabetes-associated cognitive deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated that adult neurogenesis generally occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the subventricular zone, and the olfactory bulbs (OB) and is defective in patients with diabetes. We hypothesized that OB neurogenesis and associated behaviors would be affected in diabetes. In this study, we show that inhibition of Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in the OB causes several behavioral deficits in STZ-induced diabetic rats, including impaired odor discrimination, cognitive dysfunction, and increased anxiety. Notably, the sodium- and chloride-dependent GABA transporters and excitatory amino acid transporters that localize to GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals decreased in the OB of diabetic rats. Moreover, GAT1 inhibitor administration also hindered Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in vitro Collectively, these data suggest that STZ-induced diabetes adversely affects OB neurogenesis via GABA and glutamate transporter systems, leading to functional impairments in olfactory performance.

  17. Mitosis and inhibition of intracellular transport stimulate palmitoylation of a 62-kD protein

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a cycle of acylation/deacylation is involved in the vesicular transport of proteins between intracellular compartments at both the budding and the fusion stage (Glick, B. S., and J. E. Rothman. 1987. Nature (Lond.). 326:309-312). Since a number of cellular processes requiring vesicular transport are inhibited during mitosis, we examined the fatty acylation of proteins in interphase and mitotic cells. We have identified a major palmitoylated protein with an apparent molecular weight of 62,000 (p62), whose level of acylation increases 5-10-fold during mitosis. Acylation was reversible and p62 was no longer palmitoylated in cells that have exited mitosis and entered G1. p62 is tightly bound to the cytoplasmic side of membranes, since it was sensitive to digestion with proteases in the absence of detergent and was not removed by treatment with 1 M KCl. p62 is removed from membranes by nonionic detergents or concentrations of urea greater than 4 M. The localization of p62 by subcellular fractionation is consistent with it being in the cis-Golgi or the cis-Golgi network. A palmitoylated protein of the same molecular weight was also observed in interphase cells treated with inhibitors of intracellular transport, such as brefeldin A, monensin, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, or aluminum fluoride. The protein palmitoylated in the presence of brefeldin A was shown to be the same as that palmitoylated during mitosis using partial proteolysis. Digestion with two enzymes, alkaline protease and endoprotease lys-C, generated the same 3H-palmitate-labeled peptide fragments from p62 from mitotic or brefeldin A-treated cells. We suggest that the acylation and deacylation of p62 may be important in vesicular transport and that this process may be regulated during mitosis. PMID:1730740

  18. Reduction of glucose uptake through inhibition of hexose transporters and enhancement of their endocytosis by methylglyoxal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Aya; Wei, Dandan; Nomura, Wataru; Izawa, Shingo; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-02

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by an impairment of glucose uptake even though blood glucose levels are increased. Methylglyoxal is derived from glycolysis and has been implicated in the development of diabetes mellitus, because methylglyoxal levels in blood and tissues are higher in diabetic patients than in healthy individuals. However, it remains to be elucidated whether such factors are a cause, or consequence, of diabetes. Here, we show that methylglyoxal inhibits the activity of mammalian glucose transporters using recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells genetically lacking all hexose transporters but carrying cDNA for human GLUT1 or rat GLUT4. We found that methylglyoxal inhibits yeast hexose transporters also. Glucose uptake was reduced in a stepwise manner following treatment with methylglyoxal, i.e. a rapid reduction within 5 min, followed by a slow and gradual reduction. The rapid reduction was due to the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal on hexose transporters, whereas the slow and gradual reduction seemed due to endocytosis, which leads to a decrease in the amount of hexose transporters on the plasma membrane. We found that Rsp5, a HECT-type ubiquitin ligase, is responsible for the ubiquitination of hexose transporters. Intriguingly, Plc1 (phospholipase C) negatively regulated the endocytosis of hexose transporters in an Rsp5-dependent manner, although the methylglyoxal-induced endocytosis of hexose transporters occurred irrespective of Plc1. Meanwhile, the internalization of hexose transporters following treatment with methylglyoxal was delayed in a mutant defective in protein kinase C.

  19. Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship for Inhibition of Human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter (OCTN2)

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Lei; Ekins, Sean; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN2; SLC22A5) is an important transporter for L-carnitine homeostasis, but can be inhibited by drugs, which may cause L-carnitine deficiency and possibly other OCTN2-mediated drug-drug interactions. One objective was to develop a quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) of OCTN2 inhibitors, in order to predict and identify other potential OCTN2 inhibitors and infer potential clinical interactions. A second objective was to assess two high renal clearance drugs that interact with OCTN2 in vitro (cetirizine and cephaloridine) for possible OCTN2-mediated drug-drug interactions. Using previously generated in vitro data of 22 drugs, a 3D quantitative pharmacophore model and a Bayesian machine learning model were developed. The four pharmacophore features include two hydrophobic groups, one hydrogen-bond acceptor, and one positive ionizable center. The Bayesian machine learning model was developed using simple interpretable descriptors and function class fingerprints of maximum diameter 6 (FCFP_6). An external test set of 27 molecules, including 15 newly identified OCTN2 inhibitors, and a literature test set of 22 molecules were used to validate both models. The computational models afforded good capability to identify structurally diverse OCTN2 inhibitors, providing a valuable tool to predict new inhibitors efficiently. Inhibition results confirmed our previously observed association between rhabdomyolysis and Cmax/Ki ratio. The two high renal clearance drugs cetirizine and cephaloridine were found not to be OCTN2 substrates and their diminished elimination by other drugs is concluded not to be mediated by OCTN2. PMID:20831193

  20. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase in mice promotes reverse cholesterol transport and regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Peng, Hongchun; Peng, Ran; Fan, Qingsong; Zhao, Shuiping; Xu, Danyan; Morisseau, Christophe; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-04-01

    Adipose tissue is the body largest free cholesterol reservoir and abundantly expresses ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1), which maintains plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. HDLs have a protective role in atherosclerosis by mediating reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a cytosolic enzyme whose inhibition has various beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The sEH is highly expressed in adipocytes, and it converts epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) into less bioactive dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. We previously showed that increasing EETs levels with a sEH inhibitor (sEHI) (t-AUCB) resulted in elevated ABCA1 expression and promoted ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The present study investigates the impacts of t-AUCB in mice deficient for the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (Ldlr(-/-) mice) with established atherosclerotic plaques. The sEH inhibitor delivered in vivo for 4 weeks decreased the activity of sEH in adipose tissue, enhanced ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux from adipose depots, and consequently increased HDL levels. Furthermore, t-AUCB enhanced RCT to the plasma, liver, bile and feces. It also showed the reduction of plasma LDL-C levels. Consistently, t-AUCB-treated mice showed reductions in the size of atherosclerotic plaques. These studies establish that raising adipose ABCA1 expression, cholesterol efflux, and plasma HDL levels with t-AUCB treatment promotes RCT, decreasing LDL-C and atherosclerosis regression, suggesting that sEH inhibition may be a promising strategy to treat atherosclerotic vascular disease.

  1. Pharmacodynamic model of sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition: implications for quantitative translational pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Tristan S; Ghosh, Avijit; Haddish-Berhane, Nahor; Sawant-Basak, Aarti; Boustany-Kari, Carine M; She, Li; Leininger, Michael T; Zhu, Tong; Tugnait, Meera; Yang, Xin; Kimoto, Emi; Mascitti, Vincent; Robinson, Ralph P

    2011-12-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are an emerging class of agents for use in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Inhibition of SGLT2 leads to improved glycemic control through increased urinary glucose excretion (UGE). In this study, a biologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model of SGLT2 inhibitor-mediated UGE was developed. The derived model was used to characterize the acute PK/PD relationship of the SGLT2 inhibitor, dapagliflozin, in rats. The quantitative translational pharmacology of dapagliflozin was examined through both prospective simulation and direct modeling of mean literature data obtained for dapagliflozin in healthy subjects. Prospective simulations provided time courses of UGE that were of consistent shape to clinical observations, but were modestly biased toward under prediction. Direct modeling provided an improved characterization of the data and precise parameter estimates which were reasonably consistent with those predicted from preclinical data. Overall, these results indicate that the acute clinical pharmacology of SGLT2 inhibitors in healthy subjects can be reasonably well predicted from preclinical data through rational accounting of species differences in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and SGLT2 pharmacology. Because these data can be generated at the earliest stages of drug discovery, the proposed model is useful in the design and development of novel SGLT2 inhibitors. In addition, this model is expected to serve as a useful foundation for future efforts to understand and predict the effects of SGLT2 inhibition under chronic administration and in other patient populations.

  2. Sodium glucose transporter-2 inhibition has no renoprotective effects on non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiuyue; Steiger, Stefanie; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Sodium glucose transporter (SGLT)-2 inhibition has renoprotective effects in diabetic kidney disease. Whether similar effects can be achieved also in non-diabetic kidney disease is speculative. Chronic kidney disease was induced in C57BL/6N mice by feeding an oxalate-rich diet for 14 days, known to induce nephrocalcinosis-related tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis without directly affecting the glomerular compartment. Empagliflozin treatment started from day 0 of oxalate feeding had no effect on the decline of glomerular filtration rate, crystal deposition, blood urea nitrogen or serum creatinine levels on day 7 and 14. Tissue morphometry of tubular injury and kidney mRNA levels of kidney injury molecule-1 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 were comparable between empagliflozin- and vehicle-treated mice with oxalate nephropathy on day 7 and 14. Similarly, empagliflozin did not affect markers of interstitial fibrosis, including silver, alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) and collagen 1 staining, and mRNA levels of fibronectin-1, collagen 1α1, fibroblast-specific protein-1, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 on day 7 and 14. Thus, the specific renoprotective mechanisms-of-action of SGLT2 inhibition in diabetic kidney disease do not apply to chronic oxalosis, a non-diabetic form of chronic kidney disease.

  3. Inhibition of Fast Axonal Transport by Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Gerardo A.; Bosco, Daryl A.; Brown, Hannah; Gatto, Rodolfo; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Song, Yuyu; Molla, Linda; Baker, Lisa; Marangoni, M. Natalia; Berth, Sarah; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Bagnato, Carolina; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Watterson, D. Martin; Huang, Chun-Fang; Banker, Gary; Brown, Robert H.; Brady, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT) deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS. PMID:23776455

  4. Aberrant regulation of choline metabolism by mitochondrial electron transport system inhibition in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Baykal, Ahmet T.; Jain, Mohit R.

    2009-01-01

    Anomalous choline metabolic patterns have been consistently observed in vivo using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) analysis of patients with neurodegenerative diseases and tissues from cancer patient. It remains unclear; however, what signaling events may have triggered these choline metabolic aberrancies. This study investigates how changes in choline and phospholipid metabolism are regulated by distinct changes in the mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS). We used specific inhibitors to down regulate the function of individual protein complexes in the ETS of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, we found that dramatic elevation in the levels of phosphatidylcholine metabolites could be induced by the inhibition of individual ETS complexes, similar to in vivo observations. Such interferences produced divergent metabolic patterns, which were distinguishable via principal component analysis of the cellular metabolomes. Functional impairments in ETS components have been reported in several central nervous system (CNS) diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, it remains largely unknown how the suppression of individual ETS complex function could lead to specific dysfunction in different cell types, resulting in distinct disease phenotypes. Our results suggest that the inhibition of each of the five ETS complexes might differentially regulate phospholipase activities within choline metabolic pathways in neuronal cells, which could contribute to the overall understanding of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:19774105

  5. Listeria monocytogenes Inhibits Serotonin Transporter in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Latorre, E; Pradilla, A; Chueca, B; Pagán, R; Layunta, E; Alcalde, A I; Mesonero, J E

    2016-10-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that can cause a serious infection. Intestinal microorganisms have been demonstrated to contribute to intestinal physiology not only through immunological responses but also by modulating the intestinal serotonergic system. Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator that is synthesized in the intestinal epithelium and regulates the whole intestinal physiology. The serotonin transporter (SERT), located in enterocytes, controls intestinal 5-HT availability and therefore serotonin's effects. Infections caused by L. monocytogenes are well described as being due to the invasion of intestinal epithelial cells; however, the effect of L. monocytogenes on the intestinal epithelium remains unknown. The main aim of this work, therefore, was to study the effect of L. monocytogenes on SERT. Caco2/TC7 cell line was used as an enterocyte-like in vitro model, and SERT functional and molecular expression assays were performed. Our results demonstrate that living L. monocytogenes inhibits serotonin uptake by reducing SERT expression at the brush border membrane. However, neither inactivated L. monocytogenes nor soluble metabolites were able to affect SERT. The results also demonstrate that L. monocytogenes yields TLR2 and TLR10 transcriptional changes in intestinal epithelial cells and suggest that TLR10 is potentially involved in the inhibitory effect observed on SERT. Therefore, L. monocytogenes, through TLR10-mediated SERT inhibition, may induce increased intestinal serotonin availability and potentially contributing to intestinal physiological changes and the initiation of the inflammatory response.

  6. Molecular mechanism of serotonin transporter inhibition elucidated by a new flexible docking protocol.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mari; Kurczab, Rafał; Ravna, Aina W; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2012-01-01

    The two main groups of antidepressant drugs, the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), as well as several other compounds, act by inhibiting the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, the binding mode and molecular mechanism of inhibition in SERT are not fully understood. In this study, five classes of SERT inhibitors were docked into an outward-facing SERT homology model using a new 4D ensemble docking protocol. Unlike other docking protocols, where protein flexibility is not considered or is highly dependent on the ligand structure, flexibility was here obtained by side chain sampling of the amino acids of the binding pocket using biased probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) prior to docking. This resulted in the generation of multiple binding pocket conformations that the ligands were docked into. The docking results showed that the inhibitors were stacked between the aromatic amino acids of the extracellular gate (Y176, F335) presumably preventing its closure. The inhibitors interacted with amino acids in both the putative substrate binding site and more extracellular regions of the protein. A general structure-docking-based pharmacophore model was generated to explain binding of all studied classes of SERT inhibitors. Docking of a test set of actives and decoys furthermore showed that the outward-facing ensemble SERT homology model consistently and selectively scored the majority of active compounds above decoys, which indicates its usefulness in virtual screening.

  7. Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibition Promotes Striatal Axon Sprouting via NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Candace; Mrejeru, Ana; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Klein, Zoe; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activity is involved in shaping synaptic connections throughout development and adulthood. We recently reported that brief activation of NMDA receptors on cultured ventral midbrain dopamine neurons enhanced their axon growth rate and induced axonal branching. To test whether this mechanism was relevant to axon regrowth in adult animals, we examined the reinnervation of dorsal striatum following nigral dopamine neuron loss induced by unilateral intrastriatal injections of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine. We used a pharmacological approach to enhance NMDA receptor-dependent signaling by treatment with an inhibitor of glycine transporter-1 that elevates levels of extracellular glycine, a coagonist required for NMDA receptor activation. All mice displayed sprouting of dopaminergic axons from spared fibers in the ventral striatum to the denervated dorsal striatum at 7 weeks post-lesion, but the reinnervation in mice treated for 4 weeks with glycine uptake inhibitor was approximately twice as dense as in untreated mice. The treated mice also displayed higher levels of striatal dopamine and a complete recovery from lateralization in a test of sensorimotor behavior. We confirmed that the actions of glycine uptake inhibition on reinnervation and behavioral recovery required NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons using targeted deletion of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit in dopamine neurons. Glycine transport inhibitors promote functionally relevant sprouting of surviving dopamine axons and could provide clinical treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:24133278

  8. Dopamine and angiotensin type 2 receptors cooperatively inhibit sodium transport in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-08-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells, sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D(1)-like receptors (D(1)R/D(5)R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT(2)R), whereas the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and, subsequently, hypertension. We show that D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT(2)R 4-fold via a D(1)R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT(2)R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT(2)R recruitment in renal proximal tubule cells with D(1)Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D(1)Rs and AT(2)Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, protein phosphatase 2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization, and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension.

  9. Nongenomic effects of cisplatin: acute inhibition of mechanosensitive transporters and channels without actin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Nina; Duranton, Christophe; Djerbi, Nadir; Puech, Pierre Henri; Gounon, Pierre; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie Thérèse; Rauch, Cyril; Tauc, Michel; Counillon, Laurent; Poët, Mallorie

    2010-10-01

    Cisplatin is an antineoplastic drug, mostly documented to cause cell death through the formation of DNA adducts. In patients, it exhibits a range of short-term side effects that are unlikely to be related to its genomic action. As cisplatin has been shown to modify membrane properties in different cell systems, we investigated its effects on mechanosensitive ion transporters and channels. We show here that cisplatin is a noncompetitive inhibitor of the mechanosensitive Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE-1, with a half-inhibition concentration of 30 μg/mL associated with a decrease in V(max) and Hill coefficient. We also showed that it blocks the Cl(-) and K(+) mechanosensitive channels VSORC and TREK-1 at similar concentrations. In contrast, the nonmechanosensitive Cl(-) and K(+) channels CFTR and TASK-1 and the Na(+)-coupled glucose transport, which share functional features with VSORC, TREK-1, and NHE-1, respectively, were insensitive to cisplatin. We next investigated whether cisplatin action was due to a direct effect on membrane or to cortical actin remodeling that would affect mechanosensors. Using scanning electron microscopy, in vivo actin labeling, and atomic force microscopy, we did not observe any modification of the Young's modulus and actin cytoskeleton for up to 60 and 120 μg/mL cisplatin, whereas these concentrations modified membrane morphology. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for cisplatin, which affects mechanosensitive channels and transporters involved in cell fate programs and/or expressed in mechanosensitive organs in which cisplatin elicits strong secondary effects, such as the inner ear or the peripheral nervous system. These results might constitute a common denominator to previously unrelated effects of this drug.

  10. Theaflavins, dimeric catechins, inhibit peptide transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers via down-regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated peptide transporter PEPT1.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Junko; Park, Ha-Young; Kunitake, Yuri; Yoshiura, Keiko; Matsui, Toshiro

    2013-06-15

    In the small intestine, peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) plays a role in the transport of di- and tripeptides. In this study, we investigated whether theaflavins (TFs) affect the absorption of small peptides in human intestinal Caco-2 cells, since TFs do not penetrate through the cells and might be involved in intestinal transport systems. In transport experiments, the transport of glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar, a model molecule for PEPT1 transport) and other dipeptides (Val-Tyr and Ile-Phe) were significantly reduced (P<0.05) in TFs-pretreated cells. In TF 3'-O-gallate-pretreated cells, Western blot analysis revealed attenuated expression of PEPT1 transporter and Gly-Sar transport was completely ameliorated by 10 μM Compound C, an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TFs inhibit peptide transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers, probably through suppression of AMPK-mediated PEPT1 expression, which should be considered a new bioactivity of TFs in black tea.

  11. P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) inhibited network of mitochondrion transport along microtubule and BMP signal-induced cell shape in chimpanzee left cerebrum by systems-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Minghu; Huang, Juxiang; Qi, Lianxiu

    2012-10-01

    We constructed the significant low-expression P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) inhibited transport and signal network in chimpanzee compared with high-expression (fold change ≥2) the human left cerebrum in GEO data set, by using integration of gene regulatory activated and inhibited network inference method with gene ontology (GO) analysis. Our result showed that ABCB1 transport and signal upstream network RAB2A inhibited ABCB1, and downstream ABCB1-inhibited SMAD1_2, NCK2, SLC25A46, GDF10, RASGRP1, EGFR, LRPPRC, RASSF2, RASA4, CA2, CBLB, UBR5, SLC25A16, ITGB3BP, DDIT4, PDPN, RAB2A in chimpanzee left cerebrum. We obtained that the different biological processes of ABCB1 inhibited transport and signal network repressed carbon dioxide transport, ER to Golgi vesicle-mediated transport, folic acid transport, mitochondrion transport along microtubule, water transport, BMP signaling pathway, Ras protein signal transduction, transforming growth factor beta receptor signaling pathway in chimpanzee compared with the inhibited network of the human left cerebrum, as a result of inducing inhibition of mitochondrion transport along microtubule and BMP signal-induced cell shape in chimpanzee left cerebrum. Our hypothesis was verified by the same and different biological processes of ABCB1 inhibited transport and signal network of chimpanzee compared with the corresponding activated network of chimpanzee and the human left cerebrum, respectively.

  12. Heterocyclic cyclohexanone monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin can inhibit the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters in cancer multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Revalde, Jezrael L; Li, Yan; Hawkins, Bill C; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Paxton, James W

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is a phytochemical that inhibits the xenobiotic ABC efflux transporters implicated in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR), such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 1 and 5 (MRP1 and MRP5). The use of CUR in the clinic however, is complicated by its instability and poor pharmacokinetic profile. Monocarbonyl analogs of CUR (MACs) are compounds without CUR's unstable β-diketone moiety and were reported to have improved stability and in vivo disposition. Whether the MACs can be used as MDR reversal agents is less clear, as the absence of a β-diketone may negatively impact transporter inhibition. In this study, we investigated 23 heterocyclic cyclohexanone MACs for inhibitory effects against P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP5. Using flow cytometry and resistance reversal assays, we found that many of these compounds inhibited the transport activity of the ABC transporters investigated, often with much greater potency than CUR. Overall the analogs were most effective at inhibiting BCRP and we identified three compounds, A12 (2,6-bis((E)-2,5-dimethoxy-benzylidene)cyclohexanone), A13 (2,6-bis((E)-4-hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzylidene)-cyclohexanone) and B11 (3,5-bis((E)-2-fluoro-4,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidin-4-one), as the most promising BCRP inhibitors. These compounds inhibited BCRP activity in a non-cell line, non-substrate-specific manner. Their inhibition occurred by direct transporter interaction rather than modulating protein or cell surface expression. From these results, we concluded that MACs, such as the heterocyclic cyclohexanone analogs in this study, also have potential as MDR reversal agents and may be superior alternatives to the unstable parent compound, CUR.

  13. Extracellular nucleotides inhibit oxalate transport by human intestinal Caco-2-BBe cells through PKC-δ activation.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Sharma, Sapna; Ratakonda, Sireesha; Hassan, Hatim A

    2013-07-01

    Nephrolithiasis remains a major health problem in Western countries. Seventy to 80% of kidney stones are composed of calcium oxalate, and small changes in urinary oxalate affect risk of kidney stone formation. Intestinal oxalate secretion mediated by the anion exchanger SLC26A6 plays an essential role in preventing hyperoxaluria and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis, indicating that understanding the mechanisms regulating intestinal oxalate transport is critical for management of hyperoxaluria. Purinergic signaling modulates several intestinal processes through pathways including PKC activation, which we previously found to inhibit Slc26a6 activity in mouse duodenal tissue. We therefore examined whether purinergic stimulation with ATP and UTP affects oxalate transport by human intestinal Caco-2-BBe (C2) cells. We measured [¹⁴C]oxalate uptake in the presence of an outward Cl⁻ gradient as an assay of Cl⁻/oxalate exchange activity, ≥50% of which is mediated by SLC26A6. We found that ATP and UTP significantly inhibited oxalate transport by C2 cells, an effect blocked by the PKC inhibitor Gö-6983. Utilizing pharmacological agonists and antagonists, as well as PKC-δ knockdown studies, we observed that ATP inhibits oxalate transport through the P2Y₂ receptor, PLC, and PKC-δ. Biotinylation studies showed that ATP inhibits oxalate transport by lowering SLC26A6 surface expression. These findings are of potential relevance to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease-associated hyperoxaluria, where supraphysiological levels of ATP/UTP are expected and overexpression of the P2Y₂ receptor has been reported. We conclude that ATP and UTP inhibit oxalate transport by lowering SLC26A6 surface expression in C2 cells through signaling pathways including the P2Y₂ purinergic receptor, PLC, and PKC-δ.

  14. Comparison of Cytotoxicity and Inhibition of Membrane ABC Transporters Induced by MWCNTs with Different Length and Functional Groups.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Liu, Su; Wu, Bing; Shen, Zhuoyan; Cherr, Gary N; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Li, Mei

    2016-04-05

    Experimental studies indicate that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have the potential to induce cytotoxicity. However, the reports are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, adverse effects of MWCNTs at low concentration are not well understood. In this study, we systemically compared adverse effects of six MWCNTs including pristine MWCNTs, hydroxyl-MWCNTs and carboxyl-MWCNTs of two different lengths (0.5-2 μm and 10-30 μm) on human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Results showed that MWCNTs induced cytotoxicity by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and damaging cell function. Pristine short MWCNTs induced higher cytotoxicity than pristine long MWCNTs. Functionalization increased cytotoxicity of long MWCNTs, but reduced cytotoxicity of short MWCNTs. Further, our results indicated that the six MWCNTs, at nontoxic concentration, might not be environmentally safe as they inhibited ABC transporters' efflux capabilities. This inhibition was observed even at very low concentrations, which were 40-1000 times lower than their effective concentrations on cytotoxicity. The inhibition of ABC transporters significantly increased cytotoxicity of arsenic, a known substrate of ABC transporters, indicating a chemosensitizing effect of MWCNTs. Plasma membrane damage was likely the mechanism by which the six MWCNTs inhibited ABC transporter activity. This study provides insight into risk assessments of low levels of MWCNTs in the environment.

  15. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein-mediated transport by extracts of and monoterpenoids contained in Zanthoxyli Fructus

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Naoko; Takagi, Akiyoshi; Kitazawa, Hidenori; Kawakami, Junichi . E-mail: kawakami-tym@umin.ac.jp; Adachi, Isao

    2005-12-01

    Citrus (rutaceous) herbs are often used in traditional medicine and Japanese cuisine and can be taken concomitantly with conventional medicine. In this study, the effect of various citrus-herb extracts on P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated transport was examined in vitro to investigate a possible interaction with P-gp substrates. Component monoterpenoids of the essential oil in Zanthoxyli Fructus was screened to find novel P-gp inhibitors. LLC-GA5-COL150 cells transfected with human MDR1 cDNA encoding P-gp were used. Cellular accumulation of [{sup 3}H]digoxin was measured in the presence or absence of P-gp inhibitors or test samples. Aurantii Fructus, Evodiae Fructus, Aurantii Fructus Immaturus, Aurantii Nobilis Pericarpium, Phellodendri Cortex, and Zanthoxyli Fructus were extracted with hot water (decocted) and then fractionated with ethyl acetate. The cell to medium ratio of [{sup 3}H]digoxin accumulation increased significantly in the presence of the decoction of Evodiae Fructus, Aurantii Nobilis Pericarpium, and Zanthoxyli Fructus, and the ethyl acetate fraction of all citrus herbs used. The ethyl acetate fraction of Zanthoxyli Fructus exhibited the strongest inhibition of P-gp among tested samples with an IC{sub 5} value of 166 {mu}g/mL. Then its component monoterpenoids, geraniol, geranyl acetate (R)-(+)-limonene, (R)-(+)-linalool, citronellal (R)-(+)-citronellal, DL-citronellol (S)-(-)-{beta}-citronellol, and cineole, were screened. (R)-(+)-citronellal and (S)-(-)-{beta}-citronellol inhibited P-gp with IC{sub 5} values of 167 {mu}M and 504 {mu}M, respectively. These findings suggest that Zanthoxyli Fructus may interact with P-gp substrates and that some monoterpenoids with the relatively lower molecular weight of about 150 such as (R)-(+)-citronellal can be potent inhibitors of P-gp.

  16. Inhibition of the glucose transporter SGLT2 with dapagliflozin in pancreatic alpha cells triggers glucagon secretion.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Caroline; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gmyr, Valéry; Queniat, Gurvan; Moerman, Ericka; Thévenet, Julien; Beaucamps, Cédric; Delalleau, Nathalie; Popescu, Iuliana; Malaisse, Willy J; Sener, Abdullah; Deprez, Benoit; Abderrahmani, Amar; Staels, Bart; Pattou, François

    2015-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia resulting from a deficiency in insulin signaling, because of insulin resistance and/or defects in insulin secretion; it is also associated with increases in glucagon and endogenous glucose production (EGP). Gliflozins, including dapagliflozin, are a new class of approved oral antidiabetic agents that specifically inhibit sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) function in the kidney, thus preventing renal glucose reabsorption and increasing glycosuria in diabetic individuals while reducing hyperglycemia. However, gliflozin treatment in subjects with T2D increases both plasma glucagon and EGP by unknown mechanisms. In spite of the rise in EGP, T2D patients treated with gliflozin have lower blood glucose levels than those receiving placebo, possibly because of increased glycosuria; however, the resulting increase in plasma glucagon levels represents a possible concerning side effect, especially in a patient population already affected by hyperglucagonemia. Here we demonstrate that SGLT2 is expressed in glucagon-secreting alpha cells of the pancreatic islets. We further found that expression of SLC5A2 (which encodes SGLT2) was lower and glucagon (GCG) gene expression was higher in islets from T2D individuals and in normal islets exposed to chronic hyperglycemia than in islets from non-diabetics. Moreover, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-α (HNF4A) is specifically expressed in human alpha cells, in which it controls SLC5A2 expression, and its expression is downregulated by hyperglycemia. In addition, inhibition of either SLC5A2 via siRNA-induced gene silencing or SGLT2 via dapagliflozin treatment in human islets triggered glucagon secretion through KATP channel activation. Finally, we found that dapagliflozin treatment further promotes glucagon secretion and hepatic gluconeogenesis in healthy mice, thereby limiting the decrease of plasma glucose induced by fasting. Collectively, these results identify a

  17. Inhibition of electron transport chain assembly and function promotes photodynamic killing of Candida

    PubMed Central

    Chabrier-Roselló, Yeissa; Giesselman, Benjamin R.; De Jesús-Andino, Francisco J.; Foster, Thomas H.; Mitra, Soumya; Haidaris, Constantine G.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory deficiency increases the sensitivity of the pathogenic fungi Candida albicans and C. glabrata to oxidative stress induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT) sensitized by the cationic porphyrin meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP-1363). Since disruption of electron transport chain (ETC) function increases intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species in yeast, we determined whether interference with ETC assembly or function increased sensitivity to TMP-1363-PDT in C. albicans, C. glabrata and the non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Metabolic inhibitor antimycin A and defined genetic mutants were used to identify ETC components that contribute to the sensitivity to PDT. Inhibition of cytochrome bc1 (Complex III) with antimycin A increases mitochondrial levels of reactive oxygen species. PDT performed following pretreatment with antimycin A reduced colony forming units (CFU) of C. albicans and C. glabrata by approximately two orders of magnitude relative to PDT alone. A S. cerevisiae mitochondrial glutaredoxin grx5 mutant, defective in assembly of Fe-S clusters critical for Complex III function, displayed increased sensitivity to PDT. Furthermore, C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae mutants in cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV) synthesis and assembly were also significantly more sensitive to PDT. These included suv3, encoding an ATP-dependent RNA helicase critical for maturation of cytochrome c oxidase subunit transcripts, and pet117, encoding an essential cytochrome c oxidase assembly factor. Following PDT, the reduction in CFU of these mutants was one to two orders of magnitude greater than in their respective parental strains. The data demonstrate that selective inhibition of ETC Complexes III and IV significantly increases the sensitivity of C. albicans, C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae to PDT sensitized with TMP-1363. PMID:20381373

  18. Enantioselective inhibition of D-serine transport by (S)-ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S; Bernier, Michel; Camandola, Simonetta; Khadeer, Mohammed A; Moaddel, Ruin; Mattson, Mark P; Wainer, Irving W

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with major depressive disorder receiving racemic ketamine, (R,S)-ketamine, experience transient increases in Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale scores and a coincident drop in plasma d-serine levels. The results suggest that (R,S)-ketamine produces an immediate, concentration-dependent pharmacological effect on d-serine plasma concentrations. One potential source of this effect is (R,S)-ketamine-induced inhibition of the transporter ASCT2, which regulates intracellular d-serine concentrations. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of (S)- and (R)-ketamine on ASCT2-mediated transport of d-serine in PC-12 and 1321N1 cells and primary neuronal cells in culture. Experimental Approach Intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels were determined using capillary electrophoresis–laser-induced fluorescence and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry respectively. Expression of ASCT2, Asc-1 and serine racemase was determined utilizing Western blotting. Key Results (S)-Ketamine produced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular d-serine and reduced extracellular d-serine accumulation. In contrast, (R)-ketamine decreased both intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels. The ASCT2 inhibitor, benzyl-d-serine (BDS), and ASCT2 gene knockdown mimicked the action of (S)-ketamine on d-serine in PC-12 cells, while the Asc-1 agonist d-isoleucine reduced intracellular d-serine and increased extracellular d-serine accumulation. This response to d-isoleucine was not affected by BDS or (S)-ketamine. Primary cultures of rat neuronal cells expressed ASCT2 and were responsive to (S)-ketamine and BDS. (S)- and (R)-ketamine increased the expression of monomeric serine racemase in all the cells studied, with (S)-ketamine having the greatest effect. Conclusions and Implications (S)-Ketamine decreased cellular export of d-serine via selective inhibition of ASCT2, and this could represent a possible source

  19. Quercetin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and ferroportin transporter expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lesjak, Marija; Hoque, Rukshana; Balesaria, Sara; Skinner, Vernon; Debnam, Edward S; Srai, Surjit K S; Sharp, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Balancing systemic iron levels within narrow limits is critical for maintaining human health. There are no known pathways to eliminate excess iron from the body and therefore iron homeostasis is maintained by modifying dietary absorption so that it matches daily obligatory losses. Several dietary factors can modify iron absorption. Polyphenols are plentiful in human diet and many compounds, including quercetin--the most abundant dietary polyphenol--are potent iron chelators. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and longer-term effects of quercetin on intestinal iron metabolism. Acute exposure of rat duodenal mucosa to quercetin increased apical iron uptake but decreased subsequent basolateral iron efflux into the circulation. Quercetin binds iron between its 3-hydroxyl and 4-carbonyl groups and methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group negated both the increase in apical uptake and the inhibition of basolateral iron release, suggesting that the acute effects of quercetin on iron transport were due to iron chelation. In longer-term studies, rats were administered quercetin by a single gavage and iron transporter expression measured 18 h later. Duodenal FPN expression was decreased in quercetin-treated rats. This effect was recapitulated in Caco-2 cells exposed to quercetin for 18 h. Reporter assays in Caco-2 cells indicated that repression of FPN by quercetin was not a transcriptional event but might be mediated by miRNA interaction with the FPN 3'UTR. Our study highlights a novel mechanism for the regulation of iron bioavailability by dietary polyphenols. Potentially, diets rich in polyphenols might be beneficial for patients groups at risk of iron loading by limiting the rate of intestinal iron absorption.

  20. Urotensin II Inhibits Skeletal Muscle Glucose Transport Signaling Pathways via the NADPH Oxidase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Wu, Xin-Rui; Yang, Hui; Yin, Chun-Lin; Shi, Li-Jin; Wang, Xue-Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that the urotensin (UII) and its receptor are up-regulated in the skeletal muscle of mice with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but the significance of UII in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of UII on NADPH oxidase and glucose transport signaling pathways in the skeletal muscle of mice with T2DM and in C2C12 mouse myotube cells. KK/upj-AY/J mice (KK) mice were divided into the following groups: KK group, with saline treatment for 2 weeks; KK+ urantide group, with daily 30 µg/kg body weight injections over the same time period of urantide, a potent urotensin II antagonist peptide; Non-diabetic C57BL/6J mice were used as normal controls. After urantide treatment, mice were subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, in addition to measurements of the levels of ROS, NADPH oxidase and the phosphorylated AKT, PKC and ERK. C2C12 cells were incubated with serum-free DMEM for 24 hours before conducting the experiments, and then administrated with 100 nM UII for 2 hours or 24 hours. Urantide treatment improved glucose tolerance, decreased the translocation of the NADPH subunits p40-phox and p47-phox, and increased levels of the phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK. In contrast, UII treatment increased ROS production and p47-phox and p67-phox translocation, and decreased the phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and p38MAPK; Apocynin abrogated this effect. In conclusion, UII increased ROS production by NADPH oxidase, leading to the inhibition of signaling pathways involving glucose transport, such as AKT/PKC/ERK. Our data imply a role for UII at the molecular level in glucose homeostasis, and possibly in skeletal muscle insulin resistance in T2DM. PMID:24116164

  1. Tubuloglomerular and connecting tubuloglomerular feedback during inhibition of various Na transporters in the nephron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; D'Ambrosio, Martin A; Ren, YiLin; Monu, Sumit R; Leung, Pablo; Kutskill, Kristopher; Garvin, Jeffrey L; Janic, Branislava; Peterson, Edward L; Carretero, Oscar A

    2015-05-01

    Afferent (Af-Art) and efferent arterioles resistance regulate glomerular capillary pressure. The nephron regulates Af-Art resistance via: 1) vasoconstrictor tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), initiated in the macula densa via Na-K-2Cl cotransporters (NKCC2) and 2) vasodilator connecting tubuloglomerular feedback (CTGF), initiated in connecting tubules via epithelial Na channels (ENaC). Furosemide inhibits NKCC2 and TGF. Benzamil inhibits ENaC and CTGF. In vitro, CTGF dilates preconstricted Af-Arts. In vivo, benzamil decreases stop-flow pressure (PSF), suggesting that CTGF antagonizes TGF; however, even when TGF is blocked, CTGF does not increase PSF, suggesting there is another mechanism antagonizing CTGF. We hypothesize that in addition to NKCC2, activation of Na/H exchanger (NHE) antagonizes CTGF, and when both are blocked CTGF dilates Af-Arts and this effect is blocked by a CTGF inhibitor benzamil. Using micropuncture, we studied the effects of transport inhibitors on TGF responses by measuring PSF while increasing nephron perfusion from 0 to 40 nl/min. Control TGF response (-7.9 ± 0.2 mmHg) was blocked by furosemide (-0.4 ± 0.2 mmHg; P < 0.001). Benzamil restored TGF in the presence of furosemide (furosemide: -0.2 ± 0.1 vs. furosemide+benzamil: -4.3 ± 0.3 mmHg; P < 0.001). With furosemide and NHE inhibitor, dimethylamiloride (DMA), increase in tubular flow increased PSF (furosemide+DMA: 2.7 ± 0.5 mmHg, n = 6), and benzamil blocked this (furosemide+DMA+benzamil: -1.1 ± 0.2 mmHg; P < 0.01, n = 6). We conclude that NHE in the nephron decreases PSF (Af-Art constriction) when NKCC2 and ENaC are inhibited, suggesting that in the absence of NKCC2, NHE causes a TGF response and that CTGF dilates the Af-Art when TGF is blocked with NKCC2 and NHE inhibitors.

  2. Evaluation of organic cation transporter 3 (SLC22A3) inhibition as a potential mechanism of antidepressant action.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao-Jie; Appel, David I; Gründemann, Dirk; Richelson, Elliott; Markowitz, John S

    2012-04-01

    Organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3, SLC22A3) is a low-affinity, high-capacity transporter widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and other major organs in both humans and rodents. It is postulated that OCT3 has a role in the overall regulation of neurotransmission and maintenance of homeostasis within the CNS. It is generally believed that all antidepressant drugs in current clinical use exert their primary therapeutic effects through inhibition of one or more of the high-affinity neuronal plasma membrane monoamine transporters, such as the norepinephrine transporter and the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of selected antidepressants on OCT3 activity in OCT3-transfected cells to evaluate whether OCT3 inhibition may at least in part contribute to the pharmacological effects of tested antidepressants. The studies demonstrated that all examined antidepressants inhibited OCT3-mediated uptake of the established OCT3 substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide (4-Di-1-ASP) in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC(50) values were determined to be 4.7 μM, 7.4 μM, 12.0 μM, 18.6 μM, 11.2 μM, and 21.9 μM for desipramine, sertraline, paroxetine, amitriptyline, imipramine, and fluoxetine, respectively. Additionally, desipramine had an IC(50) value of 0.7 μM for the uptake of NE by OCT3, while the IC(50) value of sertraline was 2.3 μM for 5-HT uptake. Both desipramine and sertraline appeared to inhibit OCT3 activity via a non-competitive mechanism. In vivo studies are warranted to determine whether such effects on OCT3 inhibition are of sufficient magnitude to contribute to the overall therapeutic effects of antidepressants.

  3. Curcumin and its cyclohexanone analogue inhibited human Equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Revalde, Jezrael L; Li, Yan; Wijeratne, Tharaka S; Bugde, Piyush; Hawkins, Bill C; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Paxton, James W

    2017-03-29

    Our group investigated combining the phytochemical curcumin and gemcitabine in a liposome, to improve gemcitabine's activity against pancreatic tumours. While optimising the curcumin: gemcitabine ratio for co-encapsulation, we found that increasing curcumin concentrations relative to gemcitabine resulted in antagonistic interactions. As curcumin is a promiscuous transporter inhibitor; we suspected that increased resistance occurred via inhibition of Equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1)-mediated gemcitabine uptake. To test our hypothesis, we determined whether curcumin and a related analogue, 2,6-bis((3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)methylene)-cyclohexanone (or A13), inhibited ENT1-mediated accumulation of [(3)H]uridine and [(3)H]gemcitabine into pancreatic cancer cells. We then confirmed the inhibition of gemcitabine accumulation by investigating whether curcumin/A13 could increase gemcitabine resistance in growth inhibition assays. We found that curcumin and A13 concentration-dependently inhibited the ENT1-mediated accumulation of both uridine and gemcitabine in MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. We also found that non-toxic concentrations of curcumin and A13 significantly increased the resistance of both cell lines to gemcitabine. Increased resistance only occurred when curcumin/A13 was co-incubated with gemcitabine, and not with sequential exposure (i.e., curcumin first, followed by gemcitabine, or vice versa). We also found that the curcumin analogue (3E,5E)-3,5-bis[(2-fluorophenyl)methylene]-4-piperidinone (or EF24) did not inhibit gemcitabine accumulation, making it more suitable in combinations than curcumin/A13. From these results, we concluded that curcumin and A13 are inhibitors of the ENT1 transporter, but only at high concentrations (2-20µM). Curcumin is unlikely to inhibit gemcitabine uptake in tumours but may interfere with the oral absorption of ENT1 substrates due to high gut concentrations readily achievable from over-the-counter tablets/capsules.

  4. Inhibition of RNA transportation induces glioma cell apoptosis via downregulation of RanGAP1 expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Chen, Ku-Chung; Lin, Chien-Ju; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2015-05-05

    The prognosis of glioblastoma remains poor, even treatment with surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Therefore, it is still important to develop a new strategy for treatment of glioblastoma. Previous reports demonstrated that rRNA is produced at abnormally high levels in tumor cells. Nuclear export of all non-coding RNAs are known to depend on RanGTPase system. Hydrolyzation of RanGTP-RNA complex by RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) releases RNA from nucleus to cytoplasm. Therefore, inhibition of RNA transportation would be a useful strategy to affect cancer cell fate. In this study, 5-30 μM of oridonin, a natural diterpenoid compound isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine, Rabdosia rubescens, induced U87MG glioma cell apoptosis and RNA accumulation in nucleus at 12h-time point. Before U87MG cell apoptosis, the RanGAP1 protein amount decreased and RanGTP accumulated in nucleus as respectively determined by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, suggesting that decrease of RanGAP1 may result in nuclear entrapment of RanGTP and RNA, and then induce U87MG cell death. In contrast, over-expression of the RanGAP1 protein reversed oridonin-induced U87MG cell apoptosis. Hence, we demonstrated that downregulation of the RanGAP1 protein level by oridonin may result in RNA accumulation in nucleus via nuclear entrapment of RanGTP which eventually led to the apoptosis of glioma cells.

  5. SKF-83566, a D1-dopamine receptor antagonist, inhibits the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Ali, Solav; Reith, Maarten E A; Patel, Jyoti C; Sarti, Federica; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2011-09-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an important transmitter in both motor and limbic pathways. We sought to investigate the role of D(1)-receptor activation in axonal DA release regulation in dorsal striatum using a D(1)-receptor antagonist, SKF-83566. Evoked DA release was monitored in rat striatal slices using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. SKF-83566 caused a concentration-dependent increase in peak single-pulse evoked extracellular DA concentration, with a maximum increase of ∼ 65% in 5 μM SKF-83566. This was accompanied by a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular DA concentration clearance time. Both effects were occluded by nomifensine (1 μM), a dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, suggesting that SKF-83566 acted via the DAT. We tested this by examining [(3)H]DA uptake into LLc-PK cells expressing rat DAT, and confirmed that SKF-83566 is a competitive DAT inhibitor with an IC(50) of 5.7 μM. Binding studies with [(3)H]CFT, a cocaine analog, showed even more potent action of SKF-83566 at the DAT cocaine binding site (IC(50) = 0.51 μM). Thus, data obtained using SKF-83566 as a D(1) DA-receptor antagonist may be confounded by concurrent DAT inhibition. More positively, however, SKF-83566 might be a candidate to attenuate cocaine effects in vivo because of the greater potency of this drug at the cocaine versus DA binding site of the DAT.

  6. Flavonoids from Eight Tropical Plant Species That Inhibit the Multidrug Resistance Transporter ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Versiani, Muhammad Ali; Diyabalanage, Thushara; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Henrich, Curtis J.; Bates, Susan E.; McMahon, James B.; Gustafson, Kirk R.

    2013-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCG2, a membrane-bound multidrug transporter, can make tumor cells resistant to treatment with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. A high-throughput screening effort with the NCI repository of natural product extracts revealed that eight tropical plant extracts significantly inhibited the function of ABCG2. This activity was tracked throughout the extract fractionation process to a series of ABCG2 inhibitory flavonoids (1–13). Their structures were identified by a combination of NMR, mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism studies, and this resulted in the elucidation of (2S)-5,7,3′-trihydroxy-4′-methoxy-8-(3″-methylbut-2″-enyl)-flavonone (1), (2S)-5,7,3′,5′-tetrahydroxy-8-[3″,8″ -dimethylocta-2″(E),7″-dienyl]flavonone (3), and 5,7,3′-trihydroxy-3,5′-dimethoxy-2′-(3′-methylbut-2-enyl)flavone (12) as new compounds. PMID:21275386

  7. CD147 silencing inhibits tumor growth by suppressing glucose transport in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Su, Juan; Gao, Tianyuan; Jiang, Minghao; Wu, Lisha; Zeng, Weiqi; Zhao, Shuang; Peng, Cong; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a very malignant disease and there are still no effective treatments. CD147 participates in the carcinogenesis of multiple human cancers and GLUT-1, as a glucose transporter, is associated with tumor growth. However, the function of CD147 and GLUT-1 in melanoma have not been completely understood. Thus, in this study we investigated the expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 in melanoma tissue, which were overexpressed compared with that in nevus tissue. In addition, CD147 and GLUT-1 were co-localized in the cytoplasm of human melanoma A375 cells. Immunoprecipitation proved that CD147 interacted with GLUT-1 at D105-199. Silencing CD147 by specific siRNA could downregulate GLUT-1 level via inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling and decrease glucose uptake in A375 cells. In vivo experiments also supported that CD147 knockdown suppressed the tumor growth in melanoma subcutaneous mice model, observed by micro PET/CT. Our results could help validate CD147 as a new therapeutic target for treating melanoma. PMID:27556188

  8. Chronic renin inhibition with aliskiren improves glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle glucose transport activity in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Marchionne, Elizabeth M; Diamond-Stanic, Maggie K; Prasonnarong, Mujalin; Henriksen, Erik J

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is associated with whole body and skeletal muscle insulin resistance in obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats. Moreover, this obesity-associated insulin resistance is reduced by treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor (type 1) blockers. However, it is currently unknown whether specific inhibition of renin itself, the rate-limiting step in RAS functionality, improves insulin action in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Therefore, the present study assessed the effect of chronic, selective renin inhibition using aliskiren on glucose tolerance, whole body insulin sensitivity, and insulin action on the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats. Obese Zucker rats were treated for 21 days with either vehicle or aliskiren (50 mg/kg body wt ip). Renin inhibition was associated with a significant lowering (10%, P < 0.05) of resting systolic blood pressure and induced reductions in fasting plasma glucose (11%) and free fatty acids (46%) and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (13%). Glucose tolerance (glucose area under the curve) and whole body insulin sensitivity (inverse of the glucose-insulin index) during an oral glucose tolerance test were improved by 15% and 16%, respectively, following chronic renin inhibition. Moreover, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in isolated soleus muscle of renin inhibitor-treated animals was increased by 36% and was associated with a 2.2-fold greater Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that chronic selective inhibition of renin activity leads to improvements in glucose tolerance and whole body insulin sensitivity in the insulin-resistant obese Zucker rat. Importantly, chronic renin inhibition is associated with upregulation of insulin action on skeletal muscle glucose transport, and it may involve improved Akt signaling. These data support the

  9. The influence of inhibited prostaglandin biosynthesis on post-ovulatory oviductal ova transport in sows.

    PubMed

    Hultén, F; Tantasuparuk, W; Englund, P; Kindahl, H; Einarsson, S

    2000-04-15

    Changes in prostaglandin and progesterone concentrations after ovulation seem to affect reproductive functions in the sow. The influence of lowered prostaglandin levels on ova transport velocity through the isthmus part of the oviduct, and on progesterone concentrations, was studied during the second estrus after weaning in thirteen purebred Yorkshire multiparous sows. To determine the time of ovulation transrectal ultrasonographic examination was performed. In the second estrus, six sows were given intravenous injections of flunixin meglumine (2.2 mg/kg body weight) every sixth hour from 4 to 8 h after time of ovulation until about 48 h after ovulation, at which time the sows were slaughtered. Blood samples were collected every second hour from about 12 h before ovulation until slaughter. Progesterone and prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) metabolite levels were determined. Immediately after slaughter the isthmus part of the oviducts were cut into 3 equally long segments and the number of ova in each segment, and in the upper part of the uterine horns, was determined. Before start of treatment, PGF2alpha metabolite levels were similar in the 2 groups (P=0.84). In the treatment group, PGF2alpha values dropped to below the detection limit immediately after start of treatment, whereas in the control group the concentrations were quite stable throughout the sampling period (P=0.005). Ova recovery rate was 94% in the treatment group and 95 % in the control group. At time of slaughter, in the treatment group ova had on average passed 2.1 segments whereas in the control group the ova had passed 2.5 segments (P=0.57). The progesterone levels increased continuously in both groups after ovulation but there was no difference in the mean progesterone concentrations between the two groups before (P=0.96) or after (P=0.58) ovulation. It can be concluded that the transport of ova through the isthmus part of the oviduct is unaffected by an inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis

  10. Fetal hydantoin syndrome: inhibition of placental folic acid transport as a potential mechanism for fetal growth retardation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Will, M.; Barnard, J.A.; Said, H.M.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1985-04-01

    Maternal hydantoin ingestion during pregnancy results in a well defined clinical entity termed ''fetal hydantoin syndrome''. The clinical characteristics of this syndrome includes growth retardation, and congenital anomalies. Because folic acid is essential for protein synthesis and growth, and since hydantoin interferes with intestinal transport of folic acid, the authors postulated that part of the fetal hydantoin syndrome may be due to inhibition of placental folic acid by maternal hydantoin. Therefore, they studied in vivo placental folate transport in a well-established model for fetal hydantoin syndrome in the rat. Our results indicate that maternal hydantoin ingestion, significantly decreased fetal weight and placental and fetal uptake of folate compared to controls. To determine whether maternal hydantoin ingestion has a generalized or specific effect on placental function, they examined placental and fetal zinc transport in the same model. Our results indicate that zinc transport is not altered by hydantoin ingestion. They conclude that maternal hydantoin ingestion results in fetal growth retardation which may be due in part to inhibition of placental folate transport.

  11. Protective Role of Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter 2 Inhibition Against Vascular Complications in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Matsui, Takanori

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic micro- and macroangiopathy are devastating vascular complications that could account for disabilities and high mortality rate in patients with diabetes. Indeed, diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy are the leading causes of end-stage renal failure and acquired blindness, respectively, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD) accounts for about 60% of death in diabetic subjects. As a result, the average life span of diabetic patients is about 10-15 years shorter than that of non-diabetic subjects. Furthermore, tight blood glucose control might have no more than a marginal impact on CVD in general and on all-cause mortality in particular in diabetes. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that target vascular complications in diabetes need to be developed. Recently, selective inhibition of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with diabetes because of low risk of hypoglycemia and no weight gain. Because 90% of glucose filtered by the glomerulus is reabsorbed by a low-affinity/high-capacity SGLT2 expressed in the S1 and S2 segments of the proximal tubule, blockade of SGLT2 promotes urinary glucose excretion and as a result improves hyperglycemia in an insulin-independent manner. Moreover, we have shown that SGLT2-mediated glucose overload to tubular cells could elicit inflammatory and pro-apoptotic reactions in this cell, being directly involved in diabetic nephropathy. In addition, several clinical studies have also shown that SGLT2 inhibitors could reduce blood pressure, body weight, and serum uric acid levels and ameliorate cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes. This review summarizes the pathophysiological role of SGLT2 in vascular complications in diabetes and its potential therapeutic interventions.

  12. Engineering biomineralised groundwater flow barriers for inhibiting radionuclide transport in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundell, N.; Cuthbert, M. O.; Riley, M. S.; Handley-Sidhu, S.; Renshaw, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) is a promising engineering solution for inhibiting pollution transport in fractured rocks through permeability reduction of fine aperture fractures surrounding nuclear decommissioning sites or repositories. However, although many batch and column studies of MICP within porous media have been carried out, the method has yet to be successfully applied within fractured materials and upscaled to block and field scales to demonstrate its potential utility. This paper presents results of laboratory MICP experiments within artificial granite-perspex fractures (30 cm x 10 cm x 150 µm) under flowing conditions using ureolytic bacteria and a 'cementing solution' comprising dissolved urea and calcium chloride. A variety of injection combinations and bacterial/solute concentrations were trialled and changes in hydraulic conductivity of the fractures were measured over time. Injected bacteria were successfully 'fixed' by adding sufficient calcium chloride to encourage flocculation and hence mechanical filtration to trap the bacteria. Observed reductions in hydraulic conductivity of up to 3 orders of magnitude were achieved after 4 x 4 hour phases of injection with a decreasing mass of precipitate with distance from the inlet manifold. Although the results are very promising, a remaining challenge for successful upscaling of the technique to the field scale is in controlling the spatial distribution of bacterial fixing and precipitation to enable sealing of fractures at larger distances from the point of injection. In comparison to existing grouting techniques, MICP has the advantage of being low viscosity and is therefore potentially useful for very fine scale fractures while also potentially providing greater mechanical strength.

  13. Intestinal Serotonin Transporter Inhibition by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation. A Feedback Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Layunta, Elena; Grasa, Laura; Castro, Marta; Pardo, Julián; Gomollón, Fernando; Mesonero, José E.

    2016-01-01

    TLR2 is a microbiota recognition receptor that has been described to contribute to intestinal homeostasis and to ameliorate inflammatory intestinal injury. In this context, serotonin (5-HT) has shown to be an essential intestinal physiological neuromodulator that is also involved in intestinal inflammatory diseases. Since the interaction between TLR2 activation and the intestinal serotoninergic system remains non-investigated, our main aim was to analyze the effect of TLR2 on intestinal serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and expression and the intracellular pathways involved. Caco-2/TC7 cells were used to analyze SERT and TLR2 molecular expression and SERT activity by measuring 5-HT uptake. The results showed that apical TLR2 activation inhibits SERT activity in Caco-2/TC7 cells mainly by reducing SERT protein level either in the plasma membrane, after short-term TLR2 activation or in both the plasma membrane and cell lysate, after long-term activation. cAMP/PKA pathway appears to mediate short-term inhibitory effect of TLR2 on SERT; however, p38 MAPK pathway has been shown to be involved in both short- and long-term TLR2 effect. Reciprocally, 5-HT long-term treatment yielded TLR2 down regulation in Caco-2/TC7 cells. Finally, results from in vivo showed an augmented intestinal SERT expression in mice Tlr2-/-, thus confirming our inhibitory effect of TLR2 on intestinal SERT in vitro. The present work infers that TLR2 may act in intestinal pathophysiology, not only by its inherent innate immune role, but also by regulating the intestinal serotoninergic system. PMID:28033388

  14. Gabapentin inhibits the activity of the rat excitatory glutamate transporter 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gil, Yang Sook; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Chi Hyo; Han, Jong In; Zuo, Zhiyi; Baik, Hee Jung

    2015-09-05

    Gabapentin, a derivative of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain. The pharmacological mechanisms for gabapentin effects are not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of gabapentin on the activity of excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) that can regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Membrane currents were recorded after application of l-glutamate in the presence or absence of different concentrations of gabapentin (1-300μM) by using a two-electrode voltage clamp. To determine the effect of gabapentin on Vmax and Km of EAAT3 for l-glutamate, l-glutamate at 3-300μM was used. To study the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on gabapentin-induced changes in EAAT3 activity, oocytes were incubated with the PKC activator (Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA), the PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine or staurosporine), and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Gabapentin decreased EAAT3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner and EAAT3 activity was significantly inhibited by 10-300μM gabapentin. Gabapentin significantly decreased Vmax without affecting Km. PMA increased EAAT3 activity; however, gabapentin attenuated the PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity. Pre-incubation of oocytes with chelerythrine, staurosporine, or wortmannin decreased basal EAAT3 activity, which was further reduced by gabapentin. We conclude that gabapentin decreases EAAT3 activity at clinically relevant and higher concentrations, in which PKC and PI3K may not be involved. The results suggest that EAAT3 might not be a target for the anticonvulsant action of gabapentin.

  15. Intestinal Serotonin Transporter Inhibition by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation. A Feedback Modulation.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Eva; Layunta, Elena; Grasa, Laura; Castro, Marta; Pardo, Julián; Gomollón, Fernando; Alcalde, Ana I; Mesonero, José E

    2016-01-01

    TLR2 is a microbiota recognition receptor that has been described to contribute to intestinal homeostasis and to ameliorate inflammatory intestinal injury. In this context, serotonin (5-HT) has shown to be an essential intestinal physiological neuromodulator that is also involved in intestinal inflammatory diseases. Since the interaction between TLR2 activation and the intestinal serotoninergic system remains non-investigated, our main aim was to analyze the effect of TLR2 on intestinal serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and expression and the intracellular pathways involved. Caco-2/TC7 cells were used to analyze SERT and TLR2 molecular expression and SERT activity by measuring 5-HT uptake. The results showed that apical TLR2 activation inhibits SERT activity in Caco-2/TC7 cells mainly by reducing SERT protein level either in the plasma membrane, after short-term TLR2 activation or in both the plasma membrane and cell lysate, after long-term activation. cAMP/PKA pathway appears to mediate short-term inhibitory effect of TLR2 on SERT; however, p38 MAPK pathway has been shown to be involved in both short- and long-term TLR2 effect. Reciprocally, 5-HT long-term treatment yielded TLR2 down regulation in Caco-2/TC7 cells. Finally, results from in vivo showed an augmented intestinal SERT expression in mice Tlr2-/-, thus confirming our inhibitory effect of TLR2 on intestinal SERT in vitro. The present work infers that TLR2 may act in intestinal pathophysiology, not only by its inherent innate immune role, but also by regulating the intestinal serotoninergic system.

  16. Pathogenic forms of tau inhibit kinesin-dependent axonal transport through a mechanism involving activation of axonal phosphotransferases.

    PubMed

    Kanaan, Nicholas M; Morfini, Gerardo A; LaPointe, Nichole E; Pigino, Gustavo F; Patterson, Kristina R; Song, Yuyu; Andreadis, Athena; Fu, Yifan; Brady, Scott T; Binder, Lester I

    2011-07-06

    Aggregated filamentous forms of hyperphosphorylated tau (a microtubule-associated protein) represent pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. While axonal transport dysfunction is thought to represent a primary pathogenic factor in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases, the direct molecular link between pathogenic forms of tau and deficits in axonal transport remain unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that filamentous, but not soluble, forms of wild-type tau inhibit anterograde, kinesin-based fast axonal transport (FAT) by activating axonal protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), independent of microtubule binding. Here, we demonstrate that amino acids 2-18 of tau, comprising a phosphatase-activating domain (PAD), are necessary and sufficient for activation of this pathway in axoplasms isolated from squid giant axons. Various pathogenic forms of tau displaying increased exposure of PAD inhibited anterograde FAT in squid axoplasm. Importantly, immunohistochemical studies using a novel PAD-specific monoclonal antibody in human postmortem tissue indicated that increased PAD exposure represents an early pathogenic event in AD that closely associates in time with AT8 immunoreactivity, an early marker of pathological tau. We propose a model of pathogenesis in which disease-associated changes in tau conformation lead to increased exposure of PAD, activation of PP1-GSK3, and inhibition of FAT. Results from these studies reveal a novel role for tau in modulating axonal phosphotransferases and provide a molecular basis for a toxic gain-of-function associated with pathogenic forms of tau.

  17. Glucuronide transport across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane is inhibited by epigallocatechin gallate and other green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Révész, Katalin; Tütto, Anna; Margittai, Eva; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Magyar, Judit E; Mandl, József; Csala, Miklós

    2007-01-01

    Toxic endogenous or exogenous compounds can be inactivated by various conjugation reactions. Glucuronidation (i.e. conjugation with glucuronate) is especially important due to the large number of drugs and chemical carcinogens that are detoxified through this pathway. Stable and harmless glucuronides can be reactivated by enzymatic hydrolysis thus inhibitors of glucuronidase activity reduce the risk of chemical carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to reveal whether this mechanism contributes to the anti-cancer effect of green tea flavanols, which has been shown in various animal models. Therefore, we investigated the effect of these polyphenols on deglucuronidation in rat liver microsomes and in Hepa 1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells, using 4-methylumbelliferyl glucuronide as model substrate. Tea flavanols inhibited beta-glucuronidase in intact vesicles, where glucuronide transport across the microsomal membrane is rate-limiting, but were almost ineffective in permeabilized vesicles. Epigallocatechin gallate, the major green tea flavanol was shown to have a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on both beta-glucuronidase activity and glucuronide transport in native vesicles. Epigallocatechin gallate also inhibited beta-glucuronidase activity in native Hepa 1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells, while failed to affect the enzyme in alamethicin-permeabilized cells, where the endoplasmic membrane barrier was eliminated. Our findings indicate that tea flavanols inhibit deglucuronidation in the endoplasmic reticulum at the glucuronide transport stage. This phenomenon might potentially contribute to the cancer-preventing dietary or pharmacological effect attributed to these catechins.

  18. Muscarinic cholinergic inhibition of beta-adrenergic stimulation of phospholamban phosphorylation and CaS transport in guinea pig ventricles

    SciTech Connect

    Lindemann, J.P.; Watanabe, A.M.

    1985-10-25

    The effects of muscarinic cholinergic stimulation on beta-adrenergic induced increases in phospholamban phosphorylation and CaS transport were studied in intact myocardium. Isolated guinea pig ventricles were perfused via the coronary arteries with TSPi, after which membrane vesicles were isolated from individual hearts. Isoproterenol produced reversible increases in TSP incorporation into phospholamban. Associated with the increases in TSP incorporation were increases in the initial rate of phosphate-facilitated CaS uptake measured in aliquots of the same membrane vesicles isolated from the perfused hearts. The increases in TSP incorporation and calcium transport were significantly attenuated by the simultaneous administration of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine also attenuated increases in phospholamban phosphorylation and CaS uptake produced by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine and forskolin. The contractile effects of all agents which increased cAMP levels (increased contractility and a reduction in the t1/2 of relaxation) were also attenuated by acetylcholine. The inhibitory effects of acetylcholine were associated with attenuation of the increases in cAMP levels produced by isoproterenol and isobutylmethylxanthine but not by forskolin. Acetylcholine also increased the rate of reversal of the functional and biochemical effects of isoproterenol by propranolol without affecting cAMP levels. These results suggest that cholinergic agonists inhibit the functional effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation in part by inhibition of phospholamban phosphorylation. This inhibition may be mediated by two potential mechanisms: inhibition of beta-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of dephosphorylation.

  19. Modeling Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Inhibition to Elucidate Interaction Risks in Early Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Ismael; Winiwarter, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    The importance of transporter proteins for the disposition of drugs has become increasingly apparent during the past decade. A noted drug-drug interaction risk is the inhibition of organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), key transporters for the liver uptake of the widely used statins. We show here the development of a ligand-based in silico model for interaction with OATP1B1, an important representative of the OATP family. The model is based on a structural overlay of 6 known OATP1B1 inhibitors. A data set of about 150 compounds with published OATP1B1 inhibition data was compared to the resulting "transportophor," and a similarity threshold was defined to distinguish between active and inactive molecules. In addition, using a statistical model based on physicochemical properties of the compounds as prefilter was found to enhance the overall predictivity of the model (final accuracy 0.73, specificity 074, and sensitivity 0.71, based on 126 compounds). The combined model was validated using an in-house data set (accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity were 0.63, 0.59, and 0.78, respectively; 62 compounds). The model gives also a structural overlay to the most similar template enabling visualization of where a change in a given structure might reduce the interaction with the transporter.

  20. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by downregulation of lipid transporter expression via PPAR-α dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kondaiah, Palsa; Palika, Ravindranadh; Ghosh, Sudip; Nair, Madhavan K; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2016-01-15

    The involvement of lipid transporters, the scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) and Niemann-Pick type C1 Like 1 protein (NPC1L1) in carotenoid absorption is demonstrated in intestinal cells and animal models. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids are known to possess antilipidemic properties, which could be mediated by activation of PPAR family transcription factors. The present study was conducted to determine the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), on intestinal β-carotene absorption. β-carotene uptake in Caco-2/TC7 cells was inhibited by EPA (p < 0.01) and PPARα agonist (P < 0.01), but not by DHA, PPARγ or PPARδ agonists. Despite unaltered β-carotene uptake, both DHA and PPARδ agonists inhibited the NPC1L1 expression. Further, EPA also induced the expression of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) expression, a PPARα target gene. Interestingly, EPA induced inhibition of β-carotene uptake and SR B1 expression were abrogated by specific PPARα antagonist, but not by PPARδ antagonist. EPA and PPARα agonist also inhibited the basolateral secretion of β-carotene from Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. These results suggest that EPA inhibits intestinal β-carotene absorption by down regulation of SR B1 expression via PPARα dependent mechanism and provide an evidence for dietary modulation of intestinal β-carotene absorption.

  1. Salvinorin A inhibits colonic transit and neurogenic ion transport in mice by activating kappa-opioid and cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Fichna, J; Schicho, R; Andrews, C N; Bashashati, M; Klompus, M; McKay, D M; Sharkey, K A; Zjawiony, J K; Janecka, A; Storr, M A

    2009-12-01

    The major active ingredient of the plant Salvia divinorum, salvinorin A (SA) has been used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. As the action of SA on the regulation of colonic function is unknown, our aim was to examine the effects of SA on mouse colonic motility and secretion in vitro and in vivo. The effects of SA on GI motility were studied using isolated preparations of colon, which were compared with preparations from stomach and ileum. Colonic epithelial ion transport was evaluated using Ussing chambers. Additionally, we studied GI motility in vivo by measuring colonic propulsion, gastric emptying, and upper GI transit. Salvinorin A inhibited contractions of the mouse colon, stomach, and ileum in vitro, prolonged colonic propulsion and slowed upper GI transit in vivo. Salvinorin A had no effect on gastric emptying in vivo. Salvinorin A reduced veratridine-, but not forskolin-induced epithelial ion transport. The effects of SA on colonic motility in vitro were mediated by kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) and cannabinoid (CB) receptors, as they were inhibited by the antagonists nor-binaltorphimine (KOR), AM 251 (CB(1) receptor) and AM 630 (CB(2) receptor). However, in the colon in vivo, the effects were largely mediated by KORs. The effects of SA on veratridine-mediated epithelial ion transport were inhibited by nor-binaltorphimine and AM 630. Salvinorin A slows colonic motility in vitro and in vivo and influences neurogenic ion transport. Due to its specific regional action, SA or its derivatives may be useful drugs in the treatment of lower GI disorders associated with increased GI transit and diarrhoea.

  2. Small compound inhibitors of basal glucose transport inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in cancer cells via glucose-deprivation-like mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Weihe; Cao, Yanyan; Liu, Yan; Bergmeier, Stephen; Chen, Xiaozhuo

    2010-12-08

    Cancer cells depend heavily on glucose as both energy and biosynthesis sources and are found to upregulate glucose transport and switch their main energy supply pathway from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. These molecular and metabolic changes also provide targets for cancer treatment. Here we report that novel small molecules inhibited basal glucose transport and cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis in lung and breast cancer cells without affecting much their normal cell counterparts. Cancer cells survived the compound treatment lost their capability to proliferate. Mechanistic study indicates that the cancer cell inhibition by the test compounds has a component of apoptosis and the induced apoptosis was p53-independent and caspase 3-dependent, similar to those resulted from glucose deprivation. Compound treatment also led to cell cycle arrest in G1/S phase. The inhibition of cancer cell growth was partially relieved when additional glucose was supplied to cells, suggesting that the inhibition was due to, at least in part, the inhibition of basal glucose transport. When used in combination, the test compounds demonstrated synergistic effects with anticancer drugs cisplatin or paclitaxel in inhibition of cancer cell growth. All these results suggest that these glucose transport inhibitors mimic glucose deprivation and work through inhibiting basal glucose transport. These inhibitors have the potential to complement and replace traditional glucose deprivation, which cannot be used in animals, as new tools to study the effects of glucose transport and metabolism on cancer and normal cells.

  3. The yeast mitochondrial citrate transport protein: identification of the Lysine residues responsible for inhibition mediated by Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Remani, Sreevidya; Sun, Jiakang; Kotaria, Rusudan; Mayor, June A; Brownlee, June M; Harrison, David H T; Walters, D Eric; Kaplan, Ronald S

    2008-12-01

    The present investigation identifies the molecular basis for the well-documented inhibition of the mitochondrial inner membrane citrate transport protein (CTP) function by the lysine-selective reagent pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Kinetic analysis indicates that PLP is a linear mixed inhibitor of the Cys-less CTP, with a predominantly competitive component. We have previously concluded that the CTP contains at least two substrate binding sites which are located at increasing depths within the substrate translocation pathway and which contain key lysine residues. In the present investigation, the roles of Lys-83 in substrate binding site one, Lys-37 and Lys-239 in substrate binding site two, and four other off-pathway lysines in conferring PLP-inhibition of transport was determined by functional characterization of seven lysine to cysteine substitution mutants. We observed that replacement of Lys-83 with cysteine resulted in a 78% loss of the PLP-mediated inhibition of CTP function. In contrast, replacement of either Lys-37 or Lys-239 with cysteine caused a modest reduction in the inhibition caused by PLP (i.e., 31% and 20% loss of inhibition, respectively). Interestingly, these losses of PLP-mediated inhibition could be rescued by covalent modification of each cysteine with MTSEA, a reagent that adds a lysine-like moiety (i.e. SCH(2)CH(2)NH(3) (+)) to the cysteine sulfhydryl group. Importantly, the replacement of non-binding site lysines (i.e., Lys-45, Lys-48, Lys-134, Lys-141) with cysteine resulted in little change in the PLP inhibition. Based upon these results, we conducted docking calculations with the CTP structural model leading to the development of a physical binding model for PLP. In combination, our data support the conclusion that PLP exerts its main inhibitory effect by binding to residues located within the two substrate binding sites of the CTP, with Lys-83 being the primary determinant of the total PLP effect since the replacement of this single lysine

  4. Interleukin-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Aye, Irving L M H; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-12-05

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) promotes insulin resistance in tissues such as liver and skeletal muscle; however the influence of IL-1β on placental insulin signaling is unknown. We recently reported increased IL-1β protein expression in placentas of obese mothers, which could contribute to insulin resistance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IL-1β inhibits insulin signaling and prevents insulin-stimulated amino acid transport in cultured primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells. Cultured trophoblasts isolated from term placentas were treated with physiological concentrations of IL-1β (10pg/ml) for 24h. IL-1β increased the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at Ser307 (inhibitory) and decreased total IRS-1 protein abundance but did not affect insulin receptor β expression. Furthermore, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Tyr612, activation site) and Akt (Thr308) and prevented insulin-stimulated increase in PI3K/p85 and Grb2 protein expression. IL-1β alone stimulated cRaf (Ser338), MEK (Ser221) and Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation. The inflammatory pathways nuclear factor kappa B and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, which are involved in insulin resistance, were also activated by IL-1β treatment. Moreover, IL-1β inhibited insulin-stimulated System A, but not System L amino acid uptake, indicating functional impairment of insulin signaling. In conclusion, IL-1β inhibited the insulin signaling pathway by inhibiting IRS-1 signaling and prevented insulin-stimulated System A transport, thereby promoting insulin resistance in cultured PHT cells. These findings indicate that conditions which lead to increased systemic maternal or placental IL-1β levels may attenuate the effects of maternal insulin on placental function and consequently fetal growth.

  5. Dynamic adaption of metabolic pathways during germination and growth of lily pollen tubes after inhibition of the electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Obermeyer, Gerhard; Fragner, Lena; Lang, Veronika; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-08-01

    Investigation of the metabolome and the transcriptome of pollen of lily (Lilium longiflorum) gave a comprehensive overview of metabolic pathways active during pollen germination and tube growth. More than 100 different metabolites were determined simultaneously by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and expressed genes of selected metabolic pathways were identified by next-generation sequencing of lily pollen transcripts. The time-dependent changes in metabolite abundances, as well as the changes after inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, revealed a fast and dynamic adaption of the metabolic pathways in the range of minutes. The metabolic state prior to pollen germination differed clearly from the metabolic state during pollen tube growth, as indicated by principal component analysis of all detected metabolites and by detailed observation of individual metabolites. For instance, the amount of sucrose increased during the first 60 minutes of pollen culture but decreased during tube growth, while glucose and fructose showed the opposite behavior. Glycolysis, tricarbonic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, starch, and fatty acid degradation were activated, providing energy during pollen germination and tube growth. Inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain by antimycin A resulted in an immediate production of ethanol and a fast rearrangement of metabolic pathways, which correlated with changes in the amounts of the majority of identified metabolites, e.g. a rapid increase in γ-aminobutyric acid indicated the activation of a γ-aminobutyric acid shunt in the tricarbonic acid cycle, while ethanol fermentation compensated the reduced ATP production after inhibition of the oxidative phosphorylation.

  6. Inhibition of multixenobiotic resistance transporters (MXR) by silver nanoparticles and ions in vitro and in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Georgantzopoulou, Anastasia; Cambier, Sébastien; Serchi, Tommaso; Kruszewski, Marcin; Balachandran, Yekkuni L; Grysan, Patrick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Ziebel, Johanna; Guignard, Cédric; Gutleb, Arno C; Murk, AlberTinka J

    2016-11-01

    The P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1), important members of the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters, protect cells and organisms via efflux of xenobiotics and are responsible for the phenomenon of multidrug or multixenobiotic resistance (MXR). In this study we first evaluated, in vitro, the interaction of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs, 20, 23 and 27nm), Ag 200nm particles and Ag ions (AgNO3) with MXR efflux transporters using MDCKII and the P-gp over-expressing MDCKII-MDR1 cells and calcein-AM as a substrate of the transporters. Next the in vivo modulation of MXR activity was studied in Daphnia magna juveniles with the model P-gp and MRP1 inhibitors verapamil-HCl and MK571, respectively. The common environmental contaminants perfluorooctane sulfonate and bisphenol A, previously observed to interfere with the P-gp in vitro, also inhibited the efflux of calcein in vivo. Small-sized Ag NPs (with biomolecules present on the surface) and AgNO3 inhibited the MXR activity in daphnids and MDCKII-MDR1 cells, but abcb1 gene expression remained unchanged. Both Ag NPs and dissolved ions contributed to the effects. This study provides evidence of the interference of Ag NPs and AgNO3 with the MXR activity both in vitro and in D. magna, and should be taken into account when Ag NP toxicity is assessed.

  7. Catalytic conversion in nanoporous materials: Concentration oscillations and spatial correlations due to inhibited transport and intermolecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Andres; Evans, James W.

    2016-11-03

    We show that steady-state catalytic conversion in nanoporous materials can occur in a quasi-counter-diffusion mode with the reactant (product) concentration strongly decaying (growing) into the pore, but also with oscillations in the total concentration. These oscillations reflect the response of the fluid to the transition from an extended to a confined environment near the pore opening. We focus on the regime of strongly inhibited transport in narrow pores corresponding to single-file diffusion. Here, limited penetration of the reactant into the pores and the associated low reaction yield is impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by both reaction (non-equilibrium correlations) and also by intermolecular interactions (thermodynamic correlations). We develop a generalized hydrodynamic formulation to effectively describe inhibited transport accounting for the effect of these correlations, and incorporate this description of transport into appropriate reaction-diffusion equations. These equations accurately describe both shorter-range concentration oscillations near the pore opening and the longer-range mesoscale variation of concentration profiles in the pore (and thus also describe reaction yield). Success of the analytic theory is validated by comparison with a precise kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of an appropriate molecular-level stochastic reaction-diffusion model. As a result, this work elucidates unconventional chemical kinetics in interacting confined systems.

  8. Catalytic conversion in nanoporous materials: Concentration oscillations and spatial correlations due to inhibited transport and intermolecular interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Andres; Evans, James W.

    2016-11-03

    We show that steady-state catalytic conversion in nanoporous materials can occur in a quasi-counter-diffusion mode with the reactant (product) concentration strongly decaying (growing) into the pore, but also with oscillations in the total concentration. These oscillations reflect the response of the fluid to the transition from an extended to a confined environment near the pore opening. We focus on the regime of strongly inhibited transport in narrow pores corresponding to single-file diffusion. Here, limited penetration of the reactant into the pores and the associated low reaction yield is impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by both reaction (non-equilibrium correlations) andmore » also by intermolecular interactions (thermodynamic correlations). We develop a generalized hydrodynamic formulation to effectively describe inhibited transport accounting for the effect of these correlations, and incorporate this description of transport into appropriate reaction-diffusion equations. These equations accurately describe both shorter-range concentration oscillations near the pore opening and the longer-range mesoscale variation of concentration profiles in the pore (and thus also describe reaction yield). Success of the analytic theory is validated by comparison with a precise kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of an appropriate molecular-level stochastic reaction-diffusion model. As a result, this work elucidates unconventional chemical kinetics in interacting confined systems.« less

  9. Quercetin derivatives regulate melanosome transportation via EPI64 inhibition and elongate the cell shape of B16 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Kosei; Mitsunaga, Tohru; Inagaki, Mizuho; Suzuki, Tohru

    2015-03-01

    4'-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-glucopyranoside (3C4'GQ), first isolated from Helminthostachys zeylanica root extract, was synthesized as a compound that stimulates intracellular melanogenesis. 3-O-methylquercetin (3MQ) and 3,4',7-O-trimethylquercetin (34'7TMQ) were synthesized as compounds that enhance extracellular melanin formation. The formation of dendrites and the expression of EBP50-PDZ interactor of 64 kDa (EPI64) relating to melanin transportation were investigated using B16 melanoma cells treated with 3C4'GQ, 3MQ, or 34'7TMQ in order to understand the mechanism underlying the observed activities. The influence of 3C4'GQ on the increase of intracellular melanin contents enhanced the expression of EPI64, exhibited no dendrite elongation activity, and inhibited melanin transportation. On the other hand, the increase of extracellular melanin content by 3MQ and 34'7TMQ inhibited the expression of EPI64 and formed elongated cells to stimulate melanin transportation.

  10. Catalytic conversion in nanoporous materials: Concentration oscillations and spatial correlations due to inhibited transport and intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés; Evans, James W.

    2016-11-01

    We show that steady-state catalytic conversion in nanoporous materials can occur in a quasi-counter-diffusion mode with the reactant (product) concentration strongly decaying (growing) into the pore, but also with oscillations in the total concentration. These oscillations reflect the response of the fluid to the transition from an extended to a confined environment near the pore opening. We focus on the regime of strongly inhibited transport in narrow pores corresponding to single-file diffusion. Here, limited penetration of the reactant into the pores and the associated low reaction yield is impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by both reaction (non-equilibrium correlations) and also by intermolecular interactions (thermodynamic correlations). We develop a generalized hydrodynamic formulation to effectively describe inhibited transport accounting for the effect of these correlations, and incorporate this description of transport into appropriate reaction-diffusion equations. These equations accurately describe both shorter-range concentration oscillations near the pore opening and the longer-range mesoscale variation of concentration profiles in the pore (and thus also describe reaction yield). Success of the analytic theory is validated by comparison with a precise kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of an appropriate molecular-level stochastic reaction-diffusion model. This work elucidates unconventional chemical kinetics in interacting confined systems.

  11. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients.

  12. The enriched fraction of Elephantopus scaber Triggers apoptosis and inhibits multi-drug resistance transporters in human epithelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Beeran, Asmy Appadath; Maliyakkal, Naseer; Rao, Chamallamudi Mallikarjuna; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medicinal plants have played an important role in the development of clinically useful anticancer agents. Elephantopus scaber (Asteraceae) (ES) is widely used in Indian traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various ailments including cancer. Objective: To investigate anticancer effects of ES in human epithelial cancer cells. Materials and Methods: Cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of ES (ES-ET) and its fractions, such as ES Petroleum ether fraction (ES-PET), ES Dichloromethane fraction (ES DCM), n Butyl alcohol fraction (ES-BT), and ES-Rest (ES-R) were assessed in human epithelial cancer cell lines using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide assay and Hoechst 33342 assays were used to gauge induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis and micronuclei assay were used to assess cell cycle specific pharmacological effects and drug induced genotoxicty. Further, the ability of ES to inhibit multi drug resistant (MDR) transporters (ABC-B1 and ABC-G2) was determined by Rhodamine (Rho) and Mitoxantrone (MXR) efflux assays. Results: The enriched fraction of ES (ES DCM) possessed dose-dependent potent cytotoxicity in human epithelial cancer cells. Further, treatment of cancer cells (HeLa, A549, MCF-7, and Caco-2) with ES DCM showed hall mark properties of apoptosis (membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation etc.). Similarly, ES DCM caused enhanced sub G0 content and micronuclei formation indicating the induction of apoptosis and drug induced genotoxicity in cancer cells, respectively. Interestingly, ES DCM inhibited MDR transporters (ABC B1 and ABC G2) in cancer cells. Conclusion: The enriched fraction of ES imparted cytotoxic effects, triggered apoptosis, induced genotoxicity, and inhibited MDR transporters in human epithelial cancer cells. Thus, ES appears to be potential anticancer agent. PMID:25829763

  13. Selective Inhibition of Absorption and Long Distance Transport in Relation to the Dual Mechanisms of Ion Absorption in Maize Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Luttge, Ulrich; Laties, George G.

    1967-01-01

    The influence of several uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and inhibitors of terminal electron transport was studied on absorption and long distance transport of both K and C1 at concentrations within each range of the dual isotherm typical of ion uptake by maize roots. At low concentrations in the range of system 1, the system considered to implement ion movement through the plasma membrane, root absorption and long distance transport are equally inhibited by a given inhibitor. In the high range of system 2, the system considered to mediate ion passage through the tonoplast, long distance transport is markedly less sensitive to inhibitors than is absorption. The observations are in accord with the hypothesis that only system 1 is involved in the uptake of ions from the external solution into the symplast, and hence into the xylem. At high concentrations, entrance into the symplasm is deemed to be largely by diffusion and therefore less inhibitor sensitive. With respect to absorption by the roots, the plasma membrane system is more inhibitor sensitive than is the tonoplast system. It is suggested that the difference in sensitivity is real, and not the consequence of an inequality of inhibitor concentration in the vicinity of the plasma membrane and tonoplast respectively. Images PMID:6040889

  14. Quantitative evaluation of the combination between cytotoxic drug and efflux transporter inhibitors based on a tumour growth inhibition model.

    PubMed

    Sostelly, Alexandre; Payen, Léa; Guitton, Jérôme; Di Pietro, Attilio; Falson, Pierre; Honorat, Mylène; Boumendjel, Ahcène; Gèze, Annabelle; Freyer, Gilles; Tod, Michel

    2014-04-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters such as ABCG2 confer resistance to various anticancer drugs including irinotecan and its active metabolite, SN38. Early quantitative evaluation of efflux transporter inhibitors-cytotoxic combination requires quantitative drug-disease models. A proof-of-concept study has been carried out for studying the effect of a new ABCG2 transporter inhibitor, MBLI87 combined to irinotecan in mice xenografted with cells overexpressing ABCG2. Mice were treated with irinotecan alone or combined to MBLI87, and tumour size was periodically measured. To model those data, a tumour growth inhibition model was developed. Unperturbed tumour growth was modelled using Simeoni's model. Drug effect kinetics was accounted for by a Kinetic-Pharmacodynamic approach. Effect of inhibitor was described with a pharmacodynamic interaction model where inhibitor enhances activity of cytotoxic. This model correctly predicted tumour growth dynamics from our study. MBLI87 increased irinotecan potency by 20% per μmol of MBLI87. This model retains enough complexity to simultaneously describe tumour growth and effect of this type of drug combination. It can thus be used as a template to early evaluate efflux transporter inhibitors in-vivo.

  15. Expanding Spectrum of Sodium Potassium Chloride Co-transporters in the Pathophysiology of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Kaur, Aalamjeet; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    Sodium potassium chloride co-transporter (NKCC) belongs to cation-dependent chloride co-transporter family, whose activation allows the entry of Na+, K+ and 2Cl- inside the cell. It acts in concert with K+ Cl- co-transporter (KCC), which extrudes K+ and Cl- ions from cell. NKCC1 is widely distributed throughout the body, while NKCC2 is exclusively present in kidney. Protein kinase A, protein kinase C, Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase, oxidative stress responsive kinases, With No K=lysine kinase and protein phosphatase type 1 control the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of key threonine residues of in regulatory domain of NKCC1. The selective inhibitors of NKCC1 including bumetanide and furosemide are conventionally employed as diuretics. However, recent studies have indicated that NKCC1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, neuropathic pain, fragile X syndrome, autism and schizophrenia. The inhibitors of NKCC1 are shown to produce anxiolytic effects; attenuate cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal injury; produce antiepileptic effects and attenuate neuropathic pain. In the early developing brain, GABAA activation primarily produces excitatory actions due to high NKCC1/KCC2 ratio. However, as the development progresses, the ratio of NKCC1/KCC2 ratio reverses and there is switch in the polarity of GABAA actions and latter acquires the inhibitory actions. The recapitulation of developmental-like state during pathological state may be associated with increase in the expression and functioning of NKCC1, which decreases the strength of inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. The present review describes the expanding role and mechanism of NKCC1 in the pathophysiology of different diseases. PMID:26411965

  16. Serotonin Transporter Genotype Moderates the Link between Children's Reports of Overprotective Parenting and Their Behavioral Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhouse, Katie L.; Gibb, Brandon E.; Coles, Meredith E.; Knopik, Valerie S.; McGeary, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to examine environmental and genetic correlates of children's levels of behavioral inhibition (BI). Participants were 100 mother child pairs drawn from the community who were part of a larger study of the intergenerational transmission of depression. Results indicated that higher levels of maternal overprotection,…

  17. The Role of Chloride Transport in Postsynaptic Inhibition of Hippocampal Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misgeld, U.; Deisz, R. A.; Dodt, H. U.; Lux, H. D.

    1986-06-01

    Hippocampal inhibitory postsynaptic potentials are depolarizing in granule cells but hyperpolarizing in CA3 neurons because the reversal potentials and membrane potentials of these cells differ. Here the hippocampal slice preparation was used to investigate the role of chloride transport in these inhibitory responses. In both cell types, increasing the intracellular chloride concentration by injection shifted the reversal potential of these responses in a positive direction, and blocking the outward transport of chloride with furosemide slowed their recovery from the injection. In addition, hyperpolarizing and depolarizing inhibitory responses and the hyperpolarizing and depolarizing responses to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ - aminobutyric acid decreased in the presence of furosemide. These effects of furosemide suggest that the internal chloride activity of an individual hippocampal neuron is regulated by two transport processes, one that accumulates chloride and one that extrudes chloride.

  18. Inhibition of Prostaglandin Transporter (PGT) Promotes Perfusion and Vascularization and Accelerates Wound Healing in Non-Diabetic and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongbo; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Syeda, Mahrukh M.; Schuster, Victor L.; Chi, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral ischemia, resulting from diminished arterial flow and defective local vascularization, is one of the main causes of impaired wound healing in diabetes. Vasodilatory prostaglandins (PGs), including PGE2 and PGI2, regulate blood flow in peripheral tissues. PGs also stimulate angiogenesis by inducing vascular endothelial growth factor. However, PG levels are reduced in diabetes mainly due to enhanced degradation. We hypothesized that inhibition of the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) (SLCO2A1), which mediates the degradation of PGs, would increase blood flow and stimulate vascularization, thereby mitigating peripheral ischemia and accelerating wound healing in diabetes. Here we report that inhibiting PGT with intravenously injected PGT inhibitor, T26A, increased blood flow in ischemic hind limbs created in non-diabetic rats and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Systemic, or combined with topical, T26A accelerated closure of cutaneous wounds. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that inhibition of PGT enhanced vascularization (marked by larger numbers of vessels formed by CD34+ cells), and accelerated re-epithelialization of cutaneous wounds. In cultured primary human bone marrow CD34+ cells and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) either inhibiting or silencing PGT increased migration in both cell lines. Thus PGT directly regulates mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and HEKs, which could contribute to PGT-mediated vascularization and re-epithelialization. At the molecular level, systemic inhibition of PGT raised circulating PGE2. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PGT modulates arterial blood flow, mobilization of EPCs and HEKs, and vascularization and epithelialization in wound healing by regulating vasodilatory and pro-angiogenic PGs. PMID:26230411

  19. Inverse agonism at the P2Y12 receptor and ENT1 transporter blockade contribute to platelet inhibition by ticagrelor

    PubMed Central

    Aungraheeta, Riyaad; Conibear, Alexandra; Butler, Mark; Kelly, Eamonn; Nylander, Sven; Mumford, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Ticagrelor is a potent antagonist of the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) and consequently an inhibitor of platelet activity effective in the treatment of atherothrombosis. Here, we sought to further characterize its molecular mechanism of action. Initial studies showed that ticagrelor promoted a greater inhibition of adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP)–induced Ca2+ release in washed platelets vs other P2Y12R antagonists. This additional effect of ticagrelor beyond P2Y12R antagonism was in part as a consequence of ticagrelor inhibiting the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) on platelets, leading to accumulation of extracellular adenosine and activation of Gs-coupled adenosine A2A receptors. This contributed to an increase in basal cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (VASP-P). In addition, ticagrelor increased platelet cAMP and VASP-P in the absence of ADP in an adenosine receptor–independent manner. We hypothesized that this increase originated from a direct effect on basal agonist-independent P2Y12R signaling, and this was validated in 1321N1 cells stably transfected with human P2Y12R. In these cells, ticagrelor blocked the constitutive agonist-independent activity of the P2Y12R, limiting basal Gi-coupled signaling and thereby increasing cAMP levels. These data suggest that ticagrelor has the pharmacological profile of an inverse agonist. Based on our results showing insurmountable inhibition of ADP-induced Ca2+ release and forskolin-induced cAMP, the mode of antagonism of ticagrelor also appears noncompetitive, at least functionally. In summary, our studies describe 2 novel modes of action of ticagrelor, inhibition of platelet ENT1 and inverse agonism at the P2Y12R that contribute to its effective inhibition of platelet activation. PMID:27694321

  20. Serotonin Transporter Knockout Rats Show Improved Strategy Set-Shifting and Reduced Latent Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonkes, Lourens J. P.; van de Vondervoort, Ilse I. G. M.; de Leeuw, Mark J. C.; Wijlaars, Linda P.; Maes, Joseph H. R.; Homberg, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility is a cognitive process depending on prefrontal areas allowing adaptive responses to environmental changes. Serotonin transporter knockout (5-HTT[superscript -/-]) rodents show improved reversal learning in addition to orbitofrontal cortex changes. Another form of behavioral flexibility, extradimensional strategy set-shifting…

  1. Using Cytochome c to Monitor Electron Transport and Inhibition in Beef Heart Submitochondrial Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Amanda D.; Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a two-part undergraduate laboratory exercise. In the first part, electron transport in bovine heart submitochondrial particles causing reduction of cytochrome c is monitored at 550 nm. Redox-active dyes have historically been used in most previous undergraduate laboratory exercises of this sort but do not demonstrate respiratory…

  2. Bovine neuronal vesicular glutamate transporter activity is inhibited by ergovaline and other ergopeptines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    L-Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter responsible for neurotransmission in the vertebrate central nervous system, including the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of cattle. Vesicular Glu transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 concentrate (50 mM) Glu (Km = 1 to 4 mM) into synaptic vesicles (S...

  3. Cyclosporine-inhibitable Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Transport Influences Clinical Morphine Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Konrad; Avram, Michael J.; Yermolenka, Viktar; Francis, Amber M.; Blood, Jane; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The blood-brain barrier is richly populated by active influx and efflux transporters influencing brain drug concentrations. Morphine, a drug with delayed clinical onset, is a substrate for the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein in vitro and in animals. This investigation tested whether morphine is a transporter substrate in humans. Methods Fourteen healthy volunteers received morphine (0.1 mg/kg, 1 h intravenous infusion) in a crossover study after nothing (control) or the validated P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporine (5 mg/kg, 2 h infusion). Plasma and urine morphine and morphine glucuronide metabolite concentrations were measured by mass spectrometry. Morphine effects were measured by miosis and analgesia. Results Cyclosporine minimally altered morphine disposition, increasing the area under the plasma morphine concentration versus time curve to 100 ± 21 versus 85 ± 24 ng/ml•hr (p < 0.05) without changing maximum plasma concentration. Cyclosporine enhanced (3.2 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.0 mm peak) and prolonged miosis, and increased the area under the miosis-time curve (18 ± 9 vs. 11 ± 5 mm-hr), plasma-effect site transfer rate constant (ke0, median 0.27 vs. 0.17 hr−1), and maximum calculated effect site morphine concentration (11.5 ± 3.7 vs. 7.6 ± 2.9 ng/ml) (all p < 0.05). Analgesia testing was confounded by cyclosporine-related pain. Conclusions Morphine is a transporter substrate at the human blood-brain barrier. Results suggest a role for P-glycoprotein or other efflux transporters in brain morphine access, although the magnitude of the effect is small, and unlikely to be a major determinant of morphine clinical effects. Efflux may explain some variability in clinical morphine effects. PMID:23851346

  4. Complex Response of Epithelial Cells to Inhibition of Na(+) Transport by Amiloride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Physiol. 23): C297-C303, occurring within milliseconds (1, 12), it would be ex- 1988. ’When toad urinary bladder or frog skin epithelia are pected that I...amiloride indicated in response to inhibition of Na+ entry into epithelial that the magnitude of the secondary decline increased in frog cells. We suggest...electrophysiology; cytoskele- ton; short-circuit current Experiments were performed using isolated frog skin and toad urinary bladders. Frogs (Rana

  5. Apigenin inhibits the proliferation of adenoid cystic carcinoma via suppression of glucose transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jin; Bao, Yang-Yang; Zhou, Shui-Hong; Fan, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Apigenin is a natural phyto-oestrogen flavonoid, which exerts various biological effects, including anti‑oxidative, anti‑inflammatory and anticancer activities. In addition, apigenin has recently been reported to target hypoxic markers; however, there are currently no studies regarding the association between apigenin and glucose transporter‑1 (GLUT‑1) in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). The present study investigated whether apigenin inhibits the proliferation of ACC cells or suppresses the expression of GLUT‑1 in ACC cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that apigenin inhibits ACC‑2 cell growth in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Treatment with apigenin also induced apoptosis and G2/M‑phase arrest in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. Corresponding with the above results, the expression levels of GLUT‑1 were significantly decreased following treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that the inhibition of ACC-2 cell growth by apigenin may be due to the decreased expression of GLUT-1.

  6. Inhibition of bile salt transport by drugs associated with liver injury in primary hepatocytes from human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; He, Kan; Cai, Lining; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Yifan; Shi, Qin; Woolf, Thomas F; Ge, Weigong; Guo, Lei; Borlak, Jürgen; Tong, Weida

    2016-08-05

    Interference of bile salt transport is one of the underlying mechanisms for drug-induced liver injury (DILI). We developed a novel bile salt transport activity assay involving in situ biosynthesis of bile salts from their precursors in primary human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse hepatocytes in suspension as well as LC-MS/MS determination of extracellular bile salts transported out of hepatocytes. Glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids were rapidly formed in hepatocytes and effectively transported into the extracellular medium. The bile salt formation and transport activities were time‒ and bile-acid-concentration‒dependent in primary human hepatocytes. The transport activity was inhibited by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibitors ketoconazole, saquinavir, cyclosporine, and troglitazone. The assay was used to test 86 drugs for their potential to inhibit bile salt transport activity in human hepatocytes, which included 35 drugs associated with severe DILI (sDILI) and 51 with non-severe DILI (non-sDILI). Approximately 60% of the sDILI drugs showed potent inhibition (with IC50 values <50 μM), but only about 20% of the non-sDILI drugs showed this strength of inhibition in primary human hepatocytes and these drugs are associated only with cholestatic and mixed hepatocellular cholestatic (mixed) injuries. The sDILI drugs, which did not show substantial inhibition of bile salt transport activity, are likely to be associated with immune-mediated liver injury. Twenty-four drugs were also tested in monkey, dog, rat and mouse hepatocytes. Species differences in potency were observed with mouse being less sensitive than other species to inhibition of bile salt transport. In summary, a novel assay has been developed using hepatocytes in suspension from human and animal species that can be used to assess the potential for drugs and/or drug-derived metabolites to inhibit bile salt transport and/or formation activity. Drugs causing sDILI, except those by immune

  7. Riluzole attenuates excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 activity in Xenopus oocytes via protein kinase C inhibition.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Zuo, Zhiyi; Yang, Seong-Mi; Chang, Hye-Won; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2013-08-05

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of riluzole on the activity of excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3), a neuronal glutamate transporter, and to investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in this effect. EAAT3 expression was induced in Xenopus oocytes by injecting EAAT3 mRNA. Using the two-electrode voltage clamping method, membrane currents were recorded before, during, and after applying l-glutamate (30 μM) in the absence and presence of prior incubation with riluzole (0.3-100 μM). To study the effect of PKC on the riluzole-induced change in EAAT3 activity, oocytes were preincubated with 100 μM phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, or PKC inhibitors (2 µM staurosporine and 100 µM chelerythrine) before the recording. Responses were quantified by integrating current traces and are reported in microCoulombs (μC). Riluzole reduced EAAT3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner (0.3-100 μM). Treatment of oocytes with PMA significantly increased the baseline and riluzole-reduced EAAT activity (P<0.05). In addition, treatment of oocytes with PKC inhibitors reduced basal transporter currents, but did not show a further significant decrease in the riluzole-reduced EAAT3 activity. These results suggest that riluzole reduces EAAT3 activity through PKC inhibition.

  8. Mechanism of high affinity inhibition of the human urate transporter URAT1

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Philip K.; Ostertag, Traci M.; Miner, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Gout is caused by elevated serum urate levels, which can be treated using inhibitors of the uric acid transporter, URAT1. We exploited affinity differences between the human and rat transporters to map inhibitor binding sites in URAT1. Human-rat transporter chimeras revealed that human URAT1 serine-35, phenylalanine-365 and isoleucine-481 are necessary and sufficient to provide up to a 100-fold increase in affinity for inhibitors. Moreover, serine-35 and phenylalanine-365 are important for high-affinity interaction with the substrate urate. A novel URAT1 binding assay provides support for direct interaction with these amino acids; thus, current clinically important URAT1 inhibitors likely bind the same site in URAT1. A structural model suggests that these three URAT1 residues are in close proximity potentially projecting within the channel. Our results indicate that amino acids from several transmembrane segments functionally cooperate to form a high-affinity URAT1 inhibitor binding site that, when occupied, prevents substrate interactions. PMID:27713539

  9. 2,4-D resistance in wild radish: reduced herbicide translocation via inhibition of cellular transport

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Cawthray, Gregory R.; Powles, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to auxinic herbicides is increasing in a range of dicotyledonous weed species, but in most cases the biochemical mechanism of resistance is unknown. Using 14C-labelled herbicide, the mechanism of resistance to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in two wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum L.) populations was identified as an inability to translocate 2,4-D out of the treated leaf. Although 2,4-D was metabolized in wild radish, and in a different manner to the well-characterized crop species wheat and bean, there was no difference in metabolism between the susceptible and resistant populations. Reduced translocation of 2,4-D in the latter was also not due to sequestration of the herbicide, or to reduced uptake by the leaf epidermis or mesophyll cells. Application of auxin efflux or ABCB transporter inhibitors to 2,4-D-susceptible plants caused a mimicking of the reduced-translocation resistance phenotype, suggesting that 2,4-D resistance in the populations under investigation could be due to an alteration in the activity of a plasma membrane ABCB-type auxin transporter responsible for facilitating long-distance transport of 2,4-D. PMID:26994475

  10. The dynein inhibitor Ciliobrevin D inhibits the bidirectional transport of organelles along sensory axons and impairs NGF-mediated regulation of growth cones and axon branches.

    PubMed

    Sainath, Rajiv; Gallo, Gianluca

    2015-07-01

    The axonal transport of organelles is critical for the development, maintenance, and survival of neurons, and its dysfunction has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. Retrograde axon transport is mediated by the motor protein dynein. In this study, using embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglion neurons, we investigate the effects of Ciliobrevin D, a pharmacological dynein inhibitor, on the transport of axonal organelles, axon extension, nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced branching and growth cone expansion, and axon thinning in response to actin filament depolymerization. Live imaging of mitochondria, lysosomes, and Golgi-derived vesicles in axons revealed that both the retrograde and anterograde transport of these organelles was inhibited by treatment with Ciliobrevin D. Treatment with Ciliobrevin D reversibly inhibits axon extension and transport, with effects detectable within the first 20 min of treatment. NGF induces growth cone expansion, axonal filopodia formation and branching. Ciliobrevin D prevented NGF-induced formation of axonal filopodia and branching but not growth cone expansion. Finally, we report that the retrograde reorganization of the axonal cytoplasm which occurs on actin filament depolymerization is inhibited by treatment with Ciliobrevin D, indicating a role for microtubule based transport in this process, as well as Ciliobrevin D accelerating Wallerian degeneration. This study identifies Ciliobrevin D as an inhibitor of the bidirectional transport of multiple axonal organelles, indicating this drug may be a valuable tool for both the study of dynein function and a first pass analysis of the role of axonal transport.

  11. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  12. Inhibiting the transport of hazardous spores using polymer-based solutions.

    PubMed

    Krauter, Paula A; Hoffman, D Mark; Vu, Alexander K; Keating, Garrett A; Zalk, David M

    2007-11-01

    A series of polymer solutions were developed for the purpose of immobilizing aerosolized 1-10 mu m sized hazardous biological particles. The polymer solutions were designed as tools for emergency response and remediation personnel. The inhibition of secondary aerosolization and migration of biothreat particles has important implications for public health protection and contamination cleanup. Limiting further dispersion of particles such as Bacillus anthracis spores may reduce inhalation hazards and enhance remediation efficiencies. This study evaluated film-forming polymers that have multiple functional groups capable of attracting and binding particles; these included acrylates, cellulosics, vinyl polymers, and polyurethanes. The selected polymers were combined with appropriate solvents to design solutions that met specific performance objectives. The polymer solutions were then evaluated for key characteristics, such as high adhesion, high elasticity, low density, short drying time, low viscosity, and low surface tension. These solutions were also evaluated for their adhesion to biothreat agent in a series of wind tunnel experiments using highly refined aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus spores (a simulant for anthrax, 1-3 mu m). Results demonstrated that a polymer solution, an amphoteric acrylate identified as NS-2, was the best candidate for attaching to spores and inhibiting reaerosolization. This polymer solution was anionic, thus providing the electrostatic (coulombic) attraction to cationic spores, had low surface tension, and performed well in wind tunnel tests.

  13. Inhibition of glucose metabolism prevents glycosylation of the glutamine transporter ASCT2 and promotes compensatory LAT1 upregulation in leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Polet, Florence; Martherus, Ruben; Corbet, Cyril; Pinto, Adan; Feron, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are highly dependent on glucose and glutamine as bioenergetic and biosynthetic fuels. Inhibition of the metabolism of glucose but also of glutamine is thus proposed as a therapeutic modality to block leukemia cell growth. Since glucose also supports protein glycosylation, we wondered whether part of the growth inhibitory effects resulting from glycolysis inhibition could indirectly result from a defect in glycosylation of glutamine transporters. We found that ASCT2/SLC1A5, a major glutamine transporter, was indeed deglycosylated upon glucose deprivation and 2-deoxyglucose exposure in HL-60 and K-562 leukemia cells. Inhibition of glycosylation by these modalities as well as by the bona fide glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin however marginally influenced glutamine transport and did not impact on ASCT2 subcellular location. This work eventually unraveled the dispensability of ASCT2 to support HL-60 and K-562 leukemia cell growth and identified the upregulation of the neutral amino acid antiporter LAT1/SLC7A5 as a mechanism counteracting the inhibition of glycosylation. Pharmacological inhibition of LAT1 increased the growth inhibitory effects and the inactivation of the mTOR pathway resulting from glycosylation defects, an effect further emphasized during the regrowth period post-treatment with tunicamycin. In conclusion, this study points towards the underestimated impact of glycosylation inhibition in the interpretation of metabolic alterations resulting from glycolysis inhibition, and identifies LAT1 as a therapeutic target to prevent compensatory mechanisms induced by alterations in the glycosylating process. PMID:27344174

  14. P‑glycoprotein inhibition increases the transport of dauricine across the blood‑brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Dong, Pei-Liang; Han, Hua; Zhang, Tian-Yu; Yang, Bingyou; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Eerdun, Gao-Wa

    2014-03-01

    Dauricine is the major bioactive component isolated from the roots of Menispermum dauricum D.C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of P‑glycoprotein in the transport of dauricine across the blood‑brain barrier by pre‑treatment with the P‑glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into a verapamil group (pretreated with verapamil at a dose of 20 mg/kg) and a control group (pretreated with the same volume of normal saline). After 90 min, the animals were injected intravenously with dauricine (10 mg/kg). At 15, 30 and 60 min after dauricine administration, the levels of dauricine in the blood and brain were detected by high‑performance liquid chromatography. Compared with the control group, the dauricine concentration in the brains of the rats in the verapamil group was significantly increased. Furthermore, the brain‑plasma ratio of dauricine in the rats pretreated with verapamil was significantly higher than that of the animals in the control group. However, there was no difference identified between dauricine levels in the plasma of the verapamil and the control groups. The results indicated that dauricine is able to pass the blood‑brain barrier, and that P‑glycoprotein has an important role in the transportation of dauricine across the blood‑brain barrier.

  15. Inhibition of glycine transporter-1 in the dorsal vagal complex improves metabolic homeostasis in diabetes and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Jessica T. Y.; Abraham, Mona A.; Bauer, Paige V.; LaPierre, Mary P.; Wang, Peili; Duca, Frank A.; Filippi, Beatrice M.; Chan, Owen; Lam, Tony K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired glucose homeostasis and energy balance are integral to the pathophysiology of diabetes and obesity. Here we show that administration of a glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) inhibitor, or molecular GlyT1 knockdown, in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) suppresses glucose production, increases glucose tolerance and reduces food intake and body weight gain in healthy, obese and diabetic rats. These findings provide proof of concept that GlyT1 inhibition in the brain improves glucose and energy homeostasis. Considering the clinical safety and efficacy of GlyT1 inhibitors in raising glycine levels in clinical trials for schizophrenia, we propose that GlyT1 inhibitors have the potential to be repurposed as a treatment of both obesity and diabetes. PMID:27874011

  16. CP-MLR/PLS directed QSAR study on apical sodium-codependent bile acid transporter inhibition activity of benzothiepines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Brij Kishore; Singh, Prithvi; Pilania, Pradeep; Sarbhai, Kirti; Prabhakar, Yenamandra S

    2011-02-01

    The apical sodium-codependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibition activity of benzothiepine derivatives have been analyzed based on topological and molecular features. Analysis of the structural features in conjunction with the biological endpoints in Combinatorial Protocol in Multiple Linear Regression (CP-MLR) led to the identification of 21 descriptors for modeling the activity. The study clearly suggested that the role of Randic shape index (path/walk ratio 3) and topological charges of 2-, 5-, and 6-orders to optimize the ASBT inhibitory activity of titled compounds. The influence of atomic van der Waals volumes, masses, Sanderson electronegativities, and polarizabilities are indicated via different lags of Moran and Geary autocorrelations. Presence of tertiary aromatic amine functionality in molecular structure has also shown its relevance in rationalizing the biological actions of benzothiepines. The PLS analysis has confirmed the dominance of information content of CP-MLR identified descriptors for modeling the activity when compared to those of the leftover ones.

  17. Inhibition of glucose-transporter 1 (GLUT-1) expression reversed Warburg effect in gastric cancer cell MKN45.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Biao; Zhao, Ying; Tong, Zhao-Xue; Guan, Yi-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) plays critical roles in cancer development and progression. Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis) contributes greatly to tumorigenesis and could be targeted for tumor therapy. However, published data on the relationship between GLUT-1 and Warburg effect are scarce. In this study, gastric cancer cell, MKN45, was transfected with GLUT-1 shRNA using Lipofectamine 2000. Oxygen consumption, LDH activity, lactate production and cytoplasmic pyruvate were detected after MKN45 cells with GLUT-1 knockdown. In the last, hexokinase 1 (HK1), HK2, and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression were detected by using western blot. In this study, we showed that inhibition of GLUT-1 expression reversed Warburg effect in MKN45 cells, and induced apoptosis.

  18. Sulla carnosa modulates root invertase activity in response to the inhibition of long-distance sucrose transport under magnesium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Farhat, N; Smaoui, A; Maurousset, L; Porcheron, B; Lemoine, R; Abdelly, C; Rabhi, M

    2016-11-01

    Being the principal product of photosynthesis, sucrose is involved in many metabolic processes in plants. As magnesium (Mg) is phloem mobile, an inverse relationship between Mg shortage and sugar accumulation in leaves is often observed. Mg deficiency effects on carbohydrate contents and invertase activities were determined in Sulla carnosa Desf. Plants were grown hydroponically at different Mg concentrations (0.00, 0.01, 0.05 and 1.50 mM Mg) for one month. Mineral analysis showed that Mg contents were drastically diminished in shoots and roots mainly at 0.01 and 0.00 mM Mg. This decline was adversely associated with a significant increase of sucrose, fructose and mainly glucose in shoots of plants exposed to severe deficiency. By contrast, sugar contents were severely reduced in roots of these plants indicating an alteration of carbohydrate partitioning between shoots and roots of Mg-deficient plants. Cell wall invertase activity was highly enhanced in roots of Mg-deficient plants, while the vacuolar invertase activity was reduced at 0.00 mM Mg. This decrease of vacuolar invertase activity may indicate the sensibility of roots to Mg starvation resulting from sucrose transport inhibition. (14) CO2 labeling experiments were in accordance with these findings showing an inhibition of sucrose transport from source leaves to sink tissues (roots) under Mg depletion. The obtained results confirm previous findings about Mg involvement in photosynthate loading into phloem and add new insights into mechanisms evolved by S. carnosa to cope with Mg shortage in particular the increase of the activity of cell wall invertase.

  19. Norepinephrine transporter inhibition with desipramine exacerbates L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: role for synaptic dopamine regulation in denervated nigrostriatal terminals.

    PubMed

    Chotibut, Tanya; Fields, Victoria; Salvatore, Michael F

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacological dopamine (DA) replacement with Levodopa [L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)] is the gold standard treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long-term L-DOPA treatment is complicated by eventual debilitating abnormal involuntary movements termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), a clinically significant obstacle for the majority of patients who rely on L-DOPA to alleviate PD-related motor symptoms. The manifestation of LID may in part be driven by excessive extracellular DA derived from L-DOPA, but potential involvement of DA reuptake in LID severity or expression is unknown. We recently reported that in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned striatum, norepinephrine transporter (NET) expression increases and may play a significant role in DA transport. Furthermore, L-DOPA preferentially inhibits DA uptake in lesioned striatum. Therefore, we hypothesized that desipramine (DMI), a NET antagonist, could affect the severity of LID in an established LID model. Whereas DMI alone elicited no dyskinetic effects in lesioned rats, DMI + L-DOPA-treated rats gradually expressed more severe dyskinesia compared with L-DOPA alone over time. At the conclusion of the study, we observed reduced NET expression and norepinephrine-mediated inhibition of DA uptake in the DMI + L-DOPA group compared with L-DOPA-alone group in lesioned striatum. LID severity positively correlated with striatal extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation among the three treatment groups, with increased ppERK1/2 in DMI + L-DOPA group compared with the L-DOPA- and DMI-alone groups. Taken together, these results indicate that the combination of chronic L-DOPA and NET-mediated DA reuptake in lesioned nigrostriatal terminals may have a role in LID severity in experimental Parkinsonism.

  20. Inhibition of polar calcium movement and gravitropism in roots treated with auxin-transport inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) exhibit strong positive gravitropism. In both species, gravistimulation induces polar movement of calcium across the root tip from the upper side to the lower side. Roots of onion (Allium cepa L.) are not responsive to gravity and gravistimulation induces little or no polar movement of calcium across the root tip. Treatment of maize or pea roots with inhibitors of auxin transport (morphactin, naphthylphthalamic acid, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid) prevents both gravitropism and gravity-induced polar movement of calcium across the root tip. The results indicate that calcium movement and auxin movement are closely linked in roots and that gravity-induced redistribution of calcium across the root cap may play an important role in the development of gravitropic curvature.

  1. Caffeine-induced inhibition of the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sang-Tae; Zuo, Zhiyi; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2013-02-27

    Caffeine has been known to trigger seizures, however, the precise mechanism about the proconvulsive effect of caffeine remains unclear. Glutamate transporters play an important role to maintain the homeostasis of glutamate concentration in the brain tissue. Especially, dysfunction of excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3) can lead to seizures. We investigated the effects of caffeine on the activity of EAAT3 and the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Rat EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting EAAT3 mRNA. l-Glutamate (30μM)-induced inward currents were recorded via the two-electrode voltage clamp method. Caffeine decreased EAAT3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Caffeine (30μM for 3min) significantly reduced V(max), but did not alter K(m) value of EAAT3 for glutamate. When preincubated oocytes with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator) were exposed to caffeine, PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity was abolished. Two PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine and staurosporine) significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity. Whereas, there were no significant differences among the PKC inhibitors, caffeine, and PKC inhibitors+caffeine groups. In similarly fashion, wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor) significantly decreased EAAT3 activity, however no statistical differences were observed among the wortmannin, caffeine, and wortmannin+caffeine groups. Our results demonstrate that caffeine attenuates EAAT3 activity and this reducing effect of caffeine seems to be mediated by PKC and PI3K.

  2. Allatostatin-C reversibly blocks the transport of citrate out of the mitochondria and inhibits juvenile hormone synthesis in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Nouzova, Marcela; Rivera-Perez, Crisalejandra; Noriega, Fernando G

    2015-02-01

    Aedes aegypti allatostatin-C (AeaAST-C or PISCF-AST) is a strong and fast reversible inhibitor of juvenile hormone III (JH III) synthesis by the corpora allata (CA) of mosquitoes; however, its mechanism of action remains poorly understood. AeaAST-C showed no inhibitory activity in the presence of any of the intermediate precursors of JH III indicating that the AeaAST-C target is located before the entry of acetyl-CoA in the pathway. Stimulation experiments using different sources of carbon (glucose, pyruvate, acetate and citrate) suggest that AST-C acts after pyruvate is transformed to citrate in the mitochondria. In vitro inhibition of the citrate mitochondrial carrier (CIC) mimicked the effect of AeaAST-C, and was overridden by addition of citrate or acetate. Our results provide compelling evidence that AeaAST-C inhibits JH III synthesis by blocking the CIC carrier that transports citrate from the mitochondria to the cytosol, obstructing the production of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA that sustains JH III synthesis in the CA of mosquitoes.

  3. Inhibition of biliary cholesterol and phospholipid secretion by cefmetazole. The role of vesicular transport and of canalicular events.

    PubMed Central

    Cava, F; Gonzalez, J; Gonzalez-Buitrago, J M; Muriel, C; Jimenez, R

    1991-01-01

    A number of organic anions selectively inhibit the biliary secretion of cholesterol and phospholipids without affecting bile acid secretion. We studied the effect of cefmetazole, a third-generation cephalosporin, on biliary lipid secretion in the rat. Injection of cefmetazole at a dose of 200 mumol/kg body wt. induced a choleretic effect and a significant decrease in the biliary output of cholesterol and phospholipid, without changes in bile acid secretion. The decrease was more marked for cholesterol than for phospholipid secretion, with a significant decrease in their molar ratio in bile. The effects were apparently unrelated to an inhibition of intracellular vesicular transport because, after injection of horseradish peroxidase, both the time course and total amount secreted of the protein did not significantly differ between control animals and those receiving cefmetazole. The secretory rate of the lysosomal marker acid phosphatase was not affected by cefmetazole administration. Biliary outputs of the plasma-membrane enzymes alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly decreased by the antibiotic. These results point to an effect of cefmetazole at the level of the canalicular membrane. PMID:1674860

  4. Inhibited transport of graphene oxide nanoparticles in granular quartz sand coated with Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida biofilms.

    PubMed

    He, Jian-Zhou; Wang, Deng-Jun; Fang, Huan; Fu, Qing-Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2017-02-01

    Increasing production and use of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) boost their wide dissemination in the subsurface environments where biofilms occur ubiquitously, representative of the physical and chemical heterogeneities. This study aimed at investigating the influence of Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis (BS) and Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida (PP) biofilms on the transport of GONPs under different ionic strengths (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mM CaCl2) at neutral pH 7.2 in water-saturated porous media. Particularly, the X-ray micro-computed tomography was used to quantitatively characterize the pore structures of sand columns in the presence and absence of biofilms. Our results indicated that the presence of biofilms reduced the porosity and narrowed down the pore sizes of packed columns. Transport experiments in biofilm-coated sand showed that biofilms, irrespective of bacterial species, significantly inhibited the mobility of GONPs compared to that in cleaned sand. This could be due to the Ca(2+) complexation, increased surface roughness and charge heterogeneities of collectors, and particularly enhanced physical straining caused by biofilms. The two-site kinetic retention model-fitted value of maximum solid-phase concentration (Smax2) for GONPs was higher for biofilm-coated sand than for cleaned sand, demonstrating that biofilms act as favorable sites for GONPs retention. Our findings presented herein are important to deepen our current understanding on the nature of particle-collector interactions.

  5. Zinc inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid transporter 4 (GAT4) reveals a link between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kfir, Einav; Lee, William; Eskandari, Sepehr; Nelson, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters (GATs) play an important role in inhibitory neurotransmission by clearing synaptically released GABA and by maintaining low resting levels of GABA in synaptic and extrasynaptic regions. In certain brain regions, vesicular zinc is colocalized and coreleased with glutamate and modulates the behavior of a number of channels, receptors, and transporters. We examined the effect of zinc on expressed GATs (GAT1, GAT2, GAT3, and GAT4) in Xenopus laevis oocytes by using tracer flux and electrophysiological methods. We show that zinc is a potent inhibitor of GAT4 (Ki of 3 μM). Immunolocalization of GAT4 in the hippocampus revealed dense localization in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus, regions which are known to be heavily populated by zinc-containing glutamatergic neurons. The results suggest a physiological role of synaptically released zinc in the hippocampus, because zinc released from hyperactive glutamatergic neurons may simultaneously bring about elevated GABAergic inhibition. Therefore, this mode of zinc function signifies a link between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission and may play a neuroprotective role against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. PMID:15829583

  6. Bafetinib (INNO-406) reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 and ABCG2 transporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Kai; Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Patel, Bhargav A.; Talele, Tanaji T.; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette transporters are involved in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds and are responsible for decreasing drug accumulation in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. Discovered by structure-based virtual screening algorithms, bafetinib, a Bcr-Abl/Lyn tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to have inhibitory effects on both ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR in this in-vitro investigation. Bafetinib significantly sensitized ABCB1 and ABCG2 overexpressing MDR cells to their anticancer substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of anticancer drugs, particularly doxorubicin and [3H]-paclitaxel in ABCB1 overexpressing cells; mitoxantrone and [3H]-mitoxantrone in ABCG2 overexpressing cells, respectively. Bafetinib stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activities while inhibited ABCG2 ATPase activities. There were no significant changes in the expression level or the subcellular distribution of ABCB1 and ABCG2 in the cells exposed to 3 μM of bafetinib. Overall, our study indicated that bafetinib reversed ABCB1- and ABCG2-mediated MDR by blocking the drug efflux function of these transporters. These findings might be useful in developing combination therapy for MDR cancer treatment.

  7. Inhibition of copper uptake in yeast reveals the copper transporter Ctr1p as a potential molecular target of saxitoxin

    PubMed Central

    Cusick, Kathleen D.; Minkin, Steven C.; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chang, Christopher J.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a secondary metabolite produced by several species of dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria which targets voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels in higher vertebrates. However, its molecular target in planktonic aquatic community members that co-occur with the toxin producers remains unknown. Previous microarray analysis with yeast identified copper and iron-homeostasis genes as being differentially regulated in response to saxitoxin. This study sought to identify the molecular target in microbial cells by comparing the transcriptional profiles of key copper and iron homeostasis genes (CTR1, FRE1, FET3, CUP1, CRS5) in cells exposed to saxitoxin, excess copper, excess iron, an extracellular Cu(I) chelator, or an intracellular Cu(I) chelator. Protein expression and localization of Ctr1p (copper transporter), Fet3p (multicopper oxidase involved in high-affinity iron uptake), and Aft1p (iron regulator) were also compared among treatments. Combined transcript and protein profiles suggested saxitoxin inhibited copper uptake. This hypothesis was confirmed by intracellular Cu(I) imaging with a selective fluorescent probe for labile copper. Based on the combined molecular and physiological results, a model is presented in which the copper transporter Ctr1p serves as a molecular target of saxitoxin and these observations couched in the context of the eco-evolutionary role this toxin may serve for species that produce it. PMID:22304436

  8. Lipophilic Triphenylphosphonium Cations Inhibit Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain and Induce Mitochondrial Proton Leak

    PubMed Central

    Anděl, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background The lipophilic positively charged moiety of triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) has been used to target a range of biologically active compounds including antioxidants, spin-traps and other probes into mitochondria. The moiety itself, while often considered biologically inert, appears to influence mitochondrial metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings We used the Seahorse XF flux analyzer to measure the effect of a range of alkylTPP+ on cellular respiration and further analyzed their effect on mitochondrial membrane potential and the activity of respiratory complexes. We found that the ability of alkylTPP+ to inhibit the respiratory chain and decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential increases with the length of the alkyl chain suggesting that hydrophobicity is an important determinant of toxicity. Conclusions/Significance More hydrophobic TPP+ derivatives can be expected to have a negative impact on mitochondrial membrane potential and respiratory chain activity in addition to the effect of the biologically active moiety attached to them. Using shorter linker chains or adding hydrophilic functional groups may provide a means to decrease this negative effect. PMID:25927600

  9. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  10. Risk Factors for Development of Cholestatic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Inhibition of Hepatic Basolateral Bile Acid Transporters Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins 3 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Köck, Kathleen; Ferslew, Brian C.; Netterberg, Ida; Yang, Kyunghee; Urban, Thomas J.; Swaan, Peter W.; Stewart, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired hepatic bile acid export may contribute to development of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI). The multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 3 and 4 are postulated to be compensatory hepatic basolateral bile acid efflux transporters when biliary excretion by the bile salt export pump (BSEP) is impaired. BSEP inhibition is a risk factor for cholestatic DILI. This study aimed to characterize the relationship between MRP3, MRP4, and BSEP inhibition and cholestatic potential of drugs. The inhibitory effect of 88 drugs (100 μM) on MRP3- and MRP4-mediated substrate transport was measured in membrane vesicles. Drugs selected for investigation included 50 BSEP non-inhibitors (24 non-cholestatic; 26 cholestatic) and 38 BSEP inhibitors (16 non-cholestatic; 22 cholestatic). MRP4 inhibition was associated with an increased risk of cholestatic potential among BSEP non-inhibitors. In this group, for each 1% increase in MRP4 inhibition, the odds of the drug being cholestatic increased by 3.1%. Using an inhibition cutoff of 21%, which predicted a 50% chance of cholestasis, 62% of cholestatic drugs inhibited MRP4 (P < 0.05); in contrast, only 17% of non-cholestatic drugs were MRP4 inhibitors. Among BSEP inhibitors, MRP4 inhibition did not provide additional predictive value of cholestatic potential; almost all BSEP inhibitors were also MRP4 inhibitors. Inclusion of pharmacokinetic predictor variables (e.g., maximal unbound concentration in plasma) in addition to percent MRP4 inhibition in logistic regression models did not improve cholestasis prediction. Association of cholestasis with percent MRP3 inhibition was not statistically significant, regardless of BSEP-inhibition status. Inhibition of MRP4, in addition to BSEP, may be a risk factor for the development of cholestatic DILI. PMID:24154606

  11. Apple Polyphenol Phloretin Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Cell Growth via Inhibition of the Type 2 Glucose Transporter and Activation of p53-Mediated Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Tsai; Tu, Shih-Hsin; Yang, Po-Sheng; Hsu, Sung-Po; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Ho, Chi-Tang; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Lai, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Ming-Yao; Chen, Li-Ching

    2016-09-14

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) are required for glucose uptake in malignant cells, and they can be used as molecular targets for cancer therapy. An RT-PCR analysis was performed to investigate the mRNA levels of 14 subtypes of GLUTs in human colorectal cancer (COLO 205 and HT-29) and normal (FHC) cells. RT-PCR (n = 27) was used to assess the differences in paired tissue samples (tumor vs normal) isolated from colorectal cancer patients. GLUT2 was detected in all tested cells. The average GLUT2 mRNA level in 12 of 27 (44.4%) cases was 2.4-fold higher in tumor compared to normal tissues (*, p = 0.027). Higher GLUT2 mRNA expression was preferentially detected in advanced-stage tumors (stage 0 vs 3 = 16.38-fold, 95% CI = 9.22-26.54-fold; *, p = 0.029). The apple polyphenol phloretin (Ph) and siRNA methods were used to inhibit GLUT2 protein expression. Ph (0-100 μM, for 24 h) induced COLO 205 cell growth cycle arrest in a p53-dependent manner, which was confirmed by pretreatment of the cells with a p53-specific dominant negative expression vector. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 6 (HNF6), which was previously reported to be a transcription factor that activates GLUT2 and p53, was also induced by Ph (0-100 μM, for 24 h). The antitumor effect of Ph (25 mg/kg or DMSO twice a week for 6 weeks) was demonstrated in vivo using BALB/c nude mice bearing COLO 205 tumor xenografts. In conclusion, targeting GLUT2 could potentially suppress colorectal tumor cell invasiveness.

  12. Gibberellins inhibit adventitious rooting in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis by affecting auxin transport.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Petterle, Anna; Bellini, Catherine; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of processes involved in adventitious rooting is important to improve both fundamental understanding of plant physiology and the propagation of numerous plants. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloïdes) plants overexpressing a key gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis gene (AtGA20ox1) grow rapidly but have poor rooting efficiency, which restricts their clonal propagation. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of adventitious rooting in Populus and the model plant Arabidopsis. The production of adventitious roots (ARs) in tree cuttings is initiated from the basal stem region, and involves the interplay of several endogenous and exogenous factors. The roles of several hormones in this process have been characterized, but the effects of GAs have not been fully investigated. Here, we show that a GA treatment negatively affects the numbers of ARs produced by wild-type hybrid aspen cuttings. Furthermore, both hybrid aspen plants and intact Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing AtGA20ox1, PttGID1.1 or PttGID1.3 genes (with a 35S promoter) produce few ARs, although ARs develop from the basal stem region of hybrid aspen and the hypocotyl of Arabidopsis. In Arabidopsis, auxin and strigolactones are known to affect AR formation. Our data show that the inhibitory effect of GA treatment on adventitious rooting is not mediated by perturbation of the auxin signalling pathway, or of the strigolactone biosynthetic and signalling pathways. Instead, GAs appear to act by perturbing polar auxin transport, in particular auxin efflux in hybrid aspen, and both efflux and influx in Arabidopsis.

  13. Functional and molecular effects of mercury compounds on the human OCTN1 cation transporter: C50 and C136 are the targets for potent inhibition.

    PubMed

    Galluccio, Michele; Pochini, Lorena; Peta, Valentina; Iannì, Maria; Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Indiveri, Cesare

    2015-03-01

    The effect of mercury compounds has been tested on the organic cation transporter, hOCTN1. MeHg(+), Hg(2+), or Cd(2+) caused strong inhibition of transport. 1,4-Dithioerythritol (DTE), cysteine (Cys), and N-acetyl-l-cysteine reversed (NAC) the inhibition at different extents. 2-Aminoethyl methanethiosulfonate hydrobromide (MTSEA), a prototype SH reagent, exerted inhibition of transport similar to that observed for the mercurial agents. To investigate the mechanism of action of mercurials, mutants of hOCTN1 in which each of the Cys residues was substituted by Ala have been constructed, over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) uptake mediated by each mutant in proteoliposomes was comparable to that of wild type (WT). IC50 values of the WT and mutants for the mercury compounds were derived from dose-response analyses. The mutants C50A and C136A showed significant increase of IC50 indicating that the 2 Cys residues were involved in the interaction with the mercury compounds and inhibition of the transporter. The double mutant C50A/C136A was constructed; the lack of inhibition confirmed that the 2 Cys residues are the targets of mercury compounds. MTSEA showed similar behavior with respect to the mercurial reagents with the difference that increased IC50 was observed also in the C81A mutant. Similar results were obtained when transport was measured as acetylcholine uptake. Ethyl mercury (Thimerosal) inhibited hOCTN1 as well. C50A, C50A/C136A and, at very lower extent, C136A showed increased IC50 indicating that C50 was the major target of this mercury compound. The homology model of hOCTN1 was built using as template PiPT and validated by the experimental data on mutant proteins.

  14. Proteinases inhibit H(+)-ATPase and Na+/H+ exchange but not water transport in apical and endosomal membranes from rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Sabolić, I; Shi, L B; Brown, D; Ausiello, D A; Verkman, A S

    1992-01-10

    A marked increase in water permeability can be induced in Xenopus oocytes by injection of mRNA from tissues that express water channels, suggesting that the water channel is a protein. In view of this and previous reports which showed that proteinases may interfere with mercurial inhibition of water transport in red blood cells (RBC), we examined the influence of trypsin, chymotrypsin, papain, pronase, subtilisin and thermolysin on water permeability as well as on ATPase activity, H(+)-pump, passive H+ conductance, and Na+/H+ exchange in apical brush-border vesicles (BBMV) and endosomal (EV) vesicles from rat renal cortex. H+ transport was measured by Acridine orange fluorescence quenching and water transport by stopped-flow light scattering. As measured by potential-driven H+ accumulation in BBMV and EV, proteinase treatment had little effect on vesicle integrity. In BBMV, ecto-ATPase activity was inhibited by 15-30%, Na+/H+ exchange by 20-55%, and H+ conductance was unchanged. Osmotic water permeability (Pf) was 570 microns/s and was inhibited 85-90% by 0.6 mM HgCl2; proteinase treatment did not affect Pf or the HgCl2 inhibition. In EV, NEM-sensitive H+ accumulation and ATPase activity were inhibited by greater than 95%. Pf (140 microns/s) and HgCl2 inhibition (75-85%) were not influenced by proteinase treatment. SDS-PAGE showed selective digestion of multiple polypeptides by proteinases. These results confirm the presence of water channels in BBMV and EV and demonstrate selective inhibition of ATPase function and Na+/H+ exchange by proteinase digestion. The lack of effect of proteinases on water transport by mercurials. We conclude that the water channel may be a small integral membrane protein which, unlike the H(+)-ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger, has no functionally important membrane domains that are sensitive to proteolysis.

  15. Microbially driven fracture sealing for inhibiting contaminant transport at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Lindsay; Cuthbert, Mark; Riley, Michael; Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Tobler, Dominique; Phoenix, Vernon

    2013-04-01

    Successful implementation of subsurface carbon storage and nuclear waste containment schemes relies on transmissivity reduction through the sealing of fractures in the surrounding rocks. Effective transmissivity reduction in fine scale features is difficult to achieve using traditional high viscosity cement grouts injected at high pressures. However, laboratory scale studies suggest microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) can provide a low-viscosity alternative. The first field trials of MICP in fractured hard rock were carried out in a multiple borehole array by using the ureolytic bacterium Sporosarcina pasteurii. Flow at depth at the experimental site is dominated by a single fracture. Injection of the bacteria in parallel with a 'cementing fluid' of urea and calcium chloride was used to fix the bacteria in the subsurface. Subsequent flushing with the cementing fluid alone drove further ureolysis and calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation is eventually limited by crystal growth preventing interaction of the accumulated bacteria with the cementing fluid; repeated bacteria injections are necessary. Coupled equations for bacterial and urea transport, bacterial accumulation, and calcite production were used to model the field trial numerically and gave excellent agreement with field data. While a significant reduction in the transmissivity of the fracture was achieved over several m2 the modelling results suggest challenges remain in encouraging aperture reduction at a distance from the injection borehole due primarily to cementation and clogging around the bacteria injection hole. A further borehole array at the same site provides the opportunity for additional experiments informed by the promising initial results. Models of a number of alternative bacteria and cementing fluid injection schemes have been created using the geometry of the new borehole array. These models have been parameterised using the calibrated model from the initial field trial

  16. γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB)-induced respiratory depression: combined receptor-transporter inhibition therapy for treatment in GHB overdose.

    PubMed

    Morse, Bridget L; Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E

    2012-08-01

    Overdose of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) frequently causes respiratory depression, occasionally resulting in death; however, little is known about the dose-response relationship or effects of potential overdose treatment strategies on GHB-induced respiratory depression. In these studies, the parameters of respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute volume were measured using whole-body plethysmography in rats administered GHB. Intravenous doses of 200, 600, and 1500 mg/kg were administered to assess the dose-dependent effects of GHB on respiration. To determine the receptors involved in GHB-induced respiratory depression, a specific GABA(B) receptor antagonist, (2S)-(+)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH50911), and a specific GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline, were administered before GHB. The potential therapeutic strategies of receptor inhibition and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) inhibition were assessed by inhibitor administration 5 min after GHB. The primary effect of GHB on respiration was a dose-dependent decrease in respiratory rate, accompanied by an increase in tidal volume, resulting in little change in minute volume. Pretreatment with 150 mg/kg SCH50911 completely prevented the decrease in respiratory rate, indicating agonism at GABA(B) receptors to be primarily responsible for GHB-induced respiratory depression. Administration of 50 mg/kg SCH50911 after GHB completely reversed the decrease in respiratory rate; lower doses had partial effects. Administration of the MCT inhibitor l-lactate increased GHB renal and total clearance, also improving respiratory rate. Administration of 5 mg/kg SCH50911 plus l-lactate further improved respiratory rate compared with the same dose of either agent alone, indicating that GABA(B) and MCT inhibitors, alone and in combination, represent potential treatment options for GHB-induced respiratory depression.

  17. Viral Inhibition of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP): A Striking Example of Functional Convergent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, Marieke C.; Horst, Daniëlle; Griffin, Bryan D.; Luteijn, Rutger D.; Davison, Andrew J.; Ressing, Maaike E.; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large DNA viruses that are highly abundant within their host populations. Even in the presence of a healthy immune system, these viruses manage to cause lifelong infections. This persistence is partially mediated by the virus entering latency, a phase of infection characterized by limited viral protein expression. Moreover, herpesviruses have devoted a significant part of their coding capacity to immune evasion strategies. It is believed that the close coexistence of herpesviruses and their hosts has resulted in the evolution of viral proteins that specifically attack multiple arms of the host immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in antiviral immunity. CTLs recognize their target through viral peptides presented in the context of MHC molecules at the cell surface. Every herpesvirus studied to date encodes multiple immune evasion molecules that effectively interfere with specific steps of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) plays a key role in the loading of viral peptides onto MHC class I molecules. This is reflected by the numerous ways herpesviruses have developed to block TAP function. In this review, we describe the characteristics and mechanisms of action of all known virus-encoded TAP inhibitors. Orthologs of these proteins encoded by related viruses are identified, and the conservation of TAP inhibition is discussed. A phylogenetic analysis of members of the family Herpesviridae is included to study the origin of these molecules. In addition, we discuss the characteristics of the first TAP inhibitor identified outside the herpesvirus family, namely, in cowpox virus. The strategies of TAP inhibition employed by viruses are very distinct and are likely to have been acquired independently during evolution. These findings and the recent discovery of a non-herpesvirus TAP inhibitor represent a striking example of functional convergent evolution

  18. Vandetanib (Zactima, ZD6474) Antagonizes ABCC1- and ABCG2-Mediated Multidrug Resistance by Inhibition of Their Transport Function

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li-sheng; Wang, Fang; Li, Yu-hong; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Li-ming; Liang, Yong-ju; Dai, Chun-ling; Yan, Yan-yan; Tao, Li-yang; Mi, Yan-jun; Yang, An-kui; To, Kenneth Kin Wah; Fu, Li-wu

    2009-01-01

    Background ABCC1 and ABCG2 are ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette transmembrane proteins that play an important role in multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, we evaluated the possible interaction of vandetanib, an orally administered drug inhibiting multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, with ABCC1 and ABCG2 in vitro. Methodology and Principal Findings MDR cancer cells overexpressing ABCC1 or ABCG2 and their sensitive parental cell lines were used. MTT assay showed that vandetanib had moderate and almost equal-potent anti-proliferative activity in both sensitive parental and MDR cancer cells. Concomitant treatment of MDR cells with vandetanib and specific inhibitors of ABCC1 or ABCG2 did not alter their sensitivity to the former drug. On the other hand, clinically attainable but non-toxic doses of vandetanib were found to significantly enhance the sensitivity of MDR cancer cells to ABCC1 or ABCG2 substrate antitumor drugs. Flow cytometric analysis showed that vandetanib treatment significantly increase the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123, substrates of ABCC1 and ABCG2 respectively, in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). However, no significant effect was shown in sensitive parental cell lines. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that vandetanib did not change the expression of ABCC1 and ABCG2 at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, total and phosphorylated forms of AKT and ERK1/2 remained unchanged after vandetanib treatment in both sensitive and MDR cancer cells. Conclusions Vandetanib is unlikely to be a substrate of ABCC1 or ABCG2. It overcomes ABCC1- and ABCG2-mediated drug resistance by inhibiting the transporter activity, independent of the blockade of AKT and ERK1/2 signal transduction pathways. PMID:19390592

  19. Up-Regulation of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter A1 Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, Claire; Douam, Florian; Lebreton, Stéphanie; Lagaye, Sylvie; Pol, Stanislas; Helle, François; Plengpanich, Wanee; Guérin, Maryse; Bourgine, Maryline; Michel, Marie Louise; Lavillette, Dimitri; Roingeard, Philippe; le Goff, Wilfried; Budkowska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes infection using host lipid metabolism pathways that are thus considered potential targets for indirect anti-HCV strategies. HCV enters the cell via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, interacting with several receptors, and virus-cell fusion, which depends on acidic pH and the integrity of cholesterol-rich domains of the hepatocyte membrane. The ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates cholesterol efflux from hepatocytes to extracellular Apolipoprotein A1 and moves cholesterol within cell membranes. Furthermore, it generates high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. HDL protects against arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We show that the up-regulation of ABCA1 gene expression and its cholesterol efflux function in Huh7.5 hepatoma cells, using the liver X receptor (LXR) agonist GW3965, impairs HCV infection and decreases levels of virus produced. ABCA1-stimulation inhibited HCV cell entry, acting on virus-host cell fusion, but had no impact on virus attachment, replication, or assembly/secretion. It did not affect infectivity or properties of virus particles produced. Silencing of the ABCA1 gene and reduction of the specific cholesterol efflux function counteracted the inhibitory effect of the GW3965 on HCV infection, providing evidence for a key role of ABCA1 in this process. Impaired virus-cell entry correlated with the reorganisation of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts). The inhibitory effect could be reversed by an exogenous cholesterol supply, indicating that restriction of HCV infection was induced by changes of cholesterol content/distribution in membrane regions essential for virus-cell fusion. Stimulation of ABCA1 expression by GW3965 inhibited HCV infection of both human primary hepatocytes and isolated human liver slices. This study reveals that pharmacological stimulation of the ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux pathway disrupts membrane cholesterol homeostasis, leading to the

  20. Vesicle miR-195 derived from Endothelial Cells Inhibits Expression of Serotonin Transporter in Vessel Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Junzhong; Zhang, Huiyuan; Ji, Bingyang; Jiang, Hui; Zhao, Tao; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Zhiren; Tan, Shengjiang; Ahmed, Asif; Gu, Yuchun

    2017-03-08

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been shown to be essential in lots of physiological and pathological processes. It is well known that 5-HT and 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) play important roles in the pulmonary artery in pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the function of 5-HTT in other arteries. In this study we found that the expression of 5-HTT was elevated in injured carotid arteries and over-expression of 5-HTT induced proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs); however, this phenotype could be reversed by knocking-down of 5-HTT or endothelial cells conditional medium (EC-CM). A 5-HTT inhibitor, fluoxetine, treated animals also exhibited reduced restenosis after injury. We identified that miR-195 was packaged in the extracellular vesicles from EC-CM. We further confirmed that extracellular vesicles could transfer miR-195 from ECs to SMCs to inhibit the expression of 5-HTT in SMCs and the proliferation of SMCs. These results provide the first evidence that ECs communicate with SMCs via micro-RNA195 in the regulation of the proliferation of SMCs through 5-HTT, which will contribute to a better understanding of communications between ECs and SMCs via micro-RNA. Our findings suggest a potential target for the control of vessel restenosis.

  1. Callose deposition in the phloem plasmodesmata and inhibition of phloem transport in citrus leaves infected with "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus".

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun-Ji; Zhou, Lijuan; Williams, Donna S; Park, Jiyoung; Ding, Ningyuan; Duan, Yong-Ping; Kang, Byung-Ho

    2012-07-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a destructive disease of citrus trees caused by phloem-limited bacteria, Candidatus Liberibacter spp. One of the early microscopic manifestations of HLB is excessive starch accumulation in leaf chloroplasts. We hypothesize that the causative bacteria in the phloem may intervene photoassimilate export, causing the starch to over-accumulate. We examined citrus leaf phloem cells by microscopy methods to characterize plant responses to Liberibacter infection and the contribution of these responses to the pathogenicity of HLB. Plasmodesmata pore units (PPUs) connecting companion cells and sieve elements were stained with a callose-specific dye in the Liberibacter-infected leaf phloem cells; callose accumulated around PPUs before starch began to accumulate in the chloroplasts. When examined by transmission electron microscopy, PPUs with abnormally large callose deposits were more abundant in the Liberibacter-infected samples than in the uninfected samples. We demonstrated an impairment of symplastic dye movement into the vascular tissue and delayed photoassimilate export in the Liberibacter-infected leaves. Liberibacter infection was also linked to callose deposition in the sieve plates, which effectively reduced the sizes of sieve pores. Our results indicate that Liberibacter infection is accompanied by callose deposition in PPUs and sieve pores of the sieve tubes and suggest that the phloem plugging by callose inhibits phloem transport, contributing to the development of HLB symptoms.

  2. Mechanism of inhibition of human glucose transporter GLUT1 is conserved between cytochalasin B and phenylalanine amides.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Khyati; Finer-Moore, Janet S; Pedersen, Bjørn P; Caboni, Laura; Waight, Andrew; Hillig, Roman C; Bringmann, Peter; Heisler, Iring; Müller, Thomas; Siebeneicher, Holger; Stroud, Robert M

    2016-04-26

    Cancerous cells have an acutely increased demand for energy, leading to increased levels of human glucose transporter 1 (hGLUT1). This up-regulation suggests hGLUT1 as a target for therapeutic inhibitors addressing a multitude of cancer types. Here, we present three inhibitor-bound, inward-open structures of WT-hGLUT1 crystallized with three different inhibitors: cytochalasin B, a nine-membered bicyclic ring fused to a 14-membered macrocycle, which has been described extensively in the literature of hGLUTs, and two previously undescribed Phe amide-derived inhibitors. Despite very different chemical backbones, all three compounds bind in the central cavity of the inward-open state of hGLUT1, and all binding sites overlap the glucose-binding site. The inhibitory action of the compounds was determined for hGLUT family members, hGLUT1-4, using cell-based assays, and compared with homology models for these hGLUT members. This comparison uncovered a probable basis for the observed differences in inhibition between family members. We pinpoint regions of the hGLUT proteins that can be targeted to achieve isoform selectivity, and show that these same regions are used for inhibitors with very distinct structural backbones. The inhibitor cocomplex structures of hGLUT1 provide an important structural insight for the design of more selective inhibitors for hGLUTs and hGLUT1 in particular.

  3. TIGAR knockdown radiosensitizes TrxR1-overexpressing glioma in vitro and in vivo via inhibiting Trx1 nuclear transport

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yushuo; Chen, Fei; Tai, Guomei; Wang, Jiaojiao; Shang, Jun; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Ping; Huang, Baoxing; Du, Jie; Yu, Jiahua; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Fenju

    2017-01-01

    The up-regulation of thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) is detected in more than half of gliomas, which is significantly associated with increased malignancy grade and recurrence rate. The biological functions of NADPH-dependent TrxR1 are mainly associated with reduced thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) which plays critical roles in cellular redox signaling and tumour radio-resistance. Our previous work has proved that TP53 induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) knockdown could notably radiosensitize glioma cells. However, whether TrxR1-overexpressing glioma cells could be re-radiosensitized by TIGAR silence is still far from clear. In the present study, TrxR1 was stably over-expressed in U-87MG and T98G glioma cells. Both in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated that the radiosensitivity of glioma cells was considerably diminished by TrxR1 overexpression. TIGAR abrogation was able to radiosensitize TrxR1-overexpressing gliomas by inhibiting IR-induced Trx1 nuclear transport. Post-radiotherapy, TIGAR low-expression predicted significant longer survival time for animals suffering from TrxR1-overexpessing xenografts, which suggested that TIGAR abrogation might be a promising strategy for radiosensitizing TrxR1-overexpressing glial tumours. PMID:28338004

  4. Mechanism of inhibition of human glucose transporter GLUT1 is conserved between cytochalasin B and phenylalanine amides

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Khyati; Finer-Moore, Janet S.; Pedersen, Bjørn P.; Caboni, Laura; Waight, Andrew; Hillig, Roman C.; Bringmann, Peter; Heisler, Iring; Müller, Thomas; Siebeneicher, Holger; Stroud, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancerous cells have an acutely increased demand for energy, leading to increased levels of human glucose transporter 1 (hGLUT1). This up-regulation suggests hGLUT1 as a target for therapeutic inhibitors addressing a multitude of cancer types. Here, we present three inhibitor-bound, inward-open structures of WT-hGLUT1 crystallized with three different inhibitors: cytochalasin B, a nine-membered bicyclic ring fused to a 14-membered macrocycle, which has been described extensively in the literature of hGLUTs, and two previously undescribed Phe amide-derived inhibitors. Despite very different chemical backbones, all three compounds bind in the central cavity of the inward-open state of hGLUT1, and all binding sites overlap the glucose-binding site. The inhibitory action of the compounds was determined for hGLUT family members, hGLUT1–4, using cell-based assays, and compared with homology models for these hGLUT members. This comparison uncovered a probable basis for the observed differences in inhibition between family members. We pinpoint regions of the hGLUT proteins that can be targeted to achieve isoform selectivity, and show that these same regions are used for inhibitors with very distinct structural backbones. The inhibitor cocomplex structures of hGLUT1 provide an important structural insight for the design of more selective inhibitors for hGLUTs and hGLUT1 in particular. PMID:27078104

  5. Dopaminergic Control of Attentional Flexibility: Inhibition of Return is Associated with the Dopamine Transporter Gene (DAT1)

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Pratt, Jay; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variability related to the dopamine (DA) transporter gene (DAT1) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of human cognition. The 9-repeat allele of the DAT1 gene is presumably associated with higher striatal DA levels than the 10-repeat allele, which might support inhibitory control functions. We investigated the impact of the DAT1 gene on the inhibition of return (IOR) effect, which refers to the fact that people are slower to detect a target if it appears in a previously attended location. 140 healthy adults, genotyped for the DAT1 gene, performed an IOR task with stimulus-onset asynchronies (SOAs) between attention cue and target of 150–1200 ms. Nine-repeat carriers showed more pronounced IOR effect than 10/10 homozygous at short SOAs but both groups of subjects eventually reached the same magnitude of IOR. Our findings support the idea that striatal DA levels promote IOR, presumably by biasing the interplay between prefrontal and striatal networks towards greater cognitive flexibility. PMID:20661460

  6. TIGAR knockdown radiosensitizes TrxR1-overexpressing glioma in vitro and in vivo via inhibiting Trx1 nuclear transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yushuo; Chen, Fei; Tai, Guomei; Wang, Jiaojiao; Shang, Jun; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Ping; Huang, Baoxing; Du, Jie; Yu, Jiahua; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Fenju

    2017-03-24

    The up-regulation of thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) is detected in more than half of gliomas, which is significantly associated with increased malignancy grade and recurrence rate. The biological functions of NADPH-dependent TrxR1 are mainly associated with reduced thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) which plays critical roles in cellular redox signaling and tumour radio-resistance. Our previous work has proved that TP53 induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) knockdown could notably radiosensitize glioma cells. However, whether TrxR1-overexpressing glioma cells could be re-radiosensitized by TIGAR silence is still far from clear. In the present study, TrxR1 was stably over-expressed in U-87MG and T98G glioma cells. Both in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated that the radiosensitivity of glioma cells was considerably diminished by TrxR1 overexpression. TIGAR abrogation was able to radiosensitize TrxR1-overexpressing gliomas by inhibiting IR-induced Trx1 nuclear transport. Post-radiotherapy, TIGAR low-expression predicted significant longer survival time for animals suffering from TrxR1-overexpessing xenografts, which suggested that TIGAR abrogation might be a promising strategy for radiosensitizing TrxR1-overexpressing glial tumours.

  7. Vesicle miR-195 derived from Endothelial Cells Inhibits Expression of Serotonin Transporter in Vessel Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junzhong; Zhang, Huiyuan; Ji, Bingyang; Jiang, Hui; Zhao, Tao; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Zhiren; Tan, Shengjiang; Ahmed, Asif; Gu, Yuchun

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been shown to be essential in lots of physiological and pathological processes. It is well known that 5-HT and 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) play important roles in the pulmonary artery in pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the function of 5-HTT in other arteries. In this study we found that the expression of 5-HTT was elevated in injured carotid arteries and over-expression of 5-HTT induced proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs); however, this phenotype could be reversed by knocking-down of 5-HTT or endothelial cells conditional medium (EC-CM). A 5-HTT inhibitor, fluoxetine, treated animals also exhibited reduced restenosis after injury. We identified that miR-195 was packaged in the extracellular vesicles from EC-CM. We further confirmed that extracellular vesicles could transfer miR-195 from ECs to SMCs to inhibit the expression of 5-HTT in SMCs and the proliferation of SMCs. These results provide the first evidence that ECs communicate with SMCs via micro-RNA195 in the regulation of the proliferation of SMCs through 5-HTT, which will contribute to a better understanding of communications between ECs and SMCs via micro-RNA. Our findings suggest a potential target for the control of vessel restenosis. PMID:28272473

  8. Parathyroid hormone inhibits phosphate transport in OK cells but not in LLC-PK1 and JTC-12.P3 cells.

    PubMed

    Malmström, K; Murer, H

    1986-07-01

    Na+-dependent phosphate transport and its response to parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been investigated in three continuous cell lines of renal epithelial origin (LLC-PK1, JTC-12.P3, and OK). The apparent Km for phosphate was similar, but the maximal transport rate (Vmax) was markedly different in the three cell lines. PTH and forskolin produced an increase of cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in all cell lines, but Na+-dependent phosphate transport was inhibited exclusively in the OK cells (a threefold reduction of influx after 4 h of exposure to 10(-10) M PTH). The change in phosphate transport is accounted for by a lowered Vmax (30.8 +/- 5.3 vs. 10.2 +/- 1.1 pmol X mg-1 X 3 min-1). The reduction in phosphate transport was reversible, such that 5 h after removal of PTH the Vmax had increased threefold over the inhibited state. Addition of PTH did not alter Na+-dependent L-alanine influx in the OK cells. Experiments with apical membrane vesicles showed that the change in Vmax occurred at the membrane level. It is concluded that the regulatory event responsible for PTH-reduced phosphate transport is beyond cAMP. Of the cell lines studied, only OK cells have a complete regulatory cascade.

  9. Bifunctional effects of O-methylated flavones from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi on melanocytes: Inhibition of melanin production and intracellular melanosome transport.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiko; Kobayashi-Nakamura, Kumiko; Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest in skin lightening has recently renewed attention on the esthetic applications of Chinese herbal medicine. Although Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi is used for antipyretic and antiinflammatory purposes, its whitening effect remains unclear. This study reports three major findings: (1) S. baicalensis has a potent inhibitory effect on melanogenesis; (2) wogonin and its glycoside are the active components of S. baicalensis; and (3) O-methylated flavones from S. baicalensis, such as wogonin, inhibit intracellular melanosome transport. Using a melanin quantification assay, we showed that S. baicalensis potently inhibits melanogenesis in B16F10 cells. Componential analyses revealed that the main components of S. baicalensis are baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, wogonin, and oroxylin A. Among these five flavones, wogonin and wogonoside consistently inhibited melanogenesis in both B16F10 melanoma cells and primary melanocytes. Wogonin exhibited the strongest inhibition of melanin production and markedly lightened the color of skin equivalents. We identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase-related proteins as potential targets of wogonin- and wogonoside-induced melanogenesis suppression. In culture, we found that the melanosomes in wogonin-treated B16F10 cells were localized to the perinuclear region. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that wogonin significantly reduced in melanophilin protein, which is required for actin-based melanosome transport. Other actin-based melanosome transport-related molecules, i.e., Rab27A and myosin Va, were not affected by wogonin. Cotreatment with MG132 blocked the wogonin-induced decrease in melanophilin, suggesting that wogonin promotes the proteolytic degradation of melanophilin via the calpain/proteasomal pathway. We determined that the structural specificities of the mono-O-methyl group in the flavone A-ring and the aglycone form were responsible for reducing melanosome transport

  10. Fentanyl Enhances Hepatotoxicity of Paclitaxel via Inhibition of CYP3A4 and ABCB1 Transport Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jia-Hao; Bi, Bing-Tian; Feng, Kun-Yao; Huang, Wan; Zeng, Wei-An

    2015-01-01

    Fentanyl, a potent opioid analgesic that is used to treat cancer pain, is commonly administered with paclitaxel in advanced tumors. However, the effect of fentanyl on the hepatotoxicity of paclitaxel and its potential mechanism of action is not well studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fentanyl on the hepatotoxicity of paclitaxel and its potential mechanisms of action. Pharmacokinetic parameters of paclitaxel were tested using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and mouse liver histopathology were examined. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of anti-carcinogens was examined using 1-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT), and the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123 was detected by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression of ABCB1 and the activity of ABCB1 ATPase and CYP3A4 were also examined. In this study, the co-administration of fentanyl and paclitaxel prolonged the half-life (t1/2) of paclitaxel from 1.455 hours to 2.344 hours and decreased the clearance (CL) from 10.997 ml/h to 7.014 ml/h in mice. Fentanyl significantly increased the levels of ALT in mice to 88.2 U/L, which is more than 2-fold higher than the level detected in the control group, and it increased the histological damage in mouse livers. Furthermore, fentanyl enhanced the cytotoxicity of anti-carcinogens that are ABCB1 substrates and increased the accumulation of doxorubicin and rhodamine 123. Additionally, fentanyl stimulated ABCB1 ATPase activity and inhibited CYP3A4 activity in the liver microsomes of mice. Our study indicates that the obvious hepatotoxicity during this co-administration was due to the inhibition of CYP3A4 activity and ABCB1 transport activity. These findings suggested that the accumulation-induced hepatotoxicity of paclitaxel when it is combined with fentanyl should be avoided. PMID:26633878

  11. Sodium glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibition with empagliflozin improves cardiac diastolic function in a female rodent model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Javad; Aroor, Annayya R; Sowers, James R; Jia, Guanghong; Hayden, Melvin R; Garro, Mona; Barron, Brady; Mayoux, Eric; Rector, R Scott; Whaley-Connell, Adam; DeMarco, Vincent G

    2017-01-13

    Obese and diabetic individuals are at increased risk for impairments in diastolic relaxation and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. The impairments in diastolic relaxation are especially pronounced in obese and diabetic women and predict future cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in this population. Recent clinical data suggest sodium glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibition reduces CVD events in diabetic individuals, but the mechanisms of this CVD protection are unknown. To determine whether targeting SGLT2 improves diastolic relaxation, we utilized empagliflozin (EMPA) in female db/db mice. Eleven week old female db/db mice were fed normal mouse chow, with or without EMPA, for 5 weeks. Blood pressure (BP), HbA1c and fasting glucose were significantly increased in untreated db/db mice (DbC) (P < 0.01). EMPA treatment (DbE) improved glycemic indices (P < 0.05), but not BP (P > 0.05). At baseline, DbC and DbE had already established impaired diastolic relaxation as indicated by impaired septal wall motion (>tissue Doppler derived E'/A' ratio) and increased left ventricular (LV) filling pressure (

  12. The substituted aspartate analogue L-beta-threo-benzyl-aspartate preferentially inhibits the neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter EAAT3.

    PubMed

    Esslinger, C Sean; Agarwal, Shailesh; Gerdes, John; Wilson, Paul A; Davis, Erin S; Awes, Alicia N; O'Brien, Erin; Mavencamp, Teri; Koch, Hans P; Poulsen, David J; Rhoderick, Joseph F; Chamberlin, A Richard; Kavanaugh, Michael P; Bridges, Richard J

    2005-11-01

    The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) play key roles in the regulation of CNS L-glutamate, especially related to synthesis, signal termination, synaptic spillover, and excitotoxic protection. Inhibitors available to delineate EAAT pharmacology and function are essentially limited to those that non-selectively block all EAATs or those that exhibit a substantial preference for EAAT2. Thus, it is difficult to selectively study the other subtypes, particularly EAAT1 and EAAT3. Structure activity studies on a series of beta-substituted aspartate analogues identify L-beta-benzyl-aspartate (L-beta-BA) as among the first blockers that potently and preferentially inhibits the neuronal EAAT3 subtype. Kinetic analysis of D-[(3)H]aspartate uptake into C17.2 cells expressing the hEAATs demonstrate that L-beta-threo-BA is the more potent diastereomer, acts competitively, and exhibits a 10-fold preference for EAAT3 compared to EAAT1 and EAAT2. Electrophysiological recordings of EAAT-mediated currents in Xenopus oocytes identify L-beta-BA as a non-substrate inhibitor. Analyzing L-beta-threo-BA within the context of a novel EAAT2 pharmacophore model suggests: (1) a highly conserved positioning of the electrostatic carboxyl and amino groups; (2) nearby regions that accommodate select structural modifications (cyclopropyl rings, methyl groups, oxygen atoms); and (3) a unique region L-beta-threo-BA occupied by the benzyl moieties of L-TBOA, L-beta-threo-BA and related analogues. It is plausible that the preference of L-beta-threo-BA and L-TBOA for EAAT3 and EAAT2, respectively, could reside in the latter two pharmacophore regions.

  13. Attenuation of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus by inhibition of endocannabinoid transport and degradation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shubina, Liubov; Aliev, Rubin; Kitchigina, Valentina

    2015-03-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency associated with a high rate of mortality if not treated promptly. Exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties both in vivo and in vitro. Here we study the influence of endocannabinoid metabolism on the development of kainic acid-induced SE in guinea pigs. For this purpose, the inhibitors of endocannabinoid transport, AM404, and enzymatic (fatty acid amide hydrolase) degradation, URB597, were applied. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, was also tested. Animal behavior as well as local electric field potentials in four structures: medial septum, hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and amygdala were analyzed when AM404 (120nmol), URB597 (4.8nmol) or AM251 (20nmol) were administrated alone or together with 0.4μg of kainic acid. All substances were injected i.c.v. AM404, URB597 or AM251 administered alone did not alter markedly local field potentials of all four studied structures in the long-term compared with their basal activity. AM404 and URB597 significantly alleviated kainic acid-induced SE, decreasing behavioral manifestations, duration of seizure events and SE in general without changing the amplitude of local field potentials. AM251 did not produce distinct effects on SE in terms of our experimental paradigm. There was no apparent change of the seizure initiation pattern when kainic acid was coadministrated with AM404, URB597 or AM251. The present study provides electrophysiologic and behavioral evidences that inhibition of endocannabinoid metabolism plays a protective role against kainic acid-induced SE and may be employed for therapeutic purposes. Further investigations of the influences of cannabinoid-related compounds on SE genesis and especially epileptogenesis are required.

  14. Novel N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl analogs of lobelane inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-10-01

    Lobelane, a chemically defunctionalized saturated analog of lobeline, has increased selectivity for the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) compared with the parent compound. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine (DA) release and decreases methamphetamine self-administration. Unfortunately, tolerance develops to the ability of lobelane to decrease these behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Lobelane has low water solubility, which is problematic for drug development. The aim of the current study was to determine the pharmacological effect of replacement of the N-methyl moiety with a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl (N-1,2-diol) moiety, which enhances water solubility, altering the configuration of the N-1,2-diol moiety and incorporating phenyl ring substituents into the analogs. To determine VMAT2 selectivity, structure-activity relationships also were generated for inhibition of DA and serotonin transporters. Analogs with the highest potency for inhibiting DA uptake at VMAT2 and at least 10-fold selectivity were evaluated further for ability to inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release from superfused striatal slices. (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(4-methoxyphenethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-793A), the (R)-4-methoxyphenyl-N-1,2-diol analog, and (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(1-naphthylethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-794A), the (R)-1-naphthyl-N-1,2-diol analog, exhibited the highest potency (K(i) ∼30 nM) inhibiting VMAT2, and both analogs inhibited methamphetamine-evoked endogenous DA release (IC(50) = 10.6 and 0.4 μM, respectively). Thus, the pharmacophore for VMAT2 inhibition accommodates the N-1,2-diol moiety, which improves drug-likeness and enhances the potential for the development of these clinical candidates as treatments for methamphetamine abuse.

  15. Transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine n erythrocytes: inhibition of transport and preferential labeling of a 31,000-dalton protein by sulfhydryl reactive reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.; Schroit, A.J.

    1988-02-09

    A series of /sup 125/I-labeled thiolation reagents were synthesized on the basis of the parent structure pyridyldithioethylamine (PDA). These compounds specifically and reversibly inhibit the active intrabilayer transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) in human blood cells. The binding of PDA to cells can be quantified since the thiol-disulfide exchange reaction yields a chromophore. In addition, the presence of a primary amine makes it amenable to derivatization with a variety of compounds. An iodinated derivative of PDA preferentially labeled a 31,000-dalton red blood cell peptide. The labeled component, which may represent the PS transporter, comigrated with integral membrane protein band 7.

  16. The Role of Monocarboxylate Transporters and Their Chaperone CD147 in Lactate Efflux Inhibition and the Anticancer Effects of Terminalia chebula in Neuroblastoma Cell Line N2-A

    PubMed Central

    Messeha, S. S.; Zarmouh, N. O.; Taka, E.; Gendy, S. G.; Shokry, G. R.; Kolta, M. G.; Soliman, K. F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In the presence of oxygen, most of the synthesized pyruvate during glycolysis in the cancer cell of solid tumors is released away from the mitochondria to form lactate (Warburg Effect). To maintain cell homeostasis, lactate is transported across the cell membrane by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). The major aim of the current investigation is to identify novel compounds that inhibit lactate efflux that may lead to identifying effective targets for cancer treatment. Study Design In this study, 900 ethanol plant extracts were screened for their lactate efflux inhibition using neuroblastoma (N2-A) cell line. Additionally, we investigated the mechanism of inhibition for the most potent plant extract regarding monocarboxylate transporters expression, and consequences effects on viability, growth, and apoptosis. Methodology The potency of lactate efflux inhibition of ethanol plant extracts was evaluated in N2-A cells by measuring extracellular lactate levels. Caspase 3- activity and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining were performed to assess the apoptotic effect. The antiproliferative effect was measured using WST assay. Western blotting was performed to quantify protein expression of MCTs and their chaperone CD147 in treated cells lysates. Results Terminalia chebula plant extract was the most potent lactate efflux inhibitor in N2-A cells among the 900 - tested plant extracts. The results obtained show that extract of Terminalia chebula fruits (TCE) significantly (P = 0.05) reduced the expression of the MCT1, MCT3, MCT4 and the chaperone CD147. The plant extract was more potent (IC50 of 3.59 ± 0.26 μg/ml) than the MCT standard inhibitor phloretin (IC50 76.54 ± 3.19 μg/ml). The extract also showed more potency and selective cytotoxicity in cancer cells than DI-TNC1 primary cell line (IC50 7.37 ± 0.28 vs. 17.35 ± 0.19 μg/ml). Moreover, TCE Inhibited N2-A cell growth (IG50 = 5.20 ± 0.30 μg/ml) and induced apoptosis at the 7.5 μg/ml concentration

  17. Two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, niflumic acid and diclofenac, inhibit the human glutamate transporter EAAT1 through different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kanako; Ishii-Nozawa, Reiko; Takeuchi, Kouichi; Nakazawa, Ken; Sato, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on substrate-induced currents of L-glutamate (L-Glu) transporter EAAT1 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Niflumic acid (NFA) and diclofenac inhibited L-Glu-induced current through EAAT1 in a non-competitive manner. NFA produced a leftward shift in reversal potential (E(rev)) of L-Glu-induced current and increased current amplitude at the potentials more negative than -100 mV. Diclofenac had no effects on E(rev) and inhibited the current amplitude to the same extent at all negative potentials. These results indicate that NFA and diclofenac inhibit the L-Glu-induced EAAT1 current via different mechanisms.

  18. TSPO ligands stimulate ZnPPIX transport and ROS accumulation leading to the inhibition of P. falciparum growth in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Marginedas-Freixa, I.; Hattab, C.; Bouyer, G.; Halle, F.; Chene, A.; Lefevre, S. D.; Cambot, M.; Cueff, A.; Schmitt, M.; Gamain, B.; Lacapere, J. J.; Egee, S.; Bihel, F.; Le Van Kim, C.; Ostuni, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    After invading red blood cells (RBCs), Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) can export its own proteins to the host membrane and activate endogenous channels that are present in the membrane of RBCs. This transport pathway involves the Voltage Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC). Moreover, ligands of the VDAC partner TranSlocator PrOtein (TSPO) were demonstrated to inhibit the growth of the parasite. We studied the expression of TSPO and VDAC isoforms in late erythroid precursors, examined the presence of these proteins in membranes of non-infected and infected human RBCs, and evaluated the efficiency of TSPO ligands in inhibiting plasmodium growth, transporting the haem analogue Zn-protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPPIX) and enhancing the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). TSPO and VDAC isoforms are differentially expressed on erythroid cells in late differentiation states. TSPO2 and VDAC are present in the membranes of mature RBCs in a unique protein complex that changes the affinity of TSPO ligands after Pf infection. TSPO ligands dose-dependently inhibited parasite growth, and this inhibition was correlated to ZnPPIX uptake and ROS accumulation in the infected RBCs. Our results demonstrate that TSPO ligands can induce Pf death by increasing the uptake of porphyrins through a TSPO2–VDAC complex, which leads to an accumulation of ROS. PMID:27641616

  19. Differential expression patterns of K(+) /Cl(-) cotransporter 2 in neurons within the superficial spinal dorsal horn of rats.

    PubMed

    Javdani, Fariba; Holló, Krisztina; Hegedűs, Krisztina; Kis, Gréta; Hegyi, Zoltán; Dócs, Klaudia; Kasugai, Yu; Fukazawa, Yugo; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Antal, Miklós

    2015-09-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and glycine-mediated hyperpolarizing inhibition is associated with a chloride influx that depends on the inwardly directed chloride electrochemical gradient. In neurons, the extrusion of chloride from the cytosol primarily depends on the expression of an isoform of potassium-chloride cotransporters (KCC2s). KCC2 is crucial in the regulation of the inhibitory tone of neural circuits, including pain processing neural assemblies. Thus we investigated the cellular distribution of KCC2 in neurons underlying pain processing in the superficial spinal dorsal horn of rats by using high-resolution immunocytochemical methods. We demonstrated that perikarya and dendrites widely expressed KCC2, but axon terminals proved to be negative for KCC2. In single ultrathin sections, silver deposits labeling KCC2 molecules showed different densities on the surface of dendritic profiles, some of which were negative for KCC2. In freeze fracture replicas and tissue sections double stained for the β3-subunit of GABAA receptors and KCC2, GABAA receptors were revealed on dendritic segments with high and also with low KCC2 densities. By measuring the distances between spots immunoreactive for gephyrin (a scaffolding protein of GABAA and glycine receptors) and KCC2 on the surface of neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-immunoreactive dendrites, we found that gephyrin-immunoreactive spots were located at various distances from KCC2 cotransporters; 5.7 % of them were recovered in the middle of 4-10-µm-long dendritic segments that were free of KCC2 immunostaining. The variable local densities of KCC2 may result in variable postsynaptic potentials evoked by the activation of GABAA and glycine receptors along the dendrites of spinal neurons.

  20. Down-Regulating CsHT1, a Cucumber Pollen-Specific Hexose Transporter, Inhibits Pollen Germination, Tube Growth, and Seed Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jintao; Wang, Zhenyu; Yao, Fengzhen; Gao, Lihong; Ma, Si; Zhang, Zhenxian

    2015-01-01

    Efficient sugar transport is needed to support the high metabolic activity of pollen tubes as they grow through the pistil. Failure of transport results in male sterility. Although sucrose transporters have been shown to play a role in pollen tube development, the role of hexoses and hexose transporters is not as well established. The pollen of some species can grow in vitro on hexose as well as on sucrose, but knockouts of individual hexose transporters have not been shown to impair fertilization, possibly due to transporter redundancy. Here, the functions of CsHT1, a hexose transporter from cucumber (Cucumis sativus), are studied using a combination of heterologous expression in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), histochemical and immunohistochemical localization, and reverse genetics. The results indicate that CsHT1 is a plasma membrane-localized hexose transporter with high affinity for glucose, exclusively transcribed in pollen development and expressed both at the levels of transcription and translation during pollen grain germination and pollen tube growth. Overexpression of CsHT1 in cucumber pollen results in a higher pollen germination ratio and longer pollen tube growth than wild-type pollen in glucose- or galactose-containing medium. By contrast, antisense suppression of CsHT1 leads to inhibition of pollen germination and pollen tube elongation in the same medium and results in a decrease of seed number per fruit and seed size when antisense transgenic pollen is used to fertilize wild-type or transgenic cucumber plants. The important role of CsHT1 in pollen germination, pollen tube growth, and seed development is discussed. PMID:25888616

  1. Down-Regulating CsHT1, a Cucumber Pollen-Specific Hexose Transporter, Inhibits Pollen Germination, Tube Growth, and Seed Development.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jintao; Wang, Zhenyu; Yao, Fengzhen; Gao, Lihong; Ma, Si; Sui, Xiaolei; Zhang, Zhenxian

    2015-06-01

    Efficient sugar transport is needed to support the high metabolic activity of pollen tubes as they grow through the pistil. Failure of transport results in male sterility. Although sucrose transporters have been shown to play a role in pollen tube development, the role of hexoses and hexose transporters is not as well established. The pollen of some species can grow in vitro on hexose as well as on sucrose, but knockouts of individual hexose transporters have not been shown to impair fertilization, possibly due to transporter redundancy. Here, the functions of CsHT1, a hexose transporter from cucumber (Cucumis sativus), are studied using a combination of heterologous expression in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), histochemical and immunohistochemical localization, and reverse genetics. The results indicate that CsHT1 is a plasma membrane-localized hexose transporter with high affinity for glucose, exclusively transcribed in pollen development and expressed both at the levels of transcription and translation during pollen grain germination and pollen tube growth. Overexpression of CsHT1 in cucumber pollen results in a higher pollen germination ratio and longer pollen tube growth than wild-type pollen in glucose- or galactose-containing medium. By contrast, antisense suppression of CsHT1 leads to inhibition of pollen germination and pollen tube elongation in the same medium and results in a decrease of seed number per fruit and seed size when antisense transgenic pollen is used to fertilize wild-type or transgenic cucumber plants. The important role of CsHT1 in pollen germination, pollen tube growth, and seed development is discussed.

  2. Structure–activity relationships of bumetanide derivatives: correlation between diuretic activity in dogs and inhibition of the human NKCC2A transporter

    PubMed Central

    Lykke, Kasper; Töllner, Kathrin; Römermann, Kerstin; Feit, Peter W; Erker, Thomas; MacAulay, Nanna; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The N-K-Cl cotransporters (NKCCs) mediate the coupled, electroneutral movement of Na+, K+ and Cl− ions across cell membranes. There are two isoforms of this cation co-transporter, NKCC1 and NKCC2. NKCC2 is expressed primarily in the kidney and is the target of diuretics such as bumetanide. Bumetanide was discovered by screening ∼5000 3-amino-5-sulfamoylbenzoic acid derivatives, long before NKCC2 was identified in the kidney. Therefore, structure–activity studies on effects of bumetanide derivatives on NKCC2 are not available. Experimental Approach In this study, the effect of a series of diuretically active bumetanide derivatives was investigated on human NKCC2 variant A (hNKCC2A) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Key Results Bumetanide blocked hNKCC2A transport with an IC50 of 4 μM. There was good correlation between the diuretic potency of bumetanide and its derivatives in dogs and their inhibition of hNKCC2A (r2 = 0.817; P < 0.01). Replacement of the carboxylic group of bumetanide by a non-ionic residue, for example, an anilinomethyl group, decreased inhibition of hNKCC2A, indicating that an acidic group was required for transporter inhibition. Exchange of the phenoxy group of bumetanide for a 4-chloroanilino group or the sulfamoyl group by a methylsulfonyl group resulted in compounds with higher potency to inhibit hNKCC2A than bumetanide. Conclusions and Implications The X. laevis oocyte expression system used in these experiments allowed analysis of the structural requirements that determine relative potency of loop diuretics on human NKCC2 splice variants, and may lead to the discovery of novel high-ceiling diuretics. PMID:26101812

  3. Dicumarol, an inhibitor of ADP-ribosylation of CtBP3/BARS, fragments golgi non-compact tubular zones and inhibits intra-golgi transport.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Alexander A; Colanzi, Antonino; Polishchuk, Roman S; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Mironov, Alexander A; Fusella, Aurora; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Silletta, Maria Giuseppina; Corda, Daniela; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Luini, Alberto

    2004-07-01

    Dicumarol (3,3'-methylenebis[4-hydroxycoumarin]) is an inhibitor of brefeldin-A-dependent ADP-ribosylation that antagonises brefeldin-A-dependent Golgi tubulation and redistribution to the endoplasmic reticulum. We have investigated whether dicumarol can directly affect the morphology of the Golgi apparatus. Here we show that dicumarol induces the breakdown of the tubular reticular networks that interconnect adjacent Golgi stacks and that contain either soluble or membrane-associated cargo proteins. This results in the formation of 65-120-nm vesicles that are sometimes invaginated. In contrast, smaller vesicles (45-65 nm in diameter, a size consistent with that of coat-protein-I-dependent vesicles) that excluded cargo proteins from their lumen are not affected by dicumarol. All other endomembranes are largely unaffected by dicumarol, including Golgi stacks, the ER, multivesicular bodies and the trans-Golgi network. In permeabilized cells, dicumarol activity depends on the function of CtBP3/BARS protein and pre-ADP-ribosylation of cytosol inhibits the breakdown of Golgi tubules by dicumarol. In functional experiments, dicumarol markedly slows down intra-Golgi traffic of VSV-G transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the medial Golgi, and inhibits the diffusional mobility of both galactosyl transferase and VSV-G tagged with green fluorescent protein. However, it does not affect: transport from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface; Golgi-to-endoplasmic reticulum traffic of ERGIC58; coat-protein-I-dependent Golgi vesiculation by AlF4 or ADP-ribosylation factor; or ADP-ribosylation factor and beta-coat protein binding to Golgi membranes. Thus the ADP-ribosylation inhibitor dicumarol induces the selective breakdown of the tubular components of the Golgi complex and inhibition of intra-Golgi transport. This suggests that lateral diffusion between adjacent stacks has a role in protein transport through the Golgi complex.

  4. Non-dioxin-like PCBs inhibit [(3)H]WIN-35,428 binding to the dopamine transporter: a structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Wigestrand, M B; Stenberg, M; Walaas, S I; Fonnum, F; Andersson, P L

    2013-12-01

    Non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (NDL-PCBs) are neurotoxic compounds with known effects at the dopaminergic system in the brain. In a previous study we demonstrated that NDL-PCBs inhibit uptake of dopamine into rat brain synaptosomes, an effect most likely mediated by inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, using the cocaine analogue [(3)H]WIN-35,428 binding assay and synaptosomes, we directly investigate whether NDL-PCBs act via DAT and explore the structure-activity relationship of this effect. In total, thirty PCBs were investigated, including a previously selected training set of twenty PCBs covering the structural variation within tri- to hepta-chlorinated NDL-PCBs, and an additional set of ten NDL-PCB congeners selected to validate the structure-activity pattern of neurotoxic PCBs. Since previous work has demonstrated that NDL-PCBs can also inhibit the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), we additionally examined whether some PCB congeners favour an effect on VMAT2 and others on DAT. Our results show that NDL-PCBs are potent inhibitors of [(3)H]WIN-35,428 binding to DAT. In fact, we identify a PCB congener (PCB 110) with similar potency for [(3)H]WIN-35,428 binding inhibition as cocaine. All active congeners were ortho-chlorinated PCBs, and in particular, tetra- and penta-chlorinated with 2-3 chlorine atoms in the ortho position were potent inhibitors of [(3)H]WIN-35,428 binding. Notably, the most active PCBs are highly prevalent in commercial mixtures of PCBs (Aroclor 1242, 1254 and 1260), which indicates that DAT inhibition could be one of the factors contributing to behavioural effects after Aroclor exposure. Derived data correlated well with the recently derived neurotoxic equivalency factors (NEQs), indicating the generality and applicability of the NEQ scheme in risk assessments of PCBs.

  5. Celecoxib Induced Tumor Cell Radiosensitization by Inhibiting Radiation Induced Nuclear EGFR Transport and DNA-Repair: A COX-2 Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, Klaus H. Mayer, Claus; Ohneseit, Petra A.; Raju, Uma; Andratschke, Nickolaus H.; Milas, Luka; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms mediating radiosensitization of human tumor cells by the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed using bronchial carcinoma cells A549, transformed fibroblasts HH4dd, the FaDu head-and-neck tumor cells, the colon carcinoma cells HCT116, and normal fibroblasts HSF7. Effects of celecoxib treatment were assessed by clonogenic cell survival, Western analysis, and quantification of residual DNA damage by {gamma}H{sub 2}AX foci assay. Results: Celecoxib treatment resulted in a pronounced radiosensitization of A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells, whereas FaDu and HH4dd cells were not radiosensitized. The observed radiosensitization could neither be correlated with basal COX-2 expression pattern nor with basal production of prostaglandin E2, but was depended on the ability of celecoxib to inhibit basal and radiation-induced nuclear transport of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The nuclear EGFR transport was strongly inhibited in A549-, HSF7-, and COX-2-deficient HCT116 cells, which were radiosensitized, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells, which resisted celecoxib-induced radiosensitization. Celecoxib inhibited radiation-induced DNA-PK activation in A549, HSF7, and HCT116 cells, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells. Consequentially, celecoxib increased residual {gamma}H2AX foci after irradiation, demonstrating that inhibition of DNA repair has occurred in responsive A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells only. Conclusions: Celecoxib enhanced radiosensitivity by inhibition of EGFR-mediated mechanisms of radioresistance, a signaling that was independent of COX-2 activity. This novel observation may have therapeutic implications such that COX-2 inhibitors may improve therapeutic efficacy of radiation even in patients whose tumor radioresistance is not dependent on COX-2.

  6. Inhibition Mechanism of the Intracellular Transporter Ca2+-Pump from Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum by the Antitumor Agent Dimethyl-Celecoxib

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Castell, Ernesto; Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Fernández-Belda, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl-celecoxib is a celecoxib analog that lacks the capacity as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor and therefore the life-threatening effects but retains the antineoplastic properties. The action mechanism at the molecular level is unclear. Our in vitro assays using a sarcoplasmic reticulum preparation from rabbit skeletal muscle demonstrate that dimethyl-celecoxib inhibits Ca2+-ATPase activity and ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Celecoxib was a more potent inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase activity than dimethyl-celecoxib, as deduced from the half-maximum effect but dimethyl-celecoxib exhibited higher inhibition potency when Ca2+ transport was evaluated. Since Ca2+ transport was more sensitive to inhibition than Ca2+-ATPase activity the drugs under study caused Ca2+/Pi uncoupling. Dimethyl-celecoxib provoked greater uncoupling and the effect was dependent on drug concentration but independent of Ca2+-pump functioning. Dimethyl-celecoxib prevented Ca2+ binding by stabilizing the inactive Ca2+-free conformation of the pump. The effect on the kinetics of phosphoenzyme accumulation and the dependence of the phosphoenzyme level on dimethyl-celecoxib concentration were independent of whether or not the Ca2+–pump was exposed to the drug in the presence of Ca2+ before phosphorylation. This provided evidence of non-preferential interaction with the Ca2+-free conformation. Likewise, the decreased phosphoenzyme level in the presence of dimethyl-celecoxib that was partially relieved by increasing Ca2+ was consistent with the mentioned effect on Ca2+ binding. The kinetics of phosphoenzyme decomposition under turnover conditions was not altered by dimethyl-celecoxib. The dual effect of the drug involves Ca2+-pump inhibition and membrane permeabilization activity. The reported data can explain the cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects that have been attributed to the celecoxib analog. Ligand docking simulation predicts interaction of celecoxib and

  7. Bifunctional effects of O-methylated flavones from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi on melanocytes: Inhibition of melanin production and intracellular melanosome transport

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest in skin lightening has recently renewed attention on the esthetic applications of Chinese herbal medicine. Although Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi is used for antipyretic and antiinflammatory purposes, its whitening effect remains unclear. This study reports three major findings: (1) S. baicalensis has a potent inhibitory effect on melanogenesis; (2) wogonin and its glycoside are the active components of S. baicalensis; and (3) O-methylated flavones from S. baicalensis, such as wogonin, inhibit intracellular melanosome transport. Using a melanin quantification assay, we showed that S. baicalensis potently inhibits melanogenesis in B16F10 cells. Componential analyses revealed that the main components of S. baicalensis are baicalin, wogonoside, baicalein, wogonin, and oroxylin A. Among these five flavones, wogonin and wogonoside consistently inhibited melanogenesis in both B16F10 melanoma cells and primary melanocytes. Wogonin exhibited the strongest inhibition of melanin production and markedly lightened the color of skin equivalents. We identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase-related proteins as potential targets of wogonin- and wogonoside-induced melanogenesis suppression. In culture, we found that the melanosomes in wogonin-treated B16F10 cells were localized to the perinuclear region. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that wogonin significantly reduced in melanophilin protein, which is required for actin-based melanosome transport. Other actin-based melanosome transport-related molecules, i.e., Rab27A and myosin Va, were not affected by wogonin. Cotreatment with MG132 blocked the wogonin-induced decrease in melanophilin, suggesting that wogonin promotes the proteolytic degradation of melanophilin via the calpain/proteasomal pathway. We determined that the structural specificities of the mono-O-methyl group in the flavone A-ring and the aglycone form were responsible for reducing melanosome transport

  8. The Antimicrobial Agent Fusidic Acid Inhibits Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide-Mediated Hepatic Clearance and May Potentiate Statin-Induced Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Scialis, Renato J; Rotter, Charles J; Lin, Jian; Lazzaro, Sarah; Varma, Manthena V; Di, Li; Feng, Bo; West, Michael; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-05-01

    Chronic treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with the bacteriostatic agent fusidic acid (FA) is frequently associated with myopathy including rhabdomyolysis upon coadministration with statins. Because adverse effects with statins are usually the result of drug-drug interactions, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of FA against human CYP3A4 and clinically relevant drug transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, multidrug resistant protein 1, and breast cancer resistance protein, which are involved in the oral absorption and/or systemic clearance of statins including atorvastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin. FA was a weak reversible (IC50= 295 ± 1.0μM) and time-dependent (KI= 216 ± 41μM and kinact= 0.0179 ± 0.001 min(-1)) inhibitor of CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam-1'-hydroxylase activity in human liver microsomes. FA demonstrated inhibition of multidrug resistant protein 1-mediated digoxin transport with an IC50 value of 157 ± 1.0μM and was devoid of breast cancer resistance protein inhibition (IC50> 500μM). In contrast, FA showed potent inhibition of OATP1B1- and OATP1B3-specific rosuvastatin transport with IC50 values of 1.59μM and 2.47μM, respectively. Furthermore, coadministration of oral rosuvastatin and FA to rats led to an approximately 19.3-fold and 24.6-fold increase in the rosuvastatin maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve, respectively, which could be potentially mediated through inhibitory effects of FA on rat Oatp1a4 (IC50= 2.26μM) and Oatp1b2 (IC50= 4.38μM) transporters, which are responsible for rosuvastatin uptake in rat liver. The potent inhibition of human OATP1B1/OATP1B3 by FA could attenuate hepatic uptake of statins, resulting in increased blood and tissue concentrations, potentially manifesting in musculoskeletal toxicity.

  9. UNC-16 (JIP3) Acts Through Synapse-Assembly Proteins to Inhibit the Active Transport of Cell Soma Organelles to Caenorhabditis elegans Motor Neuron Axons.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stacey L; Morrison, Logan M; Yorks, Rosalina M; Hoover, Christopher M; Boominathan, Soorajnath; Miller, Kenneth G

    2015-09-01

    The conserved protein UNC-16 (JIP3) inhibits the active transport of some cell soma organelles, such as lysosomes, early endosomes, and Golgi, to the synaptic region of axons. However, little is known about UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function, which is distinct from its Kinesin-1 adaptor function. We used an unc-16 suppressor screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to discover that UNC-16 acts through CDK-5 (Cdk5) and two conserved synapse assembly proteins: SAD-1 (SAD-A Kinase), and SYD-2 (Liprin-α). Genetic analysis of all combinations of double and triple mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds showed that the three proteins (CDK-5, SAD-1, and SYD-2) are all part of the same organelle transport regulatory system, which we named the CSS system based on its founder proteins. Further genetic analysis revealed roles for SYD-1 (another synapse assembly protein) and STRADα (a SAD-1-interacting protein) in the CSS system. In an unc-16(-) background, loss of the CSS system improved the sluggish locomotion of unc-16 mutants, inhibited axonal lysosome accumulation, and led to the dynein-dependent accumulation of lysosomes in dendrites. Time-lapse imaging of lysosomes in CSS system mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds revealed active transport defects consistent with the steady-state distributions of lysosomes. UNC-16 also uses the CSS system to regulate the distribution of early endosomes in neurons and, to a lesser extent, Golgi. The data reveal a new and unprecedented role for synapse assembly proteins, acting as part of the newly defined CSS system, in mediating UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function.

  10. Extracellular glucose increases the coupling capacity of the yeast V H+-ATPase and the resistance of its H+ transport activity to nitrate inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Camila C; Monteiro, Renan M; Freitas, Flavia P; Retamal, Claudio; Teixeira, Layz R S; Palma, Livia M; Silva, Flavia E; Façanha, Arnoldo R; Okorokova-Façanha, Anna L; Okorokov, Lev A

    2012-01-01

    V H(+)-ATPase has an important role in a variety of key physiological processes. This enzyme is reversibly activated/partly inactivated by the addition/exhaustion of extracellular glucose. The current model of its regulation assumes the reversible disassembly/reassembly of ∼60-70% of the V1 and V0 membrane complexes, which are responsible for ATP hydrolysis and H(+) conductance, respectively. The number of assembled complexes determines the pump activity because disassembled complexes are inactive. The model predicts the identical catalytic properties for the activated and semi-active enzymes molecules. To verify the model predictions we have isolated total membranes from yeast spheroplasts that were pre-incubated either with or without glucose. Nitrate treatment of membranes revealed the similar ATPase inhibition for two enzyme states, suggesting that they have identical structures that are essential for ATP hydrolysis. However, H(+) transport was inhibited more than the ATPase activities, indicating a nitrate uncoupling action, which was significantly higher for the nonactivated enzyme. This finding suggests that the structure of the non-activated enzyme, which is essential for H(+) transport, is less stable than that of the activated enzyme. Moreover, the glucose activation of the pump increases i) its coupling capacity; ii) its K(M) for ATP hydrolysis and ATP affinity for H(+) transport; iii) the Vmax for H(+) transport in comparison with the Vmax for ATP hydrolysis and iv) the immune reactivity of catalytic subunit A and regulatory subunit B by 9.3 and 2.4 times, respectively. The protein content of subunits A and B was not changed by extracellular glucose. We propose that instead of the dissociation/reassociation of complexes V1 and V0, changes in the extracellular glucose concentration cause reversible and asymmetrical modulations in the immune reactivity of subunits A and B by their putative biochemical modifications. This response asymmetrically

  11. Hydrogen sulfide-mediated stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport involves inhibition of the mitochondrial phosphodiesterase 2A, elevation of cAMP and activation of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Módis, Katalin; Panopoulos, Panagiotis; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-11-01

    Although hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) is generally known as a mitochondrial poison, recent studies show that lower concentrations of H₂S play a physiological role in the stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport and cellular bioenergetics. This effect involves electron donation at Complex II. Other lines of recent studies demonstrated that one of the biological actions of H₂S involves inhibition of cAMP and cGMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Given the emerging functional role of the mitochondrial isoform of cAMP PDE (PDE2A) in the regulation of mitochondrial function the current study investigated whether cAMP-dependent mechanisms participate in the stimulatory effect of NaHS on mitochondrial function. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, partial digestion studies localized PDE2A into the mitochondrial matrix. NaHS exerted a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on recombinant PDE2A enzyme in vitro. Moreover, NaHS induced an elevation of cAMP levels when added to isolated mitochondria and stimulated the mitochondrial electron transport. The latter effect was inhibited by Rp-cAMP, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The current findings suggest that the direct electron donating effect of NaHS is amplified by an intramitochondrial cAMP system, which may involve the inhibition of PDE2A and subsequent, cAMP-mediated stimulation of PKA.

  12. High resolution respirometry analysis of polyethylenimine-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis and cellular stress: Mitochondrial proton leak and inhibition of the electron transport system.

    PubMed

    Hall, Arnaldur; Larsen, Anna K; Parhamifar, Ladan; Meyle, Kathrine D; Wu, Lin-Ping; Moghimi, S Moein

    2013-10-01

    Polyethylenimines (PEIs) are highly efficient non-viral transfectants, but can induce cell death through poorly understood necrotic and apoptotic processes as well as autophagy. Through high resolution respirometry studies in H1299 cells we demonstrate that the 25kDa branched polyethylenimine (25k-PEI-B), in a concentration and time-dependent manner, facilitates mitochondrial proton leak and inhibits the electron transport system. These events were associated with gradual reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. The intracellular ATP levels further declined as a consequence of PEI-mediated plasma membrane damage and subsequent ATP leakage to the extracellular medium. Studies with freshly isolated mouse liver mitochondria corroborated with bioenergetic findings and demonstrated parallel polycation concentration- and time-dependent changes in state 2 and state 4o oxygen flux as well as lowered ADP phosphorylation (state 3) and mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Polycation-mediated reduction of electron transport system activity was further demonstrated in 'broken mitochondria' (freeze-thawed mitochondrial preparations). Moreover, by using both high-resolution respirometry and spectrophotometry analysis of cytochrome c oxidase activity we were able to identify complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) as a likely specific site of PEI mediated inhibition within the electron transport system. Unraveling the mechanisms of PEI-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis is central for combinatorial design of safer polymeric non-viral gene delivery systems.

  13. Protein kinase C activators selectively inhibit insulin-stimulated system A transport activity in skeletal muscle at a post-receptor level.

    PubMed Central

    Gumà, A; Camps, M; Palacín, M; Testar, X; Zorzano, A

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the role of phorbol esters on different biological effects induced by insulin in muscle, such as activation of system A transport activity, glucose utilization and insulin receptor function. System A transport activity was measured by monitoring the uptake of the system A-specific analogue alpha-(methyl)aminoisobutyric acid (MeAIB), by intact rat extensor digitorum longus muscle. The addition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA, 0.5 microM) for 60 or 180 min did not modify basal MeAIB uptake by muscle, suggesting that insulin signalling required to stimulate MeAIB transport does not involve protein kinase C activation. However, TPA added 30 min before insulin (100 nM) markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated MeAIB uptake. The addition of polymyxin B (0.1 mM) or H-7 (1 mM), protein kinase C inhibitors, alone or in combination with TPA leads to impairment of insulin-stimulated MeAIB uptake. This paradoxical pattern is incompatible with a unique action of Polymyxin B or H-7 on protein kinase C activity. Therefore these agents are not suitable tools with which to investigate whether a certain insulin effect is mediated by protein kinase C. TPA did not cause a generalized inhibition of insulin action. Thus both TPA and insulin increased 3-O-methylglucose uptake by muscle, and their effects were not additive. Furthermore, TPA did not modify insulin-stimulated lactate production by muscle. In keeping with this selective modification of insulin action, treatment of muscles with TPA did not modify insulin receptor binding or kinase activities. In conclusion, phorbol esters do not mimic insulin action on system A transport activity; however, they markedly inhibit insulin-stimulated amino acid transport, with no modification of insulin receptor function in rat skeletal muscle. It is suggested that protein kinase C activation causes a selective post-receptor modification on the biochemical pathway by which insulin activates system A amino acid

  14. Inhibition of Gene Expression of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter and Antioxidant Enzymes in Oxazaphosphorines-Induced Acute Cardiomyopathic Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Aldelemy, Meshan Lafi; Hafez, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that high therapeutic doses of oxazaphosphorines, cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IFO), are associated with cardiomyopathy. This study investigated whether oxazaphosphorines alter the expression of organic cation/carnitine transporter (OCTN2) and antioxidant genes and if so, whether these alterations contribute to CP and IFO-induced cardiotoxicity. Adult male Wistar albino rats were assigned to one of six treatment groups namely, control, L carnitine, CP, IFO, CP plus L carnitine and IFO plus L carnitine. In cardiac and kidney tissues, CP and IFO significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of OCTN2. Oxazaphosphorines significantly increased serum acyl-carnitine/free carnitine ratio and urinary carnitine excretion and significantly decreased total carnitine in cardiac tissues. Interestingly, carnitine supplementation completely reversed the biochemical and gene expression changes-induced by oxazaphosphorines to the control values, except OCTN2 expression remained inhibited by IFO. Data from this study suggest that: (1) Oxazaphosphorines decreased myocardial carnitine content following the inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in cardiac tissues. (2) Oxazaphosphorine therapy increased urinary loss of carnitine secondary to the inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in proximal tubules of the kidney. (3) Carnitine supplementation attenuates CP but not IFO-induced inhibition of OCTN2 mRNA and protein expression in heart and kidney tissues. PMID:22701146

  15. Ursolic Acid Inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase Activity and Prevents TNF-α-Induced Gene Expression by Blocking Amino Acid Transport and Cellular Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yokomichi, Tomonobu; Morimoto, Kyoko; Oshima, Nana; Yamada, Yuriko; Fu, Liwei; Taketani, Shigeru; Ando, Masayoshi; Kataoka, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, induce the expression of a wide variety of genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Ursolic acid (3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) was identified to inhibit the cell-surface ICAM-1 expression induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. Ursolic acid was found to inhibit the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 protein expression almost completely, whereas the TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression and NF-κB signaling pathway were decreased only partially by ursolic acid. In line with these findings, ursolic acid prevented cellular protein synthesis as well as amino acid uptake, but did not obviously affect nucleoside uptake and the subsequent DNA/RNA syntheses. This inhibitory profile of ursolic acid was similar to that of the Na+/K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain, but not the translation inhibitor, cycloheximide. Consistent with this notion, ursolic acid was found to inhibit the catalytic activity of Na+/K+-ATPase. Thus, our present study reveals a novel molecular mechanism in which ursolic acid inhibits Na+/K+-ATPase activity and prevents the TNF-α-induced gene expression by blocking amino acid transport and cellular protein synthesis. PMID:24970122

  16. IL-8 inhibits cAMP-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Jérémie; McNicholas, Carmel M.; Carles, Michel; Goolaerts, Arnaud; Houseman, Benjamin T.; Dickinson, Dale A.; Iles, Karen E.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Matthay, Michael A.; Pittet, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Patients with acute lung injury (ALI) who retain maximal alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) have better clinical outcomes. Experimental and small clinical studies have shown that β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists enhance AFC via a cAMP-dependent mechanism. However, two multicenter phase 3 clinical trials failed to show that β2AR agonists provide a survival advantage in patients with ALI. We hypothesized that IL-8, an important mediator of ALI, directly antagonizes the alveolar epithelial response to β2AR agonists. Short-circuit current and whole-cell patch-clamping experiments revealed that IL-8 or its rat analog CINC-1 decreases by 50% β2AR agonist-stimulated vectorial Cl− and net fluid transport across rat and human alveolar epithelial type II cells via a reduction in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator activity and biosynthesis. This reduction was mediated by heterologous β2AR desensitization and down-regulation (50%) via the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2)/PI3K signaling pathway. Inhibition of CINC-1 restored β2AR agonist-stimulated AFC in an experimental model of ALI in rats. Finally, consistent with the experimental results, high pulmonary edema fluid levels of IL-8 (>4000 pg/ml) were associated with impaired AFC in patients with ALI. These results demonstrate a novel role for IL-8 in inhibiting β2AR agonist-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanisms.—Roux, J., McNicholas, C. M., Carles, M., Goolaerts, A., Houseman, B. T., Dickinson, D. A., Iles, K. E., Ware, L. B., Matthay, M. A., Pittet, J.-F. IL-8 inhibits cAMP-stimulated alveolar epithelial fluid transport via a GRK2/PI3K-dependent mechanism. PMID:23221335

  17. Selective inhibition by dexamethasone of induction of NO synthase, but not of induction of L-arginine transport, in activated murine macrophage J774 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Baydoun, A. R.; Bogle, R. G.; Pearson, J. D.; Mann, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    1. Effects of dexamethasone on induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthase and L-arginine transport by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were examined in a murine cultured macrophage cell line J774. Metabolism of L-arginine to L-citrulline and subsequent changes in intracellular amino acids pools were correlated with changes in nitrite production. 2. Despite a high intracellular concentration of arginine in activated J774 cells, LPS (1 microgram ml-1, 8 h) induced a 2.4 fold increase in arginine transport. Treatment of cells with cycloheximide (1 microgram ml-1) inhibited the time-dependent (1-8 h) induction of NO synthase and arginine transport mediated by LPS. 3. Induction of NO synthase by LPS (1 microgram ml-1, 24 h) alone was accompanied by a marked increase in arginine utilisation leading to decreased intracellular arginine levels and elevated intracellular and extracellular L-citrulline levels. These changes were further enhanced in the presence of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma, 100 units ml-1, 24 h). 4. Dexamethasone (1 microM) abolished the increases in both nitrite and citrulline production induced by LPS alone but only partially reversed the combined effects of LPS and IFN-gamma. In contrast, treatment of cells with dexamethasone (10 microM) had no effect on the LPS-mediated induction of arginine transport or the decrease in intracellular arginine concentration. 5. We conclude that induction of arginine transporter activity in LPS-stimulated J774 cells involves de novo synthesis of carrier proteins, which increases transport of exogenous arginine during enhanced NO production.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7508326

  18. Anacetrapib and dalcetrapib differentially alters HDL metabolism and macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport at similar levels of CETP inhibition in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Briand, François; Thieblemont, Quentin; Muzotte, Elodie; Burr, Noémie; Urbain, Isabelle; Sulpice, Thierry; Johns, Douglas G

    2014-10-05

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors dalcetrapib and anacetrapib differentially alter LDL- and HDL-cholesterol levels, which might be related to the potency of each drug to inhibit CETP activity. We evaluated the effects of both drugs at similar levels of CETP inhibition on macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in hamsters. In normolipidemic hamsters, both anacetrapib 30 mg/kg QD and dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID inhibited CETP activity by ~60%. After injection of 3H-cholesteryl oleate labeled HDL, anacetrapib and dalcetrapib reduced HDL-cholesteryl esters fractional catabolic rate (FCR) by 30% and 26% (both P<0.001 vs. vehicle) respectively, but only dalcetrapib increased HDL-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion by 30% (P<0.05 vs. vehicle). After 3H-cholesterol labeled macrophage intraperitoneal injection, anacetrapib stimulated 3H-tracer appearance in HDL, but both drugs did not promote macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion. In dyslipidemic hamsters, both anacetrapib 1 mg/kg QD and dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID inhibited CETP activity by ~65% and reduced HDL-cholesteryl ester FCR by 36% (both P<0.001 vs. vehicle), but only anacetrapib increased HDL-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion significantly by 39%. After 3H-cholesterol labeled macrophage injection, only anacetrapib 1 mg/kg QD stimulated macrophage-derived 3H-tracer appearance in HDL. These effects remained weaker than those observed with anacetrapib 60 mg/kg QD, which induced a maximal inhibition of CETP and stimulation of macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion. In contrast, dalcetrapib 200 mg/kg BID reduced macrophage-derived 3H-tracer fecal excretion by 23% (P<0.05 vs. vehicle). In conclusion, anacetrapib and dalcetrapib differentially alter HDL metabolism and RCT in hamsters. A stronger inhibition of CETP may be required to promote macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport in dyslipidemic hamsters.

  19. Lack of Zn inhibition of Cd accumulation by rice (Oryza sativa L.) supports non-Zn transporter uptake of Cd

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) grown on Cd contaminated soils has been linked to health problems in subsistence rice farmers in Japan and China. For other crops, normal geogenic Zn inhibits the increased uptake of Cd on contaminated soils. A study was conducted using a multi-chelator buffered nutrient sol...

  20. Effects of stachyose on absorption and transportation of tea catechins in mice: possible role of Phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters inhibition by stachyose

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenfeng; Lu, Yalong; Huang, Di; Han, Xiao; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Nutritional and absorption-promoting properties of stachyose combined with tea catechins (TC) have been revealed. However, the mechanism involved in non-digestible oligosaccharides-mediated enhancement of flavonoid absorption has largely remained elusive. Methods This study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanism of stachyose in enhancing absorption and transportation of TC in mice. Mice were orally pre-treated with stachyose (50, 250, and 500 mg/kg·bw) for 0–8 weeks, and 1 h before sacrifice, mice were treated with TC (250 mg/kg·bw). Results Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that serum concentrations of epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate were dose- and time-dependently elevated with stachyose pre-treatment in mice. Furthermore, pre-treatment with stachyose in mice reduced intestinal sulfotransferase and uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase levels by 3.3–43.2% and 23.9–30.4%, relative to control mice, respectively. Moreover, intestinal P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 contents were decreased in mice by pre-administration of stachyose in dose- and time-dependent manner. Conclusions This is the first time to demonstrate that suppression of Phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters of TC in the intestine can play a major role in increasing absorption of TC by stachyose feeding. PMID:27782875

  1. Exclusion of mRNPs and ribosomal particles from a thin zone beneath the nuclear envelope revealed upon inhibition of transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kylberg, Karin; Bjoerk, Petra; Fomproix, Nathalie; Ivarsson, Birgitta; Wieslander, Lars; Daneholt, Bertil

    2010-04-01

    We have studied the nucleocytoplasmic transport of a specific messenger RNP (mRNP) particle, named Balbiani ring (BR) granule, and ribosomal RNP (rRNP) particles in the salivary glands of the dipteran Chironomus tentans. The passage of the RNPs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) was inhibited with the nucleoporin-binding wheat germ agglutinin, and the effects were examined by electron microscopy. BR mRNPs bound to the nuclear basket increased in number, while BR mRNPs translocating through the central channel decreased, suggesting that the initiation of translocation proper had been inhibited. The rRNPs accumulated heavily in nucleoplasm, while no or very few rRNPs were recorded within nuclear baskets. Thus, the transport of rRNPs had been blocked prior to the entry into the baskets. Remarkably, the rRNPs had been excluded both from baskets and the space in between the baskets. We propose that normally basket fibrils move freely and repel RNPs from the exclusion zone unless the particles have affinity for and bind to nucleoporins within the baskets.

  2. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein enhances transport of imipramine across the blood–brain barrier: microdialysis studies in conscious freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, FE; Clarke, G; Fitzgerald, P; Dinan, TG; Griffin, BT; Cryan, JF

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent studies indicate that efflux of antidepressants by the multidrug resistance transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood–brain barrier (BBB) may contribute to treatment-resistant depression (TRD) by limiting intracerebral antidepressant concentrations. In addition, clinical experience shows that adjunctive treatment with the P-gp inhibitor verapamil may improve the clinical outcome in TRD. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effect of P-gp inhibition on the transport of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and its active metabolite desipramine across the BBB. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Intracerebral microdialysis in rats was used to monitor brain levels of imipramine and desipramine following i.v. imipramine administration, with or without pretreatment with one of the P-gp inhibitors verapamil or cyclosporin A (CsA). Plasma drug levels were also determined at regular intervals. KEY RESULTS Pretreatment with either verapamil or CsA resulted in significant increases in imipramine concentrations in the microdialysis samples, without altering imipramine plasma pharmacokinetics. Furthermore, pretreatment with verapamil, but not CsA, led to a significant elevation in plasma and brain levels of desipramine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present study demonstrated that P-gp inhibition enhanced the intracerebral concentration of imipramine, thus supporting the hypothesis that P-gp activity restricts brain levels of certain antidepressants, including imipramine. These findings may help to explain reports of a beneficial response to adjunctive therapy with verapamil in TRD. PMID:22250926

  3. Exclusion of mRNPs and ribosomal particles from a thin zone beneath the nuclear envelope revealed upon inhibition of transport.

    PubMed

    Kylberg, Karin; Björk, Petra; Fomproix, Nathalie; Ivarsson, Birgitta; Wieslander, Lars; Daneholt, Bertil

    2010-04-01

    We have studied the nucleocytoplasmic transport of a specific messenger RNP (mRNP) particle, named Balbiani ring (BR) granule, and ribosomal RNP (rRNP) particles in the salivary glands of the dipteran Chironomus tentans. The passage of the RNPs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) was inhibited with the nucleoporin-binding wheat germ agglutinin, and the effects were examined by electron microscopy. BR mRNPs bound to the nuclear basket increased in number, while BR mRNPs translocating through the central channel decreased, suggesting that the initiation of translocation proper had been inhibited. The rRNPs accumulated heavily in nucleoplasm, while no or very few rRNPs were recorded within nuclear baskets. Thus, the transport of rRNPs had been blocked prior to the entry into the baskets. Remarkably, the rRNPs had been excluded both from baskets and the space in between the baskets. We propose that normally basket fibrils move freely and repel RNPs from the exclusion zone unless the particles have affinity for and bind to nucleoporins within the baskets.

  4. Ammonia inhibits cAMP-regulated intestinal Cl- transport. Asymmetric effects of apical and basolateral exposure and implications for epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, M; Smith, J A; Resnick, A; Awtrey, C S; Hrnjez, B J; Matthews, J B

    1995-01-01

    The colon, unlike most organs, is normally exposed to high concentrations of ammonia, a weak base which exerts profound and diverse biological effects on mammalian cells. The impact of ammonia on intestinal cell function is largely unknown despite its concentration of 4-70 mM in the colonic lumen. The human intestinal epithelial cell line T84 was used to model electrogenic Cl- secretion, the transport event which hydrates mucosal surfaces and accounts for secretory diarrhea. Transepithelial transport and isotopic flux analysis indicated that physiologically-relevant concentrations of ammonia (as NH4Cl) markedly inhibit cyclic nucleotide-regulated Cl- secretion but not the response to the Ca2+ agonist carbachol. Inhibition by ammonia was 25-fold more potent with basolateral compared to apical exposure. Ion substitution indicated that the effect of NH4Cl was not due to altered cation composition or membrane potential. The site of action of ammonia is distal to cAMP generation and is not due simply to cytoplasmic alkalization. The results support a novel role for ammonia as an inhibitory modulator of intestinal epithelial Cl- secretion. Secretory responsiveness may be dampened in pathological conditions associated with increased mucosal permeability due to enhanced access of lumenal ammonia to the basolateral epithelial compartment. Images PMID:7593599

  5. Arsenic and Mercury Containing Traditional Chinese Medicine (Realgar and Cinnabar) Strongly Inhibit Organic Anion Transporters, Oat1 and Oat3, In Vivo in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Hao; Zhang, Na; Qi, Jin-Feng; Sun, Chen; Wang, Yong-Hui; Lin, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals, including mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As), accumulate preferentially in kidneys and always cause acute renal failure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these samples affect organic anion transporters, Oat1 and Oat3, in vivo in mice kidney. Mice (n = 10) were orally treated with investigational samples. After last administration, all mice were i.v. p-aminohippuric acid (PAH), and the blood and kidneys samples were collected. The concentrations of PAH were quantified by spectrophotometry. mRNA expressions of Oat1 and Oat3 were assayed by real-time PCR. In comparison with corresponding control, major pharmacokinetic parameters of PAH in sera were significantly changed by investigational samples (p < 0.05), PAH accumulations in the kidney tissues were significantly higher (p < 0.05), PAH uptake by renal slices was greatly reduced, Oat1 and Oat3 mRNA expression were significantly inhibited in investigational sample groups. Arsenic and mercury containing traditional Chinese medicine (Realgar and Cinnabar) probably induce kidney damage through inhibiting several members of the organic anion transporters (such as OAT1 and OAT3).

  6. Zinc transporter 7 deficiency affects lipid synthesis in adipocytes by inhibiting insulin-dependent Akt activity and glucose uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mice deficient for zinc transporter 7 (Znt7) are mildly zinc deficient, accompanied with low body weight gain and body fat accumulation. To investigate the underlying mechanism of Znt7 deficiency in body adiposity, we investigated fatty acid composition and insulin sensitivity in visceral (epididyma...

  7. Phloem flow and sugar transport in Ricinus communis L. is inhibited under anoxic conditions of shoot or roots.

    PubMed

    Peuke, Andreas D; Gessler, Arthur; Trumbore, Susan; Windt, Carel W; Homan, Natalia; Gerkema, Edo; VAN As, Henk

    2015-03-01

    Anoxic conditions should hamper the transport of sugar in the phloem, as this is an active process. The canopy is a carbohydrate source and the roots are carbohydrate sinks. By fumigating the shoot with N2 or flooding the rhizosphere, anoxic conditions in the source or sink, respectively, were induced. Volume flow, velocity, conducting area and stationary water of the phloem were assessed by non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) flowmetry. Carbohydrates and δ(13) C in leaves, roots and phloem saps were determined. Following flooding, volume flow and conducting area of the phloem declined and sugar concentrations in leaves and in phloem saps slightly increased. Oligosaccharides appeared in phloem saps and after 3 d, carbon transport was reduced to 77%. Additionally, the xylem flow declined and showed finally no daily rhythm. Anoxia of the shoot resulted within minutes in a reduction of volume flow, conductive area and sucrose in the phloem sap decreased. Sugar transport dropped to below 40% by the end of the N2 treatment. However, volume flow and phloem sap sugar tended to recover during the N2 treatment. Both anoxia treatments hampered sugar transport. The flow velocity remained about constant, although phloem sap sugar concentration changed during treatments. Apparently, stored starch was remobilized under anoxia.

  8. Impact of p-glycoprotein inhibition and lipopolysaccharide administration on blood-brain barrier transport of colistin in mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L; Nicolazzo, Joseph A

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factors limiting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport of colistin in healthy mice and to assess the impact of systemic inflammation on the transport of this antibiotic across the BBB. Colistin sulfate (40 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously to Swiss outbred mice as single and multiple doses to determine any relationship between brain uptake and plasma concentrations of colistin. To assess the effect of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) on BBB transport, colistin sulfate (5 mg/kg) was concomitantly administered intravenously with PSC833 or GF120918 (10 mg/kg). Systemic inflammation was induced by three intraperitoneal injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 3 mg/kg), and BBB transport of colistin was subsequently measured following subcutaneous administration and by an in situ brain perfusion. The brain uptake of colistin was low following single and multiple subcutaneous doses, with brain-to-plasma concentration ratios ranging between 0.021 and 0.037, and this was not significantly enhanced by coadministration of GF120918 or PSC833 (P > 0.05). LPS significantly increased the brain uptake of subcutaneously administered colistin with area under the brain concentration time curve (AUC(brain)) values of 11.7 ± 2.7 μg·h/g and 4.0 ± 0.3 μg·h/g for LPS- and saline-treated mice, respectively (mean ± standard deviation). Similarly, in situ perfusion of colistin led to higher antibiotic brain concentrations in LPS-treated animals than in saline-treated animals, with colistin brain-to-perfusate concentration ratios of 0.019 ± 0.001 and 0.014 ± 0.001, respectively. This study demonstrates that the BBB transport of colistin is negligible in healthy mice; however, brain concentrations of colistin can be significantly enhanced during systemic inflammation, as might be observed in infected patients.

  9. Hemodynamic and neurohumoral effects of various grades of selective adenosine transport inhibition in humans. Implications for its future role in cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Rongen, G A; Smits, P; Ver Donck, K; Willemsen, J J; De Abreu, R A; Van Belle, H; Thien, T

    1995-02-01

    In 12 healthy male volunteers (27-53 yr), a placebo-controlled randomized double blind cross-over trial was performed to study the effect of the intravenous injection of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 mg draflazine (a selective nucleoside transport inhibitor) on hemodynamic and neurohumoral parameters and ex vivo nucleoside transport inhibition. We hypothesized that an intravenous draflazine dosage without effect on hemodynamic and neurohumoral parameters would still be able to augment the forearm vasodilator response to intraarterially infused adenosine. Heart rate (electrocardiography), systolic blood pressure (Dinamap 1846 SX; Critikon, Portanje Electronica BV, Utrecht, The Netherlands) plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine increased dose-dependently and could almost totally be abolished by caffeine pretreatment indicating the involvement of adenosine receptors. Draflazine did not affect forearm blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography). Intravenous injection of 0.5 mg draflazine did not affect any of the measured hemodynamic parameters but still induced a significant ex vivo nucleoside-transport inhibition of 31.5 +/- 4.1% (P < 0.05 vs placebo). In a subgroup of 10 subjects the brachial artery was cannulated to infuse adenosine (0.15, 0.5, 1.5, 5, 15, and 50 micrograms/100 ml forearm per min) before and after intravenous injection of 0.5 mg draflazine. Forearm blood flow amounted 1.9 +/- 0.3 ml/100 ml forearm per min for placebo and 1.8 +/- 0.2, 2.0 +/- 0.3, 3.8 +/- 0.9, 6.3 +/- 1.2, 11.3 +/- 2.2, and 19.3 +/- 3.9 ml/100 ml forearm per min for the six incremental adenosine dosages, respectively. After the intravenous draflazine infusion, these values were 1.6 +/- 0.2 ml/100 ml forearm per min for placebo and 2.1 +/- 0.3, 3.3 +/- 0.6, 5.8 +/- 1.1, 6.9 +/- 1.4, 14.4 +/- 2.9, and 23.5 +/- 4.0 ml/100 ml forearm per min, respectively (Friedman ANOVA: P < 0.05 before vs after draflazine infusion). In conclusion, a 30-50% inhibition of adenosine transport significantly

  10. Dynamic Adaption of Metabolic Pathways during Germination and Growth of Lily Pollen Tubes after Inhibition of the Electron Transport Chain1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Obermeyer, Gerhard; Fragner, Lena; Lang, Veronika; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of the metabolome and the transcriptome of pollen of lily (Lilium longiflorum) gave a comprehensive overview of metabolic pathways active during pollen germination and tube growth. More than 100 different metabolites were determined simultaneously by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and expressed genes of selected metabolic pathways were identified by next-generation sequencing of lily pollen transcripts. The time-dependent changes in metabolite abundances, as well as the changes after inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, revealed a fast and dynamic adaption of the metabolic pathways in the range of minutes. The metabolic state prior to pollen germination differed clearly from the metabolic state during pollen tube growth, as indicated by principal component analysis of all detected metabolites and by detailed observation of individual metabolites. For instance, the amount of sucrose increased during the first 60 minutes of pollen culture but decreased during tube growth, while glucose and fructose showed the opposite behavior. Glycolysis, tricarbonic acid cycle, glyoxylate cycle, starch, and fatty acid degradation were activated, providing energy during pollen germination and tube growth. Inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain by antimycin A resulted in an immediate production of ethanol and a fast rearrangement of metabolic pathways, which correlated with changes in the amounts of the majority of identified metabolites, e.g. a rapid increase in γ-aminobutyric acid indicated the activation of a γ-aminobutyric acid shunt in the tricarbonic acid cycle, while ethanol fermentation compensated the reduced ATP production after inhibition of the oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:23660836

  11. Social Subordination and Polymorphisms in the Gene Encoding the Serotonin Transporter Enhance Estradiol Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Female Rhesus Monkeys1

    PubMed Central

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Berga, Sarah L.; Kaplan, Jay R.; Wilson, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Psychosocial factors, particularly social stress, may compromise reproduction. However, some individuals may be more susceptible to socially induced infertility. The present study used group-housed, adult, ovariectomized rhesus monkeys to test the hypothesis that exposure to psychosocial stress, imposed by social subordination, would enhance estradiol (E2)-negative feedback inhibition of LH. Because polymorphisms in the gene encoding the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) may contribute to individual differences in response to adverse environments, we determined whether subordinate females with the short-promoter-length allele (s-variant) would show greater suppression of LH. Subordinate females, particularly those with the s-variant SLC6A4 genotype, received significantly higher rates of noncontact aggression from more dominant cage mates and had consistently lower body weights. Serum LH was not influenced by social status in the absence of E2. In contrast, subordinate females were hypersensitive to E2-negative feedback inhibition of LH. Furthermore, serum LH in subordinate females with s-variant SLC6A4 genotype was maximally suppressed by Day 4 of treatment, whereas nadir concentrations were not reached until later in treatment in other females. Finally, pharmacological elevation of serum cortisol potentiated E2-negative feedback inhibition in all females. The current data suggest that infertility induced by psychosocial stressors may be mediated by hypersensitivity to E2-negative feedback and that polymorphisms in the SLC6A4 gene may contribute to differences in reproductive compromise in response to chronic stress. PMID:19605783

  12. Inhibition of the Serotonin Transporter Is Altered by Metabolites of Selective Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors and Represents a Caution to Acute or Chronic Treatment Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Krout, Danielle; Rodriquez, Meghan; Brose, Stephen A; Golovko, Mikhail Y; Henry, L Keith; Thompson, Brent J

    2016-12-28

    Previous studies of transgenic mice carrying a single isoleucine to methionine substitution (I172M) in the serotonin transporter (SERT) demonstrated a loss of sensitivity to multiple antidepressants (ADs) at SERT. However, the ability of AD metabolites to antagonize SERT was not assessed. Here, we evaluated the selectivity and potency of these metabolites for inhibition of SERT in mouse brain-derived synaptosomes and blood platelets from wild-type (I172 mSERT) and the antidepressant-insensitive mouse M172 mSERT. The metabolites norfluoxetine and desmethylsertraline lost the selectivity demonstrated by the parent compounds for inhibition of wild-type mSERT over M172 mSERT, whereas desvenlafaxine and desmethylcitalopram retained selectivity. Furthermore, we show that the metabolite desmethylcitalopram accumulates in the brain and that the metabolites desmethylcitalopram, norfluoxetine, and desvenlafaxine inhibit serotonin uptake in wild-type mSERT at potencies similar to those of their parent compounds, suggesting that metabolites may play a role in effects observed following AD administration in wild-type and M172 mice.

  13. A heterocyclic compound CE-103 inhibits dopamine reuptake and modulates dopamine transporter and dopamine D1-D3 containing receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sase, Ajinkya; Aher, Yogesh D; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Ganesan, Minu Karthika; Sase, Sunetra; Holy, Marion; Höger, Harald; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Ecker, Gerhard F; Langer, Thierry; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann; Lubec, Gert

    2016-03-01

    A series of compounds have been reported to enhance memory via the DA system and herein a heterocyclic compound was tested for working memory (WM) enhancement. 2-((benzhydrylsulfinyl)methyl)thiazole (CE-103) was synthesized in a six-step synthesis. Binding of CE-103 to the dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters and dopamine reuptake inhibition was tested as well as blood brain permeation and a screen for GPCR targets. 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups: CE-103 treated 1-10 mg/kg body weight, trained (TDI) and yoked (YDI) and vehicle treated, trained (TVI) and yoked (YVI) rats. Daily single intraperitoneal injections for a period of 10 days were administered and rats were tested in a radial arm maze (RAM). Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT) and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits were determined. CE-103 was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 14.73 μM). From day eight the compound was decreasing WM errors in the RAM significantly at both doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. In the trained CE-103-treated group levels of the complex containing the phosphorylated dopamine transporter (pDAT) as well as D1R were decreased while levels of complexes containing D2R and D3R were significantly increased. CE-103 was shown to enhance spatial WM and DA reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3 receptors is proposed as a possible mechanism of action.

  14. Secondary Effects of Glyphosate Action in Phelipanche aegyptiaca: Inhibition of Solute Transport from the Host Plant to the Parasite.

    PubMed

    Shilo, Tal; Rubin, Baruch; Plakhine, Dina; Gal, Shira; Amir, Rachel; Hacham, Yael; Wolf, Shmuel; Eizenberg, Hanan

    2017-01-01

    It is currently held that glyphosate efficiently controls the obligate holoparasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Egyptian broomrape) by inhibiting its endogenous shikimate pathway, thereby causing a deficiency in aromatic amino acids (AAA). While there is no argument regarding the shikimate pathway being the primary site of the herbicide's action, the fact that the parasite receives a constant supply of nutrients, including proteins and amino acids, from the host does not fit with an AAA deficiency. This apparent contradiction implies that glyphosate mechanism of action in P. aegyptiaca is probably more complex and does not end with the inhibition of the AAA biosynthetic pathway alone. A possible explanation would lie in a limitation of the translocation of solutes from the host as a secondary effect. We examined the following hypotheses: (a) glyphosate does not affects P. aegyptiaca during its independent phase and (b) glyphosate has a secondary effect on the ability of P. aegyptiaca to attract nutrients, limiting the translocation to the parasite. By using a glyphosate-resistant host plant expressing the "phloem-mobile" green fluorescent protein (GFP), it was shown that glyphosate interacts specifically with P. aegyptiaca, initiating a deceleration of GFP translocation to the parasite within 24 h of treatment. Additionally, changes in the entire sugars profile (together with that of other metabolites) of P. aegyptiaca were induced by glyphosate. In addition, glyphosate did not impair germination or seedling development of P. aegyptiaca but begun to exert its action only after the parasite has established a connection to the host vascular system and became exposed to the herbicide. Our findings thus indicate that glyphosate does indeed have a secondary effect in P. aegyptiaca, probably as a consequence of its primary target inhibition-via inhibition of the translocation of phloem-mobile solutes to the parasite, as was simulated by the mobile GFP. The observed

  15. Gene expression profile of Xenopus A6 cells cultured under random positioning machine shows downregulation of ion transporter genes and inhibition of dome formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuzawa, Masayuki; Akiduki, Saori; Asashima, Makoto

    Random positioning machine (RPM) devices that generate a simulated microgravity environment of approximately 0 g prevent the formation of dome structures in Xenopus kidney-derived A6 cells. In the present study, the gene expression profile of A6 cells cultured under RPM was determined using the Xenopus 22K scale microarray, and those genes up- or downregulated twofold or more were investigated. We identified 29 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 4 genes) on day 5, 68 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 43 genes) on day 8, 111 genes (up, 69 genes; down, 42 genes) on day 10, and 283 genes (up, 153 genes; down, 130 genes) on day 15 of culture under RPM. These genes were classified according to categories described in the KOG database, such as "extracellular structure", "cytoskeleton", and "transcription". Almost all the genes involved in "inorganic ion transport and metabolism" were downregulated under RPM. Our study further investigated some of these including the epithelial Na + channel (ENaC) and Na +/K +-ATPase transporter genes. A specific inhibitor of Na +/K +-ATPases, ouabain, inhibited dome formation in the A6 cells, even under control culturing conditions of 1 g (the static condition). Together these data suggested that downregulation of sodium ion transporter gene expression plays a significant role in the RPM-dependent prevention of the dome formation in kidney epithelial cells.

  16. The astrocytic transporter SLC7A10 (Asc-1) mediates glycinergic inhibition of spinal cord motor neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ehmsen, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Yong; Wang, Yue; Paladugu, Nikhil; Johnson, Anna E.; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; du Lac, Sascha; Mattson, Mark P.; Höke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    SLC7A10 (Asc-1) is a sodium-independent amino acid transporter known to facilitate transport of a number of amino acids including glycine, L-serine, L-alanine, and L-cysteine, as well as their D-enantiomers. It has been described as a neuronal transporter with a primary role related to modulation of excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission. We find that SLC7A10 is substantially enriched in a subset of astrocytes of the caudal brain and spinal cord in a distribution corresponding with high densities of glycinergic inhibitory synapses. Accordingly, we find that spinal cord glycine levels are significantly reduced in Slc7a10-null mice and spontaneous glycinergic postsynaptic currents in motor neurons show substantially diminished amplitudes, demonstrating an essential role for SLC7A10 in glycinergic inhibitory function in the central nervous system. These observations establish the etiology of sustained myoclonus (sudden involuntary muscle movements) and early postnatal lethality characteristic of Slc7a10-null mice, and implicate SLC7A10 as a candidate gene and auto-antibody target in human hyperekplexia and stiff person syndrome, respectively. PMID:27759100

  17. Secondary Effects of Glyphosate Action in Phelipanche aegyptiaca: Inhibition of Solute Transport from the Host Plant to the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Tal; Rubin, Baruch; Plakhine, Dina; Gal, Shira; Amir, Rachel; Hacham, Yael; Wolf, Shmuel; Eizenberg, Hanan

    2017-01-01

    It is currently held that glyphosate efficiently controls the obligate holoparasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca (Egyptian broomrape) by inhibiting its endogenous shikimate pathway, thereby causing a deficiency in aromatic amino acids (AAA). While there is no argument regarding the shikimate pathway being the primary site of the herbicide's action, the fact that the parasite receives a constant supply of nutrients, including proteins and amino acids, from the host does not fit with an AAA deficiency. This apparent contradiction implies that glyphosate mechanism of action in P. aegyptiaca is probably more complex and does not end with the inhibition of the AAA biosynthetic pathway alone. A possible explanation would lie in a limitation of the translocation of solutes from the host as a secondary effect. We examined the following hypotheses: (a) glyphosate does not affects P. aegyptiaca during its independent phase and (b) glyphosate has a secondary effect on the ability of P. aegyptiaca to attract nutrients, limiting the translocation to the parasite. By using a glyphosate-resistant host plant expressing the “phloem-mobile” green fluorescent protein (GFP), it was shown that glyphosate interacts specifically with P. aegyptiaca, initiating a deceleration of GFP translocation to the parasite within 24 h of treatment. Additionally, changes in the entire sugars profile (together with that of other metabolites) of P. aegyptiaca were induced by glyphosate. In addition, glyphosate did not impair germination or seedling development of P. aegyptiaca but begun to exert its action only after the parasite has established a connection to the host vascular system and became exposed to the herbicide. Our findings thus indicate that glyphosate does indeed have a secondary effect in P. aegyptiaca, probably as a consequence of its primary target inhibition—via inhibition of the translocation of phloem-mobile solutes to the parasite, as was simulated by the mobile GFP. The observed

  18. Perchlorate transport and inhibition of the sodium iodide symporter measured with the yellow fluorescent protein variant YFP-H148Q/I152L

    SciTech Connect

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Bernardo, Julie di; Romeo, Giovanni; Rhoden, Kerry J.

    2010-03-15

    Perchlorate is an environmental contaminant that impairs thyroid function by interacting with the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), the transporter responsible for iodide uptake in the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is well known as a competitive inhibitor of iodide transport by NIS, and recent evidence demonstrates that NIS can also transport perchlorate. In this study, we evaluated the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variant YFP-H148Q/I152L, as a genetically encodable biosensor of intracellular perchlorate concentration monitored by real-time fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence of recombinant YFP-H148Q/I152L was suppressed by perchlorate and iodide with similar affinities of 1.2 mM and 1.6 mM, respectively. Perchlorate suppressed YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 thyroid cells and NIS-expressing COS-7 cells, but had no effect on COS-7 cells lacking NIS. Fluorescence changes in FRTL-5 cells were Na{sup +}-dependent, consistent with the Na{sup +}-dependence of NIS activity. Perchlorate uptake in FRTL-5 cells resulted in 10-fold lower intracellular concentrations than iodide uptake, and was characterized by a higher affinity (K{sub m} 4.6 muM for perchlorate and 34.8 muM for iodide) and lower maximal velocity (V{sub max} 6.8 muM/s for perchlorate and 39.5 muM/s for iodide). Perchlorate also prevented iodide-induced changes in YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 cells, with half-maximal inhibition occurring at 1.1-1.6 muM. In conclusion, YFP-H148Q/I152L detects perchlorate accumulation by thyroid and other NIS-expressing cells, and reveals differences in the kinetics of perchlorate versus iodide transport by NIS.

  19. Ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate inhibit ubiquitin activation through intracellular metal transport and increased oxidative stress in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Kathleen E; Valentine, William M

    2015-04-20

    Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional

  20. Hyperoxia Inhibits Nitric Oxide Treatment Effects in Alveolar Epithelial Cells via Effects on L-Type Amino Acid Transporter-1

    PubMed Central

    Brahmajothi, Mulugu V.; Tinch, Brian T.; Wempe, Michael F.; Endou, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The aims of this study were to determine hyperoxia effects on S-nitrosothiol (SNO) accumulation and L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression/function in alveolar epithelium and to determine whether hyperoxia impairs exogenous nitric oxide (NO) treatment effects in alveolar epithelium through effects on LAT1 expression and/or function. Results: SNO accumulation in vitro and in vivo after NO treatment was dependent on the LAT1 system transport. Hyperoxia (60% or 90%) impaired NO effects on SNO accumulation and soluble guanylyl cyclase activation in proportion to the magnitude of hyperoxia and the duration of exposure, up to 12 h, in type I-like (R3/1) and type II-like (L2) rat and human (A549) alveolar epithelial cells. LAT function, determined by sodium-independent 3H-leucine uptake, was impaired in a parallel manner. Hyperoxia impaired LAT1 expression in alveolar epithelial cells, determined by immunoblots and immunofluorescence, and in newborn rats exposed to 60% O2 for 4 days, determined by immunohistochemistry. Innovation: Despite significant preclinical evidence, inhaled NO has shown disappointing limitations in clinical applications. Our studies suggest an important explanation: oxidative stress, a common feature of diseases in which therapeutic NO would be considered, impairs LAT1 expression and function, blocking a major route for inhaled NO (iNO) action, that is, the uptake of S-nitrosocysteine via LAT1. Conclusions: SNO uptake after NO treatment is dependent on LAT1. Hyperoxia impairs SNO uptake and NO effects during NO exposure and impairs LAT system function and LAT1 expression. Effects on SNO formation and transport must be considered for rational optimization of NO-based therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1823–1836. PMID:25089378

  1. Inhibition of small-intestinal sugar and amino acid transport by the enterotoxin of Shigella dysenteriae I.

    PubMed

    Binder, H J; Whiting, D S

    1977-05-01

    The enterotoxin of Shigella dysenteriae I produces fluid and electrolyte secretion in the rabbit ileum. These present studies were designed to evaluate nonelectrolyte transport in rabbit ileal mucosa exposed to Shigella enterotoxin. Both 10 mM galactose and 5 mM L-alanine absorptions were significantly impaired in enterotoxin-exposed ileal mucosa compared with control mucosa. L-Alanine influx was not imparied in two other secretory processes: that induced by cholera enterotoxin and hyperosmolarity. These studies provide evidence that both surgar and amino acid absorptions are diminished in the small intestine by the enterotoxin of S. dysenteriae I.

  2. Inhibition of small-intestinal sugar and amino acid transport by the enterotoxin of Shigella dysenteriae I.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, H J; Whiting, D S

    1977-01-01

    The enterotoxin of Shigella dysenteriae I produces fluid and electrolyte secretion in the rabbit ileum. These present studies were designed to evaluate nonelectrolyte transport in rabbit ileal mucosa exposed to Shigella enterotoxin. Both 10 mM galactose and 5 mM L-alanine absorptions were significantly impaired in enterotoxin-exposed ileal mucosa compared with control mucosa. L-Alanine influx was not imparied in two other secretory processes: that induced by cholera enterotoxin and hyperosmolarity. These studies provide evidence that both surgar and amino acid absorptions are diminished in the small intestine by the enterotoxin of S. dysenteriae I. PMID:324910

  3. Mitochondrial electron transport is inhibited by disappearance of metallothionein in human bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Miyayama, Takamitsu; Arai, Yuta; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Hirano, Seishiro

    2013-03-08

    Silver (Ag) possesses antibacterial activity and has been used in wound dressings and deodorant powders worldwide. However, the metabolic behavior and biological roles of Ag in mammals have not been well characterized. In the present study, we exposed human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to AgNO3 and investigated uptake and intracellular distribution of Ag, expression of metallothionein (MT), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and changes in mitochondrial respiration. The culture medium concentration of Ag decreased with time and stabilized at 12h. The concentration of both Ag and MT in the soluble cellular fraction increased up to 3h and then decreased, indicating that cytosolic Ag relocated to the insoluble fraction of the cells. The levels of mRNAs for the major human MT isoforms MT-I and MT-II paralleled with the protein levels of Ag-MT. The intensity of fluorescence derived from ROS was elevated in the mitochondrial region at 24h. Ag decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption in a dose-dependent manner and the activity of mitochondrial complex I-IV enzymes was significantly inhibited following exposure to Ag. In a separate experiment, we found that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at concentrations as low as 0.001% (equivalent to the concentration of H2O2 in Ag-exposed cells) removed Ag from MT. These results suggest MT was decomposed by cytosolic H2O2, and then Ag released from MT relocated to insoluble cellular fractions and inhibited electron chain transfer of mitochondrial complexes, which eventually led to cell damage.

  4. Inhibition of the Human ABC Efflux Transporters P-gp and BCRP by the BDE-47 Hydroxylated Metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47: Considerations for Human Exposure.

    PubMed

    Marchitti, Satori A; Mazur, Christopher S; Dillingham, Caleb M; Rawat, Swati; Sharma, Anshika; Zastre, Jason; Kenneke, John F

    2017-01-01

    High body burdens of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in infants and young children have led to increased concern over their potential impact on human development. PBDE exposure can alter the expression of genes involved in thyroid homeostasis, including those of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which mediate cellular xenobiotic efflux. However, little information exists on how PBDEs interact with ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the interactions of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and its hydroxylated metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 with P-gp and BCRP, using human MDR1- and BCRP-expressing membrane vesicles and stably transfected NIH-3T3-MDR1 and MDCK-BCRP cells. In P-gp membranes, BDE-47 did not affect P-gp activity; however, 6-OH-BDE-47 inhibited P-gp activity at low µM concentrations (IC50 = 11.7 µM). In BCRP membranes, BDE-47 inhibited BCRP activity; however, 6-OH-BDE-47 was a stronger inhibitor [IC50 = 45.9 µM (BDE-47) vs. IC50 = 9.4 µM (6-OH-BDE-47)]. Intracellular concentrations of known P-gp and BCRP substrates [((3)H)-paclitaxel and ((3)H)-prazosin, respectively] were significantly higher (indicating less efflux) in NIH-3T3-MDR1 and MDCK-BCRP cells in the presence of 6-OH-BDE-47, but not BDE-47. Collectively, our results indicate that the BDE-47 metabolite 6-OH-BDE-47 is an inhibitor of both P-gp and BCRP efflux activity. These findings suggest that some effects previously attributed to BDE-47 in biological systems may actually be due to 6-OH-BDE-47. Considerations for human exposure are discussed.

  5. Reversible inhibition of the glycine transporter GlyT2 circumvents acute toxicity while preserving efficacy in the treatment of pain

    PubMed Central

    Mingorance-Le Meur, A; Ghisdal, P; Mullier, B; De Ron, P; Downey, P; Van Der Perren, C; Declercq, V; Cornelis, S; Famelart, M; Van Asperen, J; Jnoff, E; Courade, J P

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Available medications for chronic pain provide only partial relief and often cause unacceptable side effects. There is therefore a need for novel molecular targets to develop new therapeutics with improved efficacy and tolerability. Despite encouraging efficacy data in rodents with inhibitors of the neuronal glycine transporter-2 (GlyT2), there are also some reports of toxicity and their development was discontinued. Experimental Approach In order to clarify the possibility of targeting GlyT2 for the treatment of pain, we have used an integrated approach comprising in vitro pharmacology, selectivity, bioavailability, in vivo efficacy and safety assessment to analyse the properties and efficacy of ALX-1393 and Org-25543, the two published GlyT2 inhibitors from which in vivo data are available. Key Results We report that these compounds have a different set of undesirable properties that limit their usefulness as pharmacological tools. Importantly, we discover that inhibitors of GlyT2 can exert an apparent reversible or irreversible inhibition of the transporter and describe a new class of reversible GlyT2 inhibitors that preserves efficacy while avoiding acute toxicity. Conclusions and Implications Our pharmacological comparison of two closely related GlyT2 inhibitors with different modes of inhibition provides important insights into their safety and efficacy profiles, uncovering that in the presence of a GlyT2 mechanism-based toxicity, reversible inhibitors might allow a tolerable balance between efficacy and toxicity. These findings shed light into the drawbacks associated with the early GlyT2 inhibitors and describe a new mechanism that might serve as the starting point for new drug development. PMID:23962079

  6. Blockade of dendritic cell development by bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate through a transporter (Slc5a8)-dependent inhibition of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nagendra; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D; Martin, Pamela M; Lambert, Nevin A; Boettger, Thomas; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2010-09-03

    Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria, yet there is no undue inflammatory response by the host against these bacteria under normal conditions. The bacterial fermentation products acetate, propionate, and butyrate are believed, at least in part, to be responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells play an essential role in presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes and initiation of adaptive immune responses. Here we report that butyrate and propionate block the generation of dendritic cells from bone marrow stem cells, without affecting the generation of granulocytes. This effect is dependent on the Na(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporter Slc5a8, which transports butyrate and propionate into cells, and on the ability of these two bacterial metabolites to inhibit histone deacetylases. Acetate, which is also a substrate for Slc5a8 but not an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, does not affect dendritic cell development, indicating the essential role of histone deacetylase inhibition in the process. The blockade of dendritic cell development by butyrate and propionate is associated with decreased expression of the transcription factors PU.1 and RelB. Butyrate also elicits its biologic effects through its ability to activate the G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr109a, but this mechanism is not involved in butyrate-induced blockade of dendritic cell development. The participation of Slc5a8 and the non-involvement of Gpr109a in butyrate effects have been substantiated using bone marrow cells obtained from Slc5a8(-/-) and Gpr109a(-/-) mice. These findings uncover an important mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory functions of the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate.

  7. Blockade of Dendritic Cell Development by Bacterial Fermentation Products Butyrate and Propionate through a Transporter (Slc5a8)-dependent Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Prasad, Puttur D.; Martin, Pamela M.; Lambert, Nevin A.; Boettger, Thomas; Offermanns, Stefan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian colon harbors trillions of bacteria, yet there is no undue inflammatory response by the host against these bacteria under normal conditions. The bacterial fermentation products acetate, propionate, and butyrate are believed, at least in part, to be responsible for these immunosuppressive effects. Dendritic cells play an essential role in presentation of antigens to T lymphocytes and initiation of adaptive immune responses. Here we report that butyrate and propionate block the generation of dendritic cells from bone marrow stem cells, without affecting the generation of granulocytes. This effect is dependent on the Na+-coupled monocarboxylate transporter Slc5a8, which transports butyrate and propionate into cells, and on the ability of these two bacterial metabolites to inhibit histone deacetylases. Acetate, which is also a substrate for Slc5a8 but not an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, does not affect dendritic cell development, indicating the essential role of histone deacetylase inhibition in the process. The blockade of dendritic cell development by butyrate and propionate is associated with decreased expression of the transcription factors PU.1 and RelB. Butyrate also elicits its biologic effects through its ability to activate the G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr109a, but this mechanism is not involved in butyrate-induced blockade of dendritic cell development. The participation of Slc5a8 and the non-involvement of Gpr109a in butyrate effects have been substantiated using bone marrow cells obtained from Slc5a8−/− and Gpr109a−/− mice. These findings uncover an important mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory functions of the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate. PMID:20601425

  8. Inhibition of the expression of aquaporin‑1 by RNA interference in pulmonary epithelial cells and its effects on water transport.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuyue; Fu, Jianhua; Xue, Xindong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of aquaporin‑1 (AQP1) on fluid transportation in pulmonary epithelial cells, and the role of AQP1 in alveolar fluid clearance were investigated to provide an experimental foundation to elucidate the pathogenesis of hyperoxic lung edema. An siRNA transfection technique was used to silence AQP1 in the A549 cell line. The transfected cells were randomized into a hyperoxia exposure and an air control group, with a negative control group set for each group. Cell volume was determined using flow cytometry, and Pf values were used to determine osmotic water permeability. Cell volume was found to be reduced in the AQP1‑silenced A549 cells, compared with the negative control group 72 h following air exposure. In addition, cell volume was reduced in the AQP1‑silenced A549 cells, compared with the negative control group 48 and 72 h following hyperoxia exposure. The osmotic water permeability of the AQP1‑silenced cells was reduced in the air control and hyperoxia exposure groups, compared with the negative control group 48 and 72 h following exposure. The volume and cell membrane osmotic water permeability of the A549 cells were reduced, compared with those in the control group following AQP1‑silencing, which indicated that the downregulation of AQP1 impedes extracellular to intracellular fluid transportation. Therefore, the disturbance in alveolar fluid clearance resulting from the downregulation of AQP1 following hyperoxia exposure may be one of the key mechanisms responsible for hyperoxic lung edema.

  9. Application of a nonradioactive assay for high throughput screening for inhibition of thyroid hormone uptake via the transmembrane transporter MCT8.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongyan; Wade, Michael G

    2017-04-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) play important roles in almost all physiological processes. High-throughput screening (HTS) assays are needed to screen the vast numbers of chemicals for their potential to disrupt TH signalling. The current work has confirmed the ability of a rapid assay to identify substances inhibiting TH uptake through monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 8. Perturbation of MCT8 function results in significant developmental impairments, suggesting substances inhibiting MCT8 may be important developmental toxicants. We examined the accuracy and consistency of a recently described method to identify TH inhibitors via MCT8, using MDCK cells overexpressing human MCT8 gene. We confirmed the method detected T3 uptake in a concentration/time-dependent manner, and this effect was blocked by substances previous reported to block TH uptake via MCT8. Assay performance was assessed extensively and the system was found to have high signal dynamic range and Z' factor. The assay was also validated with a diverse set of training chemicals. This assay was then used to screen chemicals suspected to disrupt TH signalling. Other than bisphenol A (BPA), all substances tested were negative. Our results suggest that this assay could be part of a battery of screening assays to predict the potential thyroid disrupting activity of chemicals.

  10. High-temperature inhibition of biosynthesis and transportation of anthocyanins results in the poor red coloration in red-fleshed Actinidia chinensis.

    PubMed

    Man, Yu-Ping; Wang, Yan-Chang; Li, Zuo-Zhou; Jiang, Zheng-Wang; Yang, Hong-Li; Gong, Jun-Jie; He, Shi-Song; Wu, Shi-Quan; Yang, Zuo-Quan; Zheng, Jing; Wang, Zhong-Yan

    2015-04-01

    In plants, the role of anthocyanins trafficking in response to high temperature has been rarely studied, and therefore poorly understood. Red-fleshed kiwifruit has stimulated the world kiwifruit industry owing to its appealing color. However, fruit in warmer climates have been found to have poor flesh coloration, and the factors responsible for this response remain elusive. Partial correlation and regression analysis confirmed that accumulative temperatures above 25 °C (T25) was one of the dominant factors inhibiting anthocyanin accumulation in red-fleshed Actinidia chinensis, 'Hongyang'. Expression of structural genes, AcMRP and AcMYB1 in inner pericarp sampled from the two high altitudes (low temperature area), was notably higher than the low altitude (high temperature area) during fruit coloration. AcMYB1 and structural genes coordinate expression supported the MYB-bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix)-WD40 regulatory complex mediated downregulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis induced by high temperatures in kiwifruit. Moreover, cytological observations using the light and transmission electronic microscopy showed that there were a series of anthocyanic vacuolar inclusion (AVI)-like structures involved in their vacuolization process and dissolution of the pigmented bodies inside cells of fruit inner pericarp. Anthocyanin transport was inhibited by high temperature via retardation of vacuolization or reduction in AIV-like structure formation. Our findings strongly suggested that complex multimechanisms influenced the effects of high temperature on red-fleshed kiwifruit coloration.

  11. Dehydroascorbic acid taken up by glucose transporters stimulates estradiol production through inhibition of JNK/c-Jun/AP1 signaling in JAR cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjie; Tang, Chao; Wu, Minglan; Pan, Yibin; Ruan, Hongfeng; Chen, Linling; Yao, Hongyi; Zhu, Haibin; Wu, Ximei

    2014-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the reduced form of vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid, AA) is able to induce the production of both steroid and peptide hormones in human choriocarcinoma cells. Here, we attempted to investigate the role and underlying mechanism of the oxidized form of vitamin C, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), in steroidogenesis in primary human cytotrophoblasts and human choriocarcinoma cells. Messenger RNA and protein levels of steroidogenic enzymes including P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3β-HSD1), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17β-HSD1) and aromatase were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and western blots, respectively. Progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) levels were determined by enzyme immunoassays. Knockdown of c-Jun was achieved by lentivirus-mediated shRNA, and signaling pathways implicated in DHA-induced steroidogenesis were examined by western blots and dual-luciferase assays. DHA dose-dependently induced the expression of steroidogenic enzymes including 3β-HSD1, 17β-HSD1 and aromatase at both mRNA and protein levels, and subsequently increased the production of E2 but not P4. These effects were synergized by diethylmaleate, a glutathione-depleting compound, and α-tocopherol, a reducing agent, but robustly attenuated by inhibition of DHA transportation by phloretin or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. DHA time-dependently inhibited JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation, and dose-dependently reduced AP1 reporter activity. JNK signaling pathway-specific inhibitor SP600125 and c-Jun shRNA both significantly increased the expression of steroidogenic enzymes and E2 production regardless of the presence or absence of DHA. These findings suggest that DHA is able to induce steroidogenesis through inhibition of JNK/c-Jun/AP1 signaling, and may therefore play indispensable roles in pregnancy maintenance.

  12. Inhibition of isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3 by serine 465 sequence-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Li, Liaoliao; Washington, Jacqueline M; Xu, Xuebing; Sando, Julianne J; Lin, Daowei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-03-25

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) transport glutamate into cells to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain nontoxic extracellular glutamate levels for neurons. We showed previously that the commonly used volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases the transporting activity of EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. This effect requires a protein kinase C (PKC) α-mediated and S465-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that specific peptides can be designed to block this effect. We conjugated a 10-amino acid synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of EAAT3 around the S465 to a peptide that can facilitate permeation of the plasma membrane. This fusion peptide inhibited the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane in C6 cells and hippocampus. It did not affect the basal EAAT3 activity. This peptide also attenuated isoflurane-induced increase of PKCα in the immunoprecipitates produced by an anti-EAAT3 antibody. A scrambled peptide that has the same amino acid composition as the S465 sequence-specific peptide but has a random sequence did not change the effects of isoflurane on EAAT3. The S465 sequence-specific peptide, but not the scrambled peptide, is a good PKCα substrate in in vitro assay. These peptides did not affect cell viability. These results, along with our previous findings, strongly suggest that PKCα interacts with EAAT3 to regulate its functions. The S465 sequence-specific peptide may interrupt this interaction and is an effective inhibitor for the regulation of EAAT3 activity and trafficking by PKCα and isoflurane.

  13. Higher concentrations of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in soil induced rice chlorosis due to inhibited active iron transportation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Fang, Zhanqiang; Cheng, Wen; Yan, Xiaomin; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Zhao, Dongye

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the effects of concentrations 0, 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1000 mg kg(-1) of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) on germination, seedlings growth, physiology and toxicity mechanisms were investigated. The results showed that nZVI had no effect on germination, but inhibited the rice seedlings growth in higher concentrations (>500 mg kg(-1) nZVI). The highest suppression rate of the length of roots and shoots reached 46.9% and 57.5%, respectively. The 1000mg kg(-1) nZVI caused the highest suppression rates for chlorophyll and carotenoids, at 91.6% and 85.2%, respectively. In addition, the activity of antioxidant enzymes was altered by the translocation of nanoparticles and changes in active iron content. Visible symptoms of iron deficiency were observed at higher concentrations, at which the active iron content decreased 61.02% in the shoots, but the active iron content not decreased in roots. Interestingly, the total and available amounts of iron in the soil were not less than those in the control. Therefore, the plants iron deficiency was not caused by (i) deficiency of available iron in the soil and (ii) restraint of the absorption that plant takes in the available iron, while induced by (ⅲ) the transport of active iron from the root to the shoot was blocked. The cortex tissues were seriously damaged by nZVI which was transported from soil to the root, these were proved by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This current study shows that the mechanism of iron deficiency in rice seedling was due to transport of active iron from the root to the shoot blocked, which was caused by the uptake of nZVI.

  14. Role of calcium in phosphoinositide metabolism and inhibition of norepinephrine transport into synaptic vesicles by amphetamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Knepper, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Norepinephrine-(NE) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated phosphoinositide (PIn) metabolism in rat brain slices was studied under varying calcium conditions. Tissue was labelled with /sup 3/H-myo-inositol and /sup 3/H-inositol phosphates (IPn), products of PIn metabolism were measured. In the absence of media calcium the response to NE was decreased while that to A23187 was little affected A23187 can release calcium from intracellular stores. Basal and stimulated accumulation of /sup 3/H-IPn was reversibly antagonized with EGTA by addition of calcium. Using calcium buffers, approximately 10/sup -7/ M free calcium was required to support hydrolysis. Free intracellular calcium is maintained at approximately this level. Thus calcium is required for PIn hydrolysis but appears to play a permissive role, basal levels being sufficient to support metabolism. Conformationally-defined (rigid) and -restricted (semi-rigid) analogs of the most stable conformations of amphetamine, antiperiplanar (exo) and gauche (endo), were utilized to probe the conformational requirements of vesicular NE transport. Analogs tested were 2-aminotetralin (2AT), 3-methyltetrahydroisoquinoline, anti- and syn-9-aminobenzobicyclo(2.2.1)heptene, and endo and exo conformers of 2-aminobenzobicyclo(2.2.1)heptene and 2-aminobenzobicyclo(2.2.2)octene.

  15. Increase in SGLT1-mediated transport explains renal glucose reabsorption during genetic and pharmacological SGLT2 inhibition in euglycemia.

    PubMed

    Rieg, Timo; Masuda, Takahiro; Gerasimova, Maria; Mayoux, Eric; Platt, Kenneth; Powell, David R; Thomson, Scott C; Koepsell, Hermann; Vallon, Volker

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, the sodium-glucose cotransporters SGLT2 and SGLT1 are thought to account for >90 and ∼3% of fractional glucose reabsorption (FGR), respectively. However, euglycemic humans treated with an SGLT2 inhibitor maintain an FGR of 40-50%, mimicking values in Sglt2 knockout mice. Here, we show that oral gavage with a selective SGLT2 inhibitor (SGLT2-I) dose dependently increased urinary glucose excretion (UGE) in wild-type (WT) mice. The dose-response curve was shifted leftward and the maximum response doubled in Sglt1 knockout (Sglt1-/-) mice. Treatment in diet with the SGLT2-I for 3 wk maintained 1.5- to 2-fold higher urine glucose/creatinine ratios in Sglt1-/- vs. WT mice, associated with a temporarily greater reduction in blood glucose in Sglt1-/- vs. WT after 24 h (-33 vs. -11%). Subsequent inulin clearance studies under anesthesia revealed free plasma concentrations of the SGLT2-I (corresponding to early proximal concentration) close to the reported IC50 for SGLT2 in mice, which were associated with FGR of 64 ± 2% in WT and 17 ± 2% in Sglt1-/-. Additional intraperitoneal application of the SGLT2-I (maximum effective dose in metabolic cages) increased free plasma concentrations ∼10-fold and reduced FGR to 44 ± 3% in WT and to -1 ± 3% in Sglt1-/-. The absence of renal glucose reabsorption was confirmed in male and female Sglt1/Sglt2 double knockout mice. In conclusion, SGLT2 and SGLT1 account for renal glucose reabsorption in euglycemia, with 97 and 3% being reabsorbed by SGLT2 and SGLT1, respectively. When SGLT2 is fully inhibited by SGLT2-I, the increase in SGLT1-mediated glucose reabsorption explains why only 50-60% of filtered glucose is excreted.

  16. Specific Inhibition of the Distribution of Lobeglitazone to the Liver by Atorvastatin in Rats: Evidence for a Rat Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B2-Mediated Interaction in Hepatic Transport.

    PubMed

    Yim, Chang-Soon; Jeong, Yoo-Seong; Lee, Song-Yi; Pyeon, Wonji; Ryu, Heon-Min; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Kyeong-Ryoon; Maeng, Han-Joo; Chung, Suk-Jae

    2017-03-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes and human organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 are reported to be involved in the pharmacokinetics of lobeglitazone (LB), a new peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist. Atorvastatin (ATV), a substrate for CYP3A and human OATP1B1, is likely to be coadministered with LB in patients with the metabolic syndrome. We report herein on a study of potential interactions between LB and ATV in rats. When LB was administered intravenously with ATV, the systemic clearance and volume of distribution at steady state for LB remained unchanged (2.67 ± 0.63 ml/min per kg and 289 ± 20 ml/kg, respectively), compared with that of LB without ATV (2.34 ± 0.37 ml/min per kg and 271 ± 20 ml/kg, respectively). Although the tissue-to-plasma partition coefficient (Kp) of LB was not affected by ATV in most major tissues, the liver Kp for LB was decreased by ATV coadministration. Steady-state liver Kp values for three levels of LB were significantly decreased as a result of ATV coadministration. LB uptake was inhibited by ATV in rat OATP1B2-overexpressing Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and in isolated rat hepatocytes in vitro. After incorporating the kinetic parameters for the in vitro studies into a physiologically based pharmacokinetics model, the characteristics of LB distribution to the liver were consistent with the findings of the in vivo study. It thus appears that the distribution of LB to the liver is mediated by the hepatic uptake of transporters such as rat OATP1B2, and carrier-mediated transport is involved in the liver-specific drug-drug interaction between LB and ATV in vivo.

  17. Relationship between glycine transporter 1 inhibition as measured with positron emission tomography and changes in cognitive performances in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Castner, S A; Murthy, N V; Ridler, K; Herdon, H; Roberts, B M; Weinzimmer, D P; Huang, Y; Zheng, M Q; Rabiner, E A; Gunn, R N; Carson, R E; Williams, G V; Laruelle, M

    2014-11-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that schizophrenia is associated with deficits in glutamatergic transmission at the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Glycine is a NMDA receptor co-agonist, and extracellular levels of glycine are regulated in the forebrain by the glycine type-1 transporters (GlyT-1). GlyT-1 inhibitors elevate extracellular glycine and thus potentiate NMDA transmission. This mechanism represents a promising new avenue for the treatment of schizophrenia. Here, the recently introduced positron emission tomography radiotracer [11C]GSK931145 was used to quantify the relationship between occupancy of GlyT-1 by a GlyT-1 inhibitor, Org 25935, and its impact on spatial working memory performances in rhesus monkeys. The effect of Org 25935 on working memory was assessed both in control conditions and during a state of relative NMDA hypofunction induced by ketamine administration, at a dose selected for each animal to reduce task performance by about 50%. Under control conditions, Org 25935 had no effect on working memory at GlyT-1 occupancies lower than 75% and significantly impaired working memory at occupancies higher than 75%. Under ketamine conditions, Org 25935 reversed the deficit in working memory induced by ketamine and did so optimally in the 40-70% GlyT-1 occupancy range. The results confirm the efficacy of this mechanism to correct working memory deficits associated with NMDA hypofunction. These data also suggest the existence of an inverted-U dose-response curve in the potential therapeutic effect of this class of compounds.

  18. Relationship Between Glycine Transporter 1 Inhibition as Measured with Positron Emission Tomography and Changes in Cognitive Performances in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Castner, S A; Murthy, N V; Ridler, K; Herdon, H; Roberts, B M; Weinzimmer, D P; Huang, Y; Zheng, M Q; Rabiner, E A; Gunn, R N; Carson, R E; Williams, G V; Laruelle, M

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that schizophrenia is associated with deficits in glutamatergic transmission at the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Glycine is a NMDA receptor co-agonist, and extracellular levels of glycine are regulated in the forebrain by the glycine type-1 transporters (GlyT-1). GlyT-1 inhibitors elevate extracellular glycine and thus potentiate NMDA transmission. This mechanism represents a promising new avenue for the treatment of schizophrenia. Here, the recently introduced positron emission tomography radiotracer [11C]GSK931145 was used to quantify the relationship between occupancy of GlyT-1 by a GlyT-1 inhibitor, Org 25935, and its impact on spatial working memory performances in rhesus monkeys. The effect of Org 25935 on working memory was assessed both in control conditions and during a state of relative NMDA hypofunction induced by ketamine administration, at a dose selected for each animal to reduce task performance by about 50%. Under control conditions, Org 25935 had no effect on working memory at GlyT-1 occupancies lower than 75% and significantly impaired working memory at occupancies higher than 75%. Under ketamine conditions, Org 25935 reversed the deficit in working memory induced by ketamine and did so optimally in the 40–70% GlyT-1 occupancy range. The results confirm the efficacy of this mechanism to correct working memory deficits associated with NMDA hypofunction. These data also suggest the existence of an inverted-U dose–response curve in the potential therapeutic effect of this class of compounds. PMID:24487737

  19. Inhibiting Glycine Transporter-1 Facilitates Cocaine-Cue Extinction and Attenuates Reacquisition of Cocaine-Seeking Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Nic Dhonnchadha, Bríd Á; Pinard, Emmanuel; Alberati, Daniela; Wettstein, Joseph G.; Spealman, Roger D.; Kantak, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Combining extinction training with cognitive-enhancing pharmacotherapy represents a novel strategy for improving the efficacy of exposure therapy for drug relapse prevention. We investigated if the selective glycine transporter-1 (GlyT-1) inhibitor RO4543338 could facilitate extinction of cocaine-conditioned responses and attenuate reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior. Methods Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.3 mg/kg), which was associated with a 2-sec light cue under a second-order schedule of i.v. drug injection. Rats received vehicle, 30 or 45 mg/kg of RO4543338 prior to three 1-hr extinction-training sessions spaced at weekly intervals. Responses were extinguished by substituting saline for cocaine while maintaining response-contingent cue presentations. Reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior during self-administration sessions began one week after the last extinction session. Control experiments were conducted under conditions that precluded explicit extinction of cocaine-conditioned responses. Results Compared to vehicle, 30 and 45 mg/kg RO4543338 significantly decreased responding early in extinction training and during subsequent reacquisition sessions. The latter effect persisted for at least five sessions. In control studies, reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior was not altered when RO4543338 was administered either prior to weekly self-administration control sessions or prior to weekly control sessions in which cocaine and cues were omitted and the levers retracted. Conclusions As the GlyT-1 inhibitor facilitated cocaine-cue extinction learning and attenuated subsequent reacquisition of cocaine-seeking behavior, this class of compounds may have utility as a pharmacological adjunct to cocaine-cue exposure therapy in addicts. PMID:21992874

  20. Triton WR1339, an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase, decreases vitamin E concentration in some tissues of rats by inhibiting its transport to liver.

    PubMed

    Abe, Chisato; Ikeda, Saiko; Uchida, Tomono; Yamashita, Kanae; Ichikawa, Tomio

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this experiment was to clarify the contribution of the alpha-tocopherol transfer activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) to vitamin E transport to tissues in vivo. We studied the effect of Triton WR1339, which prevents the catabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins by LPL on vitamin E distribution in rats. Vitamin E-deficient rats fed a vitamin E-free diet for 4 wk were injected with Triton WR1339 and administered by oral gavage an emulsion containing 10 mg of alpha-tocopherol, 10 mg of gamma-tocopherol, or 29.5 mg of a tocotrienol mixture with 200 mg of sodium taurocholate, 200 mg of triolein, and 50 mg of albumin. alpha-Tocopherol was detected in the serum and other tissues of the vitamin E-deficient rats, but gamma-tocopherol, alpha- and gamma-tocotrienol were not detected. Triton WR1339 injection elevated (P<0.05) the serum alpha-tocopherol concentration and inhibited (P<0.05) the elevation of alpha-tocopherol concentration in the liver, adrenal gland, and spleen due to the oral administration of alpha-tocopherol. Neither alpha-tocopherol administration nor Triton WR1339 injection affected (P>or=0.05) the alpha-tocopherol concentration in the perirenal adipose tissue, epididymal fat, and soleus muscle despite a high expression of LPL in the adipose tissue and muscle. These data show that alpha-tocopherol transfer activity of LPL in adipose tissue and muscle is not important for alpha-tocopherol transport to the tissue after alpha-tocopherol intake or that the amount transferred is small relative to the tissue concentration. Furthermore, Triton WR1339 injection tended to elevate the serum gamma-tocopherol (P=0.071) and alpha-tocotrienol (P=0.053) concentrations and lowered them (P<0.05) in the liver and adrenal gland of rats administered gamma-tocopherol or alpha-tocotrienol. These data suggest that lipolysis of triacylglycerol-rich chylomicron by LPL is necessary for postprandial vitamin E transport to the liver and subsequent transport to the

  1. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide produces delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-like discriminative and neurochemical effects that are enhanced by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase but not by inhibition of anandamide transport.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Justinova, Zuzana; Wertheim, Carrie E; Yasar, Sevil; Piomelli, Daniele; Vadivel, Subramanian K; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R

    2007-04-01

    Anandamide is an endogenous ligand for brain cannabinoid CB(1) receptors, but its behavioral effects are difficult to measure due to rapid inactivation. Here we used a drug-discrimination procedure to test the hypothesis that anandamide, given i.v. or i.p., would produce discriminative effects like those of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rats when its metabolic inactivation was inhibited. We also used an in vivo microdialysis procedure to investigate the effects of anandamide, given i.v. or i.p., on dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell in rats. When injected i.v., methanandamide (AM-356), a metabolically stable anandamide analog, produced clear dose-related THC-like discriminative effects, but anandamide produced THC-like discriminative effects only at a high 10-mg/kg dose that almost eliminated lever-press responding. Cyclohexyl carbamic acid 3'-carbamoyl-biphenyl-3-yl ester (URB-597), an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for metabolic inactivation of anandamide, produced no THC-like discriminative effects alone but dramatically potentiated discriminative effects of anandamide, with 3 mg/kg anandamide completely substituting for the THC training dose. URB-597 also potentiated the ability of anandamide to increase dopamine levels in the accumbens shell. The THC-like discriminative-stimulus effects of anandamide after URB-597 and methanandamide were blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant, but not the vanilloid VR1 receptor antagonist capsazepine. Surprisingly, the anandamide transport inhibitors N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-eicosa-5,8,11,14-tetraenamide (AM-404) and N-(3-furylmethyl)eicosa-5,8,11,14-tetraenamide (UCM-707) did not potentiate THC-like discriminative effects of anandamide or its dopamine-elevating effects. Thus, anandamide has THC-like discriminative and neurochemical effects that are enhanced after treatment with a FAAH inhibitor but not after treatment with transport inhibitors, suggesting

  2. Regulation of neuronal chloride homeostasis by neuromodulators

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, Vivek; Woodin, Melanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract KCC2 is the central regulator of neuronal Cl− homeostasis, and is critical for enabling strong hyperpolarizing synaptic inhibition in the mature brain. KCC2 hypofunction results in decreased inhibition and increased network hyperexcitability that underlies numerous disease states including epilepsy, neuropathic pain and neuropsychiatric disorders. The current holy grail of KCC2 biology is to identify how we can rescue KCC2 hypofunction in order to restore physiological levels of synaptic inhibition and neuronal network activity. It is becoming increasingly clear that diverse cellular signals regulate KCC2 surface expression and function including neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. In the present review we explore the existing evidence that G‐protein‐coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling can regulate KCC2 activity in numerous regions of the nervous system including the hypothalamus, hippocampus and spinal cord. We present key evidence from the literature suggesting that GPCR signalling is a conserved mechanism for regulating chloride homeostasis. This evidence includes: (1) the activation of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors and metabotropic Zn2+ receptors strengthens GABAergic inhibition in CA3 pyramidal neurons through a regulation of KCC2; (2) activation of the 5‐hydroxytryptamine type 2A serotonin receptors upregulates KCC2 cell surface expression and function, restores endogenous inhibition in motoneurons, and reduces spasticity in rats; and (3) activation of A3A‐type adenosine receptors rescues KCC2 dysfunction and reverses allodynia in a model of neuropathic pain. We propose that GPCR‐signals are novel endogenous Cl− extrusion enhancers that may regulate KCC2 function. PMID:26876607

  3. 1-[N, O-bis-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-N-methyl-L-tyrosyl]-4- phenylpiperazine (KN-62), an inhibitor of calcium-dependent camodulin protein kinase II, inhibits both insulin- and hypoxia-stimulated glucose transport in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Brozinick, J T; Reynolds, T H; Dean, D; Cartee, G; Cushman, S W

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated a role for calmodulin in hypoxia-and insulin-stimulated glucose transport. However, since calmodulin interacts with multiple protein targets, it is unknown which of these targets is involved in the regulation of glucose transport. In the present study, we have used the calcium-dependent calmodulin protein kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor 1-[N, O-bis-(5-isoquinolinesulphonyl) -N-methyl-L-tyrosyl]-4-phenylpiperazine (KN-62) to investigate the possible role of this enzyme in the regulation of glucose transport in isolated rat soleus and epitrochlearis muscles. KN-62 did not affect basal 2-deoxyglucose transport, but it did inhibit both insulin- and hypoxia-stimulated glucose transport activity by 46 and 40% respectively. 1-[N,O-Bis-(1, 5-isoquinolinesulphonyl)-N-methyl-l-tyrosyl]-4-phenylpiperazine (KN-04), a structural analogue of KN-62 that does not inhibit CAMKII, had no effect on hypoxia-or insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Accordingly, KN-62 decreased the stimulated cell-surface GLUT4 labelling by a similar extent as the inhibition of glucose transport (insulin, 49% and hypoxia, 54%). Additional experiments showed that KN-62 also inhibited insulin- and hypoxia-stimulated transport by 37 and 40% respectively in isolated rat epitrochlearis (a fast-twitch muscle), indicating that the effect of KN-62 was not limited to the slow-twitch fibres of the soleus. The inhibitory effect of KN-62 on hypoxia-stimulated glucose transport appears to be specific to CAMKII, since KN-62 did not inhibit hypoxia-stimulated 45Ca efflux from muscles pre-loaded with 45Ca, or hypoxia-stimulated glycogen breakdown. Additionally, KN-62 affected neither insulin-stimulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase nor Akt activity, suggesting that the effects of KN-62 are not due to non-specific effects of this inhibitor on these regions of the insulin-signalling cascade. The results of the present study suggest that CAMKII might have a distinct role in insulin- and hypoxia

  4. Fatty Acid Transport Protein 4 (FATP4) Prevents Light-Induced Degeneration of Cone and Rod Photoreceptors by Inhibiting RPE65 Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songhua; Lee, Jungsoo; Zhou, Yongdong; Gordon, William C.; Hill, James M.; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Jin, Minghao

    2013-01-01

    While Rhodopsin is essential for sensing light for vision, it also mediates light-induced apoptosis of photoreceptors in mouse. RPE65, which catalyzes isomerization of all-trans retinyl fatty acid esters to 11-cis retinol (11cROL) in the visual cycle, controls the rhodopsin regeneration rate and photoreceptor susceptibility to light-induced degeneration. Mutations in RPE65 have been linked to blindness in affected children. Despite such importance, the mechanism that regulates RPE65 function remains unclear. Through unbiased expression screening of a bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cDNA library, we have identified elongation of very long-chain fatty acids-like 1 (ELOVL1) and fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4), which each have very long-chain fatty acid acyl-CoA synthetase (VLCFA-ACS) activity, as negative regulators of RPE65. We found that the VLCFA derivative lignoceroyl (C24:0)-CoA inhibited synthesis of 11cROL, whereas palmitoyl (C16:0)-CoA promoted synthesis of 11cROL. We further found that competition of FATP4 with RPE65 for the substrate of RPE65 was also involved in the mechanisms by which FATP4 inhibits synthesis of 11cROL. FATP4 was predominantly expressed in RPE, and the FATP4-deficient RPE showed significantly higher isomerase activity. Consistent with these results, the regeneration rate of 11-cis retinaldehyde and the recovery rate for rod light sensitivity were faster in FATP4-deficient mice than wild-type mice. Moreover, FATP4-deficient mice displayed increased accumulation of the cytotoxic all-trans retinaldehyde and hyper susceptibility to light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. Our findings demonstrate that ELOVL1, FATP4, and their products comprise the regulatory elements of RPE65 and play important roles in protecting photoreceptors from degeneration induced by light damage. PMID:23407971

  5. Quilamine HQ1-44, an iron chelator vectorized toward tumor cells by the polyamine transport system, inhibits HCT116 tumor growth without adverse effect.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Stéphanie; Corcé, Vincent; Cannie, Isabelle; Ropert, Martine; Lepage, Sylvie; Loréal, Olivier; Deniaud, David; Gaboriau, François

    2015-08-01

    Tumor cell growth requires large iron quantities and the deprivation of this metal induced by synthetic metal chelators is therefore an attractive method for limiting the cancer cell proliferation. The antiproliferative effect of the Quilamine HQ1-44, a new iron chelator vectorized toward tumor cells by a polyamine chain, is related to its high selectivity for the Polyamine Transport System (PTS), allowing its preferential uptake by tumoral cells. The difference in PTS activation between healthy cells and tumor cells enables tumor cells to be targeted, whereas the strong dependence of these cells on iron ensures a secondary targeting. Here, we demonstrated in vitro that HQ1-44 inhibits DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of HCT116 cells by modulating the intracellular metabolism of both iron and polyamines. Moreover, in vivo, in xenografted athymic nude mice, we found that HQ1-44 was as effective as cis-platin in reducing HCT116 tumor growth, without its side effects. Furthermore, as suggested by in vitro data, the depletion in exogenous or endogenous polyamines, known to activate the PTS, dramatically enhanced the antitumor efficiency of HQ1-44. These data support the need for further studies to assess the value of HQ1-44 as an adjuvant treatment in cancer.

  6. Inhibition of Nuclear Transport of NF-ĸB p65 by the Salmonella Type III Secretion System Effector SpvD

    PubMed Central

    Rolhion, Nathalie; Furniss, R. Christopher D.; Grabe, Grzegorz; Ryan, Aindrias; Liu, Mei; Matthews, Sophie A.; Holden, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica replicates in macrophages through the action of effector proteins translocated across the vacuolar membrane by a type III secretion system (T3SS). Here we show that the SPI-2 T3SS effector SpvD suppresses proinflammatory immune responses. SpvD prevented activation of an NF-ĸB-dependent promoter and caused nuclear accumulation of importin-α, which is required for nuclear import of p65. SpvD interacted specifically with the exportin Xpo2, which mediates nuclear-cytoplasmic recycling of importins. We propose that interaction between SpvD and Xpo2 disrupts the normal recycling of importin-α from the nucleus, leading to a defect in nuclear translocation of p65 and inhibition of activation of NF-ĸB regulated promoters. SpvD down-regulated pro-inflammatory responses and contributed to systemic growth of bacteria in mice. This work shows that a bacterial pathogen can manipulate host cell immune responses by interfering with the nuclear transport machinery. PMID:27232334

  7. The anti-TNF-α antibody infliximab inhibits the expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 in a selective hepatic-radiation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F; Wolff, Hendrik A; Malik, Ihtzaz A

    2015-03-02

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1-3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6-12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6-12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo.

  8. Glaucarubinone sensitizes KB cells to paclitaxel by inhibiting ABC transporters via ROS-dependent and p53-mediated activation of apoptotic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Subburayan; Hoti, Sugeerappa Laxmanappa; Nazeer, Yasin; Hegde, Harsha Vasudev

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is considered to be the major contributor to failure of chemotherapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study was aimed to explore the effects and mechanisms of glaucarubinone (GLU), one of the major quassinoids from Simarouba glauca DC, in potentiating cytotoxicity of paclitaxel (PTX), an anticancer drug in KB cells. Our data showed that the administration of GLU pre-treatment significantly enhanced PTX anti-proliferative effect in ABCB1 over-expressing KB cells. The Rh 123 drug efflux studies revealed that there was a significant transport function inhibition by GLU-PTX treatment. Interestingly, it was also found that this enhanced anticancer efficacy of GLU was associated with PTX-induced cell arrest in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, the combined treatment of GLU-PTX had significant decrease in the expression levels of P-gp, MRPs, and BCRP in resistant KB cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, the combination treatments showed significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, chromatin condensation and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in resistant KB cells. The results from DNA fragmentation analysis also demonstrated the GLU induced apoptosis in KB cells and its synergy with PTX. Importantly, GLU and/or PTX triggered apoptosis through the activation of pro-apoptotic proteins such as p53, Bax, and caspase-9. Our findings demonstrated for the first time that GLU causes cell death in human oral cancer cells via the ROS-dependent suppression of MDR transporters and p53-mediated activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Additionally, the present study also focussed on investigation of the protective effect of GLU and combination drugs in human normal blood lymphocytes. Normal blood lymphocytes assay indicated that GLU is able to induce selective toxicity in cancer cells and in silico molecular docking studies support the choice of GLU as ABC inhibitor to enhance PTX efficacy

  9. Inhibition of Intestinal Bile Acid Transporter Slc10a2 Improves Triglyceride Metabolism and Normalizes Elevated Plasma Glucose Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Snaith, Michael; Lindmark, Helena; Lundberg, Johanna; Östlund-Lindqvist, Ann-Margret; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Interruption of the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids increases cholesterol catabolism, thereby stimulating hepatic cholesterol synthesis from acetate. We hypothesized that such treatment should lower the hepatic acetate pool which may alter triglyceride and glucose metabolism. We explored this using mice deficient of the ileal sodium-dependent BA transporter (Slc10a2) and ob/ob mice treated with a specific inhibitor of Slc10a2. Plasma TG levels were reduced in Slc10a2-deficient mice, and when challenged with a sucrose-rich diet, they displayed a reduced response in hepatic TG production as observed from the mRNA levels of several key enzymes in fatty acid synthesis. This effect was paralleled by a diminished induction of mature sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (Srebp1c). Unexpectedly, the SR-diet induced intestinal fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15 mRNA and normalized bile acid synthesis in Slc10a2−/− mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of Slc10a2 in diabetic ob/ob mice reduced serum glucose, insulin and TGs, as well as hepatic mRNA levels of Srebp1c and its target genes. These responses are contrary to those reported following treatment of mice with a bile acid binding resin. Moreover, when key metabolic signal transduction pathways in the liver were investigated, those of Mek1/2 - Erk1/2 and Akt were blunted after treatment of ob/ob mice with the Slc10a2 inhibitor. It is concluded that abrogation of Slc10a2 reduces hepatic Srebp1c activity and serum TGs, and in the diabetic ob/ob model it also reduces glucose and insulin levels. Hence, targeting of Slc10a2 may be a promising strategy to treat hypertriglyceridemia and diabetes. PMID:22662222

  10. Computational modeling analysis of mitochondrial superoxide production under varying substrate conditions and upon inhibition of different segments of the electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Markevich, Nikolai I; Hoek, Jan B

    2015-01-01

    A computational mechanistic model of superoxide (O2•-) formation in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) was developed to facilitate the quantitative analysis of factors controlling mitochondrial O2•- production and assist in the interpretation of experimental studies. The model takes into account all individual electron transfer reactions in Complexes I and III. The model accounts for multiple, often seemingly contradictory observations on the effects of ΔΨ and ΔpH, and for the effects of multiple substrate and inhibitor conditions, including differential effects of Complex III inhibitors antimycin A, myxothiazol and stigmatellin. Simulation results confirm that, in addition to O2•- formation in Complex III and at the flavin site of Complex I, the quinone binding site of Complex I is an additional superoxide generating site that accounts for experimental observations on O2•- production during reverse electron transfer. However, our simulation results predict that, when cytochrome c oxidase is inhibited during oxidation of succinate, ROS production at this site is eliminated and almost all superoxide in Complex I is generated by reduced FMN, even when the redox pressure for reverse electron transfer from succinate is strong. In addition, the model indicates that conflicting literature data on the kinetics of electron transfer in Complex III involving the iron-sulfur protein-cytochrome bL complex can be resolved in favor of a dissociation of the protein only after electron transfer to cytochrome bH. The model predictions can be helpful in understanding factors driving mitochondrial superoxide formation in intact cells and tissues.

  11. Introduction of aromatic ring-containing substituents in cyclic nucleotides is associated with inhibition of toxin uptake by the hepatocyte transporters OATP 1B1 and 1B3.

    PubMed

    Herfindal, Lars; Krakstad, Camilla; Myhren, Lene; Hagland, Hanne; Kopperud, Reidun; Teigen, Knut; Schwede, Frank; Kleppe, Rune; Døskeland, Stein Ove

    2014-01-01

    Analogs of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP have been extensively used to mimic or modulate cellular events mediated by protein kinase A (PKA), Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), or protein kinase G (PKG). We report here that some of the most commonly used cyclic nucleotide analogs inhibit transmembrane transport mediated by the liver specific organic anion transporter peptides OATP1B1 and OATP1B3, unrelated to actions on Epac, PKA or PKG. Several cAMP analogs, particularly with 8-pCPT-substitution, inhibited nodularin (Nod) induced primary rat hepatocyte apoptosis. Inhibition was not mediated by PKA or Epac, since increased endogenous cAMP, and some strong PKA- or Epac-activating analogs failed to protect cells against Nod induced apoptosis. The cAMP analogs inhibiting Nod induced hepatocyte apoptosis also reduced accumulation of radiolabeled Nod or cholic acid in primary rat hepatocytes. They also inhibited Nod induced apoptosis in HEK293 cells with enforced expression of OATP1B1 or 1B3, responsible for Nod transport into cells. Similar results were found with adenosine analogs, disconnecting the inhibitory effect of certain cAMP analogs from PKA or Epac. The most potent inhibitors were 8-pCPT-6-Phe-cAMP and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, whereas analogs like 6-MB-cAMP or 8-Br-cAMP did not inhibit Nod uptake. This suggests that the addition of aromatic ring-containing substituents like the chloro-phenyl-thio group to the purines of cyclic nucleotides increases their ability to inhibit the OATP-mediated transport. Taken together, our data show that aromatic ring substituents can add unwanted effects to cyclic nucleotides, and that such nucleotide analogs must be used with care, particularly when working with cells expressing OATP1B1/1B3, like hepatocytes, or intact animals where hepatic metabolism can be an issue, as well as certain cancer cells. On the other hand, cAMP analogs with substituents like bromo, monobutyryl were non-inhibitory, and could be

  12. Inhibition of Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), overexpression of cholesterol transporter gene, and protection of amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers-induced neuronal cell death by tricyclic pyrone molecules.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Laxman; Maezawa, Izumi; Nguyen, Thi D T; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Jin, Lee-Way; Hua, Duy H

    2012-10-25

    A major effort in Alzheimer's disease therapeutic development has targeted Aβ and downstream events. We have synthesized a small library of tricyclic pyrone compounds. Their protective action in MC65 cells and inhibition of ACAT along with the upregulation of cholesterol transporter gene were investigated. Five active compounds exhibited potencies in the nanomolar ranges. The multiple effects of the compounds on Aβ and cellular cholesterol pathways could be potential mechanisms underlying the protective effects in vivo.

  13. Coproporphyrins in Plasma and Urine Can Be Appropriate Clinical Biomarkers to Recapitulate Drug-Drug Interactions Mediated by Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yurong; Mandlekar, Sandhya; Shen, Hong; Holenarsipur, Vinay K; Langish, Robert; Rajanna, Prabhakar; Murugesan, Senthilkumar; Gaud, Nilesh; Selvam, Sabariya; Date, Onkar; Cheng, Yaofeng; Shipkova, Petia; Dai, Jun; Humphreys, William G; Marathe, Punit

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, an open-label, three-treatment, three-period clinical study of rosuvastatin (RSV) and rifampicin (RIF) when administered alone and in combination was conducted in 12 male healthy subjects to determine if coproporphyrin I (CP-I) and coproporphyrin III (CP-III) could serve as clinical biomarkers for organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) and 1B3 that belong to the solute carrier organic anion gene subfamily. Genotyping of the human OATP1B1 gene was performed in all 12 subjects and confirmed absence of OATP1B1*5 and OATP1B1*15 mutations. Average plasma concentrations of CP-I and CP-III prior to drug administration were 0.91 ± 0.21 and 0.15 ± 0.04 nM, respectively, with minimum fluctuation over the three periods. CP-I was passively eliminated, whereas CP-III was actively secreted from urine. Administration of RSV caused no significant changes in the plasma and urinary profiles of CP-I and CP-III. RIF markedly increased the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of CP-I and CP-III by 5.7- and 5.4-fold (RIF) or 5.7- and 6.5-fold (RIF+RSV), respectively, as compared with the predose values. The area under the plasma concentration curves from time 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24h) of CP-I and CP-III with RIF and RSV increased by 4.0- and 3.3-fold, respectively, when compared with RSV alone. In agreement with this finding, Cmax and AUC0-24h of RSV increased by 13.2- and 5.0-fold, respectively, when RIF was coadministered. Collectively, we conclude that CP-I and CP-III in plasma and urine can be appropriate endogenous biomarkers specifically and reliably reflecting OATP inhibition, and thus the measurement of these molecules can serve as a useful tool to assess OATP drug-drug interaction liabilities in early clinical studies.

  14. Cholesterol transport from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes is inhibited by 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one.

    PubMed

    Härmälä, A S; Pörn, M I; Mattjus, P; Slotte, J P

    1994-03-24

    The compound U1866A (3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one) has been shown to inhibit the cellular transfer of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes to plasma membranes (Liscum and Faust (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 11796-806). We have in this study examined the effects of U18666A on cholesterol translocation from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes. Translocation of plasma membrane cholesterol was induced by degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin. The sphingomyelinase-induced activation of the acyl-CoA cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT) reaction was completely inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by U18666A, both in cultured human skin fibroblasts and baby hamster kidney cells. Half-maximal inhibition (within 60 min) was obtained with 0.5-1 microgram/ml of U18666A. A time-course study indicated that the onset of inhibition was rapid (within 10-15 min), and reversible if U18666A was removed from the incubation mixture. Using a cholesterol oxidase assay, we observed that the extent of plasma membrane cholesterol translocation in sphingomyelinase-treated HSF cells was significantly lowered in the presence of U18666A (at 3 micrograms/ml). The effect of U18666A on cholesterol translocation was also fully reversible when the drug was withdrawn. In mouse Leydig tumor cells, labeled to constant specific activity with [3H]cholesterol, the compound U18666A inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the cyclic AMP-stimulated secretion of [3H]steroid hormones. The effects seen with compound U18666A appeared to be specific for this molecule, since another hydrophobic amine, imipramine, did not in our experiments affect cholesterol translocation or ACAT activation. Since different cell types display sensitivity to U18666A in various intracellular cholesterol transfer processes, they appear to have a common U18666A-sensitive regulatory mechanism.

  15. Modulation of GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission by ethanol in the developing neocortex: an in vitro test of the excessive inhibition hypothesis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Jennifer L.; Partridge, L. Donald; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Summary Exposure to ethanol during development triggers neuronal cell death and this is thought to play a central role in the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Studies suggest that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration during the period of synaptogenesis results from widespread potentiation of GABAA receptors and inhibition of NMDA receptors throughout the brain, with neocortical layer II being particularly sensitive. Here, we tested whether ethanol modulates the function of these receptors during this developmental period using patch-clamp electrophysiological and Ca2+ imaging techniques in acute slices from postnatal day 7–9 rats. We focused on pyramidal neurons in layer II of the parietal cortex (with layer III as a control). Ethanol (70 mM) increased spontaneous action potential-dependent GABA release in layer II (but not layer III) neurons without affecting postsynaptic GABAA receptors. Protein and mRNA expression for both the Cl− importer, NKCC1, and the Cl− exporter KCC2, were detected in layer II/III neurons. Perforated-patch experiments demonstrated that ECl− is shifted to the right of Em; activation of GABAA receptors with muscimol depolarized Em, decreased action potential firing, and minimally increased [Ca2+]i. However, the ethanol-induced increase of GABAergic transmission did not affect neuronal excitability. Ethanol had no effect on currents exogenously evoked by NMDA or AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Acute application of ethanol in the absence of receptor antagonists minimally increased [Ca2+]i. These findings are inconsistent with the excessive inhibition model of ethanol-induced neurodegeneration, supporting the view that ethanol damages developing neurons via more complex mechanisms that vary among specific neuronal populations. PMID:19027758

  16. Cbl-b inhibits P-gp transporter function by preventing its translocation into caveolae in multiple drug-resistant gastric and breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Qu, Xiujuan; Teng, Yuee; Li, Zhi; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jing; Ma, Yanju; Fan, Yibo; Li, Ce; Liu, Shizhou; Wang, Zhenning; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Yunpeng

    2015-03-30

    The transport function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) requires its efficient localization to caveolae, a subset of lipid rafts, and disruption of caveolae suppresses P-gp transport function. However, the regulatory molecules involved in the translocation of P-gp into caveolae remain unknown. In the present study, we showed that c-Src dependent Caveolin-1 phosphorylation promoted the translocation of P-gp into caveolae, resulting in multidrug resistance in adriamycin resistant gastric cancer SGC7901/Adr and breast cancer MCF-7/Adr cells. In a negative feedback loop, the translocation of Cbl-b from the nucleus to the cytoplasm prevented the localization of P-gp to caveolae resulting in the reversal of MDR through the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Src. Clinical data showed a significant positive relationship between Cbl-b expression and survival in P-gp positive breast cancer patients who received anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Our findings identified a new regulatory mechanism of P-gp transport function in multiple drug-resistant gastric and breast cancers.

  17. Lipid nanocapsules containing the non-ionic surfactant Solutol HS15 inhibit the transport of calcium through hyperforin-activated channels in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Sylvain; Barras, Alexandre; Boukherroub, Rabah; Bouron, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Hyperforin is described as a natural antidepressant inhibiting the reuptake of neurotransmitters and also activating cation channels. However the blood-brain barrier limits the access to the brain of this biomolecule. To circumvent this problem it was envisaged to encapsulate hyperforin into biomimetic lipid nano-carriers like lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). When testing the safety of 25 nm LNCs it appeared that they strongly blocked hyperforin-activated Ca2+ channels of cultured cortical neurons. This inhibition was due to one of their main component: solutol HS15 (polyoxyethylene-660-12-hydroxy stearate), a non-ionic soluble surfactant. Solutol HS15 rapidly depresses in a concentration-dependent manner the entry of Ca2+ through hyperforin-activated channels without influencing store-operated channels. This effect is mimicked by Brij58 but not by PEG600, indicating that the lipid chain of Solutol HS15 is important in determining its effects on the channels. The inhibition of the Ca2+ fluxes depends on the cellular cholesterol content; it is stronger after depleting cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin and is nearly absent on cells cultured in a cholesterol-rich medium. When chronically applied for 24 h, Solutol HS15 slightly up-regulates the entry of Ca2+ through hyperforin-activated channels. Similar observations were made when testing 25 nm lipid nanocapsules containing the surfactant Solutol HS15. Altogether, this study shows that Solutol HS15 perturbs in a cholesterol-dependent manner the activity of some neuronal channels. This is the first demonstration that LNCs containing this surfactant can influence cellular calcium signaling in the brain, a finding that can have important clinical implications.

  18. Development and regulation of chloride homeostasis in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miho; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter of the mature central nervous system (CNS). The developmental switch of GABAergic transmission from excitation to inhibition is induced by changes in Cl− gradients, which are generated by cation-Cl− co-transporters. An accumulation of Cl− by the Na+-K+-2Cl− co-transporter (NKCC1) increases the intracellular Cl− concentration ([Cl−]i) such that GABA depolarizes neuronal precursors and immature neurons. The subsequent ontogenetic switch, i.e., upregulation of the Cl−-extruder KCC2, which is a neuron-specific K+-Cl− co-transporter, with or without downregulation of NKCC1, results in low [Cl−]i levels and the hyperpolarizing action of GABA in mature neurons. Development of Cl− homeostasis depends on developmental changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression. Generally, developmental shifts (decreases) in [Cl−]i parallel the maturation of the nervous system, e.g., early in the spinal cord, hypothalamus and thalamus, followed by the limbic system, and last in the neocortex. There are several regulators of KCC2 and/or NKCC1 expression, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Therefore, regionally different expression of these regulators may also contribute to the regional developmental shifts of Cl− homeostasis. KCC2 and NKCC1 functions are also regulated by phosphorylation by enzymes such as PKC, Src-family tyrosine kinases, and WNK1–4 and their downstream effectors STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)-oxidative stress responsive kinase-1 (OSR1). In addition, activation of these kinases is modulated by humoral factors such as estrogen and taurine. Because these transporters use the electrochemical driving force of Na+ and K+ ions, topographical interaction with the Na+-K+ ATPase and its modulators such as creatine kinase (CK) should modulate functions of Cl

  19. Inhibition of nitrate transport by anti-nitrate reductase IgG fragments and the identification of plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase in roots of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Membrane associated nitrate reductase (NR) was detected in plasma membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) roots. The PM associated NR was not removed by washing vesicles with 500 millimolar NaCl and 1 millimolar EDTA and represented up to 4% of the total root NR activity. PM associated NR was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 whereas soluble NR was only increased 1.7-fold. The latency was a function of the solubilization of NR from the membrane. NR, solubilized from the PM fraction by Triton X-100 was inactivated by antiserum to Chlorella sorokiniana NR. Anti-NR immunoglobulin G fragments purified from the anti-NR serum inhibited NO3- uptake by more than 90% but had no effect on NO2- uptake. The inhibitory effect was only partially reversible; uptake recovered to 50% of the control after thorough rinsing of roots. Preimmune serum immunoglobulin G fragments inhibited NO3- uptake 36% but the effect was completely reversible by rinsing. Intact NR antiserum had no effect on NO3- uptake. The results present the possibility that NO3- uptake and NO3- reduction in the PM of barley roots may be related.

  20. Competitive inhibition of the luminal efflux by multidrug and toxin extrusions, but not basolateral uptake by organic cation transporter 2, is the likely mechanism underlying the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions caused by cimetidine in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Ito, Sumito; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Yokochi, Miyu; Toyoshima, Junko; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yuasa, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2012-02-01

    Cimetidine, an H₂ receptor antagonist, has been used to investigate the tubular secretion of organic cations in human kidney. We report a systematic comprehensive analysis of the inhibition potency of cimetidine for the influx and efflux transporters of organic cations [human organic cation transporter 1 (hOCT1) and hOCT2 and human multidrug and toxin extrusion 1 (hMATE1) and hMATE2-K, respectively]. Inhibition constants (K(i)) of cimetidine were determined by using five substrates [tetraethylammonium (TEA), metformin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium, and m-iodobenzylguanidine]. They were 95 to 146 μM for hOCT2, providing at most 10% inhibition based on its clinically reported plasma unbound concentrations (3.6-7.8 μM). In contrast, cimetidine is a potent inhibitor of MATE1 and MATE2-K with K(i) values (μM) of 1.1 to 3.8 and 2.1 to 6.9, respectively. The same tendency was observed for mouse Oct1 (mOct1), mOct2, and mouse Mate1. Cimetidine showed a negligible effect on the uptake of metformin by mouse kidney slices at 20 μM. Cimetidine was administered to mice by a constant infusion to achieve a plasma unbound concentration of 21.6 μM to examine its effect on the renal disposition of Mate1 probes (metformin, TEA, and cephalexin) in vivo. The kidney- and liver-to-plasma ratios of metformin both were increased 2.4-fold by cimetidine, whereas the renal clearance was not changed. Cimetidine also increased the kidney-to-plasma ratio of TEA and cephalexin 8.0- and 3.3-fold compared with a control and decreased the renal clearance from 49 to 23 and 11 to 6.6 ml/min/kg, respectively. These results suggest that the inhibition of MATEs, but not OCT2, is a likely mechanism underlying the drug-drug interactions with cimetidine in renal elimination.

  1. Sulfate and thiosulfate inhibit oxalate transport via a dPrestin (Slc26a6)-dependent mechanism in an insect model of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Landry, Greg M; Hirata, Taku; Anderson, Jacob B; Cabrero, Pablo; Gallo, Christopher J R; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2016-01-15

    Nephrolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract disorders, with the majority of kidney stones composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx). Given its prevalence (US occurrence 10%), it is still poorly understood, lacking progress in identifying new therapies because of its complex etiology. Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) is a recently developed model of CaOx nephrolithiasis. Effects of sulfate and thiosulfate on crystal formation were investigated using the Drosophila model, as well as electrophysiological effects on both Drosophila (Slc26a5/6; dPrestin) and mouse (mSlc26a6) oxalate transporters utilizing the Xenopus laevis oocyte heterologous expression system. Results indicate that both transport thiosulfate with a much higher affinity than sulfate Additionally, both compounds were effective at decreasing CaOx crystallization when added to the diet. However, these results were not observed when compounds were applied to Malpighian tubules ex vivo. Neither compound affected CaOx crystallization in dPrestin knockdown animals, indicating a role for principal cell-specific dPrestin in luminal oxalate transport. Furthermore, thiosulfate has a higher affinity for dPrestin and mSlc26a6 compared with oxalate These data indicate that thiosulfate's ability to act as a competitive inhibitor of oxalate via dPrestin, can explain the decrease in CaOx crystallization seen in the presence of thiosulfate, but not sulfate. Overall, our findings predict that thiosulfate or oxalate-mimics may be effective as therapeutic competitive inhibitors of CaOx crystallization.

  2. Sulfate and thiosulfate inhibit oxalate transport via a dPrestin (Slc26a6)-dependent mechanism in an insect model of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Greg M.; Hirata, Taku; Anderson, Jacob B.; Cabrero, Pablo; Gallo, Christopher J. R.; Dow, Julian A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract disorders, with the majority of kidney stones composed of calcium oxalate (CaOx). Given its prevalence (US occurrence 10%), it is still poorly understood, lacking progress in identifying new therapies because of its complex etiology. Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly) is a recently developed model of CaOx nephrolithiasis. Effects of sulfate and thiosulfate on crystal formation were investigated using the Drosophila model, as well as electrophysiological effects on both Drosophila (Slc26a5/6; dPrestin) and mouse (mSlc26a6) oxalate transporters utilizing the Xenopus laevis oocyte heterologous expression system. Results indicate that both transport thiosulfate with a much higher affinity than sulfate Additionally, both compounds were effective at decreasing CaOx crystallization when added to the diet. However, these results were not observed when compounds were applied to Malpighian tubules ex vivo. Neither compound affected CaOx crystallization in dPrestin knockdown animals, indicating a role for principal cell-specific dPrestin in luminal oxalate transport. Furthermore, thiosulfate has a higher affinity for dPrestin and mSlc26a6 compared with oxalate These data indicate that thiosulfate's ability to act as a competitive inhibitor of oxalate via dPrestin, can explain the decrease in CaOx crystallization seen in the presence of thiosulfate, but not sulfate. Overall, our findings predict that thiosulfate or oxalate-mimics may be effective as therapeutic competitive inhibitors of CaOx crystallization. PMID:26538444

  3. Immunolocalization of cation-chloride cotransporters in the developing and mature spinal cord of opossums, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Phan, Ha-Loan; Pflieger, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Spinal inhibition is required to generate coordinated outputs between antagonistic muscles during locomotion. It relies on low neuronal chloride concentration set by two cation-chloride cotransporters, NKCC1 and KCC2 which, respectively, pumps Cl(-) in or out of neurons. It is generally accepted that NKCC1 is gradually inactivated during development, while KCC2 is upregulated and activated, resulting in low intracellular [Cl(-)]. Newborn opossums are very immature but perform rhythmic and alternate movements of the forelimbs to crawl on the mother's belly and attach to a teat. Their hindlimbs are immobile. The alternation of the forelimbs suggests that mechanisms allowing spinal inhibition are present at birth. We studied the anatomical basis of inhibition in the spinal enlargements of postnatal opossums by immunolocalizing NKCC1 and KCC2. In some specimens, motoneurons and sensory afferents were labeled with TRDA prior to immunolabeling. At birth, both NKCC1 and KCC2 are detected in the presumptive gray and white matter of the ventral and the intermediolateral cord of both enlargements, but are sparse in the dorsal horn, where KCC2 is mostly seen on a small bundle of dendrites along primary afferents. KCC2 labeling is bright and has a mesh-like appearance in the gray matter and a radial appearance in the white matter, whereas NKCC1 is pale and diffuse. The subsequent expression of the cotransporters follows general ventrodorsal and mediolateral gradients, with the lumbar segments slightly lagging the cervical segments, until the mature pattern is observed around the 5th week. At all ages studied, KCC2 labeling is strong in the periphery of neurons. NKCC1 labeling decreases and becomes more uniformly distributed in the cells with age. Despite the significant anatomical and motor differences between the forelimbs and the hindlimbs of neonatal opossums, the maturation of KCC2 and NKCC1 is quite similar in both enlargements.

  4. Competitive inhibition of human organic anion transporters 1 (SLC22A6), 3 (SLC22A8) and 4 (SLC22A11) by major components of the medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen).

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Sweet, Douglas H

    2013-01-01

    When herbal products are used in combination therapy with drugs, alterations in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and toxicity can result. Many active components of herbal products are organic anions, and human organic anion transporter 1 (hOAT1, SLC22A6), hOAT3 (SLC22A8), and hOAT4 (SLC22A11) have been identified as potential sites of drug-drug interactions. Therefore, we assessed the effects of lithospermic acid (LSA), rosmarinic acid (RMA), salvianolic acid A (SAA), salvianolic acid B (SAB), and tanshinol (TSL), components of the herbal medicine Danshen, on the function of these transporters. Kinetic analysis demonstrated a competitive mechanism of inhibition for all five. K(i) values (µM) were estimated as 20.8 ± 2.1 (LSA), 0.35 ± 0.06 (RMA), 5.6 ± 0.3 (SAA), 22.2 ± 1.9 (SAB), and 40.4 ± 12.9 (TSL) on hOAT1 and as 0.59 ± 0.26 (LSA), 0.55 ± 0.25 (RMA), 0.16 ± 0.03 (SAA), 19.8 ± 8.4 (SAB), and 8.6 ± 3.3 (TSL) on hOAT3. No significant inhibition of hOAT4 activity by TSL was observed. Using published human pharmacokinetic values, unbound C(max)/K(i) ratios were calculated as an indicator of in vivo drug-drug interaction potential. Analysis indicated a strong interaction potential for RMA and TSL on both hOAT1 and hOAT3 and for LSA on hOAT3. Thus, herb-drug interactions may occur in vivo in situations of co-administration of Danshen and clinical therapeutics known to be hOAT1/hOAT3 substrates.

  5. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-07

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension.

  6. Prolonged Oral Administration of a Pan-Retinoic Acid Receptor Antagonist Inhibits Spermatogenesis in Mice With a Rapid Recovery and Changes in the Expression of Influx and Efflux Transporters.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sanny S W; Wang, Xiangyuan; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2016-04-01

    We have previously shown that oral administration of a pan-retinoic acid receptor antagonist in mice daily at 2.5 mg/kg for 4 weeks reversibly inhibited spermatogenesis, with no detectable side effects. To elucidate the lowest dose and the longest dosing regimen that inhibits spermatogenesis but results in complete restoration of fertility upon cessation of administration of the drug, we examined the effects of daily doses as low as 1.0 mg/kg with dosing periods of 4, 8, and 16 weeks. We observed 100% sterility in all regimens, with restoration of fertility upon cessation of the drug treatment even for as long as 16 weeks. There was no change in testosterone levels in these males and the progeny examined from 2 of the recovered males were healthy and fertile, with normal testicular weight and testicular histology. Strikingly, a more rapid recovery, as assessed by mating studies, was observed at the lower dose and longer dosing periods. Insight into possible mechanisms underlying this rapid recovery was obtained at 2 levels. First, histological examination revealed that spermatogenesis was not as severely disrupted at the lower dose and with the longer treatment regimens. Second, gene expression analysis revealed that the more rapid recovery may involve the interplay of ATP-binding cassette efflux and solute carrier influx transporters in the testes.

  7. Functional inhibition of urea transporter UT-B enhances endothelial-dependent vasodilatation and lowers blood pressure via L-arginine-endothelial nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Lau, Chi-Wai; Jia, Yingli; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Weiling; Ran, Jianhua; Li, Fei; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Hong; Yang, Baoxue

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian urea transporters (UTs), UT-A and UT-B, are best known for their role in urine concentration. UT-B is especially distributed in multiple extrarenal tissues with abundant expression in vascular endothelium, but little is known about its role in vascular function. The present study investigated the physiological significance of UT-B in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure. UT-B deletion in mice or treatment with UT-B inhibitor PU-14 in Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) reduced blood pressure. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was significantly augmented in aortas from UT-B null mice. PU-14 concentration-dependently produced endothelium-dependent relaxations in thoracic aortas and mesenteric arteries from both mice and rats and the relaxations were abolished by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Both expression and phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were up-regulated and expression of arginase I was down-regulated when UT-B was inhibited both in vivo and in vitro. PU-14 induced endothelium-dependent relaxations to a similar degree in aortas from 12 weeks old SHRs or WKYs. In summary, here we report for the first time that inhibition of UT-B plays an important role in regulating vasorelaxations and blood pressure via up-regulation of L-arginine-eNOS-NO pathway, and it may become another potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26739766

  8. The Antimalarial Activities of Methylene Blue and the 1,4-Naphthoquinone 3-[4-(Trifluoromethyl)Benzyl]-Menadione Are Not Due to Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Katharina; Ke, Hangjun; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Lanzer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Methylene blue and a series of recently developed 1,4-naphthoquinones, including 3-[4-(substituted)benzyl]-menadiones, are potent antimalarial agents in vitro and in vivo. The activity of these structurally diverse compounds against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum might involve their peculiar redox properties. According to the current theory, redox-active methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione are “subversive substrates.” These agents are thought to shuttle electrons from reduced flavoproteins to acceptors such as hemoglobin-associated or free Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX. The reduction of Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX could subsequently prevent essential hemoglobin digestion and heme detoxification in the parasite. Alternatively, owing to their structures and redox properties, methylene blue and 1,4-naphthoquinones might also affect the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we tested the latter hypothesis using an established system of transgenic P. falciparum cell lines and the antimalarial agents atovaquone and chloroquine as controls. In contrast to atovaquone, methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione do not inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain. A systematic comparison of the morphologies of drug-treated parasites furthermore suggests that the three drugs do not share a mechanism of action. Our findings support the idea that methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione exert their antimalarial activity as redox-active subversive substrates. PMID:23439633

  9. The antimalarial activities of methylene blue and the 1,4-naphthoquinone 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione are not due to inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Katharina; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth; Ke, Hangjun; Vaidya, Akhil B; Lanzer, Michael; Deponte, Marcel

    2013-05-01

    Methylene blue and a series of recently developed 1,4-naphthoquinones, including 3-[4-(substituted)benzyl]-menadiones, are potent antimalarial agents in vitro and in vivo. The activity of these structurally diverse compounds against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum might involve their peculiar redox properties. According to the current theory, redox-active methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione are "subversive substrates." These agents are thought to shuttle electrons from reduced flavoproteins to acceptors such as hemoglobin-associated or free Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX. The reduction of Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX could subsequently prevent essential hemoglobin digestion and heme detoxification in the parasite. Alternatively, owing to their structures and redox properties, methylene blue and 1,4-naphthoquinones might also affect the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we tested the latter hypothesis using an established system of transgenic P. falciparum cell lines and the antimalarial agents atovaquone and chloroquine as controls. In contrast to atovaquone, methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione do not inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain. A systematic comparison of the morphologies of drug-treated parasites furthermore suggests that the three drugs do not share a mechanism of action. Our findings support the idea that methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione exert their antimalarial activity as redox-active subversive substrates.

  10. Ceapins inhibit ATF6α signaling by selectively preventing transport of ATF6α to the Golgi apparatus during ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Ciara M; Walter, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-bound transcription factor ATF6α is activated by proteolysis during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ATF6α target genes encode foldases, chaperones, and lipid biosynthesis enzymes that increase protein-folding capacity in response to demand. The off-state of ATF6α is maintained by its spatial separation in the ER from Golgi-resident proteases that activate it. ER stress induces trafficking of ATF6α. We discovered Ceapins, a class of pyrazole amides, as selective inhibitors of ATF6α signaling that do not inhibit the Golgi proteases or other UPR branches. We show that Ceapins block ATF6α signaling by trapping it in ER-resident foci that are excluded from ER exit sites. Removing the requirement for trafficking by pharmacological elimination of the spatial separation of the ER and Golgi apparatus restored cleavage of ATF6α in the presence of Ceapins. Washout of Ceapins resensitized ATF6α to ER stress. These results suggest that trafficking of ATF6α is regulated by its oligomeric state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11880.001 PMID:27435962

  11. Inhibition of monocarboxylate transporter 2 in the retrotrapezoid nucleus in rats: a test of the astrocyte-neuron lactate-shuttle hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, Joseph S; Hewitt, Amy; Damon, Tracey L; Hart, Michael; Kurascz, Jennifer; Li, Aihua; Leiter, James C

    2008-05-07

    The astrocyte-neuronal lactate-shuttle hypothesis posits that lactate released from astrocytes into the extracellular space is metabolized by neurons. The lactate released should alter extracellular pH (pHe), and changes in pH in central chemosensory regions of the brainstem stimulate ventilation. Therefore, we assessed the impact of disrupting the lactate shuttle by administering 100 microM alpha-cyano-4-hydroxy-cinnamate (4-CIN), a dose that blocks the neuronal monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 2 but not the astrocytic MCTs (MCT1 and MCT4). Administration of 4-CIN focally in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a medullary central chemosensory nucleus, increased ventilation and decreased pHe in intact animals. In medullary brain slices, 4-CIN reduced astrocytic intracellular pH (pHi) slightly but alkalinized neuronal pHi. Nonetheless, pHi fell significantly in both cell types when they were treated with exogenous lactate, although 100 microM 4-CIN significantly reduced the magnitude of the acidosis in neurons but not astrocytes. Finally, 4-CIN treatment increased the uptake of a fluorescent 2-deoxy-D-glucose analog in neurons but did not alter the uptake rate of this 2-deoxy-D-glucose analog in astrocytes. These data confirm the existence of an astrocyte to neuron lactate shuttle in intact animals in the RTN, and lactate derived from astrocytes forms part of the central chemosensory stimulus for ventilation in this nucleus. When the lactate shuttle was disrupted by treatment with 4-CIN, neurons increased the uptake of glucose. Therefore, neurons seem to metabolize a combination of glucose and lactate (and other substances such as pyruvate) depending, in part, on the availability of each of these particular substrates.

  12. In contrast to Chlamydia trachomatis, Waddlia chondrophila grows in human cells without inhibiting apoptosis, fragmenting the Golgi apparatus, or diverting post-Golgi sphingomyelin transport.

    PubMed

    Dille, Stephanie; Kleinschnitz, Eva-Maria; Kontchou, Collins Waguia; Nölke, Thilo; Häcker, Georg

    2015-08-01

    The Chlamydiales are an order of obligate intracellular bacteria sharing a developmental cycle inside a cytosolic vacuole, with very diverse natural hosts, from amoebae to mammals. The clinically most important species is Chlamydia trachomatis. Many uncertainties remain as to how Chlamydia organizes its intracellular development and replication. The discovery of new Chlamydiales species from other families permits the comparative analysis of cell-biological events and may indicate events that are common to all or peculiar to some species and more or less tightly linked to "chlamydial" development. We used this approach in the infection of human cells with Waddlia chondrophila, a species from the family Waddliaceae whose natural host is uncertain. Compared to C. trachomatis, W. chondrophila had slightly different growth characteristics, including faster cytotoxicity. The embedding in cytoskeletal structures was not as pronounced as for the C. trachomatis inclusion. C. trachomatis infection generates proteolytic activity by the protease Chlamydia protease-like activity factor (CPAF), which degrades host substrates upon extraction; these substrates were not cleaved in the case of W. chondrophila. Unlike Chlamydia, W. chondrophila did not protect against staurosporine-induced apoptosis. C. trachomatis infection causes Golgi apparatus fragmentation and redirects post-Golgi sphingomyelin transport to the inclusion; both were absent from W. chondrophila-infected cells. When host cells were infected with both species, growth of both species was reduced. This study highlights differences between bacterial species that both depend on obligate intracellular replication inside an inclusion. Some features seem principally dispensable for intracellular development of Chlamydiales in vitro but may be linked to host adaptation of Chlamydia and the higher virulence of C. trachomatis.

  13. Iron Deficiency Induces a Partial Inhibition of the Photosynthetic Electron Transport and a High Sensitivity to Light in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Roncel, Mercedes; González-Rodríguez, Antonio A; Naranjo, Belén; Bernal-Bayard, Pilar; Lindahl, Anna M; Hervás, Manuel; Navarro, José A; Ortega, José M

    2016-01-01

    Iron limitation is the major factor controlling phytoplankton growth in vast regions of the contemporary oceans. In this study, a combination of thermoluminescence (TL), chlorophyll fluorescence, and P700 absorbance measurements have been used to elucidate the effects of iron deficiency in the photosynthetic electron transport of the marine diatom P. tricornutum. TL was used to determine the effects of iron deficiency on photosystem II (PSII) activity. Excitation of iron-replete P. tricornutum cells with single turn-over flashes induced the appearance of TL glow curves with two components with different peaks of temperature and contributions to the total signal intensity: the B band (23°C, 63%), and the AG band (40°C, 37%). Iron limitation did not significantly alter these bands, but induced a decrease of the total TL signal. Far red excitation did not increase the amount of the AG band in iron-limited cells, as observed for iron-replete cells. The effect of iron deficiency on the photosystem I (PSI) activity was also examined by measuring the changes in P700 redox state during illumination. The electron donation to PSI was substantially reduced in iron-deficient cells. This could be related with the important decline on cytochrome c 6 content observed in these cells. Iron deficiency also induced a marked increase in light sensitivity in P. tricornutum cells. A drastic increase in the level of peroxidation of chloroplast lipids was detected in iron-deficient cells even when grown under standard conditions at low light intensity. Illumination with a light intensity of 300 μE m(-2) s(-1) during different time periods caused a dramatic disappearance in TL signal in cells grown under low iron concentration, this treatment not affecting to the signal in iron-replete cells. The results of this work suggest that iron deficiency induces partial blocking of the electron transfer between PSII and PSI, due to a lower concentration of the electron donor cytochrome c 6. This

  14. Iron Deficiency Induces a Partial Inhibition of the Photosynthetic Electron Transport and a High Sensitivity to Light in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Roncel, Mercedes; González-Rodríguez, Antonio A.; Naranjo, Belén; Bernal-Bayard, Pilar; Lindahl, Anna M.; Hervás, Manuel; Navarro, José A.; Ortega, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Iron limitation is the major factor controlling phytoplankton growth in vast regions of the contemporary oceans. In this study, a combination of thermoluminescence (TL), chlorophyll fluorescence, and P700 absorbance measurements have been used to elucidate the effects of iron deficiency in the photosynthetic electron transport of the marine diatom P. tricornutum. TL was used to determine the effects of iron deficiency on photosystem II (PSII) activity. Excitation of iron-replete P. tricornutum cells with single turn-over flashes induced the appearance of TL glow curves with two components with different peaks of temperature and contributions to the total signal intensity: the B band (23°C, 63%), and the AG band (40°C, 37%). Iron limitation did not significantly alter these bands, but induced a decrease of the total TL signal. Far red excitation did not increase the amount of the AG band in iron-limited cells, as observed for iron-replete cells. The effect of iron deficiency on the photosystem I (PSI) activity was also examined by measuring the changes in P700 redox state during illumination. The electron donation to PSI was substantially reduced in iron-deficient cells. This could be related with the important decline on cytochrome c6 content observed in these cells. Iron deficiency also induced a marked increase in light sensitivity in P. tricornutum cells. A drastic increase in the level of peroxidation of chloroplast lipids was detected in iron-deficient cells even when grown under standard conditions at low light intensity. Illumination with a light intensity of 300 μE m-2 s-1 during different time periods caused a dramatic disappearance in TL signal in cells grown under low iron concentration, this treatment not affecting to the signal in iron-replete cells. The results of this work suggest that iron deficiency induces partial blocking of the electron transfer between PSII and PSI, due to a lower concentration of the electron donor cytochrome c6. This

  15. Tumor Targeting with Novel 6-Substituted Pyrrolo [2,3-d] Pyrimidine Antifolates with Heteroatom Bridge Substitutions via Cellular Uptake by Folate Receptor α and the Proton-Coupled Folate Transporter and Inhibition of de Novo Purine Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Golani, Lalit K; Wallace-Povirk, Adrianne; Deis, Siobhan M; Wong, Jennifer; Ke, Jiyuan; Gu, Xin; Raghavan, Sudhir; Wilson, Mike R; Li, Xinxin; Polin, Lisa; de Waal, Parker W; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; O'Connor, Carrie; Hou, Zhanjun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Dann, Charles E; Matherly, Larry H; Gangjee, Aleem

    2016-09-08

    Targeted antifolates with heteroatom replacements of the carbon vicinal to the phenyl ring in 1 by N (4), O (8), or S (9), or with N-substituted formyl (5), acetyl (6), or trifluoroacetyl (7) moieties, were synthesized and tested for selective cellular uptake by folate receptor (FR) α and β or the proton-coupled folate transporter. Results show increased in vitro antiproliferative activity toward engineered Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing FRs by 4-9 over the CH2 analogue 1. Compounds 4-9 inhibited de novo purine biosynthesis and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). X-ray crystal structures for 4 with FRα and GARFTase showed that the bound conformations of 4 required flexibility for attachment to both FRα and GARFTase. In mice bearing IGROV1 ovarian tumor xenografts, 4 was highly efficacious. Our results establish that heteroatom substitutions in the 3-atom bridge region of 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidines related to 1 provide targeted antifolates that warrant further evaluation as anticancer agents.

  16. Neuroimmune Regulation of GABAergic Neurons Within the Ventral Tegmental Area During Withdrawal from Chronic Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Anna M W; Castonguay, Annie; Ghogha, Atefeh; Vayssiere, Pia; Pradhan, Amynah A A; Xue, Lihua; Mehrabani, Sadaf; Wu, Juli; Levitt, Pat; Olmstead, Mary C; De Koninck, Yves; Evans, Christopher J; Cahill, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    Opioid dependence is accompanied by neuroplastic changes in reward circuitry leading to a negative affective state contributing to addictive behaviors and risk of relapse. The current study presents a neuroimmune mechanism through which chronic opioids disrupt the ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic circuitry that contributes to impaired reward behavior. Opioid dependence was induced in rodents by treatment with escalating doses of morphine. Microglial activation was observed in the VTA following spontaneous withdrawal from chronic morphine treatment. Opioid-induced microglial activation resulted in an increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and a reduction in the expression and function of the K+Cl− co-transporter KCC2 within VTA GABAergic neurons. Inhibition of microglial activation or interfering with BDNF signaling prevented the loss of Cl− extrusion capacity and restored the rewarding effects of cocaine in opioid-dependent animals. Consistent with a microglial-derived BDNF-induced disruption of reward, intra-VTA injection of BDNF or a KCC2 inhibitor resulted in a loss of cocaine-induced place preference in opioid-naïve animals. The loss of the extracellular Cl− gradient undermines GABAA-mediated inhibition, and represents a mechanism by which chronic opioid treatments can result in blunted reward circuitry. This study directly implicates microglial-derived BDNF as a negative regulator of reward in opioid-dependent states, identifying new therapeutic targets for opiate addictive behaviors. PMID:26202104

  17. Dissection of the Golgi complex. I. Monensin inhibits the transport of viral membrane proteins from medial to trans Golgi cisternae in baby hamster kidney cells infected with Semliki Forest virus

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells were infected with Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and, 2 h later, were treated for 4 h with 10 microM monensin. Each of the four to six flattened cisternae in the Golgi stack became swollen and separated from the others. Intracellular transport of the viral membrane proteins was almost completely inhibited, but their synthesis continued and they accumulated in the swollen Golgi cisternae before the monensin block. In consequence, these cisternae bound large numbers of viral nucleocapsids and were easily distinguished from other swollen cisternae such as those after the block. These intracellular capsid-binding membranes (ICBMs) were not stained by cytochemical markers for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) (glucose-6-phosphatase) or trans Golgi cisternae (thiamine pyrophosphatase, acid phosphatase) but were labeled by Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA) in thin, frozen sections. Since this lectin labels only Golgi cisternae in the middle and on the trans side of the stack (Griffiths, G., R. Brands, B. Burke, D. Louvard, and G. Warren, 1982, J. Cell Biol., 95:781-792), we conclude that ICBMs are derived from Golgi cisternae in the middle of the stack, which we term medial cisternae. The overall movement of viral membrane proteins appears to be from cis to trans Golgi cisternae (see reference above), so monensin would block movement from medial to the trans cisternae. It also blocked the trimming of the high-mannose oligosaccharides bound to the viral membrane proteins and their conversion to complex oligosaccharides. These functions presumably reside in trans Golgi cisternae. This is supported by data in the accompanying paper, in which we also show that fatty acids are covalently attached to the viral membrane proteins in the cis or medial cisternae. We suggest that the Golgi stack can be divided into three functionally distinct compartments, each comprising one or two cisternae. The viral membrane proteins, after leaving the ER, would all pass

  18. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  19. Ergostatrien-3β-ol from Antrodia camphorata inhibits diabetes and hyperlipidemia in high-fat-diet treated mice via regulation of hepatic related genes, glucose transporter 4, and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Shih, Chun-Ching

    2015-03-11

    This study was designed to explore the effects and mechanism of ergostatrien-3β-ol (EK100) from the submerged whole broth of Antrodia camphorata on diabetes and dyslipidemia in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice for 12 weeks. The C57BL/6J mouse fed with a high fat diet (HFD) could induce insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia. After 8 week of induction, mice were receiving EK100 (at three dosages) or fenofibrate (Feno) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or vehicle by oral gavage 4 weeks afterward. HFD-fed mice display increased blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), insulin, and leptin levels. These blood markers were significantly lower in EK100-treated mice, and finally ameliorated insulin resistance. EK100 treatment exhibited reduced hepatic ballooning degeneration and size of visceral adipocytes. Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) proteins and phosphorylation of Akt in skeletal muscle were significantly increased in EK100- and Rosi-treated mice. EK100, Feno, and Rosi treatment led to significant increases in phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (phospho-AMPK) protein in both skeletal muscle and liver. Moreover, EK100 caused a decrease in hepatic expressions of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6 Pase), and decreased glucose production. EK100 lowered blood TG level by inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis by dampening sterol response element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) but increasing expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα). Moreover, EK100-treated mice reduced blood TC levels by decreased hepatic expressions of SREBP2, which plays a major role in the regulation of cholesterol synthesis. EK100 increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations by increasing expressions of apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) in liver tissue. Our findings manifest that EK100 may have therapeutic potential in treating type 2 diabetes associated with hyperlipidemia

  20. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  1. NEUTRALIZATION OF THE ASPARTIC ACID RESIDUE D367, BUT NOT D454, INHIBITS BINDING OF NA+ TO THE GLUTAMATE-FREE FORM AND CYCLING OF THE GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER EAAC1

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhen; Zhang, Zhou; Grewer, Christof

    2008-01-01

    Substrate transport by the plasma membrane glutamate transporter EAAC1 is coupled to cotransport of three sodium ions. One of these Na+ ions binds to the transporter already in the absence of glutamate. Here, we have investigated the possible involvement of two conserved aspartic acid residues in transmembrane segments 7 and 8 of EAAC1, D367 and D454, in Na+ cotransport. In order to test the effect of charge neutralization mutations in these positions on Na+ binding to the glutamate-free transporter, we recorded the Na+-induced anion leak current to determine the Km of EAAC1 for Na+. For EAAC1WT, this Km was determined as 120 mM. When the negative charge of D367 was neutralized by mutagenesis to asparagine, Na+ activated the anion leak current with a Km of about 2 M, indicating dramatically impaired Na+ binding to the mutant transporter. In contrast, the Na+ affinity of EAAC1D454N was virtually unchanged compared to the wild type transporter (Km = 90 mM). The reduced occupancy of the Na+ binding site of EAAC1D367N resulted in a dramatic reduction in glutamate affinity (Km = 3.6 mM, 140 mM [Na+]), which could be partially overcome by increasing extracellular [Na+]. In addition to impairing Na+ binding, the D367N mutation slowed glutamate transport, as shown by pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of transport currents, by strongly decreasing the rate of a reaction step associated with glutamate translocation. Our data are consistent with a model in which D367, but not D454 is involved in coordinating the bound Na+ in the glutamate-free transporter form. PMID:16478724

  2. Changes in spinal inhibitory networks induced by furosemide in humans

    PubMed Central

    Klomjai, Wanalee; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Katz, Rose; Bussel, Bernard; Bensmail, Djamel; Lamy, Jean-Charles; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    During neural development in animals, GABAergic and glycinergic neurons are first excitatory, and then become inhibitory in the mature state. This developmental shift is due mainly to strong expression of the cation-chloride K–Cl cotransporter 2 (KCC2) and down-regulation of Na–K–Cl cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) during maturation. The down-regulation of co-transporter KCC2 after spinal cord transection in animals leads to the depolarising (excitatory) action of GABA and glycine and thus results in a reduction of inhibitory synaptic efficiency. Furosemide, a loop diuretic, has been shown to selectively and reversibly block inhibitory postsynaptic potentials without affecting excitatory postsynaptic potentials in animal spinal neurons. Moreover, this diuretic has been also demonstrated to block the cation-chloride co-transporters. Here, we used furosemide to demonstrate changes in spinal inhibitory networks in healthy human subjects. Non-invasive electrophysiological techniques were used to assess presynaptic inhibition, postsynaptic inhibition and the efficacy of synaptic transmission between muscle afferent terminals and soleus motoneurons in the spinal cord. Orally administered furosemide, at doses commonly used in the clinic (40 mg), significantly reduced spinal inhibitory interneuronal activity for at least 70 min from intake compared to control experiments in the same subjects while no changes were observed in the efficacy of synaptic transmission between muscle afferent terminals and soleus motoneurons. The reduction of inhibition was dose-dependent. Our results provide indirect evidence that reversible changes in the cation-chloride transport system induce modulations of inhibitory neuronal activity at spinal cord level in humans. PMID:24835171

  3. Strigolactone inhibition of shoot branching.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Roldan, Victoria; Fermas, Soraya; Brewer, Philip B; Puech-Pagès, Virginie; Dun, Elizabeth A; Pillot, Jean-Paul; Letisse, Fabien; Matusova, Radoslava; Danoun, Saida; Portais, Jean-Charles; Bouwmeester, Harro; Bécard, Guillaume; Beveridge, Christine A; Rameau, Catherine; Rochange, Soizic F

    2008-09-11

    A carotenoid-derived hormonal signal that inhibits shoot branching in plants has long escaped identification. Strigolactones are compounds thought to be derived from carotenoids and are known to trigger the germination of parasitic plant seeds and stimulate symbiotic fungi. Here we present evidence that carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 8 shoot branching mutants of pea are strigolactone deficient and that strigolactone application restores the wild-type branching phenotype to ccd8 mutants. Moreover, we show that other branching mutants previously characterized as lacking a response to the branching inhibition signal also lack strigolactone response, and are not deficient in strigolactones. These responses are conserved in Arabidopsis. In agreement with the expected properties of the hormonal signal, exogenous strigolactone can be transported in shoots and act at low concentrations. We suggest that endogenous strigolactones or related compounds inhibit shoot branching in plants. Furthermore, ccd8 mutants demonstrate the diverse effects of strigolactones in shoot branching, mycorrhizal symbiosis and parasitic weed interaction.

  4. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  5. Synthesis, biological and antitumor activity of a highly potent 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine thienoyl antifolate inhibitor with proton-coupled folate transporter and folate receptor selectivity over the reduced folate carrier that inhibits β-glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Desmoulin, Sita Kugel; Cherian, Christina; Polin, Lisa; White, Kathryn; Kushner, Juiwanna; Fulterer, Andreas; Chang, Min-Hwang; Mitchell, Shermaine; Stout, Mark; Romero, Michael F.; Hou, Zhanjun; Matherly, Larry H.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2011-01-01

    2-Amino-4-oxo-6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine antifolates with a thienoyl side chain (compounds 1–3, respectively) were synthesized for comparison with compound 4, the previous lead compound of this series. Conversion of hydroxyl acetylen-thiophene carboxylic esters to thiophenyl-α-bromomethylketones and condensation with 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine afforded the 6-substituted pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine compounds of type 18 and 19. Coupling with L-glutamate diethyl ester, followed by saponification, afforded 1–3. Compound 3 selectively inhibited proliferation of cells expressing folate receptors (FRs) α or β, or the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT), including human tumor cells KB and IGROV1 much more potently than 4. Compound 3 was more inhibitory than 4 toward β-glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase (GARFTase). Both 3 and 4 depleted cellular ATP pools. In SCID mice with IGROV1 tumors, 3 was more efficacious than 4. Collectively, our results show potent antitumor activity for 3 in vitro and in vivo, associated with its selective membrane transport by FRs and PCFT over RFC and inhibition of GARFTase, clearly establishing the 3-atom bridge as superior to the 1, 2 and 4-atom bridge lengths for the activity of this series. PMID:21879757

  6. Inhibition of auxin transport and auxin signaling and treatment with far red light induces root coiling in the phospholipase-A mutant ppla-I-1. Significance for surface penetration?

    PubMed

    Perrineau, F; Wimalasekera, R; Effendi, Y; Scherer, G F E

    2016-06-01

    When grown on a non-penetretable at a surface angle of 45°, Arabidopsis roots form wave-like structures and, in wild type rarely, but in certain mutants the tip root even may form circles. These circles are called coils. The formation of coils depends on the complex interaction of circumnutation, gravitropism and negative thigmotropism where - at least - gravitropism is intimately linked to auxin transport and signaling. The knockout mutant of patatin-related phospholipase-AI-1 (pplaI-1) is an auxin-signaling mutant which forms moderately increased numbers of coils on tilted agar plates. We tested the effects of the auxin efflux transport inhibitor NPA (1-naphthylphtalamic acid) and of the influx transport inhibitor 1-NOA (1-naphthoxyacetic acid) which both further increased root coil formation. The pPLAI-1 inhibitors HELSS (haloenol lactone suicide substrate=E-6-(bromomethylene)tetrahydro-3-(1-naphthalenyl)-2H-pyran-2-one) and ETYA (eicosatetraynoic acid) which are auxin signaling inhibitors also increased coil formation. In addition, far red light treatment increased coil formation. The results point out that a disturbance of auxin transport and signaling is one potential cause for root coils. As we show that the mutant pplaI-1 penetrates horizontal agar plates better than wild type plants root movements may help penetrating the soil.

  7. Transport characteristics of urea transporter-B.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    UT-B represents the major urea transporter in erythrocytes, in addition to being expressed in kidney descending vasa recta, brain, spleen, ureter, bladder, and testis. Expression of urea transporter UT-B confers high urea permeability to mammalian erythrocytes. Erythrocyte membranes are also permeable to various urea analogues, suggesting common transport pathways for urea and structurally similar solutes. UT-B is highly permeable to urea and the chemical analogues formamide, acetamide, methylurea, methylformamide, ammonium carbamate, and acrylamide, each with a Ps > 5.0 × 10(-6) cm/s at 10 °C. The amides formamide, acetamide, acrylamide, and butyramide efficiently diffuse across lipid bilayers. The urea analogues dimethylurea, acryalmide, methylurea, thiourea, and methylformamide inhibit UT-B-mediated urea transport by >60 % by a pore-blocking mechanism. UT-B is also a water channel in erythrocytes and has a single-channel water permeability that is similar to aquaporin-1. Whether UT-B is an NH3 channel still needs further study. Urea permeability (Purea) in erythrocytes differs between different mammals. Carnivores (dog, fox, cat) exhibit high Purea. In contrast, herbivores (cow, donkey, sheep) show much lower Purea. Erythrocyte Purea in human and pig (omnivores) was intermediate. Rodents and lagomorphs (mouse, rat, rabbit) have Purea intermediate between carnivores and omnivores. Birds that do not excrete urea and do not express UT-B in their erythrocytes have very low values. In contrast to Purea, water permeability is relatively similar in all mammals studied. This chapter will provide information about the transporter characteristics of UT-B.

  8. Cysteine Transport into Cultured Tobacco Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, H. Michael; Smith, Ivan K.

    1977-01-01

    Cysteine transport by tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Xanthi) cultured on liquid B-5 medium was examined. Transport was linear with time or amount of tissue and had a pH optimum of 4.5. Cysteine transport over a wide concentration range was biphasic. The isotherm, for descriptive convenience, was divided into two segments both of which obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The Km for high affinity transport was in the range 1.7 × 10−5m(±0.17) while the Km for low affinity transport was in the range 3.5 × 10−4m(±0.13). Maximum velocities were 3 to 6 nmoles/g fresh weight/minute and 13 to 16 nmoles/g fresh weight/minute, respectively. Azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol caused more than 90% inhibition of net transport by either system. N,N′-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide was not inhibitory while the inhibition by carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone was dependent on the cysteine concentration. Only those compounds that were inhibitory to transport caused significant efflux of labeled material from preloaded cells. Tobacco cells that had been preincubated in iodoacetamide or N-ethylmaleimide did not transport cysteine while similar treatments with dithiothreitol were only slightly inhibitory or had no effect on transport. Transport by either system was, to some extent, inhibited by all other tested amino acids and analogs. Alanine, methionine, and S-methyl cysteine were most effective in inhibiting cysteine transport. Both alanine and methionine were competitive inhibitors of cysteine transport by either system with inhibition constants that were similar to the Km for the particular system. PMID:16660190

  9. Quantum Transport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-15

    Notre Dame was concerned with a variety of quantum transport in mesoscopic structures. This research was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific...Research under Grant No. AFOSR-91-0211. The major issues examined included quantum transport in high magnetic fields and modulated channels, Coulomb...lifetimes in quasi-1D structures, quantum transport experiments in metals, the mesoscopic photovoltaic effect, and new techniques for fabricating quantum structures in semiconductors.

  10. Overexpression of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-1B in adipocytes inhibits insulin-stimulated phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity without altering glucose transport or Akt/Protein kinase B activation.

    PubMed

    Venable, C L; Frevert, E U; Kim, Y B; Fischer, B M; Kamatkar, S; Neel, B G; Kahn, B B

    2000-06-16

    Previous studies suggested that protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) antagonizes insulin action by catalyzing dephosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and/or other key proteins in the insulin signaling pathway. In adipose tissue and muscle of obese humans and rodents, PTP1B expression is increased, which led to the hypothesis that PTP1B plays a role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Consistent with this, mice in which the PTP1B gene was disrupted exhibit increased insulin sensitivity. To test whether increased expression of PTP1B in an insulin-sensitive cell type could contribute to insulin resistance, we overexpressed wild-type PTP1B in 3T3L1 adipocytes using adenovirus-mediated gene delivery. PTP1B expression was increased approximately 3-5-fold above endogenous levels at 16 h, approximately 14-fold at 40 h, and approximately 20-fold at 72 h post-transduction. Total protein-tyrosine phosphatase activity was increased by 50% at 16 h, 3-4-fold at 40 h, and 5-6-fold at 72 h post-transduction. Compared with control cells, cells expressing high levels of PTP1B showed a 50-60% decrease in maximally insulin-stimulated tyrosyl phosphorylation of IR and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity associated with IRS-1 or with phosphotyrosine. Akt phosphorylation and activity were unchanged. Phosphorylation of p42 and p44 MAP kinase (MAPK) was reduced approximately 32%. Overexpression of PTP1B had no effect on basal, submaximally or maximally (100 nm) insulin-stimulated glucose transport or on the EC(50) for transport. Our results suggest that: 1) insulin stimulation of glucose transport in adipocytes requires transport in adipocytes, and 3) overexpression of PTP1B alone in adipocytes does not impair glucose transport.

  11. Phenolsulfonphthalein transport by potential-sensitive urate transport system.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Shirou; Shimamoto, Soji; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Michiya; Miyazaki, Katsumi; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2005-08-22

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the transporter-mediated secretion systems for phenolsulfonphthalein in brush-border membranes. In human and rat renal brush-border membranes, a potential-sensitive transport system has been shown to be involved in the efflux of organic anions. The uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein into rat renal brush-border membrane vesicles was stimulated by an inside-positive membrane potential. This potential-sensitive uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein was inhibited by probenecid, pyrazinoate and urate. p-Aminohippurate had no effect on the potential-sensitive uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein. Moreover, urate competitively inhibited the uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein. On the other hand, the uptake of phenolsulfonphthalein was slightly increased in the presence of an outward Cl- gradient. These results suggest that phenolsulfonphthalein has high affinity for the potential-sensitive urate transport system but has low affinity for an anion exchanger.

  12. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A special report on school transportation covers the following topics: (1) a school bus safety update; (2) equipping school buses with motion detectors; (3) state training requirements for school bus drivers; (4) recruiting and retaining drivers; (5) regulations covering underground fuel-storage tanks; and (6) a transportation directory. (MLF)

  13. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  14. Amino acid transport by prosthecae of Asticcacaulis biprosthecum: evidence for a broad-range transport system.

    PubMed

    Tam, E; Pate, J L

    1985-10-01

    Prosthecae purified from cells of Asticcaulis biprosthecum possess active transport systems that transport all 20 amino acids tested. Using ascorbate-reduced phenazine methosulphate in the presence of oxygen, all 20 amino acids are accumulated against a concentration gradient by isolated prosthecae. Results of experiments testing the inhibition of transport of one amino acid by another, and of experiments testing the exchange of exogenous amino acids with those preloaded in prosthecae, along with characteristics of mutants defective in amino acid transport, suggest the presence in prosthecae of three amino acid transport systems. One, the general or G system, transports at least 18 of the 20 amino acids tested. Another system, referred to as the proline or P system, transports seven amino acids (including proline) that are also transported by the G system. The third system transports only glutamate and aspartate, and is referred to as the acidic amino acid transport system or A system.

  15. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  16. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a course designed to achieve a balance between exposing students to (1) advanced topics in transport phenomena, pointing out similarities and differences between three transfer processes and (2) common methods of solving differential equations. (JN)

  17. Hydroxyl radical scavengers inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Novogrodsky, A; Ravid, A; Rubin, A L; Stenzel, K H

    1982-01-01

    Agents that are known to be scavengers of hydroxyl radicals inhibit lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) to a greater extent than they inhibit mitogenesis induced by concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin. These agents include dimethyl sulfoxide, benzoate, thiourea, dimethylurea, tetramethylurea, L-tryptophan, mannitol, and several other alcohols. Their inhibitory effect is not associated with cytotoxicity. The hydroxyl radical scavengers do not inhibit PMA-dependent amino acid transport in T cells or PMA-induced superoxide production by monocytes. Thus, they do not inhibit the primary interaction of PMA with responding cells. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with PMA increased cellular guanylate cyclase in most experiments, and dimethyl sulfoxide tended to inhibit this increase. In addition to inhibition of PMA-induced mitogenesis, hydroxyl radical scavengers markedly inhibited the activity of lymphocyte activating factor (interleukin 1). The differential inhibition of lymphocyte mitogenesis induced by different mitogens appears to be related to the differential macrophage requirements of the mitogens. The data suggest that hydroxyl radicals may be involved in mediating the triggering signal for lymphocyte activation. Some of the hydroxyl radical scavengers are inducers of cellular differentiation,. nd it is possible that their differentiating activity is related to their ability to scavenge free radicals. PMID:6122209

  18. Chloride Accumulators NKCC1 and AE2 in Mouse GnRH Neurons: Implications for GABAA Mediated Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Burds, Carol; Cheng, Paul; Wray, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A developmental “switch” in chloride transporters occurs in most neurons resulting in GABAA mediated hyperpolarization in the adult. However, several neuronal cell subtypes maintain primarily depolarizing responses to GABAA receptor activation. Among this group are gonadotropin-releasing hormone-1 (GnRH) neurons, which control puberty and reproduction. NKCC1 is the primary chloride accumulator in neurons, expressed at high levels early in development and contributes to depolarization after GABAA receptor activation. In contrast, KCC2 is the primary chloride extruder in neurons, expressed at high levels in the adult and contributes to hyperpolarization after GABAA receptor activation. Anion exchangers (AEs) are also potential modulators of responses to GABAA activation since they accumulate chloride and extrude bicarbonate. To evaluate the mechanism(s) underlying GABAA mediated depolarization, GnRH neurons were analyzed for 1) expression of chloride transporters and AEs in embryonic, pre-pubertal, and adult mice 2) responses to GABAA receptor activation in NKCC1-/- mice and 3) function of AEs in these responses. At all ages, GnRH neurons were immunopositive for NKCC1 and AE2 but not KCC2 or AE3. Using explants, calcium imaging and gramicidin perforated patch clamp techniques we found that GnRH neurons from NKCC1-/- mice retained relatively normal responses to the GABAA agonist muscimol. However, acute pharmacological inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide eliminated the depolarization/calcium response to muscimol in 40% of GnRH neurons from WT mice. In the remaining GnRH neurons, HCO3- mediated mechanisms accounted for the remaining calcium responses to muscimol. Collectively these data reveal mechanisms responsible for maintaining depolarizing GABAA mediated transmission in GnRH neurons. PMID:26110920

  19. Ectopic expression of eIF4E-transporter triggers the movement of eIF4E into P-bodies, inhibiting steady-state translation but not the pioneer round of translation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyung Chul; Cho, Hana; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2008-05-16

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is the best-characterized mRNA surveillance mechanism; this process removes faulty mRNAs harboring premature termination codons (PTCs). NMD targets newly synthesized mRNAs bound by nuclear cap-binding proteins 80/20 (CBP80/20) and exon junction complex (EJC), the former of which is thought to recruit the ribosome to initiate the pioneer round of translation. After completion of the pioneer round of translation, CBP80/20 is replaced by the cytoplasmic cap-binding protein eIF4E, which mediates steady-state translation in the cytoplasm. Here, we show that overexpression of eIF4E-T preferentially inhibits cap-dependent steady-state translation, but not the pioneer round of translation. We also demonstrate that overexpression of eIF4E-T or Dcp1a triggers the movement of eIF4E into the processing bodies. These results suggest that the pioneer round of translation differs from steady-state translation in terms of ribosome recruitment.

  20. Manganese (III) meso-tetrakis N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl porphyrin acts as a pro-oxidant to inhibit electron transport chain proteins, modulate bioenergetics, and enhance the response to chemotherapy in lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Melba C; Briehl, Margaret M; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Tome, Margaret E

    2015-06-01

    The manganese porphyrin, manganese (III) meso-tetrakis N-ethylpyridinium-2-yl porphyrin (MnTE-2-PyP(5+)), acts as a pro-oxidant in the presence of intracellular H2O2. Mitochondria are the most prominent source of intracellular ROS and important regulators of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the increased oxidants near and within the mitochondria, we hypothesized that the mitochondria are a target of the pro-oxidative activity of MnTE-2-PyP(5+) and that we could exploit this effect to enhance the chemotherapeutic response in lymphoma. In this study, we demonstrate that MnTE-2-PyP(5+) modulates the mitochondrial redox environment and sensitizes lymphoma cells to antilymphoma chemotherapeutics. MnTE-2-PyP(5+) increased dexamethasone-induced mitochondrial ROS and oxidation of the mitochondrial glutathione pool in lymphoma cells. The combination treatment induced glutathionylation of Complexes I, III, and IV in the electron transport chain, and decreased the activity of Complexes I and III, but not the activity of Complex IV. Treatment with the porphyrin and dexamethasone also decreased cellular ATP levels. Rho(0) malignant T-cells with impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain function were less sensitive to the combination treatment than wild-type cells. These findings suggest that mitochondria are important for the porphyrin's ability to enhance cell death. MnTE-2-PyP(5+) also augmented the effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG), an antiglycolytic agent. In combination with 2DG, MnTE-2-PyP(5+) increased protein glutathionylation, decreased ATP levels more than 2DG treatment alone, and enhanced 2DG-induced cell death in primary B-ALL cells. MnTE-2-PyP(5+) did not enhance dexamethasone- or 2DG-induced cell death in normal cells. Our findings suggest that MnTE-2-PyP(5+) has potential as an adjuvant for the treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  1. Saturable brain-to-blood transport of endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Kastin, A J; Fasold, M B; Smith, R R; Horner, K A; Zadina, J E

    2001-07-01

    Opiate-modulating tetrapeptides such as tyrosine-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-release inhibiting factor-1 (Tyr-MIF-1; Tyr-Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2) and Tyr-W-MIF-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Gly-NH2) are saturably transported from brain to blood. We examined whether two recently described endogenous opiate tetrapeptides with similar structures, the mu-specific endomorphins, also are transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We found that the efflux rates of endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2) were each self-inhibited by an excess of the respective endomorphin, thereby defining saturable transport. Cross-inhibition of the transport of each endomorphin by the other indicated shared transport. By contrast, no inhibition of the efflux of either endomorphin resulted from coadministration of Tyr-MIF-1, indicating that peptide transport system-1 (PTS-1) was not involved. Tyr-W-MIF-1, which is partially transported by PTS-1, significantly (P<0.01) decreased the transport of endomorphin-1 and tended (P=0.051) to decrease the transport of endomorphin-2, consistent with its role as both an opiate and antiopiate. Although involved in modulation of pain, coinjection of calcitonin gene-related peptide or constriction of the sciatic nerve did not appear to inhibit endomorphin efflux. Thus, the results demonstrate the existence of a new efflux system across the BBB which saturably transports endomorphins from brain to blood.

  2. An allosteric binding site at the human serotonin transporter mediates the inhibition of escitalopram by R-citalopram: kinetic binding studies with the ALI/VFL-SI/TT mutant.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Huailing; Hansen, Kasper B; Boyle, Noel J; Han, Kiho; Muske, Galina; Huang, Xinyan; Egebjerg, Jan; Sánchez, Connie

    2009-10-25

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) has primary and allosteric binding sites for escitalopram and R-citalopram. Previous studies have established that the interaction of these two compounds at a low affinity allosteric binding site of hSERT can affect the dissociation of [(3)H]escitalopram from hSERT. The allosteric binding site involves a series of residues in the 10th, 11th, and 12th trans-membrane domains of hSERT. The low affinity allosteric activities of escitalopram and R-citalopram are essentially eliminated in a mutant hSERT with changes in some of these residues, namely A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T, as measured in dissociation binding studies. We confirm that in association binding experiments, R-citalopram at clinically relevant concentrations reduces the association rate of [(3)H]escitalopram as a ligand to wild type hSERT. We demonstrate that the ability of R-citalopram to reduce the association rate of escitalopram is also abolished in the mutant hSERT (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T), along with the expected disruption the low affinity allosteric function on dissociation binding. This suggests that the allosteric binding site mediates both the low affinity and higher affinity interactions between R-citalopram, escitalopram, and hSERT. Our data add an additional structural basis for the different efficacies of escitalopram compared to racemic citalopram reported in animal studies and clinical trials, and substantiate the hypothesis that hSERT has complex allosteric mechanisms underlying the unexplained in vivo activities of its inhibitors.

  3. PKCε inhibits isolation and stemness of side population cells via the suppression of ABCB1 transporter and PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK signaling in renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Fu, Shun Jun; Fan, Wen Zhe; Wang, Zhong Hua; Chen, Ze Bin; Guo, Sheng Jie; Chen, Jun Xing; Qiu, Shao Peng

    2016-06-28

    Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), a member of the novel PKC family, is known to be a transforming oncogene and tumor biomarker for many human solid cancers including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We isolated side population (SP) cells from the RCC 769P cell line, and proved that those cells possess cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics. In this study, to identify the function of PKCε in cancer stemness of 769P SP cells, we reduced the expression of PKCε in those cells, following the results demonstrated that PKCε depletion had a negative correlation with the existence of SP cells in 769P cell line. Down-regulation of PKCε also suppresses the CSC potential of sorted 769P SP cells in several ways: proliferation potential, resistance to chemotherapeutics and in vivo tumor formation ability. Our study also reveals that PKCε is associated with ABCB1 and this association probably contributed to the SP cells isolation from 769P cell line. Furthermore, the expression of ABCB1 is directly regulated by PKCε. Additionally, after the depletion of PKCε, the phosphorylation of pAkt, pStat3 and pERK was apparently suppressed in 769P SP cells, whereas PKCε overexpression could promote the phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3 and ERK in 769P Non-SP cells. Overall, PKCε down-regulation suppresses sorting and the cancer stem-like phenotype of RCC 769P SP cells through the regulation of ABCB1 transporter and the PI3K/Akt, Stat3 and MAPK/ERK pathways that are dependent on the phosphorylation effects. Thus, PKCε may work as an important mediator in cancer stem cell pathogenesis of renal cell cancer.

  4. Enabling glucose/xylose co-transport in yeast through the directed evolution of a sugar transporter.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Schmitz, Olivia; Alper, Hal S

    2016-12-01

    The capacity to co-transport glucose and xylose into yeast has remained a technical challenge in the field. While significant efforts have been made in transporter engineering to increase xylose transport rates, glucose-based inhibition still limit most of these transporters. To address this issue, we further engineer sugar transporter proteins to remove glucose inhibition and enable glucose/xylose co-transport. Specifically, we start with our previously derived CiGXS1 FIM mutant strain and subjugate it to several rounds of mutagenesis and selection in a hexose metabolism null strain. Through this effort, we identify several mutations including N326H, a truncation in the C-terminal tail, I171F, and M40V as additionally dominant for reducing glucose inhibition. The resulting transporter shows substantially improved xylose transport rates in the presence of high quantities of glucose including up to 70 g/L glucose. Moreover, the resulting transporter enables co-utilization of glucose and xylose with glucose rates on par with a wild-type transporter and xylose rates exceeding that of glucose. These results demonstrate that major facilitator superfamily hexose transporters can be rewired into glucose-xylose co-transporters without functional inhibition by either substrate. These results enhance the potential of using lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock for yeast.

  5. Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Fabian; Fromm, Martin F

    2011-07-01

    Drug-drug interactions are a serious clinical issue. An important mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions is induction or inhibition of drug transporters that mediate the cellular uptake and efflux of xenobiotics. Especially drug transporters of the small intestine, liver and kidney are major determinants of the pharmacokinetic profile of drugs. Transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions in these three organs can considerably influence the pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of drugs. In this article, we focus on probe drugs lacking significant metabolism to highlight mechanisms of interactions of selected intestinal, hepatic and renal drug transporters (e.g., organic anion transporting polypeptide [OATP] 1A2, OATP2B1, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, P-gp, organic anion transporter [OAT] 1, OAT3, breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP], organic cation transporter [OCT] 2 and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein [MATE] 1). Genotype-dependent drug-drug interactions are also discussed.

  6. Air transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, F Handley

    1924-01-01

    I purpose (sic) in this paper to deal with the development in air transport which has taken place since civil aviation between England and the Continent first started at the end of August 1919. A great deal of attention has been paid in the press to air services of the future, to the detriment of the consideration of results obtained up to the present.

  7. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…

  8. Anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheverry, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    This article is concerned with the relativistic Vlasov equation, for collisionless axisymmetric plasmas immersed in a strong magnetic field, like in tokamaks. It provides a consistent kinetic treatment of the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics. It shows that the turbulent transport can be completely described through WKB expansions.

  9. A phosphotyrosine switch regulates organic cation transporters.

    PubMed

    Sprowl, Jason A; Ong, Su Sien; Gibson, Alice A; Hu, Shuiying; Du, Guoqing; Lin, Wenwei; Li, Lie; Bharill, Shashank; Ness, Rachel A; Stecula, Adrian; Offer, Steven M; Diasio, Robert B; Nies, Anne T; Schwab, Matthias; Cavaletti, Guido; Schlatter, Eberhard; Ciarimboli, Giuliano; Schellens, Jan H M; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Sali, Andrej; Chen, Taosheng; Baker, Sharyn D; Sparreboom, Alex; Pabla, Navjotsingh

    2016-03-16

    Membrane transporters are key determinants of therapeutic outcomes. They regulate systemic and cellular drug levels influencing efficacy as well as toxicities. Here we report a unique phosphorylation-dependent interaction between drug transporters and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which has uncovered widespread phosphotyrosine-mediated regulation of drug transporters. We initially found that organic cation transporters (OCTs), uptake carriers of metformin and oxaliplatin, were inhibited by several clinically used TKIs. Mechanistic studies showed that these TKIs inhibit the Src family kinase Yes1, which was found to be essential for OCT2 tyrosine phosphorylation and function. Yes1 inhibition in vivo diminished OCT2 activity, significantly mitigating oxaliplatin-induced acute sensory neuropathy. Along with OCT2, other SLC-family drug transporters are potentially part of an extensive 'transporter-phosphoproteome' with unique susceptibility to TKIs. On the basis of these findings we propose that TKIs, an important and rapidly expanding class of therapeutics, can functionally modulate pharmacologically important proteins by inhibiting protein kinases essential for their post-translational regulation.

  10. Calcium inhibits diacylglycerol uptake by serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ahyayauch, Hasna; Arana, Gorka; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M

    2009-03-01

    Serum albumin is an abundant protein in blood plasma, that is well-known for its ability to transport hydrophobic biomolecules and drugs. Recent hypotheses propose that serum albumin plays a role in the regulation of lipid metabolism in addition to its lipid transport properties. The present work explores the capacity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to extract diacylglycerols (DAG) from phospholipid bilayers, and the inhibition of such interaction by divalent cations. Quantitative measurements using radioactive DAG and morphological evidence derived from giant unilamellar vesicles examined by confocal microscopy provide concurrent results. BSA extracts DAG from vesicles consisting of phosphatidylinositol/DAG. Long, saturated DAG species are incorporated more readily than the shorter-chain or unsaturated ones. Divalent cations hinder DAG uptake by BSA. For Ca(2+), the concentration causing half-maximal inhibition is approximately 10 muM; 90% inhibition is caused by 100 muM Ca(2+). Sr(2+) requires concentrations one order of magnitude higher, while Mg(2+) has virtually no effect. As an example on how DAG uptake by BSA, and its inhibition by Ca(2+), could play a regulating role in lipid metabolism, a PI-specific phospholipase C has been assayed in the presence of BSA and/or Ca(2+). BSA activates the enzyme by removing the end-product DAG, but the activation is reverted by Ca(2+) that inhibits DAG uptake.

  11. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copp