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Sample records for inhibits neuronal cell

  1. Mouse bone marrow stromal cells differentiate to neuron-like cells upon inhibition of BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Monika; Prashar, Paritosh; Yadav, Prem Swaroop; Sen, Jonaki

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a source of autologous stem cells that have the potential for undergoing differentiation into multiple cell types including neurons. Although the neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells has been studied for a long time, the molecular players involved are still not defined. Here we report that the genetic deletion of two members of the bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) family, Bmp2 and Bmp4 in mouse BMSCs causes their differentiation into cells with neuron-like morphology. Surprisingly these cells expressed certain markers characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Based on this observation, we inhibited BMP signaling in mouse BMSCs through a brief exposure to Noggin protein which also led to their differentiation into cells expressing both neuronal and glial markers. Such cells seem to have the potential for further differentiation into subtypes of neuronal and glial cells and thus could be utilized for cell-based therapeutic applications.

  2. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-01-01

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer’s disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide’s antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide’s direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17. PMID:26062019

  3. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-01-01

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide's antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide's direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17.

  4. Humanin Derivatives Inhibit Necrotic Cell Death in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Aviv; Lerner-Yardeni, Jenny; Meridor, David; Kasher, Roni; Nathan, Ilana; Parola, Abraham H

    2015-01-01

    Humanin and its derivatives are peptides known for their protective antiapoptotic effects against Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we identify a novel function of the humanin-derivative AGA(C8R)-HNG17 (namely, protection against cellular necrosis). Necrosis is one of the main modes of cell death, which was until recently considered an unmoderated process. However, recent findings suggest the opposite. We have found that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 confers protection against necrosis in the neuronal cell lines PC-12 and NSC-34, where necrosis is induced in a glucose-free medium by either chemohypoxia or by a shift from apoptosis to necrosis. Our studies in traumatic brain injury models in mice, where necrosis is the main mode of neuronal cell death, have shown that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has a protective effect. This result is demonstrated by a decrease in a neuronal severity score and by a reduction in brain edema, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An insight into the peptide's antinecrotic mechanism was attained through measurements of cellular ATP levels in PC-12 cells under necrotic conditions, showing that the peptide mitigates a necrosis-associated decrease in ATP levels. Further, we demonstrate the peptide's direct enhancement of the activity of ATP synthase activity, isolated from rat-liver mitochondria, suggesting that AGA(C8R)-HNG17 targets the mitochondria and regulates cellular ATP levels. Thus, AGA(C8R)-HNG17 has potential use for the development of drug therapies for necrosis-related diseases, for example, traumatic brain injury, stroke, myocardial infarction, and other conditions for which no efficient drug-based treatment is currently available. Finally, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antinecrotic mode of action of AGA(C8R)-HNG17. PMID:26062019

  5. Integration of Purkinje cell inhibition by cerebellar nucleo-olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Najac, Marion; Raman, Indira M

    2015-01-14

    Neurons in the cerebellar cortex, cerebellar nuclei, and inferior olive (IO) form a trisynaptic loop critical for motor learning. IO neurons excite Purkinje cells via climbing fibers and depress their parallel fiber inputs. Purkinje cells inhibit diverse cells in the cerebellar nuclei, including small GABAergic nucleo-olivary neurons that project to the IO. To investigate how these neurons integrate synaptic signals from Purkinje cells, we retrogradely labeled nucleo-olivary cells in the contralateral interpositus and lateral nuclei with cholera toxin subunit B-Alexa Fluor 488 and recorded their electrophysiological properties in cerebellar slices from weanling mice. Nucleo-olivary cells fired action potentials over a relatively narrow dynamic range (maximal rate, ∼ 70 spikes/s), unlike large cells that project to premotor areas (maximal rate, ∼ 400 spikes/s). GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs evoked by electrical or optogenetic stimulation of Purkinje cells were more than 10-fold slower in nucleo-olivary cells (decay time, ∼ 25 ms) than in large cells (∼ 2 ms), and repetitive stimulation at 20-150 Hz evoked greatly summating IPSCs. Nucleo-olivary firing rates varied inversely with IPSP frequency, and the timing of Purkinje IPSPs and nucleo-olivary spikes was uncorrelated. These attributes contrast with large cells, whose brief IPSCs and rapid firing rates can permit well timed postinhibitory spiking. Thus, the intrinsic and synaptic properties of these two projection neurons from the cerebellar nuclei tailor them for differential integration and transmission of their Purkinje cell input.

  6. Integration of Purkinje cell inhibition by cerebellar nucleo-olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Najac, Marion; Raman, Indira M

    2015-01-14

    Neurons in the cerebellar cortex, cerebellar nuclei, and inferior olive (IO) form a trisynaptic loop critical for motor learning. IO neurons excite Purkinje cells via climbing fibers and depress their parallel fiber inputs. Purkinje cells inhibit diverse cells in the cerebellar nuclei, including small GABAergic nucleo-olivary neurons that project to the IO. To investigate how these neurons integrate synaptic signals from Purkinje cells, we retrogradely labeled nucleo-olivary cells in the contralateral interpositus and lateral nuclei with cholera toxin subunit B-Alexa Fluor 488 and recorded their electrophysiological properties in cerebellar slices from weanling mice. Nucleo-olivary cells fired action potentials over a relatively narrow dynamic range (maximal rate, ∼ 70 spikes/s), unlike large cells that project to premotor areas (maximal rate, ∼ 400 spikes/s). GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs evoked by electrical or optogenetic stimulation of Purkinje cells were more than 10-fold slower in nucleo-olivary cells (decay time, ∼ 25 ms) than in large cells (∼ 2 ms), and repetitive stimulation at 20-150 Hz evoked greatly summating IPSCs. Nucleo-olivary firing rates varied inversely with IPSP frequency, and the timing of Purkinje IPSPs and nucleo-olivary spikes was uncorrelated. These attributes contrast with large cells, whose brief IPSCs and rapid firing rates can permit well timed postinhibitory spiking. Thus, the intrinsic and synaptic properties of these two projection neurons from the cerebellar nuclei tailor them for differential integration and transmission of their Purkinje cell input. PMID:25589749

  7. Calreticulin Binds to Fas Ligand and Inhibits Neuronal Cell Apoptosis Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Beilei; Wu, Zhengzheng; Xu, Jun; Xu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background. Calreticulin (CRT) can bind to Fas ligand (FasL) and inhibit Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of Jurkat T cells. However, its effect on neuronal cell apoptosis has not been investigated. Purpose. We aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CRT following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Methods. Mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and SH-SY5Y cells subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) were used as models for IRI. The CRT protein level was detected by Western blotting, and mRNA expression of CRT, caspase-3, and caspase-8 was measured by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence was used to assess the localization of CRT and FasL. The interaction of CRT with FasL was verified by coimmunoprecipitation. SH-SY5Y cell viability was determined by MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The measurement of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity was carried out using caspase activity assay kits. Results. After IRI, CRT was upregulated on the neuron surface and bound to FasL, leading to increased viability of OGD-exposed SH-SY5Y cells and decreased activity of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Conclusions. This study for the first time revealed that increased CRT inhibited Fas/FasL-mediated neuronal cell apoptosis during the early stage of ischemic stroke, suggesting it to be a potential protector activated soon after IRI. PMID:26583143

  8. Tocilizumab inhibits neuronal cell apoptosis and activates STAT3 in cerebral infarction rat model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaojun; Zhou, Jun; Kang, Weijie; Dong, Zhaoni; Wang, Hezuo

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is a severe hypoxic ischemic necrosis with accelerated neuronal cell apoptosis in the brain. As a monoclonal antibody against interleukin 6, tocilizumab (TCZ) is widely used in immune diseases, whose function in cerebral infarction has not been studied. This study aims to reveal the role of TCZ in regulating neuronal cell apoptosis in cerebral infarction. The cerebral infarction rat model was constructed by middle cerebral artery occlusion and treated with TCZ. Cell apoptosis in hippocampus and cortex of the brain was examined with TUNEL method. Rat neuronal cells cultured in oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions and treated with TCZ were used to compare cell viability and apoptosis. Apoptosis-related factors including B-cell lymphoma extra large (Bcl-xL) and Caspase 3, as well as the phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) in brain cortex were analyzed from the protein level. Results indicated that TCZ treatment could significantly prevent the promoted cell apoptosis caused by cerebral infarction or OGD (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). In brain cortex of the rat model, TCZ up-regulated Bcl-xL and down-regulated Caspase 3, consistent with the inhibited cell apoptosis. It also promoted tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of STAT3, which might be the potential regulatory mechanism of TCZ in neuronal cells. This study provided evidence for the protective role of TCZ against neuronal cell apoptosis in cerebral infarction. Based on these fundamental data, TCZ is a promising option for treating cerebral infarction, but further investigations on related mechanisms are still necessary. PMID:26773188

  9. Synergistic effects of CoCl(2) and ROCK inhibition on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Legros, Hélène; Valable, Samuel; Duchatelle, Pascal; Lecocq, Myriam; Petit, Edwige; Nicole, Olivier; Bernaudin, Myriam

    2006-07-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) constitute an interesting cellular source to promote brain regeneration after neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, several studies suggested that oxygen-dependent gene expression is of crucial importance in governing the essential steps of neurogenesis such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. In this context, we analysed the effect of the HIF-1 (hypoxia inducible factor-1) activation-mimicking agent CoCl(2) on MSCs. CoCl(2) treatment increased the expression of the anti-proliferative gene BTG2/PC3 and decreased cyclin D1 expression. Expression of HIF-1alpha and its target genes EPO, VEGF and p21 was also upregulated. These changes were followed by inhibition of cell proliferation and morphological changes resulting in neuron-like cells, which had increased neuronal marker expression and responded to neurotransmitters. Echinomycin, a molecule inhibiting HIF-1 DNA-binding activity, blocked the CoCl(2) effect on MSCs. Additionally, by using Y-27632, we demonstrated that Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibition potentiated CoCl(2)-induced MSC differentiation in particular into dopaminergic neuron-like cells as attested by its effect on tyrosine hydroxylase expression. Altogether, these results support the ability of MSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells in response to CoCl(2), an effect that might act, in part, through HIF-1 activation and cell-cycle arrest, and which is potentiated by inhibition of ROCK.

  10. KIF1A inhibition immortalizes brain stem cells but blocks BDNF-mediated neuronal migration

    PubMed Central

    Carabalona, Aurelie; Hu, Daniel Jun-Kit; B. Vallee1, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Brain neural stem cells (RGPs) undergo a mysterious form of cell cycle-entrained “interkinetic” nuclear migration (INM), driven apically by cytoplasmic dynein and basally by the kinesin KIF1A, which has recently been implicated in human brain developmental disease. To understand the consequences of altered basal INM and the roles of KIF1A in disease, we performed constitutive and conditional RNAi and expressed mutant KIF1A in E16-P7 rat RGPs and neurons. RGPs inhibited in basal INM still showed normal cell cycle progression, though neurogenic divisions were severely reduced. Postmitotic neuronal migration was independently disrupted at the multipolar stage, accompanied by premature ectopic expression of neuronal differentiation markers. Similar effects were unexpectedly observed throughout the layer of surrounding control cells, mimicked by Bdnf or Dcx RNAi, and rescued by BDNF application. These results identify novel, sequential, and independent roles for KIF1A and provide an important new approach for reversing the effects of human disease. PMID:26752160

  11. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Avi; Strom, Bjorn Oddvar; Turner, Simon R.; Timperley, Christopher M.; Bird, Michael; Green, A. Christopher; Chad, John E.; Worek, Franz; Tattersall, John E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase), but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning. PMID:26274808

  12. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Ring, Avi; Strom, Bjorn Oddvar; Turner, Simon R; Timperley, Christopher M; Bird, Michael; Green, A Christopher; Chad, John E; Worek, Franz; Tattersall, John E H

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase), but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  13. The Ubiquitin Ligase Praja1 Reduces NRAGE Expression and Inhibits Neuronal Differentiation of PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Teuber, Jan; Mueller, Bettina; Fukabori, Ryoji; Lang, Daniel; Albrecht, Anne; Stork, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that regulated ubiquitination of proteins plays a critical role in the development and plasticity of the central nervous system. We have previously identified the ubiquitin ligase Praja1 as a gene product induced during fear memory consolidation. However, the neuronal function of this enzyme still needs to be clarified. Here, we investigate its involvement in the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Praja1 co-localizes with cytoskeleton components and the neurotrophin receptor interacting MAGE homologue (NRAGE). We observed an enhanced expression of Praja1 after 3 days of NGF treatment and a suppression of neurite formation upon Praja1 overexpression in stably transfected PC12 cell lines, which was associated with a proteasome-dependent reduction of NRAGE levels. Our data suggest that Praja1, through ubiquitination and degradation of NRAGE, inhibits neuronal differentiation. The two murine isoforms, Praja1.1 and Praja1.2, appear to be functionally homologous in this respect. PMID:23717400

  14. Sutherlandia frutescens Ethanol Extracts Inhibit Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Responses in Neurons and Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinghua; Chuang, Dennis Y.; Zong, Yijia; Patel, Jayleenkumar; Brownstein, Korey; Lei, Wei; Lu, Chi-Hua; Simonyi, Agnes; Gu, Zezong; Cui, Jiankun; Rottinghaus, George E.; Fritsche, Kevin L.; Lubahn, Dennis B.; Folk, William R.; Sun, Grace Y.

    2014-01-01

    Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R.Br. (SF) is a medicinal plant indigenous to southern Africa and used in folk and contemporary remedies for stress, chronic diseases, cancer, and HIV/AIDS. While previous studies have focused on physiological effects of SF on cellular and systemic abnormalities associated with these diseases, little is known about its effects in the brain and immune cells in the central nervous system. Results of this study indicate that ethanol extracts of SF (SF-E) suppress NMDA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in neurons, and LPS- and IFNγ-induced ROS and nitric oxide (NO) production in microglial cells. SF-E’s action on microglial cells appears to be mediated through inhibition of the IFNγ-induced p-ERK1/2 signaling pathway which is central to regulating a number of intracellular metabolic processes including enhancing STAT1α phosphorylation and filopodia formation. The involvement of SF in these pathways suggests the potential for novel therapeutics for stress and prevention, and/or treatment of HIV/AIDS as well as other inflammatory diseases in the brain. PMID:24587007

  15. Concomitant inhibition of prolyl hydroxylases and ROCK initiates differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and PC12 towards the neuronal lineage.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Petit, Edwige; Bernaudin, Myriam

    2008-12-12

    This study demonstrates that a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, FG-0041, is able, in combination with the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, to initiate differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neuron-like cells. FG-0041/Y-27632 co-treatment provokes morphological changes into neuron-like cells, increases neuronal marker expression and provokes modifications of cell cycle-related gene expression consistent with a cell cycle arrest of MSC, three events showing the engagement of MSC towards the neuronal lineage. Moreover, as we observed in our previous studies with cobalt chloride and desferroxamine, the activation of HIF-1 by this prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor is potentiated by Y-27632 which could explain at least in part the effect of this co-treatment on MSC neuronal differentiation. In addition, we show that this co-treatment enhances neurite outgrowth and tyrosine hydroxylase expression in PC12 cells. Altogether, these results evidence that concomitant inhibition of prolyl hydroxylases and ROCK represents a relevant protocol to initiate neuronal differentiation.

  16. Inhibition of cell proliferation: a mechanism likely to mediate the prevention of neuronal cell death by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Mayo, J C; Sainz, R M; Uría, H; Antolín, I; Estéban, M M; Rodríguez

    1998-08-01

    In a previous work we demonstrated that melatonin is able to prevent apoptosis induced by low doses of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in undifferentiated and neuronal PC12 cells. We also reported how this neurohormone was able to prevent the decrease in the mRNA for antioxidant enzymes caused by 6-OHDA. Although the antioxidant capability of melatonin seems to be clearly implicated in its antiapoptotic activity, literature suggests that its antiproliferative property could also be involved in its prevention of apoptosis. In the present work we demonstrated that melatonin is able to inhibit cell proliferation in undifferentiated PC12 cells, decreasing cell number and the total amount of DNA, and the mRNA for the histone H4, which are known to increase during DNA synthesis. Melatonin does not decrease the number of cells in nonproliferating PC12 cells, indicating that it does not cause cell death. Additionally, we demonstrate that other inhibitors of cell proliferation, as well as other antioxidants, are able to mimic the antiapoptotic effect of melatonin. This is interpreted to mean that melatonin acts by both mechanisms to inhibit apoptosis caused by 6-OHDA and the findings support the hypothesis of a relationship between oxidative stress and regulation of the cell cycle.

  17. PDE4 Inhibition by Rolipram Promotes Neuronal Differentiation in Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Joe, I-Seul; Cho, Goang-Won

    2016-08-01

    Increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) can promote axonal elongation and facilitate neuronal repair, while decreased cAMP is associated with losses in neuronal regenerative capacity. Rolipram, which upregulates intracellular cAMP by blocking phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) enzyme activity, can mitigate diverse neurological disorders. In this study, we investigated whether rolipram induces neuronal differentiation of human bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). Rolipram-treated MSCs (Roli-MSCs) had significantly increased expression of the neuroprogenitor proteins Nestin, Musashi, GFAP, and Sox-2. When Roli-MSCs were differentiated with neuronal induction media (Roli-dMSCs), they exhibited cell body and dendritic morphologies similar to those of neurons. The neurite number and length of Roli-dMSCs were significantly increased compared to those of differentiated MSCs (dMSCs). Compared with undifferentiated hBM-MSCs, the Roli-dMSCs and dMSCs showed significantly increased expression of the neuronal-specific marker genes Nestin, Musashi, CD133, GFAP, NF-M, MAP-2, KCNH1, KCNH5, SCN3A, and CACNA1A, and decreased expression of other lineage-specific markers Adiponectin, ALP, FABP4, and MMP13. The Roli-dMSCs also showed a higher expression of the neuronal markers Nestin, Musashi, Sox-2, NF-M, and Tuj-1 compared to those of the undifferentiated hBM-MSCs, measured by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting assay. Thus, we have shown that rolipram ameliorates neuronal differentiation by the regulation of neuroprogenitor expression in hBM-MSCs, and rolipram treatment of MSCs may improve the therapeutic efficacy of stem cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27459581

  18. Inhibition of HIF-prolyl-4-hydroxylases prevents mitochondrial impairment and cell death in a model of neuronal oxytosis

    PubMed Central

    Neitemeier, S; Dolga, A M; Honrath, B; Karuppagounder, S S; Alim, I; Ratan, R R; Culmsee, C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment induced by oxidative stress is a main characteristic of intrinsic cell death pathways in neurons underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protection of mitochondrial integrity and function is emerging as a promising strategy to prevent neuronal damage. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl-4-hydroxylases (HIF-PHDs) by adaptaquin inhibits lipid peroxidation and fully maintains mitochondrial function as indicated by restored mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, reduced formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and preserved mitochondrial respiration, thereby protecting neuronal HT-22 cells in a model of glutamate-induced oxytosis. Selective reduction of PHD1 protein using CRISPR/Cas9 technology also reduced both lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment, and attenuated glutamate toxicity in the HT-22 cells. Regulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) expression levels and related target genes may mediate these beneficial effects. Overall, these results expose HIF-PHDs as promising targets to protect mitochondria and, thereby, neurons from oxidative cell death. PMID:27148687

  19. Inhibiting Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 Ameliorates Neuronal Loss in the Ganglion Cell Layer of Rats in Retinal Ischemia/Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tu; You, Qiuting; Chen, Dan; Tong, Jianbin; Shang, Lei; Luo, Jia; Qiu, Yi; Yu, Huimin; Zeng, Leping; Huang, Jufang

    2016-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) is integrally involved in the neuronal degeneration of the central nervous system by promoting glial activation, neuronal apoptosis and damage to the brain-blood barrier. However, whether MMP3 also contributes to the neuronal degeneration induced by retinal ischemia/reperfusion is still uncertain. In the present study, we detected the cellular localization of MMP3 in adult rat retinae and explored the relationship of its expression with neuronal loss in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) in retinal ischemia/reperfusion. We found that MMP3 was widely expressed in many cells throughout the layers of the rat retinae, including Vertebrate neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-, parvalbumin-, calbindin-, protein kinase C-α-, glial fibrillary acidic protein-, glutamine synthetase- and CD11b-positive cells. Furthermore, all rats were treated with high intraocular pressure (HIOP) for 1 h (h) and sacrificed at 6 h, 1 day (d), 3 d, and 7 d after HIOP. Compared to the normal control, the expression of both proenzyme MMP3 and active MMP3 were significantly up-regulated after HIOP treatment without alteration of the laminar distribution pattern. Moreover, inhibiting MMP3 ameliorated the loss of NeuN-positive cells in the GCL following HIOP. In summary, our data demonstrates that MMP3 is expressed in multiple types of neurons and glial cells in normal rat retinae. Simultaneously, the up-regulation of its expression and activity are closely involved in neuronal loss in the GCL in retinal ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:26830289

  20. The impact of tonic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition on neuronal excitability varies across brain region and cell type

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vallent; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunits and the numerous configurations during subunit assembly give rise to a variety of receptors with different functional properties. This heterogeneity results in variations in GABAergic conductances across numerous brain regions and cell types. Phasic inhibition is mediated by synaptically-localized receptors with a low affinity for GABA and results in a transient, rapidly desensitizing GABAergic conductance; whereas, tonic inhibition is mediated by extrasynaptic receptors with a high affinity for GABA and results in a persistent GABAergic conductance. The specific functions of tonic versus phasic GABAergic inhibition in different cell types and the impact on specific neural circuits are only beginning to be unraveled. Here we review the diversity in the magnitude of tonic GABAergic inhibition in various brain regions and cell types, and highlight the impact on neuronal excitability in different neuronal circuits. Further, we discuss the relevance of tonic inhibition in various physiological and pathological contexts as well as the potential of targeting these receptor subtypes for treatment of diseases, such as epilepsy. PMID:24550784

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells protect CNS neurons against glutamate excitotoxicity by inhibiting glutamate receptor expression and function.

    PubMed

    Voulgari-Kokota, A; Fairless, R; Karamita, M; Kyrargyri, V; Tseveleki, V; Evangelidou, M; Delorme, B; Charbord, P; Diem, R; Probert, L

    2012-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) promote functional recovery in experimental models of central nervous system (CNS) pathology and are currently being tested in clinical trials for stroke, multiple sclerosis and CNS injury. Their beneficial effects are attributed to the activation of endogenous CNS protection and repair processes as well as immune regulation but their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Here we investigated the neuroprotective effects of mouse MSC in rodent MSC-neuron co-cultures and mice using models of glutamate excitotoxicity. A 24h pre-culture of mouse primary cortical neurons with MSC protected them against glutamate (NMDA) receptor-induced death and conditioned medium from MSC (MSC CM) was sufficient for this effect. Protection by MSC CM was associated with reduced mRNA levels of genes encoding NMDA receptor subunits, and increased levels for genes associated with non-neuronal and stem cell types, as shown by RT-PCR and cDNA microarray analyses. Changes in gene expression were not associated with alterations in cell lineage representation within the cultures. Further, MSC CM-mediated neuroprotection in rat retinal ganglion cells was associated with reduced glutamate-induced calcium influx. The adoptive transfer of EGFP(+)MSC in a mouse kainic acid epilepsy model also provided neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity in vivo, as shown by reduced neuron damage and glial cell activation in the hippocampus. These results show that MSC mediate direct neuroprotection by reducing neuronal sensitivity to glutamate receptor ligands and altering gene expression, and suggest a link between the therapeutic effects of MSC and the activation of cell plasticity in the damaged CNS. PMID:22561409

  2. Minocycline inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of microglia on neural progenitor cells and protected their neuronal differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuqing; Su, Huanxing; Chu, Tak-Ho; Guo, Anchen; Wu, Wutian

    2013-05-10

    Neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation offers great potential to treat spinal cord injury (SCI), but their efficiency is limited by poor survival and neuronal differentiation after transplantation. In the injury site, microglia may become activated and participate in the inflammation reaction. In vitro studies indicated that activated microglia might impair NPC survival and neuronal differentiation, but resting microglia did not. This study investigated the potential of minocycline to modify the negative effects of activated microglia on NPCs in vitro. First, the direct effects of minocycline on NPCs were tested. The results showed that at the concentration of 10μg/ml or lower, minocycline did not affect NPC survival and proliferation, but impaired neuronal differentiation. Then microglia were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or treated with LPS plus minocycline (LPSMC), and the effects of conditioned media on NPC apoptosis and differentiation were studied. The results showed that, compared with LPS treatment group, the microglia conditioned media of LPSMC treatment group resulted in a significantly lower apoptotic rate of NPCs, and increased the neuronal differentiation of NPCs. This suggested that minocycline might inhibit the negative effects of microglia on NPCs, and have the potential to support the survival and neuronal differentiation of transplanted NPCs for SCI.

  3. Interferon-gamma inhibits the neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells by inhibiting the expression of Neurogenin2 via the JAK/STAT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jyhyun; Lee, Junsub; Kim, Sunyoung

    2015-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is one of the critical cytokines released by host immune cells upon infection. Despite the important role(s) of IFN-γ in host immune responses, there has been no in vivo study regarding the effects of IFN-γ on brain development, and the results from many in vitro studies are controversial. In this study, the effects of IFN-γ on embryonic neurogenesis were investigated. Treatment of E14.5 mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) with IFN-γ resulted in a decrease in the percentage of TuJ1-positive immature neurons but an increase in the percentage of Nestin-positive NPCs. Similar results were obtained in vivo. Treatment of NPCs with a JAK inhibitor or the knockdown of STAT1 expression abrogated the IFN-γ-mediated inhibition of neurogenesis. Interestingly, the expression of one of proneural genes, Neurogenin2 (Neurog2) was dramatically inhibited upon IFN-γ treatment, and cells overexpressing Neurog2 did not respond to IFN-γ. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IFN-γ inhibits neuronal differentiation of NPCs by negatively regulating the expression of Neurog2 via the JAK/STAT1 pathway. Our findings may provide an insight into the role of IFN-γ in the development of embryonic brain.

  4. Dual Inhibition of Activin/Nodal/TGF-β and BMP Signaling Pathways by SB431542 and Dorsomorphin Induces Neuronal Differentiation of Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Madhu, Vedavathi; Dighe, Abhijit S.; Cui, Quanjun; Deal, D. Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the nervous system can cause devastating diseases or musculoskeletal dysfunctions and transplantation of progenitor stem cells can be an excellent treatment option in this regard. Preclinical studies demonstrate that untreated stem cells, unlike stem cells activated to differentiate into neuronal lineage, do not survive in the neuronal tissues. Conventional methods of inducing neuronal differentiation of stem cells are complex and expensive. We therefore sought to determine if a simple, one-step, and cost effective method, previously reported to induce neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem cells and induced-pluripotent stem cells, can be applied to adult stem cells. Indeed, dual inhibition of activin/nodal/TGF-β and BMP pathways using SB431542 and dorsomorphin, respectively, induced neuronal differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) as evidenced by formation of neurite extensions, protein expression of neuron-specific gamma enolase, and mRNA expression of neuron-specific transcription factors Sox1 and Pax6 and matured neuronal marker NF200. This process correlated with enhanced phosphorylation of p38, Erk1/2, PI3K, and Akt1/3. Additionally, in vitro subcutaneous implants of SB431542 and dorsomorphin treated hADSCs displayed significantly higher expression of active-axonal-growth-specific marker GAP43. Our data offers novel insights into cell-based therapies for the nervous system repair. PMID:26798350

  5. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks. PMID:27274721

  6. Inhibition Controls Asynchronous States of Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Computations in cortical circuits require action potentials from excitatory and inhibitory neurons. In this mini-review, I first provide a quick overview of findings that indicate that GABAergic neurons play a fundamental role in coordinating spikes and generating synchronized network activity. Next, I argue that these observations helped popularize the notion that network oscillations require a high degree of spike correlations among interneurons which, in turn, produce synchronous inhibition of the local microcircuit. The aim of this text is to discuss some recent experimental and computational findings that support a complementary view: one in which interneurons participate actively in producing asynchronous states in cortical networks. This requires a proper mixture of shared excitation and inhibition leading to asynchronous activity between neighboring cells. Such contribution from interneurons would be extremely important because it would tend to reduce the spike correlation between neighboring pyramidal cells, a drop in redundancy that could enhance the information-processing capacity of neural networks.

  7. Cellular form of prion protein inhibits Reelin-mediated shedding of Caspr from the neuronal cell surface to potentiate Caspr-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Vasudharani; Jakovcevski, Igor; Santuccione, Antonella; Li, Shen; Lee, Hyun Joon; Peles, Elior; Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir; Schachner, Melitta

    2010-07-01

    Extension of axonal and dendritic processes in the CNS is tightly regulated by outgrowth-promoting and -inhibitory cues to assure precision of synaptic connections. We identify a novel role for contactin-associated protein (Caspr) as an inhibitory cue that reduces neurite outgrowth from CNS neurons. We show that proteolysis of Caspr at the cell surface is regulated by the cellular form of prion protein (PrP), which directly binds to Caspr. PrP inhibits Reelin-mediated shedding of Caspr from the cell surface, thereby increasing surface levels of Caspr and potentiating the inhibitory effect of Caspr on neurite outgrowth. PrP deficiency results in reduced levels of Caspr at the cell surface, enhanced neurite outgrowth in vitro, and more efficient regeneration of axons in vivo following spinal cord injury. Thus, we reveal a previously unrecognized role for Caspr and PrP in inhibitory modulation of neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons, which is counterbalanced by the proteolytic activity of Reelin. PMID:20610764

  8. Time course of morphine's effects on adult hippocampal subgranular zone reveals preferential inhibition of cells in S phase of the cell cycle and a subpopulation of immature neurons.

    PubMed

    Arguello, A A; Harburg, G C; Schonborn, J R; Mandyam, C D; Yamaguchi, M; Eisch, A J

    2008-11-11

    Opiates, such as morphine, decrease neurogenesis in the adult hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ), raising the possibility that decreased neurogenesis contributes to opiate-induced cognitive deficits. However, there is an incomplete understanding of how alterations in cell cycle progression and progenitor maturation contribute to this decrease. The present study examined how morphine regulates progenitor cell cycle, cell death and immature SGZ neurons (experiment 1) as well as the progression of SGZ progenitors through key stages of maturation (experiment 2). In experiment 1, mice received sham or morphine pellets (s.c., 0 and 48 h) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) 2 h prior to sacrifice (24, 72 or 96 h). Morphine decreased both the number of S phase and total cycling cells, as there were fewer cells immunoreactive (IR) for the S phase marker BrdU and the cell cycle marker Ki67. The percentage of Ki67-IR cells that were BrdU-IR was decreased after 24 but not 96 h of morphine, suggesting a disproportionate effect on S phase cells relative to all cycling cells at this time point. Cell death (activated caspase-3 counts) was increased after 24 but not 96 h. In experiment 2, nestin-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice given BrdU 1 day prior to morphine or sham surgery (0 and 48 h, sacrifice 96 h) had fewer Ki67-IR cells, but no change in BrdU-IR cell number, suggesting that this population of BrdU-IR cells was less sensitive to morphine. Interestingly, examination of key stages of progenitor cell maturation revealed that morphine increased the percent of BrdU-IR cells that were type 2b and decreased the percent that were immature neurons. These data suggest that chronic morphine decreases SGZ neurogenesis by inhibiting dividing cells, particularly those in S phase, and progenitor cell progression to a more mature neuronal stage.

  9. Anion-selective channelrhodopsin expressed in neuronal cell culture and in vivo in murine brain: Light-induced inhibition of generation of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, D A; Malyshev, A Yu; Salozhin, S V; Nekrasova, O V; Petrovskaya, L E; Roshchin, M V; Borodinova, A A; Feldman, T B; Balaban, P M; Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovsky, M A

    2015-01-01

    Anionic channelrhodopsin slow ChloC was expressed in the culture of nerve cells and in vivo in mouse brain. We demonstrated ability of slow ChloC to suppress effectively the activity of the neuron in response to the illumination with the visible light. It has been shown for a first time that slow ChloC works equally efficiently in both neuronal culture and in the whole brain being expressed in vivo. Thus, slow ChloC could be considered as an effective optogenetic tool capable in response to light stimulation to inhibit the generation of action potentials in the neuron.

  10. Inhibition of mouse GPM6A expression leads to decreased differentiation of neurons derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Michibata, Hideo; Okuno, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Nae; Wakimoto, Koji; Kyono, Kiyoshi; Aoki, Kan; Kondo, Yasushi; Takata, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Glycoprotein M6A (GPM6A) is known as a transmembrane protein and an abundant cell surface protein on neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the function of GPM6A is still unknown in the differentiation of neurons derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells. To investigate the function of GPM6A, we generated knockdown mouse ES cell lines (D3m-shM6A) using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector driven by the U6 small nuclear RNA promoter, which can significantly suppress the expression of mouse GPM6A mRNA. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) and immunocytochemical analysis showed that expression of shRNA against GPM6A markedly reduced the expression of neuroectodermal-associated genes (OTX1, Lmx1b, En1, Pax2, Pax5, Sox1, Sox2, and Wnt1), and also the number of neural stem cells (NSC) derived from D3mshM6A cells compared to control vector-transfected mouse ES cells (D3m-Mock). Moreover, our results show a decrease in both the number of neuronal markers and the number of differentiating neuronal cells (cholinergic, catecholaminergic, and GABAergic neurons) from NSC in D3m-shM6A cells. Hence, our findings suggest that expression level of GPM6A is directly or indirectly associated with the differentiation of neurons derived from undifferentiated ES cells. PMID:18522499

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-1 protects against prion peptide-induced cell death in neuronal cells via inhibition of Bax translocation.

    PubMed

    Park, Yang-Gyu; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Moon, Myung-Hee; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Seog-Jin; Park, Sang-Youel

    2012-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is one of the most important components of bovine colostrum. It exhibits antiapoptotic and antioxidative activities. Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by cell death through mitochondrial dysfunction and increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study examined the protective effect of IGF-1 on residues 106-126 of the cellular prion protein [PrP (106-126)]-mediated mitochondrial neurotoxicity and oxidative stress. In SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells, treatment with PrP (106-126) decreased the cell viability and IGF-1 pretreatment markedly blocked the PrP (106-126)-induced neuronal cell death. IGF-1 inhibited PrP (106-126)-induced intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial oxidative stress. In addition, IGF-1 blocked the translocation of the Bax protein to the mitochondria induced by PrP (106-126). These results demonstrate that IGF-1 protects neuronal cells against PrP (106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity through an antioxidative effect and blockage of mitochondrial Bax translocation. The results also suggest that regulation of IGF-1 secretion may have a therapeutic potential in the management of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:22895829

  12. Development of a pluripotent stem cell derived neuronal model to identify chemically induced pathway perturbations in relation to neurotoxicity: Effects of CREB pathway inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Pistollato, Francesca; Louisse, Jochem; Scelfo, Bibiana; Mennecozzi, Milena; Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Gaspar, John Antonydas; Zagoura, Dimitra; Barilari, Manuela; Palosaari, Taina; Sachinidis, Agapios; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne

    2014-10-15

    According to the advocated paradigm shift in toxicology, acquisition of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of chemicals, such as perturbations of biological pathways, is of primary interest. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), offer a unique opportunity to derive physiologically relevant human cell types to measure molecular and cellular effects of such pathway modulations. Here we compared the neuronal differentiation propensity of hESCs and hiPSCs with the aim to develop novel hiPSC-based tools for measuring pathway perturbation in relation to molecular and cellular effects in vitro. Among other fundamental pathways, also, the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway was activated in our neuronal models and gave us the opportunity to study time-dependent effects elicited by chemical perturbations of the CREB pathway in relation to cellular effects. We show that the inhibition of the CREB pathway, using 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), induced an inhibition of neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, as well as a decrease of MAP2{sup +} neuronal cells. These data indicate that a CREB pathway inhibition can be related to molecular and cellular effects that may be relevant for neurotoxicity testing, and, thus, qualify the use of our hiPSC-derived neuronal model for studying chemical-induced neurotoxicity resulting from pathway perturbations. - Highlights: • HESCs derived neuronal cells serve as benchmark for iPSC based neuronal toxicity test development. • Comparisons between hESCs and hiPSCs demonstrated variability of the epigenetic state • CREB pathway modulation have been explored in relation to the neurotoxicant exposure KG-501 • hiPSC might be promising tools to translate theoretical AoPs into toxicological in vitro tests.

  13. Inhibition of mTOR by Rapamycin Results in Auditory Hair Cell Damage and Decreased Spiral Ganglion Neuron Outgrowth and Neurite Formation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Leitmeyer, Katharina; Glutz, Andrea; Radojevic, Vesna; Setz, Cristian; Huerzeler, Nathan; Bumann, Helen; Bodmer, Daniel; Brand, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is an antifungal agent with immunosuppressive properties. Rapamycin inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by blocking the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1). mTOR is an atypical serine/threonine protein kinase, which controls cell growth, cell proliferation, and cell metabolism. However, less is known about the mTOR pathway in the inner ear. First, we evaluated whether or not the two mTOR complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2, resp.) are present in the mammalian cochlea. Next, tissue explants of 5-day-old rats were treated with increasing concentrations of rapamycin to explore the effects of rapamycin on auditory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. Auditory hair cell survival, spiral ganglion neuron number, length of neurites, and neuronal survival were analyzed in vitro. Our data indicates that both mTOR complexes are expressed in the mammalian cochlea. We observed that inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin results in a dose dependent damage of auditory hair cells. Moreover, spiral ganglion neurite number and length of neurites were significantly decreased in all concentrations used compared to control in a dose dependent manner. Our data indicate that the mTOR may play a role in the survival of hair cells and modulates spiral ganglion neuronal outgrowth and neurite formation.

  14. Selective ablation of dorsal horn NK1 expressing cells reveals a modulation of spinal alpha2-adrenergic inhibition of dorsal horn neurones.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Wahida; Suzuki, Rie; Hunt, Stephen P; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2008-06-01

    Activity in descending systems from the brainstem modulates nociceptive transmission through the dorsal horn. Intrathecal injection of the neurotoxin saporin conjugated to SP (SP-SAP) into the lumbar spinal cord results in the selective ablation of NK(1) receptor expressing (NK(1)+ve) neurones in the superficial dorsal horn (lamina I/III). Loss of these NK(1)+ve neurones attenuates excitability of deep dorsal horn neurones due to a disruption of both intrinsic spinal circuits and a spino-bulbo-spinal loop, which activates a descending excitatory drive, mediated through spinal 5HT(3) receptors. Descending inhibitory pathways also modulate spinal activity and hence control the level of nociceptive transmission relayed to higher centres. To ascertain the spinal origins of the major descending noradrenergic inhibitory pathway we studied the effects of a selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist, atipamezole, on neuronal activity in animals pre-treated with SP-SAP. Intrathecal application of atipamezole dose dependently facilitated the mechanically evoked neuronal responses of deep dorsal horn neurones to low intensity von Frey hairs (5-15 g) and noxious thermal (45-50 degrees C) evoked responses in SAP control animals indicating a physiological alpha2-adrenoceptor control. This facilitatory effect of atipamezole was lost in the SP-SAP treated group. These data suggest that activity within noradrenergic pathways have a dependence on dorsal horn NK(1)+ve cells. Further, noradrenergic descending inhibition may in part be driven by lamina I/III (NK(1)+ve) cells, and mediated via spinal alpha2-adrenoceptor activation. Since the same neuronal population drives descending facilitation and inhibition, the reduced excitability of lamina V/VI WDR neurones seen after loss of these NK(1)+ve neurones indicates a dominant role of descending facilitation. PMID:18462764

  15. Adenosine inhibits glutamatergic input to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hawryluk, J. M.; Ferrari, L. L.; Keating, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous homeostatic sleep factor that accumulates during waking and inhibits wake-active neurons to promote sleep. It has been specifically hypothesized that adenosine decreases wakefulness and promotes sleep recovery by directly inhibiting wake-active neurons of the basal forebrain (BF), particularly BF cholinergic neurons. We previously showed that adenosine directly inhibits BF cholinergic neurons. Here, we investigated 1) how adenosine modulates glutamatergic input to BF cholinergic neurons and 2) how adenosine uptake and adenosine metabolism are involved in regulating extracellular levels of adenosine. Our experiments were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. We found that in BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine reduced the amplitude of AMPA-mediated evoked glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs through presynaptic A1 receptors. Thus we have demonstrated that in addition to directly inhibiting BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine depresses excitatory inputs to these neurons. It is therefore possible that both direct and indirect inhibition may synergistically contribute to the sleep-promoting effects of adenosine in the BF. We also found that blocking the influx of adenosine through the equilibrative nucleoside transporters or inhibiting adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase increased endogenous adenosine inhibitory tone, suggesting a possible mechanism through which adenosine extracellular levels in the basal forebrain are regulated. PMID:22357797

  16. Passive movement improves the learning and memory function of rats with cerebral infarction by inhibiting neuron cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Peng, Jun; Wang, Meng-Die; Song, Yan-Ling; Mei, Yuan-Wu; Fang, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Passive movement has been found to improve evidently ischemic stroke patients' impaired capacity of learning and memory, but the optimal time window of initiating the therapy and the underlying mechanism are not fully understood. In this study, the effect of passive movement at different time windows on learning and memory of rats with cerebral infarction was detected. The results showed that the expression of caspase-3 and escape latency in the passive movement group were all considerably lower than those in the model group (P < 0.05), while the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA was significantly higher than those in the model group (P < 0.05). Moreover, we found that there were most significant changes of escape latency and expressions of Bcl-2 mRNA and caspase-3 when the therapy started at 24 h after focal cerebral infarction. These results suggest that passive movement is able to contribute to the recovery of learning and memory of rats with cerebral infarction, which is partially mediated by inhibiting neuron cell apoptosis, and the optimal therapeutic time is at 24 h after cerebral infarction.

  17. Neuron-Glia Adhesion is Inhibited by Antibodies to Neural Determinants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumet, M.; Rutishauser, U.; Edelman, G. M.

    1983-10-01

    Suspensions of embryonic chick neuronal cells adhered to monolayers of glial cells, but few neurons bound to control monolayers of fibroblastic cells from meninges or skin. Neuronal cell-glial cell adhesion was inhibited by prior incubation of the neurons with Fab' fragments of antibodies to neuronal membranes. In contrast, antibodies to the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) did not inhibit the binding. These results suggest that a specific adhesive mechanism between neurons and glial cells exists and that it is mediated by CAM's that differ from those so far identified.

  18. Inhibition of autophagy and glycolysis by nitric oxide during hypoxia-reoxygenation impairs cellular bioenergetics and promotes cell death in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Gloria A; Liang, Qiuli; Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-12-01

    Excessive nitric oxide (NO) production is known to damage mitochondrial proteins and the autophagy repair pathway and so can potentially contribute to neurotoxicity. Accordingly, we hypothesized that protection against protein damage from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under conditions of low oxygen by the autophagy pathway in neurons would be impaired by NO and enhance bioenergetic dysfunction. Rat primary cortical neurons had the same basal cellular respiration in hypoxia as in normoxia, whereas NO-exposed cells exhibited a gradual decrease in mitochondrial respiration in hypoxia. Upon reoxygenation, the respiration in NO-treated cells did not recover to prehypoxic levels. Hypoxia-reoxygenation in the presence of NO was associated with inhibition of autophagy, and the inability to recover during reoxygenation was exacerbated by an inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine. The effects of hypoxia could be recapitulated by inhibiting glycolytic flux under normoxic conditions. Under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions NO exposure induced immediate stimulation of glycolysis, but prolonged NO exposure, associated with irreversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in hypoxia, inhibited glycolysis. Importantly, we found that NO inhibited basal respiration under normoxic conditions only when glucose was absent from the medium or glycolysis was inhibited by 2-deoxy-d-glucose, revealing a novel NO-dependent mechanism for the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration that is modulated by glycolysis. Taken together these data suggest an oxygen-dependent interaction between mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and autophagy in protecting neuronal cells exposed to NO. Importantly, they indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction is intimately linked to a failure of glycolytic flux induced by exposure to NO. In addition, these studies provide new insights into the understanding of how autophagy and NO may play interactive roles in neuroinflammation-induced cellular

  19. [Astragalus induces human amniotic epithelial cells (WISH) to differentiate toward neurons, inhibits the expression of Notch1 and promotes cell survival].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Dong; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2012-12-25

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of astragalus on differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cell line WISH into neurons, the expression of Notch1 gene and cell viability. WISH were randomly divided into astragalus group (4 subgroups), alltransretinoic acid (RA) group and control group. Astragalus group and RA group were induced to differentiate into neurocytes by using chemical inducer RA and astragalus, respectively. The expression of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2), Nestin and GFAP of induced cells in three groups were detected using immunocytochemical method. RT- PCR was further used to detect the expression of Oct4, Notch1, Hes1, Nestin and NSE. The cell viability was measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium methods. Under the convert microscope it was observed that WISH cells started to change their shape, and there were several axon or dendrite-like processes out from the cell body induced by astragalus for 24 h or RA for 12 h. The positive cell rates of NSE and MAP-2 in 100 μL/mL astragalus-induced group were less than those in RA-induced group at 48 h (P < 0.05), but higher than those in control group. Cell viability in astragalus group was higher than that of RA group (P < 0.05). While the positive cell rates of Nestin and GFAP in 100 μL/mL astragalus-induced group were higher than those in RA-induced group at 48 h (P < 0.05). The positive cell rates of Nestin in the two induced groups were lower than those in control group. RT-PCR showed that the expressions of Oct4, Notch1 and Hes1 in RA and astragalus (100 μL/mL) groups were less than those in control group, but the expression of NSE was higher than that in control group. These results suggest that astragalus (especially at 100 μL/mL, 48 h) and RA can both induce human amniotic epithelial cell line WISH cells into neuron-like cells, but astragalus induction has a higher cell survival rate than RA induction, and the expression of Notch1

  20. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation.

  1. The parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 mutation R1441G inhibits neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Nicklas, Sarah; Palm, Thomas; Menzl, Ingeborg; Birzele, Fabian; Gillardon, Frank; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause familial as well as sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) that is characterized by an age-dependent degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. LRRK2 is strongly expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs), but still the exact molecular function of LRRK2 in these cells remains unknown. By performing a systemic analysis of the gene expression profile of LRRK2-deficient NSCs, we found that the expression of several PD-associated genes, such as oxidation and reduction in mitochondria, are deregulated on LRRK2 absence. Our data, indeed, indicate that LRRK2 regulates the level of cellular oxidative stress and thereby influences the survival of NSCs. Furthermore, the lack of LRRK2 leads to an up-regulation of neuronal differentiation-inducing processes, including the Let-7a pathway. On the other hand, the constitutive mutant of LRRK2(R1441G), known to cause PD, leads to down-regulation of the same pathway. In agreement with the function of Let-7a during neuronal differentiation, LRRK2-deficient NSCs differentiate faster than wild-type cells, while LRRK2(R1441G)-expressing NSCs show impaired neuronal differentiation. These results might help better characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of LRRK2 in NSCs and would further improve potential cell-replacement strategies as well as drug discovery approaches.

  2. Inhibition of BCL-2 leads to increased apoptosis and delayed neuronal differentiation in human ReNcell VM cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Michael; Jaeger, Alexandra; Weiss, Dieter G; Kriehuber, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    BCL-2 is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle progression and neural developmental processes. Its function in the latter process is not well understood and needs further elucidation. Therefore, we characterized the protein expression kinetics of BCL-2 and associated regulatory proteins of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway during the process of neuronal differentiation in ReNcell VM cells with and without functional inhibition of BCL-2 by its competitive ligand HA14-1. Inhibition of BCL-2 caused a diminished BCL-2 expression and higher levels of cleaved BAX, activated Caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, all pro-apoptotic markers, when compared with untreated differentiating cells. In parallel, flow cytometric analysis of HA14-1-treated cells revealed a delayed differentiation into HuC/D+ neuronal cells when compared to untreated differentiating cells. In conclusion, BCL-2 possess a protective function in fully differentiated ReNcell VM cells. We propose that the pro-survival signaling of BCL-2 is closely connected with its stimulatory effects on neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

  3. Nrf2 promotes neuronal cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fei; Wu, Tongde; Lau, Alexandria; Jiang, Tao; Huang, Zheping; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Weimin; Wong, Pak Kin; Zhang, Donna D.

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 has emerged as a master regulator for the endogenous antioxidant response, which is critical in defending cells against environmental insults and in maintaining intracellular redox balance. However, whether Nrf2 has any role in neuronal cell differentiation is largely unknown. In this report, we have examined the effects of Nrf2 on cell differentiation using a neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y. Retinoic acid (RA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), two well-studied inducers for neuronal differentiation, are able to induce Nrf2 and its target gene NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in a dose- and time- dependent manner. RA-induced Nrf2 up-regulation is accompanied by neurite outgrowth and an induction of two neuronal differentiation markers, neurofilament-M (NF-M) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). Overexpression of Nrf2 in SH-SY5Y cells promotes neuronal differentiation whereas inhibition of endogenous Nrf2 expression inhibited neuronal differentiation. More remarkably, the positive role of Nrf2 in neuronal differentiation was verified ex vivo in primary neuron culture. Primary neurons isolated from Nrf2-null mice showed a retarded progress in differentiation, compared to that from wild-type mice. Collectively, our data demonstrate a novel role for Nrf2 in promoting neuronal cell differentiation, which will open new perspectives for therapeutic uses of Nrf2 activators in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19573594

  4. Inhibition of the proliferation and acceleration of migration of vascular endothelial cells by increased cysteine-rich motor neuron 1

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yukiko; Morimoto, Mayuka; Toda, Ken-ichi; Shinya, Tomohiro; Sato, Keizo; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-03

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is upregulated only in extracellular matrix gels by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It then plays a critical role in the tube formation of endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of increased CRIM1 on other endothelial functions such as proliferation and migration. Knock down of CRIM1 had no effect on VEGF-induced proliferation or migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), indicating that basal CRIM1 is not involved in the proliferation or migration of endothelial cells. Stable CRIM1-overexpressing endothelial F-2 cells, termed CR1 and CR2, were constructed, because it was difficult to prepare monolayer HUVECs that expressed high levels of CRIM1. Proliferation was reduced and migration was accelerated in both CR1 and CR2 cells, compared with normal F-2 cells. Furthermore, the transient overexpression of CRIM1 resulted in decreased proliferation and increased migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, neither proliferation nor migration of COS-7 cells were changed by the overexpression of CRIM1. These results demonstrate that increased CRIM1 reduces the proliferation and accelerates the migration of endothelial cells. These CRIM1 effects might contribute to tube formation of endothelial cells. CRIM1 induced by angiogenic factors may serve as a regulator in endothelial cells to switch from proliferating cells to morphological differentiation. - Highlights: • CRIM1 was upregulated only in tubular endothelial cells, but not in monolayers. • Increased CRIM1 reduced the proliferation of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 accelerated the migration of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 had no effect on the proliferation or migration of COS-7 cells.

  5. GDE2 regulates subtype-specific motor neuron generation through inhibition of Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee; Park, Sungjin; Rao, Meenakshi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2011-09-22

    The specification of spinal interneuron and motor neuron identities initiates within progenitor cells, while motor neuron subtype diversification is regulated by hierarchical transcriptional programs implemented postmitotically. Here we find that mice lacking GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that triggers motor neuron generation, exhibit selective losses of distinct motor neuron subtypes, specifically in defined subsets of limb-innervating motor pools that correlate with the loss of force-generating alpha motor neurons. Mechanistically, GDE2 is expressed by postmitotic motor neurons but utilizes extracellular glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase activity to induce motor neuron generation by inhibiting Notch signaling in neighboring motor neuron progenitors. Thus, neuronal GDE2 controls motor neuron subtype diversity through a non-cell-autonomous feedback mechanism that directly regulates progenitor cell differentiation, implying that subtype specification initiates within motor neuron progenitor populations prior to their differentiation into postmitotic motor neurons.

  6. Diversity of vestibular nuclei neurons targeted by cerebellar nodulus inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Blázquez, Pablo M; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A functional role of the cerebellar nodulus and ventral uvula (lobules X and IXc,d of the vermis) for vestibular processing has been strongly suggested by direct reciprocal connections with the vestibular nuclei, as well as direct vestibular afferent inputs as mossy fibres. Here we have explored the types of neurons in the macaque vestibular nuclei targeted by nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition using orthodromic identification from the caudal vermis. We found that all nodulus-target neurons are tuned to vestibular stimuli, and most are insensitive to eye movements. Such non-eye-movement neurons are thought to project to vestibulo-spinal and/or thalamo-cortical pathways. Less than 20% of nodulus-target neurons were sensitive to eye movements, suggesting that the caudal vermis can also directly influence vestibulo-ocular pathways. In general, response properties of nodulus-target neurons were diverse, spanning the whole continuum previously described in the vestibular nuclei. Most nodulus-target cells responded to both rotation and translation stimuli and only a few were selectively tuned to translation motion only. Other neurons were sensitive to net linear acceleration, similar to otolith afferents. These results demonstrate that, unlike the flocculus and ventral paraflocculus which target a particular cell group, nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition targets a large diversity of cell types in the vestibular nuclei, consistent with a broad functional significance contributing to vestibulo-ocular, vestibulo-thalamic and vestibulo-spinal pathways. PMID:24127616

  7. Regulation of neuronal input transformations by tunable dendritic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lovett-Barron, Matthew; Turi, Gergely F; Kaifosh, Patrick; Lee, Peter H; Bolze, Frédéric; Sun, Xiao-Hua; Nicoud, Jean-François; Zemelman, Boris V; Sternson, Scott M; Losonczy, Attila

    2012-03-01

    Transforming synaptic input into action potential output is a fundamental function of neurons. The pattern of action potential output from principal cells of the mammalian hippocampus encodes spatial and nonspatial information, but the cellular and circuit mechanisms by which neurons transform their synaptic input into a given output are unknown. Using a combination of optical activation and cell type-specific pharmacogenetic silencing in vitro, we found that dendritic inhibition is the primary regulator of input-output transformations in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, and acts by gating the dendritic electrogenesis driving burst spiking. Dendrite-targeting interneurons are themselves modulated by interneurons targeting pyramidal cell somata, providing a synaptic substrate for tuning pyramidal cell output through interactions in the local inhibitory network. These results provide evidence for a division of labor in cortical circuits, where distinct computational functions are implemented by subtypes of local inhibitory neurons. PMID:22246433

  8. Sensory experience regulates cortical inhibition by inducing IGF1 in VIP neurons.

    PubMed

    Mardinly, A R; Spiegel, I; Patrizi, A; Centofante, E; Bazinet, J E; Tzeng, C P; Mandel-Brehm, C; Harmin, D A; Adesnik, H; Fagiolini, M; Greenberg, M E

    2016-03-17

    Inhibitory neurons regulate the adaptation of neural circuits to sensory experience, but the molecular mechanisms by which experience controls the connectivity between different types of inhibitory neuron to regulate cortical plasticity are largely unknown. Here we show that exposure of dark-housed mice to light induces a gene program in cortical vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons that is markedly distinct from that induced in excitatory neurons and other subtypes of inhibitory neuron. We identify Igf1 as one of several activity-regulated genes that are specific to VIP neurons, and demonstrate that IGF1 functions cell-autonomously in VIP neurons to increase inhibitory synaptic input onto these neurons. Our findings further suggest that in cortical VIP neurons, experience-dependent gene transcription regulates visual acuity by activating the expression of IGF1, thus promoting the inhibition of disinhibitory neurons and affecting inhibition onto cortical pyramidal neurons.

  9. Neuronal chemorepellent Slit2 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration by suppressing small GTPase Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Hou, Jie; Hu, Xing; Wang, Xuerong; Xiao, Yan; Mou, Yongshan; De Leon, Hector

    2006-03-01

    The Slits are secreted proteins with roles in axonal guidance and leukocyte migration. On binding to Robo receptors, Slit2 repels developing axons and inhibits leukocyte chemotaxis. Slit2 is cleaved into Slit2-N, a protein tightly binding to cell membranes, and Slit2-C, a diffusible fragment. In the present study, we characterized the functional role of Slit2-N in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the cell association properties of 2 truncated versions of Slit2-N. Here, we document for the first time that Slit2-N is a chemorepellent of VSMCs. Intact blood vessels expressed Slit2 and Robo receptors as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR. Recombinant Slit2-N prevented the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated migration of VSMCs. Slit2-N also abrogated PDGF-mediated activation of small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, a member of the Rho GTPase superfamily of proteins involved in regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, Slit2-N inhibited the PDGF-induced formation of lamellipodia, a crucial cytoskeletal reorganization event for cell motility. Slit2-N had no effect on the PDGF-mediated increase in DNA synthesis determined by [3H]thymidine uptake, suggesting that VSMC growth is unaffected by Slit2. Analysis of 2 engineered Slit2-N fragments (Slit2-N/1118 and Slit2-N/1121) indicated that 3 amino acids upstream of the putative cleavage site (Arg1121, Thr1122) are involved in the association of Slit2-N to the cell membrane. Our data assign a novel functional role to Slit2 in vascular function and show that cell guidance mechanisms that operate in the developing central nervous system are conserved in VSMCs.

  10. Neuroprotective effect of Citrus unshiu immature peel and nobiletin inhibiting hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 murine hippocampal neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Jung, Su Young; Lee, Gyeong Hwan; Cho, Jung Hee; Choi, In Young

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress-induced cell damage is common in the etiology of several neurobiological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. In a case study, nobiletin-rich Citrus reticulata peels could prevent the progression of cognitive impairment in donepezil-preadministered Alzheimer's disease patients. Objective: In this study, we investigated the effects and underlying mechanism of nobiletin and Citrus unshiu immature peel (CUIP) water extract, which contains nobiletin as a major compound, on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal neuronal model. Materials and Methods: HT22 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide in the presence or absence of various concentrations of CUIP and nobiletin. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic protein levels were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and Western blotting. Results: Pretreatment with CUIP and nobiletin inhibited cell death due to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide-induced the expression of phospho-Jun N-terminal kinases (p-JNK) and p-p38 proteins in HT22 cells; however CUIP and nobiletin suppressed p-JNK and p-p38 without changing JNK or p38. Regarding apoptosis, caspase 3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and Bax protein expression was determined. CUIP and nobiletin suppressed caspase 3 and Bax expression, but they induced Bcl-2 expression in HT22 cells. Conclusion: These results show that CUIP and nobiletin can protect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in HT22 neurons via mitogen-activated protein kinases and apoptotic pathways. PMID:26664016

  11. Ethanol inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate-activated current in mouse hippocampal neurones: whole-cell patch-clamp analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peoples, Robert W; White, Geoffrey; Lovinger, David M; Weight, Forrest F

    1997-01-01

    The action of ethanol on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-activated ion current was studied in mouse hippocampal neurones in culture using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Ethanol inhibited NMDA-activated current in a voltage-independent manner, and did not alter the reversal potential of NMDA-activated current. Concentration–response analysis of NMDA- and glycine-activated current revealed that ethanol decreased the maximal response to both agonists without affecting their EC50 values. The polyamine spermine (1 μM) increased amplitude of NMDA-activated current but did not alter the percentage inhibition of ethanol. Compared to an extracellular pH of 7.0, pH 6.0 decreased and pH 8.0 increased the amplitude of NMDA-activated current, but these changes in pH did not significantly alter the percentage inhibition by ethanol. The sulphydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol (2 mM) increased the amplitude of NMDA-activated current, but did not affect the percentage inhibition by ethanol. Mg2+ (10, 100, 500 μM), Zn2+ (5, 20 μM) or ketamine (2, 10 μM) decreased the amplitude of NMDA-activated current, but did not affect the percentage inhibition by ethanol. The observations are consistent with ethanol inhibiting the function of NMDA receptors by a non-competitive mechanism that does not involve several modulatory sites on the NMDA receptor–ionophore complex. PMID:9401766

  12. Eugenol inhibits the GABAA current in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Moon, Jee Youn; Jung, Sung Jun; Kang, Jin Gu; Choi, Seung Pyo; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol has sedative, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects, but also serves as an irritant through the regulation of a different set of ion channels. Activation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on sensory neurons leads to the stabilization of neuronal excitability but contributes to formalin-induced inflammatory pain. In this study, we examined the effect of eugenol on the GABA-induced current in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor α1β2γ2 subtype using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the expression of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit mRNA and protein in the TG and hippocampus. Eugenol decreased the amplitude ratio of the GABA-induced current to 27.5 ± 3.2% (p < 0.05) in TG neurons, which recovered after a 3-min washout. In HEK 293 cells expressing the α1β2γ2 subtype, eugenol inhibited GABA-induced currents in a dose-dependent manner. Application of eugenol also decreased the GABA response in the presence of a G-protein blocker. Eugenol pretreatment with different concentrations of GABA resulted in similar inhibition of the GABA-induced current in a non-competitive manner. In conclusion, eugenol inhibits the GABA-induced current in TG neurons and HEK 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor in a reversible, dose-dependent, and non-competitive manner, but not via the G-protein pathway. We suggest that the GABAA receptor could be a molecular target for eugenol in the modulation of nociceptive information.

  13. Lipid nanocapsules containing the non-ionic surfactant Solutol HS15 inhibit the transport of calcium through hyperforin-activated channels in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Sylvain; Barras, Alexandre; Boukherroub, Rabah; Bouron, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Hyperforin is described as a natural antidepressant inhibiting the reuptake of neurotransmitters and also activating cation channels. However the blood-brain barrier limits the access to the brain of this biomolecule. To circumvent this problem it was envisaged to encapsulate hyperforin into biomimetic lipid nano-carriers like lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). When testing the safety of 25 nm LNCs it appeared that they strongly blocked hyperforin-activated Ca2+ channels of cultured cortical neurons. This inhibition was due to one of their main component: solutol HS15 (polyoxyethylene-660-12-hydroxy stearate), a non-ionic soluble surfactant. Solutol HS15 rapidly depresses in a concentration-dependent manner the entry of Ca2+ through hyperforin-activated channels without influencing store-operated channels. This effect is mimicked by Brij58 but not by PEG600, indicating that the lipid chain of Solutol HS15 is important in determining its effects on the channels. The inhibition of the Ca2+ fluxes depends on the cellular cholesterol content; it is stronger after depleting cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin and is nearly absent on cells cultured in a cholesterol-rich medium. When chronically applied for 24 h, Solutol HS15 slightly up-regulates the entry of Ca2+ through hyperforin-activated channels. Similar observations were made when testing 25 nm lipid nanocapsules containing the surfactant Solutol HS15. Altogether, this study shows that Solutol HS15 perturbs in a cholesterol-dependent manner the activity of some neuronal channels. This is the first demonstration that LNCs containing this surfactant can influence cellular calcium signaling in the brain, a finding that can have important clinical implications. PMID:26341818

  14. Lipid nanocapsules containing the non-ionic surfactant Solutol HS15 inhibit the transport of calcium through hyperforin-activated channels in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Sylvain; Barras, Alexandre; Boukherroub, Rabah; Bouron, Alexandre

    2015-12-01

    Hyperforin is described as a natural antidepressant inhibiting the reuptake of neurotransmitters and also activating cation channels. However the blood-brain barrier limits the access to the brain of this biomolecule. To circumvent this problem it was envisaged to encapsulate hyperforin into biomimetic lipid nano-carriers like lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). When testing the safety of 25 nm LNCs it appeared that they strongly blocked hyperforin-activated Ca2+ channels of cultured cortical neurons. This inhibition was due to one of their main component: solutol HS15 (polyoxyethylene-660-12-hydroxy stearate), a non-ionic soluble surfactant. Solutol HS15 rapidly depresses in a concentration-dependent manner the entry of Ca2+ through hyperforin-activated channels without influencing store-operated channels. This effect is mimicked by Brij58 but not by PEG600, indicating that the lipid chain of Solutol HS15 is important in determining its effects on the channels. The inhibition of the Ca2+ fluxes depends on the cellular cholesterol content; it is stronger after depleting cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin and is nearly absent on cells cultured in a cholesterol-rich medium. When chronically applied for 24 h, Solutol HS15 slightly up-regulates the entry of Ca2+ through hyperforin-activated channels. Similar observations were made when testing 25 nm lipid nanocapsules containing the surfactant Solutol HS15. Altogether, this study shows that Solutol HS15 perturbs in a cholesterol-dependent manner the activity of some neuronal channels. This is the first demonstration that LNCs containing this surfactant can influence cellular calcium signaling in the brain, a finding that can have important clinical implications.

  15. Gammaherpesvirus Infection of Human Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Hem Chandra; Mehta, Devan; Lu, Jie; El-Naccache, Darine; Shukla, Sanket K.; Kovacsics, Colleen; Kolson, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses human herpesvirus 4 (HHV4) and HHV8 are two prominent members of the herpesvirus family associated with a number of human cancers. HHV4, also known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a ubiquitous gammaherpesvirus prevalent in 90 to 95% of the human population, is clinically associated with various neurological diseases such as primary central nervous system lymphoma, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, cerebellar ataxia, and encephalitis. However, the possibility that EBV and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) can directly infect neurons has been largely overlooked. This study has, for the first time, characterized EBV infection in neural cell backgrounds by using the Sh-Sy5y neuroblastoma cell line, teratocarcinoma Ntera2 neurons, and primary human fetal neurons. Furthermore, we also demonstrated KSHV infection of neural Sh-Sy5y cells. These neuronal cells were infected with green fluorescent protein-expressing recombinant EBV or KSHV. Microscopy, genetic analysis, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analyses for specific viral antigens supported and validated the infection of these cells by EBV and KSHV and showed that the infection was efficient and productive. Progeny virus produced from infected neuronal cells efficiently infected fresh neuronal cells, as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, acyclovir was effective at inhibiting the production of virus from neuronal cells similar to lymphoblastoid cell lines; this suggests active lytic replication in infected neurons in vitro. These studies represent a potentially new in vitro model of EBV- and KSHV-associated neuronal disease development and pathogenesis. PMID:26628726

  16. Estragole blocks neuronal excitability by direct inhibition of Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Alves, K.S.; Ferreira-da-Silva, F.W.; Peixoto-Neves, D.; Viana-Cardoso, K.V.; Moreira-Júnior, L.; Oquendo, M.B.; Oliveira-Abreu, K.; Albuquerque, A.A.C.; Coelho-de-Souza, A.N.; Leal-Cardoso, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Estragole is a volatile terpenoid, which occurs naturally as a constituent of the essential oils of many plants. It has several pharmacological and biological activities. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of action of estragole on neuronal excitability. Intact and dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons of rats were used to record action potential and Na+ currents with intracellular and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Estragole blocked the generation of action potentials in cells with or without inflexions on their descendant (repolarization) phase (Ninf and N0 neurons, respectively) in a concentration-dependent manner. The resting potentials and input resistances of Ninf and N0 cells were not altered by estragole (2, 4, and 6 mM). Estragole also inhibited total Na+ current and tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 3.2 and 3.6 mM, respectively). Kinetic analysis of Na+ current in the presence of 4 mM estragole showed a statistically significant reduction of fast and slow inactivation time constants, indicating an acceleration of the inactivation process. These data demonstrate that estragole blocks neuronal excitability by direct inhibition of Na+ channel conductance activation. This action of estragole is likely to be relevant to the understanding of the mechanisms of several pharmacological effects of this substance. PMID:24345915

  17. Adenosine Inhibition of Mesopontine Cholinergic Neurons: Implications for EEG Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Rainnie, Donald G.; Grunze, Heinz C. R.; McCarley, Robert W.; Greene, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Increased discharge activity of mesopontine cholinergic neurons participates in the production of electroencephalographic (EEG) arousal; such arousal diminishes as a function of the duration of prior wakefulness or of brain hyperthermia. Whole-cell and extracellular recordings in a brainstem slice show that mesopontine cholinergic neurons are under the tonic inhibitory control of endogenous adenosine, a neuromodulator released during brain metabolism. This inhibitory tone is mediated postsynaptically by an inwardly rectifying potassium conductance and by an inhibition of the hyperpolarization-activated current. These data provide a coupling mechanism linking neuronal control of EEG-arousal with the effects of prior wakefulness, brain hyperthermia, and the use of the adenosine receptor blockers caffeine and theophylline. PMID:8303279

  18. The Neuroprotective Effects of Justicidin A on Amyloid Beta25-35-Induced Neuronal Cell Death Through Inhibition of Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Induction of Autophagy in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ming-Yao; Kim, Joonki; Yang, Hyun Ok

    2016-06-01

    Justicidin A is a structurally defined arylnaphthalide lignan, which has been shown anti-cancer activity; however, the neuroprotective effect of justicidin A is still untested. In this study, we investigated the action of justicidin A on amyloid beta (Aβ)25-35-induced neuronal cell death via inhibition of the hyperphosphorylation of tau and induction of autophagy in SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment with justicidin A significantly elevated cell viability in cells treated with Aβ25-35. Western blot data demonstrated that justicidin A inhibited the Aβ25-35-induced up-regulation the levels of hyperphosphorylation of tau in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, treatment with justicidin A significantly induced autophagy as measured by the increasing LC3 II/I ratio, an important autophagy marker. These studies showed that justicidin A inhibited activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3β), which is an important kinase in up-stream signaling pathways; inhibited hyperphosphorylation of tau in AD; and enhanced activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is the key molecule for both hyperphosphorylation of tau and induction of autophagy. These data provide the first evidence that justicidin A protects SH-SY5Y cells from Aβ25-35-induced neuronal cell death through inhibition of hyperphosphorylation of tau and induction of autophagy via regulation the activity of GSK-3β and AMPK, and they also provide some insights into the relationship between tau protein hyperphosphorylation and autophagy. Thus, we conclude that justicidin A may have a potential role for neuroprotection and, therefore, may be used as a therapeutic agent for AD. PMID:26887582

  19. Lidocaine Inhibits HCN Currents in Rat Spinal Substantia Gelatinosa Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Liu, Nana; Lv, Minhua; Ma, Longxian; Peng, Huizhen; Peng, Sicong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine, which blocks voltage-gated sodium channels, is widely used in surgical anesthesia and pain management. Recently, it has been proposed that the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN) channel is one of the other novel targets of lidocaine. Substantia gelatinosa in the spinal dorsal horn, which plays key roles in modulating nociceptive information from primary afferents, comprises heterogeneous interneurons that can be electrophysiologically categorized by firing pattern. Our previous study demonstrated that a substantial proportion of substantia gelatinosa neurons reveal the presence of HCN current (Ih); however, the roles of lidocaine and HCN channel expression in different types of substantia gelatinosa neurons remain unclear. METHODS: By using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the effect of lidocaine on Ih in rat substantia gelatinosa neurons of acute dissociated spinal cord slices. RESULTS: We found that lidocaine rapidly decreased the peak Ih amplitude with an IC50 of 80 μM. The inhibition rate on Ih was not significantly different with a second application of lidocaine in the same neuron. Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, did not affect lidocaine’s effect on Ih. In addition, lidocaine shifted the half-activation potential of Ih from −109.7 to −114.9 mV and slowed activation. Moreover, the reversal potential of Ih was shifted by −7.5 mV by lidocaine. In the current clamp, lidocaine decreased the resting membrane potential, increased membrane resistance, delayed rebound depolarization latency, and reduced the rebound spike frequency. We further found that approximately 58% of substantia gelatinosa neurons examined expressed Ih, in which most of them were tonically firing. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies demonstrate that lidocaine strongly inhibits Ih in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner in substantia gelatinosa neurons, independent of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels. Thus, our

  20. Specific asparagine-linked oligosaccharides are not required for certain neuron-neuron and neuron-Schwann cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    To determine whether specific asparagine-linked (N-linked) oligosaccharides present in cell surface glycoproteins are required for cell-cell interactions within the peripheral nervous system, we have used castanospermine to inhibit maturation of N-linked sugars in cell cultures of neurons or neurons plus Schwann cells. Maximally 10-15% of the N-linked oligosaccharides on neuronal proteins have normal structure when cells are cultured in the presence of 250 micrograms/ml castanospermine; the remaining oligosaccharides are present as immature carbohydrate chains not normally found in these glycoproteins. Although cultures were treated for 2 wk with castanospermine, cells always remained viable and appeared healthy. We have analyzed several biological responses of embryonic dorsal root ganglion neurons, with or without added purified populations of Schwann cells, in the presence of castanospermine. We have observed that a normal complement of mature, N- linked sugars are not required for neurite outgrowth, neuron-Schwann cell adhesion, neuron-induced Schwann cell proliferation, or ensheathment of neurites by Schwann cells. Treatment of neuronal cultures with castanospermine increases the propensity of neurites to fasciculate. Extracellular matrix deposition by Schwann cells and myelination of neurons by Schwann cells are greatly diminished in the presence of castanospermine as assayed by electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry, suggesting that specific N-linked oligosaccharides are required for the expression of these cellular functions. PMID:3522602

  1. All optical experimental design for neuron excitation, inhibition, and action potential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Tolstykh, Gleb; Martens, Stacey; Sedelnikova, Anna; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, infrared light has been shown to both stimulate and inhibit excitatory cells. However, studies of infrared light for excitatory cell inhibition have been constrained by the use of invasive and cumbersome electrodes for cell excitation and action potential recording. Here, we present an all optical experimental design for neuronal excitation, inhibition, and action potential detection. Primary rat neurons were transfected with plasmids containing the light sensitive ion channel CheRiff. CheRiff has a peak excitation around 450 nm, allowing excitation of transfected neurons with pulsed blue light. Additionally, primary neurons were transfected with QuasAr2, a fast and sensitive fluorescent voltage indicator. QuasAr2 is excited with yellow or red light and therefore does not spectrally overlap CheRiff, enabling imaging and action potential activation, simultaneously. Using an optic fiber, neurons were exposed to blue light sequentially to generate controlled action potentials. A second optic fiber delivered a single pulse of 1869nm light to the neuron causing inhibition of the evoked action potentials (by the blue light). When used in concert, these optical techniques enable electrode free neuron excitation, inhibition, and action potential recording, allowing research into neuronal behaviors with high spatial fidelity.

  2. CO2-inhibited neurons in the medullary raphé are GABAergic

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Taylor, Barbara E.; Harris, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported subsets of medullary raphé neurons that are either stimulated or inhibited by CO2/pH in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé CO2-inhibited neurons are GABAergic. Extracellular recordings in unanesthetized juvenile in situ rat preparations showed reversible hypercapnia-induced suppression of 19% (63/323) of medullary raphé neurons, and this suppression persisted after antagonism of NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and GABAA receptors. We stained a subset of CO2-inhibited cells and found that most (11/12) had glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity (GAD67-ir). These data indicate that the majority of acidosis-inhibited medullary raphé neurons are GABAergic, and that their chemosensitivity is independent of major fast synaptic inputs. Thus, CO2-sensitive GABAergic neurons may play a role in central CO2/pH chemoreception. PMID:25087734

  3. CO2-inhibited neurons in the medullary raphé are GABAergic.

    PubMed

    Iceman, Kimberly E; Corcoran, Andrea E; Taylor, Barbara E; Harris, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have reported subsets of medullary raphé neurons that are either stimulated or inhibited by CO2/pH in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé CO2-inhibited neurons are GABAergic. Extracellular recordings in unanesthetized juvenile in situ rat preparations showed reversible hypercapnia-induced suppression of 19% (63/323) of medullary raphé neurons, and this suppression persisted after antagonism of NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and GABAA receptors. We stained a subset of CO2-inhibited cells and found that most (11/12) had glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity (GAD67-ir). These data indicate that the majority of acidosis-inhibited medullary raphé neurons are GABAergic, and that their chemosensitivity is independent of major fast synaptic inputs. Thus, CO2-sensitive GABAergic neurons may play a role in central CO2/pH chemoreception.

  4. Senegenin inhibits neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-quan; Wu, Min-fei; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-san; Jiang, Jin-lan

    2016-01-01

    Senegenin has been shown to inhibit neuronal apoptosis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect. In the present study, we established a rat model of spinal cord contusion injury using the modified Allen's method. Three hours after injury, senegenin (30 mg/g) was injected into the tail vein for 3 consecutive days. Senegenin reduced the size of syringomyelic cavities, and it substantially reduced the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. At the site of injury, Bax and Caspase-3 mRNA and protein levels were decreased by senegenin, while Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels were increased. Nerve fiber density was increased in the spinal cord proximal to the brain, and hindlimb motor function and electrophysiological properties of rat hindlimb were improved. Taken together, our results suggest that senegenin exerts a neuroprotective effect by suppressing neuronal apoptosis at the site of spinal cord injury. PMID:27212931

  5. UNC-16 (JIP3) Acts Through Synapse-Assembly Proteins to Inhibit the Active Transport of Cell Soma Organelles to Caenorhabditis elegans Motor Neuron Axons

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Stacey L.; Morrison, Logan M.; Yorks, Rosalina M.; Hoover, Christopher M.; Boominathan, Soorajnath; Miller, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    The conserved protein UNC-16 (JIP3) inhibits the active transport of some cell soma organelles, such as lysosomes, early endosomes, and Golgi, to the synaptic region of axons. However, little is known about UNC-16’s organelle transport regulatory function, which is distinct from its Kinesin-1 adaptor function. We used an unc-16 suppressor screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to discover that UNC-16 acts through CDK-5 (Cdk5) and two conserved synapse assembly proteins: SAD-1 (SAD-A Kinase), and SYD-2 (Liprin-α). Genetic analysis of all combinations of double and triple mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(−) backgrounds showed that the three proteins (CDK-5, SAD-1, and SYD-2) are all part of the same organelle transport regulatory system, which we named the CSS system based on its founder proteins. Further genetic analysis revealed roles for SYD-1 (another synapse assembly protein) and STRADα (a SAD-1-interacting protein) in the CSS system. In an unc-16(−) background, loss of the CSS system improved the sluggish locomotion of unc-16 mutants, inhibited axonal lysosome accumulation, and led to the dynein-dependent accumulation of lysosomes in dendrites. Time-lapse imaging of lysosomes in CSS system mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(−) backgrounds revealed active transport defects consistent with the steady-state distributions of lysosomes. UNC-16 also uses the CSS system to regulate the distribution of early endosomes in neurons and, to a lesser extent, Golgi. The data reveal a new and unprecedented role for synapse assembly proteins, acting as part of the newly defined CSS system, in mediating UNC-16’s organelle transport regulatory function. PMID:26354976

  6. UNC-16 (JIP3) Acts Through Synapse-Assembly Proteins to Inhibit the Active Transport of Cell Soma Organelles to Caenorhabditis elegans Motor Neuron Axons.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stacey L; Morrison, Logan M; Yorks, Rosalina M; Hoover, Christopher M; Boominathan, Soorajnath; Miller, Kenneth G

    2015-09-01

    The conserved protein UNC-16 (JIP3) inhibits the active transport of some cell soma organelles, such as lysosomes, early endosomes, and Golgi, to the synaptic region of axons. However, little is known about UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function, which is distinct from its Kinesin-1 adaptor function. We used an unc-16 suppressor screen in Caenorhabditis elegans to discover that UNC-16 acts through CDK-5 (Cdk5) and two conserved synapse assembly proteins: SAD-1 (SAD-A Kinase), and SYD-2 (Liprin-α). Genetic analysis of all combinations of double and triple mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds showed that the three proteins (CDK-5, SAD-1, and SYD-2) are all part of the same organelle transport regulatory system, which we named the CSS system based on its founder proteins. Further genetic analysis revealed roles for SYD-1 (another synapse assembly protein) and STRADα (a SAD-1-interacting protein) in the CSS system. In an unc-16(-) background, loss of the CSS system improved the sluggish locomotion of unc-16 mutants, inhibited axonal lysosome accumulation, and led to the dynein-dependent accumulation of lysosomes in dendrites. Time-lapse imaging of lysosomes in CSS system mutants in unc-16(+) and unc-16(-) backgrounds revealed active transport defects consistent with the steady-state distributions of lysosomes. UNC-16 also uses the CSS system to regulate the distribution of early endosomes in neurons and, to a lesser extent, Golgi. The data reveal a new and unprecedented role for synapse assembly proteins, acting as part of the newly defined CSS system, in mediating UNC-16's organelle transport regulatory function.

  7. Inhibition of TYRO3/Akt signaling participates in hypoxic injury in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan-zhen; Wang, Wei; Xian, Na; Wu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway in hypoxic injury to hippocampal neurons. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that hypoxia inhibited the proliferation and viability of hippocampal neurons. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay demonstrated that hypoxia induced neuronal apoptosis in a time-dependent manner, with a greater number of apoptotic cells with longer hypoxic exposure. Immunofluorescence labeling revealed that hypoxia suppressed TYRO3 expression. Western blot assay showed that hypoxia decreased Akt phosphorylation levels in a time-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings suggest that hypoxia inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neurons and promotes apoptosis, and that the inhibition of the TYRO3/Akt signaling pathway plays an important role in hypoxia-induced neuronal injury. PMID:27335558

  8. Human prion protein-induced autophagy flux governs neuron cell damage in primary neuron cells

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Ju-Hee; Nazim, Uddin MD; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    An unusual molecular structure of the prion protein, PrPsc is found only in mammals with transmissible prion diseases. Prion protein stands for either the infectious pathogen itself or a main component of it. Recent studies suggest that autophagy is one of the major functions that keep cells alive and has a protective effect against the neurodegeneration. In this study, we investigated that the effect of human prion protein on autophagy-lysosomal system of primary neuronal cells. The treatment of human prion protein induced primary neuron cell death and decreased both LC3-II and p62 protein amount indicating autophagy flux activation. Electron microscope pictures confirmed the autophagic flux activation in neuron cells treated with prion protein. Inhibition of autophagy flux using pharmacological and genetic tools prevented neuron cell death induced by human prion protein. Autophagy flux induced by prion protein is more activated in prpc expressing cells than in prpc silencing cells. These data demonstrated that prion protein-induced autophagy flux is involved in neuron cell death in prion disease and suggest that autophagy flux might play a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases including prion disease. PMID:27102156

  9. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeo Cho; Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Park, Jae-Ho

    2015-12-10

    Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC), has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST) has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca(2+) and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca(2+) and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca(2+) and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  10. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD. PMID:26499517

  11. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-10-26

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD.

  12. Induction of hypertension blunts baroreflex inhibition of vasopressin neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Han, Su Young; Bouwer, Gregory T; Seymour, Alexander J; Korpal, Aaron K; Schwenke, Daryl O; Brown, Colin H

    2015-11-01

    Vasopressin secretion from the posterior pituitary gland is determined by action potential discharge of hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells. Vasopressin is a potent vasoconstrictor, but vasopressin levels are paradoxically elevated in some patients with established hypertension. To determine whether vasopressin neurons are excited in hypertension, extracellular single-unit recordings of vasopressin neurons from urethane-anaesthetized Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats with inducible angiotensin-dependent hypertension were made. The basal firing rate of vasopressin neurons was higher in hypertensive Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats than in non-hypertensive Cyp1a1-Ren2 rats. The increase in firing rate was specific to vasopressin neurons because oxytocin neuron firing rate was unaffected by the induction of hypertension. Intravenous injection of the α1-adrenoreceptor agonist, phenylephrine (2.5 μg/kg), transiently increased mean arterial blood pressure to cause a baroreflex-induced inhibition of heart rate and vasopressin neuron firing rate (by 52 ± 9%) in non-hypertensive rats. By contrast, intravenous phenylephrine did not inhibit vasopressin neurons in hypertensive rats, despite a similar increase in mean arterial blood pressure and inhibition of heart rate. Circulating angiotensin II can excite vasopressin neurons via activation of afferent inputs from the subfornical organ. However, the increase in vasopressin neuron firing rate and the loss of inhibition by intravenous phenylephrine were not blocked by intra-subfornical organ infusion of the angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan. It can be concluded that increased vasopressin neuron activity at the onset of hypertension is driven, at least in part, by reduced baroreflex inhibition of vasopressin neurons and that this might exacerbate the increase in blood pressure at the onset of hypertension.

  13. Gsx1 Expression Defines Neurons Required for Prepulse Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Sadie A.; Carrier, Nicole; Li, Grace H.; Ahn, Sohyun; Burgess, Harold A.

    2014-01-01

    In schizophrenia, cognitive overload is thought to reflect an inability to suppress non-salient information, a process which is studied using prepulse inhibition of the startle response. Prepulse inhibition is reduced in schizophrenia and routinely tested in animal models and pre-clinical trials of antipsychotic drugs. However the underlying neuronal circuitry is not well understood. We used a novel genetic screen in larval zebrafish to reveal the molecular identity of neurons that are required for prepulse inhibition in fish and mice. Ablation or optogenetic silencing of neurons with developmental expression of the transcription factor Gsx1 produced profound defects in prepulse inhibition in zebrafish, and prepulse inhibition was similarly impaired in Gsx1 knockout mice. Gsx1 expressing neurons reside in the dorsal brainstem and form synapses closely apposed to neurons which initiate the startle response. Surprisingly brainstem Gsx1 neurons are primarily glutamatergic despite their role in a functionally inhibitory pathway. As Gsx1 plays an important role in regulating interneuron development in the forebrain, these findings reveal a molecular link between control of interneuron specification and circuits which gate sensory information across brain regions. PMID:25224259

  14. Direct inhibition of arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons: a potential mechanism for the orexigenic actions of dynorphin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobing; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2013-01-01

    Dynorphin, an endogenous ligand of kappa (κ) opioid receptors, has multiple roles in the brain, and plays a positive role in energy balance and food intake. However, the mechanism for this is unclear. With immunocytochemistry, we find that axonal dynorphin immunoreactivity in the arcuate nucleus is strong, and that a large number of dynorphin-immunoreactive boutons terminate on or near anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cells. Here we provide evidence from whole-cell patch-clamp recording that dynorphin-A (Dyn-A) directly and dose-dependently inhibits arcuate nucleus POMC neurons. Dyn-A inhibition was eliminated by the κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-BNI, but not by the μ receptor antagonist CTAP. The inhibitory effect was mimicked by the κ2 receptor agonist GR89696, but not by the κ1 receptor agonist U69593. No presynaptic effect of κ2 agonists was found. These results suggest that Dyn-A inhibits POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor. In whole-cell voltage clamp, Dyn-A opened G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK)-like channels on POMC neurons. Dynorphin attenuated glutamate and GABA neurotransmission to POMC neurons. In contrast to the strong inhibition of POMC neurons by Dyn-A, we found a weaker direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons mediated by both κ1 and κ2 receptors. Taken together, these results indicate a direct inhibitory effect of Dyn-A on POMC neurons through activation of the κ2 opioid receptor and GIRK channels. A number of orexigenic hypothalamic neurons release dynorphin along with other neuropeptides. The inhibition of anorexigenic POMC neurons may be one mechanism underlying the orexigenic actions of dynorphin. PMID:23318874

  15. Suppression of ih contributes to propofol-induced inhibition of mouse cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangdong; Shu, Shaofang; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2005-12-01

    The contributions of the hyperpolarization-activated current, I(h), to generation of rhythmic activities are well described for various central neurons, particularly in thalamocortical circuits. In the present study, we investigated effects of a general anesthetic, propofol, on native I(h) in neurons of thalamus and cortex and on the corresponding cloned HCN channel subunits. Whole cell voltage-clamp recordings from mouse brain slices identified neuronal I(h) currents with fast activation kinetics in neocortical pyramidal neurons and with slower kinetics in thalamocortical relay cells. Propofol inhibited the fast-activating I(h) in cortical neurons at a clinically relevant concentration (5 microM); inhibition of I(h) involved a hyperpolarizing shift in half-activation voltage (DeltaV1/2 approximately -9 mV) and a decrease in maximal available current (approximately 36% inhibition, measured at -120 mV). With the slower form of I(h) expressed in thalamocortical neurons, propofol had no effect on current activation or amplitude. In heterologous expression systems, 5 muM propofol caused a large shift in V1/2 and decrease in current amplitude in homomeric HCN1 and linked heteromeric HCN1-HCN2 channels, both of which activate with fast kinetics but did not affect V1/2 or current amplitude of slowly activating homomeric HCN2 channels. With GABA(A) and glycine receptor channels blocked, propofol caused membrane hyperpolarization and suppressed action potential discharge in cortical neurons; these effects were occluded by the I(h) blocker, ZD-7288. In summary, these data indicate that propofol selectively inhibits HCN channels containing HCN1 subunits, such as those that mediate I(h) in cortical pyramidal neurons-and they suggest that anesthetic actions of propofol may involve inhibition of cortical neurons and perhaps other HCN1-expressing cells. PMID:16093340

  16. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  17. REM sleep deprivation reduces auditory evoked inhibition of dorsolateral pontine neurons.

    PubMed

    Mallick, B N; Fahringer, H M; Wu, M F; Siegel, J M

    1991-06-28

    In many dorsolateral pontine neurons, auditory stimulation produces an initial excitation followed by a sustained inhibition. We now report that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation, for periods of from 22-48 h, reduced this auditory evoked inhibition of unit discharge. Inhibition returned to baseline levels after recovery REM sleep. Prior work indicates that the auditory evoked inhibition seen in noradrenergic cells in this region is partially mediated by norepinephrine. We hypothesize that the reduction in inhibition that we see is a consequence of either downregulation/desensitization of norepinephrine receptors or reduced norepinephrine release resulting from REM sleep deprivation. PMID:1913194

  18. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic, and Parvalbumin Neurons in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Franciosi, Serena; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF) region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV) neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made from BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic and PV neurons with the size (>20 μm) and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents) corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min) bath application of adenosine (100 μM) decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic, and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM). Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required

  19. Mechanisms of Long-Interval Selectivity in Midbrain Auditory Neurons: Roles of Excitation, Inhibition, and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christofer J.; Leary, Christopher J.; Rose, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    Stereotyped intervals between successive sound pulses characterize the acoustic signals of anurans and other organisms and provide critical information to receivers. One class of midbrain neuron responds selectively when pulses are repeated at slow rates (long intervals). To examine the mechanisms that underlie long-interval selectivity, we made whole cell recordings, in vivo, from neurons in the anuran inferior colliculus (anuran IC). In most cases, long-pass interval selectivity appeared to arise from interplay between excitation and inhibition; in ∼25% of these cases, the delayed inhibition to a pulse overlapped with the excitation to the following pulse at fast pulse repetition rates (PRRs), resulting in a phasic “onset” response. In the remaining cases, inhibition appeared to precede excitation. These neurons did not respond to fast PRRs apparently because delayed excitation to a pulse overlapped with the inhibition to the following pulse. These results suggest that the relative timing of inhibition and excitation govern differences in the response properties of these two cell types. Loading cells with cesium increased their responses to fast AM rates, supporting a role for inhibition in long-interval selectivity. Three cells showed little or no evidence of inhibition and exhibited strong depression of excitation. These findings are discussed in the context of current models for long-pass interval selectivity. PMID:18945816

  20. Perampanel Inhibition of AMPA Receptor Currents in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Matt, Lucas; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Perampanel is an aryl substituted 2-pyridone AMPA receptor antagonist that was recently approved as a treatment for epilepsy. The drug potently inhibits AMPA receptor responses but the mode of block has not been characterized. Here the action of perampanel on AMPA receptors was investigated by whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Perampanel caused a slow (τ∼1 s at 3 µM), concentration-dependent inhibition of AMPA receptor currents evoked by AMPA and kainate. The rates of block and unblock of AMPA receptor currents were 1.5×105 M−1 s−1 and 0.58 s−1, respectively. Perampanel did not affect NMDA receptor currents. The extent of block of non-desensitizing kainate-evoked currents (IC50, 0.56 µM) was similar at all kainate concentrations (3–100 µM), demonstrating a noncompetitive blocking action. Parampanel did not alter the trajectory of AMPA evoked currents indicating that it does not influence AMPA receptor desensitization. Perampanel is a selective negative allosteric AMPA receptor antagonist of high-affinity and slow blocking kinetics. PMID:25229608

  1. Curcumin inhibits apoptosis by regulating intracellular calcium release, reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial depolarization levels in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Uğuz, Abdülhadi Cihangir; Öz, Ahmi; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are incurable progressive neurological disorders caused by the degeneration of neuronal cells and characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Curcumin, a turmeric product, is an anti-inflammatory agent and an effective reactive oxygen and nitrogen species scavenging molecule. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the main source of oxidative stress, which is claimed to be the major source of neurological disorders. Hence, in this study we aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on Ca(2+) signaling, oxidative stress parameters, mitochondrial depolarization levels and caspase-3 and -9 activities that are induced by the H2O2 model of oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells. SH-SY5Y neuronal cells were divided into four groups namely, the control, curcumin, H2O2, and curcumin + H2O2 groups. The dose and duration of curcumin and H2O2 were determined from published data. The cells in the curcumin, H2O2, and curcumin + H2O2 groups were incubated for 24 h with 5 µM curcumin and 100 µM H2O2. Lipid peroxidation and cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentrations were higher in the H2O2 group than in the control group; however, their levels were lower in the curcumin and curcumin + H2O2 groups than in the H2O2 group alone. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) values were lower in the H2O2 group although they were higher in the curcumin and curcumin + H2O2 groups than in the H2O2 group. Caspase-3 activity was lower in the curcumin group than in the H2O2 group. In conclusion, curcumin strongly induced modulator effects on oxidative stress, intracellular Ca(2+) levels, and the caspase-3 and -9 values in an experimental oxidative stress model in SH-SY5Y cells.

  2. Heterotypic binding between neuronal membrane vesicles and glial cells is mediated by a specific cell adhesion molecule

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    By means of a multistage quantitative assay, we have identified a new kind of cell adhesion molecule (CAM) on neuronal cells of the chick embryo that is involved in their adhesion to glial cells. The assay used to identify the binding component (which we name neuron-glia CAM or Ng-CAM) was designed to distinguish between homotypic binding (e.g., neuron to neuron) and heterotypic binding (e.g., neuron to glia). This distinction was essential because a single neuron might simultaneously carry different CAMs separately mediating each of these interactions. The adhesion of neuronal cells to glial cells in vitro was previously found to be inhibited by Fab' fragments prepared from antisera against neuronal membranes but not by Fab' fragments against N-CAM, the neural cell adhesion molecule. This suggested that neuron-glia adhesion is mediated by specific cell surface molecules different from previously isolated CAMs . To verify that this was the case, neuronal membrane vesicles were labeled internally with 6-carboxyfluorescein and externally with 125I-labeled antibodies to N-CAM to block their homotypic binding. Labeled vesicles bound to glial cells but not to fibroblasts during a 30-min incubation period. The specific binding of the neuronal vesicles to glial cells was measured by fluorescence microscopy and gamma spectroscopy of the 125I label. Binding increased with increasing concentrations of both glial cells and neuronal vesicles. Fab' fragments prepared from anti-neuronal membrane sera that inhibited binding between neurons and glial cells were also found to inhibit neuronal vesicle binding to glial cells. The inhibitory activity of the Fab' fragments was depleted by preincubation with neuronal cells but not with glial cells. Trypsin treatment of neuronal membrane vesicles released material that neutralized Fab' fragment inhibition; after chromatography, neutralizing activity was enriched 50- fold. This fraction was injected into mice to produce monoclonal

  3. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S.

    2006-06-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, astrocytes exert a complex modulatory control on the olfactory network. glutamate | GABA | inhibition | olfactory bulb | synchronization

  4. Inhibition of aminoacylase 3 protects rat brain cortex neuronal cells from the toxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal mercapturate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    SciTech Connect

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia; Bragin, Anatol; Faull, Kym; Cascio, Duilio; Damoiseaux, Robert; Schibler, Matthew J.; Pushkin, Alexander

    2012-09-15

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) and acrolein (ACR) are highly reactive neurotoxic products of lipid peroxidation that are implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Conjugation with glutathione (GSH) initiates the 4HNE and ACR detoxification pathway, which generates the mercapturates of 4HNE and ACR that can be excreted. Prior work has shown that the efficiency of the GSH-dependent renal detoxification of haloalkene derived mercapturates is significantly decreased upon their deacetylation because of rapid transformation of the deacetylated products into toxic compounds mediated by β-lyase. The enzymes of the GSH-conjugation pathway and β-lyases are expressed in the brain, and we hypothesized that a similar toxicity mechanism may be initiated in the brain by the deacetylation of 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. The present study was performed to identify an enzyme(s) involved in 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate deacetylation, characterize the brain expression of this enzyme and determine whether its inhibition decreases 4HNE and 4HNE-mercapturate neurotoxicity. We demonstrated that of two candidate deacetylases, aminoacylases 1 (AA1) and 3 (AA3), only AA3 efficiently deacetylates both 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. AA3 was further localized to neurons and blood vessels. Using a small molecule screen we generated high-affinity AA3 inhibitors. Two of them completely protected rat brain cortex neurons expressing AA3 from the toxicity of 4HNE-mercapturate. 4HNE-cysteine (4HNE-Cys) was also neurotoxic and its toxicity was mostly prevented by a β-lyase inhibitor, aminooxyacetate. The results suggest that the AA3 mediated deacetylation of 4HNE-mercapturate may be involved in the neurotoxicity of 4HNE.

  5. Exercise inhibits neuronal apoptosis and improves cerebral function following rat traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Nishida, Shozo; Tsubaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Ito, Akihiko; Satou, Takao

    2011-09-01

    Exercise is reported to inhibit neuronal apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus and improve learning and memory. However, the effect of exercise on inhibition of neuronal apoptosis surrounding the area of damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the improvement of cerebral dysfunction following TBI are unknown. Here, we investigate the effect of exercise on morphology and cerebral function following TBI in rats. Wistar rats received TBI by a pneumatic controlled injury device were randomly divided into two groups: (1) non-exercise group and (2) exercise group. The exercise group ran on a treadmill for 30 min/day at 22 m/min for seven consecutive days. Immunohistochemical and behavioral studies were performed following TBI. The number of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-positive cells around the damaged area early after TBI was significantly reduced in the exercise group compared with the non-exercise group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, most ssDNA-positive cells in the non-exercise group co-localized with neuronal cells. However, in the exercise group, a few ssDNA-positive cells co-localized with neurons. In addition, there was a significant increase in neuronal cell number and improvement in cerebral dysfunction after TBI in the exercise group compared with the non-exercise group (P < 0.05). These results indicate that exercise following TBI inhibits neuronal degeneration and apoptotic cell death around the damaged area, which results in improvement of cerebral dysfunction. In summary, treadmill running improved cerebral dysfunction following TBI, indicating its potential as an effective clinical therapy. Therefore, exercise therapy (rehabilitation) in the early phase following TBI is important for recuperation from cerebral dysfunction.

  6. Tonic synaptic inhibition modulates neuronal output pattern and spatiotemporal synaptic integration.

    PubMed

    Häusser, M; Clark, B A

    1997-09-01

    Irregular firing patterns are observed in most central neurons in vivo, but their origin is controversial. Here, we show that two types of inhibitory neurons in the cerebellar cortex fire spontaneously and regularly in the absence of synaptic input but generate an irregular firing pattern in the presence of tonic synaptic inhibition. Paired recordings between synaptically connected neurons revealed that single action potentials in inhibitory interneurons cause highly variable delays in action potential firing in their postsynaptic cells. Activity in single and multiple inhibitory interneurons also significantly reduces postsynaptic membrane time constant and input resistance. These findings suggest that the time window for synaptic integration is a dynamic variable modulated by the level of tonic inhibition, and that rate coding and temporal coding strategies may be used in parallel in the same cell type. PMID:9331356

  7. Astroglial U87 Cells Protect Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells from Indirect Effect of Radiation by Reducing DNA Damage and Inhibiting Fas Mediated Apoptotic Pathway in Coculture System.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Yasmeen; Rehman, Abdul; Xie, Bingjie; Xu, Jin; Hong, Ma; Hong, Qing; Deng, Yulin

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies provide the evidence that indirect effects of radiation could lead to neuronal cells death but underlying mechanism is not completely understood. On the other hand astroglial cells are known to protect neuronal cells against stress conditions in vivo and invitro. Yet, the fate of neuronal cells and the neuroprotective effect of coculture system (with glial cells) in response to indirect radiation exposure remain rarely discussed. Here, we purpose that the indirect effect of radiation may induce DNA damage by cell cycle arrest and receptor mediated apoptotic cascade which lead to apoptotic death of neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. We also hypothesized that coculture (with glial U87) may relieved the neuronal SH-SY5Y cells from toxicity of indirect effects radiation by reducing DNA damage and expression of apoptotic proteins in vitro. In the present study irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) was used as source of indirect effect of radiation. Neuronal SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to ICCM with and without coculture with (glial U87) in transwell coculture system respectively. Various endpoints such as, cell survival number assay, Annexin V/PI assay, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometer, mRNA level of Fas receptor by q RT-PCR, expression of key apoptotic proteins by western blot and estimation of neurotrophic factors by ELISA method were analyzed into neuronal SH-SY5Y cells with and without co culture after ICCM exposure respectively. We found that ICCM induced DNA damage in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells by significant increase in cell cycle arrest at S-phase (***P < 0.001) which was further supported by over expression of P53 protein (**P < 0.01). While coculture (with glial U87), significantly reduced the ICCM induced cell cycle arrest and expression of P53 ((###) P < 0.001) neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Further investigation of the underlying apoptotic mechanism revealed that in coculture system; ICCM induced elevated level of FAS mRNA level was significantly reduced

  8. Toxoplasma gondii Actively Inhibits Neuronal Function in Chronically Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Fahad; Händel, Ulrike; Angenstein, Frank; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Kreutzmann, Peter; Lison, Holger; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Scheich, Henning; Wetzel, Wolfram; Schlüter, Dirk; Budinger, Eike

    2012-01-01

    Upon infection with the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, fast replicating tachyzoites infect a broad spectrum of host cells including neurons. Under the pressure of the immune response, tachyzoites convert into slow-replicating bradyzoites, which persist as cysts in neurons. Currently, it is unclear whether T. gondii alters the functional activity of neurons, which may contribute to altered behaviour of T. gondii–infected mice and men. In the present study we demonstrate that upon oral infection with T. gondii cysts, chronically infected BALB/c mice lost over time their natural fear against cat urine which was paralleled by the persistence of the parasite in brain regions affecting behaviour and odor perception. Detailed immunohistochemistry showed that in infected neurons not only parasitic cysts but also the host cell cytoplasm and some axons stained positive for Toxoplasma antigen suggesting that parasitic proteins might directly interfere with neuronal function. In fact, in vitro live cell calcium (Ca2+) imaging studies revealed that tachyzoites actively manipulated Ca2+ signalling upon glutamate stimulation leading either to hyper- or hypo-responsive neurons. Experiments with the endoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ uptake inhibitor thapsigargin indicate that tachyzoites deplete Ca2+ stores in the endoplasmatic reticulum. Furthermore in vivo studies revealed that the activity-dependent uptake of the potassium analogue thallium was reduced in cyst harbouring neurons indicating their functional impairment. The percentage of non-functional neurons increased over time In conclusion, both bradyzoites and tachyzoites functionally silence infected neurons, which may significantly contribute to the altered behaviour of the host. PMID:22530040

  9. Signals from the AT2 (angiotensin type 2) receptor of angiotensin II inhibit p21ras and activate MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) to induce morphological neuronal differentiation in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Gendron, L; Laflamme, L; Rivard, N; Asselin, C; Payet, M D; Gallo-Payet, N

    1999-09-01

    In a previous study, we had shown that activation of the AT2 (angiotensin type 2) receptor of angiotensin II (Ang II) induced morphological differentiation of the neuronal cell line NG108-15. In the present study, we investigated the nature of the possible intracellular mediators involved in the AT2 effect. We found that stimulation of AT2 receptors in NG108-15 cells resulted in time-dependent modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of cytoplasmic proteins. Stimulation of NG108-15 cells with Ang II induced a decrease in GTP-bound p21ras but a sustained increase in the activity of p42mapk and p44mapk as well as neurite outgrowth. Similarly, neurite elongation, increased polymerized tubulin levels, and increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity were also observed in a stably transfected NG108-15 cell line expressing the dominant-negative mutant of p21ras, RasN17. These results support the observation that inhibition of p21ras did not impair the effect of Ang II on its ability to stimulate MAPK activity. While 10 microM of the MEK inhibitor, PD98059, only moderately affected elongation, 50 microM PD98059 completely blocked the Ang II- and the RasN17-mediated induction of neurite outgrowth. These results demonstrate that some of the events associated with the AT2 receptor-induced neuronal morphological differentiation of NG108-15 cells not only include inhibition of p21ras but an increase in MAPK activity as well, which is essential for neurite outgrowth.

  10. Selective blockade of CaMKII-alpha inhibits NMDA-induced caspase-3-dependent cell death but does not arrest PARP-1 activation or loss of plasma membrane selectivity in rat retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Dennis J

    2009-02-23

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-alpha (CaMKII-alpha) has been implicated in a number of receptor mediated events in neurons. Pharmacological blockade of CaMKII-alpha has been shown to prevent phosphorylation of NMDA-R2A and R2B receptor subunits, suggesting that this enzyme may be linked to receptor trafficking of glutamate receptors and serve as a regulatory protein for neuronal cell death. In the retina, inhibition of CaMKII-alpha has been reported to be neuroprotective against NMDA-induced cell death by preventing the activation of the caspase-3 dependent pathway. However, the effects of CaMKII-alpha blockade on the caspase-3 independent, PARP-1 dependent and the non-programmed cell death pathways have not previously been investigated. In the present study, blockade of CaMKII-alpha with the highly specific antagonist myristoylated autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide (AIP) was used in a rat in vivo model of retinal toxicity to compare the effects of on NMDA-induced caspase-3-dependent, PARP-1 dependent and the non-programmed (necrosis) cell death pathways. Results confirmed that AIP fully attenuates caspase-3 activation for at least 8 h following NMDA insult and also significantly improves retinal ganglion cell survival. However, this blockade had little effect on reducing the loss of plasma membrane selectivity (LPMS, e.g. necrosis) in cells located in the ganglion cell and inner nuclear layers and did not alter NMDA-induced PARP-1 hyperactivation, or prevent TUNEL labeling following a moderate NMDA-insult. These findings support a specific role for CaMKII-alpha in mediating the caspase-3 dependent cell death pathway and provide evidence that it is not directly linked to the signaling of either the PARP-1 dependent or the non-programmed cell death pathways.

  11. CB2 cannabinoid receptors inhibit synaptic transmission when expressed in cultured autaptic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K.; Straiker, Alex; Mackie, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The role of CB2 in the central nervous system, particularly in neurons, has generated much controversy. Fueling the controversy are imperfect tools, which have made conclusive identification of CB2-expressing neurons problematic. Imprecise localization of CB2 has made it difficult to determine its function in neurons. Here we avoid the localization controversy and directly address the question if CB2 can modulate neurotransmission. CB2 was expressed in excitatory hippocampal autaptic neurons obtained from CB1 null mice. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from these neurons to determine the effects of CB2 on short-term synaptic plasticity. CB2 expression restored depolarization induced suppression of excitation to these neurons, which was lost following genetic ablation of CB1. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) mimicked the effects of depolarization in CB2 expressing neurons. Interestingly, ongoing basal production of 2-AG resulted in constitutive activation of CB2, causing a tonic inhibition of neurotransmission that was relieved by the CB2 antagonist AM630 or the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor RHC80267. Through immunocytochemistry and analysis of spontaneous EPSCs, paired pulse ratios and coefficients of variation we determined that CB2 exerts its function at a presynaptic site of action, likely through inhibition of voltage gated calcium channels. Therefore CB2 expressed in neurons effectively mimics the actions of CB1. Thus, neuronal CB2 is well suited to integrate into conventional neuronal endocannabinoid signaling processes, with its specific role determined by its unique and highly inducible expression profile. PMID:22579668

  12. Programming embryonic stem cells to neuronal subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Mirza; Wichterle, Hynek

    2010-01-01

    Richness of neural circuits and specificity of neuronal connectivity depends on the diversification of nerve cells into functionally and molecularly distinct subtypes. While efficient methods for directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into multiple principal neuronal classes have been established, only a few studies systematically examined the subtype diversity of in vitro derived nerve cells. Here we review evidence based on molecular and in vivo transplantation studies that ESC-derived spinal motor neurons and cortical layer V pyramidal neurons acquire subtype specific functional properties. We discuss similarities and differences in the role of cell intrinsic transcriptional programs, extrinsic signals and cell-cell interactions during subtype diversification of the two classes of nerve cells. We conclude that the high degree of fidelity with which differentiating ESCs recapitulate normal embryonic development provides a unique opportunity to explore developmental processes underlying specification of mammalian neuronal diversity in a simplified and experimentally accessible system. PMID:20970319

  13. CaMKII inhibition promotes neuronal apoptosis by transcriptionally upregulating Bim expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiwei; Zhu, Lin; Yu, Shaojun; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Chong

    2016-09-28

    The effects of Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) on neuronal apoptosis are complex and contradictory, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) is an important proapoptotic protein under many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, there is no evidence that CaMKII and Bim are mechanistically linked in neuronal apoptosis. In this study, we showed that CaMKII inhibition by the inhibitors KN-62 and myristoylated autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide promoted apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons in a dose-dependent manner. CaMKII inhibition increased Bim protein and messenger RNA levels. The expression of early growth response factor-1, a transcription factor of Bim, was also induced by CaMKII inhibitors. These data suggested that CaMKII repressed the transcriptional expression of Bim. Moreover, knockdown of Bim using small interfering RNAs attenuated the proapoptotic effects of CaMKII inhibition. Taken together, this is the first report to show that CaMKII inhibition transcriptionally upregulates Bim expression to promote neuronal apoptosis, providing new insights into the proapoptotic mechanism of CaMKII inhibition.

  14. CaMKII inhibition promotes neuronal apoptosis by transcriptionally upregulating Bim expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiwei; Zhu, Lin; Yu, Shaojun; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Chong

    2016-09-28

    The effects of Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) on neuronal apoptosis are complex and contradictory, and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) is an important proapoptotic protein under many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, there is no evidence that CaMKII and Bim are mechanistically linked in neuronal apoptosis. In this study, we showed that CaMKII inhibition by the inhibitors KN-62 and myristoylated autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide promoted apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons in a dose-dependent manner. CaMKII inhibition increased Bim protein and messenger RNA levels. The expression of early growth response factor-1, a transcription factor of Bim, was also induced by CaMKII inhibitors. These data suggested that CaMKII repressed the transcriptional expression of Bim. Moreover, knockdown of Bim using small interfering RNAs attenuated the proapoptotic effects of CaMKII inhibition. Taken together, this is the first report to show that CaMKII inhibition transcriptionally upregulates Bim expression to promote neuronal apoptosis, providing new insights into the proapoptotic mechanism of CaMKII inhibition. PMID:27483389

  15. Neuronize: a tool for building realistic neuronal cell morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Juan P.; Mata, Susana; Bayona, Sofia; Pastor, Luis; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a tool, Neuronize, for building realistic three-dimensional models of neuronal cells from the morphological information extracted through computer-aided tracing applications. Neuronize consists of a set of methods designed to build 3D neural meshes that approximate the cell membrane at different resolution levels, allowing a balance to be reached between the complexity and the quality of the final model. The main contribution of the present study is the proposal of a novel approach to build a realistic and accurate 3D shape of the soma from the incomplete information stored in the digitally traced neuron, which usually consists of a 2D cell body contour. This technique is based on the deformation of an initial shape driven by the position and thickness of the first order dendrites. The addition of a set of spines along the dendrites completes the model, building a final 3D neuronal cell suitable for its visualization in a wide range of 3D environments. PMID:23761740

  16. Neuronal expression of CD22: novel mechanism for inhibiting microglial proinflammatory cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Mott, Ryan T; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Town, Terrence; Mori, Takashi; Vendrame, Martina; Zeng, Jin; Ehrhart, Jared; Mullan, Michae; Tan, Jun

    2004-05-01

    Although considered an immunologically privileged site, the central nervous system (CNS) can display significant inflammatory responses, which may play a pathogenic role in a number of neurological diseases. Microglia appear to be particularly important for initiating and sustaining CNS inflammation. These cells exist in a quiescent form in the normal CNS, but acquire macrophage-like properties (including active phagocytosis, upregulation of proteins necessary for antigen presentation, and production of proinflammatory cytokines) after stimulation with inflammatory substances such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Recent studies have focused on elucidating the role of neurons in the regulation of microglial inflammatory responses. In the present study, we demonstrate, using neuron-microglial cocultures, that neurons are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production by microglia. This inhibition appears to be dependent on secretion of substances at axon terminals, as treatment with the presynaptic calcium channel blocker omega-conotoxin abolishes this inhibitory effect. Moreover, we show that conditioned medium from neuronal cultures similarly inhibits microglial TNF-alpha production, which provides additional evidence that neurons secrete inhibitory substances. We previously demonstrated that the transmembrane protein-tyrosine phosphatase CD45 plays an important role in negatively regulating microglial activation. The recent characterization of CD22 as an endogenous ligand of this receptor led us to investigate whether neurons express this protein. Indeed, we were able to demonstrate CD22 mRNA and protein expression in cultured neurons and mouse brain, using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and antibody-based techniques. Furthermore, we show that neurons secrete CD22, which functions as an inhibitor of microglial proinflammatory cytokine production.

  17. Activation and inhibition of tph2 serotonergic neurons operate in tandem to influence larval zebrafish preference for light over darkness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ruey-Kuang; Krishnan, Seetha; Jesuthasan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic neurons have been implicated in a broad range of processes, but the principles underlying their effects remain a puzzle. Here, we ask how these neurons influence the tendency of larval zebrafish to swim in the light and avoid regions of darkness. Pharmacological inhibition of serotonin synthesis reduces dark avoidance, indicating an involvement of this neuromodulator. Calcium imaging of tph2-expressing cells demonstrates that a rostral subset of dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons fire continuously while the animal is in darkness, but are inhibited in the light. Optogenetic manipulation of tph2 neurons by channelrhodopsin or halorhodopsin expression modifies preference, confirming a role for these neurons. In particular, these results suggest that fish prefer swimming in conditions that elicits lower activity in tph2 serotonergic neurons in the rostral raphe. PMID:26868164

  18. Neuronal phagocytosis by inflammatory macrophages in ALS spinal cord: inhibition of inflammation by resolvin D1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanghao; Fiala, Milan; Mizwicki, Mathew T; Sayre, James; Magpantay, Larry; Siani, Avi; Mahanian, Michelle; Chattopadhyay, Madhuri; Cava, Antonio La; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Although the cause of neuronal degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains hypothetical, there is evidence of spinal cord infiltration by macrophages and T cells. In post-mortem ALS spinal cords, 19.8 ± 4.8 % motor neurons, including caspase-negative and caspase-positive neurons, were ingested by IL-6- and TNF-α-positive macrophages. In ALS macrophages, in vitro aggregated superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) stimulated in ALS macrophages expression of inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, through activation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and caspase-1. The lipid mediator resolvin D1 (RvD1) inhibited IL-6 and TNF-α production in ALS macrophages with 1,100 times greater potency than its parent molecule docosahexaenoic acid. ALS peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) showed increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines at baseline and after stimulation by aggregated wild-type SOD-1, and these cytokines were down regulated by RvD1. Thus the neurons are impacted by macrophages expressing inflammatory cytokines. RvD1 strongly inhibits in macrophages and PBMCs cytokine transcription but does not inhibit their production in PBMCs. Resolvins offer a new approach to ALS inflammation suppressing. PMID:22787561

  19. NFκB-inducing kinase inhibits NFκB activity specifically in neurons of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xianrong; Phanavanh, Bounleut; Hamdan, Hamdan; Moerman-Herzog, Andréa M; Barger, Steven W

    2016-04-01

    The control of NFκB in CNS neurons appears to differ from that in other cell types. Studies have reported induction of NFκB in neuronal cultures and immunostaining in vivo, but others have consistently detected little or no transcriptional activation by NFκB in brain neurons. To test if neurons lack some component of the signal transduction system for NFκB activation, we transfected cortical neurons with several members of this signaling system along with a luciferase-based NFκB-reporter plasmid; RelA was cotransfected in some conditions. No component of the NFκB pathway was permissive for endogenous NFκB activity, and none stimulated the activity of exogenous RelA. Surprisingly, however, the latter was inhibited by cotransfection of NFκB-inducing kinase (NIK). Fluorescence imaging of RelA indicated that co-expression of NIK sequestered RelA in the cytoplasm, similar to the effect of IκBα. NIK-knockout mice showed elevated expression of an NFκB-reporter construct in neurons in vivo. Cortical neurons cultured from NIK-knockout mice showed elevated expression of an NFκB-reporter transgene. Consistent with data from other cell types, a C-terminal fragment of NIK suppressed RelA activity in astrocytes as well as neurons. Therefore, the inhibitory ability of the NIK C-terminus was unbiased with regard to cell type. However, inhibition of NFκB by full-length NIK is a novel outcome that appears to be specific to CNS neurons. This has implications for unique aspects of transcription in the CNS, perhaps relevant to aspects of development, neuroplasticity, and neuroinflammation. Full-length NIK was found to inhibit (down arrow) transcriptional activation of NFκB in neurons, while it elevated (up arrow) activity in astrocytes. Deletion constructs corresponding to the N-terminus or C-terminus also inhibited NFκB in neurons, while only the C-terminus did so in astrocytes. One possible explanation is that the inhibition in neurons occurs via two different

  20. Morphological homogeneity of neurons: searching for outlier neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Krissia; Feenders, Christoph; Viana, Matheus P; Kaiser, Marcus; Costa, Luciano da F

    2012-10-01

    We report a morphology-based approach for the automatic identification of outlier neurons, as well as its application to the NeuroMorpho.org database, with more than 5,000 neurons. Each neuron in a given analysis is represented by a feature vector composed of 20 measurements, which are then projected into a two-dimensional space by applying principal component analysis. Bivariate kernel density estimation is then used to obtain the probability distribution for the group of cells, so that the cells with highest probabilities are understood as archetypes while those with the smallest probabilities are classified as outliers. The potential of the methodology is illustrated in several cases involving uniform cell types as well as cell types for specific animal species. The results provide insights regarding the distribution of cells, yielding single and multi-variate clusters, and they suggest that outlier cells tend to be more planar and tortuous. The proposed methodology can be used in several situations involving one or more categories of cells, as well as for detection of new categories and possible artifacts. PMID:22615032

  1. Communication between mast cells and rat submucosal neurons.

    PubMed

    Bell, Anna; Althaus, Mike; Diener, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Histamine is a mast cell mediator released e.g. during food allergy. The aim of the project was to identify the effect of histamine on rat submucosal neurons and the mechanisms involved. Cultured submucosal neurons from rat colon express H1, H2 and H3 receptors as shown by immunocytochemical staining confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with messenger RNA (mRNA) isolated from submucosal homogenates as starting material. Histamine evoked a biphasic rise of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in cultured submucosal neurons, consisting in a release of intracellularly stored Ca(2+) followed by an influx from the extracellular space. Although agonists of all three receptor subtypes evoked an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, experiments with antagonists revealed that mainly H1 (and to a lesser degree H2) receptors mediate the response to histamine. In coculture experiments with RBL-2H3 cells, a mast cell equivalent, compound 48/80, evoked an increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration of neighbouring neurons. Like the response to native histamine, the neuronal response to the mast cell degranulator was strongly inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine and reduced by the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine. In rats sensitized against ovalbumin, exposure to the antigen induced a rise in short-circuit current (I sc) across colonic mucosa-submucosa preparations without a significant increase in paracellular fluorescein fluxes. Pyrilamine strongly inhibited the increase in I sc, a weaker inhibition was observed after blockade of protease receptors or 5-lipoxygenase. Consequently, H1 receptors on submucosal neurons seem to play a pivotal role in the communication between mast cells and the enteric nervous system. PMID:25224285

  2. Merkel cells and neurons keep in touch

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seung-Hyun; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2014-01-01

    The Merkel cell-neurite complex is a unique vertebrate touch receptor comprising two distinct cell types in the skin. Its presence in touch-sensitive skin areas was recognized more than a century ago, but the functions of each cell type in sensory transduction have been unclear. Three recent studies demonstrate that Merkel cells are mechanosensitive cells that function in touch transduction via Piezo2. One study concludes that Merkel cells rather than sensory neurons are principal sites of mechanotransduction, whereas the other two studies report that both Merkel cells and neurons encode mechanical inputs. Together, these studies settle a longstanding debate on whether Merkel cells are mechanosensory cells, and enable future investigations of how these skin cells communicate with neurons. PMID:25480024

  3. Methamphetamine Inhibits the Glucose Uptake by Human Neurons and Astrocytes: Stabilization by Acetyl-L-Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Szlachetka, Adam M.; Haorah, James

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an addictive psycho-stimulant drug exerts euphoric effects on users and abusers. It is also known to cause cognitive impairment and neurotoxicity. Here, we hypothesized that METH exposure impairs the glucose uptake and metabolism in human neurons and astrocytes. Deprivation of glucose is expected to cause neurotoxicity and neuronal degeneration due to depletion of energy. We found that METH exposure inhibited the glucose uptake by neurons and astrocytes, in which neurons were more sensitive to METH than astrocytes in primary culture. Adaptability of these cells to fatty acid oxidation as an alternative source of energy during glucose limitation appeared to regulate this differential sensitivity. Decrease in neuronal glucose uptake by METH was associated with reduction of glucose transporter protein-3 (GLUT3). Surprisingly, METH exposure showed biphasic effects on astrocytic glucose uptake, in which 20 µM increased the uptake while 200 µM inhibited glucose uptake. Dual effects of METH on glucose uptake were paralleled to changes in the expression of astrocytic glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1). The adaptive nature of astrocyte to mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acid appeared to contribute the survival of astrocytes during METH-induced glucose deprivation. This differential adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes also governed the differential sensitivity to the toxicity of METH in these brain cells. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine for enhanced production of ATP from fatty oxidation in glucose-free culture condition validated the adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes. These findings suggest that deprivation of glucose-derived energy may contribute to neurotoxicity of METH abusers. PMID:21556365

  4. Optogenetic inhibition of neurons by internal light production

    PubMed Central

    Land, Benjamin B.; Brayton, Catherine E.; Furman, Kara E.; LaPalombara, Zoe; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics is an extremely powerful tool for selective neuronal activation/inhibition and dissection of neural circuits. However, a limitation of in vivo optogenetics is that an animal must be tethered to an optical fiber for delivery of light. Here, we describe a new method for in vivo, optogenetic inhibition of neural activity using an internal, animal-generated light source based on firefly luciferase. Two adeno-associated viruses encoding luciferase were tested and both produced concentration-dependent light after administration of the substrate, luciferin. Mice were co-infected with halorhodopsin- and luciferase-expressing viruses in the striatum, and luciferin administration significantly reduced Fos activity compared to control animals infected with halorhodopsin only. Recordings of neuronal activity in behaving animals confirmed that firing was greatly reduced after luciferin administration. Finally, amphetamine-induced locomotor activity was reduced in halorhodopsin/luciferase mice pre-injected with luciferin compared to controls. This demonstrates that virally encoded luciferase is able to generate sufficient light to activate halorhodopsin and suppress neural activity and change behavior. This approach could be used to generate inhibition in response to activation of specific molecular pathways. PMID:24744708

  5. Optogenetic inhibition of neurons by internal light production.

    PubMed

    Land, Benjamin B; Brayton, Catherine E; Furman, Kara E; Lapalombara, Zoe; Dileone, Ralph J

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics is an extremely powerful tool for selective neuronal activation/inhibition and dissection of neural circuits. However, a limitation of in vivo optogenetics is that an animal must be tethered to an optical fiber for delivery of light. Here, we describe a new method for in vivo, optogenetic inhibition of neural activity using an internal, animal-generated light source based on firefly luciferase. Two adeno-associated viruses encoding luciferase were tested and both produced concentration-dependent light after administration of the substrate, luciferin. Mice were co-infected with halorhodopsin- and luciferase-expressing viruses in the striatum, and luciferin administration significantly reduced Fos activity compared to control animals infected with halorhodopsin only. Recordings of neuronal activity in behaving animals confirmed that firing was greatly reduced after luciferin administration. Finally, amphetamine-induced locomotor activity was reduced in halorhodopsin/luciferase mice pre-injected with luciferin compared to controls. This demonstrates that virally encoded luciferase is able to generate sufficient light to activate halorhodopsin and suppress neural activity and change behavior. This approach could be used to generate inhibition in response to activation of specific molecular pathways.

  6. MLKL inhibition attenuates hypoxia-ischemia induced neuronal damage in developing brain.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yi; Shi, Jing; Tang, Ying; Zhao, Fengyan; Li, Shiping; Meng, Junjie; Tang, Jun; Lin, Xuemei; Peng, Xiaodong; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-05-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a critical molecule mediating cell necroptosis. However, its role in brain injury remains obscure. We first investigated the functions and mechanisms of MLKL in mediating neuronal damage in developing brain after hypoxia-ischemia. Neuronal necroptosis was induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) plus caspase inhibitor zVAD treatment (OGD/zVAD). We found that two important necroptosis related proteins, receptor-interacting protein 1 and 3 (RIP1, RIP3) were upregulated. Furthermore, the interaction of RIP1-RIP3 with MLKL increased. Inhibition of MLKL through siRNA diminished RIP1-RIP3-MLKL interaction and attenuated neuronal death induced by OGD/zVAD. The translocation of oligomerized MLKL to the neuronal membrane leading to the injury of cellular membrane is the possible new mechanism of neuronal necroptosis. Animal experiment with neonatal rats further proved that MLKL inhibition attenuated brain damage induced by hypoxia-ischemia. These findings suggest that MLKL is a target to attenuate brain damage in developing brain.

  7. In vivo inhibition of the mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase in neurons promotes metabolic preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Formentini, Laura; Pereira, Marta P; Sánchez-Cenizo, Laura; Santacatterina, Fulvio; Lucas, José J; Navarro, Carmen; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Cuezva, José M

    2014-01-01

    A key transducer in energy conservation and signaling cell death is the mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase. The expression of the ATPase inhibitory factor 1 (IF1) is a strategy used by cancer cells to inhibit the activity of the H+-ATP synthase to generate a ROS signal that switches on cellular programs of survival. We have generated a mouse model expressing a mutant of human IF1 in brain neurons to assess the role of the H+-ATP synthase in cell death in vivo. The expression of hIF1 inhibits the activity of oxidative phosphorylation and mediates the shift of neurons to an enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Metabolic reprogramming induces brain preconditioning affording protection against quinolinic acid-induced excitotoxicity. Mechanistically, preconditioning involves the activation of the Akt/p70S6K and PARP repair pathways and Bcl-xL protection from cell death. Overall, our findings provide the first in vivo evidence highlighting the H+-ATP synthase as a target to prevent neuronal cell death. PMID:24521670

  8. In vivo inhibition of the mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase in neurons promotes metabolic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Formentini, Laura; Pereira, Marta P; Sánchez-Cenizo, Laura; Santacatterina, Fulvio; Lucas, José J; Navarro, Carmen; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Cuezva, José M

    2014-04-01

    A key transducer in energy conservation and signaling cell death is the mitochondrial H(+)-ATP synthase. The expression of the ATPase inhibitory factor 1 (IF1) is a strategy used by cancer cells to inhibit the activity of the H(+)-ATP synthase to generate a ROS signal that switches on cellular programs of survival. We have generated a mouse model expressing a mutant of human IF1 in brain neurons to assess the role of the H(+)-ATP synthase in cell death in vivo. The expression of hIF1 inhibits the activity of oxidative phosphorylation and mediates the shift of neurons to an enhanced aerobic glycolysis. Metabolic reprogramming induces brain preconditioning affording protection against quinolinic acid-induced excitotoxicity. Mechanistically, preconditioning involves the activation of the Akt/p70S6K and PARP repair pathways and Bcl-xL protection from cell death. Overall, our findings provide the first in vivo evidence highlighting the H(+)-ATP synthase as a target to prevent neuronal cell death.

  9. Phosphodiesterase 7 Inhibition Preserves Dopaminergic Neurons in Cellular and Rodent Models of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Garcia, Jose A.; Redondo, Miriam; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Gil, Carmen; Perez, Concepción; Martinez, Ana; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Background Phosphodiesterase 7 plays a major role in down-regulation of protein kinase A activity by hydrolyzing cAMP in many cell types. This cyclic nucleotide plays a key role in signal transduction in a wide variety of cellular responses. In the brain, cAMP has been implicated in learning, memory processes and other brain functions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show a novel function of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal death. We found that S14, a heterocyclic small molecule inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 7, conferred significant neuronal protection against different insults both in the human dopaminergic cell line SH-SY5Y and in primary rat mesencephalic cultures. S14 treatment also reduced microglial activation, protected dopaminergic neurons and improved motor function in the lipopolysaccharide rat model of Parkinson disease. Finally, S14 neuroprotective effects were reversed by blocking the cAMP signaling pathways that operate through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition can protect dopaminergic neurons against different insults, and they provide support for the therapeutic potential of phosphodiesterase 7 inhibitors in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Parkinson disease. PMID:21390306

  10. Role of platinum DNA damage-induced transcriptional inhibition in chemotherapy-induced neuronal atrophy and peripheral neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Johnson J; Ip, Virginia; Jamieson, Stephen M F; McKeage, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause peripheral neurotoxicity by damaging sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. The roles of platinum DNA binding, transcription inhibition and altered cell size were investigated in primary cultures of rat DRG cells. Click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging of RNA-incorporated 5-ethynyluridine showed high, but wide ranging, global levels of transcription in individual neurons that correlated with their cell body size. Treatment with platinum drugs reduced neuronal transcription and cell body size to an extent that corresponded to the amount of preceding platinum DNA binding, but without any loss of neuronal cells. The effects of platinum drugs on neuronal transcription and cell body size were inhibited by blocking platinum DNA binding with sodium thiosulfate, and mimicked by treatment with a model transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D. In vivo oxaliplatin treatment depleted the total RNA content of DRG tissue concurrently with altering DRG neuronal size. These findings point to a mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. DRG neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this mechanism of toxicity because of their requirements for high basal levels of global transcriptional activity. Findings point to a new stepwise mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. Dorsal root ganglion neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this neurotoxicity because of their high global transcriptional outputs, demonstrated in this study by click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging.

  11. Action of ethanol on responses to nicotine from cerebellar Purkinje neurons: relationship to methyllycaconitine (MLA) inhibition of nicotine responses.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Criswell, H E; Breese, G R

    1999-08-01

    The effect of ethanol on responses to nicotine from rat cerebellar Purkinje neurons was investigated using extracellular single-unit recording. Systemic administration of ethanol initially enhanced the nicotine-induced inhibition from 50% of the Purkinje neurons. However, irrespective of whether there was an initial enhancement, systemic administration of ethanol antagonized the response to nicotine from the majority of Purkinje neurons. When varying ethanol concentrations were electro-osmotically applied to this neuronal cell type, the responses to nicotine (6/8) were enhanced when a low concentration of ethanol (40 mM) was in the pipette, whereas the majority of nicotine responses (10/11) were antagonized when a higher concentration of ethanol (160 mM) was applied to Purkinje neurons. Thus, the concentration of ethanol presented to the neuron seemed to explain the biphasic consequence of systemically administered ethanol on responses to nicotine. In order to determine whether ethanol affected a specific nACh receptor subtype containing the alpha-7 subunit, it was initially established that the nicotinic antagonists, alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) and methyllycaconitine (MLA), which are associated with this subunit, had identical actions on responses to nicotine from Purkinje neurons. When MLA was tested against responses to nicotine from this cell type, MLA antagonized the response to nicotine from 45% (9/20) of the neurons tested. In a direct comparison of the action of ethanol to inhibit responses to nicotine with the action of MLA on the same Purkinje neuron, ethanol inhibited responses to nicotine on all neurons sensitive to MLA. However, ethanol also affected nicotine-induced neural changes from some Purkinje neurons not sensitive to MLA antagonism of nicotine. These data support the supposition that ethanol affects a nACh receptor subtype which has an alpha-7 subunit as well as other nACh receptor subtypes without this specific subunit.

  12. Molecular characterization of Thy1 expressing fear-inhibiting neurons within the basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Kenneth M.; Choi, Dennis; Guo, Jidong; Zimmerman, Kelsey; Walton, Jordan; Rainnie, Donald G.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of neuron populations, particularly those controlling threat responses, is essential for understanding the cellular basis of behaviour and identifying pharmacological agents acting selectively on fear-controlling circuitry. Here we demonstrate a comprehensive workflow for identification of pharmacologically tractable markers of behaviourally characterized cell populations. Thy1-eNpHR-, Thy1-Cre- and Thy1-eYFP-labelled neurons of the BLA consistently act as fear inhibiting or ‘Fear-Off' neurons during behaviour. We use cell-type-specific optogenetics and chemogenetics (DREADDs) to modulate activity in this population during behaviour to block or enhance fear extinction. Dissociated Thy1-eYFP neurons are isolated using FACS. RNA sequencing identifies genes strongly upregulated in RNA of this population, including Ntsr2, Dkk3, Rspo2 and Wnt7a. Pharmacological manipulation of neurotensin receptor 2 confirms behavioural effects observed in optogenetic and chemogenetic experiments. These experiments identify and validate Ntsr2-expressing neurons within the BLA, as a putative ‘Fear-Off' population. PMID:27767183

  13. TGFbeta2 mediates rapid inhibition of calcium influx in identified cholinergic basal forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sylvain; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy; Danik, Marc

    2002-02-01

    Transforming growth factors betas (TGFbetas) are known to have important roles in neuronal survival and can be upregulated in disease. However, unlike many other trophic factors, nothing is known about the rapid neurotransmitter-like actions of TGFbeta in the CNS. We explored this by examining the effects of TGFbeta on calcium influx of large enzymatically dissociated basal forebrain neurons. We show that brief application of TGFbeta2, but not TGFbeta1, to fura-2AM-loaded neurons reversibly and acutely (within seconds) inhibited K(+)-evoked calcium influx. Moreover, using single-cell RT-PCR, we confirmed that the large TGFbeta2-responsive neurons presented a cholinergic phenotype. Investigation of the signaling mechanism underlying TGFbeta2 actions using whole-cell recordings of calcium currents revealed that TGFbeta2-mediated responses were insensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue GTPgammaS. However, TGFbeta2-mediated calcium current reductions were prevented by intracellular perfusion of a Smad2/3 peptide antagonist. Together, these results suggest that TGFbeta2 can acutely regulate the excitability of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons through an atypical signaling mechanism. PMID:11812008

  14. Tonic zinc inhibits spontaneous firing in dorsal cochlear nucleus principal neurons by enhancing glycinergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rosello, Tamara; Anderson, Charles T; Ling, Cindy; Lippard, Stephen J; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-09-01

    In many synapses of the CNS, mobile zinc is packaged into glutamatergic vesicles and co-released with glutamate during neurotransmission. Following synaptic release, the mobilized zinc modulates ligand- and voltage-gated channels and receptors, functioning as an inhibitory neuromodulator. However, the origin and role of tonic, as opposed to phasically released, zinc are less well understood. We investigated tonic zinc in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), a zinc-rich, auditory brainstem nucleus. Our results show that application of a high-affinity, extracellular zinc chelator (ZX1) enhances spontaneous firing in DCN principal neurons (fusiform cells), consistent with inhibition of this neuronal property by tonic zinc. The enhancing effect was prevented by prior application of strychnine, a glycine receptor antagonist, suggesting that ZX1 interferes with zinc-mediated modulation of spontaneous glycinergic inhibition. In particular, ZX1 decreased the amplitude and the frequency of glycinergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in fusiform cells, from which we conclude that tonic zinc enhances glycinergic inhibitory neurotransmission. The observed zinc-mediated inhibition in spontaneous firing is present in mice lacking the vesicular zinc transporter (ZnT3), indicating that non-vesicular zinc inhibits spontaneous firing. Noise-induced increase in the spontaneous firing of fusiform cells is crucial for the induction of tinnitus. In this context, tonic zinc provides a powerful break of spontaneous firing that may protect against pathological run-up of spontaneous activity in the DCN.

  15. Tonic zinc inhibits spontaneous firing in dorsal cochlear nucleus principal neurons by enhancing glycinergic neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Rosello, Tamara; Anderson, Charles T.; Ling, Cindy; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    In many synapses of the CNS, mobile zinc is packaged into glutamatergic vesicles and co-released with glutamate during neurotransmission. Following synaptic release, the mobilized zinc modulates ligand- and voltage-gated channels and receptors, functioning as an inhibitory neuromodulator. However, the origin and role of tonic, as opposed to phasically released, zinc are less well understood. We investigated tonic zinc in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), a zinc-rich, auditory brainstem nucleus. Our results show that application of a high-affinity, extracellular zinc chelator (ZX1) enhances spontaneous firing in DCN principal neurons (fusiform cells), consistent with inhibition of this neuronal property by tonic zinc. The enhancing effect was prevented by prior application of strychnine, a glycine receptor antagonist, suggesting that ZX1 interferes with zinc-mediated modulation of spontaneous glycinergic inhibition. In particular, ZX1 decreased the amplitude and the frequency of glycinergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in fusiform cells, from which we conclude that tonic zinc enhances glycinergic inhibitory neurotransmission. The observed zinc-mediated inhibition in spontaneous firing is present in mice lacking the vesicular zinc transporter (ZnT3), indicating that non-vesicular zinc inhibits spontaneous firing. Noise-induced increase in the spontaneous firing of fusiform cells is crucial for the induction of tinnitus. In this context, tonic zinc provides a powerful break of spontaneous firing that may protect against pathological run-up of spontaneous activity in the DCN. PMID:25796568

  16. Inhibition of M current in sensory neurons by exogenous proteases: a signaling pathway mediating inflammatory nociception.

    PubMed

    Linley, John E; Rose, Kirstin; Patil, Mayur; Robertson, Brian; Akopian, Armen N; Gamper, Nikita

    2008-10-29

    Inflammatory pain is thought to be mediated in part through the action of inflammatory mediators on membrane receptors of peripheral nerve terminals, however, the downstream signaling events which lead to pain are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the nociceptive pathways induced by activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in damage-sensing (nociceptive) neurons from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We found that activation of PAR-2 in these cells strongly inhibited M-type potassium currents (conducted by Kv7 potassium channels). Such inhibition caused depolarization of the neuronal resting membrane potential leading, ultimately, to nociception. Consistent with this mechanism, injection of the specific M channel blocker XE991 into rat paw induced nociception in a concentration-dependent manner. Injection of a PAR-2 agonist peptide also induced nociception but coinjection of XE991 and the PAR-2 agonist did not result in summation of nociception, suggesting that the action of both agents may share a similar mechanism. We also studied the signaling pathway of M current inhibition by PAR-2 using patch-clamp and fluorescence imaging of DRG neurons. These experiments revealed that the PAR-2 effect was mediated by phospholipase C (PLC). Further experiments demonstrated that M current inhibition required concurrent rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and depletion of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). We propose that PLC- and Ca(2+)/PIP(2)-mediated inhibition of M current in sensory neurons may represent one of the general mechanisms underlying pain produced by inflammatory mediators, and may therefore open up a new therapeutic window for treatment of this major clinical problem. PMID:18971466

  17. Alleviation of neuronal energy deficiency by mTOR inhibition as a treatment for mitochondria-related neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xinde; Boyer, Leah; Jin, Mingji; Kim, Yongsung; Fan, Weiwei; Bardy, Cedric; Berggren, Travis; Evans, Ronald M; Gage, Fred H; Hunter, Tony

    2016-01-01

    mTOR inhibition is beneficial in neurodegenerative disease models and its effects are often attributable to the modulation of autophagy and anti-apoptosis. Here, we report a neglected but important bioenergetic effect of mTOR inhibition in neurons. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin significantly preserves neuronal ATP levels, particularly when oxidative phosphorylation is impaired, such as in neurons treated with mitochondrial inhibitors, or in neurons derived from maternally inherited Leigh syndrome (MILS) patient iPS cells with ATP synthase deficiency. Rapamycin treatment significantly improves the resistance of MILS neurons to glutamate toxicity. Surprisingly, in mitochondrially defective neurons, but not neuroprogenitor cells, ribosomal S6 and S6 kinase phosphorylation increased over time, despite activation of AMPK, which is often linked to mTOR inhibition. A rapamycin-induced decrease in protein synthesis, a major energy-consuming process, may account for its ATP-saving effect. We propose that a mild reduction in protein synthesis may have the potential to treat mitochondria-related neurodegeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13378.001 PMID:27008180

  18. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein inhibits neuron apoptosis through the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Xue, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Kong, Hai-Bo; Liu, Ai-Jun; Li, Shou-Chun; Xu, Dong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is induced by mild hypothermia in several mammals, but the precise mechanism by which CIRP mediates hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which CIRP protects the nervous system during mild hypothermia. Rat cortical neurons were isolated and cultured in vitro under mild hypothermia (32°C). Apoptosis was measured by annexin V and propidium iodide staining, visualized by flow cytometry. Neuron ultrastructure was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. CIRP overexpression and knockdown were achieved via infection with pL/IRES/GFP-CIRP and pL/shRNA/F-CIRP-A lentivirus. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis and western blotting were used to evaluate the effects of CIRP overexpresion/knockdown on the neurons׳ transcriptome. Neuron late apoptosis was significantly reduced at day 7 of culture by 12h hypothermia, but neuron ultrastructure remained relatively intact. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis of 84 apoptosis pathway-associated factors revealed that mild hypothermia and CIRP overexpression induce similar gene expression profiles, specifically alterations of genes implicated in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Mild hypothermia-treated neurons up-regulated 12 and down-regulated 38 apoptosis pathway-associated genes. CIRP-overexpressing neurons up-regulated 15 and down-regulated 46 genes. CIRP-knocked-down hypothermia-treated cells up-regulated 9 and down-regulated 40 genes. Similar results were obtained at the protein level. In conclusion, CIRP may inhibit neuron apoptosis through the suppression of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway during mild hypothermia.

  19. The general anaesthetic etomidate inhibits the excitability of mouse thalamocortical relay neurons by modulating multiple modes of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Herd, Murray B; Lambert, Jeremy J; Belelli, Delia

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of thalamocortical (TC) relay neuron function has been implicated in the sedative and hypnotic effects of general anaesthetics. Inhibition of TC neurons is mediated predominantly by a combination of phasic and tonic inhibition, together with a recently described ‘spillover’ mode of inhibition, generated by the dynamic recruitment of extrasynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors (GABAARs). Previous studies demonstrated that the intravenous anaesthetic etomidate enhances tonic and phasic inhibition in TC relay neurons, but it is not known how etomidate may influence spillover inhibition. Moreover, it is unclear how etomidate influences the excitability of TC neurons. Thus, to investigate the relative contribution of synaptic (α1β2γ2) and extrasynaptic (α4β2δ) GABAARs to the thalamic effects of etomidate, we performed whole-cell recordings from mouse TC neurons lacking synaptic (α10/0) or extrasynaptic (δ0/0) GABAARs. Etomidate (3 μm) significantly inhibited action-potential discharge in a manner that was dependent on facilitation of both synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAARs, although enhanced tonic inhibition was dominant in this respect. Additionally, phasic inhibition evoked by stimulation of the nucleus reticularis exhibited a spillover component mediated by δ-GABAARs, which was significantly prolonged in the presence of etomidate. Thus, etomidate greatly enhanced the transient suppression of TC spike trains by evoked inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. Collectively, these results suggest that the deactivation of thalamus observed during etomidate-induced anaesthesia involves potentiation of tonic and phasic inhibition, and implicate amplification of spillover inhibition as a novel mechanism to regulate the gating of sensory information through the thalamus during anaesthetic states. PMID:24773078

  20. An improved chloride-conducting channelrhodopsin for light-induced inhibition of neuronal activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wietek, Jonas; Beltramo, Riccardo; Scanziani, Massimo; Hegemann, Peter; Oertner, Thomas G.; Simon Wiegert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins are light-gated cation channels that have been widely used for optogenetic stimulation of electrically excitable cells. Replacement of a glutamic acid in the central gate with a positively charged amino acid residue reverses the ion selectivity and produces chloride-conducting ChRs (ChloCs). Expressed in neurons, published ChloCs produced a strong shunting effect but also a small, yet significant depolarization from the resting potential. Depending on the state of the neuron, the net result of illumination might therefore be inhibitory or excitatory with respect to action potential generation. Here we report two additional amino acid substitutions that significantly shift the reversal potential of improved ChloC (iChloC) to the reversal potential of endogenous GABAA receptors. As a result, light-evoked membrane depolarization was strongly reduced and spike initiation after current injection or synaptic stimulation was reliably inhibited in iChloC-transfected neurons in vitro. In the primary visual cortex of anesthetized mice, activation of iChloC suppressed spiking activity evoked by visual stimulation. Due to its high operational light sensitivity, iChloC makes it possible to inhibit neurons in a large volume of brain tissue from a small, point-like light source. PMID:26443033

  1. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  2. Optical control of neuronal excitation and inhibition using a single opsin protein, ChR2

    PubMed Central

    Liske, Holly; Qian, Xiang; Anikeeva, Polina; Deisseroth, Karl; Delp, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The effect of electrical stimulation on neuronal membrane potential is frequency dependent. Low frequency electrical stimulation can evoke action potentials, whereas high frequency stimulation can inhibit action potential transmission. Optical stimulation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressed in neuronal membranes can also excite action potentials. However, it is unknown whether optical stimulation of ChR2-expressing neurons produces a transition from excitation to inhibition with increasing light pulse frequencies. Here we report optical inhibition of motor neuron and muscle activity in vivo in the cooled sciatic nerves of Thy1-ChR2-EYFP mice. We also demonstrate all-optical single-wavelength control of neuronal excitation and inhibition without co-expression of inhibitory and excitatory opsins. This all-optical system is free from stimulation-induced electrical artifacts and thus provides a new approach to investigate mechanisms of high frequency inhibition in neuronal circuits in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24173561

  3. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification.

    PubMed

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons.

  4. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A.; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  5. Domain-specific antibodies against the B2 chain of laminin inhibit neuronal migration in the neonatal rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Liesi, P; Hager, G; Dodt, H U; Seppälä, I; Zieglgänsberger, W

    1995-02-01

    Although the spatial and temporal patterns of neuronal migration have been analyzed in great detail, little direct evidence is available as to what extracellular matrix molecules are involved. Because there is indirect evidence implicating the extracellular matrix protein laminin in neuronal migration, we investigated the effects of antibodies against a synthetic peptide derived from a neurite outgrowth domain of the B2 chain of laminin on neuronal migration in living cerebellar slices. We show by using infrared video microscopy that divalent Fab2 fragments of these antibodies inhibit granule neuronal movement in living slices of (P8) rat cerebellum. This inhibition of neuronal movement manifests itself by cessation of both radial and horizontal translocations of nuclei inside the granule neuronal processes. Fab2 fragments of antibodies against the intact (native) laminin molecule or Fab2 fragments from the preimmune serum do not affect nuclear translocation. Immunocytochemistry shows binding of the divalent Fab2 fragments of the B2 chain-specific antibodies to the Purkinje and Bergmann glial cell areas, and as punctate deposits in between the cells of the external granule cell layer. Native laminin antibodies bind to the basement membranes, and binding of the Fab2 fragments from the preimmune sera cannot be demonstrated. These results indicate that neuronal migration in the postnatal rat cerebellum in vivo involves nuclear translocation that can be inhibited by antibodies against a neurite outgrowth domain of the B2 chain of laminin. Thus, migration of cerebellar granule neurons may depend on the interaction between a neurite outgrowth domain of the B2 chain of laminin and neuronal cytoskeleton involved in nuclear movement. PMID:7745613

  6. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  7. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  8. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Protects Neurons From Excitotoxic Death through Inhibition of NMDARs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingtao; Ma, Zhiyuan; Fu, Zhongxiao; Gao, Su; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yan; Sun, Hui; Wang, Chaoyun; Fan, Weiming; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Qing-Yin; Bi, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive glutamate release causes overactivation of N-methyl d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), leading to excitatory neuronal damage in cerebral ischemia. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), a compound extracted from Carthamus tinctorius L., has been reported to exert a neuroprotective effect in many pathological conditions, including brain ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of HSYA's effect on neurons remains elusive. In the present study, we conducted experiments using patch-clamp recording of mouse hippocampal slices. In addition, we performed Ca2+ imaging, Western blots, as well as mitochondrial-targeted circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein transfection into cultured hippocampal neurons in order to decipher the physiological mechanism underlying HSYA's neuroprotective effect. Through the electrophysiology experiments, we found that HSYA inhibited NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid A-type receptor-mediated currents. This inhibitory effect of HSYA on NMDARs was concentration dependent. HSYA did not show any preferential inhibition of either N-methyl d-aspartate receptor subtype 2A- or N-methyl d-aspartate receptor subtype 2B- subunit-containing NMDARs. Additionally, HSYA exhibits a facilitatory effect on paired NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, HSYA reduced the magnitude of NMDAR-mediated membrane depolarization currents evoked by oxygen-glucose deprivation, and suppressed oxygen-glucose deprivation–induced and NMDAR-dependent ischemic long-term potentiation, which is believed to cause severe reperfusion damage after ischemia. Through the molecular biology experiments, we found that HSYA inhibited the NMDA-induced and NMDAR-mediated intracellular Ca2+ concentration increase in hippocampal cultures, reduced apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths, and prevented mitochondrial damage. Together, our data

  9. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Protects Neurons From Excitotoxic Death through Inhibition of NMDARs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingtao; Ma, Zhiyuan; Fu, Zhongxiao; Gao, Su; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yan; Sun, Hui; Wang, Chaoyun; Fan, Weiming; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Qing-Yin; Bi, Guoqiang; Ma, Chun-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Excessive glutamate release causes overactivation of N-methyld-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), leading to excitatory neuronal damage in cerebral ischemia. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), a compound extracted from Carthamus tinctorius L., has been reported to exert a neuroprotective effect in many pathological conditions, including brain ischemia. However, the underlying mechanism of HSYA's effect on neurons remains elusive. In the present study, we conducted experiments using patch-clamp recording of mouse hippocampal slices. In addition, we performed Ca(2+) imaging, Western blots, as well as mitochondrial-targeted circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein transfection into cultured hippocampal neurons in order to decipher the physiological mechanism underlying HSYA's neuroprotective effect.Through the electrophysiology experiments, we found that HSYA inhibited NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor and γ-aminobutyric acid A-type receptor-mediated currents. This inhibitory effect of HSYA on NMDARs was concentration dependent. HSYA did not show any preferential inhibition of either N-methyld-aspartate receptor subtype 2A- or N-methyld-aspartate receptor subtype 2B- subunit-containing NMDARs. Additionally, HSYA exhibits a facilitatory effect on paired NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, HSYA reduced the magnitude of NMDAR-mediated membrane depolarization currents evoked by oxygen-glucose deprivation, and suppressed oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced and NMDAR-dependent ischemic long-term potentiation, which is believed to cause severe reperfusion damage after ischemia. Through the molecular biology experiments, we found that HSYA inhibited the NMDA-induced and NMDAR-mediated intracellular Ca(2+)concentration increase in hippocampal cultures, reduced apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths, and prevented mitochondrial damage. Together, our data

  10. Endocytosis Regulates Cell Soma Translocation and the Distribution of Adhesion Proteins in Migrating Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Jennifer C.; Schaar, Bruce T.; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Brodsky, Frances M.; McConnell, Susan K.

    2011-01-01

    Newborn neurons migrate from their birthplace to their final location to form a properly functioning nervous system. During these movements, young neurons must attach and subsequently detach from their substrate to facilitate migration, but little is known about the mechanisms cells use to release their attachments. We show that the machinery for clathrin-mediated endocytosis is positioned to regulate the distribution of adhesion proteins in a subcellular region just proximal to the neuronal cell body. Inhibiting clathrin or dynamin function impedes the movement of migrating neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting dynamin function in vitro shifts the distribution of adhesion proteins to the rear of the cell. These results suggest that endocytosis may play a critical role in regulating substrate detachment to enable cell body translocation in migrating neurons. PMID:21445347

  11. Radial Glial Cell-Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-10-28

    How extracellular cues direct axon-dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)-cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC-neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia-neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases.

  12. Leptin-inhibited PBN neurons enhance counter-regulatory responses to hypoglycemia in negative energy balance

    PubMed Central

    D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Goforth, Paulette B.; Sutton, Amy K.; Malec, Paige A.; Wong, Jenny-Marie T.; Germani, Mark; Jones, Justin C.; Rajala, Michael; Satin, Leslie; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Olson, David P.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Heisler, Lora K.; Myers, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia initiates the counter regulatory response (CRR), in which the sympathetic nervous system, glucagon, and glucocorticoids restore glucose to appropriate concentrations. During starvation, low leptin restrains energy utilization, enhancing long-term survival. To ensure short-term survival during hypoglycemia in fasted animals, the CRR must overcome this energy-sparing program and nutrient depletion. Here, we identify in mice a previously unrecognized role for leptin and a population of leptin-regulated neurons that modulate the CRR to meet these challenges. Hypoglycemia activates leptin receptor (LepRb) and cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), which project to the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. Leptin inhibits these cells and Cckcre-mediated ablation of LepRb enhances the CRR. Inhibition of PBN LepRb cells blunts the CRR, while their activation mimics the CRR in a CCK-dependent manner. PBN LepRbCCK neurons represent a crucial component of the CRR system, and may represent a therapeutic target in hypoglycemia. PMID:25383904

  13. Electrohydrodynamic jetting of mouse neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Eagles, Peter A. M.; Qureshi, Amer N.; Jayasinghe, Suwan N.

    2006-01-01

    CAD (Cath.a-differentiated) cells, a mouse neuronal cell line, were subjected to electrohydrodynamic jetting at a field strength of 0.47–0.67 kV/mm, corresponding to an applied voltage of 7–10 kV. After jetting, the cells appeared normal and continued to divide at rates similar to those shown by control samples. Jetted cells, when placed in serum-free medium, underwent differentiation that was sustained for at least 1 month. Some of the droplets produced by jetting contained only a few cells. These results indicate that the process of jetting does not significantly perturb neuronal cells and that this novel approach might in the future be a useful way to deposit small numbers of living nerve cells on to surfaces. PMID:16393140

  14. [Inhibition of Bcl-2 stimulates neuronal stem proliferation in organotypic cultures of mice hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, Ia S; Nikitina, L S; Chernigovskaia, E V; Glazova, M V

    2013-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated the participation of Bcl-2 in both processes of hippocampus neuronal stem cells (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Present experiments are performed on organotypic cultures of mice hippocampus. A selective inhibitor Bcl-2 HA14-1 (10 μM) is supplied in incubating medium and the concentration is maintained at a constant level. Our data demonstrate that per cent of surviving cells is significantly higher in the group with the supplement HA14-1 then in the control group. In additional, expressions both phospho-histone H3 and Oct3/4 significantly increase in the group with supplement HA14-1. The facts suggest about activation of NSCs proliferation. After 6 weeks incubation, formation of embryoid bodies is observed in the group with HA14-1, that also suggest about NSCs proliferation, but not their differentiation. Also we estimate the level of NSCs differentiation. Our data have shown that the level of CRMP-2 (a protein which participates in axon growth during NSCs differentiation) decreases in the group with HA14-1. We also estimate level of ERK1/2 kinase activity of the MAPK signaling pathway, which immediately regulates neuronal differentiation. Decreasing of both activities ERK1/2 and CRMP-2 indicates diminution of neuronal differentiation in the experimental group. Thus, we demonstrate that inhibition of Bcl-2 increasingly stimulates NSCs proliferation, so that, it suggests that Bcl-2 controls NSCs differentiation to neurons. PMID:25470948

  15. CANNABINOID-INDUCED HYPERPHAGIA: CORRELATION WITH INHIBITION OF PROOPIOMELANOCORTIN NEURONS?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennie; Cox, Jeremy M.; Wagner, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that cannabinoids modulate feeding in male guinea pigs, and correlated cannabinoid-induced changes in feeding behavior with alterations in glutamatergic synaptic currents impinging upon proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Feeding experiments were performed as follows: after a three-day acclimation period, animals were weighed and injected with either the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (1 mg/kg, s.c.), antagonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, s.c.) or their cremophore/ethanol/saline vehicle (1:1:18; 1 ml/kg, s.c.) each day for seven days. WIN 55,212-2 increased, whereas AM251 decreased, the rate of cumulative food intake. The agonist effect was manifest primarily by increases in meal frequency and the amount of food eaten per meal. By contrast, the antagonist effect was associated with decreases in meal frequency, duration and weight loss. For the electrophysiological experiments, we performed whole-cell patch clamp recordings from POMC neurons in hypothalamic slices. WIN 55,212-2 decreased the amplitude of evoked, glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) and increased the S2:S1 ratio. Conversely, AM251 increased eEPSC amplitude per se, and blocked the inhibitory effects of the agonist. WIN 55,212-2 also decreased miniature EPSC (mEPSC) frequency; whereas AM251 increased mEPSC frequency per se, and again blocked the inhibitory effect of the agonist. A subpopulation of cells exhibited an agonist-induced outward current, which was blocked by AM251, associated with increased conductance and reversed polarity near the Nernst equilibrium potential for K+. These data demonstrate that cannabinoids regulate appetite in the guinea pig in part through both presynaptic and postsynaptic actions on anorexigenic POMC neurons. PMID:17532014

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase and nitric oxide regulate the glucose sensitivity of ventromedial hypothalamic glucose-inhibited neurons.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Beth Ann; Fakira, Kurt A; Song, Zhentao; Beuve, Annie; Routh, Vanessa H

    2009-09-01

    The mechanisms by which glucose regulates the activity of glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) are largely unknown. We have previously shown that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases nitric oxide (NO) production in VMH GI neurons. We hypothesized that AMPK-mediated NO signaling is required for depolarization of VMH GI neurons in response to decreased glucose. In support of our hypothesis, inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) or the NO receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) blocked depolarization of GI neurons to decreased glucose from 2.5 to 0.7 mM or to AMPK activation. Conversely, activation of sGC or the cell-permeable analog of cGMP, 8-bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), enhanced the response of GI neurons to decreased glucose, suggesting that stimulation of NO-sGC-cGMP signaling by AMPK is required for glucose sensing in GI neurons. Interestingly, the AMPK inhibitor compound C completely blocked the effect of sGC activation or 8-Br-cGMP, and 8-Br-cGMP increased VMH AMPKalpha2 phosphorylation. These data suggest that NO, in turn, amplifies AMPK activation in GI neurons. Finally, inhibition of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) conductance blocked depolarization of GI neurons to decreased glucose or AMPK activation, whereas decreased glucose, AMPK activation, and 8-Br-cGMP increased VMH CFTR phosphorylation. We conclude that decreased glucose triggers the following sequence of events leading to depolarization in VMH GI neurons: AMPK activation, nNOS phosphorylation, NO production, and stimulation of sGC-cGMP signaling, which amplifies AMPK activation and leads to closure of the CFTR. PMID:19570894

  17. General overview of neuronal cell culture.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jennifer; Amini, Shohreh; White, Martyn K

    2013-01-01

    In this introductory chapter, we provide a general overview of neuronal cell culture. This is a rapidly evolving area of research and we provide an outline and contextual framework for the different chapters of this book. These chapters were all contributed by scientists actively working in the field who are currently using state-of-the-art techniques to advance our understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of the central nervous system. Each chapter provides detailed descriptions and experimental protocols for a variety of techniques ranging in scope from basic neuronal cell line culturing to advanced and specialized methods.

  18. Detection of Temperature Difference in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Ryuichi; Hiraiwa, Takumi; Nakai, Yuichiro; Shindo, Yutaka; Oka, Kotaro; Hiroi, Noriko; Funahashi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    For a better understanding of the mechanisms behind cellular functions, quantification of the heterogeneity in an organism or cells is essential. Recently, the importance of quantifying temperature has been highlighted, as it correlates with biochemical reaction rates. Several methods for detecting intracellular temperature have recently been established. Here we develop a novel method for sensing temperature in living cells based on the imaging technique of fluorescence of quantum dots. We apply the method to quantify the temperature difference in a human derived neuronal cell line, SH-SY5Y. Our results show that temperatures in the cell body and neurites are different and thus suggest that inhomogeneous heat production and dissipation happen in a cell. We estimate that heterogeneous heat dissipation results from the characteristic shape of neuronal cells, which consist of several compartments formed with different surface-volume ratios. Inhomogeneous heat production is attributable to the localization of specific organelles as the heat source. PMID:26925874

  19. Inhibition of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Reduces Anxiety-Like Responses to Pair Housing

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Joanna L.; Trainor, Brian C.; Sima Finy, M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2008-01-01

    Many psychological disorders are characterized by anxiety and alterations in social interactions. Recent studies demonstrate that the chemical messenger nitric oxide (NO) can regulate both anxiety and social behaviours. We tested whether an enzyme that produces NO in the brain, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), serves as an interface between social interactions and anxiety-like behaviour. Several investigators have observed that mice increase anxiety-like responses in the elevated plus-maze after pair housing. nNOS gene deletion and 3-Bromo-7-Nitroindazole were used to inhibit the production of neuronal NO. Similar to previous studies, pair housing reduced open arm exploration in the elevated plus-maze. Pair housing also increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. Inhibition of NO production increased open arm exploration in pair-housed mice but decreased open arm exploration in individually-housed mice. These results suggest that the effect of nNOS inhibition on anxiety-like responses is context dependent and that behavioural responses to social housing are altered after nNOS inhibition. This research suggests that NO may play an important role in mediating the effect social interactions have on anxiety. PMID:17928072

  20. Phasic, suprathreshold excitation and sustained inhibition underlie neuronal selectivity for short-duration sounds

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Gary J.; Hanson, Jessica L.; Leary, Christopher J.; Vasquez-Opazo, Gustavo A.; Graham, Jalina A.; Wilkerson, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Sound duration is important in acoustic communication, including speech recognition in humans. Although duration-selective auditory neurons have been found, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. To investigate these mechanisms we combined in vivo whole-cell patch recordings from midbrain neurons, extraction of excitatory and inhibitory conductances, and focal pharmacological manipulations. We show that selectivity for short-duration stimuli results from integration of short-latency, sustained inhibition with delayed, phasic excitation; active membrane properties appeared to amplify responses to effective stimuli. Blocking GABAA receptors attenuated stimulus-related inhibition, revealed suprathreshold excitation at all stimulus durations, and decreased short-pass selectivity without changing resting potentials. Blocking AMPA and NMDA receptors to attenuate excitation confirmed that inhibition tracks stimulus duration and revealed no evidence of postinhibitory rebound depolarization inherent to coincidence models of duration selectivity. These results strongly support an anticoincidence mechanism of short-pass selectivity, wherein inhibition and suprathreshold excitation show greatest temporal overlap for long duration stimuli. PMID:26976602

  1. Inhibition of UDP/P2Y6 purinergic signaling prevents phagocytosis of viable neurons by activated microglia in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Neher, Jonas J; Neniskyte, Urte; Hornik, Tamara; Brown, Guy C

    2014-09-01

    Microglia activated through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 or -4 can cause neuronal death by phagocytosing otherwise-viable neurons-a form of cell death called "phagoptosis." UDP release from neurons has been shown to provoke microglial phagocytosis of neurons via microglial P2Y6 receptors, but whether inhibition of this process affects neuronal survival is unknown. We tested here whether inhibition of P2Y6 signaling could prevent neuronal death in inflammatory conditions, and whether UDP signaling can induce phagoptosis of stressed but viable neurons. We find that delayed neuronal loss and death in mixed neuronal/glial cultures induced by the TLR ligands lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid was prevented by: apyrase (to degrade nucleotides), Reactive Blue 2 (to inhibit purinergic signaling), or MRS2578 (to specifically block P2Y6 receptors). In each case, inflammatory activation of microglia was not affected, and the rescued neurons remained viable for at least 7 days. Blocking P2Y6 receptors with MRS2578 also prevented phagoptosis of neurons induced by 250 nM amyloid beta 1-42, 5 μM peroxynitrite, or 50 μM 3-morpholinosydnonimine (which releases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Furthermore, the P2Y6 receptor agonist UDP by itself was sufficient to stimulate microglial phagocytosis and to induce rapid neuronal loss that was prevented by eliminating microglia or inhibiting phagocytosis. In vivo, injection of LPS into rat striatum induced microglial activation and delayed neuronal loss and blocking P2Y6 receptors with MRS2578 prevented this neuronal loss. Thus, blocking UDP/P2Y6 signaling is sufficient to prevent neuronal loss and death induced by a wide range of stimuli that activate microglial phagocytosis of neurons.

  2. Tuberculoventral neurons project to the multipolar cell area but not to the octopus cell area of the posteroventral cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Wickesberg, R E; Whitlon, D; Oertel, D

    1991-11-15

    Tuberculoventral neurons in the deep layer of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) provide frequency-specific inhibition to neurons in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) of the mouse (Wickesberg and Oertel, '88, '90). The present experiments examine the projection from the deep DCN to the posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN). Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) injections into the PVCN reveal that the multipolar cell area, but not the octopus cell area, is innervated by neurons in the deep layer of the DCN. Injections into the multipolar cell area, in the rostral and ventral PVCN, labeled neurons across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the deep DCN. The labeled tuberculoventral neurons generally lay within the band of labeled auditory nerve terminals in the DCN. Injections of HRP into the octopus cell area, in the dorsal caudal PVCN, labeled almost no cells within the band of auditory nerve fiber terminals that were labeled by the same injection. The inhibition from tuberculoventral neurons onto ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) neurons is likely to be mediated by glycine (Wickesberg and Oertel, '90). Slices of the cochlear nuclear complex were immunolabeled by an antibody against glycine conjugated with glutaraldehyde to bovine serum albumin (Wenthold et al., '87). Glycine-like immunoreactivity was found throughout the DCN, the AVCN and the multipolar cell area, but there was little labeling in the octopus cell area. This finding provides independent evidence that tuberculoventral neurons do not innervate the octopus cell area and indicates that the octopus cell area is anatomically and functionally distinct.

  3. Treadmill exercise inhibits apoptotic neuronal cell death with suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor expression in the retinas of the diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun-Sang; Ko, Il-Gyu; Cho, Jung-Wan; Davis, Ronald W.; Hwang, Gwang-Yon; Jee, Yong-Seok; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the most important microvascular complications in diabetes, and it is the major cause of visual loss. Physical exercise is known to ameliorate the symptoms of metabolic syndromes such as diabetic mellitus. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and apoptotic cell death in the retinas of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 10 in each group): control group, STZ-induce diabetes group, STZ-induced diabetes and treadmill exercise group. To induce diabetes in the experimental animals, a single intraperitioneal injection of STZ (50 mg/kg) was given to each animal. The rats in the exercise group were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day during 1 week starting 6 weeks after STZ injection. In the present results, VEGF expression in the retinas was increased by induction of diabetes. The numbers of caspase-3-positive and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the retinas were also enhanced by induction of diabetes. Treadmill exercise significantly decreased VEGF expression and suppressed the number of TUNEL-positive and caspase-3-positive cells in the retinas of diabetic rats. In the present study, we have shown that treadmill exercise might alleviate the progression of diabetic retinopathy through suppressing VEGF expression and apoptotic cell death in the retinas of the diabetic rats. PMID:24278883

  4. Ethanol inhibits histaminergic neurons in mouse tuberomammillary nucleus slices via potentiating GABAergic transmission onto the neurons at both pre- and postsynaptic sites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Jiang, Shi-yu; Ni, Jian; Luo, Yan-jia; Chen, Chang-rui; Hong, Zong-yuan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Qu, Wei-min; Wang, Lu; Huang, Zhi-li

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ethanol, one of the most frequently used and abused substances in our society, has a profound impact on sedation. However, the neuronal mechanisms underlying its sedative effect remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of ethanol on histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN), a brain region thought to be critical for wakefulness. Methods: Coronal brain slices (250 μm thick) containing the TMN were prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. GAD67-GFP was used to identify histaminergic neurons in the TMN. The spontaneous firing and membrane potential of histaminergic neurons, and GABAergic transmission onto these neurons were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Drugs were applied through superfusion. Results: Histaminergic and GAD67-expressing neurons in the TMN of GAD67-GFP mice were highly co-localized. TMN GFP-positive neurons exhibited a regular spontaneous discharge at a rate of 2–4 Hz without burst firing. Brief superfusion of ethanol (64, 190, and 560 mmol/L) dose-dependently and reversibly suppressed the spontaneous firing of the neurons in the TMN; when synaptic transmission was blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 μmol/L), ethanol caused hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Furthermore, superfusion of ethanol markedly increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and mIPSCs), which were abolished in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (20 μmol/L). Finally, ethanol-mediated enhancement of sIPSCs and mIPSCs was significantly attenuated when the slices were pretreated with the GABAB agonist baclofen (30 μmol/L). Conclusion: Ethanol inhibits the excitability of histaminergic neurons in mouse TMN slices, possibly via potentiating GABAergic transmission onto the neurons at both pre- and postsynaptic sites. PMID:27498778

  5. Novel flicker-sensitive visual circuit neurons inhibited by stationary patterns.

    PubMed

    de Haan, Roel; Lee, Yu-Jen; Nordström, Karin

    2013-05-22

    Many animals use visual motion cues for navigating within their surroundings. Both flies and vertebrates compute local motion by temporal correlation of neighboring photoreceptors, via so-called elementary motion detectors (EMDs). In the fly lobula plate and the vertebrate visual cortex the output from many EMDs is pooled in neurons sensitive to wide-field optic flow. Although the EMD has been the preferred model for more than 50 years, recent work has highlighted its limitations in describing some visual behaviors, such as responses to higher-order motion stimuli. Non-EMD motion processing may therefore serve an important function in vision. Here, we describe a novel neuron class in the fly lobula plate that clearly does not derive its input from classic EMDs. The centrifugal stationary inhibited flicker excited (cSIFE) neuron is strongly excited by flicker, up to very high temporal frequencies. The non-EMD driven flicker sensitivity leads to strong, nondirectional responses to high-speed, wide-field motion. Furthermore, cSIFE is strongly inhibited by stationary patterns, within a narrow wavelength band. cSIFE's outputs overlap with the inputs of well described optic flow-sensitive lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs). Driving cSIFE affects the active dendrites of LPTCs, and cSIFE may therefore play a large role in motion vision.

  6. MHC Class I Limits Hippocampal Synapse Density by Inhibiting Neuronal Insulin Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Salazar, Tracy J.; Fourgeaud, Lawrence; Tyler, Carolyn M.; Poole, Julianna R.; Park, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) negatively regulate synapse density in the developing vertebrate brain (Glynn et al., 2011; Elmer et al., 2013; Lee et al., 2014), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we identify a novel MHCI signaling pathway that involves the inhibition of a known synapse-promoting factor, the insulin receptor. Dominant-negative insulin receptor constructs decrease synapse density in the developing Xenopus visual system (Chiu et al., 2008), and insulin receptor activation increases dendritic spine density in mouse hippocampal neurons in vitro (Lee et al., 2011). We find that genetically reducing cell surface MHCI levels increases synapse density selectively in regions of the hippocampus where insulin receptors are expressed, and occludes the neuronal insulin response by de-repressing insulin receptor signaling. Pharmacologically inhibiting insulin receptor signaling in MHCI-deficient animals rescues synapse density, identifying insulin receptor signaling as a critical mediator of the tonic inhibitory effects of endogenous MHCI on synapse number. Insulin receptors co-immunoprecipitate MHCI from hippocampal lysates, and MHCI unmasks a cytoplasmic epitope of the insulin receptor that mediates downstream signaling. These results identify an important role for an MHCI–insulin receptor signaling pathway in circuit patterning in the developing brain, and suggest that changes in MHCI expression could unexpectedly regulate neuronal insulin sensitivity in the aging and diseased brain. PMID:25164678

  7. Pungent agents from Szechuan peppers excite sensory neurons by inhibiting two-pore potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Diana M; Sigal, Yaron M; Milstein, Aaron D; Garrison, Jennifer L; Zorn, Julie A; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Nicoll, Roger A; Julius, David

    2008-07-01

    In traditional folk medicine, Xanthoxylum plants are referred to as 'toothache trees' because their anesthetic or counter-irritant properties render them useful in the treatment of pain. Psychophysical studies have identified hydroxy-alpha-sanshool as the compound most responsible for the unique tingling and buzzing sensations produced by Szechuan peppercorns or other Xanthoxylum preparations. Although it is generally agreed that sanshool elicits its effects by activating somatosensory neurons, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain a matter of debate. Here we show that hydroxy-alpha-sanshool excites two types of sensory neurons, including small-diameter unmyelinated cells that respond to capsaicin (but not mustard oil) as well as large-diameter myelinated neurons that express the neurotrophin receptor TrkC. We found that hydroxy-alpha-sanshool excites neurons through a unique mechanism involving inhibition of pH- and anesthetic-sensitive two-pore potassium channels (KCNK3, KCNK9 and KCNK18), providing a framework for understanding the unique and complex psychophysical sensations associated with the Szechuan pepper experience.

  8. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation.

  9. Effect of GABAergic inhibition on odorant concentration coding in mushroom body intrinsic neurons of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Froese, Anja; Szyszka, Paul; Menzel, Randolf

    2014-03-01

    Kenyon cells, the intrinsic neurons of the insect mushroom body, have the intriguing property of responding in a sparse way to odorants. Sparse neuronal codes are often invariant to changes in stimulus intensity and duration, and sparse coding often depends on global inhibition. We tested if this is the case for honeybees' Kenyon cells, too, and used in vivo Ca²⁺ imaging to record their responses to different odorant concentrations. Kenyon cells responded not only to the onset of odorant stimuli (ON responses), but also to their termination (OFF responses). Both, ON and OFF responses increased with increasing odorant concentration. ON responses were phasic and invariant to the duration of odorant stimuli, while OFF responses increased with increasing odorant duration. Pharmacological blocking of GABA receptors in the brain revealed that ionotropic GABA(A) and metabotropic GABA(B) receptors attenuate Kenyon cells' ON responses without changing their OFF responses. Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors attenuated Kenyon cell ON responses more strongly than metabotropic GABA(B) receptors. However, the response dynamic, temporal resolution and paired-pulse depression did not depend on GABA(A) transmission. These data are discussed in the context of mechanisms leading to sparse coding in Kenyon cells.

  10. Inhibition of propofol on single neuron and neuronal ensemble activity in prefrontal cortex of rats during working memory task.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinyu; Tian, Yu; Wang, Guolin; Tian, Xin

    2014-08-15

    Working memory (WM) refers to the temporary storage and manipulation of information necessary for performance of complex cognitive tasks. There is a growing interest in whether and how propofol anesthesia inhibits WM function. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible inhibition mechanism of propofol anesthesia from the view of single neuron and neuronal ensemble activities. Adult SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: propofol group (0.9 mg kg(-1)min(-1), 2h via a tail vein catheter) and control group. All the rats were tested for working memory performances in a Y-maze-rewarded alternation task (a task of delayed non-matched-to-sample) at 24, 48, 72 h after propofol anesthesia, and the behavior results of WM tasks were recorded at the same time. Spatio-temporal trains of action potentials were obtained from the original signals. Single neuron activity was characterized by peri-event time histograms analysis and neuron ensemble activities were characterized by Granger causality to describe the interactions within the neuron ensemble. The results show that: comparing with the control group, the percentage of neurons excited and related to WM was significantly decreased (p<0.01 in 24h, p<0.05 in 48 h); the interactions within neuron ensemble were significantly weakened (p<0.01 in 24h, p<0.05 in 48 h), whereas no significant difference in 72 h (p>0.05), which were consistent with the behavior results. These findings could lead to improved understanding of the mechanism of anesthesia inhibition on WM functions from the view of single neuron activity and neuron ensemble interactions.

  11. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  12. Modulation of spike and burst rate in a minimal neuronal circuit with feed-forward inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zeldenrust, Fleur; Wadman, Wytse J

    2013-04-01

    Pyramidal cells perform computations on their inputs within the context of the local network. The present computational study investigates the consequences of feed-forward inhibition for the firing rate and reliability of a typical hippocampal pyramidal neuron that can respond with single spikes as well as bursts. A simple generic inhibitory interneuron is connected in a feed-forward mode to a pyramidal cell and this minimal circuit is activated with frozen noise. The properties (reversal potential, projection site, propagation delay, fast or slow kinetics) of the connecting synapse and the coupling strength between the interneuron and the pyramidal cell are varied. All forms of inhibition considered here decrease the burst rate, but the effects on the single spike (spikes that are not part of a burst) rate are more ambiguous. Slow dendritic shunting inhibition increases the single spike rate, but fast somatic inhibition does not. When a propagation delay is included in the slow dendritic synapse, the increase of the single spike rate is smaller, an effect that could also be obtained by lowering the reversal potential of the synaptic current. Cross-correlations, reverse correlation analysis and decorrelating the interneuron and pyramidal cell activity are used to demonstrate that these effects depend critically on the exact timing of inhibition, emphasizing the relevance of spatiotemporal organization. The reliability of the firing of the pyramidal cell is quantified with the Victor-Purpura measure. When burst and spikes together or spikes alone are taken into account, feed-forward inhibition makes firing more reliable. This is not the case when the analysis is restricted to bursts. A hyperpolarization-activated, non-specific cation current (Ih) is inserted into the dendritic membrane of the pyramidal cell, where it slightly depolarizes the membrane and reduces its time constant. This dendritic h-current increases the output frequency, makes inhibition less

  13. Primary structure and neuronal effects of α-bag cell peptide, a second candidate neurotransmitter encoded by a single gene in bag cell neurons of Aplysia

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Barry S.; Mayeri, Earl; Brown, Richard O.; Yuan, Pau-Miau; Shively, John E.

    1983-01-01

    A discharge of impulse activity in a group of neuroendocrine cells, the bag cells, produces several types of prolonged responses in various identified neurons of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia. Two excitatory responses are almost certainly mediated by egg-laying hormone, but this peptide cannot account for other responses, such as inhibition of left upper quadrant neurons. We report here the isolation from bag cell clusters of three structurally similar peptides, seven, eight, and nine residues long, that are candidate transmitters for mediating bag cell-induced inhibition. They may also serve as autoexcitatory transmitters since the seven-residue peptide produces a slow depolarization of the bag cells similar to that which occurs during bag cell discharge. The amino acid sequence of the largest peptide, termed α-bag cell peptide[1-9], is H-Ala-Pro-Arg-Leu-Arg-Phe-Tyr-Ser-Leu-OH. The other two peptides are identical to α-BCP[1-9] except that they lack the COOH-terminal Ser-Leu or leucine residues. The three peptides inhibit left upper quadrant neurons at relative potencies of 10:30:1 (seven-, eight-, and nine-residue peptides, respectively). Recent molecular genetic analysis shows that both α-BCP[1-9] and egg-laying hormone are encoded by the same bag cell-specific gene. The multiple neuronal effects of bag cells are therefore likely to be mediated by at least two transmitters that are cleaved from a common precursor molecule. PMID:16593372

  14. The effects of short-term JNK inhibition on the survival and growth of aged sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Guha, Isa; Slamova, Ivana; Chun, Soyon; Clegg, Arthur; Golos, Michal; Thrasivoulou, Chris; Simons, J Paul; Al-Shawi, Raya

    2016-10-01

    During the course of normal aging, certain populations of nerve growth factor (NGF)-responsive neurons become selectively vulnerable to cell death. Studies using dissociated neurons isolated from neonates have shown that c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are important in regulating the survival and neurite outgrowth of NGF-responsive sympathetic neurons. Unlike neonatal neurons, adult sympathetic neurons are not dependent on NGF for their survival. Moreover, the NGF precursor, proNGF, is neurotoxic for aging but not young adult NGF-responsive neurons. Because of these age-related differences, the effects of JNK inhibition on the survival and growth of sympathetic neurons isolated from aged mice were studied. Aged neurons, as well as glia, were found to be dependent on JNK for their growth but not their survival. Conversely, proNGF neurotoxicity was JNK-dependent and mediated by the p75-interacting protein NRAGE, whereas neurite outgrowth was independent of NRAGE. These results have implications for the potential use of JNK inhibitors as therapies for ameliorating age-related neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27490965

  15. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Florian, Christian; Langmann, Thomas; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Morsczeck, Christian

    2008-09-19

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture.

  16. Progesterone inhibits mast cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Vasiadi, M; Kempuraj, D; Boucher, W; Kalogeromitros, D; Theoharides, T C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, where they secrete numerous vasoactive, inflammatory and nociceptive mediators in response to immunoglobulin E (IgE) and antigen. However, they have also been implicated in inflammatory conditions, such as painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and migraines, all of which occur more often in women and are exacerbated during ovulation, but are suppressed during pregnancy. Mast cells express high affinity estrogen receptors and estradiol augments their secretion, while tamoxifen inhibits it. Here we report that progesterone (100 nM), but not the structurally related cholesterol, inhibits histamine secretion from purified rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated immunologically or by substance P (SP), an effect also documented by electron microscopy. These results suggest that mast cell secretion may be regulated by progesterone and may explain the reduced symptoms of certain inflammatory conditions during pregnancy.

  17. Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex-dependent succinylation of proteins in neurons and neuronal cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Xu, Hui; Chen, Huan-Lian; Chen, Wei; Denton, Travis; Zhang, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Reversible post-translation modifications of proteins are common in all cells and appear to regulate many processes. Nevertheless, the enzyme(s) responsible for the alterations and the significance of the modification are largely unknown. Succinylation of proteins occurs and causes large changes in the structure of proteins; however, the source of the succinyl groups, the targets, and the consequences of these modifications on other proteins are unknown. These studies focused on succinylation of mitochondrial proteins. The results demonstrate that the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) can serve as a trans-succinylase that mediates succinylation in an α-ketoglutarate-dependent manner. Inhibition of KGDHC reduced suc-cinylation of both cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins in cultured neurons and in a neuronal cell line. Purified KGDHC can succinylate multiple proteins including other enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle leading to modification of their activity. Inhibition of KGDHC also modifies acetylation by modifying the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. The much greater effectiveness of KGDHC than succinyl CoA suggests that the catalysis due to the E2k suc-cinyltransferase is important. Succinylation appears to be a major signaling system and it can be mediated by KGDHC. PMID:25772995

  18. Interferon alpha inhibits spinal cord synaptic and nociceptive transmission via neuronal-glial interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chien-Cheng; Gao, Yong-Jing; Luo, Hao; Berta, Temugin; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that interferons (IFNs), such as type-I IFN (IFN-α) and type-II IFN (IFN-γ) are produced by immune cells to elicit antiviral effects. IFNs are also produced by glial cells in the CNS to regulate brain functions. As a proinflammatory cytokine, IFN-γ drives neuropathic pain by inducing microglial activation in the spinal cord. However, little is known about the role of IFN-α in regulating pain sensitivity and synaptic transmission. Strikingly, we found that IFN-α/β receptor (type-I IFN receptor) was expressed by primary afferent terminals in the superficial dorsal horn that co-expressed the neuropeptide CGRP. In the spinal cord IFN-α was primarily expressed by astrocytes. Perfusion of spinal cord slices with IFN-α suppressed excitatory synaptic transmission by reducing the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSCs). IFN-α also inhibited nociceptive transmission by reducing capsaicin-induced internalization of NK-1 and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in superficial dorsal horn neurons. Finally, spinal (intrathecal) administration of IFN-α reduced inflammatory pain and increased pain threshold in naïve rats, whereas removal of endogenous IFN-α by a neutralizing antibody induced hyperalgesia. Our findings suggest a new form of neuronal-glial interaction by which IFN-α, produced by astrocytes, inhibits nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. PMID:27670299

  19. Anesthetic activation of central respiratory chemoreceptor neurons involves inhibition of a THIK-1-like background K(+) current.

    PubMed

    Lazarenko, Roman M; Fortuna, Michal G; Shi, Yingtang; Mulkey, Daniel K; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S; Guyenet, Patrice G; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2010-07-01

    At surgical depths of anesthesia, inhalational anesthetics cause a loss of motor response to painful stimuli (i.e., immobilization) that is characterized by profound inhibition of spinal motor circuits. Yet, although clearly depressed, the respiratory motor system continues to provide adequate ventilation under these same conditions. Here, we show that isoflurane causes robust activation of CO(2)/pH-sensitive, Phox2b-expressing neurons located in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) of the rodent brainstem, in vitro and in vivo. In brainstem slices from Phox2b-eGFP mice, the firing of pH-sensitive RTN neurons was strongly increased by isoflurane, independent of prevailing pH conditions. At least two ionic mechanisms contributed to anesthetic activation of RTN neurons: activation of an Na(+)-dependent cationic current and inhibition of a background K(+) current. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis of dissociated green fluorescent protein-labeled RTN neurons revealed expression of THIK-1 (TWIK-related halothane-inhibited K(+) channel, K(2P)13.1), a channel that shares key properties with the native RTN current (i.e., suppression by inhalational anesthetics, weak rectification, inhibition by extracellular Na(+), and pH-insensitivity). Isoflurane also increased firing rate of RTN chemosensitive neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats, again independent of CO(2) levels. In these animals, isoflurane transiently enhanced activity of the respiratory system, an effect that was most prominent at low levels of respiratory drive and mediated primarily by an increase in respiratory frequency. These data indicate that inhalational anesthetics cause activation of RTN neurons, which serve an important integrative role in respiratory control; the increased drive provided by enhanced RTN neuronal activity may contribute, in part, to maintaining respiratory motor activity under immobilizing anesthetic conditions. PMID:20610767

  20. PTEN regulates AMPA receptor-mediated cell viability in iPS-derived motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, D-J; Wang, X-L; Ismail, A; Ashman, C J; Valori, C F; Wang, G; Gao, S; Higginbottom, A; Ince, P G; Azzouz, M; Xu, J; Shaw, P J; Ning, K

    2014-02-27

    Excitatory transmission in the brain is commonly mediated by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), AMPA receptors allow cytotoxic levels of calcium into neurons, contributing to motor neuron injury. We have previously shown that oculomotor neurons resistant to the disease process in ALS show reduced AMPA-mediated inward calcium currents compared with vulnerable spinal motor neurons. We have also shown that PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) knockdown via siRNA promotes motor neuron survival in models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and ALS. It has been reported that inhibition of PTEN attenuates the death of hippocampal neurons post injury by decreasing the effective translocation of the GluR2 subunit into the membrane. In addition, leptin can regulate AMPA receptor trafficking via PTEN inhibition. Thus, we speculate that manipulation of AMPA receptors by PTEN may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for neuroprotective intervention in ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders. To this end, the first step is to establish a fibroblast-iPS-motor neuron in vitro cell model to study AMPA receptor manipulation. Here we report that iPS-derived motor neurons from human fibroblasts express AMPA receptors. PTEN depletion decreases AMPA receptor expression and AMPA-mediated whole-cell currents, resulting in inhibition of AMPA-induced neuronal death in primary cultured and iPS-derived motor neurons. Taken together, our results imply that PTEN depletion may protect motor neurons by inhibition of excitatory transmission that represents a therapeutic strategy of potential benefit for the amelioration of excitotoxicity in ALS and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Labeling of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells with biocompatible fluorescent nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Hwang, Eric; Chao, Jui-I.

    2014-05-01

    Nanodiamond is a promising carbon nanomaterial developed for biomedical applications. Here, we show fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) with the biocompatible properties that can be used for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation and neuron cells derived from embryonal carcinoma stem (ECS) cells. The fluorescence intensities of FNDs were increased by treatment with FNDs in both the mouse P19 and human NT2/D1 ECS cells. FNDs were taken into ECS cells; however, FNDs did not alter the cellular morphology and growth ability. Moreover, FNDs did not change the protein expression of stem cell marker SSEA-1 of ECS cells. The neuronal differentiation of ECS cells could be induced by retinoic acid (RA). Interestingly, FNDs did not affect on the morphological alteration, cytotoxicity and apoptosis during the neuronal differentiation. Besides, FNDs did not alter the cell viability and the expression of neuron-specific marker β-III-tubulin in these differentiated neuron cells. The existence of FNDs in the neuron cells can be identified by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Together, FND is a biocompatible and readily detectable nanomaterial for the labeling and tracking of neuronal differentiation process and neuron cells from stem cells.

  2. Non-cell autonomous influence of the astrocyte system xc- on hypoglycaemic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Nicole A; Melchior, Shannon E; Hewett, James A; Hewett, Sandra J

    2012-02-08

    Despite longstanding evidence that hypoglycaemic neuronal injury is mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that the excitotoxic neuronal death that follows GD (glucose deprivation) is initiated by glutamate extruded from astrocytes via system xc---an amino acid transporter that imports L-cystine and exports L-glutamate. Specifically, we find that depriving mixed cortical cell cultures of glucose for up to 8 h injures neurons, but not astrocytes. Neuronal death is prevented by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism and is partially sensitive to tetanus toxin. Removal of amino acids during the deprivation period prevents--whereas addition of L-cystine restores--GD-induced neuronal death, implicating the cystine/glutamate antiporter, system xc-. Indeed, drugs known to inhibit system xc- ameliorate GD-induced neuronal death. Further, a dramatic reduction in neuronal death is observed in chimaeric cultures consisting of neurons derived from WT (wild-type) mice plated on top of astrocytes derived from sut mice, which harbour a naturally occurring null mutation in the gene (Slc7a11) that encodes the substrate-specific light chain of system xc- (xCT). Finally, enhancement of astrocytic system xc- expression and function via IL-1β (interleukin-1β) exposure potentiates hypoglycaemic neuronal death, the process of which is prevented by removal of l-cystine and/or addition of system xc- inhibitors. Thus, under the conditions of GD, our studies demonstrate that astrocytes, via system xc-, have a direct, non-cell autonomous effect on cortical neuron survival.

  3. Environmental CO2 inhibits Caenorhabditis elegans egg-laying by modulating olfactory neurons and evokes widespread changes in neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Fenk, Lorenz A.; de Bono, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) gradients are ubiquitous and provide animals with information about their environment, such as the potential presence of prey or predators. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans avoids elevated CO2, and previous work identified three neuron pairs called “BAG,” “AFD,” and “ASE” that respond to CO2 stimuli. Using in vivo Ca2+ imaging and behavioral analysis, we show that C. elegans can detect CO2 independently of these sensory pathways. Many of the C. elegans sensory neurons we examined, including the AWC olfactory neurons, the ASJ and ASK gustatory neurons, and the ASH and ADL nociceptors, respond to a rise in CO2 with a rise in Ca2+. In contrast, glial sheath cells harboring the sensory endings of C. elegans’ major chemosensory neurons exhibit strong and sustained decreases in Ca2+ in response to high CO2. Some of these CO2 responses appear to be cell intrinsic. Worms therefore may couple detection of CO2 to that of other cues at the earliest stages of sensory processing. We show that C. elegans persistently suppresses oviposition at high CO2. Hermaphrodite-specific neurons (HSNs), the executive neurons driving egg-laying, are tonically inhibited when CO2 is elevated. CO2 modulates the egg-laying system partly through the AWC olfactory neurons: High CO2 tonically activates AWC by a cGMP-dependent mechanism, and AWC output inhibits the HSNs. Our work shows that CO2 is a more complex sensory cue for C. elegans than previously thought, both in terms of behavior and neural circuitry. PMID:26100886

  4. A new method to effectively and rapidly generate neurons from SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongNa; Wang, Jing; Sun, JinHua; Liu, XiaoDun; Duan, Wei-Ming; Qu, TingYu

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that neurons differentiated from SH-SY5Y cells can serve as cell models for neuroscience research; i.e., neurotoxicity and tolerance to morphine in vitro. To differentiate SH-SY5Y cells into neurons, RA (retinoic acid) is commonly used to produce the inductive effect. However, the percentage of neuronal cells produced from SH-SY5Y cells is low, either from the use of RA treatment alone or from the combined application of RA and other chemicals. In the current study, we used CM-hNSCs (conditioned medium of human neural stem cells) as the combinational inducer with RA to prompt neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells. We found that neuronal differentiation was improved and that neurons were greatly increased in the differentiated SH-SY5Y cells using a combined treatment of CM-hNSCs and RA compared to RA treatment alone. The neuronal percentage was higher than 80% (about 88%) on the 3rd day and about 91% on the 7th day examined after a combined treatment with CM-hNSCs and RA. Cell maturation and neurite growth of these neuronal cells were also improved. In addition, the use of CM-hNSCs inhibited the apoptosis of RA-treated SH-SY5Y cells in culture. We are the first to report the use of CM-hNSCs in combination with RA to induce neuronal differentiation of RA-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Our method can rapidly and effectively promote the neuronal production of SH-SY5Y cells in culture conditions.

  5. A new method to effectively and rapidly generate neurons from SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongNa; Wang, Jing; Sun, JinHua; Liu, XiaoDun; Duan, Wei-Ming; Qu, TingYu

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that neurons differentiated from SH-SY5Y cells can serve as cell models for neuroscience research; i.e., neurotoxicity and tolerance to morphine in vitro. To differentiate SH-SY5Y cells into neurons, RA (retinoic acid) is commonly used to produce the inductive effect. However, the percentage of neuronal cells produced from SH-SY5Y cells is low, either from the use of RA treatment alone or from the combined application of RA and other chemicals. In the current study, we used CM-hNSCs (conditioned medium of human neural stem cells) as the combinational inducer with RA to prompt neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells. We found that neuronal differentiation was improved and that neurons were greatly increased in the differentiated SH-SY5Y cells using a combined treatment of CM-hNSCs and RA compared to RA treatment alone. The neuronal percentage was higher than 80% (about 88%) on the 3rd day and about 91% on the 7th day examined after a combined treatment with CM-hNSCs and RA. Cell maturation and neurite growth of these neuronal cells were also improved. In addition, the use of CM-hNSCs inhibited the apoptosis of RA-treated SH-SY5Y cells in culture. We are the first to report the use of CM-hNSCs in combination with RA to induce neuronal differentiation of RA-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Our method can rapidly and effectively promote the neuronal production of SH-SY5Y cells in culture conditions. PMID:26497914

  6. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  7. Sialic Acid Is Required for Neuronal Inhibition by Soluble MAG but not for Membrane Bound MAG

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bashir, Najat; Mellado, Wilfredo; Filbin, Marie T.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein (MAG), a major inhibitor of axonal growth, is a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) super-family. Importantly, MAG (also known as Siglec-4) is a member of the Siglec family of proteins (sialic acid-binding, immunoglobulin-like lectins), MAG binds to complex gangliosides, specifically GD1a and/or GT1b. Therefore, it has been proposed as neuronal receptors for MAG inhibitory effect of axonal growth. Previously, we showed that MAG binds sialic acid through domain 1 at Arg118 and is able to inhibit axonal growth through domain 5. We developed a neurite outgrowth (NOG) assay, in which both wild type MAG and mutated MAG (MAG Arg118) are expressed on cells. In addition we also developed a soluble form NOG in which we utilized soluble MAG-Fc and mutated MAG (Arg118-Fc). Only MAG-Fc is able to inhibit NOG, but not mutated MAG (Arg118)-Fc that has been mutated at its sialic acid binding site. However, both forms of membrane bound MAG- and MAG (Arg118)- expressing cells still inhibit NOG. Here, we review various results from different groups regarding MAG’s inhibition of axonal growth. Also, we propose a model in which the sialic acid binding is not necessary for the inhibition induced by the membrane form of MAG, but it is necessary for the soluble form of MAG. This finding highlights the importance of understanding the different mechanisms by which MAG inhibits NOG in both the soluble fragmented form and the membrane-bound form in myelin debris following CNS damage. PMID:27065798

  8. Drp1 levels constitutively regulate mitochondrial dynamics and cell survival in cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Uo, Takuma; Dworzak, Jenny; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Inman, Denise M.; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Horner, Philip J.; Morrison, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria exist as dynamic networks that are constantly remodeled through the opposing actions of fusion and fission proteins. Changes in the expression of these proteins alter mitochondrial shape and size, and may promote or inhibit the propagation of apoptotic signals. Using mitochondrially targeted EGFP or DsRed2 to identify mitochondria, we observed a short, distinctly tubular mitochondrial morphology in postnatal cortical neurons in culture and in retinal ganglion cells in vivo, whereas longer, highly interconnected mitochondrial networks were detected in cortical astrocytes in vitro and non-neuronal cells in the retina in vivo. Differential expression patterns of fusion and fission proteins, in part, appear to determine these morphological differences as neurons expressed markedly high levels of Drp1 and OPA1 proteins compared to non-neuronal cells. This finding was corroborated using optic tissue samples. Moreover, cortical neurons expressed several splice variants of Drp1 including a neuron-specific isoform which incorporates exon 3. Knockdown or dominant negative interference of endogenous Drp1 significantly increased mitochondrial length in both neurons and non-neuronal cells, but caused cell death only in cortical neurons. Conversely, depletion of the fusion protein, Mfn2, but not Mfn1, caused extensive mitochondrial fission and cell death. Thus, Drp1 and Mfn2 in normal cortical neurons not only regulate mitochondrial morphology, but are also required for cell survival. The present findings point to unique patterns of Drp1 expression and selective vulnerability to reduced levels of Drp1 expression/activity in neurons, and demonstrate that the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics must be tightly regulated in neurons. PMID:19445933

  9. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at -68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at -60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  10. Remote and reversible inhibition of neurons and circuits by small molecule induced potassium channel stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Auffenberg, Eva; Jurik, Angela; Mattusch, Corinna; Stoffel, Rainer; Genewsky, Andreas; Namendorf, Christian; Schmid, Roland M.; Rammes, Gerhard; Biel, Martin; Uhr, Manfred; Moosmang, Sven; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Thoeringer, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the function of neurons and circuits that translate electrical and chemical signals into behavior represents a major challenges in neuroscience. In addition to optogenetic methods using light-activatable channels, pharmacogenetic methods with ligand induced modulation of cell signaling and excitability have been developed. However, they are largely based on ectopic expression of exogenous or chimera proteins. Now, we describe the remote and reversible expression of a Kir2.1 type potassium channel using the chemogenetic technique of small molecule induced protein stabilization. Based on shield1-mediated shedding of a destabilizing domain fused to a protein of interest and inhibition of protein degradation, this principle has been adopted for biomedicine, but not in neuroscience so far. Here, we apply this chemogenetic approach in brain research for the first time in order to control a potassium channel in a remote and reversible manner. We could show that shield1-mediated ectopic Kir2.1 stabilization induces neuronal silencing in vitro and in vivo in the mouse brain. We also validated this novel pharmacogenetic method in different neurobehavioral paradigms.The DD-Kir2.1 may complement the existing portfolio of pharmaco- and optogenetic techniques for specific neuron manipulation, but it may also provide an example for future applications of this principle in neuroscience research. PMID:26757616

  11. A unique population of ventral tegmental area neurons inhibits the lateral habenula to promote reward

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Alice M.; Jennings, Joshua H.; Ung, Randall L.; Blair, Grace A.; Weinberg, Richard J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Boyce, Frederick; Mattis, Joanna; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lateral habenula (LHb) neurons convey aversive and negative reward conditions through potent indirect inhibition of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons. While VTA dopaminergic neurons reciprocally project to the LHb, the electrophysiological properties and the behavioral consequences associated with selective manipulations of this circuit are unknown. Here, we identify a novel inhibitory input to the LHb arising from a unique population of VTA neurons expressing dopaminergic markers. Optogenetic activation of this circuit resulted in no detectable dopamine release in LHb brain slices. Instead, stimulation produced GABA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission, which suppressed the firing of postsynaptic LHb neurons in brain slices and increased the spontaneous firing rate of VTA dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Furthermore, in vivo activation of this pathway produced reward-related phenotypes that were dependent on intra-LHb GABAA receptor signaling. These results suggest that non-canonical inhibitory signaling by these hybrid dopaminergic-GABAergic neurons act to suppress LHb output under rewarding conditions. PMID:24267654

  12. Substance P Depolarizes Lamprey Spinal Cord Neurons by Inhibiting Background Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Thörn Pérez, Carolina; Hill, Russell H.; Grillner, Sten

    2015-01-01

    Substance P is endogenously released in the adult lamprey spinal cord and accelerates the burst frequency of fictive locomotion. This is achieved by multiple effects on interneurons and motoneurons, including an attenuation of calcium currents, potentiation of NMDA currents and reduction of the reciprocal inhibition. While substance P also depolarizes spinal cord neurons, the underlying mechanism has not been resolved. Here we show that effects of substance P on background K+ channels are the main source for this depolarization. Hyperpolarizing steps induced inward currents during whole-cell voltage clamp that were reduced by substance P. These background K+ channels are pH sensitive and are selectively blocked by anandamide and AVE1231. These blockers counteracted the effect of substance P on these channels and the resting membrane potential depolarization in spinal cord neurons. Thus, we have shown now that substance P inhibits background K+ channels that in turn induce depolarization, which is likely to contribute to the frequency increase observed with substance P during fictive locomotion. PMID:26197458

  13. Substance P Depolarizes Lamprey Spinal Cord Neurons by Inhibiting Background Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Thörn Pérez, Carolina; Hill, Russell H; Grillner, Sten

    2015-01-01

    Substance P is endogenously released in the adult lamprey spinal cord and accelerates the burst frequency of fictive locomotion. This is achieved by multiple effects on interneurons and motoneurons, including an attenuation of calcium currents, potentiation of NMDA currents and reduction of the reciprocal inhibition. While substance P also depolarizes spinal cord neurons, the underlying mechanism has not been resolved. Here we show that effects of substance P on background K+ channels are the main source for this depolarization. Hyperpolarizing steps induced inward currents during whole-cell voltage clamp that were reduced by substance P. These background K+ channels are pH sensitive and are selectively blocked by anandamide and AVE1231. These blockers counteracted the effect of substance P on these channels and the resting membrane potential depolarization in spinal cord neurons. Thus, we have shown now that substance P inhibits background K+ channels that in turn induce depolarization, which is likely to contribute to the frequency increase observed with substance P during fictive locomotion.

  14. Neuronal somatic ATP release triggers neuron-satellite glial cell communication in dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Chen, Y; Wang, C; Huang, L-Y M

    2007-06-01

    It has been generally assumed that the cell body (soma) of a neuron, which contains the nucleus, is mainly responsible for synthesis of macromolecules and has a limited role in cell-to-cell communication. Using sniffer patch recordings, we show here that electrical stimulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicits robust vesicular ATP release from their somata. The rate of release events increases with the frequency of nerve stimulation; external Ca(2+) entry is required for the release. FM1-43 photoconversion analysis further reveals that small clear vesicles participate in exocytosis. In addition, the released ATP activates P2X7 receptors in satellite cells that enwrap each DRG neuron and triggers the communication between neuronal somata and glial cells. Blocking L-type Ca(2+) channels completely eliminates the neuron-glia communication. We further show that activation of P2X7 receptors can lead to the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) from satellite cells. TNFalpha in turn potentiates the P2X3 receptor-mediated responses and increases the excitability of DRG neurons. This study provides strong evidence that somata of DRG neurons actively release transmitters and play a crucial role in bidirectional communication between neurons and surrounding satellite glial cells. These results also suggest that, contrary to the conventional view, neuronal somata have a significant role in cell-cell signaling.

  15. Progesterone directly and rapidly inhibits GnRH neuronal activity via progesterone receptor membrane component 1.

    PubMed

    Bashour, Nicholas Michael; Wray, Susan

    2012-09-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, being an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Progesterone (P4), a steroid hormone, modulates reproductive behavior and is associated with rapid changes in GnRH secretion. However, a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons has not been previously described. Receptors in the progestin/adipoQ receptor family (PAQR), as well as progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PgRMC1) and its partner serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1), have been shown to mediate rapid progestin actions in various tissues, including the brain. This study shows that PgRMC1 and SERBP1, but not PAQR, are expressed in prenatal GnRH neurons. Expression of PgRMC1 and SERBP1 was verified in adult mouse GnRH neurons. To investigate the effect of P4 on GnRH neuronal activity, calcium imaging was used on primary GnRH neurons maintained in explants. Application of P4 significantly decreased the activity of GnRH neurons, independent of secretion of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic input, suggesting a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons. Inhibition was not blocked by RU486, an antagonist of the classic nuclear P4 receptor. Inhibition was also maintained after uncoupling of the inhibitory regulative G protein (G(i/o)), the signal transduction pathway used by PAQR. However, AG-205, a PgRMC1 ligand and inhibitor, blocked the rapid P4-mediated inhibition, and inhibition of protein kinase G, thought to be activated downstream of PgRMC1, also blocked the inhibitory activity of P4. These data show for the first time that P4 can act directly on GnRH neurons through PgRMC1 to inhibit neuronal activity.

  16. α-Synuclein and neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Mark R

    2009-01-01

    α-Synuclein is a small protein that has special relevance for understanding Parkinson disease and related disorders. Not only is α-synuclein found in Lewy bodies characteristic of Parkinson disease, but also mutations in the gene for α-synuclein can cause an inherited form of Parkinson disease and expression of normal α-synuclein can increase the risk of developing Parkinson disease in sporadic, or non-familial, cases. Both sporadic and familial Parkinson disease are characterized by substantial loss of several groups of neurons, including the dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra that are the target of most current symptomatic therapies. Therefore, it is predicted that α-synuclein, especially in its mutant forms or under conditions where its expression levels are increased, is a toxic protein in the sense that it is associated with an increased rate of neuronal cell death. This review will discuss the experimental contexts in which α-synuclein has been demonstrated to be toxic. I will also outline what is known about the mechanisms by which α-synuclein triggers neuronal damage, and identify some of the current gaps in our knowledge about this subject. Finally, the therapeutic implications of toxicity of α-synuclein will be discussed. PMID:19193223

  17. TETRAMETHRIN AND DDT INHIBIT SPONTANEOUS FIRING IN CORTICAL NEURONAL NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The insecticidal and neurotoxic effects of pyrethroids result from prolonged sodium channel inactivation, which causes alterations in neuronal firing and communication. Previously, we determined the relative potencies of 11 type I and type II pyrethroid insecticides using microel...

  18. Manganese inhibits the ability of astrocytes to promote neuronal differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, Gennaro; Pizzurro, Daniella; VanDeMark, Kathryn; Guizzetti, Marina; Costa, Lucio G.

    2009-10-15

    Manganese (Mn) is a known neurotoxicant and developmental neurotoxicant. As Mn has been shown to accumulate in astrocytes, we sought to investigate whether Mn would alter astrocyte-neuronal interactions, specifically the ability of astrocytes to promote differentiation of neurons. We found that exposure of rat cortical astrocytes to Mn (50-500 {mu}M) impaired their ability to promote axonal and neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect of Mn appeared to be mediated by oxidative stress, as it was reversed by antioxidants (melatonin and PBN) and by increasing glutathione levels, while it was potentiated by glutathione depletion in astrocytes. As the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin plays an important role in astrocyte-mediated neuronal neurite outgrowth, we also investigated the effect of Mn on fibronectin. Mn caused a concentration-dependent decrease of fibronectin protein and mRNA in astrocytes lysate and of fibronectin protein in astrocyte medium; these effects were also antagonized by antioxidants. Exposure of astrocytes to two oxidants, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and DMNQ, similarly impaired their neuritogenic action, and led to a decreased expression of fibronectin. Mn had no inhibitory effect on neurite outgrowth when applied directly onto hippocampal neurons, where it actually caused a small increase in neuritogenesis. These results indicate that Mn, by targeting astrocytes, affects their ability to promote neuronal differentiation by a mechanism which is likely to involve oxidative stress.

  19. Mitochondrial impairment induced by 3-nitropropionic acid is enhanced by endogenous metalloprotease activity inhibition in cultured rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    de Oca Balderas, Pavel Montes; Ospina, Gabriel Gutiérrez; Del Ángel, Abel Santamaría

    2013-06-24

    Metalloproteases from the metzincin family mediate molecule processing at the cell membrane termed ectodomain shedding (ES). This mechanism enables the generation of intracellular and extracellular fragments from cell membrane molecules that exert additional functions involved in cell processes including cell death, beyond those of full length molecules. Micotoxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induces striatal neuronal degeneration in vivo and in vitro through mitochondrial complex II inhibition. In this study, we hypothesized that metalloproteases regulate mitochondrial activity in cultured rat striatal neurons undergoing degeneration. To test this idea, striatal neuronal cultures characterized by NeuN and GAD-67 expression were treated with 3-NP together with the metalloprotease inhibitor GM6001 and their mitochondrial activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Our results showed that metalloprotease inhibition potentiated mitochondrial activity impairment induced by 3-NP whereas the inhibitor alone had no effect. These results indicate that metalloproteases regulate and promote mitochondrial functionality in striatal neurons undergoing degeneration induced by 3-NP. Since NMDA receptor is involved in the excitotoxic neuronal death triggered by 3-NP and is known to undergo ES, we analyzed NMDAR subunit NR1 phenotypic distribution by immunofluorescence. 3-NP and GM6001 induced abnormal perinuclear NR1 accumulation that was not observed with 3-NP or GM6001 alone. This observation suggests that metalloproteases are involved in NR1 cellular reorganization induced by 3-NP, and that their inhibition results in abnormal NR1 distribution. Together results indicate that endogenous metalloproteases are activated during striatal neurodegeneration induced by 3-NP eliciting an adaptative or compensatory response that protects mitochondrial functionality.

  20. Inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway prevents neuronal degeneration in vitro and in vivo following methylmercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, Masatake; Usuki, Fusako; Kawamura, Miwako; Izumo, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental neurotoxicant which induces neuropathological changes in both the central nervous and peripheral sensory nervous systems. Our recent study demonstrated that down-regulation of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), which is known to promote neuritic extension, preceded MeHg-induced damage in cultured cortical neurons, suggesting that MeHg-mediated axonal degeneration is due to the disturbance of neuritic extension. Therefore we hypothesized that MeHg-induced axonal degeneration might be caused by neuritic extension/retraction incoordination. This idea brought our attention to the Ras homolog gene (Rho)/Rho-associated coiled coil-forming protein kinase (ROCK) pathway because it has been known to be associated with the development of axon and apoptotic neuronal cell death. Here we show that inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway prevents MeHg-intoxication both in vitro and in vivo. A Rho inhibitor, C3 toxin, and 2 ROCK inhibitors, Fasudil and Y-27632, significantly protected against MeHg-induced axonal degeneration and apoptotic neuronal cell death in cultured cortical neuronal cells exposed to 100 nM MeHg for 3 days. Furthermore, Fasudil partially prevented the loss of large pale neurons in dorsal root ganglia, axonal degeneration in dorsal spinal root nerves, and vacuolar degeneration in the dorsal columns of the spinal cord in MeHg-intoxicated model rats (20 ppm MeHg in drinking water for 28 days). Hind limb crossing sign, a characteristic MeHg-intoxicated sign, was significantly suppressed in this model. The results suggest that inhibition of the Rho/ROCK pathway rescues MeHg-mediated neuritic extension/retraction incoordination and is effective for the prevention of MeHg-induced axonal degeneration and apoptotic neuronal cell death.

  1. Cell cycle markers have different expression and localization patterns in neuron-like PC12 cells and primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Negis, Yesim; Unal, Aysegul Yildiz; Korulu, Sirin; Karabay, Arzu

    2011-06-01

    Neuron-like PC12 cells are extensively used in place of neurons in published studies. Aim of this paper has been to compare mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle markers; cyclinA, B, D, E; Cdk1, 2 and 4; and p27 in post-mitotic primary hippocampal neurons, mitotically active PC12 cells and NGF-differentiated post-mitotic PC12 cells. Contrary to PC12 cells, in neurons, the presence of all these markers was detected only at mRNA level; except for cyclinA, cyclinE and Cdk4, which were detectable also at protein levels. In both NGF-treated PC12 cells and neurons, cyclinE was localized only in the nucleus. In NGF-treated PC12 cells cyclinD and Cdk4 were localized in the nucleus while, in neurons cyclinD expression was not detectable; Cdk4 was localized in the cytoplasm. In neurons, cyclinA was nuclear, whereas in NGF-treated PC12 cells, it was localized in the cell body and along the processes. These results suggest that PC12 cells and primary neurons are different in terms of cell cycle protein expressions and localizations. Thus, it may not be very appropriate to use these cells as neuronal model system in order to understand neuronal physiological activities, upstream of where may lie cell cycle activation triggered events.

  2. microRNA-22 attenuates neuronal cell apoptosis in a cell model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ji; Shui, Shaofeng; Han, Xinwei; Guo, Dong; Li, Tengfei; Yan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of injury-related deaths, and the mechanism of TBI has become a research focus, but little is known about the mechanism of microRNAs in TBI. The aim of this study is the role of microRNA-22 (miR-22) in TBI-induced neuronal cell apoptosis. Rat cortical neurons were cultured and the TBI model was induced by scratch injury in vitro, before which miR-22 level was altered by transfection of agomir or antagomir. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and TUNEL assays were performed to examine neuronal cell injury and apoptosis. The activity of caspase 3 (CASP3) and level changes of several apoptosis factors including B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2), BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and v-AKT murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1) were detected. Results showed that TBI model cells possessed a downregulated miR-22 level (P < 0.001) and more LDH release and apoptotic cells indicating the aggravated neuronal cell injury and apoptosis induced by TBI. miR-22 agomir attenuated neuronal cell injury and apoptosis of the TBI model. It also caused the corresponding changes in CASP3 activity and other apoptosis factors, with cleaved CASP3, BAX and PTEN inhibited and BCL2 and phosphorylated AKT1 promoted, while miR-22 antagomir had the opposite effects. So miR-22 has neuroprotective roles of attenuating neuronal cell injury and apoptosis induced by TBI, which may be associated with its regulation on apoptosis factors. This study reveals miR-22 as a potential approach to TBI treatment and detailed mechanism remains to be uncovered. PMID:27186313

  3. Calpastatin inhibits motor neuron death and increases survival of hSOD1(G93A) mice.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mala V; Campbell, Jabbar; Palaniappan, Arti; Kumar, Asok; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron disease with a poorly understood cause and no effective treatment. Given that calpains mediate neurodegeneration in other pathological states and are abnormally activated in ALS, we investigated the possible ameliorative effects of inhibiting calpain over-activation in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic (Tg) mice in vivo by neuron-specific over-expression of calpastatin (CAST), the highly selective endogenous inhibitor of calpains. Our data indicate that over-expression of CAST in hSOD1(G93A) mice, which lowered calpain activation to levels comparable to wild-type mice, inhibited the abnormal breakdown of cytoskeletal proteins (spectrin, MAP2 and neurofilaments), and ameliorated motor axon loss. Disease onset in hSOD1(G93A) /CAST mice compared to littermate hSOD1(G93A) mice is delayed, which accounts for their longer time of survival. We also find that neuronal over-expression of CAST in hSOD1(G93A) transgenic mice inhibited production of putative neurotoxic caspase-cleaved tau and activation of Cdk5, which have been implicated in neurodegeneration in ALS models, and also reduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers. Our data indicate that inhibition of calpain with CAST is neuroprotective in an ALS mouse model. CAST (encoding calpastatin) inhibits hyperactivated calpain to prevent motor neuron disease operating through a cascade of events as indicated in the schematic, with relevance to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We propose that over-expression of CAST in motor neurons of hSOD1(G93A) mice inhibits activation of CDK5, breakdown of cytoskeletal proteins (NFs, MAP2 and Tau) and regulatory molecules (Cam Kinase IV, Calcineurin A), and disease-causing proteins (TDP-43, α-Synuclein and Huntingtin) to prevent neuronal loss and delay neurological deficits. In our experiments, CAST could also inhibit cleavage of Bid, Bax, AIF to prevent mitochondrial, ER and lysosome-mediated cell death mechanisms. Similarly, CAST

  4. Inhibition of catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) by tolcapone restores reductions in microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and synaptophysin (SYP) following exposure of neuronal cells to neurotropic HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting Ting; Chana, Gursharan; Gorry, Paul R; Ellett, Anne; Bousman, Chad A; Churchill, Melissa J; Gray, Lachlan R; Everall, Ian P

    2015-10-01

    This investigation aimed to assess whether inhibition of cathecol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) by tolcapone could provide neuroprotection against HIV-associated neurodegenerative effects. This study was conducted based on a previous work, which showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 158 (val158met) in COMT, resulted in 40 % lower COMT activity. Importantly, this reduction confers a protective effect against HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), which have been linked to HIV-associated brain changes. SH-SY5Y-differentiated neurons were exposed to macrophage-propagated HIV (neurotropic MACS2-Br strain) in the presence or absence of tolcapone for 6 days. RNA was extracted, and qPCR was performed using Qiagen RT2 custom array consisting of genes for neuronal and synaptic integrity, COMT and pro-inflammatory markers. Immunofluorescence was conducted to validate the gene expression changes at the protein level. Our findings demonstrated that HIV significantly increased the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of COMT while reducing the expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) (p = 0.0015) and synaptophysin (SYP) (p = 0.012) compared to control. A concomitant exposure of tolcapone ameliorated the perturbed expression of MAP2 (p = 0.009) and COMT (p = 0.024) associated with HIV. Immunofluorescence revealed a trend reduction of SYP and MAP2 with exposure to HIV and that concomitant exposure of tolcapone increased SYP (p = 0.016) compared to HIV alone. Our findings demonstrated in vitro that inhibition of COMT can ameliorate HIV-associated neurodegenerative changes that resulted in the decreased expression of the structural and synaptic components MAP2 and SYP. As HIV-associated dendritic and synaptic damage are contributors to HAND, inhibition of COMT may represent a potential strategy for attenuating or preventing some of the symptoms of HAND.

  5. Closing the Phenotypic Gap between Transformed Neuronal Cell Lines in Culture and Untransformed Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Tereance A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Ott, C. Mark; HonerzuBentrup, Kerstin; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Nelman-Gonzales, Mayra; Pierson, Duane L.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) are frequently limited by the failure of primary neurons to propagate in vitro. Neuronal cell lines can be substituted for primary cells but they often misrepresent normal conditions. We hypothesized that a dimensional (3-D) cell culture system would drive the phenotype of transformed neurons closer to that of untransformed cells. In our studies comparing 3-D versus 2-dimensional (2-D) culture, neuronal SH-SY5Y (SY) cells underwent distinct morphological changes combined with a significant drop in their rate of cell division. Expression of the proto-oncogene N-myc and the RNA binding protein HuD was decreased in 3-D culture as compared to standard 2-D conditions. We observed a decline in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in 3-D culture, coupled with increased expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Moreover, thapsigargin (TG)-induced apoptosis was enhanced in the 3-D cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly differing mRNA levels for over 700 genes in the cells of each culture type. These results indicate that a 3-D culture approach narrows the phenotypic gap between neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. The resulting cells may readily be used for in vitro research of neuronal pathogenesis.

  6. Astrocytic αVβ3 Integrin Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth and Promotes Retraction of Neuronal Processes by Clustering Thy-1

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Frischknecht, Renato; Maldonado, Horacio; Seidenbecher, Constanze I.; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Hetz, Claudio; Aylwin, María de la Luz; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Thy-1 is a membrane glycoprotein suggested to stabilize or inhibit growth of neuronal processes. However, its precise function has remained obscure, because its endogenous ligand is unknown. We previously showed that Thy-1 binds directly to αVβ3 integrin in trans eliciting responses in astrocytes. Nonetheless, whether αVβ3 integrin might also serve as a Thy-1-ligand triggering a neuronal response has not been explored. Thus, utilizing primary neurons and a neuron-derived cell line CAD, Thy-1-mediated effects of αVβ3 integrin on growth and retraction of neuronal processes were tested. In astrocyte-neuron co-cultures, endogenous αVβ3 integrin restricted neurite outgrowth. Likewise, αVβ3-Fc was sufficient to suppress neurite extension in Thy-1(+), but not in Thy-1(−) CAD cells. In differentiating primary neurons exposed to αVβ3-Fc, fewer and shorter dendrites were detected. This effect was abolished by cleavage of Thy-1 from the neuronal surface using phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Moreover, αVβ3-Fc also induced retraction of already extended Thy-1(+)-axon-like neurites in differentiated CAD cells as well as of axonal terminals in differentiated primary neurons. Axonal retraction occurred when redistribution and clustering of Thy-1 molecules in the plasma membrane was induced by αVβ3 integrin. Binding of αVβ3-Fc was detected in Thy-1 clusters during axon retraction of primary neurons. Moreover, αVβ3-Fc-induced Thy-1 clustering correlated in time and space with redistribution and inactivation of Src kinase. Thus, our data indicates that αVβ3 integrin is a ligand for Thy-1 that upon binding not only restricts the growth of neurites, but also induces retraction of already existing processes by inducing Thy-1 clustering. We propose that these events participate in bi-directional astrocyte-neuron communication relevant to axonal repair after neuronal damage. PMID:22479590

  7. Opioids inhibit visceral afferent activation of catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ran Ji; Roberts, Brandon L.; Zhao, Huan; Andresen, Michael C.; Appleyard, Suzanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Brainstem A2/C2 catecholamine (CA) neurons within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) influence many homeostatic functions, including food intake, stress, respiratory and cardiovascular reflexes. They also play a role in both opioid reward and withdrawal. Injections of opioids into the NTS modulate many autonomic functions influenced by catecholamine neurons including food intake and cardiac function. We recently showed that NTS-CA neurons are directly activated by incoming visceral afferent inputs. Here we determined whether opioid agonists modulate afferent activation of NTS-CA neurons using transgenic mice with EGFP expressed under the control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. The opioid agonist Met-enkephalin (Met-Enk) significantly attenuated solitary tract evoked EPSCs (ST-EPSCs) in NTS TH-EGFP neurons by 80%, an effect reversed by wash or the mu opioid receptor specific antagonist, CTOP. Met-Enk had a significantly greater effect to inhibit afferent inputs onto TH-EGFP positive neurons than EGFP negative neurons, which were only inhibited by 50%. The mu agonist, DAMGO, also inhibited the ST-EPSC in TH-EGFP neurons in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, neither the delta agonist DPDPE, nor the kappa agonist, U69,593, consistently inhibited the ST-EPSC amplitude. Met-Enk and DAMGO increased the paired pulse ratio, decreased the frequency, but not amplitude, of mini-EPSCs and had no effect on holding current, input resistance or current-voltage relationships in TH-EGFP neurons, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action on afferent terminals. Met-Enk significantly reduced both the basal firing rate of NTS TH-EGFP neurons and the ability of afferent stimulation to evoke an action potential. These results suggest that opioids inhibit NTS-CA neurons by reducing an excitatory afferent drive onto these neurons through presynaptic inhibition of glutamate release and elucidate one potential mechanism by which opioids

  8. Agmatine Ameliorates High Glucose-Induced Neuronal Cell Senescence by Regulating the p21 and p53 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Byeori; Kang, Somang; Oh, Yumi; Kim, Eosu; Kim, Chul-Hoon; Song, Ho-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal senescence caused by diabetic neuropathy is considered a common complication of diabetes mellitus. Neuronal senescence leads to the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the production of reactive oxygen species, and the alteration of cellular homeostasis. Agmatine, which is biosynthesized by arginine decarboxylation, has been reported in previous in vitro to exert a protective effect against various stresses. In present study, agmatine attenuated the cell death and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-alpha and CCL2 in high glucose in vitro conditions. Moreover, the senescence associated-β-galatosidase's activity in high glucose exposed neuronal cells was reduced by agmatine. Increased p21 and reduced p53 in high glucose conditioned cells were changed by agmatine. Ultimately, agmatine inhibits the neuronal cell senescence through the activation of p53 and the inhibition of p21. Here, we propose that agmatine may ameliorate neuronal cell senescence in hyperglycemia. PMID:26924930

  9. Preventive effects of imperatorin on perfluorohexanesulfonate-induced neuronal apoptosis via inhibition of intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunkyung; Choi, So-Young; Yang, Jae-Ho; Lee, Youn Ju

    2016-07-01

    Early life neuronal exposure to environmental toxicants has been suggested to be an important etiology of neurodegenerative disease development. Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), one of the major perfluoroalkyl compounds, is widely distributed environmental contaminants. We have reported that PFHxS induces neuronal apoptosis via ERK-mediated pathway. Imperatorin is a furanocoumarin found in various edible plants and has a wide range of pharmacological effects including neuroprotection. In this study, the effects of imperatorin on PFHxS-induced neuronal apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms are examined using cerebellar granule cells (CGC). CGC were isolated from seven-day old rats and were grown in culture for seven days. Caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining were used to determine neuronal apoptosis. PFHxS-induced apoptosis of CGC was significantly reduced by imperatorin and PD98059, an ERK pathway inhibitor. PFHxS induced a persistent increase in intracellular calcium, which was significantly blocked by imperatorin, NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 and the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers, diltiazem and nifedipine. The activation of caspase-3 by PFHxS was also inhibited by MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. PFHxS-increased ERK activation was inhibited by imperatorin, MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. Taken together, imperatorin protects CGC against PFHxS-induced apoptosis via inhibition of NMDA receptor/intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway. PMID:27382356

  10. Preventive effects of imperatorin on perfluorohexanesulfonate-induced neuronal apoptosis via inhibition of intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunkyung; Choi, So-Young; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Early life neuronal exposure to environmental toxicants has been suggested to be an important etiology of neurodegenerative disease development. Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), one of the major perfluoroalkyl compounds, is widely distributed environmental contaminants. We have reported that PFHxS induces neuronal apoptosis via ERK-mediated pathway. Imperatorin is a furanocoumarin found in various edible plants and has a wide range of pharmacological effects including neuroprotection. In this study, the effects of imperatorin on PFHxS-induced neuronal apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms are examined using cerebellar granule cells (CGC). CGC were isolated from seven-day old rats and were grown in culture for seven days. Caspase-3 activity and TUNEL staining were used to determine neuronal apoptosis. PFHxS-induced apoptosis of CGC was significantly reduced by imperatorin and PD98059, an ERK pathway inhibitor. PFHxS induced a persistent increase in intracellular calcium, which was significantly blocked by imperatorin, NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 and the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers, diltiazem and nifedipine. The activation of caspase-3 by PFHxS was also inhibited by MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. PFHxS-increased ERK activation was inhibited by imperatorin, MK801, diltiazem and nifedipine. Taken together, imperatorin protects CGC against PFHxS-induced apoptosis via inhibition of NMDA receptor/intracellular calcium-mediated ERK pathway. PMID:27382356

  11. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance. PMID:25979201

  12. Intraganglionic interactions between satellite cells and adult sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Christie, Kimberly; Koshy, Dilip; Cheng, Chu; Guo, GuiFang; Martinez, Jose A; Duraikannu, Arul; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2015-07-01

    Perineuronal satellite cells have an intimate anatomical relationship with sensory neurons that suggests close functional collaboration and mutual support. We examined several facets of this relationship in adult sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Collaboration included the support of process outgrowth by clustering of satellite cells, induction of distal branching behavior by soma signaling, the capacity of satellite cells to respond to distal axon injury of its neighboring neurons, and evidence of direct neuron-satellite cell exchange. In vitro, closely adherent coharvested satellite cells routinely clustered around new outgrowing processes and groups of satellite cells attracted neurite processes. Similar clustering was encountered in the pseudounipolar processes of intact sensory neurons within intact DRG in vivo. While short term exposure of distal growth cones of unselected adult sensory neurons to transient gradients of a PTEN inhibitor had negligible impacts on their behavior, exposure of the soma induced early and substantial growth of their distant neurites and branches, an example of local soma signaling. In turn, satellite cells sensed when distal neuronal axons were injured by enlarging and proliferating. We also observed that satellite cells were capable of internalizing and expressing a neuron fluorochrome label, diamidino yellow, applied remotely to distal injured axons of the neuron and retrogradely transported to dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. The findings illustrate a robust interaction between intranganglionic neurons and glial cells that involve two way signals, features that may be critical for both regenerative responses and ongoing maintenance.

  13. Paradoxical effect of gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone to negatively regulate neuropeptide Y neurones in mouse arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, J S; Coleman, H A; Enriori, P J; Parkington, H C; Li, Q; Pereira, A; Cowley, M A; Clarke, I J

    2013-12-01

    Regulation of reproduction and energy homeostasis are linked, although our understanding of the central neural mechanisms subserving this connection is incomplete. Gonadotrophin-inhibiting hormone (GnIH) is a neuropeptide that negatively regulates reproduction and stimulates food intake. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and products of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) precursor (β-endorphin melanocortins) are appetite regulating peptides produced in the neurones of the arcuate nucleus; these peptides also regulate reproduction. In the present study, we determined the effects of GnIH on NPY and POMC neurones. Using brain slices from mice with transgenes for fluorescent tags in the two types of neurone and patch clamp electrophysiology, a predominant inhibitory effect of GnIH was observed. GnIH (100 nM) inhibited the firing rate in POMC cells, confirming the results of previous studies and consistent with the stimulatory effect of GnIH on food intake. Paradoxically (i.e. because both GnIH and NPY stimulate food intake), GnIH also had a predominantly inhibitory effect on action potential activity in NPY cells. GnIH also inhibited the secretion of NPY and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone secretion in incubated hypothalamic blocks. GnIH (100 ng) injected into the cerebral ventricles of mice did not increase the number of NPY cells that were positively immunostained for c-Fos. Finally, dual label immunocytochemistry showed that 20% of NPY neurones had close contacts from GnIH fibres/varicosities. In conclusion, we confirm a negative effect of GnIH on POMC cells and demonstrate a paradoxical reduction of electrophysiological and functional activity in NPY cells.

  14. p90 RSK-1 associates with and inhibits neuronal nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tao; Sugimoto, Katsuyoshi; Ihara, Hideshi; Mizutani, Akihiro; Hatano, Naoya; Kume, Kodai; Kambe, Toshie; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tokuda, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2006-01-01

    Evidence is presented that RSK1 (ribosomal S6 kinase 1), a downstream target of MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), directly phosphorylates nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) on Ser847 in response to mitogens. The phosphorylation thus increases greatly following EGF (epidermal growth factor) treatment of rat pituitary tumour GH3 cells and is reduced by exposure to the MEK (MAPK/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase) inhibitor PD98059. Furthermore, it is significantly enhanced by expression of wild-type RSK1 and antagonized by kinase-inactive RSK1 or specific reduction of endogenous RSK1. EGF treatment of HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney) cells, expressing RSK1 and nNOS, led to inhibition of NOS enzyme activity, associated with an increase in phosphorylation of nNOS at Ser847, as is also the case in an in vitro assay. In addition, these phenomena were significantly blocked by treatment with the RSK inhibitor Ro31-8220. Cells expressing mutant nNOS (S847A) proved resistant to phosphorylation and decrease of NOS activity. Within minutes of adding EGF to transfected cells, RSK1 associated with nNOS and subsequently dissociated following more prolonged agonist stimulation. EGF-induced formation of the nNOS–RSK1 complex was significantly decreased by PD98059 treatment. Treatment with EGF further revealed phosphorylation of nNOS on Ser847 in rat hippocampal neurons and cerebellar granule cells. This EGF-induced phosphorylation was partially blocked by PD98059 and Ro31-8220. Together, these data provide substantial evidence that RSK1 associates with and phosphorylates nNOS on Ser847 following mitogen stimulation and suggest a novel role for RSK1 in the regulation of nitric oxide function in brain. PMID:16984226

  15. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase (MAO) by β-carbolines and their interactions in live neuronal (PC12) and liver (HuH-7 and MH1C1) cells.

    PubMed

    Santillo, Michael F; Liu, Yitong; Ferguson, Martine; Vohra, Sanah N; Wiesenfeld, Paddy L

    2014-04-01

    Interactions among monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors in drugs, botanicals, and dietary supplements may lead to unpredictable neurochemical dysfunction due to excessive inhibition or therapeutic invalidation. Often recombinant MAO or brain tissue homogenates have been used to evaluate MAO inhibitors such as the β-carboline alkaloids (harmane, harmine, harmaline, and harmalol). However, there is a lack of cellular systems for evaluation of MAO activity, which represents a more advanced in vitro model compared to recombinant enzymes or tissue lysates. Using kynuramine assays, intracellular MAO inhibition by β-carbolines was measured in PC12 (rat pheochromocytoma), MH1C1 (rat liver), and HuH-7 (human liver) cell lines, which were compared with human recombinant MAO and cell lysates. β-Carbolines (1 μM, 90 min incubations) inhibited MAO by 40-99% in live PC12 cells where MAO A was the active isoform, and <12% in HuH-7 and MH1C1 cells where MAO B was primarily active. The combination index (CI), which serves as a quantitative indicator of pharmacological interactions, was determined for harmaline/harmine (CI, 1.01-1.25) and methylene blue/harmine (CI, 0.74-1.07) in PC12 cells. Overall, this study illustrates applications of cell-based in vitro assay platforms to gain a comprehensive understanding of intracellular MAO inhibitors and their interactions.

  16. Impaired Respiratory and Body Temperature Control Upon Acute Serotonergic Neuron Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Russell; Corcoran, Andrea; Brust, Rachael; Kim, Jun Chul; Richerson, George B.; Nattie, Eugene; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis is essential for organism survival. Highly responsive neuronal networks are involved but constituent neurons are just beginning to be resolved. To query brain serotonergic neurons in homeostasis, we used a synthetic GPCR (Di)-based neuronal silencing tool, mouse RC∷FPDi, designed for cell type-specific, ligand (clozapine-N-oxide, CNO)-inducible and reversible suppression of action potential firing. In mice harboring Di-expressing serotonergic neurons, CNO administration by systemic injection attenuated the chemoreflex that normally increases respiration in response to tissue CO2 elevation and acidosis. At the cellular level, CNO suppressed firing rate increases evoked by CO2/acidosis. Body thermoregulation at room temperature was also disrupted following CNO triggering of Di; core temperatures plummeted, then recovered. This work establishes that serotonergic neurons regulate life-sustaining respiratory and thermoregulatory networks, and demonstrates a noninvasive tool for mapping neuron function. PMID:21798952

  17. A ROCK Inhibitor Blocks the Inhibitory Effect of Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan on Morphological Changes of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells into Neuron-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hee-Suk; Joe, Young Ae

    2013-11-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) inhibits neurite outgrowth of various neuronal cell types, and CSPG-associated inhibition of neurite outgrowth is mediated by the Rho/ROCK pathway. Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into neuron-like cells under specific conditions and have been shown to differentiate into neuron-like cells by co-treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y27632 and the hypoxia condition mimicking agent CoCl2. In this study, we addressed the hypothesis that a ROCK inhibitor might be beneficial to regenerate neurons during stem cell therapy by preventing transplanted MSCs from inhibition by CSPG in damaged tissues. Indeed, dose-dependent inhibition by CSPG pretreatment was observed during morphological changes of Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs) induced by Y27632 alone. The formation of neurite-like structures was significantly inhibited when WJ-MSCs were pre-treated with CSPG before induction under Y27632 plus CoCl2 conditions, and pretreatment with a protein kinase C inhibitor reversed such inhibition. However, CSPG treatment resulted in no significant inhibition of the WJ-MSC morphological changes into neuron-like cells after initiating induction by Y27632 plus CoCl2. No marked changes were detected in expression levels of neuronal markers induced by Y27632 plus CoCl2 upon CSPG treatment. CSPG also blocked the morphological changes of human bone marrow-derived MSCs into neuron-like cells under other neuronal induction condition without the ROCK inhibitor, and Y27632 pre-treatment blocked the inhibitory effect of CSPG. These results suggest that a ROCK inhibitor can be efficiently used in stem cell therapy for neuronal induction by avoiding hindrance from CSPG. PMID:24404335

  18. The extracellular protease stl functions to inhibit migration of v'ch1 sensory neuron during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhamo, Tashi; Ismat, Afshan

    2015-08-01

    Proper migration of cells through the dense and complex extracellular matrix (ECM) requires constant restructuring of the ECM to allow cells to move forward in a smooth manner. This restructuring can occur through the action of extracellular enzymes. Among these extracellular enzymes is the ADAMTS (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin repeats) family of secreted extracellular proteases. Drosophila stl encodes an ADAMTS protease expressed in and around the peripheral nervous system (PNS) during embryogenesis. The absence of stl displayed one specific neuron, the v'ch1 sensory neuron, migrating to its target sooner than in wild type. During normal development, the v'ch1 sensory neuron migrates dorsally at the same time it is extending an axon ventrally toward the CNS. Surprisingly, in the absence of stl, the v'ch1 neuron migrated further dorsally as compared to the wild type at stage 15, but did not migrate past its correct target at stage 16, suggesting a novel role for this extracellular protease in inhibiting migration of this neuron past a certain point.

  19. Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated networks of spiking neurons: effect of single neuron properties and network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are robust and do not

  20. Orientation Selectivity in Inhibition-Dominated Networks of Spiking Neurons: Effect of Single Neuron Properties and Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are robust and do not

  1. Characterisation of acetylcholinesterase release from neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Hicks, David A; Makova, Natalia Z; Nalivaeva, Natalia N; Turner, Anthony J

    2013-03-25

    Although acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is primarily a hydrolytic enzyme, metabolising the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in cholinergic synapses, it also has some non-catalytic functions in the brain which are far less well characterised. AChE was shown to be secreted or shed from the neuronal cell surface like several other membrane proteins, such as the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Since AChE does not possess a transmembrane domain, its anchorage in the membrane is established via the Proline Rich Membrane Anchor (PRiMA), a transmembrane protein. Both the subunit oligomerisation and membrane anchor of AChE are shared by a related enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), the physiological function of which in the brain is unclear. In this work, we have assayed the relative activities of AChE and BChE in membrane fractions and culture medium of three different neuronal cell lines, namely the neuroblastoma cell lines SH-SY5Y and NB7 and the mouse basal forebrain cell line SN56. In an effort to understand the shedding process of AChE, we have used several pharmacological treatments, which showed that it is likely to be mediated in part by an EDTA- and batimastat-sensitive, but GM6001-insensitive metalloprotease, with the possible additional involvement of a thiol isomerase. Cellular release of AChE by SH-SY5Y is significantly enhanced by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonists carbachol or muscarine, with the effect of carbachol blocked by the mAChR antagonist atropine. AChE has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and it has been shown that it accelerates formation and increases toxicity of amyloid fibrils, which have been closely linked to the pathology of AD. In light of this, greater understanding of AChE and BChE physiology may also benefit AD research.

  2. RNA ligation in neurons by RtcB inhibits axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kosmaczewski, Sara Guckian; Han, Sung Min; Han, Bingjie; Irving Meyer, Benjamin; Baig, Huma S.; Athar, Wardah; Lin-Moore, Alexander T.; Koelle, Michael R.; Hammarlund, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Activity of the RNA ligase RtcB has only two known functions: tRNA ligation after intron removal and XBP1 mRNA ligation during activation of the unfolded protein response. Here, we show that RtcB acts in neurons to inhibit axon regeneration after nerve injury. This function of RtcB is independent of its basal activities in tRNA ligation and the unfolded protein response. Furthermore, inhibition of axon regeneration is independent of the RtcB cofactor archease. Finally, RtcB is enriched at axon termini after nerve injury. Our data indicate that neurons have co-opted an ancient RNA modification mechanism to regulate specific and dynamic functions and identify neuronal RtcB activity as a critical regulator of neuronal growth potential. PMID:26100902

  3. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates. PMID:26729880

  4. Cortical cell and neuron density estimates in one chimpanzee hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christine E; Turner, Emily C; Sawyer, Eva Kille; Reed, Jamie L; Young, Nicole A; Flaherty, David K; Kaas, Jon H

    2016-01-19

    The density of cells and neurons in the neocortex of many mammals varies across cortical areas and regions. This variability is, perhaps, most pronounced in primates. Nonuniformity in the composition of cortex suggests regions of the cortex have different specializations. Specifically, regions with densely packed neurons contain smaller neurons that are activated by relatively few inputs, thereby preserving information, whereas regions that are less densely packed have larger neurons that have more integrative functions. Here we present the numbers of cells and neurons for 742 discrete locations across the neocortex in a chimpanzee. Using isotropic fractionation and flow fractionation methods for cell and neuron counts, we estimate that neocortex of one hemisphere contains 9.5 billion cells and 3.7 billion neurons. Primary visual cortex occupies 35 cm(2) of surface, 10% of the total, and contains 737 million densely packed neurons, 20% of the total neurons contained within the hemisphere. Other areas of high neuron packing include secondary visual areas, somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal granular cortex. Areas of low levels of neuron packing density include motor and premotor cortex. These values reflect those obtained from more limited samples of cortex in humans and other primates.

  5. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 stimulates neuronal differentiation of neuronal stem cells through the ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byoung-San; Yoon, Ju-Yong; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Hun; Choi, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), a member of the TGF-β superfamily, induced neural differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) grown in a medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The Ras protein level and the activities of the downstream ERKs were increased by transfection of BMP4 or treatment with recombinant BMP4. The effects of BMP4, including activation of the Ras-ERK pathway and induction of the neuron marker β-tubulin type III (Tuj1), were blocked by co-treatment of the BMP4 antagonist, noggin. The roles of the Ras-ERK pathway in neuronal differentiation by BMP4 were revealed by measuring the effect of the ERK pathway inhibition by dominant negative Ras or PD98059, the MEK specific inhibitor. BMP4 is a transcriptional target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and both the mRNA and protein levels of BMP4 were increased by treatment of valproic acid (VPA), a chemical inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The BMP4-mimicking effects of VPA, activation of the Ras-ERK pathway and induction of Tuj1, also were blocked by noggin. These results indicate the potential therapeutic usage of VPA as a replacement for BMP4. PMID:19287192

  6. Inhibition of mammillary body neurons by direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    The mammillary body is an important neural component of limbic circuitry implicated in learning and memory. Excitatory and inhibitory inputs, primarily mediated by glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), respectively, converge and integrate in this region, before sending information to the thalamus. One potentially overlooked mechanism for inhibition of mammillary body neurons is through direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Here, whole-cell patch clamp recordings of in vitro slice preparations containing the mammillary body nuclei of the mouse were employed to record responses to bath application of pharmacological agents to isolate the direct effect of activating Group II mGluRs. Application of the Group II mGluR specific agonist, APDC, resulted in a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in mammillary body neurons, likely resulting from the opening of a potassium conductance. These data suggest that glutamatergic inputs to the mammillary body may be attenuated via Group II mGluRs and implicates a functional role for these receptors in memory-related circuits and broadly throughout the central nervous system. PMID:27390777

  7. Motor neurons and oligodendrocytes arise from distinct cell lineages by progenitor recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ravanelli, Andrew M.; Appel, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    During spinal cord development, ventral neural progenitor cells that express the transcription factors Olig1 and Olig2, called pMN progenitors, produce motor neurons and then oligodendrocytes. Whether motor neurons and oligodendrocytes arise from common or distinct progenitors in vivo is not known. Using zebrafish, we found that motor neurons and oligodendrocytes are produced sequentially by distinct progenitors that have distinct origins. When olig2+ cells were tracked during the peak period of motor neuron formation, most differentiated as motor neurons without further cell division. Using time-lapse imaging, we found that, as motor neurons differentiated, more dorsally positioned neuroepithelial progenitors descended to the pMN domain and initiated olig2 expression. Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling during motor neuron differentiation blocked the ventral movement of progenitors, the progressive initiation of olig2 expression, and oligodendrocyte formation. We therefore propose that the motor neuron-to-oligodendrocyte switch results from Hedgehog-mediated recruitment of glial-fated progenitors to the pMN domain subsequent to neurogenesis. PMID:26584621

  8. Interplay between low threshold voltage-gated K(+) channels and synaptic inhibition in neurons of the chicken nucleus laminaris along its frequency axis.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, William R; Liu, Yu-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Quan; Lu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Central auditory neurons that localize sound in horizontal space have specialized intrinsic and synaptic cellular mechanisms to tightly control the threshold and timing for action potential generation. However, the critical interplay between intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and extrinsic synaptic conductances in determining neuronal output are not well understood. In chicken, neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) encode sound location using interaural time difference (ITD) as a cue. Along the tonotopic axis of NL, there exist robust differences among low, middle, and high frequency (LF, MF, and HF, respectively) neurons in a variety of neuronal properties such as low threshold voltage-gated K(+) (LTK) channels and depolarizing inhibition. This establishes NL as an ideal model to examine the interactions between LTK currents and synaptic inhibition across the tonotopic axis. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings prepared from chicken embryos (E17-E18), we found that LTK currents were larger in MF and HF neurons than in LF neurons. Kinetic analysis revealed that LTK currents in MF neurons activated at lower voltages than in LF and HF neurons, whereas the inactivation of the currents was similar across the tonotopic axis. Surprisingly, blockade of LTK currents using dendrotoxin-I (DTX) tended to broaden the duration and increase the amplitude of the depolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in NL neurons without dependence on coding frequency regions. Analyses of the effects of DTX on inhibitory postsynaptic currents led us to interpret this unexpected observation as a result of primarily postsynaptic effects of LTK currents on MF and HF neurons, and combined presynaptic and postsynaptic effects in LF neurons. Furthermore, DTX transferred subthreshold IPSPs to spikes. Taken together, the results suggest a critical role for LTK currents in regulating inhibitory synaptic strength in ITD-coding neurons at various frequencies.

  9. ACUPUNCTURE INHIBITS GABA NEURON ACTIVITY IN THE VENTRAL TEGMENTAL AREA AND REDUCES ETHANOL SELF-ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chae Ha; Yoon, Seong Shoon; Hansen, David M.; Wilcox, Jeffrey D.; Blumell, Bryan R; Park, Jung Jae; Steffensen, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Withdrawal from chronic ethanol enhances ventral tegmental area (VTA) GABA neuron excitability and reduces mesolimbic dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, which is suppressed by acupuncture at Shenmen (HT7) points (Zhao et al., 2006). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of HT7 acupuncture on VTA GABA neuron excitability, ethanol inhibition of VTA GABA neuron firing rate, and ethanol self-administration. A role for opioid receptors (ORs) in ethanol and acupuncture effects is also explored. Methods Using electrophysiological methods in mature rats, we evaluated the effects of HT7 stimulation and opioid antagonists on VTA GABA neuron firing rate. Using behavioral paradigms in rats, we evaluated the effects of HT7 stimulation and opioid antagonists on ethanol self-administration using a modification of the sucrose fading procedure. Results HT7 stimulation produced a biphasic modulation of VTA GABA neuron firing rate characterized by transient enhancement followed by inhibition and subsequent recovery in 5 min. HT7 inhibition of VTA GABA neuron firing rate was blocked by systemic administration of the non-selective μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist naloxone. HT7 stimulation significantly reduced ethanol suppression of VTA GABA neuron firing rate, which was also blocked by naloxone. HT7 acupuncture reduced ethanol self-administration without affecting sucrose consumption. Systemic administration of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole blocked ethanol suppression of VTA GABA neuron firing rate and significantly reduced ethanol self-administration without affecting sucrose consumption. Conclusions These findings suggest that DOR-mediated opioid modulation of VTA GABA neurons may mediate acupuncture’s role in modulating mesolimbic DA release and suppressing the reinforcing effects of ethanol. PMID:20860620

  10. Inhibition of kynurenine aminotransferase II reduces activity of midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Linderholm, Klas R; Alm, Maximilian Tufvesson; Larsson, Markus K; Olsson, Sara K; Goiny, Michel; Hajos, Mihaly; Erhardt, Sophie; Engberg, Göran

    2016-03-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA), a neuroactive metabolite of tryptophan, is elevated in the brain of patients with psychotic disorders. Therefore, lowering brain KYNA levels might be a novel approach in the treatment of psychotic disorders. The present in vivo electrophysiological study aimed to investigate the effect of an inhibitor of kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) II, the primary enzyme for KYNA synthesis, on dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Acute administration of the KAT II inhibitor PF-04859989 (5 or 10 mg/kg) was associated with a short-onset, time-dependent decrease in firing rate and burst activity of DA neurons, both parameters reaching a 50% reduction within 45 min. Furthermore, PF-04859989 reduced the number of spontaneously active DA cells as measured 4-6 after administration. Pretreatment with d-cycloserine (30 mg/kg) or CGP-52432 (10 mg/kg) prevented the inhibitory action of PF-04859989 (5 mg/kg) on firing rate and burst firing activity. In contrast, pretreatment with methyllycaconitine (MLA, 4 mg/kg) did not change the response, whereas picrotoxin (4.5 mg/kg) partially prevented the inhibitory effects of PF-04859989 (5 mg/kg, i.v.). Our results show that a specific inhibition of KAT II is associated with a marked reduction in VTA DA firing activity. This effect appears to be specifically executed by NMDA-receptors and mediated indirectly via a GABA(B)-receptor-induced disinhibition of DA neurons. Our findings are in line with the view that endogenous KYNA, by modulation of the NMDA-receptor, exerts important physiological roles in the brain.

  11. Abeta40 promotes neuronal cell fate in neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Dong, C

    2009-03-01

    Sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and then gamma- secretase gives rise to Abeta(1-40) (Abeta40), a major species of Abeta (beta-amyloid) produced by neurons under physiological conditions. Abeta(1-42) (Abeta42), a minor species of Abeta, is also produced by a similar but less understood mechanism of the gamma-secretase. The physiological functions of these Abeta species remain to be defined. In this report, we demonstrate that freshly prepared soluble Abeta40 significantly promotes neurogenesis in primary neural progenitor cells (NPCs). First, Abeta40 increases neuronal markers as determined by NeuN expression and Tuj1 promoter activity, differing from Abeta42, which induces astrocyte markers in NPCs. Second, Abeta40 induces neuronal differentiation at the end of S-phase in the cell cycle. Third, Abeta40 promotes NPC entry into S-phase, playing a role in NPC self-renewal. Interestingly, Abeta40 does not significantly increase apoptotic indexes such as DNA condensation and DNA fragmentation. In addition, Abeta40 does not augment caspase-3 activation in NeuN(+) or nestin(+) cells. Collectively, this report provides strong evidence that Abeta40 is a neurogenic factor and suggests that the debilitated function of Abeta40 in neurogenesis may account for the shortage of neurons in Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Memantine inhibits ATP-dependent K+ conductances in dopamine neurons of the rat substantia nigra pars compacta.

    PubMed

    Giustizieri, Michela; Cucchiaroni, Maria Letizia; Guatteo, Ezia; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B; Berretta, Nicola

    2007-08-01

    1-Amino-3,5-dimethyl-adamantane (memantine) is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist used in clinical practice to treat neurodegenerative disorders that could be associated with excitotoxic cell death. Because memantine reduces the loss of dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in animal models of Parkinson's disease, we examined the effects of this drug on dopamine cells of the SNc. Besides inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated currents, memantine (30 and 100 microM) increased the spontaneous firing rate of whole-cell recorded dopamine neurons in a midbrain slice preparation. Occasionally, a bursting activity was observed. These effects were independent from the block of NMDA receptors and were prevented in neurons dialyzed with a high concentration of ATP (10 mM). An increase in firing rate was also induced by the ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel antagonist tolbutamide (300 microM), and this increase occluded further effects of memantine. In addition, K(ATP) channel-mediated outward currents, induced by hypoxia, were inhibited by memantine (30 and 100 microM) in the presence of the NMDA receptor antagonist (5S, 10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801) (10 microM). An increase in the spontaneous firing rate by memantine was observed in dopamine neurons recorded with extracellular planar 8 x 8 multielectrodes in conditions of hypoglycemia. These results highlight K(ATP) channels as possible relevant targets of memantine effects in the brain. Moreover, in view of a proposed role of K(ATP) conductances in dopamine neuron degeneration, they suggest another mechanism of action underlying the protective role of memantine in Parkinson's disease.

  13. Leucokinin mimetic elicits aversive behavior in mosquito Aedes aegypti (L.) and inhibits the sugar taste neuron.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeogsun; Ali Agha, Moutaz; Smith, Ryan C; Nachman, Ronald J; Marion-Poll, Frédéric; Pietrantonio, Patricia V

    2016-06-21

    Insect kinins (leucokinins) are multifunctional peptides acting as neurohormones and neurotransmitters. In females of the mosquito vector Aedes aegypti (L.), aedeskinins are known to stimulate fluid secretion from the renal organs (Malpighian tubules) and hindgut contractions by activating a G protein-coupled kinin receptor designated "Aedae-KR." We used protease-resistant kinin analogs 1728, 1729, and 1460 to evaluate their effects on sucrose perception and feeding behavior. In no-choice feeding bioassays (capillary feeder and plate assays), the analog 1728, which contains α-amino isobutyric acid, inhibited females from feeding on sucrose. It further induced quick fly-away or walk-away behavior following contact with the tarsi and the mouthparts. Electrophysiological recordings from single long labellar sensilla of the proboscis demonstrated that mixing the analog 1728 at 1 mM with sucrose almost completely inhibited the detection of sucrose. Aedae-KR was immunolocalized in contact chemosensory neurons in prothoracic tarsi and in sensory neurons and accessory cells of long labellar sensilla in the distal labellum. Silencing Aedae-KR by RNAi significantly reduced gene expression and eliminated the feeding-aversion behavior resulting from contact with the analog 1728, thus directly implicating the Aedae-KR in the aversion response. To our knowledge, this is the first report that kinin analogs modulate sucrose perception in any insect. The aversion to feeding elicited by analog 1728 suggests that synthetic molecules targeting the mosquito Aedae-KR in the labellum and tarsi should be investigated for the potential to discover novel feeding deterrents of mosquito vectors. PMID:27274056

  14. Reconstruction of phrenic neuron identity in embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Kanning, Kevin C; Kreis, Patricia; Stevenson, Danielle; Crossley, Martin; Nowak, Magdalena; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Chambers, David; Blanc, Eric; Lieberam, Ivo

    2014-02-01

    Air breathing is an essential motor function for vertebrates living on land. The rhythm that drives breathing is generated within the central nervous system and relayed via specialised subsets of spinal motor neurons to muscles that regulate lung volume. In mammals, a key respiratory muscle is the diaphragm, which is innervated by motor neurons in the phrenic nucleus. Remarkably, relatively little is known about how this crucial subtype of motor neuron is generated during embryogenesis. Here, we used direct differentiation of motor neurons from mouse embryonic stem cells as a tool to identify genes that direct phrenic neuron identity. We find that three determinants, Pou3f1, Hoxa5 and Notch, act in combination to promote a phrenic neuron molecular identity. We show that Notch signalling induces Pou3f1 in developing motor neurons in vitro and in vivo. This suggests that the phrenic neuron lineage is established through a local source of Notch ligand at mid-cervical levels. Furthermore, we find that the cadherins Pcdh10, which is regulated by Pou3f1 and Hoxa5, and Cdh10, which is controlled by Pou3f1, are both mediators of like-like clustering of motor neuron cell bodies. This specific Pcdh10/Cdh10 activity might provide the means by which phrenic neurons are assembled into a distinct nucleus. Our study provides a framework for understanding how phrenic neuron identity is conferred and will help to generate this rare and inaccessible yet vital neuronal subtype directly from pluripotent stem cells, thus facilitating subsequent functional investigations.

  15. Phenazopyridine induces and synchronizes neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suter, David M; Preynat-Seauve, Olivier; Tirefort, Diderik; Feki, Anis; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2009-09-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are powerful tools to understand mechanisms of neuronal differentiation and to engineer neurons for in vitro studies and cell therapy. We developed a screening approach to identify small organic molecules driving neuronal differentiation of ES cells. For this purpose, we used a lentivector carrying a dual luciferase reporter system to engineer an ES cell line which allowed us to screen for small organic molecules enhancing neuronal differentiation. One of them, phenazopyridine, was further analysed in human ES cells. Phenazopyridine: (i) enhanced neuronal differentiation, (ii) increased cell survival, (iii) decreased the amount of non-neuronal and undifferentiated cells and (iv) synchronized the cellular differentiation state. Phenazopyridine allowed the development of a differentiation protocol compatible with the generation of clinical grade neural precursors, which were able differentiate into different neuronal subtypes, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. In summary, we describe a powerful approach to identify small molecules directing stem cell differentiation. This led to the establishment of a new application for an old drug and the development of a novel clinical grade protocol for neuronal differentiation of ES cells.

  16. Crocin suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced cell death of neuronally differentiated PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Soeda, S; Ochiai, T; Paopong, L; Tanaka, H; Shoyama, Y; Shimeno, H

    2001-11-01

    Crocus sativus L. is used in Chinese traditional medicine to treat some disorders of the central nervous system. Crocin is an ethanol-extractable component of Crocus sativus L.; it is reported to prevent ethanol-induced impairment of learning and memory in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that crocin suppresses the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on neuronally differentiated PC-12 cells. PC-12 cells dead from exposure to TNF-alpha show apoptotic morphological changes and DNA fragmentation. These hallmark features of cell death did not appear in cells treated in the co-presence of 10 microM crocin. Moreover, crocin suppressed the TNF-alpha-induced expression of Bcl-Xs and LICE mRNAs and simultaneously restored the cytokine-induced reduction of Bcl-X(L) mRNA expression. The modulating effects of crocin on the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins led to a marked reduction of a TNF-alpha-induced release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Crocin also blocked the cytochrome c-induced activation of caspase-3. To learn how crocin exhibits these anti-apoptotic actions in PC-12 cells, we tested the effect of crocin on PC-12 cell death induced by daunorubicin. We found that crocin inhibited the effect of daunorubicin as well. Our findings suggest that crocin inhibits neuronal cell death induced by both internal and external apoptotic stimuli.

  17. Current status of neuronal cell xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Vadori, Marta; Aron Badin, Romina; Hantraye, Philippe; Cozzi, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    Neural cell transplantation has long been considered as an option for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, several patients with Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases have been treated with human fetal-derived neurons with disparate results. However, the limited efficacy to date combined with the scarce availability of human fetal tissues and ethical concerns render this procedure inapplicable to a wide population scale. With a view to overcoming these shortcomings, transplantation of pig-derived cell precursors has been proposed and applied in preclinical and clinical trials. Recently long-term survival (more than 18 months) associated with clinical efficacy has been reported following transplantation of genetically engineered porcine neural precursors in fully immunosuppressed primate recipients. Despite the promising results obtained to date, several questions remain unanswered. In particular, the ideal xenogeneic cell-products to transplant, the extent of the immune response against the implanted xenograft and the most suitable therapeutic strategies to improve engraftment are all issues that still need to be thoroughly addressed. The present review describes the current knowledge in the pig-to-primate xenotransplantation field. In this context, recent data on human-to-nonhuman primate xenogeneic stem cell-based treatments for neurological disorders are discussed. PMID:26403068

  18. JNK Inhibition Inhibits Lateral Line Neuromast Hair Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chengfu; Lin, Jinchao; Sun, Shaoyang; He, Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    JNK signaling is known to play a role in regulating cell behaviors such as cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, and recent studies have suggested important roles for JNK signaling in embryonic development. However, the precise function of JNK signaling in hair cell development remains poorly studied. In this study, we used the small molecule JNK inhibitor SP600125 to examine the effect of JNK signaling abrogation on the development of hair cells in the zebrafish lateral line neuromast. Our results showed that SP600125 reduced the numbers of both hair cells and supporting cells in neuromasts during larval development in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, JNK inhibition strongly inhibited the proliferation of neuromast cells, which likely explains the decrease in the number of differentiated hair cells in inhibitor-treated larvae. Furthermore, western blot and in situ analysis showed that JNK inhibition induced cell cycle arrest through induction of p21 expression. We also showed that SP600125 induced cell death in developing neuromasts as measured by cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and this was accompanied with an induction of p53 gene expression. Together these results indicate that JNK might be an important regulator in the development of hair cells in the lateral line in zebrafish by controlling both cell cycle progression and apoptosis. PMID:26903805

  19. Synaptobrevin I mediates exocytosis of CGRP from sensory neurons and inhibition by botulinum toxins reflects their anti-nociceptive potential.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Wang, Jiafu; Lawrence, Gary; Dolly, J Oliver

    2007-08-15

    Calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator that mediates inflammatory pain, is elevated in migraine; nevertheless, little is known about its release from sensory neurons. In this study, CGRP was found to occur in the majority of neurons from rat trigeminal ganglia, together with the three exocytotic SNAREs [SNAP25, syntaxin 1 and the synaptobrevin (Sbr, also known as VAMP) isoforms] and synaptotagmin. Ca(2+)-dependent CGRP release was evoked with K(+)-depolarisation and, to lower levels, by capsaicin or bradykinin from neurons that contain the vanilloid receptor 1 and/or bradykinin receptor 2. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A cleaved SNAP25 and inhibited release triggered by K(+) > bradykinin > capsaicin. Unlike BoNT type D, BoNT type B did not affect exocytosis, even though the neurons possess its receptor and Sbr II and Sbr III got proteolysed (I is resistant in rat) but, in mouse neurons, it additionally cleaved Sbr I and blocked transmitter release. Sbr I and II were found in CGRP-containing vesicles, and each was shown to separately form a SNARE complex. These new findings, together with punctate staining of Sbr I and CGRP in neurites, implicate isoform Sbr I in exocytosis from large dense-core vesicles together with SNAP25 (also, probably, syntaxin 1 because BoNT type C1 caused partial cleavage and inhibition); this differs from Sbr-II-dependent release of transmitters from small synaptic vesicles. Such use of particular Sbr isoform(s) by different neurons raises the functional implications for other cells previously unrecognised.

  20. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to dopaminergic neurons in serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Thomas C; Noggle, Scott A; Palmarini, Gail M; Weiler, Deb A; Lyons, Ian G; Pensa, Kate A; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Davidson, Bruce P; Lambert, Nevin A; Condie, Brian G

    2004-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a source of dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease cell therapy will require the development of simple and reliable cell differentiation protocols. The use of cell cocultures, added extracellular signaling factors, or transgenic approaches to drive hESC differentiation could lead to additional regulatory as well as cell production delays for these therapies. Because the neuronal cell lineage seems to require limited or no signaling for its formation, we tested the ability of hESCs to differentiate to form dopamine-producing neurons in a simple serum-free suspension culture system. BG01 and BG03 hESCs were differentiated as suspension aggregates, and neural progenitors and neurons were detectable after 2-4 weeks. Plated neurons responded appropriately to electrophysiological cues. This differentiation was inhibited by early exposure to bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-4, but a pulse of BMP-4 from days 5 to 9 caused induction of peripheral neuronal differentiation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and whole-mount immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of multiple markers of the midbrain dopaminergic phenotype in serum-free differentiations. Neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) were killed by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxic catecholamine. Upon plating, these cells released dopamine and other catecholamines in response to K+ depolarization. Surviving TH+ neurons, derived from the cells differentiated in serum-free suspension cultures, were detected 8 weeks after transplantation into 6-OHDA-lesioned rat brains. This work suggests that hESCs can differentiate in simple serum-free suspension cultures to produce the large number of cells required for transplantation studies. PMID:15579641

  1. Excitation and inhibition onto central courtship neurons biases Drosophila mate choice

    PubMed Central

    Kallman, Benjamin R; Kim, Heesoo; Scott, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The ability to distinguish males from females is essential for productive mate selection and species propagation. Recent studies in Drosophila have identified different classes of contact chemosensory neurons that detect female or male pheromones and influence courtship decisions. Here, we examine central neural pathways in the male brain that process female and male pheromones using anatomical, calcium imaging, optogenetic, and behavioral studies. We find that sensory neurons that detect female pheromones, but not male pheromones, activate a novel class of neurons in the ventral nerve cord to cause activation of P1 neurons, male-specific command neurons that trigger courtship. In addition, sensory neurons that detect male pheromones, as well as those that detect female pheromones, activate central mAL neurons to inhibit P1. These studies demonstrate that the balance of excitatory and inhibitory drives onto central courtship-promoting neurons controls mating decisions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11188.001 PMID:26568316

  2. Neurokinins inhibit low threshold inactivating K+ currents in capsaicin responsive DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sculptoreanu, Adrian; Artim, Debra E.; de Groat, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Neurokinins (NK) released from terminals of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons may control firing of these neurons by an autofeedback mechanism. In this study we used patch clamp recording techniques to determine if NKs alter excitability of rat L4-S3 DRG neurons by modulating K+ currents. In capsaicin (CAPS)-responsive phasic neurons substance P (SP) lowered action potential (AP) threshold and increased the number of APs elicited by depolarizing current pulses. SP and a selective NK2 agonist, [βAla8]-neurokinin A (4–10) also inhibited low threshold inactivating K+ currents isolated by blocking non-inactivating currents with a combination of high TEA, (−) verapamil and nifedipine. Currents recorded under these conditions were heteropodatoxin-sensitive (Kv4 blocker) and α-dendrotoxin insensitive (Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 blocker). SP and NKA elicited a >10 mV positive shift of the voltage dependence of activation of the low threshold currents. This effect was absent in CAPS-unresponsive neurons. The effect of SP or NKA on K+ currents in CAPS-responsive phasic neurons was fully reversed by an NK2 receptor antagonist (MEN10376) but only partially reversed by a PKC inhibitor (bisindolylmaleimide). An NK1 selective agonist ([Sar9, Met11]-substance P) or direct activation of PKC with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, did not change firing in CAPS-responsive neurons, but did inhibit various types of K+ currents that activated over a wide range of voltages. These data suggest that the excitability of CAPS-responsive phasic afferent neurons is increased by activation of NK2 receptors and that this is due in part to inhibition and a positive voltage shift in the activation of heteropodatoxin-sensitive Kv4 channels. PMID:19631644

  3. Combretastatin A-4 efficiently inhibits angiogenesis and induces neuronal apoptosis in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun-Wei; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Xin; Gong, Jie; Zhu, Shun-Xing; Chai, Lin-Lin; Qi, Jia-Ling; Qin, Yin-Yin; Gao, Yu; Zhou, Yu-Ling; Fan, Xiao-Le; Ji, Chun-Ya; Wu, Jia-Yi; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Cis-stilbene combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) and a large group of its derivant compounds have been shown significant anti-angiogenesis activity. However the side effects even the toxicities of these chemicals were not evaluated adequately. The zebrafish model has become an important vertebrate model for evaluating drug effects. The testing of CA-4 on zebrafish is so far lacking and assessment of CA-4 on this model will provide with new insights of understanding the function of CA-4 on angiogenesis, the toxicities and side effects of CA-4. We discovered that 7–9 ng/ml CA-4 treatments resulted in developmental retardation and morphological malformation, and led to potent angiogenic defects in zebrafish embryos. Next, we demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg CA-4 obviously inhibited vessel plexus formation in regenerated pectoral fins of adult zebrafish. Interestingly, we proved that CA-4 treatment induced significant cell apoptosis in central nervous system of zebrafish embryos and adults. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the neuronal apoptosis induced by CA-4 treatment was alleviated in p53 mutants. In addition, notch1a was up-regulated in CA-4 treated embryos, and inhibition of Notch signaling by DAPT partially rescued the apoptosis in zebrafish central nervous system caused by CA-4. PMID:27452835

  4. Ngn1 inhibits astrogliogenesis through induction of miR-9 during neuronal fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Lin, Quan; Kim, Kevin J; Dardashti, Faranak D; Kim, Jennifer; He, Fei; Sun, Yi

    2015-01-01

    It has been postulated that a proneural factor, neurogenin 1 (Ngn1), simultaneously activates the neurogenic program and inhibits the alternative astrogliogenic program when specifying the neuronal fate. While Ngn1 substantially suppresses the activation of the astrogliogenic Jak-Stat pathway, the underlying molecular mechanism was unknown. Here, by employing in vivo and in vitro approaches, we report that Ngn1 binds to the promoter of a brain-enriched microRNA, miR-9, and activates its expression during neurogenesis. Subsequently, our in vitro study showed that miR-9 directly targets mRNAs of Lifr-beta, Il6st (gp130), and Jak1 to down-regulate these critical upstream components of the Jak-Stat pathway, achieving inhibition of Stat phosphorylation and consequently, suppression of astrogliogenesis. This study revealed Ngn1 modulated non-coding RNA epigenetic regulation during cell fate specifications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06885.001 PMID:26271009

  5. Acid Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) in NS20Y cells - potential role in neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    O'Bryant, Zaven; Leng, Tiandong; Liu, Mingli; Inoue, Koichi; Vann, Kiara T; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Cultured neuronal cell lines can express properties of mature neurons if properly differentiated. Although the precise mechanisms underlying neuronal differentiation are not fully understood, the expression and activation of ion channels, particularly those of Ca(2+)-permeable channels, have been suggested to play a role. In this study, we explored the presence and characterized the properties of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in NS20Y cells, a neuronal cell line previously used for the study of neuronal differentiation. In addition, the potential role of ASICs in cell differentiation was explored. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction and Western blot revealed the presence of ASIC1 subunits in these cells. Fast drops of extracellular pH activated transient inward currents which were blocked, in a dose dependent manner, by amiloride, a non-selective ASIC blocker, and by Psalmotoxin-1 (PcTX1), a specific inhibitor for homomeric ASIC1a and heteromeric ASIC1a/2b channels. Incubation of cells with PcTX1 significantly reduced the differentiation of NS20Y cells induced by cpt-cAMP, as evidenced by decreased neurite length, dendritic complexity, decreased expression of functional voltage gated Na(+) channels. Consistent with ASIC1a inhibition, ASIC1a knockdown with small interference RNA significantly attenuates cpt-cAMP-induced increase of neurite outgrowth. In summary, we described the presence of functional ASICs in NS20Y cells and demonstrate that ASIC1a plays a role in the differentiation of these cells. PMID:27342076

  6. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Dependent cdk1 Inhibition Prevents G2/M Progression in Differentiating Tetraploid Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ovejero-Benito, María C.; Frade, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is often associated with DNA synthesis in neurons, the latter usually remaining for a long time as tetraploid cells before dying by apoptosis. The molecular mechanism preventing G2/M transition in these neurons remains unknown, but it may be reminiscent of the mechanism that maintains tetraploid retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a G2-like state during normal development, thus preventing their death. Here we show that this latter process, known to depend on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), requires the inhibition of cdk1 by TrkB. We demonstrate that a subpopulation of chick RGCs previously shown to become tetraploid co-expresses TrkB and cdk1 in vivo. By using an in vitro system that recapitulates differentiation and cell cycle re-entry of chick retinal neurons we show that BDNF, employed at concentrations specific for the TrkB receptor, reduces the expression of cdk1 in TrkB-positive, differentiating neurons. In this system, BDNF also inhibits the activity of both endogenous cdk1 and exogenously-expressed cdk1/cyclin B1 complex. This inhibition correlates with the phosphorylation of cdk1 at Tyr15, an effect that can be prevented with K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor commonly used to prevent the activity of neurotrophins through their Trk receptors. The effect of BDNF on cdk1 activity is Tyr15-specific since BDNF cannot prevent the activity of a constitutively active form of cdk1 (Tyr15Phe) when expressed in differentiating retinal neurons. We also show that BDNF-dependent phosphorylation of cdk1 at Tyr15 could not be blocked with MK-1775, a Wee1-selective inhibitor, indicating that Tyr15 phosphorylation in cdk1 does not seem to occur through the canonical mechanism observed in proliferating cells. We conclude that the inhibition of both expression and activity of cdk1 through a BDNF-dependent mechanism contributes to the maintenance of tetraploid RGCs in a G2-like state. PMID:23741412

  7. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules on adult stem cells after neuronal differentiation of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kyoung Ho; Yeo, Sang Won; Troy, Frederic A.

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • PolySia expressed on neurons primarily during early stages of neuronal development. • PolySia–NCAM is expressed on neural stem cells from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion. • PolySia is a biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. - Abstract: During brain development, polysialylated (polySia) neural cell adhesion molecules (polySia–NCAMs) modulate cell–cell adhesive interactions involved in synaptogenesis, neural plasticity, myelination, and neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Our findings show that polySia–NCAM is expressed on NSC isolated from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion (GPSG), and in neurons and Schwann cells after differentiation of the NSC with epidermal, glia, fibroblast growth factors (GFs) and neurotrophins. These differentiated cells were immunoreactive with mAb’s to polySia, NCAM, β-III tubulin, nestin, S-100 and stained with BrdU. NSC could regenerate and be differentiated into neurons and Schwann cells. We conclude: (1) polySia is expressed on NSC isolated from adult GPSG and on neurons and Schwann cells differentiated from these NSC; (2) polySia is expressed on neurons primarily during the early stage of neuronal development and is expressed on Schwann cells at points of cell–cell contact; (3) polySia is a functional biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. These new findings suggest that replacement of defective cells in the inner ear of hearing impaired patients using adult spiral ganglion neurons may offer potential hope to improve the quality of life for patients with auditory dysfunction and impaired hearing disorders.

  8. Adiponectin selectively inhibits oxytocin neurons of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Hoyda, Ted D; Fry, Mark; Ahima, Rexford S; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2007-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte derived hormone which acts in the brain to modulate energy homeostasis and autonomic function. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) which plays a key role in controlling pituitary hormone secretion has been suggested to be a central target for adiponectin actions. A number of hormones produced by PVN neurons have been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis including oxytocin, corticotropin releasing hormone and thyrotropin releasing hormone. In the present study we investigated the role of adiponectin in controlling the excitability of magnocellular (MNC – oxytocin or vasopressin secreting) neurons within the PVN. Using RT-PCR techniques we have shown expression of both adiponectin receptors in the PVN. Patch clamp recordings from MNC neurons in hypothalamic slices have also identified mixed (27% hyperpolarization, 42% depolarization) effects of adiponectin in modulating the excitability of the majority of MNC neurons tested. These effects are maintained when cells are placed in synaptic isolation using tetrodotoxin. Additionally we combined electrophysiological recordings with single cell RT-PCR to examine the actions of adiponectin on MNC neurons which expressed oxytocin only, vasopressin only, or both oxytocin and vasopressin mRNA and assess the profile of receptor expression in these subgroups. Adiponectin was found to hyperpolarize 100% of oxytocin neurons tested (n = 6), while vasopressin cells, while all affected (n = 6), showed mixed responses. Further analysis indicates oxytocin neurons express both receptors (6/7) while vasopressin neurons express either both receptors (3/8) or one receptor (5/8). In contrast 6/6 oxytocin/vasopressin neurons were unaffected by adiponectin. Co-expressing oxytocin and vasopressin neurons express neither receptor (4/6). The results presented in this study suggest that adiponectin plays specific roles in controlling the excitability oxytocin secreting neurons, actions

  9. Inhibiting cholesterol degradation induces neuronal sclerosis and epileptic activity in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chali, Farah; Djelti, Fathia; Eugene, Emmanuel; Valderrama, Mario; Marquer, Catherine; Aubourg, Patrick; Duykaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Cartier, Nathalie; Navarro, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Elevations in neuronal cholesterol have been associated with several degenerative diseases. An enhanced excitability and synchronous firing in surviving neurons are among the sequels of neuronal death in these diseases and also in some epileptic syndromes. Here, we attempted to increase neuronal cholesterol levels, using a short hairpin RNA to suppress expression of the enzyme cytochrome P450 family 46, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 gene (CYP46A1). This protein hydroxylates cholesterol and so facilitates transmembrane extrusion. A short hairpin RNA CYP46A1construction coupled to the adeno-associated virus type 5 was injected focally and unilaterally into mouse hippocampus. It was selectively expressed first in neurons of the cornu ammonis (hippocampus) (CA)3a region. Cytoplasmic and membrane cholesterol increased, and the neuronal soma volume increased and then decreased before pyramidal cells died. As CA3a pyramidal cells died, interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) events occurred during exploration and non-rapid eye movement sleep. With time, neuronal death spread to involve pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA1 region. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with a delayed local expression of phosphorylated tau. Astrocytes were activated throughout the hippocampus and microglial activation was specific to regions of neuronal death. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with distinct aberrant EEG activity. During exploratory behaviour and rapid eye movement sleep, EEG oscillations at 7-10 Hz (theta) could accelerate to 14-21 Hz (beta) waves. They were accompanied by low-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations of peak power at ~300 Hz and a range of 250-350 Hz. Although episodes of EEG acceleration were not correlated with changes in exploratory behaviour, they were followed in some animals by structured seizure-like discharges. These data strengthen links between increased cholesterol, neuronal sclerosis and epileptic behaviour.

  10. Inhibiting cholesterol degradation induces neuronal sclerosis and epileptic activity in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chali, Farah; Djelti, Fathia; Eugene, Emmanuel; Valderrama, Mario; Marquer, Catherine; Aubourg, Patrick; Duykaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Cartier, Nathalie; Navarro, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Elevations in neuronal cholesterol have been associated with several degenerative diseases. An enhanced excitability and synchronous firing in surviving neurons are among the sequels of neuronal death in these diseases and also in some epileptic syndromes. Here, we attempted to increase neuronal cholesterol levels, using a short hairpin RNA to suppress expression of the enzyme cytochrome P450 family 46, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 gene (CYP46A1). This protein hydroxylates cholesterol and so facilitates transmembrane extrusion. A short hairpin RNA CYP46A1construction coupled to the adeno-associated virus type 5 was injected focally and unilaterally into mouse hippocampus. It was selectively expressed first in neurons of the cornu ammonis (hippocampus) (CA)3a region. Cytoplasmic and membrane cholesterol increased, and the neuronal soma volume increased and then decreased before pyramidal cells died. As CA3a pyramidal cells died, interictal electroencephalographic (EEG) events occurred during exploration and non-rapid eye movement sleep. With time, neuronal death spread to involve pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA1 region. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with a delayed local expression of phosphorylated tau. Astrocytes were activated throughout the hippocampus and microglial activation was specific to regions of neuronal death. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with distinct aberrant EEG activity. During exploratory behaviour and rapid eye movement sleep, EEG oscillations at 7-10 Hz (theta) could accelerate to 14-21 Hz (beta) waves. They were accompanied by low-amplitude, high-frequency oscillations of peak power at ~300 Hz and a range of 250-350 Hz. Although episodes of EEG acceleration were not correlated with changes in exploratory behaviour, they were followed in some animals by structured seizure-like discharges. These data strengthen links between increased cholesterol, neuronal sclerosis and epileptic behaviour. PMID:25847620

  11. Cell specific electrodes for neuronal network reconstruction and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bendali, Amel; Bouguelia, Sihem; Roupioz, Yoann; Forster, Valérie; Mailley, Pascal; Benosman, Ryad; Livache, Thierry; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2014-07-01

    Direct interfacing of neurons with electronic devices has been investigated for both prosthetic and neuro-computing applications. In vitro neuronal networks provide great tools not only for improving neuroprostheses but also to take advantage of their computing abilities. However, it is often difficult to organize neuronal networks according to specific cell distributions. Our aim was to develop a cell-type specific immobilization of neurons on individual electrodes to produce organized in vitro neuronal networks on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). We demonstrate the selective capture of retinal neurons on antibody functionalized surfaces following the formation of self-assembled monolayers from protein-thiol conjugates by simple contact and protein-polypyrrole deposits by electrochemical functionalization. This neuronal selection was achieved on gold for either cone photoreceptors or retinal ganglion neurons using a PNA lectin or a Thy1 antibody, respectively. Anti-fouling of un-functionalized gold surfaces was optimized to increase the capture efficiencies. The technique was extended to electrode arrays by addressing electropolymerization of pyrrole monomers and pyrrole-protein conjugates to active electrodes. Retinal ganglion cell recording on the array further demonstrated the integrity of these neurons following their selection on polypyrrole-coated electrodes. Therefore, this protein-polypyrrole electrodeposition could provide a new approach to generate organized in vitro neuronal networks.

  12. PARP-1 Inhibition Attenuates Neuronal Loss, Microglia Activation and Neurological Deficits after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Loane, David J.; Zhao, Zaorui; Kabadi, Shruti V.; Hanscom, Marie; Byrnes, Kimberly R.; Faden, Alan I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes neuronal cell death as well as microglial activation and related neurotoxicity that contribute to subsequent neurological dysfunction. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) induces neuronal cell death through activation of caspase-independent mechanisms, including release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), and microglial activation. Administration of PJ34, a selective PARP-1 inhibitor, reduced cell death of primary cortical neurons exposed to N-Methyl-N'-Nitro-N-Nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), a potent inducer of AIF-dependent cell death. PJ34 also attenuated lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ-induced activation of BV2 or primary microglia, limiting NF-κB activity and iNOS expression as well as decreasing generation of reactive oxygen species and TNFα. Systemic administration of PJ34 starting as late as 24 h after controlled cortical impact resulted in improved motor function recovery in mice with TBI. Stereological analysis demonstrated that PJ34 treatment reduced the lesion volume, attenuated neuronal cell loss in the cortex and thalamus, and reduced microglial activation in the TBI cortex. PJ34 treatment did not improve cognitive performance in a Morris water maze test or reduce neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. Overall, our data indicate that PJ34 has a significant, albeit selective, neuroprotective effect after experimental TBI, and its therapeutic effect may be from multipotential actions on neuronal cell death and neuroinflammatory pathways. PMID:24476502

  13. Retrograde release of endocannabinoids inhibits presynaptic GABA release to second-order baroreceptive neurons in NTS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bonham, Ann C; Dean, Caron; Hopp, Francis A; Hillard, Cecilia J; Seagard, Jeanne L

    2010-12-01

    In prior studies, we found that activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) prolonged baroreflex-induced sympathoinhibition in rats. In many regions of the central nervous system, activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors presynaptically inhibits γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, disinhibiting postsynaptic neurons. To determine if cannabinoid-1 receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABA release occurs in the NTS, we recorded miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in anatomically identified second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin. The cannabinoid-1 receptor agonists, WIN 55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) and methanandamide (3 μM) decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251, 5 μM). Importantly, depolarization of second-order baroreceptive neurons decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; an effect which was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist. The data indicate that depolarization of second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons induces endocannabinoid release from the neurons, leading to activation of presynaptic cannabinoid-1 receptors, inhibition of GABA release and subsequent enhanced baroreflex signaling in the NTS. The data suggest that endocannabinoid signaling in the NTS regulates short-term synaptic plasticity and provide a mechanism for endocannabinoid modulation of central baroreflex control.

  14. Glial cell-expressed mechanosensitive channel TRPV4 mediates infrasound-induced neuronal impairment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Du, Fang; Liu, Yang; Li, Li; Cai, Jing; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Xu, Xiao-Fei; Lin, Tian; Cheng, Hao-Ran; Liu, Xue-Dong; Xiong, Li-Ze; Zhao, Gang

    2013-11-01

    Vibroacoustic disease, a progressive and systemic disease, mainly involving the central nervous system, is caused by excessive exposure to low-frequency but high-intensity noise generated by various heavy transportations and machineries. Infrasound is a type of low-frequency noise. Our previous studies demonstrated that infrasound at a certain intensity caused neuronal injury in rats but the underlying mechanism(s) is still largely unknown. Here, we showed that glial cell-expressed TRPV4, a Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive channel, mediated infrasound-induced neuronal injury. Among different frequencies and intensities, infrasound at 16 Hz and 130 dB impaired rat learning and memory abilities most severely after 7-14 days exposure, a time during which a prominent loss of hippocampal CA1 neurons was evident. Infrasound also induced significant astrocytic and microglial activation in hippocampal regions following 1- to 7-day exposure, prior to neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of glial activation in vivo protected against neuronal apoptosis. In vitro, activated glial cell-released proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were found to be key factors for this neuronal apoptosis. Importantly, infrasound induced an increase in the expression level of TRPV4 both in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of TRPV4 expression by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV4 in cultured glial cells decreased the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, attenuated neuronal apoptosis, and reduced TRPV4-mediated Ca(2+) influx and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Finally, using various antagonists we revealed that calmodulin and protein kinase C signaling pathways were involved in TRPV4-triggered NF-κB activation. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that glial cell-expressed TRPV4 is a potential key factor responsible for infrasound-induced neuronal impairment. PMID:24002225

  15. A proapoptotic effect of valproic acid on progenitors of embryonic stem cell-derived glutamatergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, R; Sato, A; Fujitani, M; Yamashita, T

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a branched-chain saturated fatty acid with a long history of clinical use as an antiepileptic drug (AED). VPA is also known to inhibit histone deacetylases (HDACs) and to cause diverse effects on neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons. Although the neuroprotective or neurodestructive effects of VPA have been investigated in heterogeneous cell populations, in this study, we used homogeneous populations of NPCs and glutamatergic cortical pyramidal neurons, which were differentiated from embryonic stem (ES) cells. At therapeutic concentrations, VPA had a proapoptotic effect on ES cell-derived NPCs of glutamatergic neurons, but not on their progeny. This effect of VPA most likely occurred through the inhibition of HDACs, because similar phenotypes were observed following treatment with other HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) such as trichostatin A and sodium butyrate. The proapoptotic phenotype was not observed when cells were exposed to a structural analog of VPA, valpromide (VPM), which has the same antiepileptic effect as VPA, but does not inhibit HDACs. Western blotting confirmed that treatment with HDACis, but not VPM, significantly increased the levels of histone H3 acetylation in NPCs. HDACi treatments did not affect the survival of neurons, although the acetylation levels were increased to a limited extent. These results, which are based on a homogeneous culture system, suggest that VPA inhibits HDAC activity and induces the apoptosis of NPCs that are fated to differentiate into glutamatergic neurons. The dose-dependent effects of VPA both on apoptosis and hyperacetylation of histone H3 in NPCs supported this notion. These cell type- and differentiation stage-specific effects of VPA imply that dysfunction of HDACs during pregnancy significantly increase the risk of congenital malformations associated with VPA administration. PMID:23788034

  16. Resolvin E1 Inhibits Substance P-Induced Potentiation of TRPV1 in Primary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is expressed in primary sensory neurons and is commonly regarded as a “pain” neurotransmitter. Upon peripheral inflammation, SP activates the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and potentiates activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is coexpressed by nociceptive neurons. Therefore, SP functions as an important neurotransmitter involved in the hypersensitization of inflammatory pain. Resolvin E1 (RvE1), derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, inhibits TRPV1 activity via activation of the chemerin 23 receptor (ChemR23)—an RvE1 receptor located in dorsal root ganglion neurons—and therefore exerts an inhibitory effect on inflammatory pain. We demonstrate here that RvE1 regulates the SP-induced potentiation of TRPV1 via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) on peripheral nociceptive neurons. SP-induced potentiation of TRPV1 inhibited by RvE1 was blocked by the Gαi-coupled GPCR inhibitor pertussis toxin and the G-protein inhibitor GDPβ-S. These results indicate that a low concentration of RvE1 strongly inhibits the potentiation of TRPV1, induced by the SP-mediated activation of NK-1, via a GPCR signaling pathway activated by ChemR23 in nociceptive neurons. RvE1 might represent a new therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory pain as a prospective endogenous inhibitor that strongly inhibits TRPV1 activity associated with peripheral inflammation. PMID:27738388

  17. Inhibition of microRNA 128 promotes excitability of cultured cortical neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, K. Melodi; Gussow, Ayal B.; Bradrick, Shelton S.; Dugger, Sarah A.; Gelfman, Sahar; Wang, Quanli; Petrovski, Slavé; Frankel, Wayne N.; Boland, Michael J.; Goldstein, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Cultured neuronal networks monitored with microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have been used widely to evaluate pharmaceutical compounds for potential neurotoxic effects. A newer application of MEAs has been in the development of in vitro models of neurological disease. Here, we directly evaluated the utility of MEAs to recapitulate in vivo phenotypes of mature microRNA-128 (miR-128) deficiency, which causes fatal seizures in mice. We show that inhibition of miR-128 results in significantly increased neuronal activity in cultured neuronal networks derived from primary mouse cortical neurons. These results support the utility of MEAs in developing in vitro models of neuroexcitability disorders, such as epilepsy, and further suggest that MEAs provide an effective tool for the rapid identification of microRNAs that promote seizures when dysregulated. PMID:27516621

  18. Coding of predicted reward omission by dopamine neurons in a conditioned inhibition paradigm.

    PubMed

    Tobler, Philippe N; Dickinson, Anthony; Schultz, Wolfram

    2003-11-12

    Animals learn not only about stimuli that predict reward but also about those that signal the omission of an expected reward. We used a conditioned inhibition paradigm derived from animal learning theory to train a discrimination between a visual stimulus that predicted reward (conditioned excitor) and a second stimulus that predicted the omission of reward (conditioned inhibitor). Performing the discrimination required attention to both the conditioned excitor and the inhibitor; however, dopamine neurons showed very different responses to the two classes of stimuli. Conditioned inhibitors elicited considerable depressions in 48 of 69 neurons (median of 35% below baseline) and minor activations in 29 of 69 neurons (69% above baseline), whereas reward-predicting excitors induced pure activations in all 69 neurons tested (242% above baseline), thereby demonstrating that the neurons discriminated between conditioned stimuli predicting reward versus nonreward. The discriminative responses to stimuli with differential reward-predicting but common attentional functions indicate differential neural coding of reward prediction and attention. The neuronal responses appear to reflect reward prediction errors, thus suggesting an extension of the correspondence between learning theory and activity of single dopamine neurons to the prediction of nonreward.

  19. Arachidonic acid-mediated inhibition of a potassium current in the giant neurons of Aplysia

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological approaches were used to investigate the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in the modulation of an inwardly rectifying potassium current (I{sub R}) in the giant neurons of the marine snail, Aplysia californica. Using ({sup 3}H)AA as tracer, the intracellular free AA pool in Aplysia ganglia was found to be in a state of constant and rapid turnover through deacylation and reacylation of phospholipid, primarily phosphatidyl-inositol. This constant turnover was accompanied by a constant release of free AA and eicosanoids into the extracellular medium. The effects of three pharmacological agents were characterized with regard to AA metabolism in Aplysia ganglia. 4-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated liberation of AA from phospholipid, and 4-bromophenacylbromide (BPB), an inhibitor of phospholipate A{sub 2}, inhibited this liberation. Indomethacin at 250 {mu}M was found to inhibit uptake of AA, likely through inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase. These agents were also found to modulate I{sub R} in ways which were consistent with their biological effects: TPA inhibited I{sub R}, and both BPB and indomethacin stimulated I{sub R} . Modulation of I{sub R} by these substances was found not to involve cAMP metabolism. Acute application of exogenous AA did not affect I{sub R}; however, I{sub R} in giant neurons was found to be inhibited after dialysis with AA or other unsaturated fatty acids. Also, after perfusion with BSA overnight, a treatment which strips the giant neurons of AA in lipid storage, I{sub R} was found to have increased over 2-fold. This perfusion-induced increase was inhibited by the presence of AA or by pretreatment of the giant neurons with BPB. These results suggest AA, provided through constant turnover from phospholipid, mediates constitutive inhibition of I{sub R}.

  20. Disruption of Kcc2-dependent inhibition of olfactory bulb output neurons suggests its importance in odour discrimination.

    PubMed

    Gödde, Kathrin; Gschwend, Olivier; Puchkov, Dmytro; Pfeffer, Carsten K; Carleton, Alan; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition in the olfactory bulb (OB), the first relay station of olfactory information, is believed to be important for odour discrimination. We interfered with GABAergic inhibition of mitral and tufted cells (M/T cells), the principal neurons of the OB, by disrupting their potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (Kcc2). Roughly, 70% of mice died around 3 weeks, but surviving mice appeared normal. In these mice, the resulting increase in the intracellular Cl(-) concentration nearly abolished GABA-induced hyperpolarization of mitral cells (MCs) and unexpectedly increased the number of perisomatic synapses on MCs. In vivo analysis of odorant-induced OB electrical activity revealed increased M/T cell firing rate, altered phasing of action potentials in the breath cycle and disrupted separation of odour-induced M/T cell activity patterns. Mice also demonstrated a severely impaired ability to discriminate chemically similar odorants or odorant mixtures. Our work suggests that precisely tuned GABAergic inhibition onto M/T cells is crucial for M/T cell spike pattern separation needed to distinguish closely similar odours. PMID:27389623

  1. Disruption of Kcc2-dependent inhibition of olfactory bulb output neurons suggests its importance in odour discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Gödde, Kathrin; Gschwend, Olivier; Puchkov, Dmytro; Pfeffer, Carsten K.; Carleton, Alan; Jentsch, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition in the olfactory bulb (OB), the first relay station of olfactory information, is believed to be important for odour discrimination. We interfered with GABAergic inhibition of mitral and tufted cells (M/T cells), the principal neurons of the OB, by disrupting their potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (Kcc2). Roughly, 70% of mice died around 3 weeks, but surviving mice appeared normal. In these mice, the resulting increase in the intracellular Cl− concentration nearly abolished GABA-induced hyperpolarization of mitral cells (MCs) and unexpectedly increased the number of perisomatic synapses on MCs. In vivo analysis of odorant-induced OB electrical activity revealed increased M/T cell firing rate, altered phasing of action potentials in the breath cycle and disrupted separation of odour-induced M/T cell activity patterns. Mice also demonstrated a severely impaired ability to discriminate chemically similar odorants or odorant mixtures. Our work suggests that precisely tuned GABAergic inhibition onto M/T cells is crucial for M/T cell spike pattern separation needed to distinguish closely similar odours. PMID:27389623

  2. Salubrinal inhibits the expression of proteoglycans and favors neurite outgrowth from cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barreda-Manso, M Asunción; Yanguas-Casás, Natalia; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo

    2015-07-01

    After CNS injury, astrocytes and mesenchymal cells attempt to restore the disrupted glia limitans by secreting proteoglycans and extracellular matrix proteins (ECMs), forming the so-called glial scar. Although the glial scar is important in sealing the lesion, it is also a physical and functional barrier that prevents axonal regeneration. The synthesis of secretory proteins in the RER is under the control of the initiation factor of translation eIF2α. Inhibiting the synthesis of secretory proteins by increasing the phosphorylation of eIF2α, might be a pharmacologically efficient way of reducing proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins present in the glial scar. Salubrinal, a neuroprotective drug, decreased the expression and secretion of proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins induced by EGF or TGFβ, maintaining eIF2α phosphorylated. Besides, Salubrinal also reduced the transcription of proteoglycans and other profibrotic proteins, suggesting that it induced the degradation of non-translated mRNA. In a model in vitro of the glial scar, cortical neurons grown on cocultures of astrocytes and fibroblasts with TGFβ treated with Salubrinal, showed increased neurite outgrowth compared to untreated cells. Our results suggest that Salubrinal may be considered of therapeutic value facilitating axonal regeneration, by reducing overproduction and secretion of proteoglycans and profibrotic protein inhibitors of axonal growth. PMID:25882497

  3. Astrocyte-Specific Overexpression of Nrf2 Protects Striatal Neurons from Mitochondrial Complex II Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Marcus J.; Vargas, Marcelo R.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is known to regulate a variety of cytoprotective genes through the antioxidant response element (ARE). This endogenous response is one of the major pathways by which cells are protected from xenobiotic or innate oxidative insults. Furthermore, in neural systems, astrocyte-specific activation of Nrf2 is known to protect neurons. In previous work, our laboratory found that Nrf2 protects from intrastriatal injections of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate. Here, we extend these results to show that multiple methods of astrocyte-specific Nrf2 overexpression provide protection from neurotoxicity in vivo. GFAP-Nrf2 transgenic mice are significantly more resistant to malonate lesioning. This outcome is associated with an increased basal resistance, but more so, an enhanced Nrf2 response to lesioning that attenuated the ensuing neurotoxicity. Furthermore, striatal transplantation of neuroprogenitor cells overexpressing Nrf2 that differentiate into astrocytes after grafting also significantly reduced malonate toxicity. Overall, these data establish that enhanced astrocytic Nrf2 response and Nrf2 preconditioning are both sufficient to protect from acute lesions from mitochondrial complex II inhibition. PMID:20211941

  4. Inhibition of the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway Restores Cultured Spinal Cord-Injured Neuronal Migration, Adhesion, and Dendritic Spine Development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongdong; Cao, Fujiang; Sun, Shiwei; Liu, Tao; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-08-01

    The Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway plays an important role in central and peripheral neurons in functions such as dendritic arborization, neuronal polarity, and axon assembly. However, emerging evidence also shows that up-regulation of this signaling pathway may lead to the development of spinal cord injury. The present study aimed to determine the effects of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway inhibition on properties of spinal cord-injured neurons. First, neurons from spinal cord-injured C57BL/6 J mouse pups and sham-operated C57BL/6 J mouse pups were harvested. Then, immunofluorescence, western blotting, cell adhesion and cell migration assays, and DiI labeling were employed to investigate the effect of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway inhibition on spinal cord-injured neurons. Immunofluorescence results of synapse formation indicated that the experimental spinal cord injury model was successfully established. Western blot results identified upregulated Erk phosphorylation in the spinal cord-injured neurons, and also showed that U0126 inhibited phosphorylation of Erk, which is a downstream kinase in the Ras/Raf signaling pathway. Additionally, cell migration and adhesion was significantly increased in the spinal cord-injured neurons. DiI labeling results also showed an increased formation of mature spines after inhibition of Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling. Taken together, these results suggested that the Ras/Raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway could serve as an effective treatment target for spinal cord injury.

  5. Rapid and efficient generation of neurons from human pluripotent stem cells in a multititre plate format.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Schöler, Hans R; Greber, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Existing protocols for the generation of neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are often tedious in that they are multistep procedures involving the isolation and expansion of neural precursor cells, prior to terminal differentiation. In comparison to these time-consuming approaches, we have recently found that combined inhibition of three signaling pathways, TGFβ/SMAD2, BMP/SMAD1, and FGF/ERK, promotes rapid induction of neuroectoderm from hPSCs, followed by immediate differentiation into functional neurons. Here, we have adapted our procedure to a novel multititre plate format, to further enhance its reproducibility and to make it compatible with mid-throughput applications. It comprises four days of neuroectoderm formation in floating spheres (embryoid bodies), followed by a further four days of differentiation into neurons under adherent conditions. Most cells obtained with this protocol appear to be bipolar sensory neurons. Moreover, the procedure is highly efficient, does not require particular expert skills, and is based on a simple chemically defined medium with cost-efficient small molecules. Due to these features, the procedure may serve as a useful platform for further functional investigation as well as for cell-based screening approaches requiring human sensory neurons or neurons of any type. PMID:23486189

  6. CGRP inhibits neurons of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis: implications for the regulation of fear and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Gungor, Nur Zeynep; Pare, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is thought to generate anxiety-like states via its projections to autonomic and neuroendocrine regulatory structures of the brain. However, because most BNST cells are GABAergic, they are expected to inhibit target neurons. In contrast with this, infusion of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) into BNST was reported to potentiate anxiety while activating BNST targets. The present study aimed to shed light on this paradox. The CGRP innervation of BNST originates in the pontine parabrachial nucleus and targets its anterolateral sector (BNST-AL). Thus, we investigated the effects of CGRP on BNST-AL neurons using patch recordings in vitro in male rats. CGRP did not alter the passive properties of BNST-AL cells but increased the amplitude of IPSPs evoked by stimulation of the stria terminalis (ST). However, IPSP paired-pulse ratios were unchanged by CGRP, and there was no correlation between IPSP potentiation and variance, suggesting that CGRP acts postsynaptically. Consistent with this, CGRP hyperpolarized the GABA-A reversal of BNST-AL cells. These results indicate that CGRP increases ST-evoked GABA-A IPSPs and hyperpolarizes their reversal potential through a postsynaptic change in Cl(-) homeostasis. Overall, our findings suggest that CGRP potentiates anxiety-like behaviors and increases neural activity in BNST targets, by inhibiting BNST-AL cells, supporting the conclusion that BNST-AL exerts anxiolytic effects. PMID:24381268

  7. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu-Feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-Bo; Feng, Da-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  8. ROCK inhibition enhances neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by upregulating YAP expression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xu-feng; Ye, Fei; Wang, Yan-bo; Feng, Da-xiong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous axonal regeneration of neurons does not occur after spinal cord injury because of inhibition by myelin and other inhibitory factors. Studies have demonstrated that blocking the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway can promote neurite outgrowth in spinal cord injury models. In the present study, we investigated neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation in neural stem cells from the mouse subventricular zone after inhibition of ROCK in vitro. Inhibition of ROCK with Y-27632 increased neurite length, enhanced neuronal differentiation, and upregulated the expression of two major signaling pathway effectors, phospho-Akt and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the Hippo pathway effector YAP. These results suggest that inhibition of ROCK mediates neurite outgrowth in neural stem cells by activating the Hippo signaling pathway. PMID:27482229

  9. Membrane coordination of receptors and channels mediating the inhibition of neuronal ion currents by ADP.

    PubMed

    Gafar, Hend; Dominguez Rodriguez, Manuel; Chandaka, Giri K; Salzer, Isabella; Boehm, Stefan; Schicker, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    ADP and other nucleotides control ion currents in the nervous system via various P2Y receptors. In this respect, Cav2 and Kv7 channels have been investigated most frequently. The fine tuning of neuronal ion channel gating via G protein coupled receptors frequently relies on the formation of higher order protein complexes that are organized by scaffolding proteins and harbor receptors and channels together with interposed signaling components. However, ion channel complexes containing P2Y receptors have not been described. Therefore, the regulation of Cav2.2 and Kv7.2/7.3 channels via P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors and the coordination of these ion channels and receptors in the plasma membranes of tsA 201 cells have been investigated here. ADP inhibited currents through Cav2.2 channels via both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors with phospholipase C and pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins being involved, respectively. The nucleotide controlled the gating of Kv7 channels only via P2Y1 and phospholipase C. In fluorescence energy transfer assays using conventional as well as total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors were found juxtaposed to Cav2.2 channels, but only P2Y1, and not P2Y12, was in close proximity to Kv7 channels. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching in TIRF microscopy, evidence for a physical interaction was obtained for the pair P2Y12/Cav2.2, but not for any other receptor/channel combination. These results reveal a membrane juxtaposition of P2Y receptors and ion channels in parallel with the control of neuronal ion currents by ADP. This juxtaposition may even result in apparent physical interactions between receptors and channels.

  10. GABAergic inhibition of histaminergic neurons regulates active waking but not the sleep-wake switch or propofol-induced loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Zecharia, Anna Y; Yu, Xiao; Götz, Thomas; Ye, Zhiwen; Carr, David R; Wulff, Peer; Bettler, Bernhard; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Brickley, Stephen G; Franks, Nicholas P; Wisden, William

    2012-09-19

    The activity of histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) of the hypothalamus correlates with an animal's behavioral state and maintains arousal. We examined how GABAergic inputs onto histaminergic neurons regulate this behavior. A prominent hypothesis, the "flip-flop" model, predicts that increased and sustained GABAergic drive onto these cells promotes sleep. Similarly, because of the histaminergic neurons' key hub-like place in the arousal circuitry, it has also been suggested that anesthetics such as propofol induce loss of consciousness by acting primarily at histaminergic neurons. We tested both these hypotheses in mice by genetically removing ionotropic GABA(A) or metabotropic GABA(B) receptors from histidine decarboxylase-expressing neurons. At the cellular level, histaminergic neurons deficient in synaptic GABA(A) receptors were significantly more excitable and were insensitive to the anesthetic propofol. At the behavioral level, EEG profiles were recorded in nontethered mice over 24 h. Surprisingly, GABAergic transmission onto histaminergic neurons had no effect in regulating the natural sleep-wake cycle and, in the case of GABA(A) receptors, for propofol-induced loss of righting reflex. The latter finding makes it unlikely that the histaminergic TMN has a central role in anesthesia. GABA(B) receptors on histaminergic neurons were dispensable for all behaviors examined. Synaptic inhibition of histaminergic cells by GABA(A) receptors, however, was essential for habituation to a novel environment.

  11. GABA and GAD expression in the X-organ sinus gland system of the Procambarus clarkii crayfish: inhibition mediated by GABA between X-organ neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Polanco, Paola; Garduño, Julieta; Cebada, Jorge; Zarco, Natanael; Segovia, José; Lamas, Mónica; García, Ubaldo

    2011-09-01

    In crustaceans, the X-organ-sinus gland (XO-SG) neurosecretory system is formed of distinct populations of neurons that produce two families of neuropeptides: crustacean hyperglycemic hormone and adipokinetic hormone/red pigment-concentrating hormone. On the basis of electrophysiological evidence, it has been proposed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) regulates both electrical and secretory activity of the XO-SG system. In this work we observed that depolarizing current pulses to neurons located in the external rim of the X-organ induced repetitive firing that suppressed the spontaneous firing of previously active X-organ neurons. Picrotoxin reversibly blocked this inhibitory effect suggesting that the GABA released from the stimulated neuron inhibited neighboring cells. Immunoperoxidase in X-organ serial sections showed co-localization of GABA and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) including the aforementioned neurons. Immunofluorescence in whole mount preparations showed that two subpopulations of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-containing neurons colocalized with GABA. The expression of GAD mRNA was determined in crayfish tissue and X-organ single cells by RT-PCR. Bioinformatics analysis shows, within the amplified region, 90.4% consensus and 41.9% identity at the amino acid level compared with Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. We suggest that crustacean hyperglycemic hormone-GABA-containing neurons can regulate the excitability of other X-organ neurons that produce different neurohormones. PMID:21626307

  12. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC(50)=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca(2+) current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPgamma channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPgamma channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  13. The Satiety Signaling Neuropeptide Perisulfakinin Inhibits the Activity of Central Neurons Promoting General Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  14. Functional integration of grafted neural stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons monitored by optogenetics in an in vitro Parkinson model.

    PubMed

    Tønnesen, Jan; Parish, Clare L; Sørensen, Andreas T; Andersson, Angelica; Lundberg, Cecilia; Deisseroth, Karl; Arenas, Ernest; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Merab

    2011-03-04

    Intrastriatal grafts of stem cell-derived dopamine (DA) neurons induce behavioral recovery in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), but how they functionally integrate in host neural circuitries is poorly understood. Here, Wnt5a-overexpressing neural stem cells derived from embryonic ventral mesencephalon of tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP transgenic mice were expanded as neurospheres and transplanted into organotypic cultures of wild type mouse striatum. Differentiated GFP-labeled DA neurons in the grafts exhibited mature neuronal properties, including spontaneous firing of action potentials, presence of post-synaptic currents, and functional expression of DA D₂ autoreceptors. These properties resembled those recorded from identical cells in acute slices of intrastriatal grafts in the 6-hydroxy-DA-induced mouse PD model and from DA neurons in intact substantia nigra. Optogenetic activation or inhibition of grafted cells and host neurons using channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), respectively, revealed complex, bi-directional synaptic interactions between grafted cells and host neurons and extensive synaptic connectivity within the graft. Our data demonstrate for the first time using optogenetics that ectopically grafted stem cell-derived DA neurons become functionally integrated in the DA-denervated striatum. Further optogenetic dissection of the synaptic wiring between grafted and host neurons will be crucial to clarify the cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavioral recovery as well as adverse effects following stem cell-based DA cell replacement strategies in PD.

  15. Tracing Synaptic Connectivity onto Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Isabella; Huang, Longwen; Ung, Kevin; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.

    2012-01-01

    Transsynaptic circuit tracing using genetically modified Rabies virus (RV) is an emerging technology for identifying synaptic connections between neurons. Complementing this methodology, it has become possible to assay the basic molecular and cellular properties of neuronal lineages derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro, and these properties are under intense investigation towards devising cell replacement therapies. Here, we report the generation of a novel mouse ES cell (mESC) line that harbors the genetic elements to allow RV-mediated transsynaptic circuit tracing in ES cell-derived neurons and their synaptic networks. To facilitate transsynaptic tracing, we have engineered a new reporter allele by introducing cDNA encoding tdTomato, the Rabies-G glycoprotein, and the avian TVA receptor into the ROSA26 locus by gene targeting. We demonstrate high-efficiency differentiation of these novel mESCs into functional neurons, show their capacity to functionally connect with primary neuronal cultures as evidenced by immunohistochemistry and electrophysiological recordings, and show their ability to act as source cells for presynaptic tracing of neuronal networks in vitro and in vivo. Together, our data highlight the potential for using genetically engineered stem cells to investigate fundamental mechanisms of synapse and circuit formation with unambiguous identification of presynaptic inputs onto neuronal populations of interest. PMID:22996827

  16. pH-dependent inhibition of tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) channels by diclofenac in rat nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Michiko; Jang, Il-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the treatment of inflammatory pain. It is well established that NSAIDs exert their analgesic effects by inhibiting cyclooxygenase to prevent the production of prostaglandins; however, several NSAIDs including diclofenac also modulate other ion channels expressed in nociceptive neurons. In this study, we investigated the pH-dependent effects of diclofenac on tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channels in rat trigeminal sensory neurons by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Diclofenac decreased the peak amplitude of TTX-R Na(+) currents (INa) in a concentration dependent manner. While diclofenac had little effect on the voltage-activation relationship, it significantly shifted the steady-state fast inactivation relationship toward hyperpolarized potentials. Diclofenac increased the extent of use-dependent inhibition of TTX-R Na(+) currents. Diclofenac also significantly accelerated the development of inactivation and retarded the recovery from inactivation of TTX-R Na(+) channels. The effects of diclofenac on TTX-R Na(+) channels were stronger at pH 6.0 than at pH7.4 for most of the parameters tested. Considering that the extracellular pH falls in inflamed tissues, and that TTX-R Na(+) channels expressed on nociceptive neurons are implicated in the prostaglandin-mediated development and maintenance of inflammatory hyperalgesia, our findings could provide an additional analgesic effect of diclofenac under acidic pH conditions.

  17. A Chemical Screen Identifies Novel Compounds That Overcome Glial-Mediated Inhibition Of Neuronal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Usher, Lynn C.; Johnstone, Andrea; Ertürk, Ali; Hu, Ying; Strikis, Dinara; Wanner, Ina B.; Moorman, Sanne; Lee, Jae-Wook; Min, Jaeki; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Duan, Yuanli; Hoffman, Stanley; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Bradke, Frank; Chang, Young-Tae; Lemmon, Vance P.; Bixby, John L.

    2010-01-01

    A major barrier to regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) axons is the presence of growth-inhibitory proteins associated with myelin and the glial scar. To identify chemical compounds with the ability to overcome the inhibition of regeneration, we screened a novel triazine library, based on the ability of compounds to increase neurite outgrowth from cerebellar neurons on inhibitory myelin substrates. The screen produced 4 “hit compounds”, which act with nM potency on several different neuronal types, and on several distinct substrates relevant to glial inhibition. Moreover, the compounds selectively overcome inhibition rather than promote growth in general. The compounds do not affect neuronal cAMP levels, PKC activity, or EGFR activation. Interestingly, one of the compounds alters microtubule dynamics and increases microtubule density in both fibroblasts and neurons. This same compound promotes regeneration of dorsal column axons after acute lesions, and potentiates regeneration of optic nerve axons after nerve crush in vivo. These compounds should provide insight into the mechanisms through which glial-derived inhibitors of regeneration act, and could lead to the development of novel therapies for CNS injury. PMID:20357120

  18. Abeta(1-42) reduces synapse number and inhibits neurite outgrowth in primary cortical and hippocampal neurons: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nicholas A; Facci, Laura; Owen, Davina E; Soden, Peter E; Burbidge, Stephen A; Prinjha, Rab K; Richardson, Jill C; Skaper, Stephen D

    2008-10-30

    Synaptic loss represents one of the earliest signs of neuronal damage and is observed within both Alzheimer's disease patients and transgenic mouse models of the disease. We have developed a novel in vitro assay using high content screening technology to measure changes in a number of cell physiological parameters simultaneously within a neuronal population. Using Hoechst-33342 to label nuclei, betaIII-tubulin as a neuron-specific marker, and synapsin-I as an indicator of pre-synaptic sites, we have designed software to interrogate triple-labelled images, counting only those synaptic puncta associated with tubulin-positive structures. Here we demonstrate that addition of amyloid beta peptide (Abeta(1-42)), to either primary hippocampal or cortical neurons for 4 days in vitro has deleterious effects upon synapse formation, neurite outgrowth and arborisation in a concentration-dependent manner. Control reverse peptide showed no effect over the same concentration range. The effects of Abeta(1-42) were inhibited by D-KLVFFA, which contains residues 16-20 of Abeta that function as a self-recognition element during Abeta assembly and bind to the homologous region of Abeta and block its oligomerisation. These effects of Abeta(1-42) on synapse number and neurite outgrowth are similar to those described within AD patient pathology and transgenic mouse models.

  19. α-Lipoic acid inhibits sevoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis through PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong; Wang, Xiang; Peng, Peipei; Xiong, Jingwei; Dong, Hongquan; Wang, Lixia; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane is a widely used anaesthetic agent, including in anaesthesia of children and infants. Recent studies indicated that the general anaesthesia might cause the cell apoptosis in the brain. This issue raises the concerns about the neuronal toxicity induced by the application of anaesthetic agents, especially in the infants and young children. In this study, we used Morris water maze, western blotting and immunohistochemistry to elucidate the role of α-lipoic acid in the inhibition of neuronal apoptosis. We found that sevoflurane led to the long-term cognitive impairment in the young rats. This adverse effect may be caused by the neuronal death in the hippocampal region, mediated through PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. We also showed that α-lipoic acid offset the effect of sevoflurane on the neuronal apoptosis and cognitive dysfunction. This study elucidated the potential clinical role of α-lipoic acid, providing a promising way in the prevention and treatment of long-term cognitive impairment induced by sevoflurane general anesthesia.

  20. Genetic Inhibition of CaMKII in Dorsal Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons Reduces Functional Excitatory Synapses and Enhances Intrinsic Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Klug, Jason R.; Mathur, Brian N.; Kash, Thomas L.; Wang, Hui-Dong; Matthews, Robert T.; Robison, A. J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Lovinger, David M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Winder, Danny G.

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is abundant in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). CaMKII is dynamically regulated by changes in dopamine signaling, as occurs in Parkinson's disease as well as addiction. Although CaMKII has been extensively studied in the hippocampus where it regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, relatively little is known about how it modulates neuronal function in the striatum. Therefore, we examined the impact of selectively overexpressing an EGFP-fused CaMKII inhibitory peptide (EAC3I) in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) using a novel transgenic mouse model. EAC3I-expressing cells exhibited markedly decreased excitatory transmission, indicated by a decrease in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). This decrease was not accompanied by changes in the probability of release, levels of glutamate at the synapse, or changes in dendritic spine density. CaMKII regulation of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 is a major means by which the kinase regulates neuronal function in the hippocampus. We found that the decrease in striatal excitatory transmission seen in the EAC3I mice is mimicked by deletion of GluA1. Further, while CaMKII inhibition decreased excitatory transmission onto MSNs, it increased their intrinsic excitability. These data suggest that CaMKII plays a critical role in setting the excitability rheostat of striatal MSNs by coordinating excitatory synaptic drive and the resulting depolarization response. PMID:23028932

  1. Neuroprotective effects of sevoflurane against electromagnetic pulse-induced brain injury through inhibition of neuronal oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bin; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Jin; Han, Li-Chun; Li, Li-Ya; Wu, Guang-Li; Hou, Yan-Ning; Guo, Guo-Zhen; Wang, Qiang; Sang, Han-Fei; Xu, Li-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) causes central nervous system damage and neurobehavioral disorders, and sevoflurane protects the brain from ischemic injury. We investigated the effects of sevoflurane on EMP-induced brain injury. Rats were exposed to EMP and immediately treated with sevoflurane. The protective effects of sevoflurane were assessed by Nissl staining, Fluoro-Jade C staining and electron microscopy. The neurobehavioral effects were assessed using the open-field test and the Morris water maze. Finally, primary cerebral cortical neurons were exposed to EMP and incubated with different concentration of sevoflurane. The cellular viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) level were assayed. TUNEL staining was performed, and the expression of apoptotic markers was determined. The cerebral cortexes of EMP-exposed rats presented neuronal abnormalities. Sevoflurane alleviated these effects, as well as the learning and memory deficits caused by EMP exposure. In vitro, cell viability was reduced and LDH release was increased after EMP exposure; treatment with sevoflurane ameliorated these effects. Additionally, sevoflurane increased SOD activity, decreased MDA levels and alleviated neuronal apoptosis by regulating the expression of cleaved caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2. These findings demonstrate that Sevoflurane conferred neuroprotective effects against EMP radiation-induced brain damage by inhibiting neuronal oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  2. Interaction of leech neurons with topographical gratings: comparison with rodent and human neuronal lines and primary cells

    PubMed Central

    Tonazzini, Ilaria; Pellegrini, Monica; Pellegrino, Mario; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Controlling and improving neuronal cell migration and neurite outgrowth are critical elements of tissue engineering applications and development of artificial neuronal interfaces. To this end, a promising approach exploits nano/microstructured surfaces, which have been demonstrated to be capable of tuning neuronal differentiation, polarity, migration and neurite orientation. Here, we investigate the neurite contact guidance of leech neurons on plastic gratings (GRs; anisotropic topographies composed of alternating lines of grooves and ridges). By high-resolution microscopy, we quantitatively evaluate the changes in tubulin cytoskeleton organization and cell morphology and in the neurite and growth cone development. The topography-reading process of leech neurons on GRs is mediated by filopodia and is more responsive to 4-µm-period GRs than to smaller period GRs. Leech neuron behaviour on GRs is finally compared and validated with several other neuronal cells, from murine differentiated embryonic stem cells and primary hippocampal neurons to differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. PMID:24501675

  3. Propofol protects hippocampal neurons from apoptosis in ischemic brain injury by increasing GLT-1 expression and inhibiting the activation of NMDAR via the JNK/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hong-Yan; Zheng, Fang; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Xi-Yan; Liu, Jing-Jing; Yue, Xiu-Qin

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic brain injury (IBI) can cause nerve injury and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The neuroprotective effects of propofol against IBI have been previously demonstrated. However, the neuroprotective effects of propofol on hippocampal neurons are not yet entirely clear. In the present study, models of IBI were established in hypoxia-exposed hippocampal neuronal cells. Cell viability assay and apoptosis assay were performed to examine the neuroprotective effects of propofol on hippocampal neurons in IBI. A significant decrease in cell viability and a significant increase in cell apoptosis were observed in the IBI group compared with the control group, accompanied by a decrease in glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT‑1) expression as determined by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis. The effects of IBI were reversed by propofol treatment. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of GLT‑1 in the hypoxia-exposed hippocampal neuronal cells led to an increase in cell apoptosis, Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation and N-methyl-D‑aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NR1 and NR2B) activation, as well as to a decrease in cell viability and a decrease in Akt activation. The effects of RNA interference-mediated GLT‑1 gene silencing on cell viability, JNK activation, NMDAR activation, cell apoptosis and Akt activation in the hippocampal neuronal cells were slightly reversed by propofol treatment. The JNK agonist, anisomycin, and the Akt inhibitor, LY294002, both significantly blocked the effects of propofol on hippocampal neuronal cell viability and apoptosis in IBI. The decrease in JNK activation and the increase in Akt activation caused by GLT‑1 overexpression were reversed by NMDA. Collectively, our findings suggest that propofol treatment protects hippocampal neurons against IBI by enhancing GLT‑1 expression and inhibiting the activation of NMDAR via the JNK/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:27430327

  4. Balance between excitation and inhibition controls the temporal organization of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, F; Herrmann, H J; Perrone-Capano, C; Plenz, D; de Arcangelis, L

    2012-06-01

    Neuronal avalanches, measured in vitro and in vivo, exhibit a robust critical behavior. Their temporal organization hides the presence of correlations. Here we present experimental measurements of the waiting time distribution between successive avalanches in the rat cortex in vitro. This exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior not usually found in other natural processes. Numerical simulations provide evidence that this behavior is a consequence of the alternation between states of high and low activity, named up and down states, leading to a balance between excitation and inhibition controlled by a single parameter. During these periods, both the single neuron state and the network excitability level, keeping memory of past activity, are tuned by homeostatic mechanisms.

  5. Regulation of ceramide-induced neuronal death: cell metabolism meets neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Gonzalo; Morales, Luis Carlos; Benítez, Bruno; Arboleda, Humberto

    2009-03-01

    The present review explores the role of ceramides in neuronal apoptosis, as well as the recent discovery of the signaling pathways involved in this process placing particular emphasis on the correlation between cellular metabolism and neuronal death. Endogenous levels of ceramides are increased following various pro-apoptotic stimuli which have been identified as potential causes of chronic and acute neurodegenerative diseases. Ceramides induce changes in multiple enzymes and cell signaling components. The early inhibition of the neuronal survival pathway regulated by phosphatidil-inositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B or AKT mediated by ceramide may be a relevant early event in the decision of neuronal survival/death. It may perturb several molecular and metabolic functions. In particular it might decrease glycolysis through rapid modulation of hexokinase activity. This would in turn generate limited amounts of mitochondrial substrates leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal apoptosis. Subtle and early metabolic alterations caused by inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway mediated by ceramide may potentially work with genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Together they may be determinant steps in downstream events leading to neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, reinforcement of the PI3K/AKT pathway could constitute an important neuroprotective strategy.

  6. De novo KCNB1 mutations in infantile epilepsy inhibit repetitive neuronal firing

    PubMed Central

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Akita, Tenpei; Tohyama, Jun; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Kobayashi, Yu; Cohen, Roni; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Ohba, Chihiro; Miyatake, Satoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Fukuda, Atsuo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv2.1 potassium channel encoded by KCNB1 produces the major delayed rectifier potassium current in pyramidal neurons. Recently, de novo heterozygous missense KCNB1 mutations have been identified in three patients with epileptic encephalopathy and a patient with neurodevelopmental disorder. However, the frequency of KCNB1 mutations in infantile epileptic patients and their effects on neuronal activity are yet unknown. We searched whole exome sequencing data of a total of 437 patients with infantile epilepsy, and found novel de novo heterozygous missense KCNB1 mutations in two patients showing psychomotor developmental delay and severe infantile generalized seizures with high-amplitude spike-and-wave electroencephalogram discharges. The mutation located in the channel voltage sensor (p.R306C) disrupted sensitivity and cooperativity of the sensor, while the mutation in the channel pore domain (p.G401R) selectively abolished endogenous Kv2 currents in transfected pyramidal neurons, indicating a dominant-negative effect. Both mutants inhibited repetitive neuronal firing through preventing production of deep interspike voltages. Thus KCNB1 mutations can be a rare genetic cause of infantile epilepsy, and insufficient firing of pyramidal neurons would disturb both development and stability of neuronal circuits, leading to the disease phenotypes. PMID:26477325

  7. Reelin-dependent ApoER2 downregulation uncouples newborn neurons from progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, F. Javier; Luque-Río, Álvaro; Sakakibara, Akira; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Miyata, Takaki; Luque, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Reelin and its receptor machinery are well known to be required for the migration and positioning of neocortical projection neurons. More recently, reelin has been shown both necessary and sufficient to determine the rate of neocortical neurogenesis. The molecular links underlying its seemingly distinct proliferative and post-proliferative functions remain unknown. Here we reveal an enriched expression of functional reelin receptors, largely of Apolipoprotein E Receptor 2 (ApoER2), in radial glia basal processes and intermediate progenitor cells during mid/late cortical development. In vivo, ApoER2 overexpression inhibits neuronal migration. In contrast, precluding excessive levels of ApoER2 in reelin-deficient cortices, by either ApoER2 knock-down or the transgenic expression of reelin in neural progenitor cells, improves neuronal migration and positioning. Our study provides groundwork for the highly orchestrated clearance of neocortical neurons from their birth site, suggesting that a reelin-dependent ApoER2 downregulation mechanism uncouples newborn neurons from progenitor cells, thereby enabling neurons to migrate. PMID:23259060

  8. Cholecystokinin-immunoreactive cells form symmetrical synaptic contacts with pyramidal and nonpyramidal neurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nunzi, M G; Gorio, A; Milan, F; Freund, T F; Somogyi, P; Smith, A D

    1985-07-22

    The ultrastructural features and synaptic relationships of cholecystokinin (CCK)-immunoreactive cells of rat and cat hippocampus were studied using the unlabeled antibody immunoperoxidase technique and correlated light and electron microscopy. CCK-positive perikarya of variable shape and size were distributed in all layers and were particularly concentrated in stratum pyramidale and radiatum: the CCK-immunoreactive neurons were nonpyramidal in shape and the three most common types had the morphological features of tufted, bipolar, and multipolar cells. Electron microscopic examination revealed that all the CCK-positive boutons established symmetrical (Gray's type II) synaptic contacts with perikarya and dendrites of pyramidal and nonpyramidal neurons. The origin of some of the boutons was established by tracing fine collaterals that arose from the main axon of two CCK-immunostained cells and terminated in the stratum pyramidale; these collaterals were then examined in the electron microscope. The axon of one such neuron exhibited a course parallel to the pyramidal layer and formed pericellular nets of synaptic boutons upon the perikarya of pyramidal neurons. This pattern of axonal arborization is very similar to that of some of the basket cells, previously suggested to be the anatomical correlate for pyramidal cell inhibition. Typical dendrites of pyramidal cells also received symmetrical synaptic contacts from CCK-immunoreactive boutons, and some of these boutons could be shown to originate from a local neuron in stratum radiatum. Many CCK-immunoreactive cells received CCK-labeled boutons upon their soma and dendritic shafts. Synaptic relationship, established by multiple "en passant" boutons, was observed between CCK-positive interneurons of the stratum lacunosum-moleculare and radiatum. The soma and dendrites of the CCK-immunostained neurons also received symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses from nonimmunoreactive boutons. These results indicate that the CCK

  9. Bradykinin-induced inhibition of proliferation rate during neurosphere differentiation: consequence or cause of neuronal enrichment?

    PubMed

    Pillat, Micheli M; Cheffer, Arquimedes; de Andrade, Cinthia M; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Ulrich, Henning

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glial cells, being responsible for embryonic and postnatal development of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as for regeneration in the adult brain. These cells also play a key role in maintaining the physiological integrity of the CNS in face of injury or disease. The previous study has demonstrated that bradykinin (BK) treatment simultaneously induces neuronal enrichment (indicating that BK contributes to neurogenesis) and reduced proliferation rates during in vitro differentiation of rat embryonic telencephalon neural precursor cells (NPCs). Here, we provide a mechanism for the unresolved question whether (i) the low rate of proliferation is owed to enhanced neurogenesis or, conversely, (ii) the alteration of the population ratio could result from low proliferation of NPCs and glial cells. In agreement with the previous study, BK promoted neuron-specific β3-tubulin and MAP2 expression in differentiating embryonic mouse neurospheres, whereas glial protein expression and global proliferation rates decreased. Furthermore, BK augmented the global frequency of cells in G0 -phase of cell cycle after differentiation. Heterogeneous cell populations were observed at this stage, including neurons that always remaining a quiescent state (G0 -phase). It is noteworthy that BK did not interfere with proliferation of any particular cell type, evidenced by coimmunostaining for nestin, β3-tubulin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Thus, we conclude that neuronal enrichment is owing only to the fostering of neurogenesis, and that the low proliferation rate on the seventh day of differentiation is a consequence and not the cause of BK-induced neuronal enrichment.

  10. Inhibition of A5 Neurons Facilitates the Occurrence of REM Sleep-Like Episodes in Urethane-Anesthetized Rats: A New Role for Noradrenergic A5 Neurons?

    PubMed

    Fenik, Victor B; Marchenko, Vitaliy; Davies, Richard O; Kubin, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    When rapid eye movement (REM) sleep occurs, noradrenergic cells become silent, with the abolition of activity in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons seen as a key event permissive for the occurrence of REM sleep. However, it is not known whether silencing of other than LC noradrenergic neurons contributes to the generation of REM sleep. In urethane-anesthetized rats, stereotyped REM sleep-like episodes can be repeatedly elicited by injections of the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, into a discrete region of the dorsomedial pons. We used this preparation to test whether inhibition of ventrolateral pontine noradrenergic A5 neurons only, or together with LC neurons, also can elicit REM sleep-like effects. To silence noradrenergic cells, we sequentially injected the α(2)-adrenergic agonist clonidine (20-40 nl, 0.75 mM) into both A5 regions and then the LC. In two rats, successful bilateral clonidine injections into the A5 region elicited the characteristic REM sleep-like episodes (hippocampal theta rhythm, suppression of hypoglossal nerve activity, reduced respiratory rate). In five rats, bilateral clonidine injections into the A5 region and then into one LC triggered REM sleep-like episodes, and in two rats injections into both A5 and then both LC were needed to elicit the effect. In contrast, in three rats, uni- or bilateral clonidine injections only into the LC had no effect, and clonidine injections placed in another six rats outside of the A5 and/or LC regions were without effect. The REM sleep-like episodes elicited by clonidine had similar magnitude of suppression of hypoglossal nerve activity (by 75%), similar pattern of hippocampal changes, and similar durations (2.5-5.3 min) to the episodes triggered in the same preparation by carbachol injections into the dorsomedial pontine reticular formation. Thus, silencing of A5 cells may importantly enable the occurrence of REM sleep-like episodes, at least under anesthesia. This is a new role for noradrenergic A5

  11. Inhibition of A5 Neurons Facilitates the Occurrence of REM Sleep-Like Episodes in Urethane-Anesthetized Rats: A New Role for Noradrenergic A5 Neurons?

    PubMed Central

    Fenik, Victor B.; Marchenko, Vitaliy; Davies, Richard O.; Kubin, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    When rapid eye movement (REM) sleep occurs, noradrenergic cells become silent, with the abolition of activity in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons seen as a key event permissive for the occurrence of REM sleep. However, it is not known whether silencing of other than LC noradrenergic neurons contributes to the generation of REM sleep. In urethane-anesthetized rats, stereotyped REM sleep-like episodes can be repeatedly elicited by injections of the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, into a discrete region of the dorsomedial pons. We used this preparation to test whether inhibition of ventrolateral pontine noradrenergic A5 neurons only, or together with LC neurons, also can elicit REM sleep-like effects. To silence noradrenergic cells, we sequentially injected the α2-adrenergic agonist clonidine (20–40 nl, 0.75 mM) into both A5 regions and then the LC. In two rats, successful bilateral clonidine injections into the A5 region elicited the characteristic REM sleep-like episodes (hippocampal theta rhythm, suppression of hypoglossal nerve activity, reduced respiratory rate). In five rats, bilateral clonidine injections into the A5 region and then into one LC triggered REM sleep-like episodes, and in two rats injections into both A5 and then both LC were needed to elicit the effect. In contrast, in three rats, uni- or bilateral clonidine injections only into the LC had no effect, and clonidine injections placed in another six rats outside of the A5 and/or LC regions were without effect. The REM sleep-like episodes elicited by clonidine had similar magnitude of suppression of hypoglossal nerve activity (by 75%), similar pattern of hippocampal changes, and similar durations (2.5–5.3 min) to the episodes triggered in the same preparation by carbachol injections into the dorsomedial pontine reticular formation. Thus, silencing of A5 cells may importantly enable the occurrence of REM sleep-like episodes, at least under anesthesia. This is a new role for noradrenergic A5

  12. Cannabinoids Inhibit Acid-Sensing Ion Channel Currents in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chun-Yu; Cai, Qi; Zou, Pengcheng; Wu, Heming; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Local acidosis has been found in various pain-generating conditions such as inflammation and tissue injury. Cannabinoids exert a powerful inhibitory control over pain initiation via peripheral cognate receptors. However, the peripheral molecular targets responsible for the antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. WIN55,212-2 dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. WIN55,212-2 shifted the proton concentration–response curve downwards, with an decrease of 48.6±3.7% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the EC50 value. The inhibition of proton-gated current induced by WIN55,212-2 was almost completely blocked by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM 281, but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Pretreatment of forskolin, an AC activator, and the addition of cAMP also reversed the inhibition of WIN55,212-2. Moreover, WIN55,212-2 altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, WIN55,212-2 attenuated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in rats. These results suggest that WIN55,212-2 inhibits the activity of ASICs via CB1 receptor and cAMP dependent pathway in rat primary sensory neurons. Thus, cannabinoids can exert their analgesic action by interaction with ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which was novel analgesic mechanism of cannabinoids. PMID:23029075

  13. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27181061

  14. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  15. Pyramidal cells make specific connections onto smooth (GABAergic) neurons in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Rita; Maçarico da Costa, Nuno; Kampa, Björn M; Martin, Kevan A C; Roth, Morgane M

    2014-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of neocortical circuits is the predominance of recurrent excitation between pyramidal neurons, which is balanced by recurrent inhibition from smooth GABAergic neurons. It has been previously described that in layer 2/3 of primary visual cortex (V1) of cat and monkey, pyramidal cells filled with horseradish peroxidase connect approximately in proportion to the spiny (excitatory, 95% and 81%, respectively) and smooth (GABAergic, 5% and 19%, respectively) dendrites found in the neuropil. By contrast, a recent ultrastructural study of V1 in a single mouse found that smooth neurons formed 51% of the targets of the superficial layer pyramidal cells. This suggests that either the neuropil of this particular mouse V1 had a dramatically different composition to that of V1 in cat and monkey, or that smooth neurons were specifically targeted by the pyramidal cells in that mouse. We tested these hypotheses by examining similar cells filled with biocytin in a sample of five mice. We found that the average composition of the neuropil in V1 of these mice was similar to that described for cat and monkey V1, but that the superficial layer pyramidal cells do form proportionately more synapses with smooth dendrites than the equivalent neurons in cat or monkey. These distributions may underlie the distinct differences in functional architecture of V1 between rodent and higher mammals.

  16. Requirement of neuronal connexin36 in pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition of primary afferents in functionally mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Wendy; Nagy, James I; Dai, Yue; McCrea, David A

    2012-01-01

    Electrical synapses formed by gap junctions containing connexin36 (Cx36) promote synchronous activity of interneurones in many regions of mammalian brain; however, there is limited information on the role of electrical synapses in spinal neuronal networks. Here we show that Cx36 is widely distributed in the spinal cord and is involved in mechanisms that govern presynaptic inhibition of primary afferent terminals. Electrophysiological recordings were made in spinal cord preparations from 8- to 11-day-old wild-type and Cx36 knockout mice. Several features associated with presynaptic inhibition evoked by conditioning stimulation of low threshold hindlimb afferents were substantially compromised in Cx36 knockout mice. Dorsal root potentials (DRPs) evoked by low intensity stimulation of sensory afferents were reduced in amplitude by 79% and in duration by 67% in Cx36 knockouts. DRPs were similarly affected in wild-types by bath application of gap junction blockers. Consistent with presynaptic inhibition of group Ia muscle spindle afferent terminals on motoneurones described in adult cats, conditioning stimulation of an adjacent dorsal root evoked a long duration inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes recorded from the ventral root in wild-type mice, and this inhibition was antagonized by bicuculline. The same conditioning stimulation failed to inhibit monosynaptic reflexes in Cx36 knockout mice. Immunofluorescence labelling for Cx36 was found throughout the dorsal and ventral horns of the spinal cord of juvenile mice and persisted in mature animals. In deep dorsal horn laminae, where interneurones involved in presynaptic inhibition of large diameter muscle afferents are located, cells were extensively dye-coupled following intracellular neurobiotin injection. Coupled cells displayed Cx36-positive puncta along their processes. Our results indicate that gap junctions formed by Cx36 in spinal cord are required for maintenance of presynaptic inhibition, including the

  17. Progranulin is expressed within motor neurons and promotes neuronal cell survival

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Progranulin is a secreted high molecular weight growth factor bearing seven and one half copies of the cysteine-rich granulin-epithelin motif. While inappropriate over-expression of the progranulin gene has been associated with many cancers, haploinsufficiency leads to atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes and development of a form of dementia (frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin positive inclusions, FTLD-U) associated with the formation of ubiquitinated inclusions. Recent reports indicate that progranulin has neurotrophic effects, which, if confirmed would make progranulin the only neuroprotective growth factor that has been associated genetically with a neurological disease in humans. Preliminary studies indicated high progranulin gene expression in spinal cord motor neurons. However, it is uncertain what the role of Progranulin is in normal or diseased motor neuron function. We have investigated progranulin gene expression and subcellular localization in cultured mouse embryonic motor neurons and examined the effect of progranulin over-expression and knockdown in the NSC-34 immortalized motor neuron cell line upon proliferation and survival. Results In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical techniques revealed that the progranulin gene is highly expressed by motor neurons within the mouse spinal cord and in primary cultures of dissociated mouse embryonic spinal cord-dorsal root ganglia. Confocal microscopy coupled to immunocytochemistry together with the use of a progranulin-green fluorescent protein fusion construct revealed progranulin to be located within compartments of the secretory pathway including the Golgi apparatus. Stable transfection of the human progranulin gene into the NSC-34 motor neuron cell line stimulates the appearance of dendritic structures and provides sufficient trophic stimulus to survive serum deprivation for long periods (up to two months). This is mediated at least in part through an anti-apoptotic mechanism

  18. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  19. Lysophosphatidylethanolamine increases intracellular Ca(2+) through LPA(1) in PC-12 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Min; Park, Soo-Jin; Im, Dong-Soon

    2015-05-29

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been implicated in lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE)-induced increases in intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i), but in different cell types, this response may be dependent or independent of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) GPCR. The effects of LPEs from Grifola frondosa on the neuronal differentiation and apoptosis of PC-12 neuronal cells have been previously reported. In the present study, the authors sought to identify the mechanism responsible for the effects of LPEs in PC-12 neuronal cells. LPE increase [Ca(2+)]i concentration-dependently in PC-12 neuronal cells, but this LPE-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was less than that elicited by LPA. Studies using specific inhibitors showed that LPE-induced Ca(2+) response was mediated via pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o proteins, edelfosine-sensitive phospholipase C, and 2-APB-sensitive IP3 receptor and by Ca(2+) influx across the cell membrane, and that this did not involve the conversion of LPE to LPA. Furthermore, LPE- and LPA-induced responses were found to show homologous and heterologous desensitization in PC-12 cells. VPC32183 and Ki16425 (antagonists of LPA1 and LPA3) inhibited LPE-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. Furthermore, AM-095 (a specific inhibitor of LPA1) inhibited LPE-induced Ca(2+) response completely in PC-12 cells. These findings indicate LPE increases [Ca(2+)]i via a LPA1/Gi/o proteins/phospholipase C/IP3/Ca(2+) rise/Ca(2+) influx pathway in PC-12 neuronal cells. PMID:25888792

  20. Independent controls for neocortical neuron production and histogenetic cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verney, C.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    2000-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of cells eliminated by histogenetic cell death during the first 2 postnatal weeks in areas 1, 3 and 40 of the mouse parietal neocortex. For each layer and for the subcortical white matter in each neocortical area, the number of dying cells per mm(2) was calculated and the proportionate cell death for each day of the 2-week interval was estimated. The data show that cell death proceeds essentially uniformly across the neocortical areas and layers and that it does not follow either the spatiotemporal gradient of cell cycle progression in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium of the cerebral wall, the source of neocortical neurons, or the 'inside-out' neocortical neuronogenetic sequence. Therefore, we infer that the control mechanisms of neocortical histogenetic cell death are independent of mechanisms controlling neuronogenesis or neuronal migration but may be associated with the ingrowth, expansion and a system-wide matching of neuronal connectivity. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Instructing Perisomatic Inhibition by Direct Lineage Reprogramming of Neocortical Projection Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhanlei; Mostajo-Radji, Mohammed A; Brown, Juliana R; Rouaux, Caroline; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Hensch, Takao K; Arlotta, Paola

    2015-11-01

    During development of the cerebral cortex, local GABAergic interneurons recognize and pair with excitatory projection neurons to ensure the fine excitatory-inhibitory balance essential for proper circuit function. Whether the class-specific identity of projection neurons has a role in the establishment of afferent inhibitory synapses is debated. Here, we report that direct in vivo lineage reprogramming of layer 2/3 (L2/3) callosal projection neurons (CPNs) into induced corticofugal projection neurons (iCFuPNs) increases inhibitory input onto the converted neurons to levels similar to that of endogenous CFuPNs normally found in layer 5 (L5). iCFuPNs recruit increased numbers of inhibitory perisomatic synapses from parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, with single-cell precision and despite their ectopic location in L2/3. The data show that individual reprogrammed excitatory projection neurons extrinsically modulate afferent input by local PV(+) interneurons, suggesting that projection neuron class-specific identity can actively control the wiring of the cortical microcircuit.

  2. Glycine and Glycine Receptor Signalling in Non-Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    den Eynden, Jimmy Van; Ali, Sheen Saheb; Horwood, Nikki; Carmans, Sofie; Brône, Bert; Hellings, Niels; Steels, Paul; Harvey, Robert J.; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter acting mainly in the caudal part of the central nervous system. Besides this neurotransmitter function, glycine has cytoprotective and modulatory effects in different non-neuronal cell types. Modulatory effects were mainly described in immune cells, endothelial cells and macroglial cells, where glycine modulates proliferation, differentiation, migration and cytokine production. Activation of glycine receptors (GlyRs) causes membrane potential changes that in turn modulate calcium flux and downstream effects in these cells. Cytoprotective effects were mainly described in renal cells, hepatocytes and endothelial cells, where glycine protects cells from ischemic cell death. In these cell types, glycine has been suggested to stabilize porous defects that develop in the plasma membranes of ischemic cells, leading to leakage of macromolecules and subsequent cell death. Although there is some evidence linking these effects to the activation of GlyRs, they seem to operate in an entirely different mode from classical neuronal subtypes. PMID:19738917

  3. Sambucus williamsii induced embryonic stem cells differentiated into neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Chien-Yu; Fu, Ru-Huei; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Shih-Yin; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Shyu, Woei-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    The pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into any cell type, thus making them the focus of many clinical application studies. However, the efficiency of ESCs differentiated into neurons needs to improve. In this study, we tried to increase efficiently to a neural fate in the presence of various transitional Chinese medicines through a three-step differentiation strategy. From extracts of 10 transitional Chinese medicine candidates, we determined that Sambucus williamsii (SW) extract triggers the up-regulation of Nestin and Tuj1 (neuron cells markers) gene expression levels. After determining the different concentrations of SW extract, the number of neurons in the 200 μg/ml SW extract group was higher than the control, 50, 100, and 400 μg/ml SW extract groups. In addition, the number of neurons in the 200 μg/ml SW extract group was higher and higher after each time passage (three times). We also detected the Oct4, Sox2 (stem cells markers), Tuj1, and Nestin genes expression levels by RT-PCR. In the differentiated process, Oct4 and Sox2 genes decreased while the Tuj1 and Nestin genes expression levels increased. In summary, we demonstrated that SW could induce pluripotent stem cells differentiated into neurons. Thus, SW might become a powerful material for neurons-differentiating strategies.

  4. REST Regulates Non–Cell-Autonomous Neuronal Differentiation and Maturation of Neural Progenitor Cells via Secretogranin II

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Denli, Ahmet M.; Wright, Rebecca; Baul, Tithi D.; Clemenson, Gregory D.; Morcos, Ari S.; Zhao, Chunmei; Schafer, Simon T.

    2015-01-01

    RE-1 silencing transcription factor (REST), a master negative regulator of neuronal differentiation, controls neurogenesis by preventing the differentiation of neural stem cells. Here we focused on the role of REST in the early steps of differentiation and maturation of adult hippocampal progenitors (AHPs). REST knockdown promoted differentiation and affected the maturation of rat AHPs. Surprisingly, REST knockdown cells enhanced the differentiation of neighboring wild-type AHPs, suggesting that REST may play a non–cell-autonomous role. Gene expression analysis identified Secretogranin II (Scg2) as the major secreted REST target responsible for the non–cell-autonomous phenotype. Loss-of-function of Scg2 inhibited differentiation in vitro, and exogenous SCG2 partially rescued this phenotype. Knockdown of REST in neural progenitors in mice led to precocious maturation into neurons at the expense of mushroom spines in vivo. In summary, we found that, in addition to its cell-autonomous function, REST regulates differentiation and maturation of AHPs non–cell-autonomously via SCG2. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our results reveal that REST regulates differentiation and maturation of neural progenitor cells in vitro by orchestrating both cell-intrinsic and non–cell-autonomous factors and that Scg2 is a major secretory target of REST with a differentiation-enhancing activity in a paracrine manner. In vivo, REST depletion causes accelerated differentiation of newborn neurons at the expense of spine defects, suggesting a potential role for REST in the timing of the maturation of granule neurons. PMID:26538656

  5. 5-HT1B receptors inhibit glutamate release from primary afferent terminals in rat medullary dorsal horn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Choi, I-S; Cho, J-H; An, C-H; Jung, J-K; Hur, Y-K; Choi, J-K; Jang, I-S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although 5-HT1B receptors are expressed in trigeminal sensory neurons, it is still not known whether these receptors can modulate nociceptive transmission from primary afferents onto medullary dorsal horn neurons. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were recorded from medullary dorsal horn neurons of rat horizontal brain stem slices using a conventional whole-cell patch clamp technique under a voltage-clamp condition. KEY RESULTS CP93129, a selective 5-HT1B receptor agonist, reversibly and concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic EPSCs and increased the paired-pulse ratio. In addition, CP93129 reduced the frequency of spontaneous miniature EPSCs without affecting the current amplitude. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by GR55562, a 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, but not LY310762, a 5-HT1D receptor antagonist. Sumatriptan, an anti-migraine drug, also decreased EPSC amplitude, and this effect was partially blocked by either GR55562 or LY310762. On the other hand, primary afferent-evoked EPSCs were mediated by the Ca2+ influx passing through both presynaptic N-type and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. The CP93129-induced inhibition of EPSCs was significantly occluded by ω-conotoxin GVIA, an N-type Ca2+ channel blocker. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The present results suggest that the activation of presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors reduces glutamate release from primary afferent terminals onto medullary dorsal horn neurons, and that 5-HT1B receptors could be, at the very least, a potential target for the treatment of pain from orofacial tissues. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Connor, pp. 353–355 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.01963.x PMID:22462474

  6. Medium-chain fatty acids inhibit mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes promoting astrocyte-neuron lactate and ketone body shuttle systems.

    PubMed

    Thevenet, Jonathan; De Marchi, Umberto; Domingo, Jaime Santo; Christinat, Nicolas; Bultot, Laurent; Lefebvre, Gregory; Sakamoto, Kei; Descombes, Patrick; Masoodi, Mojgan; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides have been used as part of a ketogenic diet effective in reducing epileptic episodes. The health benefits of the derived medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are thought to result from the stimulation of liver ketogenesis providing fuel for the brain. We tested whether MCFAs have direct effects on energy metabolism in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human astrocytes and neurons. Using single-cell imaging, we observed an acute pronounced reduction of the mitochondrial electrical potential and a concomitant drop of the NAD(P)H signal in astrocytes, but not in neurons. Despite the observed effects on mitochondrial function, MCFAs did not lower intracellular ATP levels or activate the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase. ATP concentrations in astrocytes were unaltered, even when blocking the respiratory chain, suggesting compensation through accelerated glycolysis. The MCFA decanoic acid (300 μM) promoted glycolysis and augmented lactate formation by 49.6%. The shorter fatty acid octanoic acid (300 μM) did not affect glycolysis but increased the rates of astrocyte ketogenesis 2.17-fold compared with that of control cells. MCFAs may have brain health benefits through the modulation of astrocyte metabolism leading to activation of shuttle systems that provide fuel to neighboring neurons in the form of lactate and ketone bodies.-Thevenet, J., De Marchi, U., Santo Domingo, J., Christinat, N., Bultot, L., Lefebvre, G., Sakamoto, K., Descombes, P., Masoodi, M., Wiederkehr, A. Medium-chain fatty acids inhibit mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes promoting astrocyte-neuron lactate and ketone body shuttle systems.

  7. EWS and RE1-Silencing Transcription Factor Inhibit Neuronal Phenotype Development and Oncogenic Transformation in Ewing Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Savita; Gomez, Nicholas C; Bell, Russell; Patel, Mukund; Davis, Ian J; Lessnick, Stephen L; Luo, Wen

    2013-05-01

    The gene encoding EWS (EWSR1) is involved in various chromosomal translocations that cause the production of oncoproteins responsible for multiple cancers including Ewing sarcoma, myxoid liposarcoma, soft tissue clear cell sarcoma, and desmoplastic small round cell sarcoma. It is well known that EWS fuses to FLI to create EWS/FLI, which is the abnormal transcription factor that drives tumor development in Ewing sarcoma. However, the role of wild-type EWS in Ewing sarcoma pathogenesis remains unclear. In the current study, we identified EWS-regulated genes and cellular processes through RNA interference combined with RNA sequencing and functional annotation analyses. Interestingly, we found that EWS and EWS/FLI co-regulate a significant cluster of genes, indicating an interplay between the 2 proteins in regulating cellular functions. We found that among the EWS-down-regulated genes are a subset of neuronal genes that contain binding sites for the RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST or neuron-restrictive silencer factor [NRSF]), neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE), suggesting a cooperative interaction between REST and EWS in gene regulation. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that EWS interacts directly with REST. Genome-wide binding analysis showed that EWS binds chromatin at or near NRSE. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that both EWS and REST inhibit neuronal phenotype development and oncogenic transformation in Ewing sarcoma cells. Our data implicate an important role of EWS in the development of Ewing sarcoma phenotype and highlight a potential value in modulating EWS function in the treatment of Ewing sarcoma and other EWS translocation-based cancers. PMID:24069508

  8. Medium-chain fatty acids inhibit mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes promoting astrocyte-neuron lactate and ketone body shuttle systems.

    PubMed

    Thevenet, Jonathan; De Marchi, Umberto; Domingo, Jaime Santo; Christinat, Nicolas; Bultot, Laurent; Lefebvre, Gregory; Sakamoto, Kei; Descombes, Patrick; Masoodi, Mojgan; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Medium-chain triglycerides have been used as part of a ketogenic diet effective in reducing epileptic episodes. The health benefits of the derived medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) are thought to result from the stimulation of liver ketogenesis providing fuel for the brain. We tested whether MCFAs have direct effects on energy metabolism in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human astrocytes and neurons. Using single-cell imaging, we observed an acute pronounced reduction of the mitochondrial electrical potential and a concomitant drop of the NAD(P)H signal in astrocytes, but not in neurons. Despite the observed effects on mitochondrial function, MCFAs did not lower intracellular ATP levels or activate the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase. ATP concentrations in astrocytes were unaltered, even when blocking the respiratory chain, suggesting compensation through accelerated glycolysis. The MCFA decanoic acid (300 μM) promoted glycolysis and augmented lactate formation by 49.6%. The shorter fatty acid octanoic acid (300 μM) did not affect glycolysis but increased the rates of astrocyte ketogenesis 2.17-fold compared with that of control cells. MCFAs may have brain health benefits through the modulation of astrocyte metabolism leading to activation of shuttle systems that provide fuel to neighboring neurons in the form of lactate and ketone bodies.-Thevenet, J., De Marchi, U., Santo Domingo, J., Christinat, N., Bultot, L., Lefebvre, G., Sakamoto, K., Descombes, P., Masoodi, M., Wiederkehr, A. Medium-chain fatty acids inhibit mitochondrial metabolism in astrocytes promoting astrocyte-neuron lactate and ketone body shuttle systems. PMID:26839375

  9. Effects of low doses of Tat-PIM2 protein against hippocampal neuronal cell survival.

    PubMed

    Woo, Su Jung; Shin, Min Jea; Kim, Dae Won; Jo, Hyo Sang; In Yong, Ji; Ryu, Eun Ji; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Park, Sungyeon; Im, Seung Kwon; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2015-11-15

    Oxidative stress is considered a major factor in various neuronal diseases including ischemia-reperfusion injury. Proviral Integration Moloney 2 (PIM2) proteins, one of the families of PIM kinases, play crucial roles in cell survival. However, the functions of PIM2 protein against ischemia are not understood. Therefore, the protective effects of PIM2 against oxidative stress-induced hippocampal HT22 cell death and brain ischemic injury were evaluated using Tat-PIM2, a cell permeable fusion protein. Tat-PIM2 protein transduced into hippocampal HT22 cells. Low doses of transduced Tat-PIM2 protein protected against oxidative stress-induced cell death including DNA damage and markedly inhibited the activation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPKs), NF-κB and the expression levels of Bax protein. Furthermore, Tat-PIM2 protein transduced into the CA1 region of the hippocampus and significantly prevented neuronal cell death in an ischemic insult animal model. These results indicated that low doses of Tat-PIM2 protein protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death, suggesting low doses of Tat-PIM2 protein provides a potential therapeutic agent against oxidative stress-induced neuronal diseases including ischemia. PMID:26365288

  10. Generation of serotonin neurons from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhong, Xuefei; Liu, Huisheng; Hao, Ling; Huang, Cindy Tzu-Ling; Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Jones, Jeffrey; Ayala, Melvin; Li, Lingjun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin neurons located in the raphe nucleus of the hindbrain have crucial roles in regulating brain functions and have been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Yet functional human serotonin neurons are not available for in vitro studies. Through manipulation of the WNT pathway, we demonstrate efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to cells resembling central serotonin neurons, primarily those located in the rhombomeric segments 2-3 of the rostral raphe, which participate in high-order brain functions. The serotonin neurons express a series of molecules essential for serotonergic development, including tryptophan hydroxylase 2, exhibit typical electrophysiological properties and release serotonin in an activity-dependent manner. When treated with the FDA-approved drugs tramadol and escitalopram oxalate, they release or uptake serotonin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting the utility of these cells for the evaluation of drug candidates.

  11. Generation of serotonin neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianfeng; Zhong, Xuefei; Liu, Huisheng; Hao, Ling; Huang, Cindy Tzu-Ling; Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Jones, Jeffrey; Ayala, Melvin; Li, Lingjun; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin neurons located in the raphe nucleus of the hindbrain have crucial roles in regulating brain functions and have been implicated in various psychiatric disorders. Yet functional human serotonin neurons are not available for in vitro studies. Through manipulation of the WNT pathway, we demonstrate efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to cells resembling central serotonin neurons, primarily those located in the rhombomeric segments 2–3 of the rostral raphe, which participate in high-order brain functions. The serotonin neurons express a series of molecules essential for serotonergic development, including tryptophan hydroxylase 2, exhibit typical electrophysiological properties and release serotonin in an activity-dependent manner. When treated with the FDA-approved drugs tramadol and escitalopram oxalate, they release or uptake serotonin in a dose- and time-dependent manner, suggesting the utility of these cells for the evaluation of drug candidates. PMID:26655496

  12. Impulsive Pressurization of Neuronal Cells for Traumatic Brain Injury Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruqiang; Lim, Jung Yul

    2011-01-01

    A novel impulsive cell pressurization experiment has been developed using a Kolsky bar device to investigate blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). We demonstrate in this video article how blast TBI-relevant impulsive pressurization is applied to the neuronal cells in vitro. This is achieved by using well-controlled pressure pulse created by a specialized Kolsky bar device, with complete pressure history within the cell pressurization chamber recorded. Pressurized neuronal cells are inspected immediately after pressurization, or further incubated to examine the long-term effects of impulsive pressurization on neurite/axonal outgrowth, neuronal gene expression, apoptosis, etc. We observed that impulsive pressurization at about 2 MPa induces distinct neurite loss relative to unpressurized cells. Our technique provides a novel method to investigate the molecular/cellular mechanisms of blast TBI, via impulsive pressurization of brain cells at well-controlled pressure magnitude and duration. PMID:22005926

  13. Natriuretic Peptide-Induced Catecholamine Release from Cardiac Sympathetic Neurons: Inhibition by Histamine H3 and H4 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Robador, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that natriuretic peptides, including brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), promote norepinephrine release from cardiac sympathetic nerves and dopamine release from differentiated pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. These proexocytotic effects are mediated by an increase in intracellular calcium secondary to cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) activation caused by a protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 3 (PDE3). The purpose of the present study was to search for novel means to prevent the proadrenergic effects of natriuretic peptides. For this, we focused our attention on neuronal inhibitory Gαi/o-coupled histamine H3 and H4 receptors. Our findings show that activation of neuronal H3 and H4 receptors inhibits the release of catecholamines elicited by BNP in cardiac synaptosomes and differentiated PC12 cells. This effect results from a decrease in intracellular Ca2+ due to reduced intracellular cAMP/PKA activity, caused by H3 and H4 receptor-mediated PKG inhibition and consequent PDE3-induced increase in cAMP metabolism. Indeed, selective H3 and H4 receptor agonists each synergized with a PKG inhibitor and a PDE3 activator in attenuating BNP-induced norepinephrine release from cardiac sympathetic nerve endings. This indicates that PKG inhibition and PDE3 stimulation are pivotal for the H3 and H4 receptor-mediated attenuation of BNP-induced catecholamine release. Cardiac sympathetic overstimulation is characteristic of advanced heart failure, which was recently found not to be improved by the administration of recombinant BNP (nesiritide), despite the predicated beneficial effects of natriuretic peptides. Because excessive catecholamine release is likely to offset the desirable effects of natriuretic peptides, our findings suggest novel means to alleviate their adverse effects and improve their therapeutic potential. PMID:22923736

  14. BDNF-TrkB signaling in striatopallidal neurons controls inhibition of locomotor behavior.

    PubMed

    Besusso, Dario; Geibel, Mirjam; Kramer, Dana; Schneider, Tomasz; Pendolino, Valentina; Picconi, Barbara; Calabresi, Paolo; Bannerman, David M; Minichiello, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    The physiology of brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling in enkephalinergic striatopallidal neurons is poorly understood. Changes in cortical Bdnf expression levels, and/or impairment in brain-derived neurotrophic factor anterograde transport induced by mutant huntingtin (mHdh) are believed to cause striatopallidal neuron vulnerability in early-stage Huntington's disease. Although several studies have confirmed a link between altered cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling and striatal vulnerability, it is not known whether the effects are mediated via the brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor TrkB, and whether they are direct or indirect. Using a novel genetic mouse model, here, we show that selective removal of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-TrkB signaling from enkephalinergic striatal targets unexpectedly leads to spontaneous and drug-induced hyperlocomotion. This is associated with dopamine D2 receptor-dependent increased striatal protein kinase C and MAP kinase activation, resulting in altered intrinsic activation of striatal enkephalinergic neurons. Therefore, brain-derived neurotrophic factor/TrkB signaling in striatopallidal neurons controls inhibition of locomotor behavior by modulating neuronal activity in response to excitatory input through the protein kinase C/MAP kinase pathway. PMID:23774276

  15. Electroacupuncture Treatment Alleviates Central Poststroke Pain by Inhibiting Brain Neuronal Apoptosis and Aberrant Astrocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Gui-Hua; Tao, Shan-Shan; Chen, Man-Tang; Li, Yu-Sang; Shang, Hong-Cai; Tang, Xiao-Yi; Chen, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) is reported to effectively relieve the central poststroke pain (CPSP). However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The present study investigated the detailed mechanisms of action of EA treatment at different frequencies for CPSP. A CPSP model was established with a single collagenase injection to the left ventral posterolateral nucleus of the thalamus. The EA-treated groups then received EA treatment at frequency of 2, 2/15, or 15 Hz for 30 min daily for five days. The pain-related behavioral responses, neuronal apoptosis, glial activation, and the expression of pain signal transmission-related factors (β-catenin, COX-2, and NK-1R) were assessed using behavioral tests, Nissl staining, TUNEL staining, and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. The low-frequency EA treatment significantly (1) reduced brain tissue damage and hematoma sizes and (2) inhibited neuronal apoptosis, thereby exerting abirritative effects. Meanwhile, the high-frequency EA treatment induced a greater inhibition of the aberrant astrocyte activation, accompanied by the downregulation of the expressions of COX-2, β-catenin, and subsequently NK-1R, thereby alleviating inflammation and producing strong analgesic effects. Together, these findings suggest that CPSP is closely related to pathological changes of the neocortex and hippocampus. EA treatments at different frequencies may exert abirritative effects by inhibiting brain neuronal apoptosis and aberrant astrocyte activation in the brain. PMID:27774321

  16. Selective Inhibition by Ethanol of Mitochondrial Calcium Influx Mediated by Uncoupling Protein-2 in Relation to N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Cytotoxicity in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryota; Fujikawa, Koichi; Kou, Miki; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Background We have shown the involvement of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) in the cytotoxicity by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) through a mechanism relevant to the increased mitochondrial Ca2+ levels in HEK293 cells with acquired NMDAR channels. Here, we evaluated pharmacological profiles of ethanol on the NMDA-induced increase in mitochondrial Ca2+ levels in cultured murine neocortical neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings In neurons exposed to glutamate or NMDA, a significant increase was seen in mitochondrial Ca2+ levels determined by Rhod-2 at concentrations of 0.1 to 100 µM. Further addition of 250 mM ethanol significantly inhibited the increase by glutamate and NMDA in Rhod-2 fluorescence, while similarly potent inhibition of the NMDA-induced increase was seen after exposure to ethanol at 50 to 250 mM in cultured neurons. Lentiviral overexpression of UCP2 significantly accelerated the increase by NMDA in Rhod-2 fluorescence in neurons, without affecting Fluo-3 fluorescence for intracellular Ca2+ levels. In neurons overexpressing UCP2, exposure to ethanol resulted in significantly more effective inhibition of the NMDA-induced increase in mitochondrial free Ca2+ levels than in those without UCP2 overexpression, despite a similarly efficient increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels irrespective of UCP2 overexpression. Overexpression of UCP2 significantly increased the number of dead cells in a manner prevented by ethanol in neurons exposed to glutamate. In HEK293 cells with NMDAR containing GluN2B subunit, more efficient inhibition was similarly induced by ethanol at 50 and 250 mM on the NMDA-induced increase in mitochondrial Ca2+ levels than in those with GluN2A subunit. Decreased protein levels of GluN2B, but not GluN2A, subunit were seen in immunoprecipitates with UCP2 from neurons with brief exposure to ethanol at concentrations over 50 mM. Conclusions/Significance Ethanol could inhibit the interaction between UCP2 and NMDAR channels to

  17. hnRNP-Q1 represses nascent axon growth in cortical neurons by inhibiting Gap-43 mRNA translation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kathryn R.; McAninch, Damian S.; Stefanovic, Snezana; Xing, Lei; Allen, Megan; Li, Wenqi; Feng, Yue; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita; Bassell, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by mRNA-binding proteins is critical for neuronal development and function. hnRNP-Q1 is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA processing events, including translational repression. hnRNP-Q1 is highly expressed in brain tissue, suggesting a function in regulating genes critical for neuronal development. In this study, we have identified Growth-associated protein 43 (Gap-43) mRNA as a novel target of hnRNP-Q1 and have demonstrated that hnRNP-Q1 represses Gap-43 mRNA translation and consequently GAP-43 function. GAP-43 is a neuronal protein that regulates actin dynamics in growth cones and facilitates axonal growth. Previous studies have identified factors that regulate Gap-43 mRNA stability and localization, but it remains unclear whether Gap-43 mRNA translation is also regulated. Our results reveal that hnRNP-Q1 knockdown increased nascent axon length, total neurite length, and neurite number in mouse embryonic cortical neurons and enhanced Neuro2a cell process extension; these phenotypes were rescued by GAP-43 knockdown. Additionally, we have identified a G-quadruplex structure in the 5′ untranslated region of Gap-43 mRNA that directly interacts with hnRNP-Q1 as a means to inhibit Gap-43 mRNA translation. Therefore hnRNP-Q1–mediated repression of Gap-43 mRNA translation provides an additional mechanism for regulating GAP-43 expression and function and may be critical for neuronal development. PMID:26658614

  18. Resident neural stem cells restrict tissue damage and neuronal loss after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Sabelström, Hanna; Stenudd, Moa; Réu, Pedro; Dias, David O; Elfineh, Marta; Zdunek, Sofia; Damberg, Peter; Göritz, Christian; Frisén, Jonas

    2013-11-01

    Central nervous system injuries are accompanied by scar formation. It has been difficult to delineate the precise role of the scar, as it is made by several different cell types, which may limit the damage but also inhibit axonal regrowth. We show that scarring by neural stem cell-derived astrocytes is required to restrict secondary enlargement of the lesion and further axonal loss after spinal cord injury. Moreover, neural stem cell progeny exerts a neurotrophic effect required for survival of neurons adjacent to the lesion. One distinct component of the glial scar, deriving from resident neural stem cells, is required for maintaining the integrity of the injured spinal cord.

  19. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4 weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35 days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury. PMID:26896832

  20. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4 weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35 days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury.

  1. Genetically Defined Inhibitory Neurons in the Mouse Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn: A Possible Source of Rhythmic Inhibition of Motoneurons during Fictive Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jennifer M.; Blagovechtchenski, Evgueni; Brownstone, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    To ensure alternation of flexor and extensor muscles during locomotion, the spinal locomotor network provides rhythmic inhibition to motoneurons. The source of this inhibition in mammals is incompletely defined. We have identified a population of GABAergic inter-neurons located in medial laminae V/VI that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in glutamic acid decarboxylase-65::GFP transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical studies revealed GFP + terminals in apposition to motoneuronal somata, neurons in Clarke’s column, and in laminae V/VI where they apposed GFP + interneurons, thus forming putative reciprocal connections. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from GFP + interneurons in spinal cord slices revealed a range of electrophysiological profiles, including sag and postinhibitory rebound potentials. Most neurons fired tonically in response to depolarizing current injection. Calcium transients demonstrated by two-photon excitation microscopy in the hemisected spinal cord were recorded in response to low-threshold dorsal root stimulation, indicating these neurons receive primary afferent input. Following a locomotor task, the number of GFP + neurons expressing Fos increased, indicating that these neurons are active during locomotion. During fictive locomotion induced in the hemisected spinal cord, two-photon excitation imaging demonstrated rhythmic calcium activity in these interneurons, which correlated with the termination of ventral root bursts. We suggest that these dorsomedial GABAergic interneurons are involved in spinal locomotor networks, and may provide direct rhythmic inhibitory input to motoneurons during locomotion. PMID:20089922

  2. The role of NO synthase isoforms in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Berezhnaya, E. V.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important second messenger, involved in the implementation of various cell functions. It regulates various physiological and pathological processes such as neurotransmission, cell responses to stress, and neurodegeneration. NO synthase is a family of enzymes that synthesize NO from L-arginine. The activity of different NOS isoforms depends both on endogenous and exogenous factors. In particular, it is modulated by oxidative stress, induced by photodynamic therapy (PDT). We have studied the possible role of NOS in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Antinecrotic and proapoptotic effects of NO on the glial cells were found using inhibitory analysis. We have shown the role of inducible NO synthase in photoinduced apoptosis and involvement of neuronal NO synthase in photoinduced necrosis of glial cells in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. The activation of NO synthase was evaluated using NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, a marker of neurons expressing the enzyme. The activation of NO synthase in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was evaluated as a function of time after PDT. Photodynamic treatment induced transient increase in NO synthase activity and then slowly inhibited this enzyme.

  3. Neuronal cell growth on polymeric scaffolds studied by CARS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enejder, Annika; Fink, Helen; Kuhn, Hans-Georg

    2012-03-01

    For studies of neuronal cell integration and neurite outgrowth in polymeric scaffold materials as a future alternative for the treatment of damages in the neuronal system, we have developed a protocol employing CARS microscopy for imaging of neuronal networks. The benefits of CARS microscopy come here to their best use; (i) the overall three-dimensional (3D) arrangement of multiple cells and their neurites can be visualized without the need for chemical preparations or physical sectioning, potentially affecting the architecture of the soft, fragile scaffolds and (ii) details on the interaction between single cells and scaffold fibrils can be investigated by close-up images at sub-micron resolution. The establishment of biologically more relevant 3D neuronal networks in a soft hydrogel composed of native Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM) components was compared with conventional two-dimensional networks grown on a stiff substrate. Images of cells in the hydrogel scaffold reveal significantly different networking characteristics compared to the 2D networks, raising the question whether the functionality of neurons grown as layers in conventional cultivation dishes represents that of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

  4. Purkinje cell synapses target physiologically unique brainstem neurons.

    PubMed

    Sekirnjak, Chris; Vissel, Bryce; Bollinger, Jacob; Faulstich, Michael; du Lac, Sascha

    2003-07-16

    The cerebellum controls motor learning via Purkinje cell synapses onto discrete populations of neurons in the deep cerebellar nuclei and brainstem vestibular nuclei. In the circuitry that subserves the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the postsynaptic targets of Purkinje cells, termed flocculus target neurons (FTNs), are thought to be a critical site of learning. Little is known, however, about the intrinsic cellular properties of FTNs, which are sparsely distributed in the medial vestibular nucleus. To identify these neurons, we used the L7 promoter to express a tau-green fluorescent protein fusion protein selectively in Purkinje cells. Fluorescent Purkinje cell axons and terminal boutons surrounded the somata and proximal dendrites of a small subset of neurons, presumed FTNs, in the medial vestibular nucleus. Targeted intracellular recordings revealed that FTNs fired spontaneously at high rates in brain slices (mean, 47 spikes/sec) and exhibited dramatic postinhibitory rebound firing after the offset of membrane hyperpolarization. These intrinsic firing properties were exceptional among brainstem vestibular nucleus neurons but strikingly similar to neurons in the deep cerebellar nuclei, indicating a common role for intrinsic firing mechanisms in cerebellar control of diverse behaviors.

  5. Sex stratified neuronal cultures to study ischemic cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Stacy L; Vest, Rebekah; Verma, Saurabh; Traystman, Richard J; Herson, Paco S

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences in neuronal susceptibility to ischemic injury and neurodegenerative disease have long been observed, but the signaling mechanisms responsible for those differences remain unclear. Primary disassociated embryonic neuronal culture provides a simplified experimental model with which to investigate the neuronal cell signaling involved in cell death as a result of ischemia or disease; however, most neuronal cultures used in research today are mixed sex. Researchers can and do test the effects of sex steroid treatment in mixed sex neuronal cultures in models of neuronal injury and disease, but accumulating evidence suggests that the female brain responds to androgens, estrogens, and progesterone differently than the male brain. Furthermore, neonate male and female rodents respond differently to ischemic injury, with males experiencing greater injury following cerebral ischemia than females. Thus, mixed sex neuronal cultures might obscure and confound the experimental results; important information might be missed. For this reason, the Herson Lab at the University of Colorado School of Medicine routinely prepares sex-stratified primary disassociated embryonic neuronal cultures from both hippocampus and cortex. Embryos are sexed before harvesting of brain tissue and male and female tissue are disassociated separately, plated separately, and maintained separately. Using this method, the Herson Lab has demonstrated a male-specific role for the ion channel TRPM2 in ischemic cell death. In this manuscript, we share and discuss our protocol for sexing embryonic mice and preparing sex-stratified hippocampal primary disassociated neuron cultures. This method can be adapted to prepare sex-stratified cortical cultures and the method for embryo sexing can be used in conjunction with other protocols for any study in which sex is thought to be an important determinant of outcome. PMID:24378980

  6. Neuronal characteristics of small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onganer, P U; Seckl, M J; Djamgoz, M B A

    2005-01-01

    Wide ranging experimental evidence suggests that human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has a number of molecular and subcellular characteristics normally associated with neurones. This review outlines and discusses these characteristics in the light of recent developments in the field. Emphasis is placed upon neuronal cell adhesion molecules, neurone-restrictive silencer factor, neurotransmitters/peptides and voltage-gated ion, especially Na+ channels. The hypothesis is put forward that acquisition of such characteristics and the membrane ‘excitability' that would follow can accelerate metastatic progression. The clinical potential of the neuronal characteristics of SCLC, in particular ion channel expression/activity, is discussed in relation to possible novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. PMID:16265346

  7. An experimental electronic model for a neuronal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Cantón, I.; Rangel-López, A.; Martel-Gallegos, G.; Zarazúa, S.; Vertiz-Hérnandez, A.

    2014-04-01

    Over the last two decades, the study of information transmission in living beings has acquired great relevance, because it regulates and conducts the functioning of all of the organs in the body. In information transmission pathways, the neuron plays an important role in that it receives, transmits, and processes electrical signals from different parts of the human body; these signals are transmitted as electrical impulses called action potentials, and they transmit information from one neuron to another. In this work, and with the aim of developing experiments for teaching biological processes, we implemented an electronic circuit of the neuron cell device and its mathematical model based on piecewise linear functions.

  8. Major epigenetic development distinguishing neuronal and non-neuronal cells occurs postnatally in the murine hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge; Zhang, Wenjuan; Baker, Maria S; Laritsky, Eleonora; Mattan-Hung, Natalia; Yu, Dahai; Kunde-Ramamoorthy, Govindarajan; Simerly, Richard B; Chen, Rui; Shen, Lanlan; Waterland, Robert A

    2014-03-15

    Prenatal and early postnatal environment can persistently alter one's risk of obesity. Environmental effects on hypothalamic developmental epigenetics constitute a likely mechanism underlying such 'developmental programming' of energy balance regulation. To advance our understanding of these processes, it is essential to develop approaches to disentangle the cellular and regional heterogeneity of hypothalamic developmental epigenetics. We therefore performed genome-scale DNA methylation profiling in hypothalamic neurons and non-neuronal cells at postnatal day 0 (P0) and P21 and found, surprisingly, that most of the DNA methylation differences distinguishing these two cell types are established postnatally. In particular, neuron-specific increases in DNA methylation occurred extensively at genes involved in neuronal development. Quantitative bisulfite pyrosequencing verified our methylation profiling results in all 15 regions examined, and expression differences were associated with DNA methylation at several genes. We also identified extensive methylation differences between the arcuate (ARH) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH). Integrating these two data sets showed that genomic regions with PVH versus ARH differential methylation strongly overlap with those undergoing neuron-specific increases from P0 to P21, suggesting that these developmental changes occur preferentially in either the ARH or PVH. In particular, neuron-specific methylation increases at the 3' end of Shh localized to the ARH and were positively associated with gene expression. Our data indicate a key role for DNA methylation in establishing the gene expression potential of diverse hypothalamic cell types, and provide the novel insight that early postnatal life is a critical period for cell type-specific epigenetic development in the murine hypothalamus.

  9. (S)-lacosamide inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation reduces postoperative and neuropathic pain behaviors through distinct classes of sensory neurons identified by constellation pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Moutal, Aubin; Chew, Lindsey A; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yue; Yeon, Seul Ki; Telemi, Edwin; Meroueh, Seeneen; Park, Ki Duk; Shrinivasan, Raghuraman; Gilbraith, Kerry B; Qu, Chaoling; Xie, Jennifer Y; Patwardhan, Amol; Vanderah, Todd W; Khanna, May; Porreca, Frank; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    Chronic pain affects the life of millions of people. Current treatments have deleterious side effects. We have advanced a strategy for targeting protein interactions which regulate the N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channel as an alternative to direct channel block. Peptides uncoupling CaV2.2 interactions with the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) were antinociceptive without effects on memory, depression, and reward/addiction. A search for small molecules that could recapitulate uncoupling of the CaV2.2-CRMP2 interaction identified (S)-lacosamide [(S)-LCM], the inactive enantiomer of the Food and Drug Administration-approved antiepileptic drug (R)-lacosamide [(R)-LCM, Vimpat]. We show that (S)-LCM, but not (R)-LCM, inhibits CRMP2 phosphorylation by cyclin dependent kinase 5, a step necessary for driving CaV2.2 activity, in sensory neurons. (S)-lacosamide inhibited depolarization-induced Ca influx with a low micromolar IC50. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology experiments demonstrated a commensurate reduction in Ca currents in sensory neurons after an acute application of (S)-LCM. Using constellation pharmacology, a recently described high content phenotypic screening platform for functional fingerprinting of neurons that uses subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types, we investigated if (S)-LCM preferentially acts on certain types of neurons. (S)-lacosamide decreased the dorsal root ganglion neurons responding to mustard oil, and increased the number of cells responding to menthol. Finally, (S)-LCM reversed thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia in a model of postoperative pain, and 2 models of neuropathic pain. Thus, using (S)-LCM to inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation is a novel and efficient strategy to treat pain, which works by targeting specific sensory neuron populations. PMID:26967696

  10. (S)-lacosamide inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation reduces postoperative and neuropathic pain behaviors through distinct classes of sensory neurons identified by constellation pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Moutal, Aubin; Chew, Lindsey A; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Yue; Yeon, Seul Ki; Telemi, Edwin; Meroueh, Seeneen; Park, Ki Duk; Shrinivasan, Raghuraman; Gilbraith, Kerry B; Qu, Chaoling; Xie, Jennifer Y; Patwardhan, Amol; Vanderah, Todd W; Khanna, May; Porreca, Frank; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-07-01

    Chronic pain affects the life of millions of people. Current treatments have deleterious side effects. We have advanced a strategy for targeting protein interactions which regulate the N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channel as an alternative to direct channel block. Peptides uncoupling CaV2.2 interactions with the axonal collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) were antinociceptive without effects on memory, depression, and reward/addiction. A search for small molecules that could recapitulate uncoupling of the CaV2.2-CRMP2 interaction identified (S)-lacosamide [(S)-LCM], the inactive enantiomer of the Food and Drug Administration-approved antiepileptic drug (R)-lacosamide [(R)-LCM, Vimpat]. We show that (S)-LCM, but not (R)-LCM, inhibits CRMP2 phosphorylation by cyclin dependent kinase 5, a step necessary for driving CaV2.2 activity, in sensory neurons. (S)-lacosamide inhibited depolarization-induced Ca influx with a low micromolar IC50. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology experiments demonstrated a commensurate reduction in Ca currents in sensory neurons after an acute application of (S)-LCM. Using constellation pharmacology, a recently described high content phenotypic screening platform for functional fingerprinting of neurons that uses subtype-selective pharmacological agents to elucidate cell-specific combinations (constellations) of key signaling proteins that define specific cell types, we investigated if (S)-LCM preferentially acts on certain types of neurons. (S)-lacosamide decreased the dorsal root ganglion neurons responding to mustard oil, and increased the number of cells responding to menthol. Finally, (S)-LCM reversed thermal hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia in a model of postoperative pain, and 2 models of neuropathic pain. Thus, using (S)-LCM to inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation is a novel and efficient strategy to treat pain, which works by targeting specific sensory neuron populations.

  11. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) attenuates infrasound-induced neuronal impairment by inhibiting microglia-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Jing, Da; Shi, Ming; Liu, Yang; Lin, Tian; Xie, Zhen; Zhu, Yi; Zhao, Haibo; Shi, Xiaodan; Du, Fang; Zhao, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Infrasound, a kind of common environmental noise and a major contributor of vibroacoustic disease, can induce the central nervous system (CNS) damage. However, no relevant anti-infrasound drugs have been reported yet. Our recent studies have shown that infrasound resulted in excessive microglial activation rapidly and sequential inflammation, revealing a potential role of microglia in infrasound-induced CNS damage. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major bioactive component in green tea, has the capacity of protecting against various neurodegenerative diseases via an anti-inflammatory mechanism. However, it is still unknown to date whether EGCG acts on infrasound-induced microglial activation and neuronal damage. We showed that, after 1-, 2- or 5-day exposure of rats to 16 Hz, 130 dB infrasound (2 h/day), EGCG significantly inhibited infrasound-induced microglial activation in rat hippocampal region, evidenced by reduced expressions of Iba-1 (a marker for microglia) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and TNF-α). Moreover, infrasound-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat hippocampi was significantly suppressed by EGCG. EGCG also inhibited infrasound-induced activation of primary microglia in vitro and decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the supernatants of microglial culture, which were toxic to cultured neurons. Furthermore, EGCG attenuated infrasound-induced increases in nuclear NF-κB p65 and phosphorylated IκBα, and ameliorated infrasound-induced decrease in IκB in microglia. Therefore, our study provides the first evidence that EGCG acts against infrasound-induced neuronal impairment by inhibiting microglia-mediated inflammation through a potential NF-κB pathway-related mechanism, suggesting that EGCG can be used as a promising drug for the treatment of infrasound-induced CNS damage. PMID:24746834

  12. Rescuing neuronal cell death by RAIDD- and PIDD- derived peptides and its implications for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae-Ho; Lim, In-Hye; Kim, Chang Min; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Eun-Ae; Lee, Tae-Jin; Park, Hyun Ho

    2016-01-01

    Caspase-2 is known to be involved in oxidative-stress mediated neuronal cell death. In this study, we demonstrated that rotenone-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by caspase-2 activation via PIDDosome formation. Our newly designed TAT-fused peptides, which contains wild-type helix number3 (H3) from RAIDD and PIDD, blocked the PIDDosome formation in vitro. Furthermore, peptides inhibited rotenone-induced caspase-2-dependent apoptosis in neuronal cells. These results suggest that PIDD- or RAIDD-targeted peptides might be effective at protecting against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. Our peptides are novel neuronal cell apoptosis inhibitors that might serve as a prototype for development of drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27502430

  13. Role of glycinergic inhibition in shaping activity of saccadic burst neurons.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Yoshiki; Kaneko, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Kaoru; Shimazu, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    The immediate premotor signals for saccades are created at the level of medium-lead burst neurons (MLBNs). During fixations, MLBNs receive tonic inhibition from omnipause neurons (OPNs), which use glycine as a neurotransmitter. To elucidate the role of this inhibition, we studied discharge patterns of horizontal MLBNs following iontophoretic application of strychnine, a glycine-receptor antagonist, in alert cats. Three-barrel micropipettes were used for extracellular recording and iontophoresis. After application of strychnine, MLBNs exhibited spontaneous discharge and visual responses during intersaccadic intervals. Spikes were evoked by single-pulse stimulation of the contralateral superior colliculus (SC). These results show that MLBNs receive substantial excitatory input during intersaccadic intervals and that inhibitory action of OPNs is indeed necessary to prevent MLBNs from firing. Strychnine also affected saccade-related activity of MLBNs. The burst of activity, as in normal conditions, declined rapidly before the end of saccades but was followed by low rate spike activity, which continued beyond the end of saccades. This suggests that in normal conditions, the termination of saccades is determined by resumed inhibitory action of OPNs and not by termination of excitatory input to MLBNs. In addition, the firing rate and the number of spikes during saccades increased after strychnine application, suggesting that MLBNs receive glycinergic inhibition of non-OPN origin as well. We conclude that glycinergic inhibition plays essential roles in the maintenance of stable fixation, the termination of saccades, and the regulation of saccade size and velocity.

  14. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R.; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J.A.; Hardingham, Giles E.; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling — conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  15. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rzechorzek, Nina M; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J A; Hardingham, Giles E; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling--conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  16. Trafficking of cell surface beta-amyloid precursor protein: retrograde and transcytotic transport in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Amyloid beta-protein (A beta), the principal constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived by proteolysis from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta PP). The mechanism of A beta production in neurons, which are hypothesized to be a rich source of A beta in brain, remains to be defined. In this study, we describe a detailed localization of cell surface beta PP and its subsequent trafficking in primary cultured neurons. Full-length cell surface beta PP was present primarily on perikarya and axons, the latter with a characteristic discontinuous pattern. At growth cones, cell surface beta PP was inconsistently detected. By visualizing the distribution of beta PP monoclonal antibodies added to intact cultures, beta PP was shown to be internalized from distal axons or terminals and retrogradely transported back to perikarya in organelles which colocalized with fluid-phase endocytic markers. Retrograde transport of beta PP was shown in both hippocampal and peripheral sympathetic neurons, the latter using a compartment culture system that isolated cell bodies from distal axons and terminals. In addition, we demonstrated that beta PP from distal axons was transcytotically transported to the surface of perikarya from distal axons in sympathetic neurons. Indirect evidence of this transcytotic pathway was obtained in hippocampal neurons using antisense oligonucleotide to the kinesin heavy chain to inhibit anterograde beta PP transport. Taken together, these results demonstrate novel aspects of beta PP trafficking in neurons, including retrograde axonal transport and transcytosis. Moreover, the axonal predominance of cell surface beta PP is unexpected in view of the recent report of polarized sorting of beta PP to the basolateral domain of MDCK cells. PMID:7721945

  17. Cell cycle inhibition as a strategy for treatment of central nervous system diseases which must not block normal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da-Zhi; Ander, Bradley P.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2009-01-01

    Classically, the cell cycle is regarded as the central process leading to cellular proliferation. However, increasing evidence over the last decade supports the notion that neuronal cell cycle re-entry results in post-mitotic death. A mature neuron that re-enters the cell cycle can neither advance to a new G0 quiescent state nor revert to its earlier G0 state. This presents a critical dilemma to the neuron from which death may be an unavoidable, but necessary, outcome for adult neurons attempting to complete the cell cycle. In contrast, tumor cells that undergo aberrant cell cycle re-entry divide and can survive. Thus, cell cycle inhibition strategies are of interest in cancer treatment, but may also represent an important means of protecting neurons. In this review, we put forth the concept of the “expanded cell cycle” and summarize the cell cycle proteins, signal transduction events and mitogenic molecules that can drive a neuron into the cell cycle in various CNS diseases. We also discuss the pharmacological approaches that interfere with the mitogenic pathways and prevent mature neurons from attempting cell cycle re-entry, protecting them from cell death. Lastly, future attempts at blocking the cell cycle to rescue mature neurons from injury should be designed so as to not block normal neurogenesis. PMID:19944161

  18. Bax inactivation in lurcher mutants rescues cerebellar granule cells but not purkinje cells or inferior olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Selimi, F; Vogel, M W; Mariani, J

    2000-07-15

    Lurcher is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor gene (Grid2) that turns the receptor into a leaky ion channel. The expression of the Lurcher gene in heterozygous (Grid2(Lc/+)) mutants induces the death of almost all Purkinje cells starting from the second postnatal week. Ninety percent of the granule cells and 60-75% of the inferior olivary neurons die because of the loss of their target neurons, the Purkinje cells. The apoptotic nature of the neurodegeneration has been demonstrated previously by the presence of activated caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family, has been shown to be involved in developmental neuronal death. To study the role of Bax in Grid2(Lc/+) neurodegeneration, double mutants with Grid2(Lc/)+ mice and Bax knock-out mice (Bax-/-) were generated. Bax deletion had no effect on the death of Purkinje cells and inferior olivary neurons, although a temporary rescue of some Purkinje cells could be detected in P15 Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/- animals. From postnatal day 15 (P15) to P60, the number of granule cells in Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/-mice did not significantly change and was significantly increased compared with the number found in Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax+/+ mice. Granule cell number in P60 Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/- mice corresponded to 70% of the number found in wild-type mice. Our results show that Bax inactivation in Grid2(Lc/+) mice does not rescue intrinsic Purkinje cell death or the target-related cell death of olivary neurons, but Bax inactivation does inhibit persistently target-related cell death in cerebellar granule cells.

  19. Strategies for metabolic exchange between glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Deitmer, J W

    2001-12-01

    The brain is a major energy consumer and dependent on carbohydrate and oxygen supply. Electrical and synaptic activity of neurons can only be sustained given sufficient availability of ATP. Glial cells, which have long been assigned trophic functions, seem to play a pivotal role in meeting the energy requirements of active neurons. Under conditions of high neuronal activity, a number of glial functions, such as the maintenance of ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter clearance from synaptic domains, the supply of energetic compounds and calcium signalling, are challenged. In the vertebrate brain, astrocytes may increase glucose utilization and release lactate, which is taken up and consumed by neurons to generate ATP by oxidative metabolism. The CO(2) produced is processed primarily in astrocytes, which display the major activity of carboanhydrase in the brain. Protons and bicarbonate in turn may contribute to drive acid/base-coupled transporters. In the present article a scenario is discussed which couples the transfer of energy and the conversion of CO(2) with the high-affinity glutamate uptake and other transport processes at glial and neuronal cell membranes. The transporters can be linked to glial signalling and may cooperate with each other at the cellular level. This could save energy, and would render energy exchange processes between glial cells and neurons more effective. Functions implications and physiological responses, in particular in chemosensitive brain areas, are discussed.

  20. Strategies for metabolic exchange between glial cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Deitmer, J W

    2001-12-01

    The brain is a major energy consumer and dependent on carbohydrate and oxygen supply. Electrical and synaptic activity of neurons can only be sustained given sufficient availability of ATP. Glial cells, which have long been assigned trophic functions, seem to play a pivotal role in meeting the energy requirements of active neurons. Under conditions of high neuronal activity, a number of glial functions, such as the maintenance of ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter clearance from synaptic domains, the supply of energetic compounds and calcium signalling, are challenged. In the vertebrate brain, astrocytes may increase glucose utilization and release lactate, which is taken up and consumed by neurons to generate ATP by oxidative metabolism. The CO(2) produced is processed primarily in astrocytes, which display the major activity of carboanhydrase in the brain. Protons and bicarbonate in turn may contribute to drive acid/base-coupled transporters. In the present article a scenario is discussed which couples the transfer of energy and the conversion of CO(2) with the high-affinity glutamate uptake and other transport processes at glial and neuronal cell membranes. The transporters can be linked to glial signalling and may cooperate with each other at the cellular level. This could save energy, and would render energy exchange processes between glial cells and neurons more effective. Functions implications and physiological responses, in particular in chemosensitive brain areas, are discussed. PMID:11738647

  1. [From the cell theory to the neuron theory].

    PubMed

    Tixier-Vidal, Andrée

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the cell theory formulated by Schwann (1839) and by Virchow (1855) on the one hand, and, on the other hand, the neuron theory, as formulated by Waldeyer (1891) and by Cajal (1906), are discussed from a historical point of view. Both of them are the result of technical and conceptuel progress. Both of them had to fight against the dominant dogma before being accepted. The cell theory opposed the school of Bichat, the vitalist philosophy and the positivist philosophy of Auguste Comte. The neuron theory, which is clearly based on the cell theory, was mostly concerned with the mode of interneuronal communication; it opposed the concept of contiguity to Golgi's concept of continuity. At present, the cell theory remains central in every field of Biology. By contrast, the neuron theory, which until the middle of the XXth century opened the study of the nervous system to a necessary reductionnist approach, is no longer central to recent developments of neurosciences.

  2. [Methoxyflurane and ethanol do not inhibit the neuronal uptake of noradrenaline (uptake 1) at the desipramine binding site].

    PubMed

    Kress, H G; Schömig, E

    1990-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that the net accumulation of 3H-norepinephrine in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 was reduced by anesthetic concentrations of n-alkanols and the volatile anesthetics halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, and methoxyflurane. In PC12 cells, as in adrenergic neurons, norepinephrine is transported across the plasma membrane by a saturable, high-affinity, carrier-mediated mechanism (uptake1), which follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, is energy- and sodium-dependent, and is inhibited by low concentrations of cocaine and the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine. Although uptake1 is the most important process for the removal of norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft, the net accumulation of norepinephrine within the neuron also depends on other factors including its vesicular uptake and storage within the granules, its metabolism by monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and the efflux of its more lipophilic metabolites. In our previous report we could not exclude the contribution of any of these factors to the observed inhibitory effects of volatile substances. Therefore, the aim of the present study with ethanol and methoxyflurane was: (1) to elucidate further the exact mechanism responsible for the reduction of the norepinephrine accumulation; and (2) to investigate the anesthetics' interaction with the substrate recognition site, which is identical with the desipramine binding site on the norepinephrine carrier. METHODS. For 3H-norepinephrine uptake experiments, PC12 cells were cultured on dishes (60 mm, Nunc) coated with polyornithine. Reserpine (10 microM) was added to the culture 24 h before the experiment to deplete endogenous norepinephrine. The initial carrier-mediated transport rate (60 s) was measured as previously described. 3H-desipramine equilibrium binding was determined with isolated plasma membranes prepared from PC12 cells grown in suspension culture. The carrier-mediated uptake of 3H

  3. Development of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Secreting Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lund, Carina; Pulli, Kristiina; Yellapragada, Venkatram; Giacobini, Paolo; Lundin, Karolina; Vuoristo, Sanna; Tuuri, Timo; Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-08-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons regulate human puberty and reproduction. Modeling their development and function in vitro would be of interest for both basic research and clinical translation. Here, we report a three-step protocol to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into GnRH-secreting neurons. Firstly, hPSCs were differentiated to FOXG1, EMX2, and PAX6 expressing anterior neural progenitor cells (NPCs) by dual SMAD inhibition. Secondly, NPCs were treated for 10 days with FGF8, which is a key ligand implicated in GnRH neuron ontogeny, and finally, the cells were matured with Notch inhibitor to bipolar TUJ1-positive neurons that robustly expressed GNRH1 and secreted GnRH decapeptide into the culture medium. The protocol was reproducible both in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, and thus provides a translational tool for investigating the mechanisms of human puberty and its disorders. PMID:27426041

  4. The ventrolateral preoptic nucleus is required for propofol-induced inhibition of locus coeruleus neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Tian; Yuan, Jie; Yu, Bu-Wei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms underlying the unconsciousness of general anesthesia are not completely understood. Accumulating evidence indicates the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) in the endogenous sleep circuits may contribute to loss of consciousness (LOC) induced by GABA-enhancing anesthetics. However, there are few studies that look into distinct sleep pathway in the sleep-wake system. In the neural pathway from VLPO to the locus coeruleus (LC), we compared the inhibition effect of propofol on the LC activity before and after VLPO lesion in vivo rats. Systemic administration of propofol (20 mg/kg, i.p.) in normal rats caused a fast and obvious inhibition of LC neurons spontaneous firing (from 0.24 ± 0.06 to 0.12 ± 0.03 Hz). The LC neuronal firing rate of VLPO lesion rats only decreased to 0.18 ± 0.05 Hz (P = 0.021 vs. non-VLPO rats) after the propofol injection, and the time to reach the maximal inhibition level was also prolonged in VLPO lesion rats (2.3 ± 0.7 vs. 5.8 ± 1.2 min, P = 0.037). Microinjections of a selective GABAA receptor antagonist (SR95531) into the LC fully reversed the inhibitory effect of propofol on the LC neuronal activity, but did not significantly affect the latency to loss of righting reflex of rats after propofol administration (3.4 ± 0.9 vs. 3.7 ± 1.2 min, P = 0.639). Our results indicated that VLPO is necessary for the propofol-induced inhibition of LC activity, but the LC may not play an important role in the propofol-induced LOC.

  5. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. PMID:21370446

  6. Reduced neuronal inhibition and coordination of adolescent prefrontal cortex during motivated behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sturman, David A.; Moghaddam, Bita

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of both cognitive maturation and vulnerability to several major psychiatric illnesses and drug dependence. There is increasing awareness that behavioral or pharmacological intervention during this period may be critical for disease prevention in susceptible individuals. Therefore, we must attain a deeper understanding of how the adolescent brain processes salient events relevant to motivated behavior. To do this, we recorded single unit and local field potential activity in the orbitofrontal cortex of rats as they performed a simple reward-driven operant task. Adolescents encoded basic elements of the task differently than adults indicating that neuronal processing of salient events differs in the two age groups. Entrainment of local field potential oscillations, variance in spike timing and relative proportions of inhibitory and excitatory responses differed in an event-specific manner. Overall adolescent phasic neural activity was less inhibited and more variable through much of the task. Cortical inhibition is essential for efficient communication between neuronal groups, and reduced inhibitory control of cortical activity has been implicated in schizophrenia and other disorders. Thus, these results suggest that reduced inhibitory responses of adolescent cortical neurons to salient events could be a critical mechanism for some of the increased vulnerabilities of this period. PMID:21273431

  7. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  8. The natural history of sound localization in mammals – a story of neuronal inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Grothe, Benedikt; Pecka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Our concepts of sound localization in the vertebrate brain are widely based on the general assumption that both the ability to detect air-borne sounds and the neuronal processing are homologous in archosaurs (present day crocodiles and birds) and mammals. Yet studies repeatedly report conflicting results on the neuronal circuits and mechanisms, in particular the role of inhibition, as well as the coding strategies between avian and mammalian model systems. Here we argue that mammalian and avian phylogeny of spatial hearing is characterized by a convergent evolution of hearing air-borne sounds rather than by homology. In particular, the different evolutionary origins of tympanic ears and the different availability of binaural cues in early mammals and archosaurs imposed distinct constraints on the respective binaural processing mechanisms. The role of synaptic inhibition in generating binaural spatial sensitivity in mammals is highlighted, as it reveals a unifying principle of mammalian circuit design for encoding sound position. Together, we combine evolutionary, anatomical and physiological arguments for making a clear distinction between mammalian processing mechanisms and coding strategies and those of archosaurs. We emphasize that a consideration of the convergent nature of neuronal mechanisms will significantly increase the explanatory power of studies of spatial processing in both mammals and birds. PMID:25324726

  9. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later. PMID:6481819

  10. Phenotypic characteristics of hybrid cells generated by transferring neuronal nuclei into bone marrow stromal cell cytoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhujuan; Xu, Yan; Zhong, Qi; Zheng, Jian

    2012-02-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are promising donor cells for transplantation therapies for a variety of diseases. However, there still lack efficient ways to induce directional differentiation of BMSCs to promote their practical use in transplantation therapy. In this study, we constructed hybrid cells by transferring neuronal nuclei into BMSC cytoplasts and investigated the proliferative capacity and phenotypic characteristics of the hybrid cells. The neuronal nuclei were labeled with Hoechst 33342 before the transfer process, and the cell membrane antigen CD71 was used as a marker of BMSC cytoplasts. The BMSC cytoplasts and neuronal karyoplasts were separated by Ficoll density gradient ultracentrifugation. The hybrid cells were generated by the polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of BMSC cytoplasts with neuronal karyoplasts. The hybrid cells exhibited Hoechst 33342 staining in their nuclei and CD71 staining on their cytomembranes, which confirmed the success of cell fusion. The hybrid cells were positive for BrdU immunostaining. Viability analysis of the cultured hybrid cells by the MTT assay demonstrated their proliferative ability. Immunocytochemical staining revealed the expression of the neuron-specific markers NeuN and MAP2 in the third passage hybrid cells, which indicated their neuronal phenotypic characteristics. The results demonstrated that the hybrid cells produced by fusing neuronal karyoplasts with BMSC cytoplasts had proliferative capability and expressed the neuron-specific markers. Further study is required to investigate the phenotype of the hybrid cells both structurally and functionally.

  11. CCR7 signaling inhibits T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Ekkehard; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Förster, Reinhold; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2007-11-15

    CCR7 and its ligands, CCL19 and CCL21, are responsible for directing the migration of T cells and dendritic cells into lymph nodes, where these cells play an important role in the initiation of the immune response. Recently, we have shown that systemic application of CCL19-IgG is able to inhibit the colocalization of T cells and dendritic cells within secondary lymphoid organs, resulting in pronounced immunosuppression with reduced allograft rejection after organ transplantation. In this study, we demonstrate that the application of sustained high concentrations of either soluble or immobilized CCL19 and CCL21 elicits an inhibitory program in T cells. We show that these ligands specifically interfere with cell proliferation and IL-2 secretion of CCR7(+) cells. This could be demonstrated for human and murine T cells and was valid for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, CCL19 had no inhibitory effect on T cells from CCR7 knockout mice, but CCR7(-/-) T cells showed a proliferative response upon TCR-stimulation similar to that of CCL19-treated wild-type cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of proliferation is associated with delayed degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27(Kip1) and the down-regulation of CDK1. This shows that CCR7 signaling is linked to cell cycle control and that sustained engagement of CCR7, either by high concentrations of soluble ligands or by high density of immobilized ligands, is capable of inducing cell cycle arrest in TCR-stimulated cells. Thus, CCR7, a chemokine receptor that has been demonstrated to play an essential role during activation of the immune response, is also competent to directly inhibit T cell proliferation. PMID:17982037

  12. Inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors increases paraoxon-induced apoptosis in cultured neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xuan; Tian Feng; Okagaki, Peter; Marini, Ann M. . E-mail: amarini@usuhs.mil

    2005-10-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) compounds, used as insecticides and chemical warfare agents, are potent neurotoxins. We examined the neurotoxic effect of paraoxon (O,O-diethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phosphate), an organophosphate compound, and the role of NMDA receptors as a mechanism of action in cultured cerebellar granule cells. Paraoxon is neurotoxic to cultured rat cerebellar granule cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Cerebellar granule cells are less sensitive to the neurotoxic effects of paraoxon on day in vitro (DIV) 4 than neurons treated on DIV 8. Surprisingly, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801, enhances paraoxon-mediated neurotoxicity suggesting that NMDA receptors may play a protective role. Pretreatment with a subtoxic concentration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) [100 {mu}M] protects about 40% of the vulnerable neurons that would otherwise die from paraoxon-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, addition of a neuroprotective concentration of NMDA 3 h after treatment with paraoxon provides the same level of protection. Because paraoxon-mediated neuronal cell death is time-dependent, we hypothesized that apoptosis may be involved. Paraoxon increases apoptosis about 10-fold compared to basal levels. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor (Boc-D-FMK) and the caspase-9-specific inhibitor (Z-LEHD-FMK) protect against paraoxon-mediated apoptosis, paraoxon-stimulated caspase-3 activity and neuronal cell death. MK-801 increases, whereas NMDA blocks paraoxon-induced apoptosis and paraoxon-stimulated caspase-3 activity. These results suggest that activation of NMDA receptors protect neurons against paraoxon-induced neurotoxicity by blocking apoptosis initiated by paraoxon.

  13. Glial cell regulation of neuronal activity and blood flow in the retina by release of gliotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes in the brain release transmitters that actively modulate neuronal excitability and synaptic efficacy. Astrocytes also release vasoactive agents that contribute to neurovascular coupling. As reviewed in this article, Müller cells, the principal retinal glial cells, modulate neuronal activity and blood flow in the retina. Stimulated Müller cells release ATP which, following its conversion to adenosine by ectoenzymes, hyperpolarizes retinal ganglion cells by activation of A1 adenosine receptors. This results in the opening of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels. Tonic release of ATP also contributes to the generation of tone in the retinal vasculature by activation of P2X receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells. Vascular tone is lost when glial cells are poisoned with the gliotoxin fluorocitrate. The glial release of vasoactive metabolites of arachidonic acid, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), contributes to neurovascular coupling in the retina. Neurovascular coupling is reduced when neuronal stimulation of glial cells is interrupted and when the synthesis of arachidonic acid metabolites is blocked. Neurovascular coupling is compromised in diabetic retinopathy owing to the loss of glial-mediated vasodilation. This loss can be reversed by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase. It is likely that future research will reveal additional important functions of the release of transmitters from glial cells. PMID:26009774

  14. Cholesterol reduction by methyl-β-cyclodextrin attenuates the delta opioid receptor-mediated signaling in neuronal cells but enhances it in non-neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Xu, Wei; Yoon, Su-In; Chen, Chongguang; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2008-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been shown to be located in and regulated by lipid rafts/caveolae in caveolin-rich non-neuronal cells. Here, we found that caveolin-1 level was very low in rat brain and undetectable in NG108-15 cells, which endogenously express delta opioid receptors (DOR). Rat caudate putamen (CPu) membranes, NG108-15 cells and CHO cells stably transfected with FLAG-mouse-DOR (CHO-FLAG-mDOR) were homogenized, sonicated in a detergent-free 0.5 M Na2CO3 buffer and fractionated through discontinuous or continuous sucrose density gradients. About 70% of opioid receptors in CPu and DOR in both cell lines were present in low-density (5-20% sucrose) membrane-domains enriched in cholesterol and ganglioside M1 (GM1), characteristics of lipid rafts in plasma membranes. In both cells, stimulation with permeable or non-permeable full agonists, but not with partial or inverse agonists, for 30 min shifted ∼25% of DORs out of rafts, by a naloxone-reversible and pertussis toxin-insensitive mechanism, which may undergo internalization. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) treatment greatly reduced cholesterol and shifted DOR to higher-density fractions and decreased DPDPE affinities. MCD treatment attenuated DPDPE-induced [35S]GTPγS binding in CPu and NG108-15 cells, but enhanced it in CHO-FLAG-mDOR cells. In CHO-FLAG-mDOR cells, Gαi co-immunoprecipitated with caveolin-1, which was shown to inhibit Gαi/o, and MCD treatment dramatically reduced the association leading to disinhibition. Thus, although localization in rafts and agonist-induced shift of DOR are independent of caveolin-1, lipid rafts sustain DOR-mediated signaling in caveolin-deficient neuronal cells, but appear to inhibit it in caveolin-enriched non-neuronal cells. Cholesterol-dependent association of caveolin-1 with and the resulting inhibition of G proteins may be a contributing factor. PMID:17141202

  15. YiQiFuMai Powder Injection Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    YiQiFuMai (YQFM) powder injection as a modern preparation derived from Sheng Mai San, a traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, its neuroprotective effect and underlying mechanism in cerebral ischemia remain to be explored. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of YQFM on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated neuronal apoptosis in the permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion- (MCAO-) injured mice and the oxygen-glucose deprivation- (OGD-) induced pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The results showed that single administration of YQFM (1.342 g/kg, i.p.) could reduce the brain infarction and improve the neurological deficits and the cerebral blood flow (CBF) after MCAO for 24 h in mice. Moreover, incubation with YQFM (100, 200, and 400 μg/mL) could increase the cell viability, decrease the caspase-3 activity, and inhibit the cell apoptosis in OGD-induced PC12 cells for 12 h. In addition, YQFM treatment could significantly modulate cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2 expressions and inhibit the expressions of ER stress-related marker proteins and signaling pathways in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that YQFM ameliorates cerebral ischemic injury linked with modulating ER stress-related signaling pathways, which provided some new insights for its prevention and treatment of cerebral ischemia diseases. PMID:27087890

  16. Expression of PKC iota affects neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells at least partly independent of kinase function

    PubMed Central

    Doonachar, Alana; Schoenfeld, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical PKC (aPKC) plays a role in establishing cell polarity and has been indicated in neuronal differentiation and polarization, including neurite formation in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, albeit by unclear mechanisms. Here, the role of the aPKC isoform, PKC iota (PKCι), in the early neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells was investigated. NGF-treated PC12 cells with stably expressed exogenous wild-type PKCι showed decreased expression of a neuroendocrine marker, increased expression of a neuronal marker, and increased neurite formation. Stable expression of a kinase- inactive PKCι, but not constitutively active PKCι lacking a regulatory domain, had similar although less potent effects. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous aPKC kinase activity in parental PC12 cells did not inhibit neurite formation, suggesting that some of the observed effects of PKCι expression on neuronal differentiation are kinase- independent. Interestingly, exogenous expression of wild-type and kinase-inactive PKCι had little effect on overall PKCι activity, but caused a decrease in PKC zeta (PKCζ) kinase activity, suggesting an interplay between the two isoforms that may underlie the observed results. Overall, these findings suggest that in PC12 and perhaps other neuroendocrine precursor cells, PKCι influences an early differentiation decision between the neuroendocrine (chromaffin) and sympathetic neuron cell lineages, potentially by affecting PKCζ function. PMID:24910851

  17. Neuronal Firing Rate Homeostasis Is Inhibited by Sleep and Promoted by Wake.

    PubMed

    Hengen, Keith B; Torrado Pacheco, Alejandro; McGregor, James N; Van Hooser, Stephen D; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2016-03-24

    Homeostatic mechanisms stabilize neural circuit function by keeping firing rates within a set-point range, but whether this process is gated by brain state is unknown. Here, we monitored firing rate homeostasis in individual visual cortical neurons in freely behaving rats as they cycled between sleep and wake states. When neuronal firing rates were perturbed by visual deprivation, they gradually returned to a precise, cell-autonomous set point during periods of active wake, with lengthening of the wake period enhancing firing rate rebound. Unexpectedly, this resetting of neuronal firing was suppressed during sleep. This raises the possibility that memory consolidation or other sleep-dependent processes are vulnerable to interference from homeostatic plasticity mechanisms. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26997481

  18. Neuronal Firing Rate Homeostasis Is Inhibited by Sleep and Promoted by Wake.

    PubMed

    Hengen, Keith B; Torrado Pacheco, Alejandro; McGregor, James N; Van Hooser, Stephen D; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2016-03-24

    Homeostatic mechanisms stabilize neural circuit function by keeping firing rates within a set-point range, but whether this process is gated by brain state is unknown. Here, we monitored firing rate homeostasis in individual visual cortical neurons in freely behaving rats as they cycled between sleep and wake states. When neuronal firing rates were perturbed by visual deprivation, they gradually returned to a precise, cell-autonomous set point during periods of active wake, with lengthening of the wake period enhancing firing rate rebound. Unexpectedly, this resetting of neuronal firing was suppressed during sleep. This raises the possibility that memory consolidation or other sleep-dependent processes are vulnerable to interference from homeostatic plasticity mechanisms. PAPERCLIP.

  19. IgLON cell adhesion molecules are shed from the cell surface of cortical neurons to promote neuronal growth.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ricardo; Ferraro, Gino B; Fournier, Alyson E

    2015-02-13

    Matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases are members of the zinc endopeptidases, which cleave components of the extracellular matrix as well as cell surface proteins resulting in degradation or release of biologically active fragments. Surface ectodomain shedding affects numerous biological processes, including survival, axon outgrowth, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the role of metalloproteinases in regulating cortical neurite growth. We found that treatment of mature cortical neurons with pan-metalloproteinase inhibitors or with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-3 reduced neurite outgrowth. Through mass spectrometry, we characterized the metalloproteinase-sensitive cell surface proteome of mature cortical neurons. Members of the IgLON family of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neural cell adhesion molecules were identified and validated as proteins that were shed from the surface of mature cortical neurons in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner. Introduction of two members of the IgLON family, neurotrimin and NEGR1, in early embryonic neurons was sufficient to confer sensitivity to metalloproteinase inhibitors in neurite outgrowth assays. Outgrowth experiments on immobilized IgLON proteins revealed a role for all IgLON family members in promoting neurite extension from cortical neurons. Together, our findings support a role for metalloproteinase-dependent shedding of IgLON family members in regulating neurite outgrowth from mature cortical neurons.

  20. Inhibition of repulsive guidance molecule, RGMa, increases afferent synapse formation with auditory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Brugeaud, Aurore; Tong, Mingjie; Luo, Li; Edge, Albert S B

    2014-04-01

    The peripheral fibers that extend from auditory neurons to hair cells are sensitive to damage, and replacement of the fibers and their afferent synapse with hair cells would be of therapeutic interest. Here, we show that RGMa, a repulsive guidance molecule previously shown to play a role in the development of the chick visual system, is expressed in the developing, newborn, and mature mouse inner ear. The effect of RGMa on synaptogenesis between afferent neurons and hair cells, from which afferent connections had been removed, was assessed. Contact of neural processes with hair cells and elaboration of postsynaptic densities at sites of the ribbon synapse were increased by treatment with a blocking antibody to RGMa, and pruning of auditory fibers to achieve the mature branching pattern of afferent neurons was accelerated. Inhibition by RGMa could thus explain why auditory neurons have a low capacity to regenerate peripheral processes: postnatal spiral ganglion neurons retain the capacity to send out processes that respond to signals for synapse formation, but expression of RGMa postnatally appears to be detrimental to regeneration of afferent hair cell innervation and antagonizes synaptogenesis. Increased synaptogenesis after inhibition of RGMa suggests that manipulation of guidance or inhibitory factors may provide a route to increase formation of new synapses at deafferented hair cells.

  1. Bilateral inhibition generates neuronal responses tuned to interaural level differences in the auditory brainstem of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Adolphs, R

    1993-09-01

    I investigated the neural algorithms by which neurons gain selectivity for interaural level difference in the brainstem of the barn owl (Tyto alba). Differences in the timing and in the level of sounds at the ears are used by this owl to encode, respectively, azimuthal and vertical position of sound sources in space. These two cues are processed in two parallel neural pathways. Below the level of the inferior colliculus, all neurons in the pathway that processes level differences show responses to this cue that are monotonic, and thus not selective for a particular level difference. Only in the inferior colliculus, which contains a map of auditory space, are neurons sharply tuned to specific interaural level differences. How are these response properties generated from those of the nuclei that provide input to the inferior colliculus? I show that the posterior subdivision of the nucleus ventralis lemnisci lateralis (VLVp) projects bilaterally to the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus, the input stage to the map of auditory space. Both these nuclei are part of the pathway that processes interaural level differences. Manipulations of the responses in VLVp affected the responses to level differences in the inferior colliculus; responses to time differences were unaffected. By systematically increasing or decreasing neural activity in VLVp, I show that the VLVp on each side provides inhibition to the colliculus at large level differences. This results in a peaked response that is tuned to level differences in the inferior colliculus. Some cells in the lateral shell of the inferior colliculus appear to receive direct GABAergic inhibition from VLVp. I suggest that this circuitry and the algorithms it supports are the neural substrates that allow the barn owl to exploit level differences for computation of sound source elevation. PMID:7690063

  2. Activation of a muscarinic receptor selectively inhibits a rapidly inactivated Ca2+ current in rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Wanke, E; Ferroni, A; Malgaroli, A; Ambrosini, A; Pozzan, T; Meldolesi, J

    1987-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons dissociated from the superior cervical ganglion of 2-day-old rats were studied by whole-cell patch clamp and by fura-2 measurements of the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i. Step depolarizations in the presence of tetrodotoxin and hexamethonium triggered two Ca2+ currents that differed in the voltage dependence of activation and kinetics of inactivation. These currents resemble the L and N currents previously described in chicken sensory neurons [Nowycky, M. C., Fox, A. P. & Tsien, R. W. (1985) Nature (London) 316, 440-442]. Treatment with acetylcholine resulted in the rapid (within seconds), selective, and reversible inhibition of the rapidly inactivated, N-type current, whereas the long-lasting L-type current remained unaffected. The high sensitivity to blocker drugs (atropine, pirenzepine) indicated that this effect of acetylcholine was due to a muscarinic M1 receptor. Intracellular perfusion with nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide analogs or pretreatment of the neurons with pertussis toxin had profound effects on the Ca2+ current modulation. Guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate caused the disappearance of the N-type current (an effect akin to that of acetylcholine, but irreversible), whereas guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate and pertussis toxin pretreatment prevented the acetylcholine-induced inhibition. In contrast, cAMP, applied intracellularly together with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, as well as activators and inhibitors of protein kinase C, were without effect. Acetylcholine caused shortening of action potentials in neurons treated with tetraethylammonium to partially block K+ channels. Moreover, when applied to neurons loaded with the fluorescent indicator fura-2, acetylcholine failed to appreciably modify [Ca2+]i at rest but caused a partial blunting of the initial [Ca2+]i peak induced by depolarization with high K+. This effect was blocked by muscarinic antagonists and pertussis toxin and was unaffected by protein kinase

  3. Crosstalk between Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial H2O2 is required for rotenone inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway leading to neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Ruijie; Zhang, Hai; Liu, Wen; Xu, Chong; Liu, Lei; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2016-01-01

    Rotenone, a neurotoxic pesticide, induces loss of dopaminergic neurons related to Parkinson's disease. Previous studies have shown that rotenone induces neuronal apoptosis partly by triggering hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent suppression of mTOR pathway. However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show that rotenone elevates intracellular free calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) level, and activates CaMKII, resulting in inhibition of mTOR signaling and induction of neuronal apoptosis. Chelating [Ca2+]i with BAPTA/AM, preventing extracellular Ca2+ influx using EGTA, inhibiting CaMKII with KN93, or silencing CaMKII significantly attenuated rotenone-induced H2O2 production, mTOR inhibition, and cell death. Interestingly, using TTFA, antimycin A, catalase or Mito-TEMPO, we found that rotenone-induced mitochondrial H2O2 also in turn elevated [Ca2+]i level, thereby stimulating CaMKII, leading to inhibition of mTOR pathway and induction of neuronal apoptosis. Expression of wild type mTOR or constitutively active S6K1, or silencing 4E-BP1 strengthened the inhibitory effects of catalase, Mito-TEMPO, BAPTA/AM or EGTA on rotenone-induced [Ca2+]i elevation, CaMKII phosphorylation and neuronal apoptosis. Together, the results indicate that the crosstalk between Ca2+ signaling and mitochondrial H2O2 is required for rotenone inhibition of mTOR-mediated S6K1 and 4E-BP1 pathways. Our findings suggest that how to control over-elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and overproduction of mitochondrial H2O2 may be a new approach to deal with the neurotoxicity of rotenone. PMID:26859572

  4. Functional switching of ATM: sensor of DNA damage in proliferating cells and mediator of Akt survival signal in post-mitotic human neuron-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Xiong, Hua; Yang, Da-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar ataxia and oculocutaneous telangiectasias. The gene mutated in this disease, ATM (A-T, mutated), encodes a 370-kDa Ser/Thr protein kinase. ATM not only mediates cellular response to DNA damage but also acts as an activator of Akt in response to insulin. However, despite intensive studies, the mechanism underlying the neuronal degeneration symptoms of human A-T is still poorly understood. We found that the topoisomerase inhibitors etoposide and camptothecin readily induced apoptosis in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but could not induce apoptosis in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, etoposide induced p53 phosphorylation and H2AX foci formation in proliferating SH-SY5Y cells but failed to do so in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, while inhibition of ATM in undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells partially protected them from etoposide-induced apoptosis, the same treatment had no effect on cell viability in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that DNA damage or defective response to DNA damage is not the cause of neuronal cell death in human A-T. In contrast, we discovered that Akt phosphorylation was inhibited when ATM activity was suppressed in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM induced apoptosis following serum starvation in neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells but could not trigger apoptosis under the same conditions in undifferentiated proliferating SH-SY5Y cells. These results demonstrate that ATM mediates the Akt signaling and promotes cell survival in neuron-like human SH-SY5Y cells, suggesting that impaired activation of Akt is the reason for neuronal degeneration in human A-T. PMID:22739265

  5. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 2 reverses impaired cognition and neuronal remodeling caused by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Sun, Jiao; Ding, Lianshu; Ruan, Lina; Reed, Miranda; Yu, Xuefeng; Klabnik, Jonathan; Lin, Dan; Li, Jianxin; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Hanting; O'Donnell, James M

    2015-02-01

    Chronic stress and neuronal vulnerability have recently been recognized as factors contributing to cognitive disorders. One way to modify neuronal vulnerability is through mediation of phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2), an enzyme that exerts its action on cognitive processes via the control of intracellular second messengers, cGMP and, to a lesser extent, cAMP. This study explored the effects of a PDE2 inhibitor, Bay 60-7550, on stress-induced learning and memory dysfunction in terms of its ramification on behavioral, morphologic, and molecular changes. Bay 60-7550 reversed stress-induced cognitive impairment in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and location tasks (object recognition test and/or object location test), effects prevented by treatment with 7-NI, a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase; MK801, a glutamate receptor (NMDAR) inhibitor; myr-AIP, a CaMKII inhibitor; and KT5823, a protein kinase G inhibitor. Bay 60-7550 also ameliorated stress-induced structural remodeling in the CA1 of the hippocampus, leading to increases in dendritic branching, length, and spine density. However, the neuroplasticity initiated by Bay 60-7550 was not seen in the presence of 7-NI, MK801, myr-AIP, or KT5823. PDE2 inhibition reduced stress-induced extracellular-regulated protein kinase activation and attenuated stress-induced decreases in transcription factors (e.g., Elk-1, TORC1, and CREB phosphorylation) and plasticity-related proteins (e.g., Egr-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor). Pretreatment with inhibitors of NMDA, CaMKII, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and protein kinase G (or protein kinase A) blocked the effects of Bay 60-7550 on cGMP or cAMP signaling. These findings indicate that the effect of PDE2 inhibition on stress-induced memory impairment is potentially mediated via modulation of neuroplasticity-related NMDAR-CaMKII-cGMP/cAMP signaling. PMID:25442113

  6. Pharmacologic inhibition of reactive gliosis blocks TNF-α-mediated neuronal apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Livne-Bar, Izhar; Lam, Susy; Chan, Darren; Guo, Xiaoxin; Askar, Idil; Nahirnyj, Adrian; Flanagan, John G; Sivak, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is an early pathological feature common to most neurodegenerative diseases, yet its regulation and impact remain poorly understood. Normally astrocytes maintain a critical homeostatic balance. After stress or injury they undergo rapid parainflammatory activation, characterized by hypertrophy, and increased polymerization of type III intermediate filaments (IFs), particularly glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin. However, the consequences of IF dynamics in the adult CNS remains unclear, and no pharmacologic tools have been available to target this mechanism in vivo. The mammalian retina is an accessible model to study the regulation of astrocyte stress responses, and their influence on retinal neuronal homeostasis. In particular, our work and others have implicated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling as a key regulator of glutamate recycling, antioxidant activity and cytokine secretion by astrocytes and related Müller glia, with potent influences on neighboring neurons. Here we report experiments with the small molecule inhibitor, withaferin A (WFA), to specifically block type III IF dynamics in vivo. WFA was administered in a model of metabolic retinal injury induced by kainic acid, and in combination with a recent model of debridement-induced astrocyte reactivity. We show that WFA specifically targets IFs and reduces astrocyte and Müller glial reactivity in vivo. Inhibition of glial IF polymerization blocked p38 MAPK-dependent secretion of TNF-α, resulting in markedly reduced neuronal apoptosis. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of IF dynamics in reactive glia protects neurons in vivo. PMID:27685630

  7. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 2 reverses impaired cognition and neuronal remodeling caused by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Sun, Jiao; Ding, Lianshu; Ruan, Lina; Reed, Miranda; Yu, Xuefeng; Klabnik, Jonathan; Lin, Dan; Li, Jianxin; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Hanting; O'Donnell, James M

    2015-02-01

    Chronic stress and neuronal vulnerability have recently been recognized as factors contributing to cognitive disorders. One way to modify neuronal vulnerability is through mediation of phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2), an enzyme that exerts its action on cognitive processes via the control of intracellular second messengers, cGMP and, to a lesser extent, cAMP. This study explored the effects of a PDE2 inhibitor, Bay 60-7550, on stress-induced learning and memory dysfunction in terms of its ramification on behavioral, morphologic, and molecular changes. Bay 60-7550 reversed stress-induced cognitive impairment in the Morris water maze, novel object recognition, and location tasks (object recognition test and/or object location test), effects prevented by treatment with 7-NI, a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase; MK801, a glutamate receptor (NMDAR) inhibitor; myr-AIP, a CaMKII inhibitor; and KT5823, a protein kinase G inhibitor. Bay 60-7550 also ameliorated stress-induced structural remodeling in the CA1 of the hippocampus, leading to increases in dendritic branching, length, and spine density. However, the neuroplasticity initiated by Bay 60-7550 was not seen in the presence of 7-NI, MK801, myr-AIP, or KT5823. PDE2 inhibition reduced stress-induced extracellular-regulated protein kinase activation and attenuated stress-induced decreases in transcription factors (e.g., Elk-1, TORC1, and CREB phosphorylation) and plasticity-related proteins (e.g., Egr-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor). Pretreatment with inhibitors of NMDA, CaMKII, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and protein kinase G (or protein kinase A) blocked the effects of Bay 60-7550 on cGMP or cAMP signaling. These findings indicate that the effect of PDE2 inhibition on stress-induced memory impairment is potentially mediated via modulation of neuroplasticity-related NMDAR-CaMKII-cGMP/cAMP signaling.

  8. Chondroitin sulphate inhibits connective tissue mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Theoharides, T C; Patra, P; Boucher, W; Letourneau, R; Kempuraj, D; Chiang, G; Jeudy, S; Hesse, Leah; Athanasiou, A

    2000-01-01

    Mast cells derive from the bone marrow and are responsible for the development of allergic and possibly inflammatory reactions. Mast cells are stimulated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) and specific antigen, but also by a number of neuropeptides such as neurotensin (NT), somatostatin or substance P (SP), to secrete numerous pro-inflammatory molecules that include histamine, cytokines and proteolytic enzymes.Chondroitin sulphate, a major constituent of connective tissues and of mast cell secretory granules, had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on rat peritoneal mast cell release of histamine induced by the mast cell secretagogue compound 48/80 (48/80). This inhibition was stronger than that of the clinically available mast cell ‘stabilizer' disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn). Inhibition by chondroitin sulphate increased with the length of preincubation and persisted after the drug was washed off, while the effect of cromolyn was limited by rapid tachyphylaxis.Immunologic stimulation of histamine secretion from rat connective tissue mast cells (CTMC) was also inhibited, but this effect was weaker in umbilical cord-derived human mast cells and was absent in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells which are considered homologous to mucosal mast cells (MMC). Oligo- and monosaccharides were not as effective as the polysaccharides.Inhibition, documented by light and electron microscopy, involved a decrease of intracellular calcium ion levels shown by confocal microscopy and image analysis. Autoradiography at the ultrastructural level showed that chondroitin sulphate was mostly associated with plasma and perigranular membranes.Chondroitin sulphate appears to be a potent mast cell inhibitor of allergic and nonimmune stimulation with potential clinical implications. PMID:11082109

  9. Procaspase-activating compound 1 induces a caspase-3-dependent cell death in cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Gulzeb; Akselsen, Oyvind W.; Hansen, Trond V.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2010-09-15

    Procaspase-activating compound 1, PAC-1, has been introduced as a direct activator of procaspase-3 and has been suggested as a therapeutic agent against cancer. Its activation of procaspase-3 is dependent on the chelation of zinc. We have tested PAC-1 and an analogue of PAC-1 as zinc chelators in vitro as well as their ability to activate caspase-3 and induce cell death in chicken cerebellar granule neuron cultures. These neurons are non-dividing, primary cells with normal caspase-3. The results reported herein show that PAC-1 chelates zinc, activates procaspase-3, and leads to caspase-3-dependent cell death in neurons, as the specific caspase-3-inhibitor Ac-DEVD-cmk inhibited both the caspase-3 activity and cell death. Thus, chicken cerebellar granule neurons is a suitable model to study mechanisms of interference with apoptosis of PAC-1 and similar compounds. Furthermore, the present study also raises concern about potential neurotoxicity of PAC-1 if used in cancer therapy.

  10. Dominant inhibitory Ras delays Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Joe, A K; Ferrari, G; Jiang, H H; Liang, X H; Levine, B

    1996-01-01

    Mature neurons are more resistant than dividing cells or differentiating neurons to Sindbis virus-induced apoptotic death. Therefore, we hypothesized that mitogenic signal transduction pathways may influence susceptibility to Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis. Since Ras, a 21-kDa GTP-binding protein, plays an important role in cellular proliferation and neuronal differentiation, we investigated the effect of an inducible dominant inhibitory Ras on Sindbis virus-induced death of a rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12 cells. Dexamethasone induction of dominant inhibitory Ras (Ha Ras(Asn17)) expression in transfected PC12 cell lines (MMTV-M17-21 and GSrasDN6 cells) resulted in a marked delay in Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis, compared with infected, uninduced cells. The delay in death after Sindbis virus infection in induced versus uninduced PC12 cells was not associated with differences in viral titers or viral infectivity. No delay in Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis was observed in Ha Ras(Asn17)-transfected PC12 cells if dexamethasone induction was initiated less than 12 h before Sindbis virus infection or in wild-type PC12 cells infected with a chimeric Sindbis virus construct that expresses Ha Ras(Asn17). The delay in Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis in induced Ha Ras(Asn17)-transfected PC12 cells was associated with a decrease in cellular DNA synthesis as measured by 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation. Thus, in PC12 cells, inducible dominant inhibitory Ras inhibits cellular proliferation and delays Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that a Ras-dependent signaling pathway is a determinant of neuronal susceptibility to Sindbis virus-induced apoptosis. PMID:8892895

  11. Safrole oxide induces neuronal apoptosis through inhibition of integrin beta4/SOD activity and elevation of ROS/NADPH oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Le; Zhao, BaoXiang; Lv, Xin; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, ShangLi; Miao, JunYing

    2007-02-20

    Neuronal apoptosis is a very important event in the development of the central nervous system (CNS), but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We have previously shown that safrole oxide, a small molecule, induces integrin beta4 expression and promotes apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells. In this study, the effects of safrole oxide on cell growth and apoptosis have been examined in primary cultures of mouse neurons. Safrole oxide was found to significantly inhibit neuronal cell growth and to induce apoptosis. The inhibitory and apoptotic activities of safrole oxide followed a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, the expression of integrin beta4 was significantly inhibited with safrole oxide treatment. Furthermore, safrole oxide dramatically increases the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activity of NADPH oxidase. Moreover, manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity was decreased significantly with safrole oxide treatment. Our study thus demonstrates that safrole oxide induces neuronal apoptosis through integrin beta4, ROS, NADPH, and MnSOD.

  12. TACE (ADAM17) inhibits Schwann cell myelination.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Rosa; Cerri, Federica; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Bachi, Angela; Feltri, M Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Blobel, Carl P; Quattrini, Angelo; Salzer, James L; Taveggia, Carla

    2011-06-12

    Tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE; also known as ADAM17) is a proteolytic sheddase that is responsible for the cleavage of several membrane-bound molecules. We report that TACE cleaves neuregulin-1 (NRG1) type III in the epidermal growth factor domain, probably inactivating it (as assessed by deficient activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase pathway), and thereby negatively regulating peripheral nervous system (PNS) myelination. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of TACE in vitro in dorsal root ganglia neurons accelerates the onset of myelination and results in hypermyelination. In agreement, motor neurons of conditional knockout mice lacking TACE specifically in these cells are significantly hypermyelinated, and small-caliber fibers are aberrantly myelinated. Further, reduced TACE activity rescues hypomyelination in NRG1 type III haploinsufficient mice in vivo. We also show that the inhibitory effect of TACE is neuron-autonomous, as Schwann cells lacking TACE elaborate myelin of normal thickness. Thus, TACE is a modulator of NRG1 type III activity and is a negative regulator of myelination in the PNS.

  13. Prolonged GABAA-mediated inhibition following single hair afferent input to single spinal dorsal horn neurones in cats.

    PubMed

    De Koninck, Y; Henry, J L

    1994-04-01

    To study the central processing mechanisms of sensory input from low threshold afferents to the spinal cord, we examined the excitatory response of single lumbar dorsal horn neurones to stimulation of hairs in the receptive field using a mechanically driven probe, and to activation of single hair follicle afferents using an intracellular current pulse to the cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglion. Experiments were done on anaesthetized, paralysed cats, spinalized at the L1 lumbar level. Responses of spinal neurones to two types of hair afferent input were characteristically different. The excitatory response to input from a single group II hair afferent (A beta; innervating guard hair follicle receptors) was multimodal, characterized by a small early depolarization followed by a sharp, large component with a slow, prolonged decay phase, whereas the response to input from a single group III hair afferent (A delta; innervating down hair follicle receptors) was unimodal. The unitary EPSPs in response to activation of group III hair afferents had a slower rise time and longer decay time constant than those in response to activation of group II hair afferents. When the receptive field of the afferent was located in the centre of the receptive field of the dorsal horn neurone, the gain of the central response was greater for the input from a single group II afferent (> 1) than that for the input from a single group III afferent (< 1). In the case of single group II hair afferents, when pairs of single action potentials or pairs of trains of action potentials were generated at intervals of 20 ms to 3 s, the response in the dorsal horn neurone to the second volley was markedly depressed at intervals of less than 2 s, without any apparent inhibition of the on-going rate of firing. The response to the second volley in single group III afferents was less depressed. This inhibition of the response to the second of a paired volley in single group II hair afferents was

  14. TRF2 dysfunction elicits DNA damage responses associated with senescence in proliferating neural cells and differentiation of neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peisu; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Opresko, Patricia L; Xu, Xiangru; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Mattson, Mark P

    2006-04-01

    Telomeres are specialized structures at the ends of chromosomes that consist of tandem repeats of the DNA sequence TTAGGG and several proteins that protect the DNA and regulate the plasticity of the telomeres. The telomere-associated protein TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is critical for the control of telomere structure and function; TRF2 dysfunction results in the exposure of the telomere ends and activation of ATM (ataxia telangiectasin mutated)-mediated DNA damage response. Recent findings suggest that telomere attrition can cause senescence or apoptosis of mitotic cells, but the function of telomeres in differentiated neurons is unknown. Here, we examined the impact of telomere dysfunction via TRF2 inhibition in neurons (primary embryonic hippocampal neurons) and mitotic neural cells (astrocytes and neuroblastoma cells). We demonstrate that telomere dysfunction induced by adenovirus-mediated expression of dominant-negative TRF2 (DN-TRF2) triggers a DNA damage response involving the formation of nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX and activated ATM in each cell type. In mitotic neural cells DN-TRF2 induced activation of both p53 and p21 and senescence (as indicated by an up-regulation of beta-galactosidase). In contrast, in neurons DN-TRF2 increased p21, but neither p53 nor beta-galactosidase was induced. In addition, TRF2 inhibition enhanced the morphological, molecular and biophysical differentiation of hippocampal neurons. These findings demonstrate divergent molecular and physiological responses to telomere dysfunction in mitotic neural cells and neurons, indicate a role for TRF2 in regulating neuronal differentiation, and suggest a potential therapeutic application of inhibition of TRF2 function in the treatment of neural tumors. PMID:16539655

  15. Synchronization in two neurons: Results for a two-component dynamical model with time-delayed inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renversez, Gilles

    1998-03-01

    We study synchronization in two neurons using two-dimensional neuronal models coupled through threshold delayed inhibition, acting for a fixed duration T. We explain the mechanism of synchronization between the two coupled units by means of phase-plane analysis. Using a piecewise linear approximation, we compute the firing times of two mutually coupled neurons, which allows a quantitative study of synchronization. The results are in good agreement, both quantitatively and qualitatively, with the numerical simulations of the full nonlinear coupled system describing the two neurons. We first show that, with simple inhibition, only phase-lagged synchronization can be achieved except for a particular set of T-values. We then show that coincidence synchronization can rapidly be achieved with an improved coupling model which takes into account the increase of membrane conductance during inhibition.

  16. Trifluoperazine and dibucaine-induced inhibition of glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization in rat cultured forebrain neurones.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, K R; Sharma, T A; Reynolds, I J

    1997-11-01

    1. Glutamate receptor activation has been previously shown to result in mitochondrial depolarization and activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cultured neurones. In this study, we characterized the effects of two putative permeability transition inhibitors, namely trifluoperazine and dibucaine, on mitochondrial depolarization in rat intact, cultured forebrain neurones. 2. Permeability transition was monitored by following mitochondrial depolarization in neurones loaded with the mitochondrial membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent indicator, JC-1. Trifluoperazine (10 20 microM) and dibucaine (50-100 microM) inhibited or delayed the onset of glutamate-induced permeability transition. 3. We also investigated the effects of trifluoperazine and dibucaine on neuronal recovery from glutamate-induced Ca2+ loads. Trifluoperazine affected Ca2+ recovery in a manner similar to the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor, CGP-37157, while dibucaine had no apparent effect on Ca2+ recovery. Therefore, inhibition of permeability transition does not appear to be involved in Ca2+ recovery from glutamate-induced Ca2+ loads. 4. Trifluoperazine and dibucaine did not inhibit [3H]-dizocilpine binding at the concentrations that prevented mitochondrial depolarization. 5. These studies suggest that trifluoperazine and dibucaine inhibit permeability transition in intact neurones. Trifluoperazine also appears to inhibit mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These drugs should prove to be valuable tools in the further study of the role of mitochondrial permeability transition in glutamate-induced neuronal death.

  17. Trifluoperazine and dibucaine-induced inhibition of glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization in rat cultured forebrain neurones

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Kari R; Sharma, Terre A; Reynolds, Ian J

    1997-01-01

    Glutamate receptor activation has been previously shown to result in mitochondrial depolarization and activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cultured neurones. In this study, we characterized the effects of two putative permeability transition inhibitors, namely trifluoperazine and dibucaine, on mitochondrial depolarization in rat intact, cultured forebrain neurones. Permeability transition was monitored by following mitochondrial depolarization in neurones loaded with the mitochondrial membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent indicator, JC-1. Trifluoperazine (10–20 μM) and dibucaine (50–100 μM) inhibited or delayed the onset of glutamate-induced permeability transition. We also investigated the effects of trifluoperazine and dibucaine on neuronal recovery from glutamate-induced Ca2+ loads. Trifluoperazine affected Ca2+ recovery in a manner similar to the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor, CGP-37157, while dibucaine had no apparent effect on Ca2+ recovery. Therefore, inhibition of permeability transition does not appear to be involved in Ca2+ recovery from glutamate-induced Ca2+ loads. Trifluoperazine and dibucaine did not inhibit [3H]-dizocilpine binding at the concentrations that prevented mitochondrial depolarization. These studies suggest that trifluoperazine and dibucaine inhibit permeability transition in intact neurones. Trifluoperazine also appears to inhibit mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These drugs should prove to be valuable tools in the further study of the role of mitochondrial permeability transition in glutamate-induced neuronal death. PMID:9384493

  18. A 24-Residue Peptide (p5), Derived from p35, the Cdk5 Neuronal Activator, Specifically Inhibits Cdk5-p25 Hyperactivity and Tau Hyperphosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ya-Li; Amin, Niranjana D.; Hu, Ya-Fang; Rudrabhatla, Parvathi; Shukla, Varsha; Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Kesavapany, Sashi; Grant, Philip; Albers, Wayne; Pant, Harish C.

    2010-01-01

    The activity of Cdk5-p35 is tightly regulated in the developing and mature nervous system. Stress-induced cleavage of the activator p35 to p25 and a p10 N-terminal domain induces deregulated Cdk5 hyperactivity and perikaryal aggregations of hyperphosphorylated Tau and neurofilaments, pathogenic hallmarks in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, respectively. Previously, we identified a 125-residue truncated fragment of p35 called CIP that effectively and specifically inhibited Cdk5-p25 activity and Tau hyperphosphorylation induced by Aβ peptides in vitro, in HEK293 cells, and in neuronal cells. Although these results offer a possible therapeutic approach to those neurodegenerative diseases assumed to derive from Cdk5-p25 hyperactivity and/or Aβ induced pathology, CIP is too large for successful therapeutic regimens. To identify a smaller, more effective peptide, in this study we prepared a 24-residue peptide, p5, spanning CIP residues Lys245–Ala277. p5 more effectively inhibited Cdk5-p25 activity than did CIP in vitro. In neuron cells, p5 inhibited deregulated Cdk5-p25 activity but had no effect on the activity of endogenous Cdk5-p35 or on any related endogenous cyclin-dependent kinases in HEK293 cells. Specificity of p5 inhibition in cortical neurons may depend on the p10 domain in p35, which is absent in p25. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that p5 reduced Aβ(1–42)-induced Tau hyperphosphorylation and apoptosis in cortical neurons. These results suggest that p5 peptide may be a unique and useful candidate for therapeutic studies of certain neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20720012

  19. Selective increase of in vivo firing frequencies in DA SN neurons after proteasome inhibition in the ventral midbrain.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Mahalakshmi; Kern, Beatrice; Vogel, Simone; Klose, Verena; Schneider, Gaby; Roeper, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    The impairment of protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is present in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), and might play a key role in selective degeneration of vulnerable dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN). Further evidence for a causal role of dysfunctional UPS in familial PD comes from mutations in parkin, which results in a loss of function of an E3-ubiquitin-ligase. In a mouse model, genetic inactivation of an essential component of the 26S proteasome lead to widespread neuronal degeneration including DA midbrain neurons and the formation of alpha-synuclein-positive inclusion bodies, another hallmark of PD. Studies using pharmacological UPS inhibition in vivo had more mixed results, varying from extensive degeneration to no loss of DA SN neurons. However, it is currently unknown whether UPS impairment will affect the neurophysiological functions of DA midbrain neurons. To answer this question, we infused a selective proteasome inhibitor into the ventral midbrain in vivo and recorded single DA midbrain neurons 2 weeks after the proteasome challenge. We found a selective increase in the mean in vivo firing frequencies of identified DA SN neurons in anesthetized mice, while those in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were unaffected. Our results demonstrate that a single-hit UPS inhibition is sufficient to induce a stable and selective hyperexcitability phenotype in surviving DA SN neurons in vivo. This might imply that UPS dysfunction sensitizes DA SN neurons by enhancing 'stressful pacemaking'.

  20. Selective inhibition of transient K+ current by La3+ in crab peptide-secretory neurons.

    PubMed

    Duan, S; Cooke, I M

    1999-04-01

    Although divalent cations and lanthides are well-known inhibitors of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa), their ability to selectively inhibit a voltage-gated K+ current is less widely documented. We report that La3+ inhibits the transient K+ current (IA) of crab (Cardisoma carnifex) neurosecretory cells at ED50 approximately 5 microM, similar to that blocking ICa, without effecting the delayed rectifier K+ current (IK). Neurons were dissociated from the major crustacean neuroendocrine system, the X-organ-sinus gland, plated in defined medium, and recorded by whole cell patch clamp after 1-2 days in culture. The bath saline included 0.5 microM TTX and 0.5 mM CdCl2 to eliminate inward currents. Responses to depolarizing steps from a holding potential of -40 mV represented primarily IK. They were unchanged by La3+ up to 500 microM. Currents from -80 mV in the presence of 20 mM TEA were shown to represent primarily IA. La3+ (with TEA) reduced IA and maximum conductance (GA) by approximately 10% for 1 microM and another 10% each in 10 and 100 microM La3+. Normalized GA-V curves were well fit with a single Boltzmann function, with V1/2 +4 mV and slope 15 mV in control; V1/2 was successively approximately 15 mV depolarized and slope increased approximately 2 mV for each of these La3+ concentrations. Cd2+ (1 mM), Zn2+ (200 microM), and Pb2+ (100 microM) or removal of saline Mg2+ (26 mM) had little or no effect on IA. Steady-state inactivation showed similar right shifts (from V1/2 -39 mV) and slope increases (from 2.5 mV) in 10 and 100 microM La3+. Time to peak IA was slowed in 10 and 100 microM La3+, whereas curves of normalized time constants of initial decay from peak IA versus Vc were right-shifted successively approximately 15 mV for the three La3+ concentrations. The observations were fitted by a Woodhull-type model postulating a La3+-selective site that lies 0.26-0.34 of the distance across the membrane electric field, and both block of K+ movement and

  1. Valproic acid enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy by protecting normal hippocampal neurons and sensitizing malignant glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Thotala, Dinesh; Karvas, Rowan M.; Engelbach, John A.; Garbow, Joel R.; Hallahan, Andrew N.; DeWees, Todd A.; Laszlo, Andrei; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are serious sequelae that follow cranial irradiation used to treat patients with medulloblastoma and other brain neoplasms. Cranial irradiation causes apoptosis in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus leading to cognitive deficits. Valproic acid (VPA) treatment protected hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced damage in both cell culture and animal models. Radioprotection was observed in VPA-treated neuronal cells compared to cells treated with radiation alone. This protection is specific to normal neuronal cells and did not extend to cancer cells. In fact, VPA acted as a radiosensitizer in brain cancer cells. VPA treatment induced cell cycle arrest in cancer cells but not in normal neuronal cells. The level of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was increased and the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was reduced in VPA treated normal cells. VPA inhibited the activities of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), the latter of which is only inhibited in normal cells. The combination of VPA and radiation was most effective in inhibiting tumor growth in heterotopic brain tumor models. An intracranial orthotopic glioma tumor model was used to evaluate tumor growth by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE MRI) and mouse survival following treatment with VPA and radiation. VPA, in combination with radiation, significantly delayed tumor growth and improved mouse survival. Overall, VPA protects normal hippocampal neurons and not cancer cells from radiation-induced cytotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. VPA treatment has the potential for attenuating neurocognitive deficits associated with cranial irradiation while enhancing the efficiency of glioma radiotherapy. PMID:26413814

  2. Deep Brain Stimulation: More Complex than the Inhibition of Cells and Excitation of Fibers.

    PubMed

    Florence, Gerson; Sameshima, Koichi; Fonoff, Erich T; Hamani, Clement

    2016-08-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for some movement disorders. Though mechanisms underlying DBS are still unclear, commonly accepted theories include a "functional inhibition" of neuronal cell bodies and the excitation of axonal projections near the electrodes. It is becoming clear, however, that the paradoxical dissociation "local inhibition" and "distant excitation" is far more complex than initially thought. Despite an initial increase in neuronal activity following stimulation, cells are often unable to maintain normal ionic concentrations, particularly those of sodium and potassium. Based on currently available evidence, we proposed an alternative hypothesis. Increased extracellular concentrations of potassium during DBS may change the dynamics of both cells and axons, contributing not only to the intermittent excitation and inhibition of these elements but also to interrupt abnormal pathological activity. In this article, we review mechanisms through which high extracellular potassium may mediate some of the effects of DBS.

  3. Optical delivery of liposome encapsulated chemical stimuli to neuronal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinato, Giulietta; Raffaelli, Tiziano; D'Este, Elisa; Tavano, Federica; Cojoc, Dan

    2011-09-01

    Spatially confined and precise time delivery of neuroactive molecules is an important issue in neurophysiology. In this work we developed a technique for delivering chemical stimuli to cultured neurons consisting in encapsulating the molecules of interest in liposomes. These vectors were then loaded in reservoirs consisting of glass capillaries. The reservoirs were placed in the recording chamber and single liposomes were trapped and transported out by optical tweezers to the site of stimulation on cultured neurons. Finally, the release of liposome content was induced by application of UV-pulses, breaking the liposome membrane. The efficiency of encapsulation and release were first evaluated by loading the liposomes with fluorescein. In order to test the effect of the UV-induced release, liposomes with diameter ranging from 1 to 10 μm (fL to pL volumes), were filled with KCl and tested on neuronal cells. Neuronal cultures, loaded with Ca2+ dye, were monitored by imaging intracellular Ca2+. An efficient release from the liposomes was demonstrated by detectable calcium signals, indicating stimulated depolarization of the neuronal cells by KCl. The present technique represents an alternative method for focal chemical stimulation of cultured cells that circumvents some of the limitations of microejection and photorelease of caged compounds.

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Agmatine Against Cell Damage Caused by Glucocorticoids in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, M.-Y.; Wang, W.-P.; Bissette, G.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study the neuroprotective effects of agmatine against neuronal damage caused by glucocorticoids were examined in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spectrophotometric measurements of lactate dehydrogenase activities, β-tubulin III immunocytochemical staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end-labeling assay (TUNEL) labeling and caspase-3 assays were carried out to detect cell damage or possible involved mechanisms. Our results show that dexamethasone and corticosterone produced a concentration-dependent increase of lactate dehydrogenase release in 12-day hippocampal cultures. Addition of 100 μM agmatine into media prevented the glucocorticoid-induced increase of lactate dehydrogenase release, an effect also shared with the specific N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist MK801 and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists mifepristone and spironolactone. Arcaine, an analog of agmatine with similar structure as agmatine, also blocked glucocorticoid-induced increase of lactate dehydrogenase release. Spermine and putrescine, the endogenous polyamine and metabolic products of agmatine without the guanidino moiety of agmatine, have no appreciable effect on glucocorticoid-induced injuries, indicating a structural relevance for this neuroprotection. Immunocytochemical staining with β-tubulin III confirmed the substantial neuronal injuries caused by glucocorticoids and the neuroprotective effects of agmatine against these neuronal injuries. TUNEL labeling demonstrated that agmatine significantly reduced TUNEL-positive cell numbers induced by exposure of cultured neurons to dexamethasone. Moreover, exposure of hippocampal neurons to dexamethasone significantly increased caspase-3 activity, which was inhibited by co-treatment with agmatine. Taken together, these results demonstrate that agmatine can protect cultured hippocampal neurons from glucocorticoid-induced neurotoxicity, through a possible blockade of

  5. Differential inhibition of cardiac and neuronal Na(+) channels by the selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors duloxetine and venlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Stoetzer, Carsten; Papenberg, Bastian; Doll, Thorben; Völker, Marc; Heineke, Joerg; Stoetzer, Marcus; Wegner, Florian; Leffler, Andreas

    2016-07-15

    Duloxetine and venlafaxine are selective serotonin-norepinephrine-reuptake-inhibitors used as antidepressants and co-analgesics. While venlafaxine rather than duloxetine induce cardiovascular side-effects, neither of the substances are regarded cardiotoxic. Inhibition of cardiac Na(+)-channels can be associated with cardiotoxicity, and duloxetine was demonstrated to block neuronal Na(+)-channels. The aim of this study was to investigate if the non-life threatening cardiotoxicities of duloxetine and venlafaxine correlate with a weak inhibition of cardiac Na(+)-channels. Effects of duloxetine, venlafaxine and amitriptyline were examined on endogenous Na(+)-channels in neuroblastoma ND7/23 cells and on the α-subunits Nav1.5, Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 with whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Tonic block of the cardiac Na(+)-channel Nav1.5 and rat-cardiomyocytes (CM) revealed a higher potency for duloxetine (Nav 1.5 IC50 14±1µM, CM IC50 27±3µM) as compared to venlafaxine (Nav 1.5 IC50 671±26µM, CM IC50 452±34µM). Duloxetine was as potent as the cardiotoxic antidepressant amitriptyline (IC50 13±1µM). While venlafaxine almost failed to induce use-dependent block on Nav1.5 and cardiomyocytes, low concentrations of duloxetine (1, 10µM) induced prominent use-dependent block similar to amitriptyline. Duloxetine, but not venlafaxine stabilized fast and slow inactivation and delayed recovery from inactivation. Duloxetine induced an unselective inhibition of neuronal Na(+)-channels (IC50 ND7/23 23±1µM, Nav1.7 19±2µM, Nav1.8 29±2). Duloxetine, but not venlafaxine inhibits cardiac Na(+)-channels with a potency similar to amitriptyline. These data indicate that an inhibition of Na(+)-channels does not predict a clinically relevant cardiotoxicity. PMID:27130441

  6. Integrating human stem cell expansion and neuronal differentiation in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; Costa, Eunice M; Sousa, Marcos FQ; Alves, Paula M

    2009-01-01

    Background Human stem cells are cellular resources with outstanding potential for cell therapy. However, for the fulfillment of this application, major challenges remain to be met. Of paramount importance is the development of robust systems for in vitro stem cell expansion and differentiation. In this work, we successfully developed an efficient scalable bioprocess for the fast production of human neurons. Results The expansion of undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma stem cells (NTera2/cl.D1 cell line) as 3D-aggregates was firstly optimized in spinner vessel. The media exchange operation mode with an inoculum concentration of 4 × 105 cell/mL was the most efficient strategy tested, with a 4.6-fold increase in cell concentration achieved in 5 days. These results were validated in a bioreactor where similar profile and metabolic performance were obtained. Furthermore, characterization of the expanded population by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that NT2 cells maintained their stem cell characteristics along the bioreactor culture time. Finally, the neuronal differentiation step was integrated in the bioreactor process, by addition of retinoic acid when cells were in the middle of the exponential phase. Neurosphere composition was monitored and neuronal differentiation efficiency evaluated along the culture time. The results show that, for bioreactor cultures, we were able to increase significantly the neuronal differentiation efficiency by 10-fold while reducing drastically, by 30%, the time required for the differentiation process. Conclusion The culture systems developed herein are robust and represent one-step-forward towards the development of integrated bioprocesses, bridging stem cell expansion and differentiation in fully controlled bioreactors. PMID:19772662

  7. Interactive properties of human glioblastoma cells with brain neurons in culture and neuronal modulation of glial laminin organization.

    PubMed

    Faria, Jane; Romão, Luciana; Martins, Sheila; Alves, Tércia; Mendes, Fabio A; de Faria, Giselle Pinto; Hollanda, Rosenilde; Takiya, Christina; Chimelli, Leila; Morandi, Veronica; de Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Abreu, Jose Garcia; Moura Neto, Vivaldo

    2006-12-01

    The harmonious development of the central nervous system depends on the interactions of the neuronal and glial cells. Extracellular matrix elements play important roles in these interactions, especially laminin produced by astrocytes, which has been shown to be a good substrate for neuron growth and axonal guidance. Glioblastomas are the most common subtypes of primary brain tumors and may be astrocytes in origin. As normal laminin-producing glial cells are the preferential substrate for neurons, and glial tumors have been shown to produce laminin, we questioned whether glioblastoma retained the same normal glial-neuron interactive properties with respect to neuronal growth and differentiation. Then, rat neurons were co-cultured onto rat normal astrocytes or onto three human glioblastoma cell lines obtained from neurosurgery. The co-culture confirmed that human glioblastoma cells as well as astrocytes maintained the ability to support neuritogenesis, but non-neural normal or tumoral cells failed to do so. However, glioblastoma cells did not distinguish embryonic from post-natal neurons in relation to neurite pattern in the co-cultures, as normal astrocytes did. Further, the laminin organization on both normal and tumoral glial cells was altered from a filamentous arrangement to a mixed punctuate/filamentous pattern when in co-culture with neurons. Together, these results suggest that glioblastoma cells could identify neuronal cells as partners, to support their growth and induce complex neurites, but they lost the normal glia property to distinguish neuronal age. In addition, our results show for the first time that neurons modulate the organization of astrocytes and glioblastoma laminin on the extracellular matrix.

  8. Immediate differentiation of neuronal cells from stem/progenitor-like cells in the avian iris tissues.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Tamami; Fujihara, Ai; Royall, Lars; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Kosaka, Mitsuko; Araki, Masasuke

    2014-06-01

    A simple culture method that was recently developed in our laboratory was applied to the chick iris tissues to characterize neural stem/progenitor-like cells. Iris tissue is a non-neuronal tissue and does not contain any neuronal cells. In the present study we isolated iris tissues from chick embryos just prior to hatching. The isolated iris pigmented epithelium (IPE) or the stroma was embedded in Matrigel and cultured in Dulbecco's MEM supplemented with either fetal bovine serum or the synthetic serum replacement solution B27. Within 24 h of culture, elongated cells with long processes extended out from the explants of both tissues and were positively stained for various neuronal markers such as transitin, Tuj-1 and acetylated tubulin. After a longer culture period, cells positive for photoreceptor markers like rhodopsin, iodopsin and visinin were found, suggesting that the iris tissues contain retinal stem/progenitor-like cells. Several growth factors were examined to determine their effects on neuronal differentiation. EGF was shown to dramatically enhance neuronal cell differentiation, particularly the elongation of neuronal fibers. The addition of exogenous FGF2, however, did not show any positive effects on neuronal differentiation, although FGF signaling inhibitor, SU5402, suppressed neuronal differentiation. The results show that neuronal stem/progenitor-like cells can differentiate into neuronal cells immediately after they are transferred into an appropriate environment. This process did not require any exogenous factors, suggesting that neural stem/progenitor-like cells are simply suppressed from neuronal differentiation within the tissue, and isolation from the tissue releases the cells from the suppression mechanism.

  9. Embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cells fuse with microglia and mature neurons.

    PubMed

    Cusulin, Carlo; Monni, Emanuela; Ahlenius, Henrik; Wood, James; Brune, Jan Claas; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2012-12-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) is a novel strategy to restore function in the diseased brain, acting through multiple mechanisms, for example, neuronal replacement, neuroprotection, and modulation of inflammation. Whether transplanted NSCs can operate by fusing with microglial cells or mature neurons is largely unknown. Here, we have studied the interaction of a mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem (NS) cell line with rat and mouse microglia and neurons in vitro and in vivo. We show that NS cells spontaneously fuse with cocultured cortical neurons, and that this process requires the presence of microglia. Our in vitro data indicate that the NS cells can first fuse with microglia and then with neurons. The fused NS/microglial cells express markers and retain genetic and functional characteristics of both parental cell types, being able to respond to microglia-specific stimuli (LPS and IL-4/IL-13) and to differentiate to neurons and astrocytes. The NS cells fuse with microglia, at least partly, through interaction between phosphatidylserine exposed on the surface of NS cells and CD36 receptor on microglia. Transplantation of NS cells into rodent cortex results in fusion with mature pyramidal neurons, which often carry two nuclei, a process probably mediated by microglia. The fusogenic role of microglia could be even more important after NSC transplantation into brains affected by neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglia activation. It remains to be elucidated how the occurrence of the fused cells will influence the functional outcome after NSC transplantation in the diseased brain.

  10. Desipramine Protects Neuronal Cell Death and Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Mes23.5 Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Huang, Bor-Ren; Lin, Chingju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Ho; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2012-01-01

    Background Desipramine is known principally as a tricyclic antidepressant drug used to promote recovery of depressed patients. It has also been used in a number of other psychiatric and medical conditions. The present study is the first to investigate the neuroprotective effect of desipramine. Methodology/Principal Findings Mes23.5 dopaminergic cells were used to examine neuroprotective effect of desipramine. Western blot, reverse transcription-PCR, MTT assay, siRNA transfection and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) were carried out to assess the effects of desipramine. Desipramine induces endogenous anti-oxidative enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein and mRNA expression in concentration- and time-dependent manners. A different type of antidepressant SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor), fluoxetine also shows similar effects of desipramine on HO-1 expression. Moreover, desipramine induces HO-1 expression through activation of ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Desipramine also increases NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) accumulation in the nucleus and enhances Nrf2-DNA binding activity. Moreover, desipramine-mediated increase of HO-1 expression is reduced by transfection with siRNA against Nrf2. On the other hand, pretreatment of desipramine protects neuronal cells against rotenone- and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neuronal death. Furthermore, inhibition of HO-1 activity by a HO-1 pharmacological inhibitor, ZnPP IX, attenuates the neuroprotective effect of desipramine. Otherwise, activation of HO-1 activity by HO-1 activator and inducer protect 6-OHDA-induced neuronal death. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that desipramine-increased HO-1 expression is mediated by Nrf2 activation through the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Our results also suggest that desipramine provides a novel effect of neuroprotection, and neurodegenerative process might play an important role in depression disorder. PMID:23209658

  11. Neuronal cell types and connectivity: lessons from the retina

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H. Sebastian; Sümbül, Uygar

    2014-01-01

    We describe recent progress towards defining neuronal cell types in the mouse retina, and attempt to extract lessons that may be generally useful in the mammalian brain. Achieving a comprehensive catalog of retinal cell types now appears within reach, because researchers have achieved consensus concerning two fundamental challenges. The first is accuracy—defining pure cell types rather than settling for neuronal classes that are mixtures of types. The second is completeness—developing methods guaranteed to eventually identify all cell types, as well as criteria for determining when all types have been found. Case studies illustrate how these two challenges are handled by combining state-of-the-art molecular, anatomical and physiological techniques. Progress is also being made in observing and modeling connectivity between cell types. Scaling up to larger brain regions, such as the cortex, will require not only technical advances but careful consideration of the challenges of accuracy and completeness. PMID:25233310

  12. Catecholaminergic neurons result from intracerebral implantation of embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, B E; Nothias, F; Lazar, M; Jouin, H; Nicolas, J F; Peschanski, M

    1993-01-01

    A replication-defective retrovirus was used to introduce the marker gene nlsLacZ into the murine embryonal carcinoma (EC) cell line PCC7-S-aza-R-1009. Undifferentiated EC cells were implanted into the central nervous system of adult rats. One month later, the grafted cells continued to express the nlsLacZ gene. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of EC-derived neurons. These neurons were capable of expressing tyrosine hydroxylase and extended neurites into the host parenchyma. EC-derived glial cells could not be detected. There was no evidence of tumorigenicity. These results demonstrate the utility of EC cells for introduction of exogenous gene products into the central nervous system in experimental models of gene therapy. Images PMID:8094557

  13. Enteric glial cells protect neurons from oxidative stress in part via reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Hind; Derkinderen, Pascal; Gomes, Priya; Chevalier, Julien; Aubert, Philippe; Masson, Damien; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Neunlist, Michel; Lardeux, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    Enteric glial cells (EGCs) are essential in the control of gastrointestinal functions. Although lesions of EGCs are associated with neuronal degeneration in animal models, their direct neuroprotective role remains unknown. Therefore, the aims of this study were to demonstrate the direct neuroprotective effects of EGCs and to identify putative glial mediators involved. First, viral targeted ablation of EGCs in primary cultures of enteric nervous system increased neuronal death both under basal conditions and in the presence of oxidative stress (dopamine, hydrogen peroxide). Second, direct or indirect coculture experiments of EGC lines with primary cultures of enteric nervous system or neuroblastoma cell lines (SH-SY5Y) prevented neurotoxic effects induced by oxidative stress (increased membrane permeability, release of neuronal specific enolase, caspase-3 immunoreactivity, changes in [Ca(2+)](i) response). Finally, combining pharmacological inhibition and mRNA silencing methods, we demonstrated that neuroprotective effects of EGCs were mediated in part by reduced glutathione but not by oxidized glutathione or by S-nitrosoglutathione. Our study identified the neuroprotective effects of EGCs via their release of reduced glutathione, extending their critical role in physiological contexts and in enteric neuropathies.-Abdo, H., Derkinderen, P., Gomes, P., Chevalier, J., Aubert, P., Masson, D., Galmiche, J.-P., Vanden Berghe, P., Neunlist, M., Lardeux, B. Enteric glial cells protect neurons from oxidative stress in part via reduced glutathione.

  14. Altered mRNA Splicing in SMN-Depleted Motor Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todd, A. Gary; Astroski, Jacob W.; Lin, Hai; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an intractable neurodegenerative disease afflicting 1 in 6–10,000 live births. One of the key functions of the SMN protein is regulation of spliceosome assembly. Reduced levels of the SMN protein that are observed in SMA have been shown to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. SMN-dependent mis-spliced transcripts in motor neurons may cause stresses that are particularly harmful and may serve as potential targets for the treatment of motor neuron disease or as biomarkers in the SMA patient population. We performed deep RNA sequencing using motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells to screen for SMN-dependent mRNA processing changes that occur following acute depletion of SMN. We identified SMN-dependent splicing changes, including an intron retention event that results in the production of a truncated Rit1 transcript. This intron-retained transcript is stable and is mis-spliced in spinal cord from symptomatic SMA mice. Constitutively active Rit1 ameliorated the neurite outgrowth defect in SMN depleted NSC-34 cells, while expression of the truncated protein product of the mis-spliced Rit1 transcript inhibited neurite extension. These results reveal new insights into the biological consequence of SMN-dependent splicing in motor neuron-like cells. PMID:27736905

  15. Corollary discharge inhibition of ascending auditory neurons in the stridulating cricket.

    PubMed

    Poulet, James F A; Hedwig, Berthold

    2003-06-01

    Acoustically communicating animals are able to process external acoustic stimuli despite generating intense sounds during vocalization. We have examined how the crickets' ascending auditory pathway copes with self-generated, intense auditory signals (chirps) during singing (stridulation). We made intracellular recordings from two identified ascending auditory interneurons, ascending neuron 1 (AN1) and ascending neuron 2 (AN2), during pharmacologically elicited sonorous (two-winged), silent (one-winged), and fictive (isolated CNS) stridulation. During sonorous chirps, AN1 responded with bursts of spikes, whereas AN2 was inhibited and rarely spiked. Low-amplitude hyperpolarizing potentials were recorded in AN1 and AN2 during silent chirps. The potentials were also present during fictive chirps. Therefore, they were the result of a centrally generated corollary discharge from the stridulatory motor network. The spiking response of AN1 and AN2 to acoustic stimuli was inhibited during silent and fictive chirps. The maximum period of inhibition occurred in phase with the maximum spiking response to self-generated sound in a sonorously stridulating cricket. In some experiments (30%) depolarizing potentials were recorded during silent chirps. Reafferent feedback elicited by wing movement was probably responsible for the depolarizing potentials. In addition, two other sources of inhibition were present in AN1: (1) IPSPs were elicited by stimulation with 12.5 kHz stimuli and (2) a long-lasting hyperpolarization followed spiking responses to 4.5 kHz stimuli. The hyperpolarization desensitized the response of AN1 to subsequent quieter stimuli. Therefore, the corollary discharge will reduce desensitization by suppressing the response of AN1 to self-generated sounds.

  16. Neuronal networks with NMDARs and lateral inhibition implement winner-takes-all

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    A neural circuit that relies on the electrical properties of NMDA synaptic receptors is shown by numerical and theoretical analysis to be capable of realizing the winner-takes-all function, a powerful computational primitive that is often attributed to biological nervous systems. This biophysically-plausible model employs global lateral inhibition in a simple feedback arrangement. As its inputs increase, high-gain and then bi- or multi-stable equilibrium states may be assumed in which there is significant depolarization of a single neuron and hyperpolarization or very weak depolarization of other neurons in the network. The state of the winning neuron conveys analog information about its input. The winner-takes-all characteristic depends on the nonmonotonic current-voltage relation of NMDA receptor ion channels, as well as neural thresholding, and the gain and nature of the inhibitory feedback. Dynamical regimes vary with input strength. Fixed points may become unstable as the network enters a winner-takes-all regime, which can lead to entrained oscillations. Under some conditions, oscillatory behavior can be interpreted as winner-takes-all in nature. Stable winner-takes-all behavior is typically recovered as inputs increase further, but with still larger inputs, the winner-takes-all characteristic is ultimately lost. Network stability may be enhanced by biologically plausible mechanisms. PMID:25741276

  17. Prefrontal neurons encode context-based response execution and inhibition in reward seeking and extinction.

    PubMed

    Moorman, David E; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2015-07-28

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) guides execution and inhibition of behavior based on contextual demands. In rodents, the dorsal/prelimbic (PL) medial PFC (mPFC) is frequently considered essential for execution of goal-directed behavior ("go") whereas ventral/infralimbic (IL) mPFC is thought to control behavioral suppression ("stop"). This dichotomy is commonly seen for fear-related behaviors, and for some behaviors related to cocaine seeking. Overall, however, data for reward-directed behaviors are ambiguous, and few recordings of PL/IL activity have been performed to demonstrate single-neuron correlates. We recorded neuronal activity in PL and IL during discriminative stimulus driven sucrose seeking followed by multiple days of extinction of the reward-predicting stimulus. Contrary to a generalized PL-go/IL-stop hypothesis, we found cue-evoked activity in PL and IL during reward seeking and extinction. Upon analyzing this activity based on resultant behavior (lever press or withhold), we found that neurons in both areas encoded contextually appropriate behavioral initiation (during reward seeking) and withholding (during extinction), where context was dictated by response-outcome contingencies. Our results demonstrate that PL and IL signal contextual information for regulation of behavior, irrespective of whether that involves initiation or suppression of behavioral responses, rather than topographically encoding go vs. stop behaviors. The use of context to optimize behavior likely plays an important role in maximizing utility-promoting exertion of activity when behaviors are rewarded and conservation of energy when not. PMID:26170333

  18. Attenuated inhibition of medium spiny neurons participates in the pathogenesis of childhood depression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dandan; Hu, Linghan; Zhang, Junqi; Zhang, Ping; Li, Shengtian

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the nucleus accumbens, which is involved in mechanisms of reward and addiction, plays a role in the pathogenesis of depression and in the action of antidepressants. In the current study, intraperitoneal injection of nomifensine, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, decreased depression-like behaviors in the Wistar Kyoto rat model of depression in the sucrose-preference and forced swim tests. Nomifensine also reduced membrane excitability in medium spiny neurons in the core of the nucleus accumbens in the childhood Wistar Kyoto rats as evaluated by electrophysiological recording. In addition, the expression of dopamine D2-like receptor mRNA was downregulated in the nucleus accumbens, striatum and hippocampus of nomifensine-treated childhood Wistar Kyoto rats. These experimental findings indicate that impaired inhibition of medium spiny neurons, mediated by dopamine D2-like receptors, may be involved in the formation of depression-like behavior in childhood Wistar Kyoto rats, and that nomifensine can alleviate depressive behaviors by reducing medium spiny neuron membrane excitability. PMID:25206763

  19. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase dependent inhibition as a broad basis for opponent coding in Mammalian olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Ukhanov, Kirill; Corey, Elizabeth A; Ache, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling has been implicated in mediating inhibitory odorant input to mammalian olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). To better understand the breadth of such inhibition in odor coding, we screened a panel of odorants representing different chemical classes, as well as odorants known to occur in a natural odor object (tomato), for their ability to rapidly activate PI3K-dependent inhibitory signaling. Odorants were screened on dissociated native rat ORNs before and after pre-incubation with the PI3K-isoform specific blockers AS252424 and TGX221. Many different odorants increased their excitatory strength for particular ORNs following PI3K blockade in a manner consistent with activating PI3K-dependent inhibitory signaling in those cells. The PI3K-dependent inhibitory odorants overlapped with conventional excitatory odorants, but did not share the same bias, indicating partial partitioning of the odor space. Finding that PI3K-dependent inhibition can be activated by a wide range of otherwise conventional excitatory odorants strongly implies PI3K-dependent inhibition provides a broad basis for opponent coding in mammalian ORNs. PMID:23585911

  20. Arginine-Rich Polyplexes for Gene Delivery to Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Viola B.; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal gene therapy potentially offers an effective therapeutic intervention to cure or slow the progression of neurological diseases. However, neuronal cells are difficult to transfect with nonviral vectors, and in vivo their transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is inefficient. We synthesized a series of arginine-rich oligopeptides, grafted with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and modified with a short-chain polyethylene glycol (PEG). We hypothesized that the arginine would enhance cellular uptake and transport of these polyplexes across the BBB, with PEG imparting biocompatibility and “stealth” properties and PEI facilitating DNA condensation and gene transfection. The optimized composition of the polyplexes demonstrated hemocompatibility with red blood cells, causing no lysis or aggregation, and showed significantly better cytocompatibility than PEI in vitro. Polyplexes formulated with luciferase-expressing plasmid DNA could transfect rat primary astrocytes and neurons in vitro. Confocal imaging data showed efficient cellular uptake of DNA and its sustained intracellular retention and nuclear localization with polyplexes. Intravenous administration of the optimized polyplexes in mice led to gene expression in the brain, which upon further immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated gene expression in neurons. In conclusion, we have successfully designed a nonviral vector for in vitro and in vivo neuronal gene delivery. PMID:26000961

  1. Pericellular hydrogel/nanonets inhibit cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Li, Jie; Yuan, Dan; Alberti, Kyle A; Xu, Qiaobing; Xu, Bing

    2014-07-28

    Fibrils formed by proteins are vital components for cells. However, selective formation of xenogenous nanofibrils of small molecules on mammalian cells has yet to be observed. Here we report an unexpected observation of hydrogel/nanonets of a small D-peptide derivative in pericellular space. Surface and secretory phosphatases dephosphorylate a precursor of a hydrogelator to trigger the self-assembly of the hydrogelator and to result in pericellular hydrogel/nanonets selectively around the cancer cells that overexpress phosphatases. Cell-based assays confirm that the pericellular hydrogel/nanonets block cellular mass exchange to induce apoptosis of cancer cells, including multidrug-resistance (MDR) cancer cells, MES-SA/Dx5. Pericellular hydrogel/nanonets of small molecules to exhibit distinct functions illustrates a fundamentally new way to engineer molecular assemblies spatiotemporally in cellular microenvironment for inhibiting cancer cell growth and even metastasis.

  2. Control of Mitral/Tufted Cell Output by Selective Inhibition among Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Economo, Michael N; Hansen, Kyle R; Wachowiak, Matt

    2016-07-20

    Inhibition is fundamental to information processing by neural circuits. In the olfactory bulb (OB), glomeruli are the functional units for odor information coding, but inhibition among glomeruli is poorly characterized. We used two-photon calcium imaging in anesthetized and awake mice to visualize both odorant-evoked excitation and suppression in OB output neurons (mitral and tufted, MT cells). MT cell response polarity mapped uniformly to discrete OB glomeruli, allowing us to analyze how inhibition shapes OB output relative to the glomerular map. Odorants elicited unique patterns of suppression in only a subset of glomeruli in which such suppression could be detected, and excited and suppressed glomeruli were spatially intermingled. Binary mixture experiments revealed that interglomerular inhibition could suppress excitatory mitral cell responses to odorants. These results reveal that inhibitory OB circuits nonlinearly transform odor representations and support a model of selective and nonrandom inhibition among glomerular ensembles. PMID:27346531

  3. Tetramethylpyrazine promotes SH-SY5Y cell differentiation into neurons through epigenetic regulation of Topoisomerase IIβ.

    PubMed

    Yan, Y; Zhao, J; Cao, C; Jia, Z; Zhou, N; Han, S; Wang, Y; Xu, Y; Zhao, J; Yan, Y; Cui, H

    2014-10-10

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is an active compound extracted from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Chuanxiong. Recently, it has been reported that TMP enhances neurogenesis, and promotes neural stem cell differentiation toward neurons. However, its molecular basis remains unknown. Topoisomerase IIβ (TopoIIβ) is a nuclear enzyme with an essential role in neuronal development. This study aimed to investigate whether TopoIIβ is involved in TMP-induced neuronal differentiation. We examined the effect of TMP on neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells. It was found that TMP inhibited cell proliferation and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. TMP promoted SH-SY5Y cells to differentiate toward post-mitotic neurons characterized by long, out-branched neurites and up-regulated neuronal markers, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and tau. Meanwhile, we demonstrated that TopoIIβ was highly expressed following TMP treatment. To unravel how TMP affects TopoIIβ expression, two chromatin active markers, acetylated histone H3 (Ac-H3) and acetylated histone H4 (Ac-H4) were examined in this study. Our data showed that the levels of Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 were positively correlated with TopoIIβ expression in the processes of neuronal differentiation. We further performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and identified that TMP enhanced the recruitment of Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 to the TopoIIβ gene promoter region. Therefore, we concluded that TMP may stimulate neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells through epigenetic regulation of TopoIIβ. These results suggest a novel molecular mechanism underlying TMP-promoted neuronal differentiation.

  4. nNOS inhibition during profound asphyxia reduces seizure burden and improves survival of striatal phenotypic neurons in preterm fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Paul P.; Davidson, Joanne O.; Mathai, Sam; van den Heuij, Lotte G.; Ji, Haitao; Bennet, Laura; Tan, Sidhartha; Silverman, Richard B.; Gunn, Alistair J.

    2014-01-01

    Basal ganglia injury after hypoxia-ischemia remains common in preterm infants, and is closely associated with later cerebral palsy. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that a highly selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor, JI-10, would improve survival of striatal phenotypic neurons after profound asphyxia, and that the subsequent seizure burden and recovery of EEG are associated with neural outcome. 24 chronically instrumented preterm fetal sheep were randomized to either JI-10 (3 ml of 0.022 mg/ml, n=8) or saline (n=8) infusion 15 min before 25 min complete umbilical cord occlusion, or saline plus sham-occlusion (n=8). Umbilical cord occlusion was associated with reduced numbers of calbindin-28k-, GAD-, NPY-, PV-, Calretinin- and nNOS-positive striatal neurons (p < 0.05 vs. sham occlusion) but not ChAT-positive neurons. JI-10 was associated with increased numbers of calbindin-28k-, GAD-, nNOS-, NPY-, PV-, Calretinin- and ChAT-positive striatal neurons (p < 0.05 vs. saline+occlusion). Seizure burden was strongly associated with loss of calbindin-positive cells (p < 0.05), greater seizure amplitude was associated with loss of GAD-positive cells (p < 0.05), and with more activated microglia in the white matter tracts (p < 0.05). There was no relationship between EEG power after 7 days recovery and total striatal cell loss, but better survival of NPY-positive neurons was associated with lower EEG power. In summary, these findings suggest that selective nNOS inhibition during asphyxia is associated with protection of phenotypic striatal projection neurons and has potential to help reduce basal ganglia injury in some premature babies. PMID:24726307

  5. Pharmacological Activation/Inhibition of the Cannabinoid System Affects Alcohol Withdrawal-Induced Neuronal Hypersensitivity to Excitotoxic Insults

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marina; Villain, Hélène; Docagne, Fabian; Roussel, Benoit D.; Ramos, José Antonio; Vivien, Denis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; Ali, Carine

    2011-01-01

    Cessation of chronic ethanol consumption can increase the sensitivity of the brain to excitotoxic damages. Cannabinoids have been proposed as neuroprotectants in different models of neuronal injury, but their effect have never been investigated in a context of excitotoxicity after alcohol cessation. Here we examined the effects of the pharmacological activation/inhibition of the endocannabinoid system in an in vitro model of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal followed by an excitotoxic challenge. Ethanol withdrawal increased N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked neuronal death, probably by altering the ratio between GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. The stimulation of the endocannabinoid system with the cannabinoid agonist HU-210 decreased NMDA-induced neuronal death exclusively in ethanol-withdrawn neurons. This neuroprotection could be explained by a decrease in NMDA-stimulated calcium influx after the administration of HU-210, found exclusively in ethanol-withdrawn neurons. By contrast, the inhibition of the cannabinoid system with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716) during ethanol withdrawal increased death of ethanol-withdrawn neurons without any modification of NMDA-stimulated calcium influx. Moreover, chronic administration of rimonabant increased NMDA-stimulated toxicity not only in withdrawn neurons, but also in control neurons. In summary, we show for the first time that the stimulation of the endocannabinoid system is protective against the hyperexcitability developed during alcohol withdrawal. By contrast, the blockade of the endocannabinoid system is highly counterproductive during alcohol withdrawal. PMID:21886913

  6. Rapid Feedforward Inhibition and Asynchronous Excitation Regulate Granule Cell Activity in the Mammalian Main Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Granule cell-mediated inhibition is critical to patterning principal neuron activity in the olfactory bulb, and perturbation of synaptic input to granule cells significantly alters olfactory-guided behavior. Despite the critical role of granule cells in olfaction, little is known about how sensory input recruits granule cells. Here, we combined whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in acute mouse olfactory bulb slices with biophysical multicompartmental modeling to investigate the synaptic basis of granule cell recruitment. Physiological activation of sensory afferents within single glomeruli evoked diverse modes of granule cell activity, including subthreshold depolarization, spikelets, and suprathreshold responses with widely distributed spike latencies. The generation of these diverse activity modes depended, in part, on the asynchronous time course of synaptic excitation onto granule cells, which lasted several hundred milliseconds. In addition to asynchronous excitation, each granule cell also received synchronous feedforward inhibition. This inhibition targeted both proximal somatodendritic and distal apical dendritic domains of granule cells, was reliably recruited across sniff rhythms, and scaled in strength with excitation as more glomeruli were activated. Feedforward inhibition onto granule cells originated from deep short-axon cells, which responded to glomerular activation with highly reliable, short-latency firing consistent with tufted cell-mediated excitation. Simulations showed that feedforward inhibition interacts with asynchronous excitation to broaden granule cell spike latency distributions and significantly attenuates granule cell depolarization within local subcellular compartments. Collectively, our results thus identify feedforward inhibition onto granule cells as a core feature of olfactory bulb circuitry and establish asynchronous excitation and feedforward inhibition as critical regulators of granule cell activity. SIGNIFICANCE

  7. Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Bargatze, Robert F.

    2001-05-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  8. Acrolein, a product of lipid peroxidation, inhibits glucose and glutamate uptake in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Lovell, M A; Xie, C; Markesbery, W R

    2000-10-15

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased lipid peroxidation, decreased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, and increased levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), F(2)-isoprostanes, and F(4)-neuroprostanes are present in the brain in patients with AD. Acrolein, an alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation has been demonstrated to be approximately 100 times more reactive than HNE and is present in neurofibrillary tangles in the brain in AD. We recently demonstrated statistically significant elevated concentrations of extractable acrolein in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus and amygdala in AD compared with age-matched control subjects. Concentrations of acrolein were two to five times those of HNE in the same samples. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with acrolein led to a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in cell survival as well as a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular calcium. In cortical neuron cultures, we now report that acrolein causes a concentration-dependent impairment of glutamate uptake and glucose transport in cortical neuron cultures. Treatment of cortical astrocyte cultures with acrolein led to the same pattern of impairment of glutamate uptake as observed in cortical neuron cultures. Collectively, these data demonstrate neurotoxicity mechanisms of arolein that might be important in the pathogenesis of neuron degeneration in AD.

  9. Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides Reduce Neurofilament Synthesis and Inhibit Axon Regeneration in Lamprey Reticulospinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guixin; Jin, Li-qing; Hu, Jianli; Rodemer, William; Selzer, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The sea lamprey has been used as a model for the study of axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. Previous studies have suggested that, unlike developing axons in mammal, the tips of regenerating axons in lamprey spinal cord are simple in shape, packed with neurofilaments (NFs), and contain very little F-actin. Thus it has been proposed that regeneration of axons in the central nervous system of mature vertebrates is not based on the canonical actin-dependent pulling mechanism of growth cones, but involves an internal protrusive force, perhaps generated by the transport or assembly of NFs in the distal axon. In order to assess this hypothesis, expression of NFs was manipulated by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO). A standard, company-supplied MO was used as control. Axon retraction and regeneration were assessed at 2, 4 and 9 weeks after MOs were applied to a spinal cord transection (TX) site. Antisense MO inhibited NF180 expression compared to control MO. The effect of inhibiting NF expression on axon retraction and regeneration was studied by measuring the distance of axon tips from the TX site at 2 and 4 weeks post-TX, and counting the number of reticulospinal neurons (RNs) retrogradely labeled by fluorescently-tagged dextran injected caudal to the injury at 9 weeks post-TX. There was no statistically significant effect of MO on axon retraction at 2 weeks post-TX. However, at both 4 and 9 weeks post-TX, inhibition of NF expression inhibited axon regeneration. PMID:26366578

  10. Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides Reduce Neurofilament Synthesis and Inhibit Axon Regeneration in Lamprey Reticulospinal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guixin; Jin, Li-qing; Hu, Jianli; Rodemer, William; Selzer, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The sea lamprey has been used as a model for the study of axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury. Previous studies have suggested that, unlike developing axons in mammal, the tips of regenerating axons in lamprey spinal cord are simple in shape, packed with neurofilaments (NFs), and contain very little F-actin. Thus it has been proposed that regeneration of axons in the central nervous system of mature vertebrates is not based on the canonical actin-dependent pulling mechanism of growth cones, but involves an internal protrusive force, perhaps generated by the transport or assembly of NFs in the distal axon. In order to assess this hypothesis, expression of NFs was manipulated by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO). A standard, company-supplied MO was used as control. Axon retraction and regeneration were assessed at 2, 4 and 9 weeks after MOs were applied to a spinal cord transection (TX) site. Antisense MO inhibited NF180 expression compared to control MO. The effect of inhibiting NF expression on axon retraction and regeneration was studied by measuring the distance of axon tips from the TX site at 2 and 4 weeks post-TX, and counting the number of reticulospinal neurons (RNs) retrogradely labeled by fluorescently-tagged dextran injected caudal to the injury at 9 weeks post-TX. There was no statistically significant effect of MO on axon retraction at 2 weeks post-TX. However, at both 4 and 9 weeks post-TX, inhibition of NF expression inhibited axon regeneration.

  11. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase 2 reverses impaired cognition and neuronal remodeling caused by chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Sun, Jiao; Ding, Lianshu; Ruan, Lina; Reed, Miranda; Yu, Xuefeng; Klabni, Jonathan; Lin, Dan; Li, Jianxin; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Hanting; O’Donnell, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress and neuronal vulnerability have recently been recognized as factors contributing to cognitive disorders. One way to modify neuronal vulnerability is through mediation of phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2), an enzyme that exerts its action on cognitive processes via the control of intracellular second messengers, cGMP and, to a lesser extent, cAMP. This study explored the effects of a PDE2 inhibitor, Bay 60-7550, on stress-induced learning and memory dysfunction in terms of its ramification on behavioral, morphological and molecular changes. Bay 60-7550 reversed stress-induced cognitive impairment in the Morris water maze (MWM), novel object recognition and location tasks (ORT/OLT), effects prevented by treatment with 7-NI, a selective inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS); MK801, a glutamate receptor (NMDAR) inhibitor; myr-AIP, a CaMKII inhibitor; and KT5823, a PKG inhibitor. Bay 60-7550 also ameliorated stress-induced structural remodeling in the CA1 of the hippocampus, leading to increases in dendritic branching, length, and spine density. However, the neuroplasticity initiated by Bay 60-7550 was not seen in the presence of 7-NI, MK801, myr-AIP or KT5823. PDE2 inhibition reduced stress-induced ERK activation and attenuated stress-induced decreases in transcription factors (e.g., Elk-1, TORC1, and pCREB) and plasticity-related proteins (e.g, Egr-1 and BDNF). Pre-treatment with inhibitors of NMDA, CaMKII, nNOS, PKG (or PKA), blocked the effects of Bay 60-7550 on cGMP or cAMP signaling. These findings indicate that the effect of PDE2 inhibition on stress-induced memory impairment is potentially mediated via modulation of neuroplasticity-related, NMDAR-CaMKII-cGMP/cAMP signaling. PMID:25442113

  12. Expression of a plasma membrane proteolipid during differentiation of neuronal and glial cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Shea, T B; Fischer, I; Sapirstein, V

    1986-09-01

    Plasma membrane proteolipid protein (PM-PLP) synthesis was examined in embryonic rat neurons and neonatal rat glial cells during differentiation in culture. Glial cultures were treated with 1 mM N6, O2, dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) following confluency to induce differentiation, which resulted in the elaboration of long cellular processes. However, no changes in the biosynthetic level of PM-PLP was observed during the differentiation of these cells. Neurons differentiated spontaneously in culture, forming cellular aggregates immediately following plating and elaborating a network of neurites over 7 days. The differentiation of neurons was accompanied by a seven-fold increase in PM-PLP synthesis with increases in biosynthetic increase in PM-PLP synthesis with increases in biosynthetic rate observed between days 1 and 3 and between days 3 and 7 in culture. Ultrastructural examination of neurons indicated that the Golgi apparatus was also developing during this period of time, with an increase in both the number of lamellae and generation of vesicles. The transport of PM-PLP to the plasma membrane was therefore examined in neurons at day 7 in culture by pulse labeling experiments with monensin and colchicine. Monensin (1 microM) was found to inhibit the appearance of radiolabeled PM-PLP in the plasma membrane by 63%, indicating that a functional Golgi apparatus is required for transport of PM-PLP to its target membrane. Colchicine (125 microM) also inhibited the appearance of newly synthesized PM-PLP in the plasma membrane by greater than 40%, suggesting that microtubules may also be required for PM-PLP transport to the plasma membrane. PMID:3016181

  13. Carbon disulfide inhibits neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration of dorsal root ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Xiang, Yujuan; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2011-12-01

    Carbon disulfide (CS₂) is a neurotoxic industrial solvent and widely used in the vulcanization of rubber, rayon, cellophane, and adhesives. Although the neurotoxicity of CS₂ has been recognized for over a century, the precise mechanism of neurotoxic action of CS₂ remains unknown. In the present study, a embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants culture model was established. Using the organotypic DRG cultures, the direct neurotoxic effects of CS₂ on outgrowth of neurites and migration of neurons from DRG explants were investigated. The organotypic DRG cultures were exposed to different concentrations of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 0.1 mmol/L, 1 mmol/L). The number of nerve fiber bundles extended from DRG explants decreased significantly in the presence of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 15.00 ± 2.61, p < .05; 0.1 mmol/L, 11.17 ± 1.47, p < .001; 1 mmol/L, 8.00 ± 1.41, p < .001) as compared with that in the absence of CS₂ (17.83 ± 2.48). The number of neurons migrated from DRG explants decreased significantly in the presence of CS₂ (0.01 mmol/L, 79.50 ± 9.40, p < .01; 0.1 mmol/L, 62.50 ± 14.15, p < .001; 1 mmol/L, 34.67 ± 7.58, p < .001) as compared with that in the absence of CS₂ (99.33 ± 15.16). And also, the decreases in the number of nerve fiber bundles and migrated DRG neurons were in a dose-dependent manner of CS₂. These data implicated that CS₂ could inhibit neurite outgrowth and neuronal migration from DRG explants in vitro. PMID:21777162

  14. Plasma leptin inhibits the response of nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to aortic baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors have been identified within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and leptin injections into the caudal NTS inhibit the baroreceptor reflex. However, whether plasma leptin alters the discharge of NTS neurons mediating aortic baroreceptor reflex activity is not known. A series of electrophysiological single unit recording experiments was done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar and Zucker obese rat with either their neuroaxis intact or with mid-collicular transections. Single units in NTS antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of depressor sites in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) were found to display a cardiac cycle-related rhythmicity. These units were tested for their responses to stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) and intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-200ng/0.1ml). Of 63 single units tested in NTS, 33 were antidromically activated by stimulation of CVLM depressor sites and 18 of these single units responded with a decrease in discharge rate after intracarotid injections of leptin. Thirteen of these leptin responsive neurons (∼72%) were excited by ADN stimulation. Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to ADN stimulation was attenuated by about 50% after the intracarotid leptin injection. Intracarotid injections of leptin (200ng/0.1ml) in the Zucker obese rat did not alter the discharge rate of NTS-CVLM projecting neurons. These data suggest that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on brainstem neuronal circuits that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial baroreceptors. PMID:23792336

  15. Plasma leptin inhibits the response of nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to aortic baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors have been identified within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and leptin injections into the caudal NTS inhibit the baroreceptor reflex. However, whether plasma leptin alters the discharge of NTS neurons mediating aortic baroreceptor reflex activity is not known. A series of electrophysiological single unit recording experiments was done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar and Zucker obese rat with either their neuroaxis intact or with mid-collicular transections. Single units in NTS antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of depressor sites in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) were found to display a cardiac cycle-related rhythmicity. These units were tested for their responses to stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) and intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-200ng/0.1ml). Of 63 single units tested in NTS, 33 were antidromically activated by stimulation of CVLM depressor sites and 18 of these single units responded with a decrease in discharge rate after intracarotid injections of leptin. Thirteen of these leptin responsive neurons (∼72%) were excited by ADN stimulation. Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to ADN stimulation was attenuated by about 50% after the intracarotid leptin injection. Intracarotid injections of leptin (200ng/0.1ml) in the Zucker obese rat did not alter the discharge rate of NTS-CVLM projecting neurons. These data suggest that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on brainstem neuronal circuits that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial baroreceptors.

  16. Neurotherapeutics to inhibit exocytosis from sensory neurons for the control of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Dolly, J Oliver; O'Connell, Marie Ann

    2012-02-01

    There is a pressing unmet need for long-acting and effective therapeutics to alleviate symptoms of the varied forms of chronic pain. As many sufferers do not respond satisfactorily to non-addictive anti-nociceptives, a new treatment has emerged using inhibitors for the release of pain mediators from peripheral sensory nerves to give prolonged benefit. This strategy relies on proteolytically inactivating intra-neuronal SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors) proteins which are essential for regulated exocytosis of transmitters, peptides and other pain signalling molecules. Success has been achieved with botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) which targets neuronal acceptors via its heavy chain, becomes endocytosed and translocated into the cytosol where the long-lived protease of its light chain potently and specifically cleaves SNAP-25 (synaptosomal-associated protease of Mr=25k). Encouragingly, clinical trials have shown that local injections of BOTOX(®) (BoNT/A complex) reduce chronic migraine symptoms including frequency and intensity for many months. Several serotypes of the neurotoxin moiety alone have been prepared recombinantly using Escherichia coli, which exhibit optimal neuroparalysis. Moreover, an engineered chimera of BoNT/E in which its binding domain was replaced with that from /A efficaciously inhibits the TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1)-triggered release of CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) from cultured sensory neurons, and suppresses the resultant excitatory effects in brain slices. A longer acting composite toxin, containing the protease of type E attached to BoNT/A, displays prolonged amelioration of pain symptoms in an animal model of inflammatory pain. This provides proof of principle that therapeutically advantageous features of /E (most robust inhibitor of CGRP release) and /A (targeting to sensory neurons and dramatic extension of the longevity of E protease) can be incorporated

  17. B35 neuroblastoma cells: an easily transfected, cultured cell model of central nervous system neurons.

    PubMed

    Otey, Carol A; Boukhelifa, Malika; Maness, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    A panel of neuronal cell lines was derived from tumors of the neonatal rat central nervous system (CNS) in 1974, and two of these lines are in wide use today. Both the B35 and B50 lines offer a number of advantages to researchers who study CNS neurons in culture: they are simple to grow, to differentiate, and to transfect. B50 cells have been used extensively in the study of neuronal cell death, toxicology, and differentiation, whereas B35 cells have proven useful in the molecular analysis of endocytosis and of signaling pathways, in particular those that guide axonal outgrowth and cell motility. This chapter provides protocols for growing and transfecting B35 cells, selecting stable transfectants, exploring protein function using an antisense approach, and assaying cell motility in a Transwell chamber. All of these protocols have been written for researchers who have some skill in basic cell culture techniques, but previous experience with cultured neurons is not required.

  18. Spatial distribution of neurons innervated by chandelier cells.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Woodruff, Alan; Inan, Melis; Anderson, Stewart A; Yuste, Rafael; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchan-Perez, Angel

    2015-09-01

    Chandelier (or axo-axonic) cells are a distinct group of GABAergic interneurons that innervate the axon initial segments of pyramidal cells and are thus thought to have an important role in controlling the activity of cortical circuits. To examine the circuit connectivity of chandelier cells (ChCs), we made use of a genetic targeting strategy to label neocortical ChCs in upper layers of juvenile mouse neocortex. We filled individual ChCs with biocytin in living brain slices and reconstructed their axonal arbors from serial semi-thin sections. We also reconstructed the cell somata of pyramidal neurons that were located inside the ChC axonal trees and determined the percentage of pyramidal neurons whose axon initial segments were innervated by ChC terminals. We found that the total percentage of pyramidal neurons that were innervated by a single labeled ChC was 18-22 %. Sholl analysis showed that this percentage peaked at 22-35 % for distances between 30 and 60 µm from the ChC soma, decreasing to lower percentages with increasing distances. We also studied the three-dimensional spatial distribution of the innervated neurons inside the ChC axonal arbor using spatial statistical analysis tools. We found that innervated pyramidal neurons are not distributed at random, but show a clustered distribution, with pockets where almost all cells are innervated and other regions within the ChC axonal tree that receive little or no innervation. Thus, individual ChCs may exert a strong, widespread influence on their local pyramidal neighbors in a spatially heterogeneous fashion. PMID:25056931

  19. Phospholipase D1 increases Bcl-2 expression during neuronal differentiation of rat neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin-Young; Ma, Weina; Yoon, Sung Nyo; Kang, Min Jeong; Han, Joong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    We studied the possible role of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) in the neuronal differentiation, including neurite formation of neural stem cells. PLD1 protein and PLD activity increased during neuronal differentiation. Bcl-2 also increased. Downregulation of PLD1 by transfection with PLD1 siRNA or a dominant-negative form of PLD1 (DN-PLD1) inhibited both neurite outgrowth and Bcl-2 expression. PLD activity was dramatically reduced by a PLCγ (phospholipase Cγ) inhibitor (U73122), a Ca(2+)chelator (BAPTA-AM), and a PKCα (protein kinase Cα) inhibitor (RO320432). Furthermore, treatment with arachidonic acid (AA) which is generated by the action of PLA2 (phospholipase A2) on phosphatidic acid (a PLD1 product), increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and CREB, as well as Bcl-2 expression, indicating that PLA2 is involved in the differentiation process resulting from PLD1 activation. PGE2 (prostaglandin E2), a cyclooxygenase product of AA, also increased during neuronal differentiation. Moreover, treatment with PGE2 increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and CREB, as well as Bcl-2 expression, and this effect was inhibited by a PKA inhibitor (Rp-cAMP). As expected, inhibition of p38 MAPK resulted in loss of CREB activity, and when CREB activity was blocked with CREB siRNA, Bcl-2 production also decreased. We also showed that the EP4 receptor was required for the PKA/p38MAPK/CREB/Bcl-2 pathway. Taken together, these observations indicate that PLD1 is activated by PLCγ/PKCα signaling and stimulate Bcl-2 expression through PLA2/Cox2/EP4/PKA/p38MAPK/CREB during neuronal differentiation of rat neural stem cells.

  20. Smad6 promotes neuronal differentiation in the intermediate zone of the dorsal neural tube by inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihui; Chen, Yongfeng; Li, Zhenfei; Bai, Ge; Zhu, Yue; Yan, Rui; Tan, Fangzhi; Chen, Ye-Guang; Guillemot, Francois; Li, Lin; Jing, Naihe

    2011-07-19

    Proliferation of the neural/neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) at the ventricular zone of the dorsal spinal cord requires the stimuli of Wnt and bone morphogenic protein (BMP). However, how these two signaling pathways are regulated to initiate differentiation in the NPCs as they enter the intermediate zone is not known. Here, we show that Smad6, a negative regulator of BMP signaling, is expressed in the intermediate zone of the chick dorsal spinal cord. Knockdown experiments show that Smad6 is required for promoting NPCs to exit the cell cycle and differentiate into neurons. Although we find that Smad6 inhibits BMP signaling, as expected, we also find that Smad6 unexpectedly inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by Smad6 is independent of its effect on the BMP pathway. Rather, Smad6 through its N-terminal domain and link region enhances the interaction of C-terminal binding protein with the β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) complex and the TCF-binding element to inhibit β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activation. Our study provides evidence that transition of NPCs from a proliferative state to a differentiating state is controlled by the dual inhibitory role of Smad6 to both BMP and Wnt signaling at the level of transcription.

  1. Smad6 promotes neuronal differentiation in the intermediate zone of the dorsal neural tube by inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Chen, Yongfeng; Li, Zhenfei; Bai, Ge; Zhu, Yue; Yan, Rui; Tan, Fangzhi; Chen, Ye-Guang; Guillemot, Francois; Li, Lin; Jing, Naihe

    2011-01-01

    Proliferation of the neural/neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) at the ventricular zone of the dorsal spinal cord requires the stimuli of Wnt and bone morphogenic protein (BMP). However, how these two signaling pathways are regulated to initiate differentiation in the NPCs as they enter the intermediate zone is not known. Here, we show that Smad6, a negative regulator of BMP signaling, is expressed in the intermediate zone of the chick dorsal spinal cord. Knockdown experiments show that Smad6 is required for promoting NPCs to exit the cell cycle and differentiate into neurons. Although we find that Smad6 inhibits BMP signaling, as expected, we also find that Smad6 unexpectedly inhibits the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by Smad6 is independent of its effect on the BMP pathway. Rather, Smad6 through its N-terminal domain and link region enhances the interaction of C-terminal binding protein with the β-catenin/T cell factor (TCF) complex and the TCF-binding element to inhibit β-catenin–mediated transcriptional activation. Our study provides evidence that transition of NPCs from a proliferative state to a differentiating state is controlled by the dual inhibitory role of Smad6 to both BMP and Wnt signaling at the level of transcription. PMID:21730158

  2. The antidepressant imipramine inhibits M current by activating a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)-dependent pathway in rat sympathetic neurones

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Jania L; Arenas, Maria Isabel; García, David E

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about the intracellular actions of imipramine (IMI) in the regulation of ion channels. We tested the action of IMI on the intracellular cascade that regulates M current (IM) in superior cervical ganglion neurones (SCGs). Dialysis of the cells with GDPβS, a G protein signaling blocker, did not disrupt the inhibition of IM. When we incubated the cells with the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, it prevented the IM inhibition by IMI. Also, when we dialyzed the cells with an intracellular Ca2+ chelator, it did not disrupt IM inhibition by IMI, as occurs in the M1 cascade. When we incubated the cells with the generic kinase inhibitor wortmannin, it prevented the recovery of IM from the inhibition by IMI. Also, when we applied phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) intracellularly, it diminished the inhibition of IM by IMI. Our findings suggest that PLC is the target for IMI, that recovery of IM needs lipid phosphorylation for PIP2 resynthesis, and that IMI inhibits IM by activating a PLC-dependent pathway, likely by decreasing the concentration of PIP2. PMID:15852030

  3. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Neuronal Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-05-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides the ability to detect and identify a broad range of analytes and their spatial distributions from a variety of sample types, including tissue sections. Here we describe an approach for probing neuropeptides from sparse cell cultures using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MSI—at single cell spatial resolution—in both MS and tandem MS modes. Cultures of Aplysia californica neurons are grown on an array of glass beads embedded in a stretchable layer of Parafilm M. As the membrane is stretched, the beads/neurons are separated physically and the separated beads/neurons analyzed via MALDI TOF MS. Compared with direct MS imaging of samples, the stretching procedure enhances analyte extraction and incorporation into the MALDI matrix, with negligible analyte spread between separated beads. MALDI tandem MSI using the stretched imaging approach yields localization maps of both parent and fragment ions from Aplysia pedal peptide, thereby confirming peptide identification. This methodology represents a flexible platform for MSI investigation of a variety of cell cultures, including functioning neuronal networks.

  4. Ectopic Expression of α6 and δ GABAA Receptor Subunits in Hilar Somatostatin Neurons Increases Tonic Inhibition and Alters Network Activity in the Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiaoping; Peng, Zechun; Zhang, Nianhui; Cetina, Yliana; Huang, Christine S.; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    The role of GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated tonic inhibition in interneurons remains unclear and may vary among subgroups. Somatostatin (SOM) interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus show negligible expression of nonsynaptic GABAAR subunits and very low tonic inhibition. To determine the effects of ectopic expression of tonic GABAAR subtypes in these neurons, Cre-dependent viral vectors were used to express GFP-tagged GABAAR subunits (α6 and δ) selectively in hilar SOM neurons in SOM-Cre mice. In single-transfected animals, immunohistochemistry demonstrated strong expression of either the α6 or δ subunit; in cotransfected animals, both subunits were consistently expressed in the same neurons. Electrophysiology revealed a robust increase of tonic current, with progressively larger increases following transfection of δ, α6, and α6/δ subunits, respectively, indicating formation of functional receptors in all conditions and likely coassembly of the subunits in the same receptor following cotransfection. An in vitro model of repetitive bursting was used to determine the effects of increased tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons on circuit activity in the dentate gyrus. Upon cotransfection, the frequency of GABAAR-mediated bursting in granule cells was reduced, consistent with a reduction in synchronous firing among hilar SOM interneurons. Moreover, in vivo studies of Fos expression demonstrated reduced activation of α6/δ-cotransfected neurons following acute seizure induction by pentylenetetrazole. The findings demonstrate that increasing tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons can alter dentate gyrus circuit activity during strong stimulation and suggest that tonic inhibition of interneurons could play a role in regulating excessive synchrony within the network. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In contrast to many hippocampal interneurons, somatostatin (SOM) neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus have very low levels of nonsynaptic GABAARs and exhibit

  5. Signals mediating Klotho-induced neuroprotection in hippocampal neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Meng-Fu; Chen, Li-Jen; Niu, Ho-Shan; Yang, Ting-Ting; Lin, Kao-Chang; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin (Epo) receptor (EpoR) is expressed in the brain and was shown to have neuroprotective effects against brain damage in animal models. A recent study indicated that EpoR and its activity are the downstream effectors of Klotho for cytoprotection in the kidney. Thus, we propose that Klotho can stimulate the expression of EpoR in neuronal cells to enhance Epo-mediated protection. H19-7 hippocampal neuronal cells were treated with recombinant Klotho. In H19-7 cells, Klotho increased the expression of both the EpoR protein and mRNA. Klotho also enhanced the transcription activity of the EpoR promoter in H19-7 cells. Moreover, Klotho augmented the Epo-triggered phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat5 and protected H19-7 cells from hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity. The silencing of EpoR abolished the protective effect of Klotho against peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, the silencing of GATA1 diminished the Klotho-induced increase in EpoR protein and mRNA expression as well as its promoter activity. In conclusion, Klotho increased EpoR expression in neuronal cells through GATA1, thereby enabling EpoR to function as a cytoprotective protein against oxidative injury. PMID:25856523

  6. NMDA-R inhibition affects cellular process formation in Tilapia melanocytes; a model for pigmented adrenergic neurons in process formation and retraction.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Olalekan Michael; Okunnuga, Adetokunbo Adedotun; Fabiyi, Temitope Deborah; Olajide, Olayemi Joseph; Akinrinade, Ibukun Dorcas; Adeniyi, Philip Adeyemi; Ojo, Abiodun Ayodele

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease has long been described to be a product of dopamine and (or) melanin loss in the substanstia nigra (SN). Although most studies have focused on dopaminergic neurons, it is important to consider the role of pigment cells in the etiology of the disease and to create an in vitro live cell model for studies involving pigmented adrenergic cells of the SN in Parkinsonism. The Melanocytes share specific features with the pigmented adrenergic neurons as both cells are pigmented, contain adrenergic receptors and have cellular processes. Although the melanocyte cellular processes are relatively short and observable only when stimulated appropriately by epinephrine and other factors or molecules. This study employs the manipulation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDA-R), a major receptor in neuronal development, in the process formation pattern of the melanocyte in order to create a suitable model to depict cellular process elongation and shortening in pigmented adrenergic cells. NMDA-R is an important glutamate receptor implicated in neurogenesis, neuronal migration, maturation and cell death, thus we investigated the role of NMDA-R potentiation by glutamate/KCN and its inhibition by ketamine in the behavior of fish scale melanocytes in vitro. This is aimed at establishing the regulatory role of NMDA-R in this cell type (melanocytes isolated form Tilapia) in a similar manner to what is observable in the mammalian neurons. In vitro live cell culture was prepared in modified Ringer's solution following which the cells were treated as follows; Control, Glutamate, Ketamine, Glutamate + Ketamine, KCN + Ketamine and KCN. The culture was maintained for 10 min and the changes were captured in 3D-Time frame at 0, 5 and 10 min for the control and 5, 7 and 10 min for each of the treatment category. Glutamate treatment caused formation of short cellular processes localized directly on the cell body while ketamine treatment (inhibition of NMDA-R) facilitated

  7. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) localization and antagonist-mediated inhibition of capsaicin responses and neurite outgrowth in human and rat sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Anand, U; Facer, P; Yiangou, Y; Sinisi, M; Fox, M; McCarthy, T; Bountra, C; Korchev, YE; Anand, P

    2013-01-01

    Background The angiotensin II (AngII) receptor subtype 2 (AT2R) is expressed in sensory neurons and may play a role in nociception and neuronal regeneration. Methods We used immunostaining with characterized antibodies to study the localization of AT2R in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and a range of human tissues. The effects of AngII and AT2R antagonist EMA401 on capsaicin responses in cultured human and rat (DRG) neurons were measured with calcium imaging, on neurite length and density with Gap43 immunostaining, and on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) expression using immunofluorescence. Results AT2R expression was localized in small-/medium-sized cultured neurons of human and rat DRG. Treatment with the AT2R antagonist EMA401 resulted in dose-related functional inhibition of capsaicin responses (IC50 = 10 nmol/L), which was reversed by 8-bromo-cAMP, and reduced neurite length and density; AngII treatment significantly enhanced capsaicin responses, cAMP levels and neurite outgrowth. The AT1R antagonist losartan had no effect on capsaicin responses. AT2R was localized in sensory neurons of human DRG, and nerve fibres in peripheral nerves, skin, urinary bladder and bowel. A majority sub-population (60%) of small-/medium-diameter neuronal cells were immunopositive in both control post-mortem and avulsion-injured human DRG; some very small neurons appeared to be intensely immunoreactive, with TRPV1 co-localization. While AT2R levels were reduced in human limb peripheral nerve segments proximal to injury, they were preserved in painful neuromas. Conclusions AT2R antagonists could be particularly useful in the treatment of chronic pain and hypersensitivity associated with abnormal nerve sprouting. PMID:23255326

  8. Monaural and Binaural Inhibition Underlying Duration-Tuned Neurons in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, Riziq; Casseday, John H.; Covey, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) in the mammalian inferior colliculus (IC) arise from a combination of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Previous research has shown that the inhibition responsible for creating DTNs has a shorter latency than that of excitation and lasts longer than the stimulus duration. We used monotic and dichotic paired tone stimulation and recorded responses of DTNs from the IC of the bat to assess the relative contributions of each ear in forming duration-tuned circuits. The stimulus consisted of a short best duration (BD) excitatory tone and a longer duration nonexcitatory (NE) tone. In the monotic condition, when the BD and NE tones were presented to the contralateral ear and were sufficiently close in time, the NE tone always suppressed spikes evoked by the BD tone. In the dichotic condition, when the BD tone was presented to the contralateral ear and the NE tone to the ipsilateral ear, half of DTNs no longer showed spike suppression to the NE tone. Of those DTNs with suppression in both conditions, the latency of the inhibition was shorter and the duration of the inhibition was longer in the monotic condition. Therefore, in the monotic condition, DTNs received a contralaterally evoked inhibitory input that preceded the excitatory input to the same neuron. In the dichotic condition, DTNs received an ipsilaterally evoked inhibitory input that was weaker, longer in latency, and shorter in duration than the inputs from the contralateral ear. These findings indicate that the neural mechanisms that create DTNs in the IC are monaural. PMID:24403148

  9. Low-Dose Bafilomycin Attenuates Neuronal Cell Death Associated with Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pivtoraiko, Violetta N.; Harrington, Adam J.; Mader, Burton J.; Luker, Austin M.; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.; Roth, Kevin A.; Shacka, John J.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown previously that the plecomacrolide antibiotics bafilomycin A1 and B1 significantly attenuate cerebellar granule neuron death resulting from agents that disrupt lysosome function. To further characterize bafilomycin-mediated cytoprotection, we examined its ability to attenuate the death of naïve and differentiated neuronal SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells from agents that induce lysosome dysfunction in vitro, and from in vivo dopaminergic neuron death in C. elegans. Low-dose bafilomycin significantly attenuated SH-SY5Y cell death resulting from treatment with chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine amodiaquine and staurosporine. Bafilomycin also attenuated the chloroquine-induced reduction in processing of cathepsin D, the principal lysosomal aspartic acid protease, to its mature “active” form. Chloroquine induced autophagic vacuole accumulation and inhibited autophagic flux, effects that were attenuated upon treatment with bafilomycin and were associated with a significant decrease in chloroquine-induced accumulation of detergent-insoluble α-synuclein oligomers. In addition, bafilomycin significantly and dose-dependently attenuated dopaminergic neuron death in C. elegans resulting from in vivo over-expression of human wild-type α-synuclein. Together, our findings suggest that low-dose bafilomycin is cytoprotective in part through its maintenance of the autophagy-lysosome pathway, and underscores its therapeutic potential for treating Parkinson Disease and other neurodegenerative diseases that exhibit disruption of protein degradation pathways and accumulation of toxic protein species. PMID:20534000

  10. Melatonin prevents apoptosis induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in neuronal cells: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mayo, J C; Sainz, R M; Uria, H; Antolin, I; Esteban, M M; Rodriguez, C

    1998-04-01

    It was recently reported that low doses of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induce apoptosis of naive (undifferentiated) and neuronal (differentiated) PC12 cells, and this system has been proposed as an adequate experimental model for the study of Parkinson's disease. The mechanism by which this neurotoxin damages cells is via the production of free radicals. Given that the neurohormone melatonin has been reported 1) to be a highly effective endogenous free radical scavenger, 2) to increase the mRNA levels and the activity of several antioxidant enzymes, and 3) to inhibit apoptosis in other tissues, we have studied the ability of melatonin to prevent the programmed cell death induced by 6-OHDA in PC12 cells. We found that melatonin prevents the apoptosis caused by 6-OHDA in naive and neuronal PC12 cells as estimated by 1) cell viability assays, 2) counting of the number of apoptotic cells, and 3) analysis and quantification of DNA fragmentation. Exploration of the mechanisms used by melatonin to reduce programmed cell death revealed that this chemical mediator prevents the 6-OHDA induced reduction of mRNAs for several antioxidant enzymes. The possibility that melatonin utilized additional mechanisms to prevent apoptosis of these cells is also discussed. Since this endogenous agent has no known side effects and readily crosses the blood-brain-barrier, we consider melatonin to have a high clinical potential in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases, although more research on the mechanisms is yet to be done.

  11. Proneural transcription factors regulate different steps of cortical neuron migration through Rnd-mediated inhibition of RhoA signaling.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Heng, Julian; Azzarelli, Roberta; Riou, Philippe; Castro, Diogo; Lebel-Potter, Mélanie; Parras, Carlos; Bell, Donald M; Ridley, Anne J; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2011-03-24

    Little is known of the intracellular machinery that controls the motility of newborn neurons. We have previously shown that the proneural protein Neurog2 promotes the migration of nascent cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the atypical Rho GTPase Rnd2. Here, we show that another proneural factor, Ascl1, promotes neuronal migration in the cortex through direct regulation of a second Rnd family member, Rnd3. Both Rnd2 and Rnd3 promote neuronal migration by inhibiting RhoA signaling, but they control distinct steps of the migratory process, multipolar to bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate, respectively. Interestingly, these divergent functions directly result from the distinct subcellular distributions of the two Rnd proteins. Because Rnd proteins also regulate progenitor divisions and neurite outgrowth, we propose that proneural factors, through spatiotemporal regulation of Rnd proteins, integrate the process of neuronal migration with other events in the neurogenic program. PMID:21435554

  12. Proneural transcription factors regulate different steps of cortical neuron migration through Rnd-mediated inhibition of RhoA signaling.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Heng, Julian; Azzarelli, Roberta; Riou, Philippe; Castro, Diogo; Lebel-Potter, Mélanie; Parras, Carlos; Bell, Donald M; Ridley, Anne J; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2011-03-24

    Little is known of the intracellular machinery that controls the motility of newborn neurons. We have previously shown that the proneural protein Neurog2 promotes the migration of nascent cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the atypical Rho GTPase Rnd2. Here, we show that another proneural factor, Ascl1, promotes neuronal migration in the cortex through direct regulation of a second Rnd family member, Rnd3. Both Rnd2 and Rnd3 promote neuronal migration by inhibiting RhoA signaling, but they control distinct steps of the migratory process, multipolar to bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate, respectively. Interestingly, these divergent functions directly result from the distinct subcellular distributions of the two Rnd proteins. Because Rnd proteins also regulate progenitor divisions and neurite outgrowth, we propose that proneural factors, through spatiotemporal regulation of Rnd proteins, integrate the process of neuronal migration with other events in the neurogenic program.

  13. Low doses of alcohol potentiate GABA sub B inhibition of spontaneous activity of hippocampal CA1 neurons in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Criado, J.R.; Thies, R. )

    1991-03-11

    Low doses of alcohol facilitate firing of hippocampal neurons. Such doses also enhance the inhibitory actions of GABA. Alcohol is known to potentiate inhibition via GABA{sub A} receptors. However, the effects of alcohol on GABA{sub B} receptor function are not understood. Spontaneous activity of single units was recorded from CA1 neurons of male rats anesthetized with 1.0% halothane. Electrical recordings and local application of drugs were done with multi-barrel pipettes. CA1 pyramidal neurons fired spontaneous bursts of action potentials. Acute alcohol decreased the interval between bursts, a mild excitatory action. Alcohol also more than doubled the period of complete inhibition produced by local application of both GABA and baclofen. These data suggest that GABA{sub B}-mediated inhibition is also potentiated by low doses of alcohol.

  14. Helicobacter pylori inhibits gastric cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A; Smoot, D; Littleton, G; Tackey, R; Walters, C S; Kashanchi, F; Allen, C R; Ashktorab, H

    2000-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa is associated with changes in gastric epithelial cell proliferation. In vitro studies have shown that exposure to H. pylori inhibits proliferation of gastric cells. This study sought to investigate the cell cycle progression of gastric epithelial cell lines in the presence and absence of H. pylori. Unsynchronized and synchronized gastric epithelial cell lines AGS and KatoIII were exposed to H. pylori over a 24-h period. Cell cycle progression was determined by flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI), and by analysis of cyclin E, p21, and p53 protein expression using Western blots. In the absence of H. pylori 40, 45, and 15% of unsynchronized AGS cells were in G(0)-G(1), S, and G(2)-M phases, respectively, by flow cytometry analysis. When AGS cells were cultured in the presence of H. pylori, the S phase decreased 10% and the G(0)-G(1) phase increased 17% after 24 h compared with the controls. KatoIII cells, which have a deleted p53 gene, showed little or no response to H. pylori. When G1/S synchronized AGS cells were incubated with media containing H. pylori, the G(1) phase increased significantly (25%, P < 0.05) compared with controls after 24 h. In contrast, the control cells were able to pass through S phase. The inhibitory effects of H. pylori on the cell cycle of AGS cells were associated with a significant increase in p53 and p21 expression after 24 h. The expression of cyclin E was downregulated in AGS cells following exposure of AGS cells to H. pylori for 24 h. This study shows that H. pylori-induced growth inhibition in vitro is predominantly at the G(0)-G(1) checkpoint. Our results suggest that p53 may be important in H. pylori-induced cell cycle arrest. These results support a role for cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in the G(1) cell cycle arrest exerted by H. pylori and its involvement in changing the regulatory proteins, p53, p21, and cyclin E in the cell cycle. PMID:11008106

  15. Excitation and inhibition of neuronal activity in the pontine micturition center by pelvic rectal and pudendal anal afferents in dogs.

    PubMed

    Moda, Y; Yamane, M; Fukuda, H; Okada, H

    1993-04-01

    To examine whether or not the pontine micturition center (PMC) is involved in the inhibition of the micturition reflex by pelvic rectal and pudendal anal afferents, neuronal activity in the PMC was observed during inhibition of this reflex in paralyzed decerebrate dogs. Discharge of pelvic vesical branches (VBs) waxed and waned at a rhythm of about 2 Hz during the micturition reflex, which was activated by continuous stimulation of the contralateral VBs. This rhythmic discharge was modulated by continuous stimulation of contralateral pelvic rectal branches (RBs) superimposed on the VB stimulation. The modulation was composed of three effects; initial inhibition, augmentation and late inhibition. However, not all of the three effects were obvious in some dogs. One-sixth of 118 neurons examined in the pontine area ventromedial to the locus ceruleus exhibited rhythmic burst firings which preceded the rhythmic discharge of VBs by about 150 ms. Therefore, these pontine neurons are assumed to be output neurons of the PMC. The rhythmic firings of pontine neurons were augmented during continuous RB stimulation independent of the inhibitory and/or augmentative effects of the RB stimulation on the reflex discharge of the VBs. In contrast, the rhythmic firings of the pontine neurons and the reflex discharge of VBs were inhibited by mechanical stimulation of the anal canal and perineal hairs. These results suggest that the PMC is involved in the inhibition of the micturition reflex produced via pudendal afferents but not in that produced by pelvic rectal afferents, and that pelvic and pudendal afferents project to the PMC through separate pathways.

  16. Ethanol Activation of PKA Mediates Single-Minded 2 Expression in Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhihua; Sun, Yinan; Zhou, Hanjing; Chu, Guangpin; Zhang, Jing; Meng, Xianfang

    2015-12-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure can cause extensive apoptotic neurodegeneration throughout