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Sample records for initial microvessel density

  1. Microvessel and astroglial cell densities in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, M; Akagi, N; Goto, H; Watanabe, H; Nakanishi, M; Hirose, Y; Watanabe, M

    1992-01-01

    In order to study the factors responsible for glucose uptake in the mouse hippocampus, microvessel and astroglial cell densities were measured and compared in each laminal region. Microvessel density was examined on histologically prepared sections after injection of Indian ink and measured by means of an image analyser. Astroglial cell density was determined after the cells were stained immunohistochemically. Microvessel and astroglial cell densities were determined in 10 different hippocampal structures. Microvessel and astroglial cell densities were strongly correlated in all layers except the pyramidal cell layers. The highest density of perfused microvessels was found in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare, compared with other regions, and the lowest values were found in the stratum lucidum and dentate granular cell layer. Among pyramidal cell layers, microvessel density in sector CA3a was significantly higher than that in CA1. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1452486

  2. Augmented mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Tuka, Elżbieta; Danilewicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent investigations have taken into account the role of mast cells in prostate cancer formation, analyzing their dual functions (as tumour growth promoters and tumour growth inhibitors). The aim of our study was to compare mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer and in benign prostate hyperplasia. We also attempted to find possible relationships among mast cell infiltration and microvessel density, Gleason score, as well as serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Material and methods The investigation was confined to evaluations of material from prostate needle biopsies, carried out in 26 patients with prostate cancer, and of 14 specimens diagnosed as benign hyperplasia. The numbers of tryptase positive mast cells and CD34 positive vessels were determined using a computer image analysis system. In the patients with prostate cancer, both mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density were significantly increased, as compared to the control patients. Results Significant positive correlations were identified between the mean numbers of mast cells and microvessel densities, both in the prostate cancer group and in the control group. Moreover, significant positive correlations were observed between Gleason score on one hand and the number of mast cells and microvessel density on the other. The correlations between PSA serum levels and both mast cell infiltration and microvessel density were positive, but not in a statistically significant way. Conclusions The reported investigations may support the assumption of mast cell promoter function in prostate cancer development, whereas no evidence was found for their opposite PMID:24592126

  3. Evaluation of microvessel density and p53 expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jureidini, Ricardo; da Cunha, José Eduardo Monteiro; Takeda, Flavio; Namur, Guilherme Naccache; Ribeiro, Thiago Costa; Patzina, Rosely; Figueira, Estela RR; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Bacchella, Telesforo; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic significance of microvessel density and p53 expression in pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Between 2008 and 2012, 49 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent resection with curative intention. The resected specimens were immunohistochemically stained with anti-p53 and anti-CD34 antibodies. Microvessel density was assessed by counting vessels within ten areas of each tumoral section a highpower microscope. RESULTS: The microvessel density ranged from 21.2 to 54.2 vessels/mm2. Positive nuclear staining for p53 was found in 20 patients (40.6%). The overall median survival rate after resection was 24.1 months and there were no differences in survival rates related to microvessel density or p53 positivity. Microvessel density was associated with tumor diameter greater than 3.0 cm and with R0 resection failure. CONCLUSIONS: Microvessel density was associated with R1 resection and with larger tumors. p53 expression was not correlated with intratumoral microvessel density in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27438564

  4. Adverse Prognostic Impact of Bone Marrow Microvessel Density in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nuri; Lee, Hyewon; Moon, Soo Young; Sohn, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Sang Mee; Yoon, Ok Jin; Youn, Hye Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is important for the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Bone marrow (BM) microvessel density (MVD) is a useful marker of angiogenesis and is determined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD34 antibody. This study investigated the prognostic impact of MVD and demonstrated the relationship between MVD and previously mentioned prognostic factors in patients with MM. Methods The study included 107 patients with MM. MVD was assessed at initial diagnosis in a blinded manner by two hematopathologists who examined three CD34-positive hot spots per patient and counted the number of vessels in BM samples. Patients were divided into three groups according to MVD tertiles. Cumulative progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) curves, calculated by using Kaplan-Meier method, were compared among the three groups. Prognostic impact of MVD was assessed by calculating Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR). Results Median MVDs in the three groups were 16.8, 33.9, and 54.7. MVDs were correlated with other prognostic factors, including β2-microglobulin concentration, plasma cell percentage in the BM, and cancer stage according to the International Staging System. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high MVD was an independent predictor of PFS (HR=2.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-5.42; P=0.013). PFS was significantly lower in the high MVD group than in the low MVD group (P=0.025). However, no difference was observed in the OS (P=0.428). Conclusions Increased BM MVD is a marker of poor prognosis in patients newly diagnosed with MM. BM MVD should be assessed at the initial diagnosis of MM. PMID:26354343

  5. Reconsideration of the clinical and histopathological significance of angiogenesis in prostate cancer: Usefulness and limitations of microvessel density measurement.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Sakai, Hideki

    2015-09-01

    Angiogenesis plays important roles in tumor growth and cancer cell dissemination in almost all cancers. In prostate cancer, there is general agreement that increased angiogenesis is an important factor in determining tumor development and prognosis in these patients. Microvessel density is recognized as a useful marker for evaluating the angiogenic status of cancer tissues. Many investigators have reported that microvessel density is significantly associated with pathological features and outcomes in prostate cancer patients; however, some researchers have expressed opposing opinions. As the reason for such discrepancy, previous reports have suggested differences in the methodologies of measuring microvessel density in cancer tissues. In the present review, we focus on the variation in such methods, including the selected area and the method used for (semi)quantification. In particular, we discuss the relationship between malignancy potential, tumor progression, and survival and differences in the antibodies used for detection of endothelial cells in detail. We briefly compare the pathological significance and prognostic roles of microvessel density measured using von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, and CD105. Based on these analyses, the advantages and limitations of microvessel density measurements in prostate cancer tissues are clarified. Improved "real" and "specific" markers of cancer-related angiogenesis are necessary for better predictions of prognoses and for discussion of treatment strategies for patients with prostate cancer. However, establishment of a satisfactory cancer-related endothelial marker could take a long time. Therefore, knowledge regarding the pathological significance of microvessel density - based on understanding of the advantages and limitations of microvessel density determination methods - is important.

  6. Microvessel density and p53 mutations in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Niyati J; Geest, Koen De; Neff, Traci; Young, Barry De; Bender, David P; Ahmed, Amina; Smith, Brian J; Button, Anna; Goodheart, Michael J

    2013-04-30

    We planned to determine the relationship between angiogenesis and p53 mutational status in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. Using 190 tumor samples from patients with stage III and IV ovarian cancer we performed p53 sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and CD31 microvessel density (MVD) determination. MVD was elevated in tumors with p53 null mutations compared to p53 missense mutation or no mutation. Disease recurrence was increased with higher MVD in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. In adjusted analysis, p53 null mutation was associated with increased recurrence and worse overall survival. Worse overall survival and increased recurrence risk were also associated with the combination of CD31 MVD values >25 vessels/HPF and any p53 mutation. P53 mutation status and MVD may have prognostic significance in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Tumors with p53 null mutations are likely to be more vascular, contributing to decreased survival and increased recurrence probability.

  7. Microvessel density and Ki-67 labeling index in esthesioneuroblastoma: is there a prognostic role?

    PubMed

    Singh, Lavleen; Ranjan, Richa; Madan, Renu; Arava, Sudheer K; Deepak, Rakesh K; Singh, Manoj Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) is a malignant neuroectodermal tumor. Hyams grading has an established role in its prognostication. The importance of microvessel density (MVD) and Ki-67 labeling index (Ki-67 LI) is well studied in various tumors, but the same remains understated in ENB. The aims of the study were to estimate proliferation index and MVD in ENB and to correlate them with Hyams grade. Twenty-six ENB cases diagnosed over a period of 5 years were included. Hyams grade, MVD, and Ki-67 LI were evaluated for each of them. The cases were categorized as low (Hyams grades 1 and 2) and high (Hyams grades 3 and 4) grades. Microvessel density and Ki-67 LI were correlated with grade. The treatment response was analyzed in different grades. The commonest histologic grade was 4 (42%). The mean Ki-67 LI was 2%, 8.2%, 30.8%, and 40.5% and mean MVD was 81.67/mm(2), 37/mm(2), 24/mm(2), and 25.2/mm(2) in grades 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. A statistically significant correlation of grade with Ki-67 LI (P < .001) and MVD (P < .007) was noted. Hyams grade in ENB correlates well with treatment response. Ki-67 LI is an important prognostic factor in ENB. We propose a cutoff of 25% for Ki-67 LI to differentiate low- vs high-grade ENB, but larger studies are needed for validation. Contrary to epithelial tumors, there is a decrease in MVD with increasing grade in ENB.

  8. Prognostic Significance of Microvessel Density Determining by Endoglin in Stage II Rectal Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Drazen; Martinovic, Mia

    2015-01-01

    Background. The role of endoglin in the Dukes B rectal cancer is still unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of endoglin (CD105) in resected rectal cancer and to evaluate the relationship between microvessels density (MVD), clinicopathological factors, and survival rates. Methods. The study included 95 primary rectal adenocarcinomas, corresponding to 67 adjacent and 73 distant normal mucosa specimens from surgical resection samples. Tumor specimens were paraffin-embedded and immunohistochemical staining for the CD105 endothelial antigen was performed to count CD105-MVD. For exact measurement of the CD105-MVD used a computer-integrated system Alphelys Spot Browser 2 was used. Results. The intratumoral CD105-MVD was significantly higher compared with corresponding adjacent mucosa (P < 0.0001) and distant mucosa specimens (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the CD105-MVD according to patients age, gender, tumor location, grade of differentiation, histological type, depth of tumor invasion, and tumor size. The overall survival rate was significantly higher in the low CD105-MVD group of patients than in the high CD105-MVD group of patients (log-rank test, P = 0.0406). Conclusion. CD105-assessed MVD could help to identify patients with possibility of poor survival in the group of stage II RC. PMID:26089870

  9. VEGF, Flt-1, and microvessel density in primary tumors as predictive factors of colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Zygoń, Justyna; Szajewski, Mariusz; Kruszewski, Wiesław Janusz; Rzepko, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis in the primary tumor is known to be necessary for tumor progression in adenocarcinomas of the colon. However, whether angiogenesis in the primary tumors of patients with colorectal cancer affects their prognosis has yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between selected pathoclinical parameters and overall survival of resectable colorectal cancer patients with the expression of angiogenesis-promoting factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor (Flt-1), and microvessel density (MVD) in the primary tumor. VEGF and Flt-1 expression were assessed, as well as MVD (with anti-CD34) by immunohistochemistry in 139 archived primary colorectal cancer tissue samples. These results were compared with the overall survival of the patients and potential prognostic pathoclinical parameters. A higher MVD in the tumors expressing Flt-1 (P=0.04) was identified. However, there was no correlation between the pathoclinical parameters of colon cancer and Flt-1 expression, VEGF expression, or MVD in the tumor. Furthermore, the intensity of VEGF expression, Flt-1 expression and tumor MVD did not correlate with the overall survival of the patients. Therefore, although increased expression of VEGF and Flt-1 was correlated with an increased expression of MVD in the primary tumors of resectable colorectal cancer patients, these factors were not correlated with prognostic pathoclinical factors and overall survival. PMID:28357103

  10. Evaluation of mast cell counts and microvessel density in reactive lesions of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Moradzadeh Khiavi, Monir; Tahamtan, Shabnam

    2016-01-01

    Background. Reliable immunohistochemical assays to assess the definitive role of mast cells (MCs) and angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of oral reactive lesions are generally not available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mast cell counts (MCC) and microvessel density (MVD) in oral reactive lesions and determine the correlation between MCC and MVD. Methods. Seventy-five cases of reactive lesions of the oral cavity, including pyogenic granuloma, fibroma, peripheral giant cell granuloma, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, peripheral ossifying fibroma (15 for each category) were immunohisto-chemically stained with MC tryptase and CD31. Fifteen cases of normal gingival tissue were considered as the control group. The mean MCC and MVD in superficial and deep connective tissues were assessed and total MCC and MVD was computed for each lesion. Results. Statistically significant differences were observed in MCC and MVD between the study groups (P < 0.001). MC tryptase and CD31 expression increased in the superficial connective tissue of each lesion in comparison to the deep con-nective tissue. A significant negative correlation was not found between MCC and MVD in oral reactive lesions (P < 0.001, r = -0.458). Conclusion. Although MCs were present in the reactive lesions of the oral cavity, a direct correlation between MCC and MVD was not found in these lesions. Therefore, a significant interaction between MCs and endothelial cells and an active role for MCs in the growth of oral reactive lesions was not found in this study. PMID:28096950

  11. Development and Validation of a Histological Method to Measure Microvessel Density in Whole-Slide Images of Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Croons, Valerie; Waumans, Yannick; Sluydts, Ellen; De Schepper, Stefanie; Andries, Luc; Waelput, Wim; Fransen, Erik; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Kockx, Mark M.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Despite all efforts made to develop predictive biomarkers for antiangiogenic therapies, no unambiguous markers have been identified so far. This is due to among others the lack of standardized tests. This study presents an improved microvessel density quantification method in tumor tissue based on stereological principles and using whole-slide images. Vessels in tissue sections of different cancer types were stained for CD31 by an automated and validated immunohistochemical staining method. The stained slides were digitized with a digital slide scanner. Systematic, uniform, random sampling of the regions of interest on the whole-slide images was performed semi-automatically with the previously published applications AutoTag and AutoSnap. Subsequently, an unbiased counting grid was combined with the images generated with these scripts. Up to six independent observers counted microvessels in up to four cancer types: colorectal carcinoma, glioblastoma multiforme, ovarian carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. At first, inter-observer variability was found to be unacceptable. However, after a series of consensus training sessions and interim statistical analysis, counting rules were modified and inter-observer concordance improved considerably. Every CD31-positive object was counted, with exclusion of suspected CD31-positive monocytes, macrophages and tumor cells. Furthermore, if interconnected, stained objects were considered a single vessel. Ten regions of interest were sufficient for accurate microvessel density measurements. Intra-observer and inter-observer variability were low (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.7) if the observers were adequately trained. PMID:27583442

  12. Prognosis of invasive breast cancer after adjuvant therapy evaluated with VEGF microvessel density and microvascular imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Wei, Xi; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ultrasonographic microvascular imaging in the evaluation of prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies. A total of 121 patients with invasive breast cancer underwent ultrasonographic contrast-enhanced imaging, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) staining, and microvessel density (MVD) counts. The parameters of microvascular imaging and the expression of VEGF and MVD in primary breast cancer were calculated. The correlation between these factors and the overall and progression-free survival rate were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Among 121 cases, the positive VEGF cases were 75 and negative ones were 46. The cut point of 52.3 was calculated by the regressive curve for MVD counts. The data showed the mean intensity (MI) was positively associated with both the MVD counts (r = .51, p < .001) and VEGF expression (r = .35, p < .001). For the prognosis of patients, high VEGF expression and MVD counts were associated with reduced progressive and survival times (PFS, p = .032 and p = .034; OS, p = .041 and p = .038, respectively). The correlation between parameters of microvascular imaging, VEGF expressive status, and the MVD counts were established. The cut point of mean intensity (MI = 40) was used to investigate as an independent predictor for PFS (p = .021) and OS (p = .025), respectively, due to a strong correlation between MVD counts and VEGF expression in patients with invasive breast cancer. The microvascular imaging could be a visual and helpful tool to predict the prognosis of patients with invasive breast cancer treated by adjuvant therapies.

  13. Study of the Impact of Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) on Endometrial Microvessel Density (MVD) and Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Guosheng; Xiang Xianhong; Guo Wenbo; Zhang Bing; Chen Wei; Yang Jianyong

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the influence of uterine artery embolization (UAE) on endometrial microvessel density (MVD) and angiogenesis.MethodsSixty female guinea pigs were divided into two groups, the control group (n = 15) and the UAE treatment group (n = 45). In the UAE group, tris-acryl gelatin microspheres were used to generate embolization. Animals were further divided into three subgroups, A1, A2, and A3 (n = 15 for each subgroup), with uterine specimens collected at 7-15, 16-30, and 31-45 days after UAE, respectively. Immunostaining for factor VIII and CD105 was performed to identify total endometrial MVD (MVD{sub FVIII}) and CD105-positive angiogenesis (MVD{sub CD105}) at the indicated time points after UAE.ResultsQuantitative analysis revealed that MVD{sub FVIII} significantly decreased in the A1 (11.40 {+-} 2.76, p < 0.05) and A2 (15.37 {+-} 3.06, p < 0.05) groups compared to the control group (19.40 {+-} 2.50), and was restored to normal in the A3 group (18.77 {+-} 2.69). UAE caused a temporal up-regulation of MVD{sub CD105}-positive angiogenesis in the A1 group (9.33 {+-} 2.37, p < 0.05) and the A2 group (11.63 {+-} 1.56, p < 0.05) compared to the control group (7.12 {+-} 1.67), and the MVD{sub CD105} value returned to normal in the A3 group (8.07 {+-} 1.97).ConclusionUAE caused a temporal decrease in endometrial MVD that reversed over time as a result of the increase of CD105-positive angiogenesis. Although the UAE-induced reduction of endometrial MVD was reversible, its long-term effect on endometrial receptivity still needs further study.

  14. Bone marrow microvessel density and plasma angiogenic factors in myeloproliferative neoplasms: clinicopathological and molecular correlations.

    PubMed

    Lekovic, Danijela; Gotic, Mirjana; Skoda, Radek; Beleslin-Cokic, Bojana; Milic, Natasa; Mitrovic-Ajtic, Olivera; Nienhold, Ronny; Sefer, Dijana; Suboticki, Tijana; Buac, Marijana; Markovic, Dragana; Diklic, Milos; Cokic, Vladan P

    2017-03-01

    Increased angiogenesis in BCR-ABL1 negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) has been recognized, but its connection with clinical and molecular markers needs to be defined. The aims of study were to (1) assess bone marrow (BM) angiogenesis measured by microvessel density (MVD) using CD34 and CD105 antibodies; (2) analyze correlation of MVD with plasma angiogenic factors including vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin-8; (3) examine the association of MVD with clinicopathological and molecular markers. We examined 90 de novo MPN patients (30 polycythemia vera (PV), primary myelofibrosis (PMF), essential thrombocythemia (ET)) and 10 age-matched controls. MVD was analyzed by immunohistochemistry "hot spot" method, angiogenic factors by immunoassay and JAK2V617F, and CALR mutations by DNA sequencing and allelic PCR. MVD was significantly increased in MPNs compared to controls (PMF > PV > ET). Correlation between MVD and plasma angiogenic factors was found in MPNs. MVD was significantly increased in patients with JAK2V617F mutation and correlated with JAK2 mutant allele burden (CD34-MVD: ρ = 0.491, p < 0.001; CD105-MVD: ρ = 0.276, p = 0.02) but not with CALR mutation. MVD correlated with leukocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. BM fibrosis was significantly associated with CD34-MVD, CD105-MVD, interleukin-8, and JAK2 mutant allele burden. JAK2 homozygote status had positive predictive value (100%) for BM fibrosis. Patients with prefibrotic PMF had significantly higher MVD than patients with ET, and we could recommend MVD to be additional histopathological marker to distinguish these two entities. This study also highlights the strong correlation of MVD with plasma angiogenic factors, JAK2 mutant allele burden, and BM fibrosis in MPNs.

  15. Correlation between CT Perfusion Parameters and Microvessel Density and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xifu; Bai, Renju; Li, Yajun; Zhao, Jinkun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the correlation between computed tomography (CT) perfusion parameters and markers of angiogenesis in adrenal adenomas and non-adenomas to determine if perfusion CT can be used to distinguish between them. Thirty-four patients with pathologically-confirmed adrenal tumors (17 adenomas, 17 non-adenomas) received CT perfusion imaging before surgery. CT perfusion parameters (blood flow [BF], blood volume [BV], mean transit time [MTT], and permeability surface area product [PS]) were calculated. Tumor tissue sections were examined with immunohistochemical methods for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and microvessel density (MVD). The mean age of the 34 patients was 43 years. The median BV was significantly higher in adenomas than in non-adenomas [12.3 ml/100 g, inter-quartile range (IQR): 10.4 to 16.5 ml/100 g vs. 8.8 ml/100 g, IQR: 3.3 to 9.4 ml/100 g, p = 0.001]. Differences in BF, MTT, and PS parameter values between adenomas and non-adenomas were not significant (p>0.05). The mean MVD was significantly higher in adenomas compared to non-adenomas (98.5±28.5 vs. 53.5±27.0, p<0.0001). Adenomas also expressed significantly higher median VEGF than non-adenomas (65%, IQR: 50 to 79% vs. 45%, IQR: 35 to 67%, p = 0.02). A moderately strong correlation between BF and VEGF (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and between BV and MVD among adenomas (r = 0.57, p = 0.02) exist. Morphology, MVD, and VEGF expression in adenomas differ significantly from non-adenomas. Of the CT perfusion parameters examined, both BF and BV correlate with MVD, but only BF correlates with VEGF, and only in adenomas. The significant difference in BV suggests that BV may be used to differentiate adenomas from non-adenomas. However, the small difference in BV shows that it may only be possible to use BV to identify adenomas vs. non-adenomas at extreme BV values. PMID:24260316

  16. The effects of binge alcohol exposure in the 2nd trimester on the estimated density of cerebral microvessels in near-term fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Simon, Katherine E; Mondares, Robin L; Born, Donald E; Gleason, Christine A

    2008-09-22

    Heavy fetal alcohol exposure is associated with a spectrum of neurological abnormalities, although the mechanism of injury is largely unknown. We previously reported attenuated cerebral blood flow response to hypoxia in fetal and newborn sheep which were exposed to alcohol earlier in pregnancy. One possible mechanism for this effect of alcohol on the developing cerebral vasculature is a decrease in cerebral microvessel density, similar to its effect on developing neurons. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that prenatal alcohol exposure decreases cerebral microvessel density. Pregnant ewes received intravenous infusions of ethanol or saline during days 60-84 of gestation (term=150 days) and at 125 days of gestation we obtained the fetal brains for study. We immunohistochemically labeled vessels of the left cerebral forebrain hemispheres with antibody to endothelial nitric oxide synthase and then obtained unbiased stereological estimates of cerebral microvessel density using a modified optical fractionator method. We studied 20 fetal brains of which 9 were alcohol-exposed, 11 were saline-controls, and all were products of a twin gestation. Although brain and body weights were not different between groups, the alcohol-exposed group had significantly lower brain weight as a percentage of body weight. Estimates of cerebral microvessel density were not significantly different between alcohol-exposed and saline-control groups: 12.7+/-8.7 and 9.1+/-2.8 microvessels per mm(3), respectively (mean+/-SD, p=0.32). Since there is no change in estimated cerebral microvessel density after prenatal alcohol exposure, we conclude that decreased cerebral microvessel density is not a likely explanation for attenuated cerebral blood flow in response to hypoxia.

  17. Association between intratumoral lymphatic microvessel density (LMVD) and clinicopathologic features in endometrial cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lymph node metastasis in endometrial cancer significantly decreases survival rate. Few data on the influence of intratumoral lymphatic microvessel density (LMVD) on survival in endometrial cancer are available. Our aim was to assess the intratumoral LMVD of endometrial carcinomas and to investigate its association with classical pathological factors, lymph node metastasis and survival. Methods Fifty-seven patients with endometrial carcinoma diagnosed between 2000 and 2008 underwent complete surgical staging and evaluation of intratumoral LMVD and other histologic variables. Lymphatic microvessels were identified by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibody against human podoplanin (clone D2-40) and evaluated by counting the number of immunostained lymphatic vessels in 10 hot spot areas at 400× magnification. The LMVD was expressed by the mean number of vessels in these 10 hot spot microscopic fields. We next investigated the association of LMVD with the clinicopathologic findings and prognosis. Results The mean number of lymphatic vessels counted in all cases ranged between 0 and 4.7. The median value of mean LMVD was 0.5, and defined the cut-off for low and high LMVD. We identified low intratumoral LMVD in 27 (47.4%) patients and high LMVD in 30 (52.6%) patients. High intratumoral LMVD was associated with lesser miometrial and adnaexal infiltration, lesser cervical and peritoneal involvement, and fewer fatal cases. Although there was lower lymph node involvement among cases with high LMVD, the difference did not reach significance. No association was seen between LMVD and FIGO staging, histological type, or vascular invasion. On the other hand, low intratumoral LMVD was associated with poor outcome. Seventy-five percent of deaths occurred in patients with low intratumoral LMVD. Conclusion Our results show association of high intratumoral LMVD with features related to more localized disease and better outcome. We discuss the role of

  18. Magnetic Resonance Q Mapping Reveals a Decrease in Microvessel Density in the arcAβ Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ielacqua, Giovanna D.; Schlegel, Felix; Füchtemeier, Martina; Xandry, Jael; Rudin, Markus; Klohs, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in density and morphology of the cerebral microvasculature have been reported to occur in Alzheimer's disease patients and animal models of the disease. In this study we compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for their utility to detect age-dependent changes of the cerebral vasculature in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI was performed by tracking the passage of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle in the brain with dynamic gradient echo planar imaging (EPI). From this measurements relative cerebral blood volume [rCBV(DSC)] and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were estimated. For the same animal maps of the relaxation shift index Q were computed from high resolution gradient echo and spin echo data that were acquired before and after superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle injection. Q-values were used to derive estimates of microvessel density. The change in the relaxation rates ΔR2* obtained from pre- and post-contrast gradient echo data was used for the alternative determination of rCBV [rCBV(ΔR2*)]. Linear mixed effects modeling found no significant association between rCBV(DSC), rCBV(ΔR2*), rCBF, and Q with genotype in 13-month old mice [compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates (NTLs)] for any of the evaluated brain regions. In 24-month old mice there was a significant association for rCBV(DSC) with genotype in the cerebral cortex, and for rCBV(ΔR2*) in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. For rCBF there was a significant association in the cerebellum but not in other brain regions. Q-values in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum in 24-month old mice were significantly associated with genotype. In those regions Q-values were reduced between 11 and 26% in arcAβ mice compared to age-matched NTLs. Vessel staining with CD31 immunohistochemistry confirmed a reduction of microvessel density in the old arcAβ mice

  19. Magnetic Resonance Q Mapping Reveals a Decrease in Microvessel Density in the arcAβ Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Schlegel, Felix; Füchtemeier, Martina; Xandry, Jael; Rudin, Markus; Klohs, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in density and morphology of the cerebral microvasculature have been reported to occur in Alzheimer's disease patients and animal models of the disease. In this study we compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for their utility to detect age-dependent changes of the cerebral vasculature in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI was performed by tracking the passage of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle in the brain with dynamic gradient echo planar imaging (EPI). From this measurements relative cerebral blood volume [rCBV(DSC)] and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were estimated. For the same animal maps of the relaxation shift index Q were computed from high resolution gradient echo and spin echo data that were acquired before and after superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle injection. Q-values were used to derive estimates of microvessel density. The change in the relaxation rates [Formula: see text] obtained from pre- and post-contrast gradient echo data was used for the alternative determination of rCBV [rCBV([Formula: see text])]. Linear mixed effects modeling found no significant association between rCBV(DSC), rCBV([Formula: see text]), rCBF, and Q with genotype in 13-month old mice [compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates (NTLs)] for any of the evaluated brain regions. In 24-month old mice there was a significant association for rCBV(DSC) with genotype in the cerebral cortex, and for rCBV([Formula: see text]) in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. For rCBF there was a significant association in the cerebellum but not in other brain regions. Q-values in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum in 24-month old mice were significantly associated with genotype. In those regions Q-values were reduced between 11 and 26% in arcAβ mice compared to age-matched NTLs. Vessel staining with CD31 immunohistochemistry confirmed a

  20. COX-2 expression correlates with microvessel density in non-melanoma skin cancer from renal transplant recipients and immunocompetent individuals.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Anthony; O'Kelly, Patrick; Murphy, Gillian M; Leader, Mary; Kay, Elaine

    2004-12-01

    Angiogenesis, the generation of a new vascular network, is regulated in part by inducers of endothelial cell migration and proliferation, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Microvessel density (MVD) measurement is widely used to quantify angiogenesis in tissue sections of tumors, including cutaneous malignancies. The increasing number of successful renal transplantations worldwide is producing a progressive increase in patients at risk for non-melanoma skin cancers, such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and Bowen's disease (BD), and at significantly increased risk for metastatic SCC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was any difference in angiogenesis between these tumor types in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and immunocompetent individuals (ICIs) and whether angiogenesis in these tumors was related to COX-2 expression. The study measured angiogenesis and COX-2 expression in BD, SCC, BCC, and normal skin from both RTRs and ICIs. Vessel counts were performed, and COX-2 immunoexpression was assessed semiquantitatively. The MVD counts differed significantly between normal skin and all tumor types. Significant differences in MVD density were found between all SCCs and BCCs. BCCs from RTRs had significantly greater MVD at the invasive front of the tumor than BCCs from ICIs. Increased COX-2 expression correlated with increased MVD in all tumors examined. These findings indicate a difference in vascular profiles between RTRs and ICIs in BCCs and suggest a relationship between COX-2 and angiogenesis that may provide a possible treatment target for skin tumors in these 2 patient populations.

  1. Identification of lymphatic vessels and prognostic value of lymphatic microvessel density in lesions of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Saptefraţi, L; Cîmpean, Anca Maria; Ciornîi, A; Ceauşu, Raluca; Eşanu, N; Raica, M

    2009-01-01

    Incomplete characterization of the uterine cervix cancer from molecular point of view represents the main problem for the use of a proper therapy in this disease. Few data are available about D2-40 expression in lymphatic endothelial cells and also in tumor cells from uterine cervix cancer. The aim of the present work was to study the involvement of lymphatics in prognosis and tumor progression of the uterine cervix lesions. We used D2-40 immunostaining to highlight lymphatic vessels from squamous cell metaplasia (n=17), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (n=11), carcinoma in situ (n=3), microinvasive carcinoma (n=4) and invasive carcinoma (n=19) using Avidin-Biotin technique (LSAB+). Type and distribution of lymphatics in different lesions of the cervix were analyzed. We found significant correlation between lymphatic microvessel density and tumor grade and particular distribution of the lymphatics linked to histopathologic type of the lesions. Also, differences was found in lymphovascular invasion interpretation between routine Hematoxylin and Eosin staining specimens and immunohistochemical ones. Our results showed differences in the distribution and D2-40 expression in lymphatic vessels and tumor cells from the cervix lesions linked to histopathology and tumor grade.

  2. Microvessel density and endothelial cell proliferation levels in colorectal liver metastases from patients given neo-adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Eefsen, Rikke Løvendahl; Engelholm, Lars; Willemoe, Gro L; Van den Eynden, Gert G; Laerum, Ole Didrik; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Rolff, Hans Christian; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Osterlind, Kell; Vainer, Ben; Illemann, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The treatment of patients with colorectal liver metastasis has improved significantly and first line therapy is often combined chemotherapy and bevacizumab, although it is unknown who responds to this regimen. Colorectal liver metastases grow in different histological growth patterns showing differences in angiogenesis. To identify possible response markers, histological markers of angiogenesis were assessed. Patients who underwent resection of colorectal liver metastasis at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark from 2007 to 2011 were included (n = 254) including untreated and patients treated with chemotherapy or chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. The resected liver metastases were characterised with respect to growth pattern, endothelial and tumour cell proliferation as well as microvessel density and tumour regression. Tumour regression grade of liver metastases differed significantly between untreated/chemotherapy treated patients in comparison to chemotherapy plus bevacizumab treated patients (both p < 0.0001). Microvessel density was decreased in liver metastases from patients treated with bevacizumab in comparison to those from untreated/chemotherapy-treated patients (p = 0.006/p = 0.002). Tumour cell proliferation assessed by Ki67 expression correlated to a shorter recurrence free survival in the total patient cohort. In conclusion, liver metastases from patients treated with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and bevacizumab had significantly lower microvessel densities and tumour regression grades when compared to liver metastases from untreated or chemotherapy treated patients. This may indicate that bevacizumab treatment results in altered vascular biology and tumour viability, with possible tumour reducing effect.

  3. Hypoxia-Related Marker GLUT-1, CAIX, Proliferative Index and Microvessel Density in Canine Oral Malignant Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Valeria; Guscetti, Franco; Roos, Malgorzata; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Pruschy, Martin; Rohrer Bley, Carla

    2016-01-01

    For various types of tumor therapy, it is suggested that co-targeting of tumor microenvironment, mainly tumor vasculature, mediates tumor response mechanisms. Immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), Ki-67, and von Willebrand factor VIII for microvessel density (MVD) were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of canine oral malignant neoplasms. Polarographic oxygen measurements (median pO2) and perfusion data via contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (median vascularity, median blood volume) provided additional information. Ninety-two samples were analyzed: sarcomas (n = 32), carcinomas (n = 30), and malignant melanomas (n = 30). Polarographic oxygen and perfusion data was available in 22.8% (sarcomas n = 9, carcinomas n = 7, melanomas n = 5), and 27.1% (sarcomas n = 10, carcinomas n = 8, melanomas n = 7) of cases, respectively. GLUT-1 expression was detected in 46.7% of all samples, and was generally weak. CAIX expression was found in 34.8% of all samples. Median Ki-67 score and MVD count was 19% and 17, respectively. The evaluation of the GLUT-1 score and continuous data showed significantly lower GLUT-1 levels in sarcomas (mean 5.1%, SD 6.2) versus carcinomas and melanomas (mean 16.5%/ 19.0%, SD 17.3/ 20.9, p = 0.001). The expression of CAIX correlated mildly positively with GLUT-1 (p = 0.018, rho = 0.250) as well as with Ki-67 (p = 0.014, rho = 0.295). MVD showed a significantly lower level in melanomas (mean 12.6, SD 7.7) versus sarcomas and carcinomas (mean 21.8/ 26.9, SD 13.0/20.4, p = 0.001). Median vascularity and blood volume were significantly lower in sarcomas (mean 10.4%, SD 11.0, and mean 6.3%, SD 6.5, respectively) versus carcinomas (mean 39.2%, SD 16.4 and mean 33.0%, SD 25.6, respectively) and melanomas (mean 36.0%, SD 18.3, and 31.5%, SD 24.5). Between the 3 histological groups, there was neither a significant difference in the GLUT-1 and CAIX score and continuous data, nor the Ki

  4. Hypoxia-Related Marker GLUT-1, CAIX, Proliferative Index and Microvessel Density in Canine Oral Malignant Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Meier, Valeria; Guscetti, Franco; Roos, Malgorzata; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Pruschy, Martin; Rohrer Bley, Carla

    2016-01-01

    For various types of tumor therapy, it is suggested that co-targeting of tumor microenvironment, mainly tumor vasculature, mediates tumor response mechanisms. Immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), carbonic anhydrase-IX (CAIX), Ki-67, and von Willebrand factor VIII for microvessel density (MVD) were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples of canine oral malignant neoplasms. Polarographic oxygen measurements (median pO2) and perfusion data via contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasound (median vascularity, median blood volume) provided additional information. Ninety-two samples were analyzed: sarcomas (n = 32), carcinomas (n = 30), and malignant melanomas (n = 30). Polarographic oxygen and perfusion data was available in 22.8% (sarcomas n = 9, carcinomas n = 7, melanomas n = 5), and 27.1% (sarcomas n = 10, carcinomas n = 8, melanomas n = 7) of cases, respectively. GLUT-1 expression was detected in 46.7% of all samples, and was generally weak. CAIX expression was found in 34.8% of all samples. Median Ki-67 score and MVD count was 19% and 17, respectively. The evaluation of the GLUT-1 score and continuous data showed significantly lower GLUT-1 levels in sarcomas (mean 5.1%, SD 6.2) versus carcinomas and melanomas (mean 16.5%/ 19.0%, SD 17.3/ 20.9, p = 0.001). The expression of CAIX correlated mildly positively with GLUT-1 (p = 0.018, rho = 0.250) as well as with Ki-67 (p = 0.014, rho = 0.295). MVD showed a significantly lower level in melanomas (mean 12.6, SD 7.7) versus sarcomas and carcinomas (mean 21.8/ 26.9, SD 13.0/20.4, p = 0.001). Median vascularity and blood volume were significantly lower in sarcomas (mean 10.4%, SD 11.0, and mean 6.3%, SD 6.5, respectively) versus carcinomas (mean 39.2%, SD 16.4 and mean 33.0%, SD 25.6, respectively) and melanomas (mean 36.0%, SD 18.3, and 31.5%, SD 24.5). Between the 3 histological groups, there was neither a significant difference in the GLUT-1 and CAIX score and continuous data, nor the Ki

  5. Prognostic value of microvessel density and p53 expression on the locoregional metastasis and survival of the patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marcos Vinícius M; Pereira Gomes, Erika P; Pereira, Camila S; de Souza, Ludmilla R; Barros, Lucas O; Mendes, Danilo C; Guimarães, André L S; De Paula, Alfredo M B

    2013-10-01

    Cancer cells need to develop microvessels in order to grow and to establish metastatic foci. A role for the p53 protein in the regulation of the angiogenic process is suggested. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between immunohistochemical expression of microvessel density (MVD), measured by CD31 staining, and p53 protein with clinicopathologic factors, and survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (n=70). Tumor angiogenesis was estimated by determining MVD in areas with the highest number of stained microvessels (hot spots). Clinicopathologic factors and immunohistochemical data were evaluated by χ statistical test and were submitted to binary logistic regression to analyze the risk of presence of lymph node metastasis. Factors that might predict survival were investigated using Cox proportional hazards tests. Differences were considered statistically significant when P<0.05. The percentage of p53-positive cells showed no association with clinicopathologic parameters and MVD. Patients with locoregional metastasis presented statistically significant higher MVD (P=0.043). Individuals presenting head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in posterior sites (P=0.022; OR=3.644) and higher MVD (P=0.039; OR=3.247) had a significant increase in risk of metastasis occurrence. Multivariate analysis showed that presence of lymph node metastasis was statistically significant for overall survival of head and neck carcinoma patients (P=0.006; OR =2.917). The present data suggest that MVD represents a promising diagnostic tool to identify individuals with increased risk for the development of metastatic disease, which is very indicative of poor prognosis.

  6. Id-1 overexpression in invasive ductal carcinoma cells is significantly associated with intratumoral microvessel density in ER-negative/node-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki-Seok; Han, Hong Xiu; Paik, Seung Sam; Brown, Powel H; Kong, Gu

    2006-12-08

    The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of inhibitor of DNA binding (Id-1) overexpression in human breast cancer. We examined Id-1 expression by immunohistochemistry in 263 human breast cancers, 15 in situ lesions and 248 invasive cancers to investigate the relationship between its expression and various clinicopathological factors. Id-1 expression was significantly higher in invasive ductal carcinoma than in in situ ductal carcinoma or other invasive cancer subtypes (P=0.029 and 0.006, respectively). We also examined the association between Id-1 expression and tumor angiogenesis by measuring microvessel densities (MVD). Regarding the endothelial cells of microvessels showed negative or very weak Id-1 expression, Id-1 overexpression was found to be significantly related to MVD (P=0.014). Furthermore, Id-1 overexpression was found to be significantly associated with higher MVD in the ER-negative and node-involved subgroups of breast cancer (P=0.040 and 0.046, respectively). These data indicate that Id-1 overexpression is significantly associated with tumor angiogenesis, especially in the ER-negative and node-positive subtypes of invasive breast cancer. Thus, Id-1 presents a possible therapeutic antitumor target molecule in ER-negative and node-positive breast cancer.

  7. Expression and localization of the vascular endothelial growth factor and changes of microvessel density during hair follicle development of Liaoning cashmere goats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q L; Li, J P; Li, Y M; Chang, Q; Chen, Y; Jiang, H Z; Zhao, Z H; Guo, D

    2013-12-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) play important roles in neovascularization, tissue development, and angiogenesis. In this study, changes in VEGF expression patterns and microvessel density (MVD), and their correlations, were investigated during hair follicle development in epidermal appendages of Liaoning cashmere goats. Polyclonal antibodies to VEGF and microvessels were used for monthly immunohistochemical examinations of normal skin specimens from adult female goats for one year. VEGF was expressed in the hair bulb of primary and secondary hair follicles, the outer and inner root sheaths, sebaceous glands (ductal and secretory portions), eccrine sweat glands (ductal and secretory portions), and the epidermis. Abundant expression of VEGF was observed in the follicular basement membrane zone surrounding the bulb matrix and in ductal and secretory portions of eccrine sweat glands. The change in VEGFs in primary hair follicles showed a bimodal pattern, with the first peak observed from March to May, and the second in August. Maximal expression in secondary hair follicles occurred in May and August. Therefore, VEGF expression in primary and secondary hair follicles is synchronized throughout the year, and is correlated to hair development. In the later telogen and anagen phases, VEGF expression was higher in the secondary, compared to the primary, hair follicle. Changes in MVD also showed a bimodal pattern with peaks in May and August. VEGF expression and MVD showed moderate and strongly positive correlation in the primary and secondary hair follicles, respectively. Therefore, MVD and VEGF are closely related to the processes involved in hair cycle regulation.

  8. Synthesis of oxadiazole-morpholine derivatives and manifestation of the repressed CD31 Microvessel Density (MVD) as tumoral angiogenic parameters in Dalton's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghorbani, Mohammed; Vigneshwaran, V; Ranganatha, V Lakshmi; Prabhakar, B T; Khanum, Shaukath Ara

    2015-06-01

    A series of oxadiazole derivatives possessing morpholine 6a-l were synthesized by nucleophilic substitution reaction of key intermediates [1,3,4]-oxadiazole-2-thiol derivatives 5a-l with 4-(2-chloroethyl) morpholine. Compounds 6a-l were evaluated for their in vitro and in vivo antitumor potential in Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites (DLA) tumor cells. Among 6a-l series, compound 6a with concentration ∼8.5μM have shown extensive cytotoxicity in vitro and 85% reduction in tumor volume in vivo, attributing an excellent anti-proliferative capability towards the cancer cells. Compound 6a has extensively inhibited the Microvessel Density (MVD) or tumoral neovasculature which was evident from the CD31 immuno staining and peritoneal H&E staining. The major reason for the antiproliferative activity of compound 6a was due to the repression of tumor vasculature.

  9. Effects of docetaxel plus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy on microvessel density and apoptosis expression in local advanced squamous non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhai, X J; Cheng, H R; Long, H L; Mao, W K; Cao, L; Xiao, B R; Li, R Q

    2015-05-22

    We examined the effects of weekly single-agent docetaxel plus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) on apoptotic index (AI) and microvessel density (MVD) in local advanced non-small-cell lung squamous cancer patients and analyzed the correlation of MVD, AI, and 50% tumor shrinkage time (T0.5) The molecular mechanism of docetaxel radiosensitization was investigated. Sixty untreated patients with stage IIIA or IIIB lung squamous cancer were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups: observation (N = 30; 3D-CRT + docetaxel + adjuvant chemotherapy) and control (N = 30; 3D-CRT + adjuvant chemotherapy). From day 1 radiotherapy, the observation group received intravenous docetaxel (36 mg/m(2)) once weekly for 6 weeks. Post-radiotherapy, chemotherapy of docetaxel combined with cisplatin lasted 4-6 cycles in both groups. Before radiotherapy and within 24 h after radiotherapy (20 Gy), bronchoscopic biopsy was performed twice at the same site. To analyze the MVD of tumor specimens with immunohistochemical staining . The AI of lung cancer cells was assessed with TUNEL assay, T0.5 values were calculated. The observation group had significantly lower MVD than the control group (P < 0.05). AI significantly increased before and after treatment in the observation group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The decreased MVD values negatively correlated with T0.5 values (r = -0.624, P < 0.05), whereas the increased AI values did not correlate with the T0.5 values. Docetaxel radiosensitization may occur by decrease in MVD and increase in AI values. Weekly single-agent docetaxel plus 3D-CRT can improve prognosis and quality of life in local advanced non-small-cell lung squamous cancer patients.

  10. Prognostic significance of COX-2 expression and correlation with Bcl-2 and VEGF expression, microvessel density, and clinical variables in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Wha; Park, Chansik; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Suh, Cheolwon; Huh, Jooryung

    2013-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) play important roles in tumor angiogenesis. Recent reports found that COX-2 expression had prognostic value in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). The purpose of this study was to measure the expression of COX-2, B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), VEGF, and CD31 and assess their prognostic significance and potential correlation with clinical variables in cHL. A total of 167 cHL specimens were evaluated retrospectively by immunohistochemical methods for COX-2, Bcl-2, and VEGF expression and for CD31 to measure the microvessel density (MVD). Correlations between COX-2, Bcl-2, VEGF, MVD, and clinicopathologic factors were assessed, and prognostic significance was determined. COX-2, Bcl-2, and VEGF were expressed in 27.5%, 8.3%, and 33.5% of the specimens, respectively. A positive correlation was found between COX-2 and VEGF expression (P<0.001). The MVD was significantly higher in tumors positive for both COX-2 and VEGF compared with that in tumors negative for both markers (P=0.047). COX-2 expression was associated with a lower overall survival rate (P=0.015). High MVD was associated with a lower event-free survival rate (P=0.014). COX-2 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival on multivariate analysis (P=0.013). COX-2 and VEGF correlated with angiogenesis and tumor progression in cHL. The findings support targeting COX-2 as a potential new therapeutic approach in cHL.

  11. The Role of Lymphocyte to Monocyte Ratio, Microvessel Density and HiGH CD44 Tumor Cell Expression in Non Hodgkin Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Jelicic, Jelena; Balint, Milena Todorovic; Jovanovic, Maja Perunicic; Boricic, Novica; Micev, Marjan; Stojsic, Jelena; Antic, Darko; Andjelic, Bosko; Bila, Jelena; Balint, Bela; Pavlovic, Sonja; Mihaljevic, Biljana

    2016-07-01

    Prognostic significance of immune microenvironment has been emphasized using the most advanced analysis, with consecutive attempts to reveal prognostic impact of this findings. The aim of this study was to compare and define prognostic significance of clinical parameters, microvessel density (MVD) in tumour tissue and expression of CD44s as adhesive molecule on tumour cells in diffuse large B cell lymphoma-DLBCL, primary central nervous system DLBCL-CNS DLBCL and follicular lymphoma-FL. A total of 202 histopathological samples (115 DLBCL/65 FL/22 CNS DLBCL) were evaluated. Overall response (complete/partial remission) was achieved in 81.3 % DLBCL patients, 81.8 % primary CNS DLBCL and 92.3 % FL. Absolute lymphocyte count-ALC/Absolute monocyte count-AMC >2.6 in DLBCL and ALC/AMC ≥ 4.7 in FL were associated with better event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) (p < 0.05). In DLBCL, MVD > 42 blood vessels/0.36 mm(2) correlated with primary resistant disease (p < 0.0001), poorer EFS and OS (p = 0.014). High CD44s expression in FL correlated with inferior EFS and OS (p < 0.01). In DLBCL, multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that ALC/AMC was independent parameter that affected OS (HR 3.27, 95 % CI 1.51-7.09, p = 0.003) along with the NCCN-IPI (HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.08-1.79, p = 0.01). Furthermore, in FL, ALC/AMC mostly influenced OS (HR 5.21, 95 % CI 1.17-23.21, p = 0.03), followed with the FLIPI (HR 3.98, 95 % CI 1.06-14.95, p = 0.041). In DLBCL and FL, ALC/AMC is simple and robust tool that is, with current prognostic scores, able to define long-term survival and identify patients with inferior outcome. The introduction of immunochemotherapy might altered the prognostic significance of microenvionmental biomarkers (MVD and CD44s).

  12. AB112. Expression of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 and association with p53, microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor in the tissue of human bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Dawei; Hu, Hailong; Wu, Changli

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1) was initially described in 1997, and there have since been a number of studies on its expression in different types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression levels of BAI1 in bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) at different stages and the mechanism by which it inhibits tumor endothelial cell proliferation. Methods Normal bladder mucosa biopsy specimens were obtained as the control group, and human BTCC biopsy specimens were used as the study group. Immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the expression levels of BAI1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mutant p53, in addition to microvessel density (MVD) in the tissues. Western blotting was used to analyze the differential expression of BAI1 in the two samples. Results Statistical analysis was performed, which indicated that BAI1 expression levels in the normal bladder mucosa group were significantly higher than those in the BTCC group and were associated with clinical staging. BAI1 levels in the T1 stage BTCC tissues were higher than those in the T2–4 stage BTCC tissues (P<0.05). BAI1 expression levels were negatively correlated with those of VEGF (r=−0.661, P<0.001), mutant p53 (r=−0.406, P=0.002) and with the MVD (r=−0.675, P<0.001). Conclusions BAI1 may be involved in the negative regulation of BTCC microvascular proliferation, and its expression may be associated with a reduction in p53 mutations.

  13. Adrenergic receptors on cerebral microvessels in control and Parkinsonian subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Cash, R.; Lasbennes, F.; Sercombe, R.; Seylaz, J.; Agid, Y.

    1985-08-12

    The binding of adrenergic ligands (/sup 3/H-prazosin, /sup 3/H-clonidine, /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol) was studied on a preparation of cerebral microvessels in the prefrontal cortex and putamen of control and Parkinsonian subjects. The adrenergic receptor density in microvessels of control patients was less than 0.5% and 3.3% respectively of the total binding. A significant decrease in the number of alpha-1 binding sites was observed on microvessels in the putamen of patients with Parkinson's disease. 22 references, 2 tables.

  14. The Local HIF-2α/EPO Pathway in the Bone Marrow is Associated with Excessive Erythrocytosis and the Increase in Bone Marrow Microvessel Density in Chronic Mountain Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Su, Juan; Cui, Sen; Ji, Linhua; Geng, Hui; Chai, Kexia; Ma, Xiaojing; Bai, Zhenzhong; Yang, Yingzhong; Wuren, Tana; Ge, Ri-Li; Rondina, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Juan Su, Zhanquan Li, Sen Cui, Linhua Ji, Hui Geng, Kexia Chai, Xiaojing Ma, Zhenzhong Bai, Yingzhong Yang, Tana Wuren, Ri-Li Ge, and Matthew T. Rondina. The local HIF-2α/EPO pathway in the bone marrow is associated with excessive erythrocytosis and the increase in bone marrow microvessel density in chronic mountain sickness. High Alt Med Biol. 16:318–330, 2015.—Aim: Chronic mountain sickness (CMS) is characterized by excessive erythrocytosis, and angiogenesis may be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. The bone marrow niche is the primary site of erythropoiesis and angiogenesis. This study was aimed at investigating the associations of the levels of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), erythropoietin (EPO), and erythropoietin receptor (EPOR), as well as microvessel density (MVD) in the bone marrow with CMS. Results: A total of 34 patients with CMS and 30 control subjects residing in areas at altitudes of 3000–4500 m were recruited for this study. The mRNA and protein expression of HIF-2α and EPO in the bone marrow cells was significantly higher in the CMS patients than in the controls. Moreover, changes in HIF-2α expression in CMS patients were significantly correlated with EPO and hemoglobin levels. In contrast, the expression of mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α and EPOR did not differ significantly between the CMS and control patients. Increased MVD was observed in the bone marrow of the patients with CMS and it was significantly correlated with hemoglobin. Conclusions: Bone marrow cells of CMS patients may show enhanced activity of the HIF-2α/EPO pathway, and EPO may regulate the erythropoiesis and vasculogenesis through autocrine or/and paracrine mechanisms in the bone marrow niche. The increased MVD in the bone marrow of CMS patients appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26625252

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1), Partly Related to Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and Microvessel Density, is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Dan; Liu, Jiewei; Li, Zhixi; Zhu, Jiang; Hou, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to explore the correlation between FGFR1 and clinical features, including survival analysis and the promotion of angiogenesis by fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). FGFR1 gene amplification has been found in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the prognostic value of FGFR1 and the correlation between FGFR1 and clinical features are still controversial. Material/Methods A total of 92 patients with NSCLC who underwent R0 resection between July 2006 and July 2008 were enrolled in the study. The expression of FGFR1, VEGFR2, and CD34 was detected by immunohistochemistry. The correlations between the aforementioned markers and the patients’ clinical features were analyzed by the chi-square test. The impact factors of prognosis were evaluated by Cox regression analyses. Results The expression ratios of FGFR1 and VEGFR2 were 26.1% and 43.4%, respectively. The intensity of FGFR1 expression was related to VEGFR2 and histopathology. To some extent, the average microvessel density (MVD) had correlation to the expression of FGFR1 and VGEFR2. The pathological stages III–IV and high expression of FGFR1 were found to be independent prognostic factors. Conclusions The expression intensity of FGFR1 and VEGFR2 was associated with MVD, and the expression of FGFR1 is one of the independent prognostic indicators for NSCLC. PMID:28088809

  16. Blood flow and permeability in microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara-Seki, Masako; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanics of blood flow in microvessels and microvessel permeability are reviewed. In the first part, characteristics of blood flow in vivo and in vitro are described from a fluid-mechanical point of view, and mathematical models for blood flow in microvessels are presented. Possible causes of the increased flow resistance obtained in vivo compared to in vitro are examined, including the effects of irregularities of vessel lumen, the presence of endothelial surface glycocalyx and white blood cells. In the second part, the ultrastructural pathways and mechanisms whereby endothelial cells and the clefts between the cells modulate microvessel permeability to water and solutes are introduced. Previous and current models for microvessel permeability to water and solutes are reviewed. These models examine the role of structural components of interendothelial cleft, such as junction strands and surface glycocalyx, in the determination of water and solute transport across the microvessel walls. Transport models in the tissue space surrounding the microvessel are also described.

  17. Microvessel basement membrane reduplication is not associated with repeated nerve fiber degeneration and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Baker, M K; Bourque, P; Dyck, P J

    1996-03-01

    To determine whether repeated nerve fiber degeneration and regeneration can induce reduplication of endoneurial microvessel basement membranes (BMs), typical of such conditions as diabetic polyneuropathy, electronmicrographs of endoneurial microvessels of rat peroneal and tibial nerves were studied in repeatedly crushed (10 x) sciatic nerves and compared to microvessels of sham-operated uncrushed nerves. On average, crushed nerves had 2.6, SE +/- 0.1 BMs, whereas control nerves had 2.7, SE +/- 0.1 (P > 0.05). Microvessel cellular components were significantly increased in both number and size in the crushed nerves. These nerves also demonstrated a trend to increased vessel numbers and density. These results are not in keeping with the hypothesis that BM reduplication of endoneurial microvessels is simply due to repeated fiber degeneration and regeneration.

  18. Probe initial parton density and formation time via jet quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2002-09-20

    Medium modification of jet fragmentation function due to multiple scattering and induced gluon radiation leads directly to jet quenching or suppression of leading particle distribution from jet fragmentation. One can extract an effective total parton energy loss which can be related to the total transverse momentum broadening. For an expanding medium, both are shown to be sensitive to the initial parton density and formation time. Therefore, one can extract the initial parton density and formation time from simultaneous measurements of parton energy loss and transverse momentum broadening. Implication of the recent experimental data on effects of detailed balance in parton energy loss is also discussed.

  19. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  20. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis. PMID:26507779

  1. Mechanics and computational simulation of blood flow in microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, Timothy W.

    2010-01-01

    Blood is a concentrated suspension of red blood cells (RBCs). Motion and deformation of RBCs can be analyzed based on knowledge of their mechanical characteristics. Axisymmetric models for single-file motion of RBCs in capillaries yield predictions of apparent viscosity in good agreement with experimental results for diameters up to about 8 micron. Two-dimensional simulations, in which each RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, predict that off-centre RBCs in an 8-micron channel take asymmetric shapes and drift toward the centre-line. Predicted trajectories agree with observations in microvessels of the rat mesentery. An isolated RBC initially positioned near the wall of a 20-micron channel is deformed into an asymmetric shape, migrates away from the wall, and then enters a complex tumbling motion with continuous shape change. Realistic simulation of multiple interacting RBCs in microvessels remains as a major challenge. PMID:21036096

  2. Shockwave compression of Ar gas at several initial densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Garcia, Daniel B.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Lang, John M.; Aslam, Tariq D.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Gibson, Lloyd L.; Morris, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental data of the principal Hugoniot locus of variable density gas-phase noble and molecular gases are rare. The majority of shock Hugoniot data is either from shock tube experiments on low-pressure gases or from plate impact experiments on cryogenic, liquefied gases. In both cases, physics regarding shock compressibility, thresholds for the on-set of shock-driven ionization, and even dissociation chemistry are difficult to infer for gases at intermediate densities. We have developed an experimental target design for gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on noble gases at initial pressures between 200-1000 psi. Using optical velocimetry, we are able to directly determine both the shock and particle velocities of the gas on the principal Hugoniot locus, as well as clearly differentiate ionization thresholds. The target design also results in multiply shocking the gas in a quasi-isentropic fashion yielding off-Hugoniot compression data. We describe the results of a series of plate impact experiments on Ar with starting densities between 0.02-0.05 g/cm3 at room temperature. Furthermore, by coupling optical fibers to the targets, we have measured the time-resolved optical emission from the shocked gas using a spectrometer coupled to an optical streak camera to spectrally-resolve the emission, and with a 5-color optical pyrometer for temperature determination.

  3. Gender-specific protection from microvessel rarefaction in female hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Papanek, P E; Rieder, M J; Lombard, J H; Greene, A S

    1998-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies reveal that women have a significantly lower age-adjusted morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease than men, suggesting that gender is a cardiovascular disease risk factor. The mechanism of the "gender protection" is unknown. In this study, we investigated the microvascular remodeling in reduced renal mass plus a high salt (4.0% NaCl) diet model of hypertension (RRM + HS). We hypothesized that women would be protected from the increase in blood pressure and from the microvascular rarefaction associated with RRM + HS hypertension. Studies were designed to determine whether female rats were less susceptible to changes in microvessel density during RRM + HS. Microvessel density was measured in male and female low salt (0.4% LS) sham-operated controls (Sham + LS) and after 3 days or 4 weeks of RRM + HS hypertension. The microcirculation of hind limb (medial and lateral gastrocnemius, plantaris, soleus) muscles was visualized using rhodamine-labeled Griffonia simplicifolia I lectin. Tissue sections were examined by videomicroscopy and microvessel density was determined by quantitative stereology. As shown previously, mean arterial pressure increased to 160 +/- 8 mm Hg and microvessel density decreased (>30% decrease in all beds) in male RRM + HS. In contrast, mean arterial pressure of female RRM + HS rats was modestly increased from 101 +/- 2 to 118 +/- 4 mm Hg. Despite previous results showing a reduction in microvessel density of both normotensive and hypertensive male rats on a high salt diet, microvessel density of female RRM + HS rats was not reduced at either time. These results suggest that gender protection in the RRM rat extends beyond an attenuation of the increase in pressure to an immunity from microvascular rarefaction.

  4. Changes in endothelial connexin 43 expression inversely correlate with microvessel permeability and VE-cadherin expression in endotoxin-challenged lungs

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Escue, Rachel; Manna, Jayeeta; Adebiyi, Adebowale

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial barrier restoration reverses microvessel hyperpermeability and facilitates recovery from lung injury. Because inhibiting connexin 43 (Cx43)-dependent interendothelial communication blunts hyperpermeability in single microvessels, we determined whether endothelial Cx43 levels correlate with changes in microvessel permeability during recovery from lung injury. Toward this, bacterial endotoxin was instilled intratracheally into rat lungs, and at different durations postinstillation the lungs were isolated and blood perfused. Microvessel Cx43 expression was quantified by in situ immunofluorescence and microvessel permeability via a fluorescence method. To supplement the immunofluorescence data, protein levels were determined by immunoblots of lung tissue from endotoxin-instilled rats. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot together revealed that both Cx43 expression and microvessel permeability increased above baseline within a few hours after endotoxin instillation but declined progressively over the next few days. On day 5 postendotoxin, microvessel Cx43 declined to negligible levels, resulting in complete absence of intermicrovessel communication determined by photolytic uncaging of Ca2+. However, by day 14, both Cx43 expression and microvessel permeability returned to baseline levels. In contrast to Cx43, expression of microvessel vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, a critical determinant of vascular barrier integrity, exhibited an inverse trend by initially declining below baseline and then returning to baseline at a longer duration. Knockdown of vascular Cx43 by tail vein injection of Cx43 shRNA increased VE-cadherin expression, suggesting that reduction in Cx43 levels may modulate VE-cadherin levels in lung microvessels. Together, the data suggest that endotoxin challenge initiates interrelated changes in microvessel Cx43, VE-cadherin, and microvessel permeability, with changes in Cx43 temporally leading the other responses. PMID:26163513

  5. Changes in endothelial connexin 43 expression inversely correlate with microvessel permeability and VE-cadherin expression in endotoxin-challenged lungs.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Escue, Rachel; Manna, Jayeeta; Adebiyi, Adebowale; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2015-09-15

    Endothelial barrier restoration reverses microvessel hyperpermeability and facilitates recovery from lung injury. Because inhibiting connexin 43 (Cx43)-dependent interendothelial communication blunts hyperpermeability in single microvessels, we determined whether endothelial Cx43 levels correlate with changes in microvessel permeability during recovery from lung injury. Toward this, bacterial endotoxin was instilled intratracheally into rat lungs, and at different durations postinstillation the lungs were isolated and blood perfused. Microvessel Cx43 expression was quantified by in situ immunofluorescence and microvessel permeability via a fluorescence method. To supplement the immunofluorescence data, protein levels were determined by immunoblots of lung tissue from endotoxin-instilled rats. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot together revealed that both Cx43 expression and microvessel permeability increased above baseline within a few hours after endotoxin instillation but declined progressively over the next few days. On day 5 postendotoxin, microvessel Cx43 declined to negligible levels, resulting in complete absence of intermicrovessel communication determined by photolytic uncaging of Ca(2+). However, by day 14, both Cx43 expression and microvessel permeability returned to baseline levels. In contrast to Cx43, expression of microvessel vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, a critical determinant of vascular barrier integrity, exhibited an inverse trend by initially declining below baseline and then returning to baseline at a longer duration. Knockdown of vascular Cx43 by tail vein injection of Cx43 shRNA increased VE-cadherin expression, suggesting that reduction in Cx43 levels may modulate VE-cadherin levels in lung microvessels. Together, the data suggest that endotoxin challenge initiates interrelated changes in microvessel Cx43, VE-cadherin, and microvessel permeability, with changes in Cx43 temporally leading the other responses.

  6. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  7. Chronic ethanol treatment changes the number of beta-receptors in rat brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchi, L.; Cazzaniga, A.; Picotti, G.B.; Covelli, V.; Magnoni, M.S.; Borriero, L.; Spano, P.F.; Trabucchi, M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the binding (125I)-iodohydroxybenzylpindolol to beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain microvessels has been studied. The results show that chronic ethanol treatment increases the number of beta-receptors present in brain microvessels without changing the binding affinity of the binding site for the beta-adrenoceptor ligand. This effect is apparently not associated with changes in peripheral adrenergic tone, since no differences in platelet epinephrine or norepinephrine concentrations were found between ethanol-treated and control animals. An increase in beta-receptor density in brain microvessels might contribute to the alterations of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption reported during chronic ethanol intoxication.

  8. Structural and functional bases of laser-microvessels interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valentine I.; Terman, Oleg A.; Builin, Vitalij; Lebedeva, Natalia A.; Samoilov, Nickolai

    1993-07-01

    Structural and functional microcirculatory changes in tissues and organs (muscles, liver, derma, epinephros, brain cortex) under various dosages and powers of laser irradiation in the red (633 nm) and near infrared (890 nm) spectrum regions have been studied in experiments and clinic. In case of nonsensitized tissues the `photoactivation' range of power densities and doses of laser irradiation has been established. We have identified a short-term reaction of microvessels and a long-term reaction (adaptation). The former consists of intensification of microcirculation and metabolism rise in parenchymatous cells; the latter is connected with neoangiogenesis acceleration. The intensification of the blood microcirculation includes a dilation of microvessels of all orders, an amplification of arteriolar vasomotions and an opening of `reserved' capillaries. Data on the structural reconstruction of myocytes and endotheliocytes have shown that the high differential parenchymatous cells and its membrane structures are sensitive to low energy laser irradiation and, on the other hand, under low energy laser irradiation there is an activation of synthetic processes in the cells. Thus, during the laser-tissue interaction in such complex system as human organism the microcirculation plays the key role among the other systems.

  9. Shock initiation experiments with ignition and growth modeling on low density composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Garcia, Frank; Tarver, Craig M.

    2017-01-01

    Shock initiation experiments on low density (˜1.2 and ˜1.5 g/cm3) Composition B were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between packed layers (˜1.2 g/cm3) confined in Teflon rings or sample disks pressed to low density (˜1.5 g/cm3). The shock sensitivity was found to increase with decreasing density as expected. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded reasonable agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities. The shock sensitivity at the tested densities are compared to prior published work with near full density material.

  10. Thrombin Induces Inositol Trisphosphate-Mediated Spatially Extensive Responses in Lung Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Escue, Rachel; Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2017-04-01

    Activation of plasma membrane receptors initiates compartmentalized second messenger signaling. Whether this compartmentalization facilitates the preferential intercellular diffusion of specific second messengers is unclear. Toward this, the receptor-mediated agonist, thrombin, was instilled into microvessels in a restricted region of isolated blood-perfused mouse lungs. Subsequently, the thrombin-induced increase in endothelial F-actin was determined using confocal fluorescence microscopy. Increased F-actin was evident in microvessels directly treated with thrombin and in those located in adjoining thrombin-free regions. This increase was abrogated by inhibiting inositol trisphosphate-mediated calcium release with Xestospongin C (XeC). XeC also inhibited the thrombin-induced increase in the amplitude of endothelial cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations. Instillation of thrombin and XeC into adjacent restricted regions increased F-actin in microvessels in the thrombin-treated and adjacent regions but not in those in the XeC-treated region. Thus, inositol trisphosphate, and not calcium, diffused interendothelially to the spatially remote thrombin-free microvessels. Thus, activation of plasma membrane receptors increased the ambit of inflammatory responses via a second messenger different from that used by stimuli that induce cell-wide increases in second messengers. Thrombin however failed to induce the spatially extensive response in microvessels of mice lacking endothelial connexin43, suggesting a role for connexin43 gap junctions. Compartmental second messenger signaling and interendothelial communication define the specific second messenger involved in exacerbating proinflammatory responses to receptor-mediated agonists.

  11. Effects of wall shear stress and its gradient on tumor cell adhesion in curved microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yan, W W; Cai, B; Liu, Y; Fu, B M

    2012-05-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to vessel walls in the microcirculation is one critical step in cancer metastasis. In this paper, the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere at the microvessels with localized shear stresses and their gradients, such as in the curved microvessels, was examined both experimentally and computationally. Our in vivo experiments were performed on the microvessels (post-capillary venules, 30-50 μm diameter) of rat mesentery. A straight or curved microvessel was cannulated and perfused with tumor cells by a glass micropipette at a velocity of ~1mm/s. At less than 10 min after perfusion, there was a significant difference in cell adhesion to the straight and curved vessel walls. In 60 min, the averaged adhesion rate in the curved vessels (n = 14) was ~1.5-fold of that in the straight vessels (n = 19). In 51 curved segments, 45% of cell adhesion was initiated at the inner side, 25% at outer side, and 30% at both sides of the curved vessels. To investigate the mechanical mechanism by which tumor cells prefer adhering at curved sites, we performed a computational study, in which the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method , and the tumor cell dynamics was governed by the Newton's law of translation and rotation. A modified adhesive dynamics model that included the influence of wall shear stress/gradient on the association/dissociation rates of tumor cell adhesion was proposed, in which the positive wall shear stress/gradient jump would enhance tumor cell adhesion while the negative wall shear stress/gradient jump would weaken tumor cell adhesion. It was found that the wall shear stress/gradient, over a threshold, had significant contribution to tumor cell adhesion by activating or inactivating cell adhesion molecules. Our results elucidated why the tumor cell adhesion prefers to occur at the positive curvature of curved microvessels with very low Reynolds number (in the order of 10(-2)) laminar flow.

  12. Axonal action-potential initiation and Na+ channel densities in the soma and axon initial segment of subicular pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Colbert, C M; Johnston, D

    1996-11-01

    A long-standing hypothesis is that action potentials initiate first in the axon hillock/initial segment (AH-IS) region because of a locally high density of Na+ channels. We tested this idea in subicular pyramidal neurons by using patch-clamp recordings in hippocampal slices. Simultaneous recordings from the soma and IS confirmed that orthodromic action potentials initiated in the axon and then invaded the soma. However, blocking Na+ channels in the AH-IS with locally applied tetrodotoxin (TTX) did not raise the somatic threshold membrane potential for orthodromic spikes. TTX applied to the axon beyond the AH-IS (30-60 microm from the soma) raised the apparent somatic threshold by approximately 8 mV. We estimated the Na+ current density in the AH-IS and somatic membranes by using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings and found similar magnitudes (3-4 pA/microm2). Thus, the present results suggest that orthodromic action potentials initiate in the axon beyond the AH-IS and that the minimum threshold for spike initiation of the neuron is not determined by a high density of Na+ channels in the AH-IS region.

  13. Quantification of microvessels in canine lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Tonar, Zbynĕk; Egger, Gunter F; Witter, Kirsti; Wolfesberger, Birgitt

    2008-10-01

    Quantification of microvessels in tumors is mostly based on counts of vessel profiles in tumor hot spots. Drawbacks of this method include low reproducibility and large interobserver variance, mainly as a result of individual differences in sampling of image fields for analysis. Our aim was to test an unbiased method for quantifying microvessels in healthy and tumorous lymph nodes of dogs. The endothelium of blood vessels was detected in paraffin sections by a combination of immunohistochemistry (von Willebrand factor) and lectin histochemistry (wheat germ agglutinin) in comparison with detection of basal laminae by laminin immunohistochemistry or silver impregnation. Systematic uniform random sampling of 50 image fields was performed during photo-documentation. An unbiased counting frame (area 113,600 microm(2)) was applied to each micrograph. The total area sampled from each node was 5.68 mm(2). Vessel profiles were counted according to stereological counting rules. Inter- and intraobserver variabilities were tested. The application of systematic uniform random sampling was compared with the counting of vessel profiles in hot spots. The unbiased estimate of the number of vessel profiles per unit area ranged from 100.5 +/- 44.0/mm(2) to 442.6 +/- 102.5/mm(2) in contrast to 264 +/- 72.2/mm(2) to 771.0 +/- 108.2/mm(2) in hot spots. The advantage of using systematic uniform random sampling is its reproducibility, with reasonable interobserver and low intraobserver variance. This method also allows for the possibility of using archival material, because staining quality is not limiting as it is for image analysis, and artifacts can easily be excluded. However, this method is comparatively time-consuming.

  14. Leukocyte margination in a model microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan B.

    2007-02-01

    The physiological inflammation response depends upon the multibody interactions of blood cells in the microcirculation that bring leukocytes (white blood cells) to the vessel walls. We investigate the fluid mechanics of this using numerical simulations of 29 red blood cells and one leukocyte flowing in a two-dimensional microvessel, with the cells modeled as linearly elastic shell membranes. Despite its obvious simplifications, this model successfully reproduces the increasingly blunted velocity profiles and increased leukocyte margination observed at lower shear rates in actual microvessels. Red cell aggregation is shown to be unnecessary for margination. The relative stiffness of the red cells in our simulations is varied by over a factor of 10, but the margination is found to be much less correlated with this than it is to changes associated with the blunting of the mean velocity profile at lower shear rates. While velocity around the leukocyte when it is near the wall depends upon the red cell properties, it changes little for strongly versus weakly marginating cases. In the more strongly marginating cases, however, a red cell is frequently observed to be leaning on the upstream side of the leukocyte and appears to stabilize it, preventing other red cells from coming between it and the wall. A well-known feature of the microcirculation is a near-wall cell-free layer. In our simulations, it is observed that the leukocyte's most probable position is at the edge of this layer. This wall stand-off distance increases with velocity following a scaling that would be expected for a lubrication mechanism, assuming that there were a nearly constant force pushing the cells toward the wall. The leukocyte's near-wall position is observed to be less stable with increasing mean stand-off distance, but this distance would have potentially greater effect on adhesion since the range of the molecular binding is so short.

  15. Remark on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity and discontinuous initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Fang, Daoyuan

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we study the free boundary problem for 1D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity. We focus on the case where the viscosity coefficient vanishes on vacuum. We prove the global existence and uniqueness for discontinuous solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations when the initial density is a bounded variation function, and give a decay result for the density as t-->+[infinity].

  16. Ammonia inhibition on Arthrospira platensis in relation to the initial biomass density and pH.

    PubMed

    Markou, Giorgos; Vandamme, Dries; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2014-08-01

    In this study the combined effect of total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) concentration, initial biomass density and initial pH of the cultivation medium on growth of Arthrospira platensis was studied. The results indicate that TAN inhibition in relation to the initial biomass in unregulated pH cultures is neither a clearly biomass-independent nor biomass-dependent phenomenon. However, low biomass densities are more susceptible to ammonia inhibition than higher biomass densities. Higher biomass densities seems to mitigate ammonia inhibition through rapider assimilation of TAN. In all cases studied the growth rates were lower compared to the cultures with nitrate as nitrogen source. It was observed that at low TAN concentration, although no ammonia inhibition occured the growth rates were decreased due to nitrogen limitation. Low TAN concentration triggered the accumulation of carbohydrates affecting thus significantly the biomass composition. Ammonia losses from the cultivation system were also determined. Ammonia losses ranged between 17% and 80%.

  17. Heterogeneous growth fingerlings of the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus: effects of density and initial size variability.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J M; Brugiolo, S S S; Carolsfeld, J; Leitão, S S

    2006-05-01

    In this study, the effect of initial heterogeneity of weight and density on heterogeneous growth (HetG) evaluated by the coefficient of the variation of weight in the young Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus of the territorial species was tested. Fish were maintained in a glass aquarium (8 and 2 L of water) with two levels of initial heterogeneity of weight: low and high, under two density conditions: low and high, thus constituting four conditions (six replications for each). Initially, the weights of the animals were taken after 8, 16, 22 and 30 days (end of experiment). The results, evaluated by the non-parametric test of Kruskal- Wallis, demonstrated that in the groups where the animals were stored under high initial HetG, there was a reduction of the same and that in the groups where the animals were stored under high density, there was exacerbation or maintained high values of HetG. High density in association with high initial heterogeneity caused more exacerbation of HetG in such a way that the density appeared to be a determining factor for exacerbation or the maintenance of high values of HetG, whereas the initial heterogeneity of the weight could be a secondary factor.

  18. Fabrication of pillared PLGA microvessel scaffold using femtosecond laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiao-Wei; Cheng, Chung-Wei; Li, Ching-Wen; Chang, Han-Wei; Wu, Ping-Han; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2012-01-01

    One of the persistent challenges confronting tissue engineering is the lack of intrinsic microvessels for the transportation of nutrients and metabolites. An artificial microvascular system could be a feasible solution to this problem. In this study, the femtosecond laser ablation technique was implemented for the fabrication of pillared microvessel scaffolds of polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). This novel scaffold facilitates implementation of the conventional cell seeding process. The progress of cell growth can be observed in vitro by optical microscopy. The problems of becoming milky or completely opaque with the conventional PLGA scaffold after cell seeding can be resolved. In this study, PLGA microvessel scaffolds consisting of 47 μm × 80 μm pillared branches were produced. Results of cell culturing of bovine endothelial cells demonstrate that the cells adhere well and grow to surround each branch of the proposed pillared microvessel networks. PMID:22605935

  19. Physiological responses to acid stress by Saccharomyces cerevisiae when applying high initial cell density

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhong-peng; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    High initial cell density is used to increase volumetric productivity and shorten production time in lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation. Comparison of physiological parameters in high initial cell density cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of acetic, formic, levulinic and cinnamic acids demonstrated general and acid-specific responses of cells. All the acids studied impaired growth and inhibited glycolytic flux, and caused oxidative stress and accumulation of trehalose. However, trehalose may play a role other than protecting yeast cells from acid-induced oxidative stress. Unlike the other acids, cinnamic acid did not cause depletion of cellular ATP, but abolished the growth of yeast on ethanol. Compared with low initial cell density, increasing initial cell density reduced the lag phase and improved the bioconversion yield of cinnamic acid during acid adaptation. In addition, yeast cells were able to grow at elevated concentrations of acid, probable due to the increase in phenotypic cell-to-cell heterogeneity in large inoculum size. Furthermore, the specific growth rate and the specific rates of glucose consumption and metabolite production were significantly lower than at low initial cell density, which was a result of the accumulation of a large fraction of cells that persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. PMID:27620460

  20. Leukocyte Margination in a Model Microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan

    2006-11-01

    In the inflammation response, multi-body interactions of blood cells in the microcirculation bring leukocytes (white blood cells) to the vessel walls. We investigated the fluid mechanics of this using numerical simulations of 29 red blood cells and one leukocyte flowing in a two-dimensional microvessel. The cells are modeled as linearly elastic shell membranes. Though obviously simplified, this model reproduced the increasingly blunted velocity profiles and increased leukocyte margination observed at lower shear rates. To study its effect, we varied the relative stiffness of the red cells by over a factor of ten, but the margination was found to be much less correlated with this than to the bluntness of the mean velocity profile. The detailed velocity field around near-wall leukocyte was sensitive to the red cell stiffness, but it changed little for strongly versus weakly marginating cases. In the more strongly marginating cases, however, a red cell is typically leaning on the upstream side of the leukocyte and appears to stabilize it. A well-known feature of the microcirculation is a near-wall cell-free layer. We observed that the leukocyte's most probable position was at the edge of this layer, whose thickness increased following a lubrication scaling. The leukocyte's near-wall position is observed to be less stable with increasing mean stand-off distance, but this distance would have potentially greater effect on adhesion since the range of the molecular binding is so short.

  1. Effect of osmolarity on potassium transport in isolated cerebral microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Potassium transport in microvessels isolated from rat brain by a technique involving density gradient centrifugation was studied in HEPES buffer solutions of varying osmolarity from 200 to 420 mosmols, containing different concentration of sodium chloride, choline chloride, or sodium nitrate. The flux of /sup 86/Rb into and out of the endothelial cells was estimated. Potassium influx was very sensitive to the osmolarity of the medium. Ouabain-insensitive K-component was reduced in hypotonic medium and was increased in medium made hypertonic with sodium chloride or mannitol. Choline chloride replacement caused a large reduction in K influx. Potassium influx was significant decrease when nitrate is substituted for chloride ion in isotonic and hypertonic media, whereas a slight decrease was found in hypotonic medium. The decrease of K influx in the ion-replacement medium is due to a decrement of the ouabain-insensitive component. Potassium efflux was unchanged in hypotonic medium but was somewhat reduced in hypertonic medium. The marked effect of medium osmolarity of K fluxes suggests that these fluxes may be responsible for the volume regulatory K movements. The possible mechanism of changes of K flux under anisotonic media is also discussed.

  2. On the logistic equation subject to uncertainties in the environmental carrying capacity and initial population density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorini, F. A.; Cecconello, M. S.; Dorini, L. B.

    2016-04-01

    It is recognized that handling uncertainty is essential to obtain more reliable results in modeling and computer simulation. This paper aims to discuss the logistic equation subject to uncertainties in two parameters: the environmental carrying capacity, K, and the initial population density, N0. We first provide the closed-form results for the first probability density function of time-population density, N(t), and its inflection point, t*. We then use the Maximum Entropy Principle to determine both K and N0 density functions, treating such parameters as independent random variables and considering fluctuations of their values for a situation that commonly occurs in practice. Finally, closed-form results for the density functions and statistical moments of N(t), for a fixed t > 0, and of t* are provided, considering the uniform distribution case. We carried out numerical experiments to validate the theoretical results and compared them against that obtained using Monte Carlo simulation.

  3. Erythrocyte hemodynamics in stenotic microvessels: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Xing, Z. W.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional numerical investigation of deformation and motion of erythrocytes in stenotic microvessels using the immersed boundary-fictitious domain method. The erythrocytes were modeled as biconcave-shaped closed membranes filled with cytoplasm. We studied the biophysical characteristics of human erythrocytes traversing constricted microchannels with the narrowest cross-sectional diameter as small as 3 μm. The effects of essential parameters, namely, stenosis severity, shape of the erythrocytes, and erythrocyte membrane stiffness, were simulated and analyzed in this study. Moreover, simulations were performed to discuss conditions associated with the shape transitions of the cells along with the relative effects of radial position and initial orientation of erythrocytes, membrane stiffness, and plasma environments. The simulation results were compared with existing experiment findings whenever possible, and the physical insights obtained were discussed. The proposed model successfully simulated rheological behaviors of erythrocytes in microscale flow and thus is applicable to a large class of problems involving fluid flow with complex geometry and fluid-cell interactions. Our study would be helpful for further understanding of pathology of malaria and some other blood disorders.

  4. Erythrocyte hemodynamics in stenotic microvessels: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional numerical investigation of deformation and motion of erythrocytes in stenotic microvessels using the immersed boundary-fictitious domain method. The erythrocytes were modeled as biconcave-shaped closed membranes filled with cytoplasm. We studied the biophysical characteristics of human erythrocytes traversing constricted microchannels with the narrowest cross-sectional diameter as small as 3 μm. The effects of essential parameters, namely, stenosis severity, shape of the erythrocytes, and erythrocyte membrane stiffness, were simulated and analyzed in this study. Moreover, simulations were performed to discuss conditions associated with the shape transitions of the cells along with the relative effects of radial position and initial orientation of erythrocytes, membrane stiffness, and plasma environments. The simulation results were compared with existing experiment findings whenever possible, and the physical insights obtained were discussed. The proposed model successfully simulated rheological behaviors of erythrocytes in microscale flow and thus is applicable to a large class of problems involving fluid flow with complex geometry and fluid-cell interactions. Our study would be helpful for further understanding of pathology of malaria and some other blood disorders.

  5. Erythrocyte hemodynamics in stenotic microvessels: a numerical investigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Xing, Z W

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional numerical investigation of deformation and motion of erythrocytes in stenotic microvessels using the immersed boundary-fictitious domain method. The erythrocytes were modeled as biconcave-shaped closed membranes filled with cytoplasm. We studied the biophysical characteristics of human erythrocytes traversing constricted microchannels with the narrowest cross-sectional diameter as small as 3 μm. The effects of essential parameters, namely, stenosis severity, shape of the erythrocytes, and erythrocyte membrane stiffness, were simulated and analyzed in this study. Moreover, simulations were performed to discuss conditions associated with the shape transitions of the cells along with the relative effects of radial position and initial orientation of erythrocytes, membrane stiffness, and plasma environments. The simulation results were compared with existing experiment findings whenever possible, and the physical insights obtained were discussed. The proposed model successfully simulated rheological behaviors of erythrocytes in microscale flow and thus is applicable to a large class of problems involving fluid flow with complex geometry and fluid-cell interactions. Our study would be helpful for further understanding of pathology of malaria and some other blood disorders.

  6. In Silico Investigation of Angiogenesis with Growth and Stress Generation Coupled to Local Extracellular Matrix Density

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lowell T.; Hoying, James B.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical interactions during angiogenesis, i.e., traction applied by neovessels to the extracellular matrix and the corresponding deformation, are important regulators of growth and neovascularization. We have previously designed, implemented, and validated a coupled model of angiogenesis in which a discrete microvessel growth model interacts with a continuous finite element mesh through the application of local remodeling sprout stresses (Edgar et al. in Biomech Model Mechanobiol, 2014). However, the initial implementation of this framework does not take matrix density into account when determined these remodeling stresses and is therefore insufficient for the study of angiogenesis within heterogeneous matrix environments such as those found in vivo. The objective of this study was to implement sensitivity to matrix density in the active stress generation within AngioFE in order to allow the study of angiogenic growth within a heterogeneous density environment. We accomplished this by scaling active sprout stresses relative to local matrix density using a scaling factor previously determined from experimental data. We then exercised the new functionality of the model by simulating angiogenesis within four different scenarios: homogeneous density, a narrow gap model, and matrix density gradient, and a construct subjected to repeated loading/unloading and preconditioning. These numerical experiments predicted heterogeneous matrix density in the initially homogeneous case, the closure and alignment of microvessels along a low-density gap, the formation of a unique cap-like structure during angiogenesis within a density gradient, and the alignment of microvessels in the absence of applied load due to preconditioning. The result of these in silico investigations demonstrate how matrix heterogeneity affects neovascularization and matrix deformation and provides a platform for studying angiogenesis in complicated and multi-faceted mechanical environments that

  7. Correlations of neuronal and microvascular densities in murine cortex revealed by direct counting and colocalization of nuclei and vessels

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Philbert S.; Kaufhold, John P.; Blinder, Pablo; Friedman, Beth; Drew, Patrick J.; Karten, Harvey J.; Lyden, Patrick D.; Kleinfeld, David

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the density of neurons varies within the adult brain. In neocortex, this includes variations in neuronal density between different lamina as well as between different regions. Yet the concomitant variation of the microvessels is largely uncharted. Here we present automated histological, imaging, and analysis tools to simultaneously map the locations of all neuronal and non-neuronal nuclei and the centerlines and diameters of all blood vessels within thick slabs of neocortex from mice. Based on total inventory measurements of different cortical regions (~ 107 cells vectorized across brains), these methods revealed: (1) In three dimensions, the mean distance of the center of neuronal somata to the closest microvessel was 14 μm. (2) Volume samples within lamina of a given region show that the density of microvessels does not match the strong laminar variation in neuronal density. This holds for both agranular and granular cortex. (3) Volume samples in successive radii from the midline to the ventral-lateral edge, where each volume summed the number of cells and microvessels from the pia to the white matter, show a significant correlation between neuronal and microvessel densities. These data show that while neuronal and vascular densities do not track each other on the 100 μm scale of cortical lamina, they do track each other on the 1 – 10 mm scale of the cortical mantle. The absence of a disproportionate density of blood vessels in granular lamina is argued to be consistent with the initial locus of functional brain imaging signals. PMID:19923289

  8. LABORATORY CULTURE OF CHIRONOMUS TENTANS FOR USE IN TOXICITY TESTING: OPTIMUM INITIAL EGG STOCKING DENSITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was conducted to determine the effet of initial culture stocking density on: (1) post-hatch (larval) dry weight, body length and head-capsule width at 10 and 20 days; (2) time to emergence; (3) number and sex of emergent adults; (4) number of larvae and pupae at test t...

  9. Determination of an Initial Mesh Density for Finite Element Computations via Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Kanapady, R; Bathina, S K; Tamma, K K; Kamath, C; Kumar, V

    2001-07-23

    Numerical analysis software packages which employ a coarse first mesh or an inadequate initial mesh need to undergo a cumbersome and time consuming mesh refinement studies to obtain solutions with acceptable accuracy. Hence, it is critical for numerical methods such as finite element analysis to be able to determine a good initial mesh density for the subsequent finite element computations or as an input to a subsequent adaptive mesh generator. This paper explores the use of data mining techniques for obtaining an initial approximate finite element density that avoids significant trial and error to start finite element computations. As an illustration of proof of concept, a square plate which is simply supported at its edges and is subjected to a concentrated load is employed for the test case. Although simplistic, the present study provides insight into addressing the above considerations.

  10. Shock Initiation Experiments with Ignition and Growth Modeling on Low Density HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Frank; Vandersall, Kevin; Tarver, Craig

    2013-06-01

    Shock initiation experiments on low density (1.24 and 1.64 g/cm3) HMX were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between packed layers (1.24 g/cm3) or sample disks pressed to low density (1.64 g/cm3) . The measured shock sensitivity of the 1.24 g/cm3 HMX was similar to that previously measured by Dick and Sheffield et al. and the 1.64 g/cm3 HMX was measured to be much less shock sensitive. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded good agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Effect of initiator concentration to low-density polyethylene production in a tubular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, A.; Aziz, N.

    2016-11-01

    Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) is one of the most widely used polymers in the world, which is produced in high-capacity tubular and autoclave reactors. As the LDPE industry turn into more competitive and its market profit margins become tighter, manufacturers have to develop solutions to debottleneck the reactor output while abiding to the stringent product specification. A single polyolefin plant producing ten to forty grades of LDPE with various melt flow index (MFI), therefore understanding the reaction mechanism, the operating conditions as well as the dynamic behavior of tubular reactor is essential before any improvement can take place. In the present work, a steady state mathematical model representing a tubular reactor for the production of LDPE is simulated using MATLAB R2015a®. The model developed is a function of feed inlet, reactor jacket, single initiator injector and outlet stream. Analysis on the effect of initiator concentration (CI) shows sudden declining trend of initiator's concentration which indicates that all of the initiators are exhausted after polymerization reaction and no further reaction occur from this point onwards. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the concentration of initiator gives significant impact on reactor temperature's profile and monomer conversion rate, since higher initiator concentration promotes greater polymerization rate, and therefore leads to higher monomer conversion throughput.

  12. Fingerprints of the initial conditions on the density profiles of cold and warm dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polisensky, E.; Ricotti, M.

    2015-06-01

    We use N-body simulations of dark matter haloes in cold dark matter (CDM) and a large set of different warm dark matter (WDM) cosmologies to demonstrate that the spherically averaged density profile of dark matter haloes has a shape that depends on the power spectrum of matter perturbations. Density profiles are steeper in WDM but become shallower at r < 0.01Rvir. Virialization isotropizes the velocity dispersion in the inner regions of the halo but does not erase the memory of the initial conditions in phase space. The location of the observed deviations from CDM in the density profile and in phase space can be directly related to the ratio between the halo mass and the filtering mass and are most evident in small mass haloes, even for a 34 keV thermal relic WDM. The rearrangement of mass within the haloes supports analytic models of halo structure that include angular momentum. We also find evidence of a dependence of the slope of the inner density profile in CDM cosmologies on the halo mass with more massive haloes exhibiting steeper profiles, in agreement with the model predictions and with previous simulation results. Our work complements recent studies of microhaloes near the filtering scale in CDM and strongly argue against a universal shape for the density profile.

  13. Fluids density functional theory and initializing molecular dynamics simulations of block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jonathan R.; Seo, Youngmi; Maula, Tiara Ann D.; Hall, Lisa M.

    2016-03-01

    Classical, fluids density functional theory (fDFT), which can predict the equilibrium density profiles of polymeric systems, and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which are often used to show both structure and dynamics of soft materials, can be implemented using very similar bead-based polymer models. We aim to use fDFT and MD in tandem to examine the same system from these two points of view and take advantage of the different features of each methodology. Additionally, the density profiles resulting from fDFT calculations can be used to initialize the MD simulations in a close to equilibrated structure, speeding up the simulations. Here, we show how this method can be applied to study microphase separated states of both typical diblock and tapered diblock copolymers in which there is a region with a gradient in composition placed between the pure blocks. Both methods, applied at constant pressure, predict a decrease in total density as segregation strength or the length of the tapered region is increased. The predictions for the density profiles from fDFT and MD are similar across materials with a wide range of interfacial widths.

  14. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  15. Imaging of lymph flow in single microvessels in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekateryna I.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Brill, Gregory E.; Solov'eva, Anastasiya V.

    2000-10-01

    In this study parameters of lymph microcirculation are investigated. The microcirculation was studied on small intestine mesentery in norm and during Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) application. The direct measurement of lymph flow velocity (parameter V) in individual microvessels was based on the technique of light intravital videomicroscopy. The first spectral moments of Doppler signal, characterizing the mean velocities of lymph flow in microvessels (parameter M1), were measured by speckle-interferometrical method. Simultaneously, diameters of lymph microvessels as well as parameters of phasic contractions and valve function of lymphatics were registered. The value of V was very changeable; the mean V was equal to 270+/- 24micrometers /s. The M1 was the varying characteristic of the lymph flow too. The temporal dynamic of M1 was reflected alternating- translation motion of lymph flow. DMSO application during 15 min caused the constriction in a majority of lymphatics and the phasic contractions. DMSO induced lymphostatis in 20% of cases. But the other microvessels responded to the rise of lymph flow velocity. These changes led to the stimulation of drainage function of lymph microcirculation function.

  16. Mechanical behavior of the erythrocyte in microvessel stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ZhiGuo; Zhang, XiWen

    2011-05-01

    The passage of red blood cells (RBCs) through capillaries is essential for human blood microcirculation. This study used a moving mesh technology that incorporated leader-follower pairs to simulate the fluid-structure and structure-structure interactions between the RBC and a microvessel stenosis. The numerical model consisted of plasma, cytoplasm, the erythrocyte membrane, and the microvessel stenosis. Computational results showed that the rheology of the RBC is affected by the Reynolds number of the plasma flow as well as the surface-to-volume ratio of the erythrocyte. At a constant inlet flow rate, an increased plasma viscosity will improve the transit of the RBC through the microvessel stenosis. For the above reasons, we consider that the decreased hemorheology in microvessels in a pathological state may primarily be attributed to an increase in the number of white blood cells. This leads to the aggregation of RBCs and a change in the blood flow structure. The present fundamental study of hemorheology aimed at providing theoretical guidelines for clinical hemorheology.

  17. Strain energy density and thermodynamic entropy as prognostic measures of crack initiation in aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontiveros, Victor Luis

    A critical challenge to the continued use of engineering structures as they are asked to perform longer than their design life is the prediction of an initiating crack and the prevention of damage, estimation of remaining useful life, schedule maintenance and to reduce costly downtimes and inspections. The research presented in this dissertation explores the cumulative plastic strain energy density and thermodynamic entropy generation up to crack initiation. Plastic strain energy density and thermodynamic entropy generation are evaluated to investigate whether they would be capable of providing a physical basis for fatigue life and structural risk and reliability assessments. Navy aircraft, specifically, the Orion P-3C, which represent an engineered structure currently being asked to perform past is design life, which are difficult and time consuming to inspect from carrier based operations and are currently evaluated using an empirically based damage index the, fatigue life expended, is used as an example in this investigation. A set of experimental results for aluminum alloy 7075-T651, used in airframe structures, are presented to determine the correlation between plastic strain energy dissipation and the thermodynamic entropy generation versus fatigue crack initiation over a wide range of fatigue loadings. Cumulative plastic strain energy and thermodynamic entropy generation measured from hysteresis energy and temperature rise proved to be valid physical indices for estimation of the probability of crack initiation. Crack initiation is considered as a major evidence of fatigue damage and structural integrity risk. A Bayesian estimation and validation approach is used to determine systematic errors in the developed models as well as other model uncertainties. Comparisons of the energy-based and entropy-based models are presented and benefits of using one over the other are discussed.

  18. Trait- and density-mediated indirect interactions initiated by an exotic invasive plant autogenic ecosystem engineer.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Dean E

    2010-10-01

    Indirect interactions are important for structuring ecological systems. However, research on indirect effects has been heavily biased toward top-down trophic interactions, and less is known about other indirect-interaction pathways. As autogenic ecosystem engineers, plants can serve as initiators of nontrophic indirect interactions that, like top-down pathways, can involve both trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs) and density-mediated indirect interactions (DMIIs). Using microcosms, I examined a plant --> predator --> consumer interaction pathway involving the exotic autogenic ecosystem engineer Centaurea maculosa; native Dictyna spiders (which exhibit density and trait [web-building] responses to C. maculosa); Dictyna's insect prey, Urophora affinis; and Urophora's host plant (a secondary receiver species) to quantify DMIIs and TMIIs in an autogenic engineered pathway. Both DMIIs and TMIIs were strong enough to reduce Urophora populations, but only DMIIs, which were 4.3 times stronger than TMIIs, were strong enough to also reduce Urophora's fecundity and increase the fecundity of its host plant. Prior field studies support these results, suggesting that the differences between DMIIs and TMIIs are even stronger in nature. This study illustrates that autogenic ecosystem engineers can initiate powerful indirect interactions that generally parallel predator-initiated interactions but also differ in important functional ways.

  19. Relationship between exploding bridgewire and spark initiation of low density PETN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Elizabeth; Drake, Rod

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the energy delivered after bridgewire burst affects the function time of an EBW detonator. The spark which is formed post bridgewire burst is the means by which the remaining fireset energy contributes to the reaction. Therefore, by studying the characteristics of spark-gap detonators, insight into the contribution of spark initiation to the functioning of EBW detonators may be achieved. Spark initiation of low density explosives consists of: (i) spark formation, (ii) spark interaction with the bed, and (iii) ignition and growth of reaction. Experiments were performed in which an inert simulant was used to study the formation and propagation of sparks as a function of spark energy. The effect of the spark on inert porous beds was studied over a limited delivered energy range. The disruption of the bed was found to be dependent on the energy delivered. The effect of spark initiation on a low density PETN bed was then examined, the relationship between delivered energy and function time was found to be the same as for EBW detonators.

  20. Study of the stability of Z-pinch implosions with different initial density profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Batrakov, A. V.; Baksht, R. B.

    2014-05-15

    Stability of metal-puff Z pinches was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out on a facility producing a load current up to 450 kA with a rise time of 450 ns. In a metal-puff Z pinch, the plasma shell is produced due to evaporation of the electrode material during the operation of a vacuum arc. In the experiment to be reported, a single-shell and a shell-on-jet pinch load with magnesium electrodes were used. Two-dimensional, 3 ns gated, visible-light images were taken at different times during the implosion. When the shell was formed from a collimated plasma flow with small radial divergence, Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability typical of gas-puff implosions was recorded. The RT instability was completely suppressed in a mode where the initial density distribution of the shell approached a tailored density profile [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996)].

  1. Reduction of damage initiation density in fused silica optics via UV laser conditioning

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, John E.; Maricle, Stephen M.; Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.

    2004-03-16

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the density of sites on the surface of fused silica optics that are prone to the initiation of laser-induced damage, resulting in optics which have far fewer catastrophic defects and are better capable of resisting optical deterioration upon exposure for a long period of time to a high-power laser beam having a wavelength of about 360 nm or less. The initiation of laser-induced damage is reduced by conditioning the optic at low fluences below levels that normally lead to catastrophic growth of damage. When the optic is then irradiated at its high fluence design limit, the concentration of catastrophic damage sites that form on the surface of the optic is greatly reduced.

  2. Current initiation in low-density foam z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Allshouse, G.

    1996-07-01

    Low density agar and aerogel foams were tested as z-pinch loads on the SATURN accelerator. In these first experiments, we studied the initial plasma conditions by measuring the visible emission at early times with a framing camera and 1-D imaging. At later time, near the stagnation when the plasma is hotter, x-ray imaging and spectral diagnostics were used to characterize the plasma. Filamentation and arcing at the current contacts was observed. None of the implosions were uniform along the z-axis. The prime causes of these problems are believed to be the electrode contacts and the current return configuration and these are solvable. Periodic phenomena consistent with the formation of instabilities were observed on one shot, not on others, implying that there may be a way of controlling instabilities in the pinch. Many of the issues involving current initiation may be solvable. Solutions are discussed.

  3. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    PubMed Central

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  4. Statistics of initial density perturbations in heavy ion collisions and their fluid dynamic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2014-08-01

    An interesting opportunity to determine thermodynamic and transport properties in more detail is to identify generic statistical properties of initial density perturbations. Here we study event-by-event fluctuations in terms of correlation functions for two models that can be solved analytically. The first assumes Gaussian fluctuations around a distribution that is fixed by the collision geometry but leads to non-Gaussian features after averaging over the reaction plane orientation at non-zero impact parameter. In this context, we derive a three-parameter extension of the commonly used Bessel-Gaussian event-by-event distribution of harmonic flow coefficients. Secondly, we study a model of N independent point sources for which connected n-point correlation functions of initial perturbations scale like 1 /N n-1. This scaling is violated for non-central collisions in a way that can be characterized by its impact parameter dependence. We discuss to what extent these are generic properties that can be expected to hold for any model of initial conditions, and how this can improve the fluid dynamical analysis of heavy ion collisions.

  5. Schwann cell interactions with axons and microvessels in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Nádia P; Vægter, Christian B; Andersen, Henning; Østergaard, Leif; Calcutt, Nigel A; Jensen, Troels S

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes worldwide is at pandemic levels, with the number of patients increasing by 5% annually. The most common complication of diabetes is peripheral neuropathy, which has a prevalence as high as 50% and is characterized by damage to neurons, Schwann cells and blood vessels within the nerve. The pathogenic mechanisms of diabetic neuropathy remain poorly understood, impeding the development of targeted therapies to treat nerve degeneration and its most disruptive consequences of sensory loss and neuropathic pain. Involvement of Schwann cells has long been proposed, and new research techniques are beginning to unravel a complex interplay between these cells, axons and microvessels that is compromised during the development of diabetic neuropathy. In this Review, we discuss the evolving concept of Schwannopathy as an integral factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy, and how disruption of the interactions between Schwann cells, axons and microvessels contribute to the disease.

  6. Effect of viscoelasticity and RBC migration phenomena in stenotic microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakopoulos, Yiannis; Syrakos, Alexandros; Georgiou, Georgios; Tsamopoulos, John

    2014-11-01

    This study deals with the numerical simulation of the hemodynamics in stenotic microvessels. The blood flow in microvessels differs significantly from that in large arteries and veins, because the Red Blood Cells (RBCs) are comparable in size with the radius of the microvessels and, consequently, local effects such as cell interaction and migration are more pronounced. In terms of complexity of the flow, viscoelasticity along with stress-gradient induced migration effects have a more dominant role, which exceeds the viscous, inertial and transient effects. Recently, a non-homogeneous viscoelastic model has been proposed by Moyers-Gonzalez et al. (2008), which can accurately predict the Fahraeus effects. We developed a numerical algorithm for the time-integration of the set of differential equations that arise from the coupling of momentum, mass, and population balances for RBCs and aggregates with the constitutive laws for both species. The simulations show that a cell-depleted layer develops along the vessel wall with an almost constant thickness. Along this layer, the shear stresses are almost Newtonian because of the plasma, but the normal stresses that are exerted on the wall are high due to the contribution of the individual RBCs and rouleaux.

  7. Evidence for top-heavy stellar initial mass functions with increasing density and decreasing metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Michael; Kroupa, Pavel; Dabringhausen, Jörg; Pawlowski, Marcel S.

    2012-05-01

    Residual-gas expulsion after cluster formation has recently been shown to leave an imprint in the low-mass present-day stellar mass function (PDMF) which allowed the estimation of birth conditions of some Galactic globular clusters (GCs) such as mass, radius and star formation efficiency. We show that in order to explain their characteristics (masses, radii, metallicity and PDMF) their stellar initial mass function (IMF) must have been top heavy. It is found that the IMF is required to become more top heavy the lower the cluster metallicity and the larger the pre-GC cloud-core density are. The deduced trends are in qualitative agreement with theoretical expectation. The results are consistent with estimates of the shape of the high-mass end of the IMF in the Arches cluster, Westerlund 1, R136 and NGC 3603, as well as with the IMF independently constrained for ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs). The latter suggests that GCs and UCDs might have formed along the same channel or that UCDs formed via mergers of GCs. A Fundamental Plane is found which describes the variation of the IMF with density and metallicity of the pre-GC cloud cores. The implications for the evolution of galaxies and chemical enrichment over cosmological times are expected to be major.

  8. Shock initiation studies of low density HMX using electromagnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R.; Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U.

    1993-09-01

    Magnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress rate gauges have been used to measure the shock response of low density octotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) (1.24 &/cm{sup 3}). In experiments done at LANL, magnetic particle velocity gauges were located on both sides of the explosive. In nearly identical experiments done at SNL, PVDF stress rate gauges were located at the same positions so both particle velocity and stress histories were obtained for a particular experimental condition. Unreacted Hugoniot data were obtained and an EOS was developed by combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model. Using this technique, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. Loading and reaction paths were established in the stress-particle velocity plane for some experimental conditions. This information was used to determine a global reaction rate of {approx} 0.13 {mu}s{sup {minus}1} for porous HMX shocked to 0.8 GPa. At low input stresses the transmitted wave profiles had long rise times (up to 1 {mu}s) due to the compaction processes.

  9. Paedomorphosis in Ambystoma talpoideum: effects of initial body size variation and density.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jacqueline M; Whiteman, Howard H

    2008-05-01

    Facultative paedomorphosis is the ability of a salamander to either metamorphose into a terrestrial, metamorphic adult or retain a larval morphology to become a sexually mature paedomorphic adult. It has been hypothesized that density and initial body size variation within populations are instrumental in cueing metamorphosis or paedomorphosis in salamanders, yet few studies have adequately tested these hypotheses in long-term experiments. Beginning in the spring of 2004, 36 experimental ponds were used to manipulate three body size variation levels (low, medium, high) and two density levels (low, high) of Ambystoma talpoideum larvae. Larvae were individually marked using visible implant elastomers and collected every 2 weeks in order to measure snout-vent length and mass. Bi-nightly sampling was used to collect new metamorphs as they appeared. Analysis revealed significant effects of density, size variation and morph on body size of individuals during the summer. Individuals that metamorphosed during the fall and following spring were significantly larger as larvae than those becoming paedomorphic across all treatments. These results support the Best-of-a-Bad-Lot hypothesis, which proposes that the largest larvae metamorphose in order to escape unfavorable aquatic habitats. Large larvae may metamorphose to leave aquatic habitats, regardless of treatment, due to the colder climate and lower productivity found in Kentucky, which is in the northern-most part of A. talpoideum's range. By maintaining a long-term experiment, we have provided evidence for the transition of both larvae and paedomorphs into metamorphs during fall and spring metamorphosis events. Furthermore, the production of similar morphs under different environmental conditions observed in this research suggests that the ecological mechanisms maintaining polyphenisms may be more diverse that first suspected.

  10. Self-similar space-time evolution of an initial density discontinuity

    SciTech Connect

    Rekaa, V. L.; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2013-07-15

    The space-time evolution of an initial step-like plasma density variation is studied. We give particular attention to formulate the problem in a way that opens for the possibility of realizing the conditions experimentally. After a short transient time interval of the order of the electron plasma period, the solution is self-similar as illustrated by a video where the space-time evolution is reduced to be a function of the ratio x/t. Solutions of this form are usually found for problems without characteristic length and time scales, in our case the quasi-neutral limit. By introducing ion collisions with neutrals into the numerical analysis, we introduce a length scale, the collisional mean free path. We study the breakdown of the self-similarity of the solution as the mean free path is made shorter than the system length. Analytical results are presented for charge exchange collisions, demonstrating a short time collisionless evolution with an ensuing long time diffusive relaxation of the initial perturbation. For large times, we find a diffusion equation as the limiting analytical form for a charge-exchange collisional plasma, with a diffusion coefficient defined as the square of the ion sound speed divided by the (constant) ion collision frequency. The ion-neutral collision frequency acts as a parameter that allows a collisionless result to be obtained in one limit, while the solution of a diffusion equation is recovered in the opposite limit of large collision frequencies.

  11. Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Neuronal Morphology and AnkyrinG Density at the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Mónica; Dominguez, Ana; Zhang, Wei; del Puerto, Ana; Ciorraga, María; Benitez, María José; Guaza, Carmen; Garrido, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal polarization underlies the ability of neurons to integrate and transmit information. This process begins early in development with axon outgrowth, followed by dendritic growth and subsequent maturation. In between these two steps, the axon initial segment (AIS), a subcellular domain crucial for generating action potentials (APs) and maintaining the morphological and functional polarization, starts to develop. However, the cellular/molecular mechanisms and receptors involved in AIS initial development and maturation are mostly unknown. In this study, we have focused on the role of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), a highly abundant G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) in the nervous system largely involved in different phases of neuronal development and differentiation. Although CB1R activity modulation has been related to changes in axons or dendrites, its possible role as a modulator of AIS development has not been yet explored. Here we analyzed the potential role of CB1R on neuronal morphology and AIS development using pharmacological and RNA interference approaches in cultured hippocampal neurons. CB1R inhibition, at a very early developmental stage, has no effect on axonal growth, yet CB1R activation can promote it. By contrast, subsequent dendritic growth is impaired by CB1R inhibition, which also reduces ankyrinG density at the AIS. Moreover, our data show a significant correlation between early dendritic growth and ankyrinG density. However, CB1R inhibition in later developmental stages after dendrites are formed only reduces ankyrinG accumulation at the AIS. In conclusion, our data suggest that neuronal CB1R basal activity plays a role in initial development of dendrites and indirectly in AIS proteins accumulation. Based on the lack of CB1R expression at the AIS, we hypothesize that CB1R mediated modulation of dendritic arbor size during early development indirectly determines the accumulation of ankyrinG and AIS development. Further studies

  12. Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Neuronal Morphology and AnkyrinG Density at the Axon Initial Segment.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Mónica; Dominguez, Ana; Zhang, Wei; Del Puerto, Ana; Ciorraga, María; Benitez, María José; Guaza, Carmen; Garrido, Juan José

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal polarization underlies the ability of neurons to integrate and transmit information. This process begins early in development with axon outgrowth, followed by dendritic growth and subsequent maturation. In between these two steps, the axon initial segment (AIS), a subcellular domain crucial for generating action potentials (APs) and maintaining the morphological and functional polarization, starts to develop. However, the cellular/molecular mechanisms and receptors involved in AIS initial development and maturation are mostly unknown. In this study, we have focused on the role of the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), a highly abundant G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) in the nervous system largely involved in different phases of neuronal development and differentiation. Although CB1R activity modulation has been related to changes in axons or dendrites, its possible role as a modulator of AIS development has not been yet explored. Here we analyzed the potential role of CB1R on neuronal morphology and AIS development using pharmacological and RNA interference approaches in cultured hippocampal neurons. CB1R inhibition, at a very early developmental stage, has no effect on axonal growth, yet CB1R activation can promote it. By contrast, subsequent dendritic growth is impaired by CB1R inhibition, which also reduces ankyrinG density at the AIS. Moreover, our data show a significant correlation between early dendritic growth and ankyrinG density. However, CB1R inhibition in later developmental stages after dendrites are formed only reduces ankyrinG accumulation at the AIS. In conclusion, our data suggest that neuronal CB1R basal activity plays a role in initial development of dendrites and indirectly in AIS proteins accumulation. Based on the lack of CB1R expression at the AIS, we hypothesize that CB1R mediated modulation of dendritic arbor size during early development indirectly determines the accumulation of ankyrinG and AIS development. Further studies

  13. Initial density fluctuation measurements from the NSTX Beam Emission Spectroscopy diagnostic system*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schoenbeck, N. L.; Thompson, D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Stratton, B. C.

    2010-11-01

    Density fluctuation measurements on the ion gyroscale have been obtained on NSTX with a newly commissioned beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic system. The BES system measures red-shifted Dα emission near 660 nm from deuterium neutral beams with high throughput optics and high efficiency detectors. The system presently employs 16 detection channels arranged in radial and poloidal arrays, and an expansion to 32 channels is planned. Radial arrays can measure fluctuations from r/a 0.1 to beyond the last closed flux surface and resolve fluctuations with kρi<=1.5. Initial BES measurements reveal broadband turbulence and coherent modes below 300 kHz for r/a>=0.4. The broadband turbulence appears in high gradient regions and increases at H-L transitions. The frequency characteristics of the coherent modes correlate with Alfvén/energetic particle modes in Mirnov probe measurements, but some coherent modes appear in BES measurements only. *Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract Nos. DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-SC0001288.

  14. CYCLOOXYGENASE PRODUCTS STIMULATE CARBON MONOXIDE PRODUCTION BY PIGLET CEREBRAL MICROVESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Alie; Gilpin, David; Fedinec, Alexander L.

    2005-01-01

    Products of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by cyclooxygenase (COX) are important in regulation of neonatal cerebral circulation. The brain and cerebral microvessels also express heme oxygenase (HO) that metabolizes heme to carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. The purpose of this study in newborn pig cerebral microvessels was to address the hypothesis that COX products affect HO activity and HO products affect COX activity. AA (2.0-20μM) increased PGE2 measured by RIA and also CO measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Further, indomethacin (10-4M), that inhibited COX, reduced both AA and heme-induced CO production. Conversely, neither exogenous heme (2×10-6M), that markedly increased CO production, nor the inhibitor of HO, chromium mesoporphyrin, altered PGE2 synthesis. Because AA metabolism by COX generates both prostanoids and superoxides, we determined the effects of the predominant prostanoid and superoxide on CO production. While PGE2 caused a small increase in CO production, xanthine oxidase plus hypoxanthine that produces superoxide strongly stimulated the production of CO by cerebral microvessels. This increase was mildly attenuated by catalase. These data suggest that COX catalyzed AA metabolite(s), most likely superoxide, H2O2, and / or a subsequent reactive oxygen species increases cerebrovascular CO production. This increase appears to be due, at least in part, to the elevation of HO-2 catalytic activity. Conversely, COX activity is not affected by HO-catalyzed heme metabolites. These data suggest that some cerebrovascular functions attributable to COX activity could be mediated by CO. PMID:16446494

  15. Cyclooxygenase products stimulate carbon monoxide production by piglet cerebral microvessels.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Alie; Gilpin, David; Fedinec, Alexander L; Leffler, Charles W

    2006-02-01

    Products of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by cyclooxygenase (Cox) are important in regulation of neonatal cerebral circulation. The brain and cerebral microvessels also express heme oxygenase (HO) that metabolizes heme to carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and iron. The purpose of this study in newborn pig cerebral microvessels was to address the hypothesis that Cox products affect HO activity and HO products affect Cox activity. AA (2.0-20 microM) increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and also CO measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Further, 10(-4) M indomethacin, which inhibited Cox, reduced both AA and heme-induced CO production. Conversely, neither exogenous 2 x 10(-6) M heme, which markedly increased CO production, nor the inhibitor of HO, chromium mesoporphyrin, altered PGE2 synthesis. Because AA metabolism by Cox generates both prostanoids and superoxides, we determined the effects of the predominant prostanoid and superoxide on CO production. Although PGE2 caused a small increase in CO production, xanthine oxidase plus hypoxanthine, which produces superoxide, strongly stimulated the production of CO by cerebral microvessels. This increase was mildly attenuated by catalase. These data suggest that Cox-catalyzed AA metabolites, most likely superoxide and/or a subsequent reactive oxygen species, increase cerebrovascular CO production. This increase seems to be caused, at least in part, by the elevation of HO-2 catalytic activity. Conversely, Cox activity is not affected by HO-catalyzed heme metabolites. These data suggest that some cerebrovascular functions attributable to Cox activity could be mediated by CO.

  16. THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND THE SURFACE DENSITY PROFILE OF NGC 6231

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hwankyung; Sana, Hugues; Bessell, Michael S. E-mail: H.Sana@uva.nl

    2013-02-01

    We have performed new wide-field photometry of the young open cluster NGC 6231 to study the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) and mass segregation. We also investigated the reddening law toward NGC 6231 from optical to mid-infrared color excess ratios, and found that the total-to-selective extinction ratio is R{sub V} = 3.2, which is very close to the normal value. But many early-type stars in the cluster center show large color excess ratios. We derived the surface density profiles of four member groups, and found that they reach the surface density of field stars at about 10', regardless of stellar mass. The IMF of NGC 6231 is derived for the mass range 0.8-45 M{sub Sun }. The slope of the IMF of NGC 6231 ({Gamma} = -1.1 {+-} 0.1) is slightly shallower than the canonical value, but the difference is marginal. In addition, the mass function varies systematically, and is a strong function of radius-it is very shallow at the center, and very steep at the outer ring suggesting the cluster is mass segregated. We confirm the mass segregation for the massive stars (m {approx}> 8 M{sub Sun }) by a minimum spanning tree analysis. Using a Monte Carlo method, we estimate the total mass of NGC 6231 to be about 2.6 ({+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun }. We constrain the age of NGC 6231 by comparison with evolutionary isochrones. The age of the low-mass stars ranges from 1 to 7 Myr with a slight peak at 3 Myr. However, the age of the high-mass stars depends on the adopted models and is 3.5 {+-} 0.5 Myr from the non-rotating or moderately rotating models of Brott et al. as well as the non-rotating models of Ekstroem et al. But the age is 4.0-7.0 Myr if the rotating models of Ekstroem et al. are adopted. This latter age is in excellent agreement with the timescale of ejection of the high-mass runaway star HD 153919 from NGC 6231, albeit the younger age cannot be entirely excluded.

  17. Beetle and plant density as cues initiating dispersal in two species of adult predaceous diving beetles.

    PubMed

    Yee, Donald A; Taylor, Stacy; Vamosi, Steven M

    2009-05-01

    Dispersal can influence population dynamics, species distributions, and community assembly, but few studies have attempted to determine the factors that affect dispersal of insects in natural populations. Consequently, little is known about how proximate factors affect the dispersal behavior of individuals or populations, or how an organism's behavior may change in light of such factors. Adult predaceous diving beetles are active dispersers and are important predators in isolated aquatic habitats. We conducted interrelated studies to determine how several factors affected dispersal in two common pond-inhabiting species in southern Alberta, Canada: Graphoderus occidentalis and Rhantus sericans. Specifically, we (1) experimentally tested the effect of plant and beetle densities on dispersal probabilities in ponds; (2) surveyed ponds and determined the relationships among beetle densities and plant densities and water depth; and (3) conducted laboratory trials to determine how beetle behavior changed in response to variation in plant densities, conspecific densities, food, and water depth. Our field experiment determined that both species exhibited density dependence, with higher beetle densities leading to higher dispersal probabilities. Low plant density also appeared to increase beetle dispersal. Consistent with our experimental results, densities of R. sericans in ponds were significantly related to plant density and varied also with water depth; G. occidentalis densities did not vary with either factor. In the laboratory, behavior varied with plant density only for R. sericans, which swam at low density but were sedentary at high density. Both species responded to depth, with high beetle densities eliciting beetles to spend more time in deeper water. The presence of food caused opposite responses for G. occidentalis between experiments. Behavioral changes in response to patch-level heterogeneity likely influence dispersal in natural populations and are expected

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of microvessels using iron-oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olamaei, N.; Cheriet, F.; Martel, S.

    2013-03-01

    The visualization of microstructures including blood vessels with an inner overall cross-sectional area below approximately 200 μm remains beyond the capabilities of current clinical imaging modalities. But with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, magnetic entities cause susceptibility artifacts in the images by disrupting the homogeneous magnetic field in a much larger scale than their actual size. As validated in this paper through simulation and in-vitro experiments, these artifacts can serve as a source of contrast, enabling microvessels with an inner diameter below the spatial resolution of any medical imaging modalities to be visualized using a clinical MR scanner. For such experiments, micron-sized agglomerations of iron-oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were injected in microchannels with internal diameters of 200 and 50 μm equivalent to a narrower artery or a larger arteriole, and down to a smaller arteriole, respectively. The results show the feasibility of the proposed method for micro-particle detection and the visualization of microvessels using a 1.5 T clinical MR scanner. It was confirmed that the method is reproducible and accurate at the sub-pixel level.

  19. Quantitative study on appearance of microvessels in spectral endoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Yasushi; Arai, Fumihito; Morimoto, Yoshinori; Yuasa, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Increase in abnormal microvessels in the superficial mucosa is often relevant to diagnostic findings of neoplasia in digestive endoscopy; hence, observation of superficial vasculature is crucial for cancer diagnosis. To enhance the appearance of such vessels, several spectral endoscopic imaging techniques have been developed, such as narrow-band imaging and blue laser imaging. Both techniques exploit narrow-band blue light for the enhancement. The emergence of such spectral imaging techniques has increased the importance of understanding the relation of the light wavelength to the appearance of superficial vasculature, and thus a new method is desired for quantitative analysis of vessel visibility in relation to the actual structure in the tissue. Here, we developed microvessel-simulating phantoms that allowed quantitative evaluation of the appearance of 15-μm-thick vessels. We investigated the relation between the vascular contrast and light wavelength by the phantom measurements and also verified it in experiments with swine, where the endoscopically observed vascular contrast was investigated together with its real vascular depth and diameter obtained by microscopic observation of fluorescence-labeled vessels. Our study indicates that changing the spectral property even in the wavelength range of blue light may allow selective enhancement of the vascular depth for clinical use.

  20. The proteome of mouse brain microvessel membranes and basal lamina

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Hyun Bae; Scott, Michael; Niessen, Sherry; Hoover, Heather; Baird, Andrew; Yates, John; Torbett, Bruce E; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a multicellular vascular structure separating blood from the brain parenchyma that is composed of endothelial cells with tight intercellular junctions, surrounded by a basal lamina, astrocytes, and pericytes. Previous studies have generated detailed databases of the microvessel transcriptome; however, less information is available on the BBB at the protein level. In this study, we specifically focused on characterization of the membrane fraction of cells within the BBB to generate a more complete understanding of membrane transporters, tight junction proteins, and associated extracellular matrix proteins that are functional hallmarks of the BBB. We used Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology to identify a total of 1,143 proteins in mouse brain microvessels, of which 53% were determined to be membrane associated. Analyses of specific classes of BBB-associated proteins in the context of recent transcriptome reports provide a unique database to assess the relative contribution of genes at the level of both RNA and protein in the maintenance of normal BBB integrity. PMID:21792245

  1. The dynamics of superclusters - Initial determination of the mass density of the universe at large scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, H. C.; Ciardullo, R.; Harms, R. J.; Bartko, F.

    1981-01-01

    The radial velocities of cluster members of two rich, large superclusters have been measured in order to probe the supercluster mass densities, and simple evolutionary models have been computed to place limits upon the mass density within each supercluster. These superclusters represent true physical associations of size of about 100 Mpc seen presently at an early stage of evolution. One supercluster is weakly bound, the other probably barely bound, but possibly marginally unbound. Gravity has noticeably slowed the Hubble expansion of both superclusters. Galaxy surface-density counts and the density enhancement of Abell clusters within each supercluster were used to derive the ratio of mass densities of the superclusters to the mean field mass density. The results strongly exclude a closed universe.

  2. Self-gravitating compressible Maxwell Earth models: the role of the self compression and the compositional initial density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambiotti, G.

    2009-04-01

    We analyse a new class of self-gravitating Maxwell Earth models that takes the compressibility into account both at the initial state of hydrostatic equilibrium and during the deformations. By resorting to the Correspondence Principle we derive the analytical solution for a particular model with an inviscid core, a Darwin law density profile in the mantle and a continuous compositional initial density gradient. It allows to gain deep insight into the global dynamics of the Earth showing that the compressional stratification is responsible only for stable modes, namely the C0 and M0 buoyancy modes, the D-modes and the transient modes, while the compositional stratification triggers new transient modes and a denumerably set of buoyancy modes, of which the RT-modes are a particular case. We show that the model is unstable only when the square of the Brunt-Väiäsala frequency is positive and the solely unstable modes are the new compositional ones. By resorting to a numerical algorithm we extend our analysis to more general self-compressed compressible models with specific Darwin law density profiles in each layer and a compositional initial density gradient describing the density contrasts at the main Earth interfaces. We show that no buoyancy modes are due to the continuous variation of the initial density but they arise because of the density contrasts while the D-modes are substitute by a non-modal contribution always associated with the compressional relaxation times. Such results shed light on the role of the compositional stratification on the relaxation processes and allow us to deal with the issue of the Earth stability in a more consistent way compared to the past. Besides this they are relevant to model the Post-Glacial rebound and the post seismic deformations.

  3. Relation of initial spacing and relative stand density indices to stand characteristics in a Douglas-fir plantation spacing trial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, Robert O.; Bansal, Sheel; Harrington, Constance A.

    2016-01-01

    This report presents updated information on a 1981 Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii) plantation spacing trial at 33 years from planting. Stand statistics at the most recent measurement were compared for initial spacing of 1 through 6 meters and associated relative densities. There was no clear relationship of spacing to top height. Diameter, live crown ratio, and percent survival increased with spacing; basal area and relative density decreased with increase in spacing. Volume in trees ≥ 4 cm diameter was greatest at 2 m spacing, while utilizable volume (trees ≥20 cm dbh) was greatest at 4 m spacing. Live crown ratio decreased and total crown projectional area increased with increasing relative density indices. Total crown projectional area was more closely related to relative density than to basal area.

  4. Effect of Initial Nematode Population Density on the Interaction of Pratylenchus penetrans and Verticillium dahliae on 'Russet Burbank' Potato

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, I. A. M.; MacGuidwin, A. E.; Rouse, D. I.

    1998-01-01

    Four similar growth chamber experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that the initial population density (Pi) of Pratylenchus penetrans influences the severity of interactive effects of P. penetrans and Verticillium dahliae on shoot growth, photosynthesis, and tuber yield of Russet Burbank potato. In each experiment, three population densities of P. penetrans with and without concomitant inoculation with V. dahliae were compared with nematode-free controls. The three specific Pi of JR penetrans tested varied from experiment to experiment but fell in the ranges 0.8-2.5, 1.8-3.9, 2.1-8.8, and 7.5-32.4 nematodes/cm³ soil. Inoculum of V. dahliaewas mixed into soil, and the assayed density was 5.4 propagules/gram dry soil. Plants were grown 60 to 80 days in a controlled environment. Plant growth parameters in two experiments indicated significant interactions between P. penetrans and V. dahliae. In the absence of V. dahliae, P. penetrans did not reduce plant growth and tuber yield below that of the nematode-free control or did so only at the highest one or two population densities tested. In the presence of K dahliae, the lowest population density significantly reduced shoot weight and photosynthesis in three and four experiments, respectively. Higher densities had no additional effect on shoot weight and caused additional reductions in photosynthesis in only one experiment. Population densities of 0.8 and 7.5 nematodes/cm³ soil reduced tuber yield by 51% and 45%, whereas higher densities had no effect or a 15% additional effect, respectively. These data indicate that interactive effects between P. penetrans and V. dahliae on Russet Burbank potato are manifested at P. penetrans population densities less than 1 nematode/cm³ soil and that the nematode population density must be substantially higher before additional effects are apparent. PMID:19274204

  5. The Effect of Air Density on Atmospheric Electric Fields Required for Lightning Initiation from a Long Airborne Object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazelyan, E. M.; Aleksandrov, N. L.; Raizer, Yu. Pl.; Konchankov, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to determine minimum atmospheric electric fields required for lightning initiation from an airborne vehicle at various altitudes up to 10 km. The problem was reduced to the determination of a condition for initiation of a viable positive leader from a conductive object in an ambient electric field. It was shown that, depending on air density and shape and dimensions of the object, critical atmospheric fields are governed by the condition for leader viability or that for corona onset. To establish quantitative criteria for reduced air densities, available observations of spark discharges in long laboratory gaps were analyzed, the effect of air density on leader velocity was discussed and evolution in time of the properties of plasma in the leader channel was numerically simulated. The results obtained were used to evaluate the effect of pressure on the quantitative relationships between the potential difference near the leader tip, leader current and its velocity; based on these relationships, criteria for steady development of a leader were determined for various air pressures. Atmospheric electric fields required for lightning initiation from rods and ellipsoidal objects of various dimensions were calculated at different air densities. It was shown that there is no simple way to extend critical ambient fields obtained for some given objects and pressures to other objects and pressures.

  6. Endothelial cell shrinkage increases permeability through a Ca2+-dependent pathway in single frog mesenteric microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Kajimura, M; Curry, F E

    1999-01-01

    We tested whether calcium (Ca2+)-dependent mechanisms were essential for our previous observation that a change in the endothelial cell (EC)-extracellular matrix (ECM) attachment caused an increase in microvessel hydraulic permeability (Lp) after exposure to hypertonic solutions in single perfused mesenteric microvessels in pithed frogs (Rana pipiens). In microvessels where integrin-dependent EC-ECM attachments were disrupted by pretreatment with the peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro (GRGDTP; 0·3 mmol l−1), we measured microvessel Lp after exposure to hypertonic solutions under experimental conditions that reduced Ca2+ influx into endothelial cells. High K+ solutions (59·7 and 100 mmol l−1 K+) were used to depolarize the endothelial membrane and therefore to reduce the electrochemical driving force for Ca2+ influx through conductive Ca2+ channels. These solutions abolished the increase in Lp caused by hypertonic solutions in the microvessels pretreated with GRGDTP. We previously suggested that the removal of albumin from the perfusate may reduce EC-ECM attachment because hypertonic solutions increased the Lp of microvessels above that due to removal of albumin alone. This additional increase in Lp was attenuated by the 59·7 mmol l−1 K+ solution and was completely abolished by the 100 mmol l−1 K+ solution. Bumetanide, an inhibitor of the Na+-K+-2Cl− co-transporter and one of the mechanisms of regulatory volume increase after exposure to hypertonic solutions in endothelial cells, did not change the response of microvessels to high K+ solutions. Our findings indicate that Ca2+ entry into endothelial cells via passive conductance channels is necessary to increase microvessel Lp after exposure to hypertonic solutions in microvessels where EC-ECM attachments are disrupted. PMID:10373704

  7. Analysis of correlation between initial alveolar bone density and apical root resorption after 12 months of orthodontic treatment without extraction

    PubMed Central

    Scheibel, Paula Cabrini; Ramos, Adilson Luiz; Iwaki, Lilian Cristina Vessoni; Micheletti, Kelly Regina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between initial alveolar bone density of upper central incisors (ABD-UI) and external apical root resorption (EARR) after 12 months of orthodontic movement in cases without extraction. METHODS: A total of 47 orthodontic patients 11 years old or older were submitted to periapical radiography of upper incisors prior to treatment (T1) and after 12 months of treatment (T2). ABD-UI and EARR were measured by means of densitometry. RESULTS: No statistically significant correlation was found between initial ABD-UI and EARR at T2 (r = 0.149; p = 0.157). CONCLUSION: Based on the present findings, alveolar density assessed through periapical radiography is not predictive of root resorption after 12 months of orthodontic treatment in cases without extraction. PMID:25715722

  8. Real-time broadening of nonequilibrium density profiles and the role of the specific initial-state realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinigeweg, R.; Jin, F.; Schmidtke, D.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.; Gemmer, J.

    2017-01-01

    The real-time broadening of density profiles starting from nonequilibrium states is at the center of transport in condensed-matter systems and dynamics in ultracold atomic gases. Initial profiles close to equilibrium are expected to evolve according to the linear response, e.g., as given by the current correlator evaluated exactly at equilibrium. Significantly off equilibrium, the linear response is expected to break down and even a description in terms of canonical ensembles is questionable. We unveil that single pure states with density profiles of maximum amplitude yield a broadening in perfect agreement with the linear response, if the structure of these states involves randomness in terms of decoherent off-diagonal density-matrix elements. While these states allow for spin diffusion in the XXZ spin-1 /2 chain at large exchange anisotropies, coherences yield entirely different behavior.

  9. Initiation of conidiation in Erysiphe necator is regulated by prior vegetative growth, inoculum density and light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initiation of asexual sporulation in powdery mildews is preceded by a period of superficial vegetative growth of mildew colonies. We found evidence of signaling in Erysiphe necator that was promulgated at the colony center as early as five days after inoculation and stimulated sporulation throughout...

  10. ELUCID - Exploring the Local Universe with ReConstructed Initial Density Field III: Constrained Simulation in the SDSS Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Yang, Xiaohu; Zhang, Youcai; Shi, JingJing; Jing, Y. P.; Liu, Chengze; Li, Shijie; Kang, Xi; Gao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    A method we developed recently for the reconstruction of the initial density field in the nearby universe is applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. A high-resolution N-body constrained simulation (CS) of the reconstructed initial conditions, with 30723 particles evolved in a 500 {h}-1 {Mpc} box, is carried out and analyzed in terms of the statistical properties of the final density field and its relation with the distribution of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. We find that the statistical properties of the cosmic web and the halo populations are accurately reproduced in the CS. The galaxy density field is strongly correlated with the CS density field, with a bias that depends on both galaxy luminosity and color. Our further investigations show that the CS provides robust quantities describing the environments within which the observed galaxies and galaxy systems reside. Cosmic variance is greatly reduced in the CS so that the statistical uncertainties can be controlled effectively, even for samples of small volumes.

  11. Identification of P-glycoprotein co-fractionating proteins and specific binding partners in rat brain microvessels.

    PubMed

    Tome, Margaret E; Schaefer, Charles P; Jacobs, Leigh M; Zhang, Yifeng; Herndon, Joseph M; Matty, Fabian O; Davis, Thomas P

    2015-07-01

    Drug delivery to the brain for the treatment of pathologies with a CNS component is a significant clinical challenge. P-glycoprotein (PgP), a drug efflux pump in the endothelial cell membrane, is a major factor in preventing therapeutics from crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Identifying PgP regulatory mechanisms is key to developing agents to modulate PgP activity. Previously, we found that PgP trafficking was altered concomitant with increased PgP activity and disassembly of high molecular weight PgP-containing complexes during acute peripheral inflammatory pain. These data suggest that PgP activity is post-translationally regulated at the BBB. The goal of the current study was to identify proteins that co-localize with PgP in rat brain microvessel endothelial cell membrane microdomains and use the data to suggest potential regulatory mechanisms. Using new density gradients of microvessel homogenates, we identified two unique pools (1,2) of PgP in membrane fractions. Caveolar constituents, caveolin1, cavin1, and cavin2, co-localized with PgP in these fractions indicating the two pools contained caveolae. A chaperone (Hsc71), protein disulfide isomerase and endosomal/lysosomal sorting proteins (Rab5, Rab11a) also co-fractionated with PgP in the gradients. These data suggest signaling pathways with a potential role in post-translational regulation of PgP activity at the BBB.

  12. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2006-10-21

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble's oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than the UCA diameter. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA's oscillation and the microvessel's acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 microm vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1 MPa and a centre frequency of 1 MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with a diameter equal to or greater than 8 microm, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless of the vessel diameter; however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a centre frequency of 1 MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 microm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease; however the

  13. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2006-10-01

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble's oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than the UCA diameter. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA's oscillation and the microvessel's acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 µm vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1 MPa and a centre frequency of 1 MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with a diameter equal to or greater than 8 µm, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless of the vessel diameter; however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a centre frequency of 1 MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 µm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease; however the

  14. Current Fluctuations in One Dimensional Diffusive Systems with a Step Initial Density Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard; Gerschenfeld, Antoine

    2009-12-01

    We show how to apply the macroscopic fluctuation theory (MFT) of Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona-Lasinio, and Landim to study the current fluctuations of diffusive systems with a step initial condition. We argue that one has to distinguish between two ways of averaging (the annealed and the quenched cases) depending on whether we let the initial condition fluctuate or not. Although the initial condition is not a steady state, the distribution of the current satisfies a symmetry very reminiscent of the fluctuation theorem. We show how the equations of the MFT can be solved in the case of non-interacting particles. The symmetry of these equations can be used to deduce the distribution of the current for several other models, from its knowledge (Derrida and Gerschenfeld in J. Stat. Phys. 136, 1-15, 2009) for the symmetric simple exclusion process. In the range where the integrated current Qt˜sqrt{t} , we show that the non-Gaussian decay exp [- Q {/t 3}/ t] of the distribution of Q t is generic.

  15. Spectral imaging reveals microvessel physiology and function from anastomoses to thromboses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; Agarwal, Nikita; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A.; Dedeugd, Casey; Raizada, Mohan K.; Oh, S. Paul; Sorg, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal microvascular physiology and function is common in many diseases. Numerous pathologies include hypervascularity, aberrant angiogenesis, or abnormal vascular remodeling among the characteristic features of the disease, and quantitative imaging and measurement of microvessel function can be important to increase understanding of these diseases. Several optical techniques are useful for direct imaging of microvascular function. Spectral imaging is one such technique that can be used to assess microvascular oxygen transport function with high spatial and temporal resolution in microvessel networks through measurements of hemoglobin saturation. We highlight novel observation made with our intravital microscopy spectral imaging system employed with mouse dorsal skin-fold window chambers for imaging hemoglobin saturation in microvessel networks. Specifically, we image acute oxygenation fluctuations in a tumor microvessel network, the development of arteriovenous malformations in a mouse model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and the formation of spontaneous and induced microvascular thromboses and occlusions.

  16. An experimental investigation of the dynamics of submarine leveed channel initiation as sediment-laden density currents experience sudden unconfinement

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, Joel C; Hilley, George E; Fildani, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Leveed submarine channels play a critical role in the transfer of sediment from the upper continental slopes to interslope basins and ultimately deepwater settings. Despite a reasonable understanding of how these channels grow once established, how such channels initiate on previously unchannelized portions of the seafloor remains poorly understood. We conducted a series of experiments that elucidate the influence of excess density relative to flow velocity on the dynamics of, and depositional morphologies arising from, density currents undergoing sudden unconfinement across a sloped bed. Experimental currents transported only suspended sediment across a non-erodible substrate. Under flow conditions ranging from supercritical to subcritical (bulk Richardson numbers of 0.02 to 1.2) our experiments failed to produce deposits resembling or exhibiting the potential to evolve into self-formed leveed channels. In the absence of excess density, a submerged sediment-laden flow produced sharp crested lateral deposits bounding the margins of the flow for approximately a distance of two outlet widths down basin. These lateral deposits terminated in a centerline deposit that greatly exceeded marginal deposits in thickness. As excess density increased relative to the outlet velocity, the rate of lateral spreading of the flow increased relative to the downstream propagation of the density current, transitioning from a narrow flow aligned with the channel outlet to a broad radially expanding flow. Coincident with these changes in flow dynamics, the bounding lateral deposits extended for shorter distances, had lower, more poorly defined crests that were increasingly wider in separation than the initial outlet, and progressively became more oblong rather than linear. Based on our results, we conclude that leveed channels cannot initiate from sediment-laden density currents under strictly depositional conditions. Partial confinement of these currents appears to be necessary to

  17. Magnetic-nanoparticle-decorated polypyrrole microvessels: toward encapsulation of mRNA cap analogues.

    PubMed

    Kijewska, Krystyna; Jarzębińska, Anita; Kowalska, Joanna; Jemielity, Jacek; Kępińska, Daria; Szczytko, Jacek; Pisarek, Marcin; Wiktorska, Katarzyna; Stolarski, Jarosław; Krysiński, Paweł; Twardowski, Andrzej; Mazur, Maciej

    2013-06-10

    Many phosphorylated nucleoside derivatives have therapeutic potential, but their application is limited by problems with membrane permeability and with intracellular delivery. Here, we prepared polypyrrole microvessel structures modified with superparamagnetic nanoparticles for use as potential carriers of nucleotides. The microvessels were prepared via the photochemical polymerization of the monomer onto the surface of aqueous ferrofluidic droplets. A complementary physicochemical analysis revealed that a fraction of the nanoparticles was embedded in the microvessel walls, while the other nanoparticles were in the core of the vessel. SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) measurements indicated that the incorporated nanoparticles retained their superparamagnetic properties; thus, the resulting nanoparticle-modified microvessels can be directed by an external magnetic field. As a result of these features, these microvessels may be useful as drug carriers in biomedical applications. To demonstrate the encapsulation of drug molecules, two labeled mRNA cap analogues, nucleotide-derived potential anticancer agents, were used. It was shown that the cap analogues are located in the aqueous core of the microvessels and can be released to the external solution by spontaneous permeation through the polymer walls. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed that the cap analogues were preserved during encapsulation, storage, and release. This finding provides a foundation for the future development of anticancer therapies and for the delivery of nucleotide-based therapeutics.

  18. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  19. Neutral amino acid transport across brain microvessel endothelial cell monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Audus, K.L.; Borchardt, R.T.

    1986-03-01

    Brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMEC) which form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) possess an amino acid carrier specific for large neutral amino acids (LNAA). The carrier is important for facilitating the delivery of nutrient LNAA's and centrally acting drugs that are LNAA's, to the brain. Bovine BMEC's were isolated and grown up to complete monolayers on regenerated cellulose-membranes in primary culture. To study the transendothelial transport of leucine, the monolayers were placed in a side-by-side diffusion cell, and transport across the monolayers followed with (/sup 3/H)-leucine. The transendothelial transport of leucine in this in vitro model was determined to be bidirectional, and time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependent. The transport of leucine was saturable and the apparent K/sub m/ and V/sub max/, 0.18 mM and 6.3 nmol/mg/min, respectively. Other LNAA's, including the centrally acting drugs, ..cap alpha..-methyldopa, L-DOPA, ..cap alpha..-methyl-tyrosine, and baclofen, inhibited leucine transport. The leucine carrier was also found to be stereospecific and not sensitive to inhibitors of active transport. These results are consistent with previous in vitro and in vivo studies. Primary cultures of BMEC's appear to be a potentially important tool for investigating at the cellular level, the transport mechanisms of the BBB.

  20. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  1. Temperature and initial curvature effects in low-density panel flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resende, Hugo B.

    1992-01-01

    The panel flutter phenomenon is studied assuming free-molecule flow. This kind of analysis is relevant in the case of hypersonic flight vehicles traveling at high altitudes, especially in the leeward portion of the vehicle. In these conditions the aerodynamic shear can be expected to be considerably larger than the pressure at a given point, so that the effects of such a loading are incorporated into the structural model. Both the pressure and shear loadings are functions of the panel temperature, which can lead to great variations on the location of the stability boundaries for parametric studies. Different locations can, however, be 'collapsed' onto one another by using as ordinate an appropriately normalized dynamic pressure parameter. This procedure works better for higher values of the panel temperature for a fixed undisturbed flow temperature. Finally, the behavior of the system is studied when the panel has some initial curvature. This leads to the conclusion that it may be unrealistic to try to distinguish between a parabolic or sinusoidal initial shape.

  2. A comparison of the kinetics of low-density lipoprotein oxidation initiated by copper or by azobis (2-amidinopropane).

    PubMed

    Thomas, M J; Chen, Q; Franklin, C; Rudel, L L

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the kinetics of low density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation catalyzed by azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride, ABAP, or by copper. The LDLs were isolated from nonhuman primates fed diets enriched in one of three types of fatty acids: saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, predominantly, oleic acid, or polyunsaturated fatty acids, predominantly linoleic acid. Oxidation was followed by monitoring the formation of conjugated diene hydroperoxides from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). For both copper and ABAP-initiated oxidation, the rate of LDL oxidation depended on the concentrations of initiator, PUFA, and LDL. Except for the dependence on PUFA concentration the rate of LDL oxidation was not directly influenced by the fatty acid composition of the LDL particle. The two initiators had very different dependence on initiator concentration. Because LDL particles are essentially small, lipid-rich droplets, the kinetic descriptions of LDL oxidation assumed: (1), that there was only one chain per particle, and (2) that the radical chain was terminated when a second radical either entered or was formed in the particle. When two LDL samples having very different lag times were mixed, the oxidation profile was bimodal. This finding demonstrated that the oxidation of native LDL particles was independent of the oxidation state of the other native LDL particles in solution, i.e., LDL particles do not rapidly exchange radicals, for example, hydroperoxyl radicals. Oxidation initiated by ABAP was proportional to [ABAP]0.5, suggesting that hydroperoxyl radical recombination between the lipid hydroperoxyl radical and the ABAP-hydroperoxyl radical was the chain-terminating step. The reciprocal of the rate of copper oxidation was linearly related to the reciprocal copper concentration, demonstrating that the binding of copper to LDL was necessary to initiate oxidation. This binding constant showed considerable variability among LDL samples. The

  3. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  4. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins upregulate proline oxidase to initiate ROS-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zabirnyk, Olga; Liu, Wei; Khalil, Shadi; Sharma, Anit; Phang, James M

    2010-03-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that high levels of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) are associated with increased cancer risk. We examined the direct effect of physiologic concentrations oxLDL on cancer cells. OxLDLs were cytotoxic and activate both apoptosis and autophagy. OxLDLs have ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and upregulated proline oxidase (POX) through this nuclear receptor. We identified 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) as a main component responsible for the latter. To elucidate the role of POX in oxLDL-mediated cytotoxicity, we knocked down POX via small interfering RNA and found that this (i) further reduced viability of cancer cells treated with oxLDL; (ii) decreased oxLDL-associated reactive oxygen species generation; (iii) decreased autophagy measured via beclin-1 protein level and light-chain 3 protein (LC3)-I into LC3-II conversion. Using POX-expressing cell model, we established that single POX overexpression was sufficient to activate autophagy. Thus, it led to autophagosomes accumulation and increased conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Moreover, beclin-1 gene expression was directly dependent on POX catalytic activity, namely the generation of POX-dependent superoxide. We conclude that POX is critical in the cellular response to the noxious effects of oxLDL by activating protective autophagy.

  5. Initial oxidation of gallium arsenide (001)-β2(2 x 4) surface using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Yeong-Cheol

    2014-10-01

    The initial oxidation of a gallium arsenide (001)-β2(2 x 4) surface with an oxygen molecule was investigated using density functional theory. The oxygen molecule was adsorbed on the surface without any energy barrier. The dissociation of the oxygen molecule on the first arsenic layer had two dissociation paths; the inter-dimer and intra-dimer. The inter-dimer dissociation was the dominant dissociation path based on the energy barriers. The two dissociated oxygen atoms preferred breaking the arsenic-gallium back-bond to form arsenic-oxygen-gallium bonds. Our results are in good agreement with literature of the scanning tunneling microscope study.

  6. Targeted disruption of deep-lying neocortical microvessels in rat using ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Christopher B.; Friedman, Beth; Tsai, Philbert S.; Lyden, Patrick D.; Kleinfeld, David

    2004-06-01

    The study of neurovascular diseases such as vascular dementia and stroke require novel models of targeted vascular disruption in the brain. We describe a model of microvascular disruption in rat neocortex that uses ultrashort laser pulses to induce localized injury to specific targeted microvessels and uses two-photon microscopy to monitor and guide the photodisruption process. In our method, a train of high-intensity, 100-fs laser pulses is tightly focused into the lumen of a blood vessel within the upper 500 μm of cortex. Photodisruption induced by these laser pulses creates injury to a single vessel located at the focus of the laser, leaving the surrounding tissue intact. This photodisruption results in three modalities of localized vascular injury. At low power, blood plasma extravasation can be induced. The vessel itself remains intact, while serum is extravasated into the intercellular space. Localized ischemia caused by an intravascular clot results when the photodisruption leads to a brief disturbance of the vascular walls that initiates an endogenous clotting cascade. The formation of a localized thrombus stops the blood flow at the location of the photodisruption. A hemorrhage, defined as a large extravasation of blood including plasma and red blood cells, results when higher laser power is used. The targeted vessel does not remain intact.

  7. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, C; Zór, K; Canepa, S; Carminati, M; Larsen, L B; Raiteri, R; Andresen, T L; Heiskanen, A; Emnéus, J

    2015-05-21

    We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12,500, 35,000, 75,000, and 100,000 cells cm(-2)) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing time-dependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 μM doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 μM. By sensing the changes in the cell-substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity was observed 5 h earlier than when using a standard colorimetric end-point assay (MTS) which measures changes in the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, with the MTS assay no cytotoxicity was observed after 15 h of incubation with 2.5 μM doxorubicin, whereas the impedance showed at this time point cell viability that was below 25%. These results indicate that impedance detection reveals cytotoxic events undetectable when using the MTS assay, highlighting the importance of combining impedance detection with traditional drug toxicity assays towards a more in depth understanding of the effect of anti-cancer drugs on in vitro assays. Moreover, the detection of doxorubicin induced toxicity determined with impedance under static conditions proved to be 6 times faster than in perfusion culture.

  8. Miscible gravitational instability of initially stable horizontal interface in a porous medium: Non-monotonic density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Chan

    2014-11-01

    To simulate a CO2 sequestration process, some researchers employed a water/propylene glycol (PPG) system which shows a non-monotonic density profile. Motivated by this fact, the stability of the diffusion layer of two miscible fluids saturated in a porous medium is analyzed. For a non-monotonic density profile system, linear stability equations are derived in a global domain, and then transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations in an infinite domain. Initial growth rate analysis is conducted without the quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA) and shows that initially the system is unconditionally stable for the least stable disturbance. For the time evolving case, the ordinary differential equations are solved applying the eigen-analysis and numerical shooting scheme with and without the QSSA. To support these theoretical results, direct numerical simulations are conducted using the Fourier spectral method. The results of theoretical linear stability analyses and numerical simulations validate one another. The present linear and nonlinear analyses show that the water/PPG system is more unstable than the CO2/brine one, and the flow characteristics of these two systems are quite different from each other.

  9. Cathepsin L acutely alters microvessel integrity within the neurovascular unit during focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yu-Huan; Kanazawa, Masato; Hung, Stephanie Y; Wang, Xiaoyun; Fukuda, Shunichi; Koziol, James A; del Zoppo, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    During focal cerebral ischemia, the degradation of microvessel basal lamina matrix occurs acutely and is associated with edema formation and microhemorrhage. These events have been attributed to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). However, both known protease generation and ligand specificities suggest other participants. Using cerebral tissues from a non-human primate focal ischemia model and primary murine brain endothelial cells, astrocytes, and microglia in culture, the effects of active cathepsin L have been defined. Within 2 hours of ischemia onset cathepsin L, but not cathepsin B, activity appears in the ischemic core, around microvessels, within regions of neuron injury and cathepsin L expression. In in vitro studies, cathepsin L activity is generated during experimental ischemia in microglia, but not astrocytes or endothelial cells. In the acidic ischemic core, cathepsin L release is significantly increased with time. A novel ex vivo assay showed that cathepsin L released from microglia during ischemia degrades microvessel matrix, and interacts with MMP activity. Hence, the loss of microvessel matrix during ischemia is explained by microglial cathepsin L release in the acidic core during injury evolution. The roles of cathepsin L and its interactions with specific MMP activities during ischemia are relevant to strategies to reduce microvessel injury and hemorrhage. PMID:26198177

  10. Visualization of Microvessels in Skin by Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saijo, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Hozumi, N.; Tanaka, A.; Sakai, S.

    A non-invasive imaging technique capable of visualizing microvessels through epidermis to subdermis has been strongly desired. A PVDF ultrasonic transducer with the central frequency of 100 MHz and the focal length of 3.2 mm was mechanically scanned over the objects by two linear servo motors controlled by a personal computer. A microvessel model was made of a tungsten wire with a diameter of 100-microns and placed in the water tank. The microvessel model was clearly visualized by 3D ultrasound microscope. In cases of skin imaging, conventional echo gel was used as the coupling medium between transducer and skin surface. In vivo 3D skin morphology was also clearly visualized. In dermis, a microvessel may be shown as small, round, lucent echo areas continuously observed in the serial sections. 3D structure of hair-follicle was also visualized from the skin surface to the bud of hair-follicle in dermis. The 3D ultrasound microscope noninvasively provides important information on the distribution of microvessels in skin.

  11. Shear stress variation induced by red blood cell motion in microvessel.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenjuan; Zhang, Junfeng

    2010-08-01

    We simulated red blood cells flowing in microvessel to examine the induced wall shear stress variation. A typical peak-valley-peak structure is observed, and it is analyzed in terms of its magnitude, spatial influencing range, and temporal elapsed duration. Effects of red cell deformability, microvessel size, and flow velocity have been investigated. The corresponding variation characters have also been related to cell deformation and flow field. Simulation results show that the variation magnitude is mainly determined by the gap size between cell and vessel wall, while the spatial range of the shear stress variation depends on the cell length as well as the microvessel size. For a certain point on the vessel wall, the shear stress variation lasts a short time at a higher flow velocity, and vice versa. As the cell concentration in the microvessel increases, the shear stress variation structure changes accordingly with the two peaks from two close cells merging together, and eventually only one peak is observed at a hematocrit of 30.72%. However, the effect of hematocrit on the variation magnitude of shear stress is less obvious, and the dynamic nature of shear stress is still significant. This represents the first attempt to study the dynamic shear stress variation on microvessel as red blood cells flow by, and the information obtained in this study could be valuable to relevant research, for example, the mechanotransduction in the endothelia glycocalyx layer.

  12. Low Baseline CD4+ Count Is Associated With Greater Bone Mineral Density Loss After Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Philip M.; Kitch, Douglas; McComsey, Grace A.; Dube, Michael P.; Haubrich, Richard; Huang, Jeannie; Riddler, Sharon; Tebas, Pablo; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Collier, Ann C.; Brown, Todd T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Bone mineral density (BMD) decreases 2%–6% in the 2 years after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Pre-ART immune deficiency and early immune recovery may contribute to this loss. Methods. We pooled data from 3 studies of ART initiation in treatment-naive patients in which serial whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans were performed. We used linear regression to evaluate effects of baseline CD4+ and 16-week CD4+ change (both absolute and relative) on 96-week total BMD change from baseline. We performed multivariable linear regression to assess associations between baseline variables of age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), hepatitis C status, parent study, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA level, and assignment to a protease inhibitor (PI)– or tenofovir-containing regimen on 96-week total BMD change. Results. The included 796 subjects had mean 96-week total BMD loss of 2.0%. In multivariable analysis, baseline CD4+ cell count was significantly associated with 96-week BMD loss; individuals with baseline CD4+ <50 cells/µL lost significantly more BMD compared to those with CD4+ ≥500 cells/µL. A greater relative, but not absolute, 16-week increase in CD4+ count was significantly associated with greater declines in BMD, but not after controlling for baseline CD4+ count. In multivariable analysis, older age, female sex, lower BMI, higher HIV-1 RNA levels, and PI and tenofovir assignment were also associated with greater BMD decline. Conclusions. Low pretreatment CD4+ count, but not greater CD4+ count increase, is a strong and independent risk factor for bone loss after ART initiation. ART initiation at higher CD4+ counts may reduce the burden of osteoporosis and fragility fractures. PMID:23943825

  13. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2010-01-01

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble’s oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than UCA size. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA’s oscillation and the microvessel’s acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 micron vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1MPa and a center frequency of 1MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with the range of diameters considered in this work, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless the vessel diameter, however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a center frequency of 1MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 μm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease, however the

  14. LIPUS promotes spinal fusion coupling proliferation of type H microvessels in bone

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ximing; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yahong; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Yajun; Wei, Xianzhao; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been found to accelerate spinal fusion. Type H microvessels are found in close relation with bone development. We analyzed the role of type H vessels in rat spinal fusion model intervened by LIPUS. It was found LIPUS could significantly accelerate bone fusion rate and enlarge bone callus. Osteoblasts were specifically located on the bone meshwork of the allograft, and were surrounded by type H microvessels. LIPUS could significantly increase the quantity of osteoblasts during spine fusion, which process was coupled with elevated angiogenesis of type H microvessels. Our results suggest that LIPUS may be a noninvasive adjuvant treatment modality in spinal fusion for clinical use. The treatment is recommended for usage for at least one month. PMID:26830666

  15. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Shao-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Miao, Wen-yong; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun; Hu, Guang-yue Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-15

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions.

  16. Quenched dynamics in interacting one-dimensional systems: Appearance of current carrying steady states from initial domain wall density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Jarrett; Gull, Emanuel; Mitra, Aditi

    2011-03-01

    Dynamics arising after an interaction quench in the quantum sine-Gordon model is studied for the case of a system initially prepared in a spatially inhomogeneous domain wall state. The time-evolution of the density, current and equal time correlation functions are studied using the truncated Wigner approximation (TWA) to which quantum corrections are added in order to set the limits on its validity. For weak to moderate strengths of the back-scattering interaction, the domain wall is found to spread out ballistically with the system within the light cone reaching a non-equilibrium steady-state characterized by a net current flow. A steady state current is also found to exist for a quench at the exactly solvable Luther-Emery point. The magnitude of the current decreases with increasing strength of the back-scattering interaction. The two-point correlation function of the variable canonically conjugate to the density reaches a steady state which is spatially oscillating at a wavelength which is inversely related to the current. This was was supported by NSF-DMR (Award no. 1004589).

  17. Alpha-Adrenergic receptors in cerebral microvessels of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, H.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.; Magnoni, M.S.; Trabucchi, M.

    1985-03-01

    In rat cerebral microvessels, we characterized alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, using (/sup 3/H)prazosin and (/sup 3/H)-p-amino-clonidine as radioligands. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding to the cerebral microvessels was saturable and of high affinity (dissociation constant of 78 pM), with a maximum binding of 48 fmol/mg protein. (/sup 3/H)Prazosin binding reached equilibrium within 15 minutes and was dissociated by the addition of 10 microM phentolamine. The inhibitory effects of isomers of norepinephrine and epinephrine on the binding showed that l-isomers were over 10 times more potent than d-isomers. (/sup 3/H)-p-Amino-clonidine binding to the cerebral microvessels was saturable and of high affinity (K/sub D/ . 0.61 nM) with a B/sub max/ of 73 fmol/mg protein. The binding reached equilibrium within 30 minutes, and was dissociated by the addition of 100 microM l-norepinephrine. l-Isomers of norepinephrine and epinephrine were over 10 times more potent than d-isomers in displacing the binding. Thus, both (/sup 3/H)prazosin and (/sup 3/H)-p-amino-clonidine bindings to the cerebral microvessels were characterized by saturability, high affinity, reversibility, and stereo-specificity. Furthermore, the specificity of both binding sites was pharmacologically evaluated by the inhibitory effects of various adrenergic agonists and antagonists on the bindings. These data indicate the existence of alpha-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral microvessels and are consistent with the hypothesis that the cerebral microcirculation is regulated by adrenergic innervation. Furthermore, the receptors were measured in cerebral microvessels of spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto controls.

  18. Short-term priority over exotic annuals increases the initial density and longer-term cover of native perennial grasses.

    PubMed

    Vaughni, Kurt J; Young, Truman P

    2015-04-01

    Temporal priority can affect individual performance and reproduction, as well as community assembly, but whether these effects persist over time remains unclear, and their demographic mechanisms have been little explored. The continued dominance of exotic annual grasses in California has been commonly attributed to their demonstrated early germination and rapid early growth relative to native perennial grasses. This advantage may play a crucial role in the structure of California exotic annual grasslands, as well as in the practice of native grassland restoration. We tested whether a two-week planting advantage under field conditions increased individual survival, growth, and reproduction for four native perennial grass species and whether these effects persisted over three years. We show that short-term priority significantly increased the establishment success of' native perennial grasses. Increased density of native grass seedlings presaged later large increases in cover that were not evident in the first year after planting. Although priority effects at the individual level may diminish over time, short differences in emergence timing can have long-lasting effects on community structure. Earlier germination and faster initial growth of exotic annual species may help explain their unprecedented invasion and continued dominance of California grasslands. Finally, these results highlight the importance of priority effects for effective exotic annual control during native grassland restoration in California: initial control can increase the establishment of native perennial seedlings, which then results in long-term control by mature native individuals.

  19. Influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.; Markov, V. S.; Frank, A. G.

    2016-01-15

    The influence of the initial parameters of the magnetic field and plasma on the spatial structure of the electric current and electron density in current sheets formed in helium plasma in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations with X-type singular lines is studied by the methods of holographic interferometry and magnetic measurements. Significant differences in the structures of plasma and current sheets formed at close parameters of the initial plasma and similar configurations of the initial magnetic fields are revealed.

  20. Cardioscopic observation of subendocardial microvessels in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yasuto; Kanai, Masahito; Maezawa, Yuko; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Shirai, Seiichiro; Nakagawa, Osamu; Uchida, Yasumi

    2011-01-01

    Coronary microvessels play a direct and critical role in determining the extent and severity of myocardial ischemia and cardiac function. However, because direct observation has never been performed in vivo, the functional properties of the individual microvesssels in patients with coronary artery disease remain unknown. Subendocardial coronary microvessels were observed by cardioscopy in 149 successive patients with coronary artery disease (81 with stable angina and 68 with old myocardial infarction). Twenty-four arterial microvessels (AMs) and 27 venous microvessels (VMs) were observed in the left ventricular subendocardium. All 12 AMs and 13 of 14 VMs that were located in normokinetic-to-hypokinetic left ventricular wall segments were filled with blood during diastole and were collapsed during systole. In contrast, 8 of 12 AMs and 9 of 13 VMs that were located in akinetic-to-dyskinetic wall segments were filled with blood during systole and were collapsed during diastole. There were no significant correlations between the timing of blood filling and the severity of coronary stenosis and collateral development. In patients with coronary artery disease, the timing of blood filling of AMs and VMs was dependent on the regional left ventricular contractile state; during diastole when contraction was preserved and during systole when it was not. It remains to be elucidated whether and how blood filling is disturbed in other categories of heart disease.

  1. Glucose and fatty acid metabolism in normal and diabetic rabbit cerebral microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Hingorani, V.; Brecher, P.

    1987-05-01

    Rabbit cerebral microvessels were used to study fatty acid metabolism and its utilization relative to glucose. Microvessels were incubated with either (6-/sup 14/C)glucose or (1-/sup 14/C)oleic acid and the incorporation of radioactivity into /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, lactate, triglyceride, cholesterol ester, and phospholipid was determined. The inclusion of 5.5 mM glucose in the incubation mixture reduced oleate oxidation by 50% and increased esterification into both phospholipid and triglyceride. Glucose oxidation to CO/sub 2/ was reduced by oleate addition, whereas lactate production was unaffected. 2'-Tetradecylglycidic acid, an inhibitor of carnitine acyltransferase I, blocked oleic acid oxidation in the presence and absence of glucose. It did not effect fatty acid esterification when glucose was absent and eliminated the inhibition of oleate on glucose oxidation. Glucose oxidation to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was markedly suppressed in microvessels from alloxan-treated diabetic rabbits but lactate formation was unchanged. Fatty acid oxidation to CO/sub 2/ and incorporation into triglyceride, phospholipid, and cholesterol ester remained unchanged in the diabetic state. The experiments show that both fatty acid and glucose can be used as a fuel source by the cerebral microvessels, and the interactions found between fatty acid and glucose metabolism are similar to the fatty acid-glucose cycle, described previously.

  2. Quantifying Single Microvessel Permeability in Isolated Blood-perfused Rat Lung Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Kathirvel; Parthasarathi, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    The isolated blood-perfused lung preparation is widely used to visualize and define signaling in single microvessels. By coupling this preparation with real time imaging, it becomes feasible to determine permeability changes in individual pulmonary microvessels. Herein we describe steps to isolate rat lungs and perfuse them with autologous blood. Then, we outline steps to infuse fluorophores or agents via a microcatheter into a small lung region. Using these procedures described, we determined permeability increases in rat lung microvessels in response to infusions of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The data revealed that lipopolysaccharide increased fluid leak across both venular and capillary microvessel segments. Thus, this method makes it possible to compare permeability responses among vascular segments and thus, define any heterogeneity in the response. While commonly used methods to define lung permeability require postprocessing of lung tissue samples, the use of real time imaging obviates this requirement as evident from the present method. Thus, the isolated lung preparation combined with real time imaging offers several advantages over traditional methods to determine lung microvascular permeability, yet is a straightforward method to develop and implement. PMID:25045895

  3. Flow behavior of erythrocytes in microvessels and glass capillaries: effects of erythrocyte deformation and erythrocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Tateishi, N; Soutani, M; Maeda, N

    1996-01-01

    Flow behavior of erythrocytes in microvessels and glass capillaries with an inner diameter of 10-50 microns was compared in relation to erythrocyte deformation and erythrocyte aggregation. This study was focused on the formation of a marginal cell-free layer, and the thickness was determined using an image processor. Human erythrocytes were perfused through a part of microvascular networks isolated from rabbit mesentery and through glass capillaries. Erythrocyte deformability was modified by treating erythrocytes with diamide, diazene-dicarboxylic acid bis[N,N-dimethylamide], and erythrocyte aggregation was accelerated by adding dextran (with a molecular weight of 70,400) to the perfusion medium. The thickness of the cell-free layer increased with an increase of the inner diameter of flow channel, with lowering the hematocrit, and with increasing the flow velocity of erythrocytes, in both microvessels and glass capillaries. Furthermore, the thickness of cell-free layer decreased with decreasing erythrocyte deformability, while it increased with accelerating erythrocyte aggregation. However, the alteration of the cell-free layer in response to the changes of these hemorheological conditions was more sensitive in microvessels than in glass capillaries. The present study concludes that flow behavior of erythrocytes in microvessels is qualitatively similar to, but quantitatively different from those in glass capillaries, as far as evaluated by the change of the thickness of the marginal cell-free layer.

  4. Recording of lymph flow dynamics in microvessels using correlation properties of scattered coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, I V; Tuchin, Valerii V; Galanzha, E I; Solov'eva, A V; Stepanova, T V

    2002-11-30

    The direction-sensitive method of microflow velocity measurements based on the space - time correlation properties of the dynamic speckle field is described and used for in vivo monitoring of lymph flow in the vessels of rat mesentery. The results of measurements are compared with the data obtained from functional video microscopy of the microvessel region. (laser biology and medicine)

  5. Calponin and caldesmon cellular domains in reacting microvessels following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, Christian W; Morgan, Noah C; Petrov, Theodor; Rafols, Jose A

    2006-05-01

    Calponin (Cp) and caldesmon (Cd) are actin-binding proteins involved in the regulation of smooth muscle (SM) tone during blood vessel contraction. While in vitro studies have reported modifications of these proteins during vessel contractility, their role in vivo remains unclear. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes disruption of cerebral microvascular tone, leading to sustained contractility in reacting microvessels and cerebral hypoperfusion. This study aimed to determine the spatial and temporal expressions of Cp and Cd in rat cerebral cortical and hippocampal microvessels post-TBI. Reacting microvessels were analyzed in control, 4, 24, and 48 h post-injury. Single and double immunocytochemical techniques together with semiquantitative analyses revealed a Cp upregulation in SM at all time frames post-TBI; with the protein migrating from SM cytosol to the vicinity of the cell membrane. Similarly, Cd immunoreactivity significantly increased in both SM and endothelial cells (En). However, while Cp and Cd in SM remained elevated, their levels in En returned to normal at 48 h post-TBI. The results suggest that Cp and Cd levels increase while compartmentalizing to specific subcellular domains. These changes are temporally associated with modifications in the cytoskeleton and contractile apparatus of SM and En during blood vessel contractility. Furthermore, these changes may underlie the state of sustained contractility and hypoperfusion observed in reacting microvessels after TBI.

  6. Proteomic and transcriptomic study of brain microvessels in neonatal and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Porte, Baptiste; Chatelain, Clémence; Hardouin, Julie; Derambure, Céline; Zerdoumi, Yasmine; Hauchecorne, Michèle; Dupré, Nicolas; Bekri, Soumeya; Gonzalez, Bruno; Marret, Stéphane; Cosette, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Infants born before 29 weeks gestation incur a major risk of preterm encephalopathy and subependymal/intracerebral/intraventricular haemorrhage. In mice, an ontogenic window of haemorrhage risk was recorded up to 5 days after birth in serpine1 knock-out animals. Using proteome and transcriptome approaches in mouse forebrain microvessels, we previously described the remodelling of extracellular matrix and integrins likely strengthening the vascular wall between postnatal day 5 (P5) and P10. Haemorrhage is the ultimate outcome of vessel damage (i.e., during ischaemia), although discreet vessel insults may be involved in the aetiology of preterm encephalopathy. In this study, we examined proteins identified by mass spectrometry and segregating in gene ontology pathways in forebrain microvessels in P5, P10, and adult wild type mice. In parallel, comparative transcript levels were obtained using RNA hybridization microarrays and enriched biological pathways were extracted from genes exhibiting at least a two-fold change in expression. Five major biological functions were observed in those genes detected both as proteins and mRNA expression undergoing at least a two-fold change in expression in one or more age comparisons: energy metabolism, protein metabolism, antioxidant function, ion exchanges, and transport. Adult microvessels exhibited the highest protein and mRNA expression levels for a majority of genes. Energy metabolism–enriched gene ontology pathways pointed to the preferential occurrence of glycolysis in P5 microvessels cells versus P10 and adult preparations enriched in aerobic oxidative enzymes. Age-dependent levels of RNA coding transport proteins at the plasma membrane and mitochondria strengthened our findings based on protein data. The data suggest that immature microvessels have fewer energy supply alternatives to glycolysis than mature structures. In the context of high energy demand, this constraint might account for vascular damage and maintenance

  7. The Involvement of Pial Microvessels in Leukocyte Invasion after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Rongzi; Thomasian, Nicole; Chodobski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are not well understood, but likely involve neuroinflammation. Here the controlled cortical impact model of mTBI in rats was used to test this hypothesis. Mild TBI caused a rapid (within 6 h post-mTBI) upregulation of synthesis of TNF-α and IL-1β in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, followed by an increase in production of neutrophil (CXCL1–3) and monocyte (CCL2) chemoattractants. While astrocytes were not a significant source of CXC chemokines, they highly expressed CCL2. An increase in production of CXC chemokines coincided with the influx of neutrophils into the injured brain. At 6 h post-mTBI, we observed a robust influx of CCL2-expressing neutrophils across pial microvessels into the subarachnoid space (SAS) near the injury site. Mild TBI was not accompanied by any significant influx of neutrophils into the brain parenchyma until 24 h after injury. This was associated with an early induction of expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 on the endothelium of the ipsilateral pial, but not intraparenchymal, microvessels. At 6 h post-mTBI, we also observed a robust influx of neutrophils into the ipsilateral cistern of velum interpositum (CVI), a slit-shaped cerebrospinal fluid space located above the 3rd ventricle with highly vascularized pia mater. From SAS and CVI, neutrophils appeared to move along the perivascular spaces to enter the brain parenchyma. The monocyte influx was not observed until 24 h post-mTBI, and these inflammatory cells predominantly entered the ipsilateral SAS and CVI, with a limited invasion of brain parenchyma. These observations indicate that the endothelium of pial microvessels responds to injury differently than that of intraparenchymal microvessels, which may be associated with the lack of astrocytic ensheathment of cerebrovascular endothelium in pial microvessels. These findings also suggest that neuroinflammation represents the potential

  8. Relative blood velocity measurement in individual microvessels using the self-mixing effect in a fiber-coupled helium-neon laser.

    PubMed

    Ren, T; Nuttall, A L; Miller, J M

    1995-03-01

    A system has been developed for the measurement of relative blood velocity in micro-vessels by using the self-mixing effect of a laser. A helium-neon laser was coupled to a single-mode optical fiber and the pulled fiber tip (approximately 30 microns diameter) was positioned on a single microvessel. The backscattered Doppler-shifted laser light from moving red blood cells enters the laser cavity and modulates the laser output by influencing internal laser parameters. The signal of the laser output intensity change was produced using a fiber-coupled photodiode and processed by a signal processor. This processor yields an output signal proportional to the first moment of the power spectral density, i.e., the mean frequency of the Doppler shift, corresponding to the blood flow velocity on an arbitrary instrument scale. Results of the in vitro experiment demonstrated that the current method can detect moving particles in fluid and moving red blood cells in a small plastic tube. Data from the in vivo study showed that this system is capable of measuring relative blood velocity in arterioles and venules and can easily follow the cardiac cycle up to 360 beats/min. Primary data suggest that, in addition to high sensitivity, good spatial and temporal resolution, and convenience of use, the self-mixing technique may have an even greater capacity for analysis of blood flow in microvessels than explored in this study, since information on the absolute velocity and velocity distribution of red blood cells is available in self-mixing signal. Further study on its hematocrit dependence and particle bias effect is needed.

  9. Simulation of Deformation and Aggregation of Two Red Blood Cells in a Stenosed Microvessel by Dissipative Particle Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lanlan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shuo; Fu, Bingmei

    2016-12-01

    The motion of two red blood cells in a stenosed microvessel was simulated using dissipative particle dynamics. The effects of intercellular interaction, red blood cell deformability and the initial cell orientation on the deformation and aggregation of the RBCs and on the flow resistance were investigated. The red blood cell membrane was treated as a three-dimensional coarse-grained network model and the intercellular interaction was modeled by the Morse potential based on a depletion-mediated assumption. It is shown that the flow resistance increases dramatically when the red blood cells enter into the stenosis and decreases rapidly as RBCs move away from the stenosis. Particularly, for a pair of stiffer red blood cells with the initial inclination angle of 90°, the maximum value of the flow resistance is larger; while a higher flow resistance can also come from a stronger aggregation. For a pair of stiffer red blood cells moving parallel to the main flow, when their positions are closer to the vessel wall at the upstream of the stenosis, the flow resistance increases due to the migration to the vessel center at the stenosis. In addition, for a pair of red blood cells with the initial inclination angle of 0°, the flow resistance from the aggregate formed by a pair of red blood cells with a larger deformation is higher.

  10. Fracture Rates and Bone Density Among Postmenopausal Veteran and Non-Veteran Women From the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    LaFleur, Joanne; Rillamas-Sun, Eileen; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Knippenberg, Kristin A.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Gray, Shelly L.; Cauley, Jane A.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Postmenopausal osteoporosis can impact quality-of-life even prefracture. To determine whether osteoporosis should be a greater concern in women Veterans versus non-Veterans, we compared fracture rates and bone mineral density (BMD) for Veterans and non-Veterans using Women’s Health Initiative data. Design and Methods: In this cohort study, participants were women aged 50–79 years. Outcomes were hip, central body, and limb fractures occurring during up to 19 years of follow-up and hip, spine, and whole body BMD collected three times over a 6-year period in a participant subsample. Covariates comprised risk factors for fracture, including fall history and other components of the World Health Organization Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX). Cox Proportional Hazards models were used to examine fracture rates for Veterans compared with non-Veterans. Results: Of 161,808 women, 145,521 self-identified as Veteran (n = 3,719) or non-Veteran (n = 141,802). Baseline FRAX scores showed that Veterans had higher 10-year probabilities for any major fracture (13.3 vs 10.2; p < .01) and hip fracture (4.1 vs 2.2; p < .01) compared with non-Veterans. The age-adjusted rate of hip fracture per 1,000 person-years for Veterans was 3.3 versus 2.4 for non-Veterans (p < .01). After adjustment, the hazards ratio for hip fracture was 1.24 (95% confidence interval 1.03–1.49) for Veterans versus non-Veterans. Hazards ratios at other anatomic sites did not differ by Veteran status. Mean BMD at baseline and at Years 3 and 6 also did not differ by Veteran status at any site. Implications: Women Veterans had an increased hip fracture rate not explained by differences in well-recognized fracture risk factors. PMID:26768394

  11. Ultra-high Speed Optical Imaging of Ultrasound-activated Microbubbles in Mesenteric Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong

    Ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles have gained widespread applications in diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. Animal studies of bioeffects induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles have demonstrated that microbubbles can cause microvessel damage. Much scientific attention has been attracted to such microvascular bioeffects, not only because of the related safety concerns, but also because of the potential useful applications of microbubbles in the intravascular delivery of drugs and genetic materials into target tissues. A significant challenge in using microbubbles in medical ultrasound is the lack of knowledge about how the microbubbles behave in blood vessels when exposed to ultrasound and how their interactions with ultrasound cause vascular damage. Although extensive studies were performed in the past to study the dynamics of microbubbles, most of those studies were performed in vitro and did not directly address the clinical environment in which microbubbles are injected into blood vessels. In this thesis work, a synchronized optical-acoustic system was set up for ultrahigh speed imaging of insonated microbubbles in microvessels. The recorded images revealed the formation of microjets penetrating the microbubbles, as well as vessel distention (motion outward against the surrounding tissue) and vessel invagination (motion inward toward the lumen) caused by the expansion and collapse of the microbubbles, respectively. Contrary to current paradigms which propose that microbubbles damage vessels either by distending them or by forming liquid jets impinging on them, microbubbles translation and jetting were in the direction away from the nearest vessel wall; furthermore, invagination typically exceeded distention in arterioles and venules. Vessel invagination was found to be associated with vascular damage. These studies suggest that vessel invagination may be a newly discovered potential mechanism for vascular damage by ultrasound-activated microbubbles

  12. Bone Mineral Density as a Predictor of Subsequent Wrist Fractures: Findings From the Women's Health Initiative Study

    PubMed Central

    Hovey, Kathleen M.; Andrews, Christopher A.; Cauley, Jane A.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wright, Nicole C.; Li, Wenjun; Beavers, Kristen; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; LeBoff, Meryl S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Wrist fractures are common among postmenopausal women. Associations of bone mineral density (BMD) and 10-year predicted risk of major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) with wrist fractures are poorly characterized. Objective: The objective was to examine associations between the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX)-predicted risk of MOF, BMD, BMD change, and wrist fracture. Design: This was a prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 8.5 years. Setting: This study included 40 US centers. Participants: A total of 11 392 participants from the Women's Health Initiative BMD Cohort aged 50–79 years at baseline were included in this study. Interventions: None. Main Outcome: The goal was to measure incident wrist fracture. Results: A FRAX-predicted MOF risk ≥9.3% identified 17% of the women aged <65 years who subsequently experienced wrist fracture. Each one standard deviation lower BMD was associated with higher wrist fracture risk, with adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.66 (1.42–1.93) for femoral neck (FN) BMD and 1.45 (1.28–1.64) for lumbar spine BMD. Compared with FN BMD T score ≥ −1.0, wrist fracture adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) were: 1.51 (1.06–2.16) for a T score between −1.01 and −1.49; 1.93 (1.36–2.72) for T score between −1.50 and −1.99; 2.52 (1.77–3.60) for a T score between −2.00 and −2.49; and 2.65 (1.78–3.95) for a T score ≤ −2.5. Decrease in FN BMD between baseline and year 3 was associated with increased risk of subsequent wrist fracture; however, change in lumbar spine BMD was not. Conclusions: Lumbar spine and femoral neck BMDs were associated with incident wrist fracture, but the FRAX threshold recommended to identify screening candidates did not identify the majority of women who subsequently experienced wrist fracture. Improved understanding of determinants of wrist fractures is warranted. PMID:26367200

  13. Three-Dimensional Arrangement of Human Bone Marrow Microvessels Revealed by Immunohistology in Undecalcified Sections

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmi, Verena; Seiler, Anja; Lampp, Katrin; Neff, Andreas; Guthe, Michael; Lobachev, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    The arrangement of microvessels in human bone marrow is so far unknown. We combined monoclonal antibodies against CD34 and against CD141 to visualise all microvessel endothelia in 21 serial sections of about 1 cm2 size derived from a human iliac crest. The specimen was not decalcified and embedded in Technovit® 9100. In different regions of interest, the microvasculature was reconstructed in three dimensions using automatic methods. The three-dimensional models were subject to a rigid semiautomatic and manual quality control. In iliac crest bone marrow, the adipose tissue harbours irregularly distributed haematopoietic areas. These are fed by networks of large sinuses, which are loosely connected to networks of small capillaries prevailing in areas of pure adipose tissue. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that capillaries and sinuses in human iliac crest bone marrow are partially arranged in parallel. PMID:27997569

  14. Effect of heat transfer on rotating electroosmotic flow through a micro-vessel: haemodynamical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Mondal, A.; Shit, G. C.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes the heat transfer characteristics associated with electroosmotic flow of blood through a micro-vessel having permeable walls. The analysis is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for charge distributions and the Navier-Stokes equations are assumed to represent the flow field in a rotating system. The velocity slip condition at the vessel walls is taken into account. The essential features of the rotating electroosmotic flow of blood and associated heat transfer characteristics through a micro-vessel are clearly highlighted by the variation in the non-dimensional flow velocity, volumetric flow rate and non-dimensional temperature profiles. Moreover, the effect of Joule heating parameter and Prandtl number on the thermal transport characteristics are discussed thoroughly. The study reveals that the flow of blood is appreciably influenced by the elctroosmotic parameter as well as rotating Reynolds number.

  15. Local RBC aggregation disturbing blood fluidity and causing stasis in microvessels.

    PubMed

    McHedlishvili, George; Varazashvili, Manana; Gobejishvili, Leila

    2002-01-01

    Experiments in rat mesenterium were carried out under conditions when both pressure gradient in the chosen microvessels and their diameters were preserved constant. All details of the hemorheological events were directly visualized and documented by usage of appropriate microscopic video techniques. Intensified RBC aggregation locally produced in individual capillaries, immediately disturbs the normal blood flow structure inside their lumina and deranges the rheological properties of blood flow in the microvessels, which slows down till a full stop. The RBC aggregates gradually grow up due to addition of new cells, which become compressed and appear homogeneous. This usually interferes with restoration of blood flow in capillaries. Further the RBC aggregates can move slowly towards veins, while the flow accelerates immediately as soon as the aggregates reach the larger venules.

  16. Microvessel reactivity changes in light-diode irradiation of blood (470 to 980 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Nikolai N.; Yantareva, Ludmila I.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of distant light diode irradiation with various spectrums of the trunk vessels on reactivity of microvessels in the small intestine mesentery treated with threshold doses of norepinephrine (NoE) are compared. The character of changes in reactivity of microvessels to NoE was found to depend on the wave length and irradiation dose. Ultraviolet irradiation (470 nm, 0.03 J/sm2) was noticed to increase reactivity of the vessels to NoE (vasoconstriction increase). In green light irradiation (540 nm, 0.3 J/sm2 sm2) no changes in reactivity were observed. Red light irradiation (670 nm, 2.0 J/sm2), infrared particular (980 nm, 1.0 J/sm2), lowered reactivity to NoE. Thus, noninvasive light-diode irradiation of the blood results in different systemic changes of endothelial dependent reactivity of microcirculation due to specify of photochemical processes involved.

  17. Effects of curvature and cell-cell interaction on cell adhesion in microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yan, W W; Liu, Y; Fu, B M

    2010-10-01

    It has been found that both circulating blood cells and tumor cells are more easily adherent to curved microvessels than straight ones. This motivated us to investigate numerically the effect of the curvature of the curved vessel on cell adhesion. In this study, the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and the cell dynamics was governed by the Newton's law of translation and rotation. The adhesive dynamics model involved the effect of receptor-ligand bonds between circulating cells and endothelial cells (ECs). It is found that the curved vessel would increase the simultaneous bond number, and the probability of cell adhesion is increased consequently. The interaction between traveling cells would also affect the cell adhesion significantly. For two-cell case, the simultaneous bond number of the rear cell is increased significantly, and the curvature of microvessel further enhances the probability of cell adhesion.

  18. Effects of Interleukin-6 on the Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in Isolated Cerebral Microvessels from Yearling and Adult Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Susan S.; Min, May; Cummings, Erin E.; Chen, Xiaodi; Sadowska, Grazyna B.; Sharma, Surendra; Stonestreet, Barbara S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The blood-brain barrier is a selective diffusion barrier between brain parenchyma and the intravascular compartment. Tight junctions (TJs) are integral components of the blood-brain barrier. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important in the pathogenesis of brain injury and could modify the protein constituents of TJs. We hypothesized that IL-6 down-regulates key protein constituents of endothelial TJs (e.g., occludin and claudin-5). Methods We examined the effects of IL-6 on TJ protein expression using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. We isolated microvessels from yearling and adult ovine cerebral cortex and placed them into culture with IL-6 concentrations of 0 (control, phosphate buffered saline), 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL for 24 hours. Cerebral microvessels were harvested, Western immunoblot performed for occludin and claudin-5, densitometry performed, and results expressed as a ratio to control values. Results Western immunoblot analysis showed that treatment with 100 ng/ml of IL-6, but not the lower concentrations, reduced (P<0.05) occludin expression in microvessels from yearling and adult sheep, and claudin-5 in microvessels from adult sheep However, treatment with 10 ng/ml of IL-6 increased claudin-5 in microvessels from yearling sheep. The percent of lactate dehydrogenase released from the microvessels into the surrounding media was not increased by IL-6 treatment, suggesting that the reductions in TJ proteins did not result from cell death. Treatment of adult cerebral cortical microvessels with IL-6 pre-incubated with anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies partially attenuated the reduction in claudin-5. Conclusion We conclude that IL-6 modulates tight junction protein expression in cerebral cortical microvessels from yearling and adult sheep. PMID:23867217

  19. Cell-free layer and wall shear stress variation in microvessels.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xuewen; Zhang, Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we simulated multiple red blood cells flowing through straight microvessels with the immersed-boundary lattice-Boltzmann model to examine the shear stress variation on the microvessel surface and its relation to the properties of cell-free layer. Significant variation in shear stress has been observed due to the irregular configuration of blood cells flowing near the microvessel wall. A low shear stress is typically found at locations where there is a cell flowing close to the wall, and a large shear stress at locations with a relatively wide gap between cell and wall. This relationship between the shear stress magnitude and the distance between cell and wall has been attributed to the reverse pressure difference developed between the front and rear sides of a cell flowing near the vessel wall. We further studied the effects of several hemodynamic factors on the variation of shear stress, including the cell deformability, the flow rate, and the aggregation among red blood cells. These simulations show that the shear stress variation is less profound in situations with wider cell-free layers, since the reverse pressure difference around the edge cells is less evident, and the influence of this pressure difference on wall shear stress becomes weaker. This study also demonstrates the complexity of the flow field in the gap between cell and wall. More precise experimental techniques are required accurately measure such shear stress variation in microcirculation.

  20. Implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting in permeable microvessels: Comparison of two-fluid statistical transport model with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChiBin, Zhang; XiaoHui, Lin; ZhaoMin, Wang; ChangBao, Wang

    2017-03-01

    In experiments and theoretical analyses, this study examines the capture efficiency (CE) of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) for implant-assisted magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) in microvessels. It also proposes a three-dimensional statistical transport model of MDCPs for IA-MDT in permeable microvessels, which describes blood flow by the two-fluid (Casson and Newtonian) model. The model accounts for the permeable effect of the microvessel wall and the coupling effect between the blood flow and tissue fluid flow. The MDCPs move randomly through the microvessel, and their transport state is described by the Boltzmann equation. The regulated changes and factors affecting the CE of the MDCPs in the assisted magnetic targeting were obtained by solving the theoretical model and by experimental testing. The CE was negatively correlated with the blood flow velocity, and positively correlated with the external magnetic field intensity and microvessel permeability. The predicted CEs of the MDCPs were consistent with the experimental results. Additionally, under the same external magnetic field, the predicted CE was 5-8% higher in the IA-MDT model than in the model ignoring the permeability effect of the microvessel wall.

  1. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Adam R.; Atkinson, Rachel L.; Reddy, Jay P.; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li; Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae; Atkinson, Bradley J.; Brewster, Abeena; Ueno, Naoto T.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients

  2. Intratumoral α-SMA enhances the prognostic potency of CD34 associated with maintenance of microvessel integrity in hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Quan; Liu, Liang; Xu, Hua-Xiang; Luo, Guo-Pei; Chen, Tao; Wu, Chun-Tao; Xu, Yong-Feng; Xu, Jin; Liu, Chen; Zhang, Bo; Long, Jiang; Tang, Zhao-You; Yu, Xian-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Microvessel density (MVD) as an angiogenesis predictor is inefficient per se in cancer prognosis. We evaluated prognostic values of combining intratumoral alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive stromal cell density and MVD after curative resection in hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hypovascular pancreatic cancer (PC). Tissue microarrays were constructed from tumors of 305 HCC and 57 PC patients who underwent curative resection and analyzed for α-SMA and CD34 expression by immunostaining. Prognostic values of these two proteins and other clinicopathological features were examined. Both low α-SMA density and high MVD-CD34 were associated in HCC with the presence of intrahepatic metastasis and microvascular invasion, and they were related to lymph node involvement and microvascular invasion in PC (p<0.05). Although CD34 alone, but not α-SMA, was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival and recurrence-free survival, the combination of low α-SMA and high CD34 was a predictor of worst prognosis for both types of tumors and had a better power to predict patient death and early recurrence (p<0.01). Furthermore, the results show that distribution of most of the α-SMA-positive cells and vascular endothelial cells overlap, showing major colocalization on vascular walls. Poor microvessel integrity, as indicated by high MVD, together with low perivascular α-SMA-positive cell coverage is associated with early recurrence, unfavorable metastasis, and short survival after tumor resection. This finding highlights the significance of vascular quality in tumor progression, which provides an optimized complement to vascular quantity in prognosis of postoperative patients.

  3. Population age and initial density in a patchy environment affect the occurrence of abrupt transitions in a birth-and-death model of Taylor's law

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, Jiang; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Zhang, B.; Cohen, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Taylor's power law describes an empirical relationship between the mean and variance of population densities in field data, in which the variance varies as a power, b, of the mean. Most studies report values of b varying between 1 and 2. However, Cohen (2014a) showed recently that smooth changes in environmental conditions in a model can lead to an abrupt, infinite change in b. To understand what factors can influence the occurrence of an abrupt change in b, we used both mathematical analysis and Monte Carlo samples from a model in which populations of the same species settled on patches, and each population followed independently a stochastic linear birth-and-death process. We investigated how the power relationship responds to a smooth change of population growth rate, under different sampling strategies, initial population density, and population age. We showed analytically that, if the initial populations differ only in density, and samples are taken from all patches after the same time period following a major invasion event, Taylor's law holds with exponent b=1, regardless of the population growth rate. If samples are taken at different times from patches that have the same initial population densities, we calculate an abrupt shift of b, as predicted by Cohen (2014a). The loss of linearity between log variance and log mean is a leading indicator of the abrupt shift. If both initial population densities and population ages vary among patches, estimates of b lie between 1 and 2, as in most empirical studies. But the value of b declines to ~1 as the system approaches a critical point. Our results can inform empirical studies that might be designed to demonstrate an abrupt shift in Taylor's law.

  4. Modeling and Validation of the Thermal Response of TDI Encapsulating Foam as a function of Initial Density

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, Amanda B.; Larsen, Marvin E.

    2014-09-01

    TDI foams of nominal density from 10 to 45 pound per cubic foot were decomposed within a heated stainless steel container. The pressure in the container and temperatures measured by thermocouples were recorded with each test proceeding to an allowed maximum pressure before venting. Two replicate tests for each of four densities and two orientations in gravity produced very consistent pressure histories. Some thermal responses demonstrate random sudden temperature increases due to decomposition product movement. The pressurization of the container due to the generation of gaseous products is more rapid for denser foams. When heating in the inverted orientation, where gravity is in the opposite direction of the applied heat flux, the liquefied decomposition products move towards the heated plate and the pressure rises more rapidly than in the upright configuration. This effect is present at all the densities tested but becomes more pronounced as density of the foam is decreased. A thermochemical material model implemented in a transient conduction model solved with the finite element method was compared to the test data. The expected uncertainty of the model was estimated using the mean value method and importance factors for the uncertain parameters were estimated. The model that was assessed does not consider the effect of liquefaction or movement of gases. The result of the comparison is that the model uncertainty estimates do not account for the variation in orientation (no gravitational affects are in the model) and therefore the pressure predictions are not distinguishable due to orientation. Temperature predictions were generally in good agreement with the experimental data. Predictions for response locations on the outside of the can benefit from reliable estimates associated with conduction in the metal. For the lighter foams, temperatures measured on the embedded component fall well with the estimated uncertainty intervals indicating the energy transport

  5. Direct phase selection of initial phases from single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) for the improvement of electron density and ab initio structure determination

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chung-De; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Chiang, Hsin-Lin; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-01

    A novel direct phase-selection method to select optimized phases from the ambiguous phases of a subset of reflections to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases has been developed. With the improved phases, the completeness of built residues of protein molecules is enhanced for efficient structure determination. Optimization of the initial phasing has been a decisive factor in the success of the subsequent electron-density modification, model building and structure determination of biological macromolecules using the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method. Two possible phase solutions (ϕ{sub 1} and ϕ{sub 2}) generated from two symmetric phase triangles in the Harker construction for the SAD method cause the well known phase ambiguity. A novel direct phase-selection method utilizing the θ{sub DS} list as a criterion to select optimized phases ϕ{sub am} from ϕ{sub 1} or ϕ{sub 2} of a subset of reflections with a high percentage of correct phases to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases ϕ{sub SAD} has been developed. Based on this work, reflections with an angle θ{sub DS} in the range 35–145° are selected for an optimized improvement, where θ{sub DS} is the angle between the initial phase ϕ{sub SAD} and a preliminary density-modification (DM) phase ϕ{sub DM}{sup NHL}. The results show that utilizing the additional direct phase-selection step prior to simple solvent flattening without phase combination using existing DM programs, such as RESOLVE or DM from CCP4, significantly improves the final phases in terms of increased correlation coefficients of electron-density maps and diminished mean phase errors. With the improved phases and density maps from the direct phase-selection method, the completeness of residues of protein molecules built with main chains and side chains is enhanced for efficient structure determination.

  6. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  7. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES

    Merritt, E. C.; Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; ...

    2015-06-24

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varyingmore » two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. In addition, we also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.« less

  8. Modifying mixing and instability growth through the adjustment of initial conditions in a high-energy-density counter-propagating shear experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, E. C. Doss, F. W.; Loomis, E. N.; Flippo, K. A.; Kline, J. L.

    2015-06-15

    Counter-propagating shear experiments conducted at the OMEGA Laser Facility have been evaluating the effect of target initial conditions, specifically the characteristics of a tracer foil located at the shear boundary, on Kelvin-Helmholtz instability evolution and experiment transition toward nonlinearity and turbulence in the high-energy-density (HED) regime. Experiments are focused on both identifying and uncoupling the dependence of the model initial turbulent length scale in variable-density turbulence models of k-ϵ type on competing physical instability seed lengths as well as developing a path toward fully developed turbulent HED experiments. We present results from a series of experiments controllably and independently varying two initial types of scale lengths in the experiment: the thickness and surface roughness (surface perturbation scale spectrum) of a tracer layer at the shear interface. We show that decreasing the layer thickness and increasing the surface roughness both have the ability to increase the relative mixing in the system, and thus theoretically decrease the time required to begin transitioning to turbulence in the system. We also show that we can connect a change in observed mix width growth due to increased foil surface roughness to an analytically predicted change in model initial turbulent scale lengths.

  9. The Natural Frequency of Nonlinear Oscillation of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound Contrast Agent (UCAs) are under intensive investigation for their applications in physiological and molecular imaging and drug delivery. Prediction of the natural frequency of the oscillation of UCAs in microvessels has drawn increasing attention. To our knowledge, the existing models to predict the natural frequency of oscillation of UCAs in microvessels all apply the linear approximation and treat the blood vessel wall as a rigid boundary. In the potential applications of ultrasound imaging drug and gene delivery, the compliance of small vessels may play an important role in the bubble’s oscillation. The goal of this work is to provide a lumped-parameter model to study the natural frequency of nonlinear oscillation of UCAs in microvessels. Three types of the blood vessel conditions have been considered. i.e. rigid vessels, normal compliable vessels and vessels with increasing stiffness that could correspond to tumor vasculature. The corresponding bubble oscillation frequencies in the vessels with radius less than 100 μm are examined in detail. When a bubble with a radius of 4 μm is confined in a compliable vessel (inner radius 5 μm and length 100μm), the natural frequency of bubble oscillation increases by a factor of 1.7 as compared with a bubble in an unbounded field. The natural frequency of oscillation of a bubble in a compliable vessel increases with decreasing vessel size while decreasing with increasing values of vessel rigidity. This model suggests that contrast agent size, blood vessel size distribution and the type of vasculature should be comprehensively considered for choosing the transmitted frequency in ultrasound contrast imaging and drug delivery. PMID:17478030

  10. Photoacoustic simulation of microvessel bleeding: spectral analysis and its implication for monitoring vascular-targeted treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadhel, Muhannad N.; Hysi, Eno; Zalev, Jason; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    The destruction of blood vessels is a commonly used cancer therapeutic strategy. Bleeding consequently follows and leads to the accumulation of blood in the interstitium. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is well positioned to detect bleeding due to its sensitivity to hemoglobin. After treatment vascular disruption can occur within just a few hours, which leads to bleeding which might be detected using PA to assess therapeutic effectiveness. Deep micro-vessels cannot typically be resolved using acoustic-resolution PA. However, spectral analysis of PA signals may still permit assessment of bleeding. This paper introduces a theoretical model to simulate the PA signals from disrupted vessels using a fractal model. The fractal model uses bifurcated-cylinder bases to represent vascular trees. Vessels have circular absorption cross-sections. To mimic bleeding from blood vessels, the diffusion of hemoglobin from micro-vessels was simulated. The PA signals were computed and in the simulations were detected using a linear array transducer (30 MHz center frequency) for four different vascular trees (at 256 axial spatial locations/tree). The Fourier Transform of each beam-formed PA signal was computed and the power spectra were fitted to a straight line within the -6 dB bandwidth of the receiving transducer. When comparing the power spectra before and after simulated bleeding, the spectral slope and mid-band fit (MBF) parameters decreased by 0.12 dB/MHz and 2.12 dB, while the y-intercept did not change after 1 hour of simulated bleeding. The results suggest that spectral PA analysis is sensitive to changes in the concentration and spatial distribution of hemoglobin in tissue, and changes due to bleeding can be detected without the need to resolve individual vessels. The simulations support the applicability of PA imaging in cancer treatment monitoring by detecting micro-vessel disruption.

  11. A comparative study of the spatial distribution of mast cells and microvessels in the foetal, adult human thymus and thymoma.

    PubMed

    Raica, Marius; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nico, Beatrice; Guidolin, Diego; Ribatti, Domenico

    2010-02-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are widely distributed in human and animal tissues and have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis in normal and pathological conditions. Few data are available about the relationship between MCs and blood vessels in the normal human thymus, and there are virtually no data about their distribution and significance in thymoma. The aim of this study was to analyse the spatial distribution of MCs and microvessels in the normal foetal and adult thymus and thymoma. Twenty biopsy specimens of human thymus, including foetal and adult normal thymus and thymoma were analysed. Double staining with CD34 and mast cell tryptase was used to count both mast cells and microvessels in the same fields. Computer-assisted image analysis was performed to characterize the spatial distribution of MCs and blood vessels in selected specimens. Results demonstrated that MCs were localized exclusively to the medulla. Their number was significantly higher in thymoma specimens as compared with adult and foetal normal specimens respectively. In contrast the microvessel area was unchanged. The analysis of the spatial distribution and relationship between MCs and microvessels revealed that only in the thymoma specimens was there a significant spatial association between MCs and microvessels. Overall, these data suggest that MCs do not contribute significantly to the development of the vascular network in foetal and adult thymus, whereas in thymoma they show a close relationship to blood vessels. This could be an expression of their involvement not only in endothelial cells but also in tumour cell proliferation.

  12. Modeling and simulation of illumination effects for evaluation of microvessels of the conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Wick, C E; Loew, M H; Kurantsin-Mills, J

    1996-09-01

    We present the development of a comprehensive model that was undertaken to determine the relationships between the components of an image and the light intensity values present in the image of the microvessels of translucent tissues such as the bulbar conjunctiva. Experiments were conducted during the modeling process by use of a cylindrical microvessel embedded in a diffuse medium (phantom) on a reflecting background to affirm model components and simulations. The three-dimensional model was reduced to a single illumination plane with four regions of interest and modeled as Lambertian radiators and surfaces. The modeling showed that the top of the cylinder and its immediate vicinity are diffuse reflectors of light from the source plus light reflected from the background. The limbus of the cylinder is a diffuse reflector of the source and background illumination and a specular reflector of background reflections that achieve a high grazing angle with the cylinder. The immediate vicinity of the cylinder receives direct illumination from the source, but the light is partially obscured by the cylinder. The region beyond the shadow of the cylinder is a diffuse reflector of the overhead light. The diffuse medium additionally reflects the source and also attenuates the illumination reaching the other compo- rents of the scene. The direct and reflected illumination at each region of the model was calculated by use of specific geometric relationships. To verify those calculations, we analyzed a video simulation for the effects of different illumination conditions and their contributing elements. Intensity values were calculated from the relative reflectivity data determined from the video signals. The illumination values at the points along the line at the meridian of the cylinder were due to its reflectivity and also that of the medium. Similarly, the values of points distant from the shadow of the cylinder were due to the reflectivity of the background and the medium

  13. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the suggestions by Chabrier et al. (1987) and Steardo and Nathanson (1987) that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain, the ANP receptors in primary cultures of bovine brain microvessel endothelian cells were quantitated and characterized. Results of partition binding studies and the effect of cGMP additions indicated the presence of at least two types of ANP receptors, with the majority of the receptors being the nonguanylate cyclase coupled receptors. The presence of at least two ANP receptor types suggests an active role for ANP in regulating brain endothelial cell function.

  14. Tobacco outlet density and demographics at the tract level of analysis in Iowa: implications for environmentally based prevention initiatives.

    PubMed

    Schneider, John E; Reid, Robert J; Peterson, N Andrew; Lowe, John B; Hughey, Joseph

    2005-12-01

    This study assessed the geographic association between tobacco outlet density and three demographic correlates-income, race, and ethnicity-at the tract level of analysis for one county in the Midwestern United States. Data for residential census tracts in a Midwestern U.S. county were derived from year 2003 licenses for 474 tobacco outlets. Demographic variables were based on 2000 census data. Census tracts with lower median household income, higher percent of African American residents, and higher percent of Latinos residents had greater density of tobacco selling retail outlets. Areas characterized by lower income and disproportionately more African Americans and Latinos have greater physical access to tobacco products. Physical access to tobacco is a critical public-health issue because, given that smokers have been shown to be price sensitive, lowering access costs (e.g., reduced travel time) is likely to increase consumption. Findings also suggest the need for structural or environmental interventions, i.e., tobacco outlet zoning laws, to mitigate the health consequences associated with tobacco use in certain populations and geographic regions.

  15. Magnetic targeting in the impermeable microvessel with two-phase fluid model--non-Newtonian characteristics of blood.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sachin; Murthy, P V S N

    2010-09-01

    The present investigation deals with finding the trajectories of the drug dosed magnetic carrier particle in a microvessel with two-phase fluid model which is subjected to the external magnetic field. The radius of the microvessel is divided into the endothelial glycocalyx layer in which the blood is assumed to obey Newtonian character and a core and plug regions where the blood obeys the non-Newtonian Herschel-Bulkley character which is suitable for the microvessel of radius 50 microm. The carrier particles, bound with nanoparticles and drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from malignant tissue, and captured at the tumor site using a local applied magnetic field. The applied magnetic field is produced by a cylindrical magnet positioned outside the body and near the tumor position. The expressions for the fluidic force for the carrier particle traversing in the two-phase fluid in the microvessel and the magnetic force due to the external magnetic field are obtained. Several factors that influence the magnetic targeting of the carrier particles in the microvasculature, such as the size of the carrier particle, the volume fraction of embedded magnetic nanoparticles, and the distance of separation of the magnet from the axis of the microvessel are considered in the present problem. An algorithm is given to solve the system of coupled equations for trajectories of the carrier particle in the invasive case. The trajectories of the carrier particle are found for both invasive and noninvasive targeting systems. A comparison is made between the trajectories in these cases. Also, the present results are compared with the data available for the impermeable microvessel with single-phase fluid flow. Also, a prediction of the capture of therapeutic magnetic nanoparticle in the impermeable microvasculature is made for different radii, distances and volume fractions in both the invasive and noninvasive cases.

  16. Platelet-mediated adhesion facilitates leukocyte sequestration in hypoxia-reoxygenated microvessels.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Senfeng; Cao, Yanting; Zhang, Wenjian; Liu, Honglin; You, Jia; Yin, Yiqing; Lou, Jinning; Li, Chenghui

    2016-03-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration and sequestration are two distinct outcomes following leukocyte adhesion to endothelium during ischemia-reperfusion injury, in which platelets may play a pivotal role. In the present study, we established an in vitro hypoxia-reoxygenation model to mimic ischemia-reperfusion injury and found platelet pre-incubation significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells after hyoxia-reoxygenation (over 67%). Blockade of endothelial-cell-expressed adhesion molecules inhibited leukocyte direct adhesion to endothelial cells, while platelet-mediated leukocyte adhesion was suppressed by blockade of platelet-expressed adhesion molecules. Further experiments revealed platelets acted as a bridge to mediate leukocyte adhesion, and platelet-mediated adhesion was the predominant pattern in the presence of platelets. However, platelet pre-incubation significantly suppressed leukocyte transendothelial migration after hypoxia-reoxygenation (over 31%), which could be aggravated by blockade of endothelial-cell-expressed adhesion molecules, but alleviated by blockade of platelet- expressed adhesion molecules. This would indicate that platelet-mediated adhesion disrupted leukocyte transendothelial migration. An in vivo mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion model demonstrated leukocyte transfusion alone caused mild leukocyte adhesion to reperfused vessels and subsequent leukocyte infiltration, while simultaneous leukocyte and platelet transfusion led to massive leukocyte adhesion and sequestration within reperfused microvessels. Our studies revealed platelets enhanced leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, but suppressed leukocyte transendothelial migration. Overall, this leads to leukocyte sequestration in hypoxia-reoxygenated microvessels.

  17. Fabrication of a modular hybrid chip to mimic endothelial-lined microvessels in flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitingolo, Gabriele; Vecchione, Raffaele; Falanga, Andrea P.; Guarnieri, Daniela; Netti, Paolo A.

    2017-03-01

    In vitro microvessel models exploiting microfluidic channels have been developed to replicate cardiovascular flow conditions and to more closely mimic the blood vessels by traditionally using plasma or solvent evaporation bonding methods. The drawback of these methods is represented by an irreversible sealing which prevents internal accessibility as well as the reuse of the device. This paper presents a novel, simple, and low cost procedure to fabricate a modular and reusable chip with endotheliazed microvessels in a hybrid configuration based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and polydimethylsiloxane presenting a temporary magnetic bonding. In details, small magnets are embedded in the two poly(methyl methacrylate) substrates each of them carrying a thin polydimethylsiloxane layer which provides enhanced sealing during flow conditions as compared to conventional procedures and makes the microchannels circular as preferred in cell culture. Finally, an endothelial cell layer is formed by culturing brain endothelial bEnd.3 cells inside the proposed microchannels and characterized upon microchannel aperture, demonstrating the preservation of the cell layer.

  18. 3-D visualization and quantitation of microvessels in transparent human colorectal carcinoma [corrected].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-An; Pan, Shien-Tung; Hou, Yung-Chi; Shen, Ming-Yin; Peng, Shih-Jung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng; Chung, Yuan-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic analysis of tumor vasculature plays an important role in understanding the progression and malignancy of colorectal carcinoma. However, due to the geometry of blood vessels and their connections, standard microtome-based histology is limited in providing the spatial information of the vascular network with a 3-dimensional (3-D) continuum. To facilitate 3-D tissue analysis, we prepared transparent human colorectal biopsies by optical clearing for in-depth confocal microscopy with CD34 immunohistochemistry. Full-depth colons were obtained from colectomies performed for colorectal carcinoma. Specimens were prepared away from (control) and at the tumor site. Taking advantage of the transparent specimens, we acquired anatomic information up to 200 μm in depth for qualitative and quantitative analyses of the vasculature. Examples are given to illustrate: (1) the association between the tumor microstructure and vasculature in space, including the perivascular cuffs of tumor outgrowth, and (2) the difference between the 2-D and 3-D quantitation of microvessels. We also demonstrate that the optically cleared mucosa can be retrieved after 3-D microscopy to perform the standard microtome-based histology (H&E staining and immunohistochemistry) for systematic integration of the two tissue imaging methods. Overall, we established a new tumor histological approach to integrate 3-D imaging, illustration, and quantitation of human colonic microvessels in normal and cancerous specimens. This approach has significant promise to work with the standard histology to better characterize the tumor microenvironment in colorectal carcinoma.

  19. Radiation initiated graft copolymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone and acrylamide onto low density polyethylene films by individual and binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, N. H.; Dessuoki, A. M.; El-Arnaouty, M. B.

    1998-10-01

    A study has been made for the preparation of membranes by the direct radiation grafting of N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP), acrylamide (AAm) and its comonomer onto low density polyethylene (LDPE) films. The factors affecting the grafting process such as solvent, inhibitor, radiation dose, dose rate, monomer and comonomer concentrations on the grafting yield were studied. Dioxane was chosen as a diluent and the addition of any inhibitor failed in this grafting system. The optimum comonomer composition at which the highest grafting yield was obtained, was found to be (20/80 wt% of AAm/NVP) comonomer. The dependence of the grafting rate upon NVP, AAm and its comonomer concentration for comonomer composition (50/50 and 20/80 AAm/NVP) was found to be 1.7, 1.44, 1.9 and 1.7 order, respectively. Some selective properties of the graft copolymers such as, swelling behaviour, electrical and mechanical properties were investigated. On the other hand, the thermal stability of these membranes was measured by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). An improvement of these properties was observed which makes possible the use of these membranes in some practical applications such as the removal of some heavy metals from waste water.

  20. High energy emission of GRB 130821A: Constraining the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming; Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas

    2014-02-01

    GRB 130821A was detected by Fermi-GBM/LAT, Konus-WIND, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, RHESSI and Mars Odyssey-HEND. Although the data of GRB 130821A are very limited, we show in this work that the high energy γ-ray emission (i.e., above 100 MeV) alone imposes tight constraint on the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow. The temporal behavior of the high energy γ-ray emission is consistent with the forward shock synchrotron radiation model, and the circum-burst medium likely has a constant-density profile. The Lorentz factor is about a few hundred, similar to other bright GRBs.

  1. Quenched dynamics in interacting one-dimensional systems: Appearance of current-carrying steady states from initial domain wall density profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Jarrett; Gull, Emanuel; Mitra, Aditi

    2010-12-01

    We investigate dynamics arising after an interaction quench in the quantum sine-Gordon model for a one-dimensional system initially prepared in a spatially inhomogeneous domain wall state. We study the time evolution of the density, current, and equal time correlation functions using the truncated Wigner approximation to which quantum corrections are added in order to set the limits on its validity. For weak to moderate strengths of the backscattering interaction, the domain wall spreads out ballistically with the system within the light cone reaching a nonequilibrium steady state characterized by a net current flow. A steady-state current exists for a quench at the exactly solvable Luther-Emery point. The magnitude of the current decreases with increasing strength of the backscattering interaction. The two-point correlation function of the variable canonically conjugate to the density reaches a spatially oscillating steady state at a wavelength inversely related to the current.

  2. Sensitivity of mesoscale-model forecast skill to some initial-data characteristics, data density, data position, analysis procedure and measurement error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Thomas T.; Key, Lawrence E.; Lario, Annette M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of horizontal and vertical data resolution, data density, data location, different objective analysis algorithms, and measurement error on mesoscale-forecast accuracy are studied with observing-system simulation experiments. Domain-averaged errors are shown to generally decrease with time. It is found that the vertical distribution of error growth depends on the initial vertical distribution of the error itself. Larger gravity-inertia wave noise is produced in forecasts with coarser vertical data resolution. The use of a low vertical resolution observing system with three data levels leads to more forecast errors than moderate and high vertical resolution observing systems with 8 and 14 data levels. Also, with poor vertical resolution in soundings, the initial and forecast errors are not affected by the horizontal data resolution.

  3. BANYAN. IX. The Initial Mass Function and Planetary-mass Object Space Density of the TW HYA Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Malo, Lison; Doyon, René; Filippazzo, Joseph C.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Donaldson, Jessica K.; Lépine, Sébastien; Lafrenière, David; Artigau, Étienne; Burgasser, Adam J.; Looper, Dagny; Boucher, Anne; Beletsky, Yuri; Camnasio, Sara; Brunette, Charles; Arboit, Geneviève

    2017-02-01

    A determination of the initial mass function (IMF) of the current, incomplete census of the 10 Myr-old TW Hya association (TWA) is presented. This census is built from a literature compilation supplemented with new spectra and 17 new radial velocities from ongoing membership surveys, as well as a reanalysis of Hipparcos data that confirmed HR 4334 (A2 Vn) as a member. Although the dominant uncertainty in the IMF remains census incompleteness, a detailed statistical treatment is carried out to make the IMF determination independent of binning while accounting for small number statistics. The currently known high-likelihood members are fitted by a log-normal distribution with a central mass of {0.21}-0.06+0.11 M ⊙ and a characteristic width of {0.8}-0.1+0.2 dex in the 12 M Jup–2 M ⊙ range, whereas a Salpeter power law with α ={2.2}-0.5+1.1 best describes the IMF slope in the 0.1–2 M ⊙ range. This characteristic width is higher than other young associations, which may be due to incompleteness in the current census of low-mass TWA stars. A tentative overpopulation of isolated planetary-mass members similar to 2MASS J11472421–2040204 and 2MASS J11193254–1137466 is identified: this indicates that there might be as many as {10}-5+13 similar members of TWA with hot-start model-dependent masses estimated at ∼5–7 M Jup, most of which would be too faint to be detected in 2MASS. Our new radial velocity measurements corroborate the membership of 2MASS J11472421–2040204, and secure TWA 28 (M8.5 γ), TWA 29 (M9.5 γ), and TWA 33 (M4.5 e) as members. The discovery of 2MASS J09553336–0208403, a young L7-type interloper unrelated to TWA, is also presented.

  4. Visfatin Impairs Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Rat and Human Mesenteric Microvessels through Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Javier; Villalobos, Laura A.; Cercas, Elena; Leivas, Alejandra; Bermejo, Elena; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Peiró, Concepción

    2011-01-01

    Visfatin, also known as extracellular pre–B-cell colony–enhancing factor (PBEF) and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), is an adipocytokine whose circulating levels are enhanced in metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Circulating visfatin levels have been positively associated with vascular damage and endothelial dysfunction. Here, we investigated the ability of visfatin to directly impair vascular reactivity in mesenteric microvessels from both male Sprague-Dawley rats and patients undergoing non-urgent, non-septic abdominal surgery. The pre-incubation of rat microvessels with visfatin (50 and 100 ng/mL) did not modify the contractile response to noradrenaline (1 pmol/L to 30 µmol/L), as determined using a small vessel myograph. However, visfatin (10 to 100 ng/mL) concentration-dependently impaired the relaxation to acetylcholine (ACh; 100 pmol/L to 3 µmol/L), without interfering with the endothelium-independent relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (1 nmol/L to 3 µmol/L). In both cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and rat microvascular preparations, visfatin (50 ng/mL) stimulated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, as determined by lucigenin-derived chemiluminiscence. The relaxation to ACh impaired by visfatin was restored by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 µmol/L). Additionally, the Nampt inhibitor APO866 (10 mmol/L to 10 µmol/L), but not an insulin receptor-blocking antibody, also prevented the stimulation of NADPH oxidase and the relaxation impairment elicited by visfatin. Accordingly, the product of Nampt activity nicotinamide mononucleotide (100 nmol/L to 1 mmol/L) stimulated endothelial NADPH oxidase activity and concentration-dependently impaired ACh-induced vasorelaxation. In human mesenteric microvessels pre-contracted with 35 mmol/L potassium chloride, the endothelium-dependent vasodilation to bradykinin (1 nmol/L to 3 µmol/L) was equally impaired by

  5. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Recording of lymph flow dynamics in microvessels using correlation properties of scattered coherent radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, I. V.; Tuchin, Valerii V.; Galanzha, E. I.; Solov'eva, A. V.; Stepanova, T. V.

    2002-11-01

    The direction-sensitive method of microflow velocity measurements based on the space — time correlation properties of the dynamic speckle field is described and used for in vivo monitoring of lymph flow in the vessels of rat mesentery. The results of measurements are compared with the data obtained from functional video microscopy of the microvessel region.

  6. Application of image restoration and three-dimensional visualization techniques to frog microvessels in-situ loaded with fluorescent indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagakis, Stamatis N.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Lenz, Joyce F.

    1993-07-01

    In situ experiments on microvessels require image sensors of wide dynamic range due to large variations of the intensity in the scene, and 3D visualization due to the thickness of the preparation. The images require restoration because of the inherent tissue movement, out-of- focus-light contamination, and blur. To resolve the above problems, we developed an imaging system for quantitative imaging based on a 12 bits/pixel cooled CCD camera and a PC based digital imaging system. We applied the optical sectioning technique with image restoration using a modified nearest neighbor algorithm and iterative constrained deconvolution on each of the 2D optical sections. For the 3D visualization of the data, a volume rendering software was used. The data provided 3D images of the distribution of fluorescent indicators in intact microvessels. Optical cross sections were also compared with cross sections of the same microvessels examined in the electron microscope after their luminal surfaces were labeled with a tracer which was both electron dense and fluorescent. This procedure enabled precise identification of the endothelial cells in the microvessel wall as the principal site of accumulation of the fluorescent calcium indicator, fura-2, during microperfusion experiments.

  7. Elucid—exploring the local universe with the reconstructed initial density field. I. Hamiltonian Markov chain Monte Carlo method with particle mesh dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Yang, Xiaohu; Lin, W. P.; Jing, Y. P.

    2014-10-10

    Simulating the evolution of the local universe is important for studying galaxies and the intergalactic medium in a way free of cosmic variance. Here we present a method to reconstruct the initial linear density field from an input nonlinear density field, employing the Hamiltonian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm combined with Particle-mesh (PM) dynamics. The HMC+PM method is applied to cosmological simulations, and the reconstructed linear density fields are then evolved to the present day with N-body simulations. These constrained simulations accurately reproduce both the amplitudes and phases of the input simulations at various z. Using a PM model with a grid cell size of 0.75 h {sup –1} Mpc and 40 time steps in the HMC can recover more than half of the phase information down to a scale k ∼ 0.85 h Mpc{sup –1} at high z and to k ∼ 3.4 h Mpc{sup –1} at z = 0, which represents a significant improvement over similar reconstruction models in the literature, and indicates that our model can reconstruct the formation histories of cosmic structures over a large dynamical range. Adopting PM models with higher spatial and temporal resolutions yields even better reconstructions, suggesting that our method is limited more by the availability of computer resource than by principle. Dynamic models of structure evolution adopted in many earlier investigations can induce non-Gaussianity in the reconstructed linear density field, which in turn can cause large systematic deviations in the predicted halo mass function. Such deviations are greatly reduced or absent in our reconstruction.

  8. In-vivo visualization of melanoma tumor microvessels and blood flow velocity changes accompanying tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroki; Hachiga, Tadashi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Akiguchi, Shunsuke

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that using micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (μ-MLDV) for noninvasive in-vivo imaging of blood vessels is useful for diagnosing malignant melanomas by comparison with visual diagnosis by dermoscopy. The blood flow velocity in microvessels varied during growth of melanomas transplanted in mouse ears. Mouse ears were observed by μ-MLDV up to 16 days after transplantation. The blood flow velocity in the tumor increased with increasing time and reached maximum of 4.5 mm/s at 9 days, which is more than twice that prior to transplantation. After 12 days, when the lesion had grown to an area of 6.6 mm2, we observed the formation of new blood vessels in the tumor. Finally, when the lesion had an area of 18 mm2 after 16 days, the flow velocity in the tumor decreased to approximately 3.2 mm/s.

  9. The role of NF-kappaB in the angiogenic response of coronary microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, R A; Abraham, N G; Laniado-Schwartzman, M

    1996-01-01

    The activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB by 12(R)-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid [12(R)-HETrE], an arachidonic acid metabolite with potent stereospecific proinflammatory and angiogenic properties, was examined and its role in the angiogenic response was determined in capillary endothelial cells derived from coronary microvessels. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay of nuclear protein extracts from cells treated with 12(R)-HETrE demonstrated a rapid and stereospecific time- and concentration-dependent increase in the binding activity of NF-kappaB, which was inhibitable by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine, butylated hydroxyanisole, and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and was partially attenuated by the protein kinase C inhibitors, staurosporine and calphostin C. Neither 12(S)-HETrE nor other related eicosanoids--e.g., 12(R)-HETE, 12(S)-HETE, and leukotriene B4--stimulated the activation of NF-kappaB relative to 12(R)-HETrE, substantiating the claim for a specific receptor-mediated mechanism. 12(R)-HETrE stimulated the formation of capillary-like cords of microvessel endothelial cells distinguishable from a control; this effect was comparable to that observed with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Inhibition of NF-kappaB activation resulted in inhibition of capillary-like formation of endothelial cells treated with 12(R)-HETrE by 80% but did not affect growth observed with bFGF. It is suggested that 12(R)-HETrE's angiogenic activity involves the activation of NF-kappaB, possibly via protein kinase C stimulation and the generation of reactive oxygen intermediates for downstream signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:8610127

  10. Effects of ageing and fitness on skin-microvessel vasodilator function in humans.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Klonizakis, Markos; Saxton, John M

    2010-05-01

    The impact of cardiopulmonary fitness (VO(2max)) on the age-related decline in skin-microvessel vasodilator function has not been fully established and the inter-relationships among different measures of microvascular vasodilator function are unknown. We used laser Doppler flowmetry to assess relative changes in forearm skin blood flow to various stimuli in three groups of adults: young (n = 15; 27 +/- 2 years), older sedentary (n = 14; 65 +/- 6 years) and older fit (n = 15; 61 +/- 5 years). Local-heating induced and post-occlusive hyperaemia responses were higher in the young and older fit groups compared to the older sedentary group (P < 0.05) and were moderately correlated with VO(2max) in the pooled cohort of older adults (r = 0.49-0.58; P < 0.05). Peak hyperaemia responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were higher in young compared to older sedentary adults (P < 0.05) and were not associated with VO(2max) in older adults (P > 0.05). Associations among different measures of microvascular vasodilator function were generally moderate at best. In summary, the local heating and reactive hyperaemia data indicate that the age-related decline in skin-microvessel vasodilator function can be ameliorated through regular aerobic exercise training. As this is not supported by the iontophoresis data, we recommend that, when assessing microvascular function, the use of a single physiological or pharmacological stimulation coupled to laser Doppler flowmetry should be avoided. Finally, the moderate correlations between outcomes probably reflect the distinct mediators that are responsible for the vasodilator response to each test.

  11. Mediastinal micro-vessels clipping during lymph node dissection may contribute to reduce postoperative pleural drainage

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shi; Wang, Xing; Lv, Chao; Phan, Kevin; Wang, Yuzhao; Wang, Jia; Yang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative pleural drainage markedly influences the length of postoperative stay and financial costs of medical care. The aim of this study is to retrospectively investigate potentially predisposing factors related to pleural drainage after curative thoracic surgery and to explore the impact of mediastinal micro-vessels clipping on pleural drainage control after lymph node dissection. Methods From February 2012 to November 2013, 322 consecutive cases of operable non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) undergoing lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection with or without application of clipping were collected. Total and daily postoperative pleural drainage were recorded. Propensity score matching (1:2) was applied to balance variables potentially impacting pleural drainage between group clip and group control. Analyses were performed to compare drainage volume, duration of chest tube and postoperative hospital stay between the two groups. Variables linked with pleural drainage in whole cohort were assessed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Propensity score matching resulted in 197 patients (matched cohort). Baseline patient characteristics were matched between two groups. Group clip showed less cumulative drainage volume (P=0.020), shorter duration of chest tube (P=0.031) and postoperative hospital stay (P=0.022) compared with group control. Risk factors significantly associated with high-output drainage in multivariable logistic regression analysis were being male, age >60 years, bilobectomy/sleeve lobectomy, pleural adhesion, the application of clip applier, duration of operation ≥220 minutes and chylothorax (P<0.05). Conclusions This study suggests that mediastinal micro-vessels clipping during lymph node dissection may reduce postoperative pleural drainage and thus shorten hospital stay. PMID:27076936

  12. Chronic lead treatment accelerates photochemically induced platelet aggregation in cerebral microvessels of mice, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Al Dhaheri, A.H.; El-Sabban, F.; Fahim, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    Effects of two chronic treatment levels with lead on platelet aggregation in cerebral (pial) microcirculation of the mouse were investigated. Exposure to lead was made by subcutaneous injections for 7 days of lead acetate dissolved in 5% glucose solution, vehicle. Two doses of lead were used, a low dose of 0.1 mg/kg and a high dose of 1.0 mg/kg. Adult male mice were divided into three groups, 10 each; one group was injected with vehicle (control), another was injected with the low dose, and the third was injected with the high dose. Additional mice were used for the determination of hematological parameters and for the lead level in serum of the three groups. On the eighth day, platelet aggregation in pial microvessels of these groups of mice was carried out in vivo. Animals were anesthetized (urethane, 1-2 mg/g, ip), the trachea was intubated, and a craniotomy was performed. Platelet aggregation in pial microvessels was induced photochemically, by activation of circulating sodium fluorescein (0.1 mg/25 g, iv) with an intense mercury light. The time required for the first platelet aggregate to appear in pial arterioles was significantly shorter in the lead-treated mice than in control. This effect was in a dose-dependent manner; 113 {+-} 44 sec for low dose and 71 {+-} 18 sec for high dose vs 155 {+-} 25 sec for control, P < 0.02 and P < 0.001, respectively. Between the two lead-treated groups, the high dose significantly (P < 0.05) shortened the time to first aggregate. These data evidenced an increased susceptibility to cerebrovascular thrombosis as a result of exposure to lead. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation maintains parathyroid hormone and improves bone density during initial military training: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gaffney-Stomberg, Erin; Lutz, Laura J; Rood, Jennifer C; Cable, Sonya J; Pasiakos, Stefan M; Young, Andrew J; McClung, James P

    2014-11-01

    Calcium and vitamin D are essential nutrients for bone health. Periods of activity with repetitive mechanical loading, such as military training, may result in increases in parathyroid hormone (PTH), a key regulator of Ca metabolism, and may be linked to the development of stress fractures. Previous studies indicate that consumption of a Ca and vitamin D supplement may reduce stress fracture risk in female military personnel during initial military training, but circulating markers of Ca and bone metabolism and measures of bone density and strength have not been determined. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial sought to determine the effects of providing supplemental Ca and vitamin D (Ca+Vit D, 2000mg and 1000IU/d, respectively), delivered as 2 snack bars per day throughout 9weeks of Army initial military training (or basic combat training, BCT) on PTH, vitamin D status, and measures of bone density and strength in personnel undergoing BCT, as well as independent effects of BCT on bone parameters. A total of 156 men and 87 women enrolled in Army BCT (Fort Sill, OK; 34.7°N latitude) volunteered for this study. Anthropometric, biochemical, and dietary intake data were collected pre- and post-BCT. In addition, peripheral quantitative computed tomography was utilized to assess tibia bone density and strength in a subset of volunteers (n=46). Consumption of supplemental Ca+Vit D increased circulating ionized Ca (group-by-time, P=0.022), maintained PTH (group-by-time, P=0.032), and increased the osteoprotegerin:RANKL ratio (group-by-time, P=0.006). Consistent with the biochemical markers, Ca+Vit D improved vBMD (group-by-time, P=0.024) at the 4% site and cortical BMC (group-by-time, P=0.028) and thickness (group-by-time, P=0.013) at the 14% site compared to placebo. These data demonstrate the benefit of supplemental Ca and vitamin D for maintaining bone health during periods of elevated bone turnover, such as initial military training. This trial was

  14. Model-based Characterization of the Parameters of Dissimilatory Sulfate Reduction Under the Effect of Different Initial Density of Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kushkevych, Ivan; Bolis, Marco; Bartos, Milan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design a model of dissimilatory sulfate reduction process using the Verhulst function, with a particular focus on the kinetics of bacterial growth, sulfate and lactate consumption, and accumulation of hydrogen sulfide and acetate. The effect of the initial density (0.12±0.011, 0.25±0.024, 0.5±0.048 and 1.0±0.096 mg cells/ml of medium) of the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio piger Vib-7 on the growth and dissimilatory sulfate reduction was studied. The exponential growth phase of the D. piger Vib-7 was observed for 72 hours of cultivation at the (0.12 and 0.25 mg/ml) initial concentration of bacterial cells. Sulfate and lactate were consumed incompletely during this time. The increase in the initial concentration of cells to 0.5 and 1 mg/ml led to a shortening of the exponential bacterial growth phase and a shift to the stationary phase of the growth. In the case of 0.5 mg/ml seeding, the stationary growth phase was observed in the 36(th) hour of cultivation. The increase in the initial concentration of cells to 1 mg/ml led to the beginning of the stationary growth phase in 24th hours of cultivation. Under these conditions, sulfate and lactate were consumed completely in the 48th hour of cultivation. The kinetic analysis of the curves of bacterial growth and the process of dissimilatory sulfate reduction by D. piger Vib-7 was carried out.

  15. Practical aspects of using Hertzian ring crack initiation to measure surface flaw densities in glasses: influence of humidity, friction and searched areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Rajan; Paliwal, Bhasker; Gibson, Cory

    2013-07-01

    Ring crack initiation loads on glass, using spherical Tungsten carbide (WC) and glass (G) indenters, are measured and analysed. Our measurements demonstrate that environmental humidity plays a key role in determining the load to fracture; experiments conducted without controlling this variable cannot be used to obtain material properties. The role of friction is explicitly considered for dissimilar (WC-G) elastic contacts. For this material pair, the stresses at fracture are well described by a boundary lubrication value of friction coefficient. The fracture loads are used in a fracture-mechanics formulation to calculate crack sizes on glass surfaces. The 'searched-area' concept for dissimilar contacts is described, and used to provide crack density values for these surfaces.

  16. Emergent molecular theory of initiation of detonation: the effect of molecular and crystal structure on thermal stability of high density energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, Maija; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Sharia, Onise

    The sensitivity to detonation initiation of high density energy materials along with their performance are two most important criteria for choosing the best material for explosive formulations, booster engines, detonators, etc. After numerous experimental and theoretical attempts to develop a single parameter describing sensitivity of different classes of energetic materials, one concludes that the complexity of physical and chemical explosive properties cannot be trivialized. We report here the results of our theoretical and computational studies of thermal decomposition mechanisms and kinetics of five classes of EM: pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitramine cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine (HMX), diamino-dinitroethene (DADNE), bis-(nitrofurazano)-furoxane (BNFF) and benchmark triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB). Our modeling reveals how the thermal stability depends on the molecular structure of the material and how the crystal structure may additionally hinder or catalyze decomposition reactions. We will also discuss an effect of crystalline defects on sensitivity and performance of materials.

  17. A density functional theory study of phenyl formation initiated by ethynyl radical (C2H*) and ethyne (C2H2).

    PubMed

    Santiago, Romero M; Indarto, Antonius

    2008-12-01

    An ab initio computational density functional theory (DFT) was used to study the formation of the first cyclic molecule (phenyl) initiated by the ethynyl radical (C(2)H*). The study covers a competition reaction between the addition reactions of C(2)H* with ethyne (C(2)H(2)) and some molecular re-arrangement schemes. The minimum energy paths of the preferred cyclic formation route were characterized. A thorough thermochemical analysis was performed by evaluating the differences in the energy of activation (DeltaE), enthalpy (DeltaH), and Gibb's free energy (DeltaG) of the optimized stable and transition state (TS) molecules. The reaction temperatures were set to normal (T = 298 K) and combustion (T = 1,200 K) conditions.

  18. Initial stages of ITO/Si interface formation: In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements upon magnetron sputtering and atomistic modelling using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Løvvik, O. M.; Diplas, S.; Ulyashin, A.; Romanyuk, A.

    2014-02-28

    Initial stages of indium tin oxide (ITO) growth on a polished Si substrate upon magnetron sputtering were studied experimentally using in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The presence of pure indium and tin, as well as Si bonded to oxygen at the ITO/Si interface were observed. The experimental observations were compared with several atomistic models of ITO/Si interfaces. A periodic model of the ITO/Si interface was constructed, giving detailed information about the local environment at the interface. Molecular dynamics based on density functional theory was performed, showing how metal-oxygen bonds are broken on behalf of silicon-oxygen bonds. These theoretical results support and provide an explanation for the present as well as previous ex-situ and in-situ experimental observations pointing to the creation of metallic In and Sn along with the growth of SiO{sub x} at the ITO/Si interface.

  19. Computational analysis on the mechanical interaction between a thrombus and red blood cells: possible causes of membrane damage of red blood cells at microvessels.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Hiroki; Imai, Yohsuke; Nakamura, Masanori; Ishikawa, Takuji; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies investigating thrombus formation have not focused on the physical interaction between red blood cells (RBCs) and thrombus, although they have been speculated that some pathological conditions such as microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) stem from interactions between RBCs and thrombi. In this study, we investigated the mechanical influence of RBCs on primary thrombi during hemostasis. We also explored the mechanics and aggravating factors of intravascular hemolysis. Computer simulations of primary thrombogenesis in the presence and the absence of RBCs demonstrated that RBCs are unlikely to affect the thrombus height and coverage, although their presence may change microvessel hemodynamics and platelet transportation to the injured wall. Our results suggest that intravascular hemolysis owing to RBC membrane damage would be promoted by three hemodynamic factors: (1) dispersibility of platelet thrombi, because more frequent spatial thrombus formation decreases the time available for an RBC to recover its shape and enforces more severe deformation; (2) platelet thrombus stiffness, because a stiffer thrombus increases the degree of RBC deformation upon collision; and (3) vessel size and hemocyte density, because a smaller vessel diameter and higher hemocyte density decrease the room for RBCs to escape as they come closer to a thrombus, thereby enhancing thrombus-RBC interactions.

  20. Coordinated regulation of nitrogen supply mode and initial cell density for energy storage compounds production with economized nitrogen utilization in a marine microalga Isochrysis zhangjiangensis.

    PubMed

    Chi, Lei; Yao, Changhong; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and carbohydrates are main energy storage compounds (ESC) of microalgae under stressed conditions and they are potential feedstock for biofuel production. Yet, the sustainable and commercially successful production of ESC in microalgae needs to consider nitrogen utilization efficiency. Here the impact of different initial cell densities (ICDs) on ESC accumulation in Isochrysis zhangjiangensis under two nitrogen supply modes (an initially equal concentration of nitrogen per-cell in the medium (N1) and an equal total concentration of nitrogen in the culture system (N2)) were investigated. The results demonstrated that the highest ESC yield (1.36gL(-1)) at N1, which included a maximal nitrogen supply in the cultivation system, and the highest ESC content (66.5%) and ESC productivity per mass of nitrogen (3.28gg(-1) (N) day(-1)) at N2, were all obtained under a high ICD of 8.0×10(6)cellsmL(-1). Therefore I. zhangjiangensis qualifies for ESC-enriched biomass production with economized nitrogen utilization.

  1. Direct stimulation of limbal microvessel endothelial cell proliferation and capillary formation in vitro by a corneal-derived eicosanoid.

    PubMed Central

    Stoltz, R. A.; Conners, M. S.; Gerritsen, M. E.; Abraham, N. G.; Laniado-Schwartzman, M.

    1996-01-01

    12(R)-Hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (12(R)-HETrE), a corneal epithelial derived inflammatory eicosanoid, elicits blood vessel growth into the avascular cornea in the classical corneal micropocket bioassay. Using an in vivo stimulated angiogenesis assay and 12(R)-HETrE as the angiogenic stimulus, we isolated a homogeneous population of rabbit limbal microvessel endothelial cells, the target for angiogenic factors in the anterior surface of ocular tissues, and analyzed the mitogenic and angiogenic potential of this eicosanoid. 12(R)-HETrE stereospecifically increased cell number by approximately 45%, an effect comparable to that of basic fibroblast growth factor (0.6 nmol/L; 10 ng/ml). This potent mitogenic response was maximal at 0.1 nmol/L. An additive effect (approximately 90% above control) on cell proliferation was observed when 12(R)-HETrE (0.1 nmol/L) and basic fibroblast growth factor (0.6 nmol/L) were added to quiescent cultures of rabbit limbal microvessel endothelial cells. We also show that 12(R)-HETrE, but not 12(S)-HETrE, induces cultured rabbit limbal microvessel endothelial cells to organize themselves as a network of branching cords reminiscent of capillaries. This effect was evident within 48 hours, maximal by 5 days of culture, and paralleled the effect observed with basic fibroblast growth factor. This study describes a novel method for testing site-directed angiogenesis in vitro and further strengthens the angiogenic properties of 12(R)-HETrE by demonstrating a direct effect on limbal microvessel endothelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:8546200

  2. Similar endothelial glycocalyx structures in microvessels from a range of mammalian tissues: evidence for a common filtering mechanism?

    PubMed

    Arkill, K P; Knupp, C; Michel, C C; Neal, C R; Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, J; Squire, J M

    2011-09-07

    The glycocalyx or endocapillary layer on the luminal surface of microvessels has a major role in the exclusion of macromolecules from the underlying endothelial cells. Current structural evidence in the capillaries of frog mesentery indicates a regularity in the structure of the glycocalyx, with a center-to-center fiber spacing of 20 nm and a fiber width of 12 nm, which might explain the observed macromolecular filtering properties. In this study, we used electron micrographs of tissues prepared using perfusion fixation and tannic acid treatment. The digitized images were analyzed using autocorrelation to find common spacings and to establish whether similar structures, hence mechanisms, are present in the microvessel glycocalyces of a variety of mammalian tissues. Continuous glycocalyx layers in mammalian microvessels of choroid, renal tubules, glomerulus, and psoas muscle all showed similar lateral spacings at ∼19.5 nm (possibly in a quasitetragonal lattice) and longer spacings above 100 nm. Individual glycocalyx tufts above fenestrations in the first three of these tissues and also in stomach fundus and jejunum showed evidence for similar short-range structural regularity, but with more disorder. The fiber diameter was estimated as 18.8 (± 0.2) nm, but we believe this is an overestimate because of the staining method used. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. High-contrast in vivo visualization of microvessels using novel FeCo/GC magnetic nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Sherlock, Sarah P; Terashima, Masahiro; Kosuge, Hisanori; Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Goodwin, Andrew; Robinson, Joshua; Seo, Won Seok; Liu, Zhuang; Luong, Richard; McConnell, Michael V; Nishimura, Dwight G; Dai, Hongjie

    2009-12-01

    FeCo-graphitic carbon shell nanocrystals are a novel MRI contrast agent with unprecedented high per-metal-atom-basis relaxivity (r(1) = 97 mM(-1) sec(-1), r(2) = 400 mM(-1) sec(-1)) and multifunctional capabilities. While the conventional gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced angiographic magnetic MRI has proven useful for diagnosis of vascular diseases, its short circulation time and relatively low sensitivity render high-resolution MRI of morphologically small vascular structures such as those involved in collateral, arteriogenic, and angiogenic vessel formation challenging. Here, by combining FeCo-graphitic carbon shell nanocrystals with high-resolution MRI technique, we demonstrate that such microvessels down to approximately 100 mum can be monitored in high contrast and noninvasively using a conventional 1.5-T clinical MRI system, achieving a diagnostic imaging standard approximating that of the more invasive X-ray angiography. Preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity study results also show no sign of toxicity.

  4. High-Contrast In Vivo Visualization of Microvessels Using Novel FeCo/GC Magnetic Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Sherlock, Sarah P.; Terashima, Masahiro; Kosuge, Hisanori; Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Goodwin, Andrew; Robinson, Joshua; Seo, Won Seok; Liu, Zhuang; Luong, Richard; McConnell, Michael V.; Nishimura, Dwight G.; Dai, Hongjie

    2010-01-01

    FeCo-graphitic carbon shell nanocrystals are a novel MRI contrast agent with unprecedented high per-metal-atom-basis relaxivity (r1 = 97 mM−1 sec−1, r2 = 400 mM−1 sec−1) and multifunctional capabilities. While the conventional gadolinium-based contrast-enhanced angiographic magnetic MRI has proven useful for diagnosis of vascular diseases, its short circulation time and relatively low sensitivity render high-resolution MRI of morphologically small vascular structures such as those involved in collateral, arteriogenic, and angiogenic vessel formation challenging. Here, by combining FeCo-graphitic carbon shell nanocrystals with high-resolution MRI technique, we demonstrate that such microvessels down to ~100 μm can be monitored in high contrast and noninvasively using a conventional 1.5-T clinical MRI system, achieving a diagnostic imaging standard approximating that of the more invasive X-ray angiography. Preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity study results also show no sign of toxicity. PMID:19859938

  5. Dispersion characteristics of blood during nanoparticle assisted drug delivery process through a permeable microvessel.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sachin; Ganguly, Suvankar; Sibanda, Precious; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    Nanoparticle assisted drug delivery holds considerable promise as a means of next generation of medicine that allows for the intravascular delivery of drugs and contrast agents. We analyze the dispersion characteristics of blood during a nanoparticle-assisted drug delivery process through a permeable microvessel. The contribution of molecular and convective diffusion is based on Taylor's theory of shear dispersion. The aggregation of red blood cells in blood flowing through small tubes (less than 40 μm) leads to the two-phase flow with a core of rouleaux surrounded by a cell-depleted peripheral layer. The core region models as a non-Newtonian Casson fluid and the peripheral region acts as a Newtonian fluid. We investigate the influence of the nanoparticle volume fraction, the permeability of the blood vessel, pressure distribution, yield stress and the radius of the nanoparticle on the effective dispersion. We show that the effective diffusion of the nanoparticles reduces with an increase in nanoparticle volume fraction. The permeability of the blood vessels increases the effective dispersion at the inlet. The present study contributes to the fundamental understanding on how the particulate nature of blood influences nanoparticle delivery, and is of particular significance in nanomedicine design for targeted drug delivery applications.

  6. In vivo PIV measurement of red blood cell velocity field in microvessels considering mesentery motion.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Shigeru; Okamoto, Koji

    2002-05-01

    As endothelial cells are subject to flow shear stress, it is important to determine the detailed velocity distribution in microvessels in the study of mechanical interactions between blood and endothelium. Recently, particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been proposed as a quantitative method of measuring velocity fields instantaneously in experimental fluid mechanics. The authors have developed a highly accurate PIV technique with improved dynamic range. spatial resolution and measurement accuracy. In this paper, the proposed method was applied to images of the arteriole in the rat mesentery using an intravital microscope and high-speed digital video system. Taking the mesentery motion into account, the PIV technique was improved to measure red blood cell (RBC) velocity. Velocity distributions with spatial resolutions of 0.8 x 0.8 microm were obtained even near the wall in the centre plane of the arteriole. The arteriole velocity profile was blunt in the centre region of the vessel cross-section and sharp in the near-wall region. Typical flow features for non-Newtonian fluid were shown. Time-averaged velocity profiles in six cross sections with different diameters were compared.

  7. Measurement of a velocity field in microvessels using a high resolution PIV technique.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Shigeru; Okamoto, Koji

    2002-10-01

    Because endothelial cells are subject to flow shear stress, it is important to determine the velocity distribution in microvessels during studies of the mechanical interactions between the blood and the endothelium. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a quantitative method for measuring velocity fields instantaneously in experimental fluid mechanics. The authors have developed a high-resolution PIV technique that improves the dynamic flow range, spatial resolution, and measurement accuracy. The proposed method was applied to images of the arteriole in the rat mesentery, using an intravital microscope and high-speed digital video system. Taking the mesentery motion into account, the PIV technique was improved to measure red blood cell (RBC) velocity. Velocity distributions with spatial resolutions of 0.8 3 0.8 mm were obtained even near the wall in the center plane of the arteriole. The arteriole velocity profile was blunt in the center region of the vessel cross-section and sharp in the near-wall region. Typical flow features for non-Newtonian fluid are shown.

  8. Brain microvessel cross-presentation is a hallmark of experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Shanshan W; Poh, Chek Meng; Gun, Sin Yee; Claser, Carla; Malleret, Benoit; Shastri, Nilabh; Ginhoux, Florent; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Rénia, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a devastating complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Its pathogenesis is complex, involving both parasite- and immune-mediated events. CD8+ T cells play an effector role in murine experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) induced by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection. We have identified a highly immunogenic CD8 epitope in glideosome-associated protein 50 that is conserved across rodent malaria species. Epitope-specific CD8+ T cells are induced during PbA infection, migrating to the brain just before neurological signs manifest. They are functional, cytotoxic and can damage the blood–brain barrier in vivo. Such CD8+ T cells are also found in the brain during infection with parasite strains/species that do not induce neuropathology. We demonstrate here that PbA infection causes brain microvessels to cross-present parasite antigen, while non-ECM-causing parasites do not. Further, treatment with fast-acting anti-malarial drugs before the onset of ECM reduces parasite load and thus antigen presentation in the brain, preventing ECM death. Thus our data suggest that combined therapies targeting both the parasite and host antigen-presenting cells may improve the outcome of CM patients. PMID:23681698

  9. Tight junction protein expression and barrier properties of immortalized mouse brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel C; Morris, Andrew P; O'Neil, Roger G

    2007-01-26

    Understanding the molecular and biochemical mechanisms regulating the blood-brain barrier is aided by in vitro model systems. Many studies have used primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells for this purpose. However, primary cultures limit the generation of material for molecular and biochemical assays since cells grow slowly, are prone to contamination by other neurovascular unit cells, and lose blood-brain barrier characteristics when passaged. To address these issues, immortalized cell lines have been generated. In these studies, we assessed the suitability of the immortalized mouse brain endothelial cell line, bEnd3, as a blood-brain barrier model. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence indicated expression of multiple tight junction proteins. bEnd3 cells formed barriers to radiolabeled sucrose, and responded like primary cultures to disrupting stimuli. Exposing cells to serum-free media on their basolateral side significantly decreased paracellular permeability; astrocyte-conditioned media did not enhance barrier properties. The serum-free media-induced decrease in permeability was correlated with an increase in claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 immunofluorescence at cell-cell contracts. We conclude that bEnd3 cells are an attractive candidate as a model of the blood-brain barrier due to their rapid growth, maintenance of blood-brain barrier characteristics over repeated passages, formation of functional barriers and amenability to numerous molecular interventions.

  10. Selective capture of endothelial and perivascular cells from brain microvessels using laser capture microdissection.

    PubMed

    Kinnecom, Katie; Pachter, Joel S

    2005-12-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of the major cell types comprising brain microvessels offers a powerful technology to explore the molecular basis of the blood-brain barrier in health and disease. However, the ability to selectively retrieve endothelial or perivascular cells, without cross-contamination from the other, has proven difficult. Additionally, histochemical methods previously described for use with LCM have not allowed for identification of all the different size branches of the microvascular tree. Here, we describe a double immunostaining method, combining bright-field and fluorescence microscopy, and using an extensive dehydration with xylene, to clearly identify and spatially resolve endothelial from perivascular cells within all size microvascular branches in frozen brain sections. LCM of these sections, coupled with RNA analysis by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, revealed that captured endothelial cells show endothelial markers but no detectable markers for astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes. Conversely, captured astrocytes or smooth muscle cells/pericytes demonstrate their respective markers, but not those of endothelial cells. This approach has applicability to microarray analysis, thereby enabling global gene profiling of the different cell types along the entirety of the brain microvascular tree.

  11. Simulated Two-Dimensional Red Blood Cell Motion, Deformation, and Partitioning in Microvessel Bifurcations

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jared O.; Alberding, Jonathan P.; Restrepo, Juan M.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2008-01-01

    Movement, deformation, and partitioning of mammalian red blood cells (RBCs) in diverging microvessel bifurcations are simulated using a two-dimensional, flexible-particle model. A set of viscoelastic elements represents the RBC membrane and the cytoplasm. Motion of isolated cells is considered, neglecting cell-to-cell interactions. Center-of-mass trajectories deviate from background flow streamlines due to migration of flexible cells towards the mother vessel centerline upstream of the bifurcation and due to flow perturbations caused by cell obstruction in the neighborhood of the bifurcation. RBC partitioning in the bifurcation is predicted by determining the RBC fraction entering each branch, for a given partition of total flow and for a given upstream distribution of RBCs. Typically, RBCs preferentially enter the higher-flow branch, leading to unequal discharge hematocrits in the downstream branches. This effect is increased by migration toward the centerline but decreased by the effects of obstruction. It is stronger for flexible cells than for rigid circular particles of corresponding size, and decreases with increasing parent vessel diameter. For unequally-sized daughter vessels, partitioning is asymmetric, with RBCs tending to enter the smaller vessel. Partitioning is not significantly affected by branching angles. Model predictions are consistent with previous experimental results. PMID:18686035

  12. The wall traction induced by flowing red blood cells in model microvessels and its potential mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan; Vermot, Julien

    2013-11-01

    There is evidence in early embryonic development, even well before advective oxygen transport is important, that the presence of red bloods cells per se trigger essential steps of normal vascular development. For example, showed that sequestration of blood cells early in the development of a mouse, such that the hematocrit is reduced, suppresses normal vascular network development. Vascular development also provides a model for remodeling and angiogenesis. We consider the transient stresses associated with blood cells flowing in model microvessels of comparable diameter to those at early stages of development (6 μm to 12 μm). A detailed simulation tool is used to show that passing blood cells present a significant fluctuating traction signature on the vessel wall, well above the mean stresses. This is particularly pronounced for slow flows (<= 50 μm/s) or small diameters (<= 7 μm), for which root-mean-square wall traction fluctuations can exceed their mean. These events potentially present mechanotranduction triggers that direct development or remodeling. Attenuation of such fluctuating tractions by a viscoelastic endothelial glycocalyx layer is also considered. NSF supported.

  13. Control of in vivo microvessel ingrowth by modulation of biomaterial local architecture and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Joan E.; Baker, Aaron B.; Golledge, Stephen

    2002-04-01

    We developed a method for controlling local architecture and chemistry simultaneously in biomaterial implants to control microvessel ingrowth in vivo. Porous polypropylene disks (5 mm in diameter and 40 um thick) were plasma-coated with a fluoropolymer and then laser-drilled with 50-*m-diameter holes through their thickness. We then oxidized the disks to create hydroxyl functionality on the exposed polypropylene (inside the holes). Acrylamide was grafted to the hydroxyl groups through polymerization in the presence of activating ceric ions. Staining with toluidine blue O demonstrated that grafting occurred only inside the holes. We used the Hoffman degradation reaction to convert the amide groups of acrylamide to amine groups, and then we used ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether to attach biomolecules of interest inside the holes: secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) peptide Lys-Gly-His-Lys (KGHK; angiogenic), thrombospondin-2 (TSP; antiangiogenic), or albumin (rat; neutral). In vivo testing in a rat subcutaneous dorsum model for a 3-week interval demonstrated a greater vessel surface area (p = 0.032) and a greater number of vessels (p = 0.043) in tissue local to the holes with KGHKimmobilized disks than with TSP-immobilized disks. However, differences between KGHK-immobilized and albuminimmobilized disks were less significant (p = 0.120 and p = 0.289 for the vessel surface area and number of vessels, respectively). The developed methods have potential applications in biomaterial design applications for which selective neovascularization is desired.

  14. In Situ Observation of Initial Stage in Dielectric Growth and Deposition of Ultrahigh Nucleation Density Dielectric on Two-Dimensional Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hong; Movva, Hema C P; Chagarov, Evgeniy; Sardashti, Kasra; Chou, Harry; Kwak, Iljo; Hu, Kai-Ting; Fullerton-Shirey, Susan K; Choudhury, Pabitra; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Kummel, Andrew C

    2015-10-14

    Several proposed beyond-CMOS devices based on two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures require the deposition of thin dielectrics between 2D layers. However, the direct deposition of dielectrics on 2D materials is challenging due to their inert surface chemistry. To deposit high-quality, thin dielectrics on 2D materials, a flat lying titanyl phthalocyanine (TiOPc) monolayer, deposited via the molecular beam epitaxy, was employed to create a seed layer for atomic layer deposition (ALD) on 2D materials, and the initial stage of growth was probed using in situ STM. ALD pulses of trimethyl aluminum (TMA) and H2O resulted in the uniform deposition of AlOx on the TiOPc/HOPG. The uniformity of the dielectric is consistent with DFT calculations showing multiple reaction sites are available on the TiOPc molecule for reaction with TMA. Capacitors prepared with 50 cycles of AlOx on TiOPc/graphene display a capacitance greater than 1000 nF/cm(2), and dual-gated devices have current densities of 10(-7)A/cm(2) with 40 cycles.

  15. The Effects of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair on Pathological Microvessel and Angiogenesis-Associated Signaling Pathway in Mice Model of CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Shengyan; Yue, Lifeng; Shi, Mengmeng; Peng, Ying; Xu, Yangxinzi; Wang, Xinrong; Li, Qian; Kang, Zhijun; Li, Hanjing; Wang, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease is one of the most common diseases that threaten human health. Effective treatment is still lacking in western medicine. Semen Persicae (Taoren) and Flos Carthami (Honghua) are known to relieve acute hepatic injury and inflammation, improve microcirculation, and reduce tissue fiber. The aim of our study is to investigate the potential mechanisms of Taoren-Honghua Herb Pair (THHP) in murine model of chronic liver disease caused by Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4). Mice were randomly divided into seven groups: (1) blank, (2) model, (3) control (colchicine, 0.1 mg/kg), (4) THHP (5.53, 2.67, and 1.33 g/kg), and (5) Tao Hong Siwu Decoction (THSWD) (8.50 g/kg). Histological change and microvessels density were examined by microscopy. Hepatic function, serum fibrosis related factors, and hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured with ELISA. VEGF, kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR), Flt-1, and Akt mRNA expression in hepatic tissue were determined with PCR. Tissues of Akt, pAkt, KDR, and Flt-1 were measured with western blotting. Data from this study showed that THHP improved hepatic function and restrained the hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Its role in inhibiting pathological angiogenesis and hepatic fibrogenesis may be through affecting the angiogenesis-associated VEGF and its upstream and downstream signaling pathways. PMID:27293456

  16. Weight and Lean Body Mass Change with Antiretroviral Initiation and Impact on Bone Mineral Density: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5224s

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Kristine Mace; Kitch, Douglas; Tierney, Camlin; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Tebas, Pablo; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; Jahed, Nasreen C.; Mccomsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect initiating different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens have on weight, body mass index (BMI), and lean body mass (LBM) and explore how changes in body composition are associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Methods A5224s was a substudy of A5202, a prospective trial of 1857 ART-naïve participants randomized to blinded abacavir-lamivudine (ABC/3TC) or tenofovir DF-emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) with open-label efavirenz (EFV) or atazanavir-ritonavir (ATV/r). All subjects underwent dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal CT for body composition. Analyses used 2-sample t-tests and linear regression. Results A5224s included 269 subjects: 85% male, 47% white non-Hispanic, median age 38 years, HIV-1 RNA 4.6 log10 copies/mL, and CD4 233 cells/µL. Overall, significant gains occurred in weight, BMI, and LBM at 96 weeks post randomization (all p<0.001). Assignment to ATV/r (vs EFV) resulted in significantly greater weight (mean difference 3.35 kg) and BMI gain (0.88 kg/m2; both p=0.02), but not LBM (0.67 kg; p=0.15), while ABC/3TC and TDF/FTC were not significantly different (p≥0.10). In multivariable analysis, only lower baseline CD4 count and higher HIV-1 RNA were associated with greater increase in weight, BMI, or LBM. In multivariable analyses, increased LBM was associated with an increased hip BMD. Conclusions ABC/3TC vs. TDF/FTC did not differ in change in weight, BMI, or LBM; ATV/r vs. EFV resulted in greater weight and BMI gain but not LBM. A positive association between increased LBM and increased hip BMD should be further investigated through prospective interventional studies to verify the impact of increased LBM on hip BMD. PMID:24384588

  17. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  18. Sexual dimorphism in the permeability response of coronary microvessels to adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Huxley, Virginia H.; Wang, JianJie; Whitt, Stevan P.

    2012-01-01

    Gender influences volume regulation via several mechanisms; whether these include microvascular exchange, especially in the heart, is not known. In response to adenosine (Ado), permeability (Ps)to protein of coronary arterioles of female pigs decreases acutely. Whether Ado induces similar Ps changes in arterioles from males or whether equivalent responses occur in coronary venules of either sex has not been determined. Hypotheses that 1) basal Ps properties and 2) Ps responses to vasoactive stimuli are sex independent were evaluated from measures of Ps to two hydrophilic proteins, α-lactalbumin and porcine serum albumin (PSA), in arterioles and venules isolated from hearts of adult male and female pigs. Consistent with hypothesis 1, basal Ps values of both microvessel types were independent of sex. Contrary to hypothesis 2, Ps responses to Ado varied with sex, protein, and vessel type. Confirming earlier studies, Ado induced a ~20% decrease in Ps to both proteins in coronary arterioles from females. In arterioles from males, Ado did not change Ps for α-lactalbumin (Psα-lactalb, 3 ± 13%) whereas Ps for PSA (PsPSA) decreased by 27 ± 8% (P < 0.005). In venules from females, Ado elevated PsPSA by 44 ± 20% (P < 0.05), whereas in those from males, Ado reduced PsPSA by 24 ± 5% (P < 0.05). The variety of outcomes is consistent with transvascular protein and protein-carried solute flux being regulated by multiple sex-dependent mechanisms in the heart and provides evidence of differences in exchange homeostasis of males and females in health and, likely, disease. PMID:15563527

  19. Effects of hydroxyethylrutosides on the permeability of microvessels in the frog mesentery.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, S.; Towart, R.; Michel, C. C.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the effects of a standardised mixture of hydroxyethylrutosides (HR, Venoruton), a mixture of five of its main components (M) and each of the five components separately (7-mono-HR, 7,4'-di-HR, 7,3',4'-tri-HR, 5,7,3',4'-tetra-HR and 7,3'4'-tri HQ) upon the permeability of single perfused capillaries and venules in the mesenteries of pithed frogs. 2. In each experiment, the hydraulic permeability (Lp) of a single perfused microvessel and the effective osmotic pressure (sigma delta pi) exerted by macromolecules across its walls were estimated by a microcclusion technique, first during control perfusion and then in the presence of a known concentration of test substance. 3. HR, M and 7,4'-di-HR reduced Lp in a similar concentration-dependent manner over the range of 1 microgram ml-1 to 1 mg ml-1 (maximum reduction was to 40% of control Lp at 1 mg ml-1). At perfusate concentrations greater than 1 mg ml-1, these substances reduced Lp to a lesser extent. While the four other test substances reduced Lp significantly when their perfusate concentrations equalled or exceeded 100 micrograms ml-1, they were all less potent than 7,4'-di-HR. 4. The reduction in Lp induced by the mixture of flavonoids was only slightly reversed by subsequent perfusion with flavonoid-free solutions. 5. When permeability was increased by perfusing with protein-free solutions, both HR and 7,4'-di-HR reduced and then reversed the increase in Lp in a concentration-dependent manner over the range of 1 microgram ml-1 to 100 micrograms ml-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8220880

  20. A high-density wireless underground sensor network (WUSN) to quantify hydro-ecological interactions for a UK floodplain; project background and initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoef, A.; Choudhary, B.; Morris, P. J.; McCann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Floodplain meadows support some of the most diverse vegetation in the UK, and also perform key ecosystem services, such as flood storage and sediment retention. However, the UK now has less than 1500 ha of this unique habitat remaining. In order to conserve and better exploit the services provided by this grassland, an improved understanding of its functioning is essential. Vegetation functioning and species composition are known to be tightly correlated to the hydrological regime, and related temperature and nutrient regime, but the mechanisms controlling these relationships are not well established. The FUSE* project aims to investigate the spatiotemporal variability in vegetation functioning (e.g. photosynthesis and transpiration) and plant community composition in a floodplain meadow near Oxford, UK (Yarnton Mead), and their relationship to key soil physical variables (soil temperature and moisture content), soil nutrient levels and the water- and energy-balance. A distributed high density Wireless Underground Sensor Network (WUSN) is in the process of being established on Yarnton Mead. The majority, or ideally all, of the sensing and transmitting components will be installed below-ground because Yarnton Mead is a SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest, due to its unique plant community) and because occasionally sheep or cattle are grazing on it, and that could damage the nodes. This prerequisite has implications for the maximum spacing between UG nodes and their communications technologies; in terms of signal strength, path losses and requirements for battery life. The success of underground wireless communication is highly dependent on the soil type and water content. This floodplain environment is particularly challenging in this context because the soil contains a large amount of clay near the surface and is therefore less favourable to EM wave propagation than sandy soils. Furthermore, due to high relative saturation levels (as a result of high

  1. Role of alpha-tocopheroxyl radical in the initiation of lipid peroxidation in human low-density lipoprotein exposed to horse radish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Witting, P K; Upston, J M; Stocker, R

    1997-02-11

    Heme-containing (per)oxidases including horse radish peroxidase (HRP)/H2O2 have been shown to oxidatively modify isolated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in vitro and oxidized LDL is implicated in the early events leading to atherosclerosis. The role of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TOH) in the oxidation of LDL by HRP/H2O2 is unclear, although alpha-tocopheroxyl radical (alpha-TO.), which is formed during this process, can act as a chain transfer agent of lipid peroxidation in LDL. By combining HPLC and EPR spectroscopy, we hereby show that during HRP/H2O2-induced oxidation of human LDL: (i) the accumulation of cholesteryl linoleate hydroperoxides and hydroxides (CE-O(O)H) occurs concomitantly with the formation of alpha-TO. and consumption of alpha-TOH in the absence of other detectable organic (g approximately 2) radicals; (ii) the rates of alpha-TO. formation and subsequent decay reflect the rates of both alpha-TOH consumption and CE-O(O)H accumulation; (iii) CE-O(O)H accumulation is directly dependent on the level of endogenous alpha-TOH, and vitamin E supplementation results in increased lipid oxidizability; (iv) the inhibition of HRP activity by catalase plus urate results in a persistent alpha-TO. signal, the decay (t1/2 approximately 20 min) of which is accompanied by continued accumulation of CE-O(O)H, with complete cessation of lipid peroxidation upon loss of the chromanoxyl signal. These results demonstrate a direct correlation between alpha-TOH/alpha-TO. and the extent of HRP/H2O2-induced LDL lipid peroxidation, and that this type of oxidative modification can occur in the absence of g approximately 2 radicals other than alpha-TO.. Together, the results support a role for tocopherol-mediated peroxidation but not the involvement of a protein radical in the initiation of LDL lipid peroxidation induced by HRP/H2O2.

  2. [Effect of taurine on the microvessel exchange function and adrenergic response of veins and arteries in the cat skeletal muscle].

    PubMed

    Kudriashov, Iu A; Denisov, P I

    2001-01-01

    In cats anesthetized with Uretan and perfused with a constant blood volume, Taurine induced responses of neither arterial nor venous vessels of the skeletal muscle but increased the capillary filtration coefficient without any significant change of the capillary pressure in the skeletal muscle's microvessels. Taurine also increased both the constrictor and the dilatory responses of the arterial and venous vessels. The mechanism of the Taurine effects upon the smooth muscle elements of arteries and veins as well as upon proper mechanisms of capillary pressure control and capillary filtration coefficient, seems to be calcium-dependent.

  3. Endothelial surface glycocalyx can regulate flow-induced nitric oxide production in microvessels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wanyi; Cai, Bin; Yang, Jinlin; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Tarbell, John M; Fu, Bingmei M

    2015-01-01

    Due to its unique location, the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) at the luminal side of the microvessel wall may serve as a mechano-sensor and transducer of blood flow and thus regulate endothelial functions. To examine this role of the ESG, we used fluorescence microscopy to measure nitric oxide (NO) production in post-capillary venules and arterioles of rat mesentery under reduced (low) and normal (high) flow conditions, with and without enzyme pretreatment to remove heparan sulfate (HS) of the ESG and in the presence of an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Rats (SD, 250-300 g) were anesthetized. The mesentery was gently taken out from the abdominal cavity and arranged on the surface of a glass coverslip for the measurement. An individual post-capillary venule or arteriole was cannulated and loaded for 45 min with 5 μM 4, 5-Diaminofluorescein diacetate, a membrane permeable fluorescent indictor for NO, then the NO production was measured for ~10 min under a low flow (~300 μm/s) and for ~60 min under a high flow (~1000 μm/s). In the 15 min after switching to the high flow, DAF-2-NO fluorescence intensity increased to 1.27-fold of its baseline, DAF-2-NO continuously increased under the high flow, to 1.53-fold of its baseline in 60 min. Inhibition of eNOS by 1 mM L-NMMA attenuated the flow-induced NO production to 1.13-fold in 15 min and 1.30-fold of its baseline in 60 min, respectively. In contrast, no significant increase in NO production was observed after switching to the high flow for 60 min when 1 h pretreatment with 50 mU/mL heparanase III to degrade the ESG was applied. Similar NO production was observed in arterioles under low and high flows and under eNOS inhibition. Our results suggest that ESG participates in endothelial cell mechanosensing and transduction through its heparan sulfate to activate eNOS.

  4. Initial measurements of plasma current and electron density profiles using a polarimeter/interferometer (POINT) for long pulse operation in EAST (invited).

    PubMed

    Liu, H Q; Qian, J P; Jie, Y X; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Zou, Z Y; Li, W M; Lian, H; Wang, S X; Yang, Y; Zeng, L; Lan, T; Yao, Y; Hu, L Q; Zhang, X D; Wan, B N

    2016-11-01

    A double-pass, radially viewing, far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for diagnosing the plasma current and electron density profiles in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). POINT has been operated routinely during the most recent experimental campaign and provides continuous 11 chord line-integrated Faraday effect and density measurement throughout the entire plasma discharge for all heating schemes and all plasma conditions (including ITER relevant scenario development). Reliability of both the polarimetric and interferometric measurements is demonstrated in 25 s plasmas with H-mode and 102 s long-pulse discharges. Current density, safety factor (q), and electron density profiles are reconstructed using equilibrium fitting code (EFIT) with POINT constraints for the plasma core.

  5. Initial measurements of plasma current and electron density profiles using a polarimeter/interferometer (POINT) for long pulse operation in EAST (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Q.; Qian, J. P.; Jie, Y. X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Lian, H.; Wang, S. X.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Lan, T.; Yao, Y.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D.; Wan, B. N.

    2016-11-01

    A double-pass, radially viewing, far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented for diagnosing the plasma current and electron density profiles in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). POINT has been operated routinely during the most recent experimental campaign and provides continuous 11 chord line-integrated Faraday effect and density measurement throughout the entire plasma discharge for all heating schemes and all plasma conditions (including ITER relevant scenario development). Reliability of both the polarimetric and interferometric measurements is demonstrated in 25 s plasmas with H-mode and 102 s long-pulse discharges. Current density, safety factor (q), and electron density profiles are reconstructed using equilibrium fitting code (EFIT) with POINT constraints for the plasma core.

  6. In vivo spectral and fluorescence imaging microscopy of tumor microvessel blood supply and oxygenation changes following vascular targeting agent treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jennifer; Kozikowski, Raymond; Molnar, Nikolett; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2012-03-01

    The formation of new microvasculature is essential for a tumor mass to grow. Vascular targeting agents (VTAs), including anti-angiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents, aim to either inhibit new vasculature growth or destroy existing vasculature, respectively. Because the mechanisms for anti-angiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents are complementary, analysis of these drugs used together is under investigation for the enhanced treatment of tumors in comparison to each treatment alone. The preclinical evaluation of the effects of VTAs on tumor growth in small animal models is vital for the development of effective drugs for clinical use. In vivo hyperspectral imaging microscopy of hemoglobin saturation has been used previously to investigate the efficacy of VTAs through analysis of tumor microvessel oxygenation after drug administration. Combining this imaging modality with first-pass fluorescence angiographic imaging can give additional important information about the vessel morphology and blood flow changes that occur after VTA treatment, thus elucidating the relationship between microvessel structure changes and oxygenation. In this study, we report the combined use of hyperspectral and first pass fluorescence angiographic imaging to examine the relationship between vessel morphology and oxygenation of human prostate cancer tumors in mice following treatment with vascular disrupting agents, OXi4503, and anti-VEGF angiogenesis inhibitor, cediranib. Imaging of the tumors is completed before treatment as well as in the days following treatment.

  7. MicroRNA-155 Regulates ROS Production, NO Generation, Apoptosis and Multiple Functions of Human Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells Under Physiological and Pathological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajing; Pan, Qunwen; Zhao, Yuhui; He, Caixia; Bi, Kexia; Chen, Yusen; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Yanfang; Ma, Xiaotang

    2015-12-01

    The microRNA-155 (miR155) regulates various functions of cells. Dysfunction or injury of endothelial cells (ECs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the role and potential mechanisms of miR155 in human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs) under physiological and pathological conditions. We detected the effects of miR155 silencing on ROS production, NO generation, apoptosis and functions of HBMECs at basal and in response to oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). Western blot and q-PCR were used for analyzing the gene expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase(Akt), activated caspase-3, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Results showed that under both basal and challenge situations: (1) Silencing of miR155 decreased apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of HBMECs, whereas, promoted nitric oxide (NO) generation. (2) Silencing of miR155 increased the proliferation, migration, and tube formation ability of HBMECs, while decreased cell adhesion ability. (3) Gene expression analyses showed that EGFR/ERK/p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt were increased and that activated caspase-3 and ICAM-1 mRNA were decreased after knockdown of miR155. In conclusion, knockdown of miR155 could modulate ROS production, NO generation, apoptosis and function of HBMECs via regulating diverse gene expression, such as caspase-3, ICAM-1 and EGFR/ERK/p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  8. Velocimetry of red blood cells in microvessels by the dual-slit method: effect of velocity gradients.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sophie; Lorthois, Sylvie; Duru, Paul; Risso, Frédéric

    2012-11-01

    The dual-slit is a photometric technique used for the measurement of red blood cell (RBC) velocity in microvessels. Two photometric windows (slits) are positioned along the vessel. Because the light is modulated by the RBCs flowing through the microvessel, a time dependent signal is captured for each window. A time delay between the two signals is obtained by temporal cross correlation, and is used to deduce a velocity, knowing the distance between the two slits. Despite its wide use in the field of microvascular research, the velocity actually measured by this technique has not yet been unambiguously related to a relevant velocity scale of the flow (e.g. mean or maximal velocity) or to the blood flow rate. This is due to a lack of fundamental understanding of the measurement and also because such a relationship is crucially dependent on the non-uniform velocity distribution of RBCs in the direction parallel to the light beam, which is generally unknown. The aim of the present work is to clarify the physical significance of the velocity measured by the dual-slit technique. For that purpose, dual-slit measurements were performed on computer-generated image sequences of RBCs flowing in microvessels, which allowed all the parameters related to this technique to be precisely controlled. A parametric study determined the range of optimal parameters for the implementation of the dual-slit technique. In this range, it was shown that, whatever the parameters governing the flow, the measured velocity was the maximal RBC velocity found in the direction parallel to the light beam. This finding was then verified by working with image sequences of flowing RBCs acquired in PDMS micro-systems in vitro. Besides confirming the results and physical understanding gained from the study with computer generated images, this in vitro study showed that the profile of RBC maximal velocity across the channel was blunter than a parabolic profile, and exhibited a non-zero sliding velocity at

  9. Fluctuations in the population density of Gram-negative bacteria in a chernozem in the course of a succession initiated by moistening and chitin and cellulose introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskaya, L. M.; Ivanov, K. E.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    The role has been studied of Gram-negative bacteria in the destruction of polymers widely spread in soils: chitin and cellulose. The introduction of chitin had no positive effect on the population density of Gram-negative bacteria, but it advanced the date of their appearance: the maximum population density of Gram-negative bacteria was recorded not on the 7th-15th day as in the control but much earlier, on the 3rd-7th day of the experiment. Consequently, the introduction of chitin as an additional source of nutrition promoted revealing of the Gram-negative bacteria already at the early stages of the succession. In the course of the succession, when the fungal mycelium begins to die off, the actinomycetic mycelium increases in length, i.e., Gram-negative bacteria are replaced at this stage with Gram-positive ones, the leading role among which belongs to actinomycetes. The growth rate of Gram-negative bacteria is higher than that of actinomycetes, so they start chitin utilization at the early stages of the succession, whereas actinomycetes dominate at the late stages. The population density of Gram-negative bacteria was lower under the anaerobic conditions as compared with that in the aerobic ones. The population density of Gram-negative bacteria in the lower layer of the A horizon and in the B horizon was slightly higher only in the case of the chitin introduction. When cellulose was introduced into the soil under aerobic conditions, the population density of Gram-negative bacteria in all the layers of the A horizon was maximal from the 14th to the 22nd day of the experiment. Cellulose was utilized in the soil mostly by fungi, and this was suggested by the increase of the length of the fungal mycelium. Simultaneously, an increase in the length of the actinomycetal mycelium was observed, as these organisms also perform cellulose hydrolysis in soils. The Gram-negative bacteria began to develop at the stage of the fungal mycelium destruction, which indirectly

  10. Dynamics of Gram-negative bacteria population density in a soil in the course of the succession initiated by chitin and cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantin, Ivanov; Lubov, Polyanskaya

    2014-05-01

    The functions of actinomycetes in polymer destruction in soil traditionally considered as the dominant, compare to another groups of bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria also have ecological functions in destruction of soil organic matter. The role of Gram-negative bacteria has been researched in the microbial succession in terms of polymers destruction, which are widely spreads in soils: chitin and cellulose. The method with nalidixic acid as an inhibitor of DNA division of Gram-negative bacteria was modified. By modified method microbial succession of Gram-negative bacteria in the different horizons of a chernozem under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was researched. Chitin and cellulose as the source of nutrients with moistening was used in experiments. The introduction of chitin had no positive effect on the population density of Gram-negative bacteria in a chernozem, but it advanced the date of their appearance in microbial succession: the maximum of Gram-negative bacteria population density was registered on the 3rd- 7th day of the experiment with adding chitin. Compare to the control, which one was without any nutrient adding this dynamics registered much earlier. Consequently, the introduction of chitin as an additional source of nutrition promoted revealing of the Gram-negative bacteria in soil already at the early stages of the succession. In the course of the succession, when the fungal mycelium begins to die off, the actinomycetic mycelium increases in length, i.e., Gram-negative bacteria are replaced at this stage with Gram-positive ones, the leading role among which belongs to actinomycetes. The growth rate of Gram-negative bacteria is higher than that of actinomycetes, so they start chitin utilization at the early stages of the succession, whereas actinomycetes dominate at the late stages. The population density of Gram-negative bacteria was lower under the anaerobic conditions as compared with that in the aerobic ones. The population density of Gram

  11. Two-photon imaging of cortical surface microvessels reveals a robust redistribution in blood flow after vascular occlusion.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Chris B; Friedman, Beth; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schroeder, Lee F; Tsai, Philbert S; Ebner, Ford F; Lyden, Patrick D; Kleinfeld, David

    2006-02-01

    A highly interconnected network of arterioles overlies mammalian cortex to route blood to the cortical mantle. Here we test if this angioarchitecture can ensure that the supply of blood is redistributed after vascular occlusion. We use rodent parietal cortex as a model system and image the flow of red blood cells in individual microvessels. Changes in flow are quantified in response to photothrombotic occlusions to individual pial arterioles as well as to physical occlusions of the middle cerebral artery (MCA), the primary source of blood to this network. We observe that perfusion is rapidly reestablished at the first branch downstream from a photothrombotic occlusion through a reversal in flow in one vessel. More distal downstream arterioles also show reversals in flow. Further, occlusion of the MCA leads to reversals in flow through approximately half of the downstream but distant arterioles. Thus the cortical arteriolar network supports collateral flow that may mitigate the effects of vessel obstruction, as may occur secondary to neurovascular pathology.

  12. Fucoidan Extracted from Hijiki Protects Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells Against Diesel Exhaust Particle Exposure-Induced Disruption.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Sook; Eom, Sang-Yong; Kim, In-Soo; Ali, Syed F; Kleinman, Michael T; Kim, Yong-Dae; Kim, Heon

    2016-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of fucoidan against the decreased function of primary cultured bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMECs) after exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). BBMECs were extracted from bovine brains and cultured until confluent. To evaluate the function of BBMECs, we performed a permeability test using cell-by-cell equipment and by Western blot analysis for zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1), which is a tight junction protein of BMECs, and evaluated oxidative stress in BBMECs using the DCFH-DA assay and the CUPRAC-BCS assay. The increased oxidative stress in BBMECs following DEP exposure was suppressed by fucoidan. In addition, permeability of BBMECs induced by DEP exposure was decreased by fucoidan treatment. Our results showed that fucoidan protects against BBMEC disruption induced by DEP exposure. This study provides evidence that fucoidan might protect the central nervous system (CNS) against DEP exposure.

  13. Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Rolling in Bone Marrow Microvessels: Parallel Contributions by Endothelial Selectins and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1

    PubMed Central

    Mazo, Irina B.; Gutierrez-Ramos, Jose-Carlos; Frenette, Paul S.; Hynes, Richard O.; Wagner, Denisa D.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    1998-01-01

    We have used intravital microscopy to study physiologically perfused microvessels in murine bone marrow (BM). BM sinusoids and venules, but not adjacent bone vessels, supported rolling interactions of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Rolling did not involve L-selectin, but was partially reduced in wild-type mice treated with antibodies to P- or E-selectin and in mice that were deficient in these two selectins. Selectin-independent rolling was mediated by α4 integrins, which interacted with endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Parallel contribution of the endothelial selectins and VCAM-1 is not known to direct blood cell trafficking to other noninflamed tissues. This combination of constitutively expressed adhesion molecules may thus constitute a BM-specific recruitment pathway for progenitor cells analogous to the vascular addressins that direct selective lymphocyte homing to lymphoid organs. PMID:9687524

  14. Albumin modulates S1P delivery from red blood cells in perfused microvessels: mechanism of the protein effect.

    PubMed

    Adamson, R H; Clark, J F; Radeva, M; Kheirolomoom, A; Ferrara, K W; Curry, F E

    2014-04-01

    Removal of plasma proteins from perfusates increases vascular permeability. The common interpretation of the action of albumin is that it forms part of the permeability barrier by electrostatic binding to the endothelial glycocalyx. We tested the alternate hypothesis that removal of perfusate albumin in rat venular microvessels decreased the availability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which is normally carried in plasma bound to albumin and lipoproteins and is required to maintain stable baseline endothelial barriers (Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 303: H825-H834, 2012). Red blood cells (RBCs) are a primary source of S1P in the normal circulation. We compared apparent albumin permeability coefficients [solute permeability (Ps)] measured using perfusates containing albumin (10 mg/ml, control) and conditioned by 20-min exposure to rat RBCs with Ps when test perfusates were in RBC-conditioned protein-free Ringer solution. The control perfusate S1P concentration (439 ± 46 nM) was near the normal plasma value at 37 °C and established a stable baseline Ps (0.9 ± 0.4 × 10(-6) cm/s). Ringer solution perfusate contained 52 ± 8 nM S1P and increased Ps more than 10-fold (16.1 ± 3.9 × 10(-6) cm/s). Consistent with albumin-dependent transport of S1P from RBCs, S1P concentrations in RBC-conditioned solutions decreased as albumin concentration, hematocrit, and temperature decreased. Protein-free Ringer solution perfusates that used liposomes instead of RBCs as flow markers failed to maintain normal permeability, reproducing the "albumin effect" in these mammalian microvessels. We conclude that the albumin effect depends on the action of albumin to facilitate the release and transport of S1P from RBCs that normally provide a significant amount of S1P to the endothelium.

  15. Generation of Bioactive Oxylipins from Exogenously Added Arachidonic, Eicosapentaenoic and Docosahexaenoic Acid in Primary Human Brain Microvessel Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Harold M; Winter, Tanja; Ravandi, Amir; Dalvi, Siddhartha; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-05-01

    The human blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood and is formed in part by microvessel endothelial cells. The brain contains significant amounts of arachidonic acid (ARA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which potentially give rise to the generation of bioactive oxylipins. Oxylipins are oxygenated fatty acid metabolites that are involved in an assortment of biological functions regulating neurological health and disease. Since it is not known which oxylipins are generated by human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs), they were incubated for up to 30 min in the absence or presence of 0.1-mM ARA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or DHA bound to albumin (1:1 molar ratio), and the oxylipins generated were examined using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS). Of 135 oxylipins screened in the media, 63 were present at >0.1 ng/mL at baseline, and 95 were present after incubation with fatty acid. Oxylipins were rapidly generated and reached maximum levels by 2-5 min. While ARA, EPA and DHA each stimulated the production of oxylipins derived from these fatty acids themselves, ARA also stimulated the production of oxylipins from endogenous 18- and 20-carbon fatty acids, including α-linolenic acid. Oxylipins generated by the lipoxygenase pathway predominated both in resting and stimulated states. Oxylipins formed via the cytochrome P450 pathway were formed primarily from DHA and EPA, but not ARA. These data indicate that HBMECs are capable of generating a plethora of bioactive lipids that have the potential to modulate BBB endothelial cell function.

  16. In Vivo Correlation of Glucose Metabolism, Cell Density and Microcirculatory Parameters in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Initial Results Using Simultaneous PET/MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kubiessa, Klaus; Boehm, Andreas; Barthel, Henryk; Kluge, Regine; Kahn, Thomas; Sabri, Osama; Stumpp, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous acquisition of 18F-FDG-PET, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (T1w-DCE) in an integrated simultaneous PET/MRI in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and to investigate possible correlations between these parameters. Methods 17 patients that had given informed consent (15 male, 2 female) with biopsy-proven HNSCC underwent simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE. SUVmax, SUVmean, ADCmean, ADCmin and Ktrans, kep and ve were measured for each tumour and correlated using Spearman’s ρ. Results Significant correlations were observed between SUVmean and Ktrans (ρ = 0.43; p ≤ 0.05); SUVmean and kep (ρ = 0.44; p ≤ 0.05); Ktrans and kep (ρ = 0.53; p ≤ 0.05); and between kep and ve (ρ = -0.74; p ≤ 0.01). There was a trend towards statistical significance when correlating SUVmax and ADCmin (ρ = -0.35; p = 0.08); SUVmax and Ktrans (ρ = 0.37; p = 0.07); SUVmax and kep (ρ = 0.39; p = 0.06); and ADCmean and ve (ρ = 0.4; p = 0.06). Conclusion Simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE in patients with HNSCC is feasible and allows depiction of complex interactions between glucose metabolism, microcirculatory parameters and cellular density. PMID:26270054

  17. Estrogen Receptor Subtypes Mediate Distinct Microvascular Dilation and Reduction in [Ca2+]i in Mesenteric Microvessels of Female Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, Marc Q.; Mata, Karina M.; Li, Wei; Rangan, Sridhar S.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen interacts with estrogen receptors (ERs) to induce vasodilation, but the ER subtype and post-ER relaxation pathways are unclear. We tested if ER subtypes mediate distinct vasodilator and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) responses via specific relaxation pathways in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM). Pressurized mesenteric microvessels from female Sprague-Dawley rats were loaded with fura-2, and the changes in diameter and [Ca2+]i in response to 17β-estradiol (E2) (all ERs), PPT (4,4′,4′′-[4-propyl-(1H)-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl]-tris-phenol) (ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (ERβ), and G1 [(±)-1-[(3aR*,4S*,9bS*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro:3H-cyclopenta(c)quinolin-8-yl]-ethanon] (GPR30) were measured. In microvessels preconstricted with phenylephrine, ER agonists caused relaxation and decrease in [Ca2+]i that were with E2 = PPT > DPN > G1, suggesting that E2-induced vasodilation involves ERα > ERβ > GPR30. Acetylcholine caused vasodilation and decreased [Ca2+]i, which were abolished by endothelium removal or treatment with the nitric oxide synthase blocker Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and the K+ channel blockers tetraethylammonium (nonspecific) or apamin (small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel) plus TRAM-34 (1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole) (intermediate conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel), suggesting endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor–dependent activation of KCa channels. E2-, PPT-, DPN-, and G1-induced vasodilation and decreased [Ca2+]i were not blocked by L-NAME, TEA, apamin plus TRAM-34, iberiotoxin (large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel), 4-aminopyridine (voltage-dependent K+ channel), glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K+ channel), or endothelium removal, suggesting an endothelium- and K+ channel–independent mechanism. In endothelium-denuded vessels preconstricted with phenylephrine, high KCl, or the Ca2+ channel activator Bay K

  18. Electrically Stimulated Antagonist Muscle Contraction Increased Muscle Mass and Bone Mineral Density of One Astronaut - Initial Verification on the International Space Station

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Yoshio; Yoshimitsu, Kazuhiro; Omoto, Masayuki; Hashida, Ryuki; Tagawa, Yoshihiko; Inada, Tomohisa; Yamada, Shin; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    . Conclusions These results showed the orbital operation capability and utility, and the preventive effect of HTS for an astronaut’s musculoskeletal atrophy. The initial flight data together with the ground data obtained so far will be utilized in the future planning of human space exploration. PMID:26296204

  19. Simulated Red Blood Cell Motion in Microvessel Bifurcations: Effects of Cell-Cell Interactions on Cell Partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jared O.; Restrepo, Juan M.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    Partitioning of red blood cell (RBC) fluxes between the branches of a diverging microvessel bifurcation is generally not proportional to the flow rates, as RBCs preferentially enter the higher-flow branch. A two-dimensional model for RBC motion and deformation is used to investigate the effects of cell-cell mechanical interactions on RBC partitioning in bifurcations. The RBC membrane and cytoplasm are represented by sets of viscoelastic elements immersed in a low Reynolds number flow. Several types of two-cell interactions that can affect partitioning are found. In the most frequent interactions, a `trade-off' occurs, in which a cell entering one branch causes a following cell to enter the other branch. Other types of interactions include `herding,' where the leading cell is caused to enter the same branch as the following cell, and `following,' where the trailing cell is caused to enter the same branch as the leading cell. The combined effect of these cell-cell interactions is a tendency towards more uniform partitioning, which results from the trade-off effect but is reduced by the herding and following effects. With increasing hematocrit, the frequency of interactions increases, and more uniform partitioning results. This prediction is consistent with experimental observations on how hematocrit affects RBC partitioning. PMID:23555330

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in transformed bovine brain endothelial cells and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells: the role of JNK.

    PubMed

    Karahashi, Hisae; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-06-01

    Stimulation of transformed bovine brain endothelial cells (TBBEC) with LPS leads to apoptosis while human microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC) need the presence of cycloheximide (CHX) with LPS to induce apoptosis. To investigate the molecular mechanism of LPS-induced apoptosis in HMEC or TBBEC, we analyzed the involvement of MAPK and PI3K in TBBEC and HMEC. LPS-induced apoptosis in TBBEC was hallmarked by the activation of caspase 3, caspase 6, and caspase 8 after the stimulation of LPS, followed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and lactate dehydrogenase release. We also observed DNA cleavage determined by TUNEL staining in TBBEC treated with LPS. Herbimycin A, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, suppressed the activation of caspases and lactate dehydrogenase release. Moreover, a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) suppressed activation of caspases and combined treatment with both SP600125 and LY294002 completely inhibited the activation of caspases. These results suggest that the JNK signaling pathway through the tyrosine kinase and PI3K pathways is involved in the induction of apoptosis in LPS-treated TBBEC. On the other hand, we observed sustained JNK activation in HMEC treated with LPS and CHX, and neither ERK1/2 nor AKT were activated. The addition of SP600125 suppressed phosphorylation of JNK and the activation of caspase 3 in HMEC treated with LPS and CHX. These results suggest that JNK plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis in endothelial cells.

  1. Quantitative analysis of microvessels in rat circumventricular organs and pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, J.; Gross, P.; Sposito, N.; Pettersen, S.; Blasberg, R.; Patlak, C.; Butler, A.

    1986-03-01

    The cerebral circumventricular organs (CVOs) and pituitary gland (PG) purportedly have dense, highly permeable capillary beds which allow for ready blood-tissue exchange of messenger molecules. Quantitation of various morphological and physiological features of the capillaries with CVOs and PG plus some brain structures which have tight or blood-brain barrier (BBB) capillaries was undertaken in rats using several radiolabeled markers, quantitative autoradiography, image analysis, and light and electron microscopic morphometry. Microvascular blood volumes in CVOs and PG were several times larger than in other brain areas (54-70 ..mu../g and 5-8 ..mu../g, respectively). Capillary density and surface area were generally much greater in CVOs and PG than in gray matter; however the highest values for these two parameters were found for the pituitary neural lobe (NL) and supraoptic nucleus (SON), which has BBB capillaries. The rate of capillary blood flow was highest in NL and was similar in the subfornical organ, median eminence, cerebral cortex and SON (1.5 ml/g/min). The transcapillary exchange of several markers was 200-500 times greater in CVOs and NL than in BBB capillaries.

  2. Cell-free layer development process in the entrance region of microvessels.

    PubMed

    Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-08-01

    We simulated red blood cell flows through a finite length channel with a two-dimensional immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann model. The local instantaneous variation in wall-cell distance has been examined in details, and a nominal cell-free layer (CFL) thickness has been proposed. The CFL development process along the channel has been then analyzed, showing that the CFL thickness profile can be basically split into two regimes: the initial rapid increase due to cell migration and the later gradual growth due to cell reorganization. Effects of various hemorheological factors, such as rigidity, aggregation, hematocrit, and channel width, have also been investigated. The development length of the CFL to 90% of its final width ranges from 150 to 300 μm, and the development length is sensitive to changes in hemorheological conditions. The correlation between the CFL features and hemorheological parameters has also been explored. The simulation results have been compared to available experimental studies, and qualitative agreement has been noticed. In spite of the model limitations, this study reveals the complexity of CFL development process, and it could be useful for better understanding relevant processes and phenomena in the microcirculation.

  3. KDM4B histone demethylase and G9a regulate expression of vascular adhesion proteins in cerebral microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-Young; Yoon, Sang-Sun; Kim, Sang-Eun; Ahn Jo, Sangmee

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) mediates the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the endothelium, promoting inflammation. We investigated the epigenetic mechanism regulating ICAM1 expression. The pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α dramatically increased ICAM1 mRNA and protein levels in human brain microvascular endothelial cells and mouse brain microvessels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that TNF-α reduced methylation of histone H3 at lysines 9 and 27 (H3K9 and H3K27), well-known residues involved in gene suppression. Inhibition of G9a and EZH2, histone methyltransferases responsible for methylation at H3K9 and H3K27, respectively as well as G9a overexpression demonstrated the involvement of G9a in TNF-α-induced ICAM1 expression and leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. A specific role for KDM4B, a histone demethylase targeting H3K9me2, in TNF-α-induced ICAM1 upregulation was validated with siRNA. Moreover, treating mice with a KDM4 inhibitor ML324 blocked TNF-α-mediated neutrophil adhesion. Similarly, TNF-α-induced VCAM1 expression was suppressed by G9a overexpression and KDM4B knockdown. Collectively, we demonstrated that modification of H3K9me2 by G9a and KDM4B regulates expression of vascular adhesion molecules, and that depletion of these proteins or KDM4B reduces inflammation-induced leukocyte extravasation. Thus, blocking ICAM1 or KDM4B could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity treating brain diseases. PMID:28327608

  4. Association of Maternal Antiangiogenic Profile at Birth With Early Postnatal Loss of Microvascular Density in Offspring of Hypertensive Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Grace Z.; Aye, Christina Y.L.; Lewandowski, Adam J.; Davis, Esther F.; Khoo, Cheen P.; Newton, Laura; Yang, Cheng T.; Al Haj Zen, Ayman; Simpson, Lisa J.; O’Brien, Kathryn; Cook, David A.; Granne, Ingrid; Kyriakou, Theodosios; Channon, Keith M.; Watt, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Offspring of hypertensive pregnancies are more likely to have microvascular rarefaction and increased blood pressure in later life. We tested the hypothesis that maternal angiogenic profile during a hypertensive pregnancy is associated with fetal vasculogenic capacity and abnormal postnatal microvascular remodeling. Infants (n=255) born after either hypertensive or normotensive pregnancies were recruited for quantification of postnatal dermal microvascular structure at birth and 3 months of age. Vasculogenic cell potential was assessed in umbilical vein endothelial cells from 55 offspring based on in vitro microvessel tube formation and proliferation assays. Maternal angiogenic profile (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1, soluble endoglin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and placental growth factor) was measured from postpartum plasma samples to characterize severity of pregnancy disorder. At birth, offspring born after hypertensive pregnancy had similar microvessel density to those born after a normotensive pregnancy, but during the first 3 postnatal months, they had an almost 2-fold greater reduction in total vessel density (−17.7±16.4% versus −9.9±18.7%; P=0.002). This postnatal loss varied according to the vasculogenic capacity of the endothelial cells of the infant at birth (r=0.49; P=0.02). The degree of reduction in both in vitro and postnatal in vivo vascular development was proportional to levels of antiangiogenic factors in the maternal circulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that offspring born to hypertensive pregnancies have reduced vasculogenic capacity at birth that predicts microvessel density loss over the first 3 postnatal months. Degree of postnatal microvessel reduction is proportional to levels of antiangiogenic factors in the maternal circulation at birth. PMID:27456522

  5. Exogenous arachidonic acid mediates permeability of human brain microvessel endothelial cells through prostaglandin E2 activation of EP3 and EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Siddhartha; Nguyen, Hieu H; On, Ngoc; Mitchell, Ryan W; Aukema, Harold M; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2015-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Arachidonic acid (ARA; 5,8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) is a conditionally essential polyunsaturated fatty acid [20:4(n-6)] and is a major constituent of brain lipids. The current study examined the transport processes for ARA in confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Addition of radioactive ARA to the apical compartment of HBMEC cultured on Transwell(®) inserts resulted in rapid incorporation of radioactivity into the basolateral medium. Knock down of fatty acid transport proteins did not alter ARA passage into the basolateral medium as a result of the rapid generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an eicosanoid known to facilitate opening of the blood-brain barrier. Permeability following ARA or PGE2 exposure was confirmed by an increased movement of fluorescein-labeled dextran from apical to basolateral medium. ARA-mediated permeability was attenuated by specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. EP3 and EP4 receptor antagonists attenuated the ARA-mediated permeability of HBMEC. The results indicate that ARA increases permeability of HBMEC monolayers likely via increased production of PGE2 which acts upon EP3 and EP4 receptors to mediate permeability. These observations may explain the rapid influx of ARA into the brain previously observed upon plasma infusion with ARA. The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is a restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Radiolabeled arachidonic acid (ARA) movement across, and monolayer permeability in the presence of ARA, was examined in confluent monolayers of primary human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs) cultured on Transwell(®) plates. Incubation of HBMECs with ARA resulted in a rapid increase in HBMEC monolayer permeability. The mechanism was mediated, in part

  6. Neuropeptide degradation by large vessel and microvessel-derived endothelial cells in vitro: cell surface catabolism of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH).

    PubMed

    Rozental, J M; Kaminska, G; Turner, J; Schwartz, T; Cadahia, V; Brooks, B R

    1989-10-16

    Cell surface ectopeptidase activity of purified, cultured large vessel and microvessel-derived endothelial cells (EC) was studied. Degradation of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), and production of cyclo-His-Pro was significantly increased (P less than 0.001) in large vessel EC compared with microcapillary EC. Since the rate of catabolism in the microvascular capillary bed is 5 times less than that in the large vessel wall, peptide concentrations are likely maintained longer in close proximity to their site of biosynthesis, where they are presumably most active.

  7. Complete blockade of the vasorelaxant effects of angiotensin-(1–7) and bradykinin in murine microvessels by antagonists of the receptor Mas

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Vallejo, Susana; Gembardt, Florian; Palacios, Erika; Novella, Susana; Azcutia, Verónica; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Walther, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The heptapeptide angiotensin-(1–7) is a biologically active metabolite of angiotensin II, the predominant peptide of the renin–angiotensin system. Recently, we have shown that the receptor Mas is associated with angiotensin-(1–7)-induced signalling and mediates, at least in part, the vasodilatory properties of angiotensin-(1–7). However, it remained controversial whether an additional receptor could account for angiotensin-(1–7)-induced vasorelaxation. Here, we used two different angiotensin-(1–7) antagonists, A779 and d-Pro-angiotensin-(1–7), to address this question and also to study their influence on the vasodilatation induced by bradykinin. Isolated mesenteric microvessels from both wild-type and Mas-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were precontracted with noradrenaline, and vascular reactivity to angiotensin-(1–7) and bradykinin was subsequently studied using a small-vessel myograph. Furthermore, mechanisms for Mas effects were investigated in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Both angiotensin-(1–7) and bradykinin triggered a concentration-dependent vasodilatation in wild-type microvessels, which was absent in the presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. In these vessels, the pre-incubation with the Mas antagonists A779 or d-Pro-angiotensin-(1–7) totally abolished the vasodilatory capacity of both angiotensin-(1–7) and bradykinin, which was nitric oxide mediated. Accordingly, Mas-deficient microvessels lacked the capacity to relax in response to either angiotensin-(1–7) or bradykinin. Pre-incubation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with A779 prevented bradykinin-mediated NO generation and NO synthase phosphorylation at serine 1177. The angiotensin-(1–7) antagonists A779 and d-Pro-angiotensin-(1–7) equally block Mas, which completely controls the angiotensin-(1–7)-induced vasodilatation in mesenteric microvessels. Importantly, Mas also appears to be a critical player in NO-mediated vasodilatation induced by

  8. A three dimensional model of an ultrasound contrast agent gas bubble and its mechanical effects on microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinkhah, N.; Hynynen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents inside a microvessel, when driven by ultrasound, oscillate and induce mechanical stresses on the vessel wall. These mechanical stresses can produce beneficial therapeutic effects but also induce vessel rupture if the stresses are too high. Therefore, it is important to use sufficiently low pressure amplitudes to avoid rupturing the vessels while still inducing the desired therapeutic effects. In this work, we developed a comprehensive three dimensional model of a confined microbubble inside a vessel while considering the bubble shell properties, blood viscosity, vessel wall curvature and the mechanical properties of the vessel wall. Two bubble models with the assumption of a spherical symmetric bubble and a simple asymmetrical bubble were simulated. This work was validated with previous experimental results and enabled us to evaluate the microbubbles’ behaviour and the resulting mechanical stresses induced on the vessel walls. In this study the fluid shear and circumferential stresses were evaluated as indicators of the mechanical stresses. The effects of acoustical parameters, vessel viscoelasticity and rigidity, vessel/bubble size and off-center bubbles on bubble behaviour and stresses on the vessel were investigated. The fluid shear and circumferential stresses acting on the vessel varied with time and location. As the frequency changed, the microbubble oscillated with the highest amplitude at its resonance frequency which was different from the resonance frequency of an unbound bubble. The bubble resonance frequency increased as the rigidity of a flexible vessel increased. The fluid shear and circumferential stresses peaked at frequencies above the bubble’s resonance frequency. The more rigid the vessels were, the more damped the bubble oscillations. The synergistic effect of acoustic frequency and vessel elasticity had also been investigated, since the circumferential stress showed either an increasing trend or a decreasing one

  9. Unique cellular events occurring during the initial interaction of macrophages with matrix-retained or methylated aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL). Prolonged cell-surface contact during which ldl-cholesteryl ester hydrolysis exceeds ldl protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Buton, X; Mamdouh, Z; Ghosh, R; Du, H; Kuriakose, G; Beatini, N; Grabowski, G A; Maxfield, F R; Tabas, I

    1999-11-05

    A critical event in atherogenesis is the interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins. Although most studies have investigated this interaction by incubating cultured macrophages with monomeric lipoproteins dissolved in media, arterial wall macrophages encounter lipoproteins that are mostly bound to subendothelial extracellular matrix, and these lipoproteins are often aggregated or fused. Herein, we utilize a specialized cell-culture system to study the initial interaction of macrophages with aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL) bound to extracellular matrix. The aggregated LDL remains extracellular for a relatively prolonged period of time and becomes lodged in invaginations in the surface of the macrophages. As expected, the degradation of the protein moiety of the LDL was very slow. Remarkably, however, hydrolysis of the cholesteryl ester (CE) moiety of the LDL was 3-7-fold higher than that of the protein moiety, in stark contrast to the situation with receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl-LDL. Similar results were obtained using another experimental system in which the degradation of aggregated LDL protein was delayed by LDL methylation rather than by retention on matrix. Additional experiments indicated the following properties of this interaction: (a) LDL-CE hydrolysis is catalyzed by lysosomal acid lipase; (b) neither scavenger receptors nor the LDL receptor appear necessary for the excess LDL-CE hydrolysis; and (c) LDL-CE hydrolysis in this system is resistant to cellular potassium depletion, which further distinguishes this process from receptor-mediated endocytosis. In summary, experimental systems specifically designed to mimic the in vivo interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins have demonstrated an initial period of prolonged cell-surface contact in which CE hydrolysis exceeds protein degradation.

  10. Putative CD133+ melanoma cancer stem cells induce initial angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zimmerer, Rüdiger M; Matthiesen, Peter; Kreher, Fritjof; Kampmann, Andreas; Spalthoff, Simon; Jehn, Philipp; Bittermann, Gido; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Tavassol, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, and is regulated by a complex network of various types of cells, chemokines, and stimulating factors. In contrast to sprouting angiogenesis, tumor angiogenesis is also influenced by hypoxia, inflammation, and the attraction of bone-marrow-derived cells. Recently, cancer stem cells have been reported to mimic vascularization by differentiating into endothelial cells and inducing vessel formation. In this study, the influence of cancer stem cells on initial angiogenesis was evaluated for the metastatic melanoma cell line D10. Following flow cytometry, CD133+ and CD133- cells were isolated using magnetic cell separation and different cell fractions were transferred to porcine gelatin sponges, which were implanted into the dorsal skinfold chamber of immunocompromised mice. Angiogenesis was analyzed based on microvessel density over a 10-day period using in vivo fluorescence microscopy, and the results were verified using immunohistology. CD133+ D10 cells showed a significant induction of early angiogenesis in vivo, contrary to CD133- D10 cells, unsorted D10 cells, and negative control. Neovascularization was confirmed by visualizing endothelial cells by immunohistology using an anti-CD31 antibody. Because CD133+ cells are rare in clinical specimens and hardly amenable to functional assays, the D10 cell line provides a suitable model to study the angiogenic potential of putative cancer stem cells and the leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction in the dorsal skinfold chamber in vivo. This cancer stem cell model might be useful in the development and evaluation of therapeutic agents targeting tumors.

  11. Density Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiter, Richard L.; Puzey, Whitney L.; Blitz, Erin A.

    2006-01-01

    Metal rods of high purity for many elements are now commercially available and may be used to construct a display of relative densities. We have constructed a display with nine metal rods (Mg, Al, Ti, V, Fe, Cu, Ag, Pb, and W) of equal mass whose densities vary from 1.74 to 19.3 g cm[superscript -3]. The relative densities of the metals may be…

  12. The permeation of dynorphin A 1-6 across the blood brain barrier and its effect on bovine brain microvessel endothelial cell monolayer permeability.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Courtney D Kuhnline; Audus, Kenneth L; Aldrich, Jane V; Lunte, Susan M

    2012-12-01

    Dynorphin A 1-17 (Dyn A 1-17) is an endogenous neuropeptide known to act at the kappa opioid receptor; it has been implicated in a number of neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain, stress, depression, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The investigation of Dyn A 1-17 metabolism at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is important since the metabolites exhibit unique biological functions compared to the parent compound. In this work, Dyn A 1-6 is identified as a metabolite of Dyn A 1-17 in the presence of bovine brain microvessel endhothelial cells (BBMECs), using LC-MS/MS. The transport of Dyn A 1-6 at the BBB was examined using this in vitro cell culture model of the BBB. Furthermore, the permeation of the BBB by the low molecular weight permeability marker fluorescein was characterized in the presence and absences of Dyn A 1-6.

  13. Fatty acid transport protein expression in human brain and potential role in fatty acid transport across human brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Ryan W; On, Ngoc H; Del Bigio, Marc R; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2011-05-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by the brain capillary endothelial cells, provides a protective barrier between the systemic blood and the extracellular environment of the CNS. Passage of fatty acids from the blood to the brain may occur either by diffusion or by proteins that facilitate their transport. Currently several protein families have been implicated in fatty acid transport. The focus of the present study was to identify the fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) expressed in the brain microvessel endothelial cells and characterize their involvement in fatty acid transport across an in vitro BBB model. The major fatty acid transport proteins expressed in human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC), mouse capillaries and human grey matter were FATP-1, -4 and fatty acid binding protein 5 and fatty acid translocase/CD36. The passage of various radiolabeled fatty acids across confluent HBMEC monolayers was examined over a 30-min period in the presence of fatty acid free albumin in a 1 : 1 molar ratio. The apical to basolateral permeability of radiolabeled fatty acids was dependent upon both saturation and chain length of the fatty acid. Knockdown of various fatty acid transport proteins using siRNA significantly decreased radiolabeled fatty acid transport across the HBMEC monolayer. Our findings indicate that FATP-1 and FATP-4 are the predominant fatty acid transport proteins expressed in the BBB based on human and mouse expression studies. While transport studies in HBMEC monolayers support their involvement in fatty acid permeability, fatty acid translocase/CD36 also appears to play a prominent role in transport of fatty acids across HBMEC.

  14. The association of red blood cell n-3 and n-6 fatty acids to dietary fatty acid intake, bone mineral density and hip fracture risk in The Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Orchard, Tonya S.; Ing, Steven W.; Lu, Bo; Belury, Martha A.; Johnson, Karen; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Jackson, Rebecca D.

    2013-01-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in red blood cells (RBC) are an objective indicator of PUFA status and may be related to hip fracture risk. The primary objective of this study was to examine RBC PUFAs as predictors of hip fracture risk in postmenopausal women. A nested case-control study (n=400 pairs) was completed within the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) using 201 incident hip fracture cases from the Bone Mineral Density (BMD) cohort, along with 199 additional incident hip fracture cases randomly selected from the WHI Observational Study. Cases were 1:1 matched on age, race, and hormone use with non-hip fracture controls. Stored baseline RBCs were analyzed for fatty acids using gas chromatography. After removing degraded samples, 324 matched pairs were included in statistical analyses. Stratified Cox proportional hazard models were constructed according to case-control pair status; risk of fracture was estimated for tertiles of RBC PUFA. In adjusted hazard models, lower hip fracture risk was associated with higher RBC α-linolenic acid [Hazard ratio (HR) Tertile 3 (T3): 0.44; 95% CI: 0.23-0.85; p for linear trend 0.0154)], eicosapentaenoic acid (HR T3: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.24-0.87; p for linear trend 0.0181) and total n-3 PUFAs (HR T3: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.30-1.01; p for linear trend 0.0492). Conversely, hip fracture nearly doubled with the highest RBC n-6/n-3 ratio (HR T3: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.03-3.70; p for linear trend 0.0399). RBC PUFAs were not associated with BMD. RBC PUFAs were indicative of dietary intake of marine n-3 PUFAs (Spearman’s rho=0.45, p<0.0001), total n-6 PUFAs (rho=0.17, p<0.0001) and linoleic acid (rho= 0.09, p<0.05). These results suggest that higher RBC α-linolenic acid, as well as eicosapentaenoic acid and total n-3 PUFAs, may predict lower hip fracture risk. Contrastingly, a higher RBC n-6/n-3 ratio may predict higher hip fracture risk in postmenopausal women. PMID:23018646

  15. Asteroid Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britt, D. T.; Yeomans, D.; Housen, K.; Consolmagno, G.

    2005-01-01

    This data set contains a tabulation of asteroid masses, diameters, and bulk densities compiled by D. T. Britt and published in Table 1 of Britt, et al. (2002) [BRITTETAL2002] in the 'Asteroids III' volume.

  16. Ports Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of the ports initiative is to assist EPA and other participants to formulate strategies for moving forward on actions addressing the transportation, air quality and climate issues raised in the National Conversations.

  17. Event-by-event distribution of the ratio of magnetic field energy to initial fluid energy density in √{sN N}=200 GeV Au-Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Victor; Pu, Shi

    2015-12-01

    We estimate the event-by-event (e-by-e) distribution of the ratio (σ ) of the magnetic and electric field energy density to the fluid energy density in the transverse plane of Au-Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV. A Monte Carlo (MC) Glauber model is used to calculate σ in the transverse plane for impact parameter b =0 , 12 fm at time τi˜0.5 fm. The fluid energy density is obtained by using Gaussian smoothing with two different smoothing parameter σg=0.25 , 0.5 fm. For b =0 fm collisions σ is found to be ≪1 in the central region of the fireball and σ ≳1 at the periphery. For b =12 fm collisions σ ≳1 is observed for some events. The e-by-e correlation between σ and the fluid energy density (ɛ ) is studied. We did not find strong correlation between σ and ɛ at the center of the fireball, whereas they are mostly anticorrelated at the periphery of the fireball.

  18. Youth Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Office of Youth Programs.

    Summarizing the first eight months of the planning, design, and implementation of the new federal youth programs created by the Youth Employment and Demonstration Projects Act of 1977 (YEDPA) and the efforts for expansion and enrichment of the Job Corps, this report explains the charters of the two projects and their initial successes in and…

  19. Ultrastructural analysis of contractile cell development in lung microvessels in hyperoxic pulmonary hypertension. Fibroblasts and intermediate cells selectively reorganize nonmuscular segments.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R.

    1992-01-01

    The current study traces the development of contractile cells in the nonmuscular segments of rat lung microvessels in hyperoxic pulmonary hypertension. New intimal cells first develop into a well-defined layer beneath the endothelium and internal to an elastic lamina. Ultrastructurally, these cells are found to be 1) fibroblasts recruited to the vessel wall from the interstitium and 2) intermediate cells, a population of preexisting vascular cells (structurally between a smooth muscle cell and a pericyte). Early in hyperoxia (days 3 through 7), interstitial fibroblasts migrate and align around the smallest vessels in which an elastic lamina is either absent or fragmentary. These cells then are incorporated into the vessel wall by tropoelastin secretion and the formation of an elastic lamina along their abluminal margin. After day 7, the new mural fibroblasts acquire the features of contractile cells, namely a basal lamina, extensive microfilaments, and dense bodies. In other vessels, as early as day 3 of hyperoxia, intermediate cells within the vessel intima begin to acquire the additional filaments and dense bodies of contractile cells. As hyperoxia continues, each cell pathway gives rise to vessels with distinct intimal or medial layers of contractile cells. In this way, thick-walled 'newly muscularized' vessel segments form adjacent to the capillary bed. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 p1500-a Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:1466406

  20. No Identical "Mesenchymal Stem Cells" at Different Times and Sites: Human Committed Progenitors of Distinct Origin and Differentiation Potential Are Incorporated as Adventitial Cells in Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Benedetto; Funari, Alessia; Remoli, Cristina; Giannicola, Giuseppe; Kogler, Gesine; Liedtke, Stefanie; Cossu, Giulio; Serafini, Marta; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Tagliafico, Enrico; Tenedini, Elena; Saggio, Isabella; Robey, Pamela G; Riminucci, Mara; Bianco, Paolo

    2016-06-14

    A widely shared view reads that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells ("MSCs") are ubiquitous in human connective tissues, can be defined by a common in vitro phenotype, share a skeletogenic potential as assessed by in vitro differentiation assays, and coincide with ubiquitous pericytes. Using stringent in vivo differentiation assays and transcriptome analysis, we show that human cell populations from different anatomical sources, regarded as "MSCs" based on these criteria and assumptions, actually differ widely in their transcriptomic signature and in vivo differentiation potential. In contrast, they share the capacity to guide the assembly of functional microvessels in vivo, regardless of their anatomical source, or in situ identity as perivascular or circulating cells. This analysis reveals that muscle pericytes, which are not spontaneously osteochondrogenic as previously claimed, may indeed coincide with an ectopic perivascular subset of committed myogenic cells similar to satellite cells. Cord blood-derived stromal cells, on the other hand, display the unique capacity to form cartilage in vivo spontaneously, in addition to an assayable osteogenic capacity. These data suggest the need to revise current misconceptions on the origin and function of so-called "MSCs," with important applicative implications. The data also support the view that rather than a uniform class of "MSCs," different mesoderm derivatives include distinct classes of tissue-specific committed progenitors, possibly of different developmental origin.

  1. SCB initiator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-11-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  2. SCB initiator

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-01-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  3. Methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) induce differential cytotoxic effects in bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M; Rice, Kenner C; Gannon, Brenda M; Fantegrossi, William E; Gonzalez, Carmen; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F

    2016-08-26

    Designer drugs such as synthetic psychostimulants are indicative of a worldwide problem of drug abuse and addiction. In addition to methamphetamine (METH), these drugs include 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) and commercial preparations of synthetic cathinones including 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), typically referred to as "bath salts." These psychostimulants exert neurotoxic effects by altering monoamine systems in the brain. Additionally, METH and MDMA adversely affect the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB): there are no current reports on the effects of MDPV on the BBB. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of METH, MDMA and MDPV on bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (bBMVECs), an accepted in vitro model of the BBB. Confluent bBMVEC monolayers were treated with METH, MDMA and MDPV (0.5mM-2.5mM) for 24h. METH and MDMA increased lactate dehydrogenase release only at the highest concentration (2.5mM), whereas MDPV induced cytotoxicity at all concentrations. MDMA and METH decreased cellular proliferation only at 2.5mM, with similar effects observed after MDPV exposures starting at 1mM. Only MDPV increased reactive oxygen species production at all concentrations tested whereas all 3 drugs increased nitric oxide production. Morphological analysis revealed different patterns of compound-induced cell damage. METH induced vacuole formation at 1mM and disruption of the monolayer at 2.5mM. MDMA induced disruption of the endothelial monolayer from 1mM without vacuolization. On the other hand, MDPV induced monolayer disruption at doses ≥0.5mM without vacuole formation; at 2.5mM, the few remaining cells lacked endothelial morphology. These data suggest that even though these synthetic psychostimulants alter monoaminergic systems, they each induce BBB toxicity by different mechanisms with MDPV being the most toxic.

  4. Optimization of low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound-mediated microvessel disruption on prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice using an orthogonal experimental design

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YU; BAI, WENKUN; CHEN, YINI; LIN, YANDUAN; HU, BING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to provide a complete exploration of the effect of sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time on low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound (US)-mediated microvessel disruption, and to identify an optimal combination of the five factors that maximize the blockage effect. An orthogonal experimental design approach was used. Enhanced US imaging and acoustic quantification were performed to assess tumor blood perfusion. In the confirmatory test, in addition to acoustic quantification, the specimens of the tumor were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and observed using light microscopy. The results revealed that sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time had a significant effect on the average peak intensity (API). The extent of the impact of the variables on the API was in the following order: Sound intensity; frequency; duty cycle; microbubble volume; and irradiation time. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: Sound intensity, 1.00 W/cm2; frequency, 20 Hz; duty cycle, 40%; microbubble volume, 0.20 ml; and irradiation time, 3 min. In the confirmatory test, the API was 19.97±2.66 immediately subsequent to treatment, and histological examination revealed signs of tumor blood vessel injury in the optimum parameter combination group. In conclusion, the Taguchi L18 (3)6 orthogonal array design was successfully applied for determining the optimal parameter combination of API following treatment. Under the optimum orthogonal design condition, a minimum API of 19.97±2.66 subsequent to low-frequency and low-intensity mediated blood perfusion blockage was obtained. PMID:26722279

  5. Optimization of low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound-mediated microvessel disruption on prostate cancer xenografts in nude mice using an orthogonal experimental design.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y U; Bai, Wenkun; Chen, Yini; Lin, Yanduan; Hu, Bing

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to provide a complete exploration of the effect of sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time on low-frequency low-intensity ultrasound (US)-mediated microvessel disruption, and to identify an optimal combination of the five factors that maximize the blockage effect. An orthogonal experimental design approach was used. Enhanced US imaging and acoustic quantification were performed to assess tumor blood perfusion. In the confirmatory test, in addition to acoustic quantification, the specimens of the tumor were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and observed using light microscopy. The results revealed that sound intensity, frequency, duty cycle, microbubble volume and irradiation time had a significant effect on the average peak intensity (API). The extent of the impact of the variables on the API was in the following order: Sound intensity; frequency; duty cycle; microbubble volume; and irradiation time. The optimum conditions were found to be as follows: Sound intensity, 1.00 W/cm(2); frequency, 20 Hz; duty cycle, 40%; microbubble volume, 0.20 ml; and irradiation time, 3 min. In the confirmatory test, the API was 19.97±2.66 immediately subsequent to treatment, and histological examination revealed signs of tumor blood vessel injury in the optimum parameter combination group. In conclusion, the Taguchi L18 (3)(6) orthogonal array design was successfully applied for determining the optimal parameter combination of API following treatment. Under the optimum orthogonal design condition, a minimum API of 19.97±2.66 subsequent to low-frequency and low-intensity mediated blood perfusion blockage was obtained.

  6. An anti-platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 antibody inhibits leukocyte extravasation from mesenteric microvessels in vivo by blocking the passage through the basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) plays an active role in the process of leukocyte migration through cultured endothelial cells in vitro and anti-PECAM-1 antibodies (Abs) inhibit accumulation of leukocytes into sites of inflammation in vivo. Despite the latter, it is still not clear at which stage of leukocyte emigration in vivo PECAM-1 is involved. To address this point directly, we studied the effect of an anti-PECAM-1 Ab, recognizing rat PECAM-1, on leukocyte responses within rat mesenteric microvessels using intravital microscopy. In mesenteric preparations activated by interleukin (IL)-1 beta, the anti-PECAM-1 Ab had no significant effect on the rolling or adhesion of leukocytes, but inhibited their migration into the surrounding extravascular tissue in a dose-dependent manner. Although in some vessel segments these leukocytes had come to a halt within the vascular lumen, often the leukocytes appeared to be trapped within the vessel wall. Analysis of these sections by electron microscopy revealed that the leukocytes had passed through endothelial cell junctions but not the basement membrane. In contrast to the effect of the Ab in mesenteric preparations treated with IL-1 beta, leukocyte extravasation induced by topical or intraperitoneal administration of the chemotactic peptide formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine was not inhibited by the anti-PECAM-1 Ab. These results directly demonstrate a role for PECAM-1 in leukocyte extravasation in vivo and indicate that this involvement is selective for leukocyte extravasation elicited by certain inflammatory mediators. Further, our findings provide the first in vivo indication that PECAM-1 may have an important role in triggering the passage of leukocytes through the perivascular basement membrane. PMID:8691137

  7. Openness initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  8. Analysis of atomic thermospheric nitrogen density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engebretson, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A NASA grant provided support for a research project at Augsbury College, Minneapolis, Minnesota for the analysis of atomic nitrogen density data obtained by the Neutral Atmospheric Composition Spectrometer (NACS) on board the Dynamics Explorer-2 satellite. Initial funding was for an exploratory study of the feasibility of obtaining ambient densities of N from source densities of NO. Funding was continued under the Dynamics Explorer Guest Investigator Program when initial studies indicated probable success in obtaining such ambient densities. The major scientific focus of the later work was to be to characterize the behavior of N densities at high latitudes.

  9. Comparison of experimental data on detonation velocity and Chapman-Jouget pressure vs initial HE density with predictions from Ree's model equation of state. [RDX and HMX which are homologous nitramines of the family (CH/sub 2/N/sub 2/O/sub 2/)/sub n/ where n is 3 for RDX and 4 for HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, D J

    1985-02-01

    Data on the change of detonation velocity and Chapman-Jouget pressure vs initial HE density for RDX and HMX have been compared with the theoretical predictions of Ree for PBX 9404. Ree's model predicts breaks or changes in the slope of these curves due to the solidification of carbon and the formation of a separate, nitrogen-rich phase. There is good evidence for the solidification of carbon at rho/sub 0/ about 1.15 g/cc, but the evidence for the nitrogen phase separation at rho/sub 0/ about 1.56 g/cc is conflicting. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The initiation of free radical peroxidation of low-density lipoproteins by glucose and its metabolite methylglyoxal: a common molecular mechanism of vascular wall injure in atherosclerosis and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lankin, Vadim; Konovalova, Galina; Tikhaze, Alla; Shumaev, Konstantin; Kumskova, Elena; Viigimaa, Margus

    2014-10-01

    It was found that glucose in the range of concentrations 12.5-100 mM stimulated Cu(2+)-mediated free radical peroxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) from human blood plasma. Considering the kinetic parameters of LDL peroxidation we proposed that intensification of this process may be caused by formation of free radical intermediates of glucose auto-oxidation. Addition of SOD to the medium inhibited LDL oxidation, indicating the formation of superoxide anion-radicals under autoxidation of glucose. Similarly, SOD inhibited free radical peroxidation of liposomes from egg lecithin in the presence of glucose that confirms the generation of superoxide radicals under co-oxidation of unsaturated lipids and glucose. Normalization of glucose level in the blood of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus during therapy was accompanied by a significant decrease in LDL oxidation in vivo (the decrease in primary and secondary lipoperoxidation products). The formation of superoxide anion-radicals was observed during interaction of aminoacid L-lysine with a product of glucose oxidative metabolism-methylglyoxal, but not with a product of lipoperoxidation malonyldialdehyde. In accordance with the foregoing the administration of sugar-lowering drug metformin, which binds and utilizes methylglyoxal, caused a stronger inhibition of LDL peroxidation in the blood of patients with diabetes mellitus, probably due to decrease in methylglyoxal-dependent generation of superoxide anion-radicals. Based on the results we set out the hypothesis about autocatalytic mechanism of free radical reactions involving natural dicarbonyls and suppose the common molecular mechanism of vascular wall injury in atherosclerosis and diabetes.

  11. Initial experimental demonstration of the principles of a xenon gas shield designed to protect optical components from soft x-ray induced opacity (blanking) in high energy density experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swadling, G. F.; Ross, J. S.; Manha, D.; Galbraith, J.; Datte, P.; Sorce, C.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Widmann, K.; Jones, O. S.; Divol, L.; Landen, O. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Moody, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    The design principles of a xenon gas shield device that is intended to protect optical components from x-ray induced opacity ("x-ray blanking") have been experimentally demonstrated at the OMEGA-60 Laser Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. A volume of xenon gas placed in front of an optical component absorbs the incoming soft x-ray radiation but transmits optical and ultra-violet radiation. The time-resolved optical (532 nm) transmission of samples was recorded as they were exposed to soft x-rays produced by a gold sphere source (1.5 kJ sr-1, 250-300 eV). Blanking of fused silica (SiO2) was measured to occur over a range of time-integrated soft x-ray (<3 keV) fluence from ˜0.2-2.5 J cm-2. A shield test device consisting of a 30 nm silicon nitride (Si3N4) and a 10 cm long volume of 0.04 bar xenon gas succeeded in delaying loss of transmission through a magnesium fluoride sample; optical transmission was observed over a longer period than for the unprotected sample. It is hoped that the design of this x-ray shield can be scaled in order to produce a shield device for the National Ignition Facility optical Thomson scattering collection telescope, in order to allow measurements of hohlraum plasma conditions produced in inertial confinement fusion experiments. If successful, it will also have applications in many other high energy density experiments where optical and ultra-violet measurements are desirable.

  12. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  13. Gluon density in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, A.L.; Ducati, M.B.G.; Levin, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    In this talk we present our detailed study (theory and numbers) on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather controversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Then we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus-nucleus cascade. The initial conditions should be fixed both theoretically and phenomenologically before to attack such complicated problems as the mixture of hard and soft processes in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy or the theoretically reliable approach to hadron or/and parton cascades for high energy nucleus-nucleus interaction. 35 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Laser initiation of secondary explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.; Trott, Wayne M.

    Several experiments were performed to investigate the effects of explosive material parameters on energy thresholds for direct laser initiation of secondary explosives. Laser energy requirements for initiation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were decreased for small particle size powder and low density pressings. Promptness of detonation, however, was aided by higher densities. Initiation of PETN was achieved at energies at or below 10 mJ (power densities approximately 0.2 GW sq cm) at laser wavelengths of 1.06 micrometers, 532 nm and 355 nm and strong confinement of the explosive sample assisted build-up to detonation. At 355 and 308 nm PETN could be initiated by irradiation on the bare explosive surface. Hexahydro 1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) was initiated at 308 nm but not at 1.06 micrometers. Hexanitrostibene (HNS) by direct irradiation at any of these wavelengths was successful. The results suggest that if sufficient energy is deposited, a fast deflagration or convective burn is achieved and that this grows to detonation via a conventional deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  15. The dynamics of variable-density turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamics of variable-density turbulent fluids are studied by direct numerical simulation. The flow is incompressible so that acoustic waves are decoupled from the problem, and implying that density is not a thermodynamic variable. Changes in density occur due to molecular mixing. The velocity field, is in general, divergent. A pseudo-spectral numerical technique is used to solve the equations of motion. Three-dimensional simulations are performed using a grid size of 128{sup 3} grid points. Two types of problems are studied: (1) the decay of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, and (2) buoyancy-generated turbulence in a fluid with large density fluctuations. In the case of isotropic, variable-density turbulence, the overall statistical decay behavior, for the cases studied, is relatively unaffected by the presence of density variations when the initial density and velocity fields are statistically independent. The results for this case are in quantitative agreement with previous numerical and laboratory results. In this case, the initial density field has a bimodal probability density function (pdf) which evolves in time towards a Gaussian distribution. The pdf of the density field is symmetric about its mean value throughout its evolution. If the initial velocity and density fields are statistically dependent, however, the decay process is significantly affected by the density fluctuations. For the case of buoyancy-generated turbulence, variable-density departures from the Boussinesq approximation are studied. The results of the buoyancy-generated turbulence are compared with variable-density model predictions. Both a one-point (engineering) model and a two-point (spectral) model are tested against the numerical data. Some deficiencies in these variable-density models are discussed and modifications are suggested.

  16. Density: A Discovery Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieck, William

    1994-01-01

    Describes an activity that allows students to discover the concept of density and that density is a determining physical property of a pure substance. Makes suggestions to further enhance students' understanding of density. (ZWH)

  17. Multidimensional density shaping by sigmoids.

    PubMed

    Roth, Z; Baram, Y

    1996-01-01

    An estimate of the probability density function of a random vector is obtained by maximizing the output entropy of a feedforward network of sigmoidal units with respect to the input weights. Classification problems can be solved by selecting the class associated with the maximal estimated density. Newton's optimization method, applied to the estimated density, yields a recursive estimator for a random variable or a random sequence. A constrained connectivity structure yields a linear estimator, which is particularly suitable for "real time" prediction. A Gaussian nonlinearity yields a closed-form solution for the network's parameters, which may also be used for initializing the optimization algorithm when other nonlinearities are employed. A triangular connectivity between the neurons and the input, which is naturally suggested by the statistical setting, reduces the number of parameters. Applications to classification and forecasting problems are demonstrated.

  18. Osteocyte density in woven bone.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, C J; Majeska, R J; Schaffler, M B

    2004-11-01

    Woven bone forms rapidly during tissue growth, following injury and in response to certain anabolic stimuli. Functional differences between woven and lamellar bone may be due, in part, to differences in osteocyte density (cells per unit tissue). Woven bone has been estimated to contain four to eight times more osteocytes than lamellar bone, although primary data to support this assertion are limited. Given recent findings implicating osteocytes as regulators of bone remodeling, bone formation and bone volume, such large differences in osteocyte density between woven and lamellar bone may have important consequences. In this study, we compared the density of osteocyte lacunae (lacunae/mm(2) tissue) in rat lamellar bone with that in woven bone formed under several different circumstances. We found that the lacunar density of lamellar cortical bone in the rat (834+/-83 cells/mm2, mean+/-SD) did not differ significantly from that of periosteal woven bone formed via intramembranous osteogenesis, either in response to mechanical loading (921+/-204 cells/mm2) or in the periosteal buttressing region of the fracture callus (1138+/-168 cells/mm2). In contrast, lacunar density of endochondrally derived woven bone in the center (gap) region of fracture callus was nearly 100% greater (1875+/-270 cells/mm2) than in lamellar cortical bone while lacunar density of primary spongiosa of the growth plate was 40% greater (1674+/-228 cells/mm2) than that in lamellar cancellous bone (1189+/-164). These findings demonstrate that lacunar density in woven bone varies depending on skeletal site and developmental history and appears to be elevated in endochondrally derived woven bone adjacent to marrow space. Given the considerable evidence supporting osteocytes as local initiators of bone remodeling, we suggest that woven bone with increased lacunar density may undergo remodeling at an accelerated rate.

  19. TFTR initial operations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fonck, R.

    1983-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has operated since December 1982 with ohmically heated plasmas. Routine operation with feedback control of plasma current, position, and density has been obtained for plasmas with I/sub p/ approx. = 800 kA, a = 68 cm, R = 250 cm, and B/sub t/ = 27 kG. A maximum plasma current of 1 MA was achieved with q approx. = 2.5. Energy confinement times of approx. 150 msec were measured for hydrogen and deuterium plasmas with anti n/sub e/ approx. = 2 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, T/sub e/ (0) approx. = 1.5 keV, T/sub i/ (0) approx. = 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. = 3. The preliminary results suggest a size-cubed scaling from PLT and are consistent with Alcator C scaling where tau approx. nR/sup 2/a. Initial measurements of plasma disruption characteristics indicate current decay rates of approx. 800 kA in 8 ms which is within the TFTR design requirement of 3 MA in 3 ms.

  20. Initiation of a coronal transient

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B.C.; Munro, R.H.; Fisher, R.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper analyzes the coronal transient/eruptive prominence event of 1980 August 5 observed by the Mauna Loa experiment system. This event yielded data on the early development of the transient in the low corona between 1.2 R/sub sun/ and 2.2 R/sub sun/, information which was not available when earlier attempts were made to explain transient phenomena. The transient's initial appearance in the form of a rising density-depleted structure, prior to the eruption of the associated prominence, can be explained as an effect of magnetic buoyancy. The data indicate that this transient has a density depletion of 17% to 33% relative to an undisturbed corona which is approximately isothermal with a temperature of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ K and a coronal density of 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ at the base of the corona. The height versus base length relationship of the evolving transient resembles, remarkably well, the theoretical predictions obtained from a quasi-static model of a margnetically buoyant loop system. By matching this relationship with the theoretical model, we estimate the magnetic field at the base of the transient to be between 2 and 3 gauss. It is also shown that the initial, nearly constant speed of the top of the transient, 80 +- 20 km s/sup -1/, is consistent with a theoretical estimate calculated from the quasi-static model. These results suggest that some transients are not initiated impulsively, the initial stage of the development being driven by a quasi-static response to a slow change in magnetic field conditions at the base of the corona.

  1. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  2. The Plus 50 Initiative Evaluation: Initiative Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), with funding from The Atlantic Philanthropies, created the Plus 50 Initiative (2008-2012). This initiative was designed to build the capacity of community colleges nationwide to develop programming that engages the plus 50 learner. This report contains: (1) An overview of the Plus 50…

  3. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  4. Information geometric density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Marchand-Maillet, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We investigate kernel density estimation where the kernel function varies from point to point. Density estimation in the input space means to find a set of coordinates on a statistical manifold. This novel perspective helps to combine efforts from information geometry and machine learning to spawn a family of density estimators. We present example models with simulations. We discuss the principle and theory of such density estimation.

  5. Histomorphometric Analysis of Angiogenesis using CD31 Immunomarker and Mast Cell Density in Oral Premalignant and Malignant Lesions: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Jyothsna, M; Rammanohar, M

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mast cells have been implicated in promoting angiogenesis in malignant tumors of lung, oesophagus and breast, but there are few studies on Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas (OSCC). Most oral squamous cell carcinomas arise from pre-existing precancerous lesions exhibiting epithelial dysplasia. Aim The present pilot study attempts to compare Mast Cell Density (MCD), Microvessel Density (MVD), Microvessel Area (MVA) histomorphometrically between normal buccal mucosa, severe epithelial dysplasia and OSCC and to correlate the role of mast cells and angiogenesis in tumor progression. Material and Methods The retrospective study was conducted on eight cases of OSCC, eight cases of severe epithelial dysplasia and five cases of normal buccal mucosa. Immunohistochemical staining with anti CD–31, to demonstrate angiogenesis and toluidine blue staining for mast cells were employed. MVA, MVD and MCD were calculated using the measurement tools of the image analysis software and compared between the groups. One way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) was used for comparing the parameter for multiple groups followed by Games Howell test. To assess the relationship between micro vessel density and mast cell density, Karl Pearson’s correlation was used. Results MCD and MVD increased with disease progression and were statistically higher in OSCC than in severe epithelial dysplasia and normal buccal mucosa (p<0.001). MVA increased from normal to severe dysplasia and decreased from dysplasia to OSCC, may be due to revascularization of tumor tissue. A positive correlation was observed between MCD and MVD in OSCC and dysplasia, though were not statistically significant. Conclusion These findings suggest that mast cells may up regulate angiogenesis in OSCC. MCD and MVD may be used as indicators for disease progression. PMID:28274041

  6. Bone Density Test

    MedlinePlus

    Tests and Procedures Bone density test By Mayo Clinic Staff A bone density test determines if you have osteoporosis — a disease that causes bones to ... your bones could be quite weak. A bone density test enhances the accuracy of calculating your risk ...

  7. Glennan Microsystems Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brillson, Leonard J.

    2002-01-01

    During the 2001-2002 award period, we performed research on Pt/Ti/bare 6H-SiC and bare 4H-SiC interfaces in order to identify their electronic properties as a function of surface preparation. The overall aim of this work is to optimize the electronic properties of metal contacts to SiC as well as the active SiC material itself as a function of surface preparation and subsequent processing. Initially, this work has involved identifying bare surface, subsurface, and metal induced gap states at the metal-SiC contact and correlating energies and densities of deep levels with Schottky barrier heights. We used low energy electron-excited nanoluminescence (LEEN) spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) in order to correlate electronic states and energy bands with chemical composition, bonding, and crystal structure. A major development has been the discovery of polytype transformations that occur in 4H-SiC under standard microelectronic process conditions used to fabricate SiC devices. Our results are consistent with the stacking fault generation, defect formation, and consequent degradation of SiC recently reported for state-of-the-art ABB commercial diodes under localized electrical stress. Our results highlight the importance of -optimizing process conditions and material properties - anneal times, temperatures and doping to control such structural changes within epitaxial SiC layers. Thus far, we have established threshold times and temperatures beyond which 4H-SiC exhibits 3C-SiC transformation bands for a subset of dopant concentrations and process conditions. On the basis of this temperature time behavior, we have been able to establish an activation energy of approximately 2.5 eV for polytype transformation and dislocation motion. Work continues to establish the fundamental mechanisms underlying the polytype changes and its dependence on material parameters.

  8. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read jr, Kenneth F.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  9. Does turbulence determine the initial mass function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liptai, David; Price, Daniel J.; Wurster, James; Bate, Matthew R.

    2017-02-01

    We test the hypothesis that the initial mass function (IMF) is determined by the density probability distribution function (PDF) produced by supersonic turbulence. We compare 14 simulations of star cluster formation in 50 M⊙ molecular cloud cores where the initial turbulence contains either purely solenoidal or purely compressive modes, in each case resolving fragmentation to the opacity limit to determine the resultant IMF. We find statistically indistinguishable IMFs between the two sets of calculations, despite a factor of 2 difference in the star formation rate and in the standard deviation of log (ρ). This suggests that the density PDF, while determining the star formation rate, is not the primary driver of the IMF.

  10. Initial conditions and sampling for multifield inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Easther, Richard; Price, Layne C. E-mail: lpri691@aucklanduni.ac.nz

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the initial conditions problem for multifield inflation. In these scenarios the pre-inflationary dynamics can be chaotic, increasing the sensitivity of the onset of inflation to the initial data even in the homogeneous limit. To analyze physically equivalent scenarios we compare initial conditions at fixed energy. This ensures that each trajectory is counted once and only once, since the energy density decreases monotonically. We present a full analysis of hybrid inflation that reveals a greater degree of long range order in the set of ''successful'' initial conditions than was previously apparent. In addition, we explore the effective smoothing scale for the fractal set of successful initial conditions induced by the finite duration of the pre-inflationary phase. The role of the prior information used to specify the initial data is discussed in terms of Bayesian sampling.

  11. On the initial state and consistency relations

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q-vector → 0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  12. Dioxin Exposure Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Dioxin Exposure Initiative (DEI) is no longer active. This page contains a summary of the dioxin exposure initiative with illustrations, contact and background information.Originally supported by scientist Matthew Lorber, who retired in Mar 2017.

  13. Density functional theory of complex transition densities.

    PubMed

    Ernzerhof, Matthias

    2006-09-28

    We present an extension of Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham density functional theory to the domain of complex local potentials and complex electron densities. The approach is applicable to resonance (Siegert) [Phys. Rev. 56, 750 (1939)] states and other scattering and transport problems that can be described by a normalized state of a Hamiltonian containing a complex local potential. Such Hamiltonians are non-Hermitian and their eigenvalues are in general complex, the imaginary part being inversely proportional to the lifetime of the system. The one-to-one correspondence between complex local potentials nu and complex electron densities rho is established provided that the complex variables are sufficiently close to real local potentials and densities of nondegenerate ground states. We show that the exchange-correlation functionals, contributing to the complex energy, are determined through analytic continuation of their ground-state-theory counterparts. This implies that the exchange-correlation effects on the lifetime of a resonance are, under appropriate conditions, already determined by the functionals of the ground-state theory.

  14. Partition Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) is a formally exact method for obtaining molecular properties from self-consistent calculations on isolated fragments [1,2]. For a given choice of fragmentation, PDFT outputs the (in principle exact) molecular energy and density, as well as fragment densities that sum to the correct molecular density. I describe our progress understanding the behavior of the fragment energies as a function of fragment occupations, derivative discontinuities, practical implementation, and applications of PDFT to small molecules. I also discuss implications for ground-state Density Functional Theory, such as the promise of PDFT to circumvent the delocalization error of approximate density functionals. [4pt] [1] M.H. Cohen and A. Wasserman, J. Phys. Chem. A, 111, 2229(2007).[0pt] [2] P. Elliott, K. Burke, M.H. Cohen, and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. A 82, 024501 (2010).

  15. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  16. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  17. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  18. Martian drainage densities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Chuang, F.C.

    1997-01-01

    Drainage densities on Mars range from zero over large areas of volcanic plains to 0.3-0.5 km-1 locally on some volcanoes. These values refer to geologic units, not to drainage basins, as is normal for terrestrial drainage densities. The highest values are close to the lowest terrestrial values derived by similar techniques. Drainage densities were determined for every geologic unit portrayed on the 1:15,000,000 geologic map of Mars. Except for volcanoes the geologic unit with the highest drainage density is the dissected Noachian plains with a drainage density of 0.0074 km-1. The average drainage density for Noachian units is 0.0032 km-1, for Hesperian units is 0.00047 km-1, and for Amazonian units is 0.00007 km-1, excluding the volcanoes. These values are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than typical terrestrial densities as determined by similar techniques from Landsat images. The low drainage densities, despite a cumulative record that spans billions of years, indicate that compared with the Earth, the channel-forming processes have been very inefficient or have operated only rarely or that the surface is extremely permeable. The high drainage density on volcanoes is attributed to a local cause, such as hydrothermal activity, rather than to a global cause such as climate change. Copyright. Published in 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Two new density correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, M.C.H.; Monroy, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Liquid density predicted by the Peng-Robinson (P-R) equation of state is often off by 10% or more at temperature and pressure conditions encountered in most reservoirs. To improve the density predictions, two new density correlations have been developed. The first correlation is based on the chain-of-rotators (COR) equation of state and the second is based on the three-parameter Peng-Robinson (PR3) equation of state. The COR correlation is applicable to wider pressure and temperature ranges, but is computationally expensive. It is suited for interpreting fluid-analysis data, where no extensive phase-behavior calculations are needed. On the other hand, the PR3 correlation is more limited in its application range, but is computationally more efficient. It is particularly suited for compositional reservoir simulation where many density calculations are repeatedly carried out. In general, both correlations are comparable to the Standing-Katz correlation for liquid-density calculation and comparable to the P-R equation of state for vapor-density calculation. However, they are superior to the Standing-Katz correlation for liquid mixtures near critical points or liquid mixtures at high pressures. Overall, the COR equation of state gives an average prediction error of 1.9% for liquid densities and 2.7% for vapor densities, and the PR3 gives an average prediction error of less than 2% for both liquid and vapor densities.

  20. Visualization of electronic density

    DOE PAGES

    Grosso, Bastien; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pine, Polina; ...

    2015-04-22

    An atom’s volume depends on its electronic density. Although this density can only be evaluated exactly for hydrogen-like atoms, there are many excellent numerical algorithms and packages to calculate it for other materials. 3D visualization of charge density is challenging, especially when several molecular/atomic levels are intertwined in space. We explore several approaches to 3D charge density visualization, including the extension of an anaglyphic stereo visualization application based on the AViz package to larger structures such as nanotubes. We will describe motivations and potential applications of these tools for answering interesting questions about nanotube properties.

  1. Initial Events in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Emily F.; Record, M. Thomas; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Transcription initiation is a highly regulated step of gene expression. Here, we discuss the series of large conformational changes set in motion by initial specific binding of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoter DNA and their relevance for regulation. Bending and wrapping of the upstream duplex facilitates bending of the downstream duplex into the active site cleft, nucleating opening of 13 bp in the cleft. The rate-determining opening step, driven by binding free energy, forms an unstable open complex, probably with the template strand in the active site. At some promoters, this initial open complex is greatly stabilized by rearrangements of the discriminator region between the −10 element and +1 base of the nontemplate strand and of mobile in-cleft and downstream elements of RNAP. The rate of open complex formation is regulated by effects on the rapidly-reversible steps preceding DNA opening, while open complex lifetime is regulated by effects on the stabilization of the initial open complex. Intrinsic DNA opening-closing appears less regulated. This noncovalent mechanism and its regulation exhibit many analogies to mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. PMID:26023916

  2. Density-dependent covariant energy density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.

    2012-10-20

    Relativistic nuclear energy density functionals are applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena at and away fromstability line. Isoscalar monopole, isovector dipole and isoscalar quadrupole giant resonances are calculated using fully self-consistent relativistic quasiparticle randomphase approximation, based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubovmodel. The impact of pairing correlations on the fission barriers in heavy and superheavy nuclei is examined. The role of pion in constructing desnity functionals is also investigated.

  3. Density dependent neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Halnes, Geir; Liljenström, Hans; Arhem, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a neural network depends on density parameters at (at least) two different levels: the subcellular density of ion channels in single neurons, and the density of cells and synapses at a network level. For the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) neural model, the density of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) channels determines the behaviour of a single neuron when exposed to an external stimulus. The features of the onset of single neuron oscillations vary qualitatively among different regions in the channel density plane. At a network level, the density of neurons is reflected in the global connectivity. We study the relation between the two density levels in a network of oscillatory FH neurons, by qualitatively distinguishing between three regions, where the mean network activity is (1) spiking, (2) oscillating with enveloped frequencies, and (3) bursting, respectively. We demonstrate that the global activity can be shifted between regions by changing either the density of ion channels at the subcellular level, or the connectivity at the network level, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms can explain similar global phenomena. Finally, we model a possible effect of anaesthesia by blocking specific inhibitory ion channels.

  4. Holographic Dark Energy Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2011-06-01

    In this article we consider the cosmological model based on the holographic dark energy. We study dark energy density in Universe with arbitrary spatially curvature described by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. We use Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization to specify dark energy density.

  5. Density in a Bottle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roser, Charles E.; McCluskey, Catherine L.

    1998-01-01

    Explains how the Canadian soft drink Orbitz can be used for explorations of density in the classroom. The drink has colored spheres suspended throughout that have a density close to that of the liquid. Presents a hands-on activity that can be easily done in two parts. (DDR)

  6. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  7. Purification of very high density lipoproteins by differential density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Haunerland, N H; Ryan, R O; Law, J H; Bowers, W S

    1987-03-01

    Differential density gradient ultracentrifugation procedures, utilizing a vertical rotor, were developed for the preparative purification of very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, density greater than 1.21 g/ml). The VHDLs of several insect species were purified as follows. An initial density gradient ultracentrifugation step removed lipoproteins of lower density from the VHDL-fraction, which partially separated from the nonlipoproteins present in the infranatant. A complete separation was achieved by a second centrifugation step employing a modified gradient system. The use of a vertical rotor and specially designed discontinuous gradients allows a relatively fast, efficient, and economical isolation of the class of very high density lipoproteins. Similar gradient systems should be useful for the detection and purification of VHDLs from other sources.

  8. Progress in Initiator Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hrousis, C A; Christensen, J S

    2009-05-04

    There is great interest in applying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation techniques to the designs of electrical high explosive (HE) initiators, for the purpose of better understanding a design's sensitivities, optimizing its performance, and/or predicting its useful lifetime. Two MHD-capable LLNL codes, CALE and ALE3D, are being used to simulate the process of ohmic heating, vaporization, and plasma formation in the bridge of an initiator, be it an exploding bridgewire (EBW), exploding bridgefoil (EBF) or slapper type initiator. The initiation of the HE is simulated using Tarver Ignition & Growth reactive flow models. 1-D, 2-D and 3-D models have been constructed and studied. The models provide some intuitive explanation of the initiation process and are useful for evaluating the potential impact of identified aging mechanisms (such as the growth of intermetallic compounds or powder sintering). The end product of this work is a simulation capability for evaluating margin in proposed, modified or aged initiation system designs.

  9. Monitoring Abortive Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Lilian M.

    2009-01-01

    Abortive initiation, when first discovered, was an enigmatic phenomenon, but fully three decades hence, it has been shown to be an integral step in the transcript initiation process intimately tied to the promoter escape reaction undergone by RNA polymerase at the initiation-elongation transition. A detailed understanding of abortive initiation-promoter escape has brought within reach a full description of the transcription initiation mechanism. This enormous progress was the result of convergent biochemical, genetic, and biophysical investigations propelled by parallel advances in quantitation technology. This chapter discusses the knowledge gained through the biochemical approach and a high-resolution method that yields quantitative and qualitative information regarding abortive initiation-promoter escape at a promoter. PMID:18948204

  10. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  11. Plasma-cathode-initiated vacuum gap closure

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Gurbaxani, S.H. ); Buttram, M.T. )

    1990-09-01

    The properties of vacuum gap closure initiated by a plasma cathode are presented. The plasma cathode consisted of approximately 60 surface flashover sites distributed over a 10-cm{sup 2} area. Vacuum gap dimensions were 1{times}7.5 cm in diameter. Faraday cup measurements indicated an ion density greater than 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}, which was controllable by the amplitude of the initiating high-voltage pulse. Although the field-free expansion velocity of the plasma was measured to be 7 cm/{mu}s, plasma-cathode-initiated closure of the vacuum gap indicated closure speeds on the order of 0.5 cm/{mu}s. Also, increased injected ion density and increased anode-cathode potential resulted in increased closure velocity.

  12. Winning with Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    A common complaint among high school coaches is the lack of initiative shown by some of their players. Coaches expect a certain level of decision-making and independence, and more so from team captains and senior players. Developing leadership skills is a major benefit to athletes who participate at a competitive level, and taking initiative can…

  13. The Fostering Hope Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Steven; Winters, Katie; Dean, Joyce; Seymour, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Fostering Hope Initiative is a neighborhood-based Collective Impact initiative that promotes optimum child and youth development by supporting vulnerable families, encouraging connections between neighbors, strengthening systems to ensure collective impact, and advocating for family-friendly public policy. This article describes the…

  14. Prioritizing Scientific Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahcall, John N.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the way in which a limited number of astronomy research initiatives were chosen and prioritized based on a consensus of members from the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee. A list of recommended equipment initiatives and estimated costs is provided. (KR)

  15. Bone mineral density test

    MedlinePlus

    ... density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... most common and accurate way uses a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan. DEXA uses low- ...

  16. Density on Dry Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libarkin, Julie C.; Crockett, Cynthia D.; Sadler, Philip M.

    2003-01-01

    Presents activities to dispel student misconceptions about density, particularly as it applies to buoyancy. Finds that misconceptions fall under three categories: (1) size; (2) shape; and (3) material. (NB)

  17. Critical Density Interaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P; Baldis, H A; Cheung, P; Rozmus, W; Kruer, W; Wilks, S; Crowley, S; Mori, W; Hansen, C

    2001-02-14

    Experiments have been performed to study the propagation of intense laser pulses to high plasma densities. The issue of self-focusing and filamentation of the laser pulse as well as developing predictive capability of absorption processes and x-ray conversion efficiencies is important for numerous programs at the Laboratory, particularly Laser Program (Fast Ignitor and direct-drive ICF) and D&NT (radiography, high energy backlighters and laser cutting). Processes such as resonance absorption, profile modification, linear mode conversion, filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur near the critical density and can have important effects on the coupling of laser light to solid targets. A combination of experiments have been used to study the propagation of laser light to high plasma densities and the interaction physics of intense laser pulses with solid targets. Nonparaxial fluid codes to study nonstationary behavior of filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering at high densities have also been developed as part of this project.

  18. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  19. Nutrient Density Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Annette; Thompson, William T.

    1979-01-01

    Announces a nutrient density food scoring system called the Index of Nutritional Quality (INQ). It expresses the ratio between the percent RDA of a nutrient and the percent daily allowance of calories in a food. (Author/SA)

  20. Numerical estimation of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascasibar, Y.; Binney, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel technique, dubbed FIESTAS, to estimate the underlying density field from a discrete set of sample points in an arbitrary multidimensional space. FIESTAS assigns a volume to each point by means of a binary tree. Density is then computed by integrating over an adaptive kernel. As a first test, we construct several Monte Carlo realizations of a Hernquist profile and recover the particle density in both real and phase space. At a given point, Poisson noise causes the unsmoothed estimates to fluctuate by a factor of ~2 regardless of the number of particles. This spread can be reduced to about 1dex (~26 per cent) by our smoothing procedure. The density range over which the estimates are unbiased widens as the particle number increases. Our tests show that real-space densities obtained with an SPH kernel are significantly more biased than those yielded by FIESTAS. In phase space, about 10 times more particles are required in order to achieve a similar accuracy. As a second application we have estimated phase-space densities in a dark matter halo from a cosmological simulation. We confirm the results of Arad, Dekel & Klypin that the highest values of f are all associated with substructure rather than the main halo, and that the volume function v(f) ~f-2.5 over about four orders of magnitude in f. We show that a modified version of the toy model proposed by Arad et al. explains this result and suggests that the departures of v(f) from power-law form are not mere numerical artefacts. We conclude that our algorithm accurately measures the phase-space density up to the limit where discreteness effects render the simulation itself unreliable. Computationally, FIESTAS is orders of magnitude faster than the method based on Delaunay tessellation that Arad et al. employed, making it practicable to recover smoothed density estimates for sets of 109 points in six dimensions.

  1. Atmospheric density models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An atmospheric model developed by Jacchia, quite accurate but requiring a large amount of computer storage and execution time, was found to be ill-suited for the space shuttle onboard program. The development of a simple atmospheric density model to simulate the Jacchia model was studied. Required characteristics including variation with solar activity, diurnal variation, variation with geomagnetic activity, semiannual variation, and variation with height were met by the new atmospheric density model.

  2. Population Density Modeling Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-05

    of fatalities per loss. (2) where: POCA = Probability of Casualty (fatalities per loss) LCA = Lethal Crash Area of Aircraft (square...miles) Population Density = The average population density within the Potential Crash Area (PCA) (people per square miles) The LCA ...component in equation 2 has been previously calculated in the 3PRAT. The methodology used to determine the LCA is outlined in the report: Crash Lethality

  3. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  4. Autonomous aircraft initiative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewett, Marle D.

    1991-01-01

    The results of a consulting effort to aid NASA Ames-Dryden in defining a new initiative in aircraft automation are described. The initiative described is a multi-year, multi-center technology development and flight demonstration program. The initiative features the further development of technologies in aircraft automation already being pursued at multiple NASA centers and Department of Defense (DoD) research and Development (R and D) facilities. The proposed initiative involves the development of technologies in intelligent systems, guidance, control, software development, airborne computing, navigation, communications, sensors, unmanned vehicles, and air traffic control. It involves the integration and implementation of these technologies to the extent necessary to conduct selected and incremental flight demonstrations.

  5. Collaborative Procurement Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    GPP's Clean Energy Collaborative Procurement Initiative provides a platform for deploying clean energy technologies across multiple government and educational organizations for maximum impact on installed solar system capacity and local economic activity.

  6. About the RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    The RAS Initiative, a "hub and spoke" model, connects researchers to better understand and target the more than 30% of cancers driven by mutations in RAS genes. Includes oversight and contact information.

  7. RAS Initiative - Community Outreach

    Cancer.gov

    Through community and technical collaborations, workshops and symposia, and the distribution of reference reagents, the RAS Initiative seeks to increase the sharing of knowledge and resources essential to defeating cancers caused by mutant RAS genes.

  8. RAS Initiative - Events

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  9. Advanced Concepts Research Initiative

    EPA Science Inventory

    This initiative is investigating various approaches to controlling and treating wet-weather flow (WWF) discharges in the urban watershed. WWF, including combined sewer overflow (CSO), sanitary sewer overflow (SSO) and stormwater discharges are leading causes of receiving water q...

  10. The RAS Initiative

    Cancer.gov

    NCI established the RAS Initiative to explore innovative approaches for attacking the proteins encoded by mutant forms of RAS genes and to ultimately create effective, new therapies for RAS-related cancers.

  11. Project Matching Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Green Power Partnership's Project Matching initiative works to connect green power users with new, not-yet-built renewable energy projects that may align with their energy, environmental, and financial objectives.

  12. PESP Landscaping Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Landscaping practices can positively or negatively affect local environments and human health. The Landscaping Initiative seeks to enhance benefits of landscaping while reducing need for pesticides, fertilizers, etc., by working with partners.

  13. Initial Symptoms of ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapters Certified Centers and Clinics Support Groups About ALS About Us Our Research In Your Community Advocate ... Diagnosis En español Symptoms The initial symptoms of ALS can be quite varied in different people. One ...

  14. Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Midwest Clean Diesel Initiative (MCDI) is a collaboration of federal, state and local agencies, along with communities, non-profit organizations and private companies working together by reducing exposure to emissions from diesel engines

  15. Piezoelectrically Initiated Pyrotechnic Igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quince, Asia; Dutton, Maureen; Hicks, Robert; Burnham, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a pyrotechnic initiator and piezoelectric initiation system. The device will be capable of being initiated mechanically; resisting initiation by EMF, RF, and EMI (electromagnetic field, radio frequency, and electromagnetic interference, respectively); and initiating in water environments and space environments. Current devices of this nature are initiated by the mechanical action of a firing pin against a primer. Primers historically are prone to failure. These failures are commonly known as misfires or hang-fires. In many cases, the primer shows the dent where the firing pin struck the primer, but the primer failed to fire. In devices such as "T" handles, which are commonly used to initiate the blowout of canopies, loss of function of the device may result in loss of crew. In devices such as flares or smoke generators, failure can result in failure to spot a downed pilot. The piezoelectrically initiated ignition system consists of a pyrotechnic device that plugs into a mechanical system (activator), which on activation, generates a high-voltage spark. The activator, when released, will strike a stack of electrically linked piezo crystals, generating a high-voltage, low-amperage current that is then conducted to the pyro-initiator. Within the initiator, an electrode releases a spark that passes through a pyrotechnic first-fire mixture, causing it to combust. The combustion of the first-fire initiates a primary pyrotechnic or explosive powder. If used in a "T" handle, the primary would ramp the speed of burn up to the speed of sound, generating a shock wave that would cause a high explosive to go "high order." In a flare or smoke generator, the secondary would produce the heat necessary to ignite the pyrotechnic mixture. The piezo activator subsystem is redundant in that a second stack of crystals would be struck at the same time with the same activation force, doubling the probability of a first strike spark generation. If the first

  16. Spatial Density Maps from a Debris Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, L.; Kindl, S.; Binz, C.

    2016-09-01

    A debris cloud from a fragmentation on orbit may be modeled by transformation of variables from the instantaneous velocity distribution at the fragmentation time to the spatial distribution at some elapsed time later. There are no Gaussian distributions assumed and the evolution map is quite nonlinear, being derived from the solution of the Lambert, two-point boundary value, problem and the state transition matrix for unperturbed propagation, so the traditional tools of analysis that assume these qualities fail dramatically. The transformation of variables technique does not suffer from any such assumptions, and unlike the Monte Carlo method, is not subject to sampling errors or approximations. Structures and features are evident in the density maps, and these structures show promise for simplified approximation of the density map. Most prominent of the structures is the well-known pinch point at the fragmentation location in inertial space. The anti-pinch line, or wedge, is also observed. Bands on the opposite side of the fragmentation are very noticeable, and their existence may be motivated from simple orbit dynamics. These bands make the anti-pinch line actually more of a set of anti-pinch line segments. By computing these density maps over time, the evolution may be studied. There is a density generator, a density band at roughly the same altitude as the pinch point, that cycles around the earth and appears a source of the bands, with newly created bands moving radially outward and diminishing in density. Although the initial velocity distribution affects the final spatial distribution, the Lambert solutions, which are the most time consuming to compute, need only be computed once. Therefore, different initial distributions may be changed and the results recomputed with relative speed. A comparison of the effects of initial distributions is shown in this paper.

  17. Reduced dynamics with initial correlations: Multiconfigurational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghardt, I.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamical equations for a subsystem interacting with an environment are proposed which are adapted to a multiconfigurational form of the density operator. Initial correlations are accounted for in a non-Markovian master equation. Two variants of the latter are derived by projection operator techniques and cumulant expansion techniques, respectively. The present scheme is developed in view of describing the ultrafast dynamics in solute-solvent complexes where the details of system-environment correlations are of importance. The master equation is readily integrated into the equations of motion derived by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method, which provides an efficient scheme for the numerical propagation of the density operator.

  18. A quantitative measure of phase correlations in density fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative measure of the phase correlations in a density field is presented based on the location of the maxima of the Fourier components of that field. It is found that this measue can easily detect non-Gaussian behavior either in artificially constructed density fields or those that become non-Gaussian from gravitational clustering of Gaussian initial conditions. It is found that different initial power spectra produce somewhat distinguishable signals, and the signals are robust against sparse sampling.

  19. Pseudopotentials from electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Á.; Andrejkovics, I.

    1996-05-01

    A method is introduced that allows the construction of pseudopotentials in the density-functional theory. This method is based on a procedure worked out by one of the authors [J. Phys. B 26, 43 (1993); Philos. Mag. B 69, 779 (1994)] for determining Kohn-Sham potentials, one-electron orbitals, and energies from the electron density. The Hartree-Fock densities of Bunge, Barrientos, and Bunge [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 53, 114 (1993)] are used to obtain the Kohn-Sham potentials of the Li, Na, and K atoms, and then Phillips-Kleinman-type [Phys. Rev. 116, 287 (1959); 118, 1153 (1960)] pseudopotentials are calculated. The arbitrariness of the pseudo-orbital is removed by minimization of the kinetic energy.

  20. COMBINATION OF DENSITY AND ENERGY MODULATION IN MICROBUNCHING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Cheng Ying; Li, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Microbunching instability (MBI) has been one of the most challenging issues in the transport of high-brightness electron beams for modern recirculating or energy recovery linac machines. Recently we have developed and implemented a Vlasov solver [1] to calculate the microbunching gain for an arbitrary beamline lattice, based on the extension of existing theoretical formulation [2-4] for the microbunching amplification from an initial density perturbation to the final density modulation. For more thorough analyses, in addition to the case of (initial) density to (final) density amplification, we extend in this paper the previous formulation to more general cases, including energy to density, density to energy and energy to energy amplifications for a recirculation machine. Such semi-analytical formulae are then incorporated into our Vlasov solver, and qualitative agreement is obtained when the semi-analytical Vlasov results are compared with particle tracking simulation using ELEGANT [5].

  1. Binomial level densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuker, A. P.

    2001-08-01

    It is shown that nuclear level densities in a finite space are described by a continuous binomial function, determined by the first three moments of the Hamiltonian, and the dimensionality of the underlying vector space. Experimental values for 55Mn, 56Fe, and 60Ni are very well reproduced by the binomial form, which turns out to be almost perfectly approximated by Bethe's formula with backshift. A proof is given for which binomial densities reproduce the low moments of Hamiltonians of any rank: A strong form of the famous central limit result of Mon and French. Conditions under which the proof may be extended to the full spectrum are examined.

  2. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  3. Holographic charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  4. Platelet size and density affect shear-induced thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-10-01

    Thrombosis accounts for 80% of deaths in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients demonstrate tortuous microvessels and larger than normal platelets. Large platelets are associated with increased platelet activation and thrombosis, but the physical effects of large platelets in the microscale processes of thrombus formation are not clear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the physical effects of mean platelet volume (MPV), mean platelet density (MPD) and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A computational model of the transport, shear-induced activation, collision, adhesion and aggregation of individual platelets was used to simulate platelet interactions and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Our results showed that an increase in MPV resulted in a larger number of activated platelets, though MPD and level of tortuosity made little difference on platelet activation. Platelets with normal MPD yielded the lowest amount of mural thrombus. With platelets of normal MPD, the amount of mural thrombus decreased with increasing level of tortuosity but did not have a simple monotonic relationship with MPV. The physical mechanisms associated with MPV, MPD and arteriole tortuosity play important roles in platelet activation and thrombus formation.

  5. Evolution of geometrically necessary dislocation density from computational dislocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruprasad, P. J.; Benzerga, A. A.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a method for calculating GND densities in dislocation dynamics simulations. Evolution of suitably defined averages of GND density as well as maps showing the spatial nonuniform distribution of GNDs are analyzed under uniaxial loading. Focus is laid on the resolution dependence of the very notion of GND density, its dependence upon physical dimensions of plastically deformed specimens and its sensitivity to initial conditions. Acknowledgments Support from the National Science Foundation (CMMI-0748187) is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Research on diabatic initialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasahara, Akira

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to contribute to improvement in the synoptic analyses in the tropics for numerical weather prediction and climate research. In addition to a prediction model, four dimensional data assimilation systems have two principal components. One is objective analysis and the other is initialization. Various methods of objective analysis are designed primarily to analyze the mass and rotational wind fields. Methods of initialization are developed to obtain the irrotational wind and its associated vertical velocity field which are balanced with the mass field and free from meteorological noise. There are essentially three approaches to the problem of initialization: quasi-geostrophic theory, bounded derivative method and nonlinear normal mode method. In the midlatitudes, these approaches generally produce satisfactory results even without diabatic effects for large-scale motions. In the tropics, the situation is quite different from that in the midlatitudes. Because of a small magnitude of the Coriolis parameter and a weak horizontal temperature gradient in the tropics, any method of initialization must incorporate diabatic effects. In fact, it can be said that understanding the problem of diabatic initialization is the key to improving the analysis and weather forecasting in the tropics.

  7. Material and Optical Densities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The bending of a laser beam in a medium with a density and refractive index gradient in the same direction has been described previously. When a transparent container is half filled with a salt or sugar solution and an equal amount of water is floated on top of it, then diffusion will create a concentration gradient from top to bottom. A laser…

  8. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  9. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  10. Energy in density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  11. Low Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Kit NOF Events Blog Advocacy NOF Store Shopping Cart Home › Patients › Diagnosis Information › Bone Density Exam/ ... Media Kit NOF Events Blog Advocacy NOF Store Shopping Cart Contact Us Privacy Policy Legal Disclaimer Medical ...

  12. Research on diabatic initialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashara, Akira

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research is to contribute to the improvement of the analyses of irrotational wind and moisture fields in the tropics through advancement in the technique of initialization, incorporating diabatic effects and use of satellite-derived, radiometric imagery data that are not used currently by operational centers. Significant accomplishments during the period of May 1991 - April 1992 in research involving the following are presented: impact of tropical initialization upon the spin-up of precipitation forecasts; and a unified approach to diabatic initialization for improvement in the analysis of divergence and water vapor fields in the tropics. Focus of current research and plans for next year are discussed with respect to the topics of controlling the precipitation over shoot during the early part of a numerical forecast and the use of satellite imagery data for improvement of the tropical analysis.

  13. Civil space technology initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) is a major, focused, space technology program of the Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) of NASA. The program was initiated to advance technology beyond basic research in order to expand and enhance system and vehicle capabilities for near-term missions. CSTI takes critical technologies to the point at which a user can confidently incorporate the new or expanded capabilities into relatively near-term, high-priority NASA missions. In particular, the CSTI program emphasizes technologies necessary for reliable and efficient access to and operation in Earth orbit as well as for support of scientific missions from Earth orbit.

  14. Shock initiation of nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.

    1993-12-31

    The shock initiation processes of nitromethane have been examined by using a fast time-resolved emission spectroscopy at a two-stage gas gun. a broad, but strong emission has been observed in a spectral range between 350 and 700 nm from shocked nitromethane above 9 GPa. The temporal profile suggests that shocked nitromethane detonates through three characteristic periods, namely an induction period, a hock initiation period, and a thermal explosion period. This paper discusses temporal and chemical characteristics of these periods and present the temperature of the shock-detonating nitromethane at pressures between 9 and 15 GPa.

  15. Research on diabatic initialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasahara, Akira

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to contribute to the improvement of the analyses of irrotational wind and moisture fields in the trophics through advancement in the technique of initialization by incorporating diabatic effects. Significant accomplishments made during the period May 1990 to April 1991 in the following areas are presented: (1) estimation of the uncertainty of daily synoptic analyses in the tropics; (2) normal modes of Laplace's tidal equations for zonal wavenumber zero; and (3) tropical initialization to ameliorate the spin-up problem of precipitation forecasts. The focus of current research and plans for next year are also presented.

  16. STI Program Multimedia Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.; Kaye, Karen

    1993-01-01

    This paper relates the experience of the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Program in introducing multimedia within the STI Program framework. A discussion of multimedia technology is included to provide context for the STI Program effort. The STI Program's Multimedia Initiative is discussed in detail. Parallels and differences between multimedia and traditional information systems project development are highlighted. Challenges faced by the program in initiating its multimedia project are summarized along with lessons learned. The paper concludes with a synopsis of the benefits the program hopes to provide its users through the introduction of multimedia illustrated by examples of successful multimedia projects.

  17. Diet-induced ketosis increases capillary density without altered blood flow in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Puchowicz, Michelle A; Xu, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Ivy, Andre; Emancipator, Doug; LaManna, Joseph C

    2007-06-01

    It is recognized that ketone bodies, such as R-beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-HB) and acetoacetate, are energy sources for the brain. As with glucose metabolism, monocarboxylate uptake by the brain is dependent on the function and regulation of its own transporter system. We concurrently investigated ketone body influx, blood flow, and regulation of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-1) in diet-induced ketotic (KG) rat brain. Regional blood-to-brain beta-HB influx (micromol.g(-1).min(-1)) increased 40-fold with ketosis (4.8 +/- 1.8 plasmabeta-HB; mM) in all regions compared with the nonketotic groups (standard and no-fat diets); there were no changes in regional blood flow. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that GLUT-1 density (number/mm2) in the cortex was significantly elevated (40%) in the ketotic group compared with the standard and no-fat diet groups. MCT-1 was also markedly (3-fold) upregulated in the ketotic group compared with the standard diet group. In the standard diet group, 40% of the brain capillaries stained positive for MCT-1; this amount doubled with the ketotic diet. Western blot analysis of isolated microvessels from ketotic rat brain showed an eightfold increase in GLUT-1 and a threefold increase in MCT-1 compared with the standard diet group. These data suggest that diet-induced ketosis results in increased vascular density at the blood-brain barrier without changes in blood flow. The increase in extraction fraction and capillary density with increased plasma ketone bodies indicates a significant flux of substrates available for brain energy metabolism.

  18. Investigations of initiation spot size effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Steven A; Akinci, Adrian A; Leichty, Gary; Schaffer, Timothy; Murphy, Michael J; Munger, Alan; Thomas, Keith A

    2010-01-01

    As explosive components become smaller, a greater understanding of the effect of initiation spot size on detonation becomes increasingly critical. A series of tests of the effect of initiation spot size will be described. A series of DOI (direct optical initiation) detonators with initiation spots sizes from {approx}50 um to 1000um have been tested to determine laser parameters for threshold firing of low density PETN pressings. Results will be compared with theoretical predictions. Outputs of the initiation source (DOI ablation) have been characterized by a suite of diagnostics including PDV and schlieren imaging. Outputs of complete detonators have been characterized using PDV, streak, and/or schlieren imaging. At present, we have not found the expected change in the threshold energy to spot size relationship for DOI type detonators found in similar earlier for projectiles, slappers and EBWs. New detonators designs (Type C) are currently being tested that will allow the determination of the threshold for spot sizes from 250 um to 105um, where we hope to see change in the threshold vs. spot size relationship. Also, one test of an extremely small diameter spot size (50um) has resulted in preliminary NoGo only results even at energy densities as much as 8 times the energy density of the threshold results presented here. This gives preliminary evidence that 50um spot may be beyond the critical initiation diameter. The constant threshold energy to spot size relationship in the data to date does however still give some insight into the initiation mechanism of DOI detonators. If the DOI initiation mechanism were a 1D mechanism similar to a slapper or a flyer impact, the expected inflection point in the graph would have been between 300um and 500um diameter spot size, within the range of the data presented here. The lack of that inflection point indicates that the DOI initiation mechanism is more likely a 2D mechanism similar to a sphere or rod projectile. We expect to

  19. Relative microvessel area of the primary tumour, and not lymph node status, predicts the presence of bone marrow micrometastases detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in patients with clinically non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Benoy, Ina H; Salgado, Roberto; Elst, Hilde; Van Dam, Peter; Weyler, Joost; Van Marck, Eric; Scharpé, Simon; Vermeulen, Peter B; Dirix, Luc Y

    2005-01-01

    elevated relative microvessel area of the primary tumour and the presence of bone marrow micrometastases in breast cancer patients with operable disease, and corroborate the paracrine and endocrine role of interleukin-6 and the involvement of coagulation in breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  20. Monolithic exploding foil initiator

    SciTech Connect

    Welle, Eric J; Vianco, Paul T; Headley, Paul S; Jarrell, Jason A; Garrity, J. Emmett; Shelton, Keegan P; Marley, Stephen K

    2012-10-23

    A monolithic exploding foil initiator (EFI) or slapper detonator and the method for making the monolithic EFI wherein the exploding bridge and the dielectric from which the flyer will be generated are integrated directly onto the header. In some embodiments, the barrel is directly integrated directly onto the header.

  1. The SEED Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teich, Carolyn R.

    2011-01-01

    Committed to fulfilling the promise of the green economy, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) launched the Sustainability Education and Economic Development (SEED) initiative (www.theseedcenter.org) in October 2010. The project advances sustainability and clean energy workforce development practices at community colleges by…

  2. Information Technology Initiative (Videorecording),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Physical description: 1 VHS video; col.; sd.; mono.; standard playback sp.; 35:40 mins.; 1/2 in. In this video, Dr. Kurt Fisher, Deputy Director for Information Technology , introduces the Corporate Information Management (CIM) program and explains the following major technical initiatives: reuse/repositories; I-case; data administration; information technology architecture; software process improvement; standards.

  3. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  4. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-01

    The initiative will strategically focus and rally EERE’s clean energy technology offices and Advanced Manufacturing Office around the urgent competitive opportunity for the United States to be the leader in the clean energy manufacturing industries and jobs of today and tomorrow.

  5. Kinesthetic Initial Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrom, Gladys

    1978-01-01

    The author's plans for Kinesthetic Initial Training (KIT), a system of interrelated subjects designed to teach handicapped and gifted students basic reading, writing, arithmetic, and grammar skills through the use of concrete materials, are described. KIT components are reviewed, and implications are considered for areas of psychomotor,…

  6. Envisioning Effective Laptop Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausen, Jon M.; Britten, Jody; Ring, Gail

    2008-01-01

    A recent survey of 74 building-level school administrators in Indiana challenged many of the assumptions regarding 1:1 laptop initiatives and how 1:1 access would affect teaching and learning. It also revealed disturbing realities regarding instructional practices of teachers, as well as efforts to improve school technology integration. The intent…

  7. Ontario's Student Voice Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This article describes in some detail aspects of the Student Voice initiative funded and championed by Ontario's Ministry of Education since 2008. The project enables thousands of students to make their voices heard in meaningful ways and to participate in student-led research. Some students from grades 7 to 12 become members of the Student…

  8. Department-Initiated Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne; De Geest, Els

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the activity of three secondary school mathematics departments in England in self-initiated states of change that led to overall improvements in students' achievements when compared to previous cohorts. This took place without intervention and without their participation in external projects. They provide examples of departments…

  9. Statistical initial orbit determination

    SciTech Connect

    Taff, L.G.; Belkin, B.; Schweiter, G.A.; Sommar, K. D.H. Wagner Associates, Inc., Paoli, PA )

    1992-02-01

    For the ballistic missile initial orbit determination problem in particular, the concept of 'launch folders' is extended. This allows to decouple the observational data from the initial orbit determination problem per se. The observational data is only used to select among the possible orbital element sets in the group of folders. Monte Carlo simulations using up to 7200 orbital element sets are described. The results are compared to the true orbital element set and the one a good radar would have been able to produce if collocated with the optical sensor. The simplest version of the new method routinely outperforms the radar initial orbital element set by a factor of two in future miss distance. In addition, not only can a differentially corrected orbital element set be produced via this approach - after only two measurements of direction - but also an updated, meaningful, six-dimensional covariance array for it can be calculated. This technique represents a significant advance in initial orbit determination for this problem, and the concept can easily be extended to minor planets and artificial satellites. 9 refs.

  10. Transformative Change Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, D. D.; Kirby, C.; Witt, M. A.; Richie, D.; Mix, S.; Feldbaum, M.; Liu, S.; Mason, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Transformative Change Initiative (TCI) is dedicated to assisting community colleges to scale up innovation in the form of guided pathways, programs of study, and evidence-based strategies to improve student outcomes and program, organization, and system performance. The impetus for TCI is the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and…

  11. Best Practices & Outstanding Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this article, "Training" editors recognize innovative and successful learning and development programs and practices. They share best practices from Automatic Data Processing, Inc., Farmers Insurance Group, FedEx Express, InterContinental Hotels Group, and Oakwood Temporary Housing. They also present the outstanding initiatives of EMD Serono,…

  12. Strategic Defense Initiative program

    SciTech Connect

    Conachan, F.C.

    1991-05-01

    This paper discusses the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program. It summarizes the major programmatic and technological lessons learned from the SDI program over the past 7 years. It provides information on: past uses of SDI funds, persistent optimism in planning and starting projects, evolution of SDI architecture, and accuracy of cost estimates.

  13. Focusing educational initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.

    1990-01-01

    The United States will soon be facing a critical shortage of aerospace scientists and engineers. To address this problem, Space Grant Colleges can assist in focusing interest in existing educational initiatives and in creating new educational opportunities, particularly for women and underrepresented minorities.

  14. America's Caribbean Basin Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasten, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly all of the countries that have succeeded in their development over the past 30 years have done so on the strength of market-oriented policies and vigorous participation in the international economy. Aid must be complemented by trade and investment. The Caribbean Basin Initiative puts these principles into practice. (RM)

  15. Initial Teaching Orthographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Godfrey

    To achieve its purpose, an initial teaching orthography (i.t.o.) should be as simple in form and substance as possible; it should be phonemic rather than phonetic. The 40 sounds distinguished by Pitmanic shorthand and some provision for schwa can serve as a basic code. The symbols can be derived from either of two major sources--standardizing the…

  16. Bone density in patients with chondromalacia patella.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Iraj; Khazaeli, Shabnam; Hatami, Parta; Malekpour, Mahdi

    2010-06-01

    Chondromalacia of the patella is the most common cause of anterior knee pain in young women. The etiology of the disease is not well-understood but the initial lesion is a disorganization of collagenous structures. Since the disease is proposed to be due to generalized constitutional disturbance, we postulated that bony structures could also be involved. To investigate this hypothesis we measured the bone density of 286 patients with the diagnosis of chondromalacia of the patella during a 4-year period using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) method. We found a significant number of patients having low bone densities. This problem was more pronounced in men and in younger age groups. We suggest base-line bone density evaluation in all patients, treatment of osteopenia or osteoporosis in select patients and regular follow-ups using DXA.

  17. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  18. Directional Acoustic Density Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-13

    fluctuations of fluid density at a point . (2) DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART [0004] Conventional vector sensors measure particle velocity, v (vx,Vytvz...dipole-type or first order sensor that is realized by measuring particle velocity at a point , (which is the vector sensor sensing approach for...underwater sensors), or by measuring the gradient of the acoustic pressure at two closely spaced (less than the wavelength of an acoustic wave) points as it

  19. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  20. High-resolution tomographic imaging of microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Lang, Sabrina; Dominietto, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Germann, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz; David, Christian; Weitkamp, Timm

    2008-08-01

    Cancer belongs to the primary diseases these days. Although different successful treatments including surgery, chemical, pharmacological, and radiation therapies are established, the aggressive proliferation of cancerous cells and the related formation of blood vessels has to be better understood to develop more powerful strategies against the different kinds of cancer. Angiogenesis is one of the crucial steps for the survival and metastasis formation of malignant tumors. Although therapeutic strategies attempting to inhibit these processes are being developed, the biological regulation is still unclear. This study concentrates on the three-dimensional morphology of vessels formed in a mouse tumor xenograft model post mortem. Synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography (SRμCT) could provide the necessary information that is essential for validating the simulations. Using mouse and human brain tissue, the different approaches to extract the vessel tree from SRμCT data are discussed. These approaches include corrosion casting, the application of contrast agents such as barium sulfate, tissue embedding, all of them regarded as materials science based. Alternatively, phase contrast tomography was used, which gave rise to promising results but still not reaches the spatial resolution to uncover the smallest capillaries.

  1. Structural changes in Alzheimer's disease brain microvessels.

    PubMed

    Christov, Alexander; Ottman, J; Hamdheydari, L; Grammas, Paula

    2008-08-01

    Brain microvascular alterations are thought to contribute to the development of stroke and dementia. Structural changes in capillaries of elderly patients correlate positively with advanced age and dementia. The objective of this study is to use laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to compare structural (collagen content) and functional (apoptosis) parameters in brain tissues and isolated vessels of AD patients to age-matched controls. Our results show significantly higher fluorescent labeling for apoptosis in AD vessels compared to controls. Also, there is significantly higher autofluorescence (reflecting levels of collagen and other proteins that autofluoresce) in AD brain and vessels compared to controls. Western blot analysis of collagen subtypes shows elevated type I and type III and reduced type IV levels in AD vessels. These data demonstrate that changes in the amount and type of collagen occur in AD brain and suggest that cerebral vessel injury is part of AD pathology.

  2. Writing 3D patterns of microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Juodkazis, Saulius

    2012-01-01

    The laser polymerization capabilities of biocompatible and cross-linkable materials using direct laser writing are discussed. Purpose Cross-disciplinary highlight of synergy between medical applications and laser microfabrication. PMID:22888229

  3. Two Phase Technology Development Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Three promising thermal technology development initiatives, vapor compression thermal control system, electronics cooling, and electrohydrodynamics applications are outlined herein. These technologies will provide thermal engineers with additional tools to meet the thermal challenges presented by increased power densities and reduced architectural options that will be available in future spacecraft. Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland are fabricating and testing a 'proto- flight' vapor compression based thermal control system for the Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Program. The vapor compression system will be capable of transporting approximately 400 W of heat while providing a temperature lift of 60C. The system is constructed of 'commercial off-the-shelf' hardware that is modified to meet the unique environmental requirements of the ULDB. A demonstration flight is planned for 1999 or early 2000. Goddard Space Flight Center has embarked upon a multi-discipline effort to address a number of design issues regarding spacecraft electronics. The program addressed the high priority design issues concerning the total mass of standard spacecraft electronics enclosures and the impact of design changes on thermal performance. This presentation reviews the pertinent results of the Lightweight Electronics Enclosure Program. Electronics cooling is a growing challenge to thermal engineers due to increasing power densities and spacecraft architecture. The space-flight qualification program and preliminary results of thermal performance tests of copper-water heat pipes are presented. Electrohydrodynamics (EHD) is an emerging technology that uses the secondary forces that result from the application of an electric field to a flowing fluid to enhance heat transfer and manage fluid flow. A brief review of current EHD capabilities regarding heat transfer enhancement of commercial heat exchangers and capillary pumped loops is presented. Goddard Space Flight

  4. Effect of Charge Density on the Taylor Cone in Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanger, Jonathan; Tucker, Nick; Kirwan, Kerry; Staiger, Mark P.

    A detailed understanding of charge density and its origins during the electrospinning process is desirable for developing new electrospinnable polymer-solvent systems and ensuring mathematical models of the process are accurate. In this work, two different approaches were taken to alter the charge density in order to measure its effect on the Taylor cone, mass deposition rate and initial jet diameter. It was found that an increase in charge density results in a decrease in the mass deposition rate and initial jet diameter. A theory is proposed for this behaviour in that an increase in charge density leads to the tip of the Taylor cone forming a smaller radius of curvature resulting in the concentration of electric stresses at the tip. This leads to the electrostatic forces drawing the initial jet from a smaller effective area or "virtual orifice".

  5. Probing the Density Structure of 48 Librae's Circumstellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaj, J.; Jones, C. E.; Carciofi, A. C.; Escolano, C.; Tycner, C.

    2016-11-01

    48 Librae is a well-known Be shell star that exhibits spectacular cyclic V/R asymmetries in its Balmer emission lines. In this work, we use the HDUST code to investigate the disk density structure required to produce this signature. By modelling one representative Hα profile, we obtain the two initial densities required to match each peak, and from this we infer the average initial disk density. Furthermore, we investigate the parameters of the central star by modelling the SED, and we constrain the inclination angle of the system with polarization measurements. We find 48 Lib is best represented by a B3V central star surrounded by a very dense disk with an average initial density of 1.1×10-10 g cm-3, and that the system is oriented at 85°.

  6. Gedanken densities and exact constraints in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, John P.; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Sun, Jianwei; Burke, Kieron

    2014-05-14

    Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is not an approximation to it. We further derive a strongly and optimally tightened bound on the exchange enhancement factor of a two-electron density, which is satisfied by the local density approximation but is violated by all published GGA's or meta-GGA’s. Finally, some consequences of the non-uniform density-scaling behavior for the asymptotics of the exchange enhancement factor of a GGA or meta-GGA are given.

  7. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  8. Density Gradients in Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines experiments in which a density gradient might be used to advantage. A density gradient consists of a column of liquid, the composition and density of which varies along its length. The procedure can be used in analysis of solutions and mixtures and in density measures of solids. (Author/TS)

  9. Gravity wave initiated convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  10. The NLM Indexing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Aronson, A R; Bodenreider, O; Chang, H F; Humphrey, S M; Mork, J G; Nelson, S J; Rindflesch, T C; Wilbur, W J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of NLM's Indexing Initiative (IND) is to investigate methods whereby automated indexing methods partially or completely substitute for current indexing practices. The project will be considered a success if methods can be designed and implemented that result in retrieval performance that is equal to or better than the retrieval performance of systems based principally on humanly assigned index terms. We describe the current state of the project and discuss our plans for the future.

  11. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  12. Genetics of Fiber Initiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To study the cellular mechanisms involved in fiber initiation, three fiberless lines were crossed with wildtype and fuzzless seed cotton and the F1, F2 and BC1 progeny ratios are presently being evaluated. The three fiberless lines included: MD17 (N1N1n2n2), SL1-7-1 (N1N1fl1fl1n3n3) and XZ142w. XZ...

  13. The space exploration initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, Pete

    1991-01-01

    A number of view graph charts are presented which outline the presentation. Outlined are reasons for going to Mars, why it is necessary to go to the Moon first, and the presidential decision on the space exploration initiative. Other representative charts are entitled: Lunar transportation system requirement drivers; Mars transportation system requirement drivers; National space policy goals; Exploration hardware needed; Mars mission profile; Science on the Moon and Mars; and Two independent reviews.

  14. MSI develops refugee initiative.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This brief article highlights the new initiative by Marie Stopes International (MSI), which is part of a Reproductive Health for Refugees Consortium of four organizations formed in 1995. The new initiative will promote awareness about the need for reproductive health among refugees. Over 80% of refugees are women and children who fled a variety of disasters only to be at high risk from sexual violence, sexually transmitted infections, and the effects of unintended and unsafe pregnancies. The consortium members will work to increase donors' understanding of the health conditions of women and to significantly increase donor support for reproductive health initiatives. In addition to the role of advocacy, MSI will be introducing refugee services into its global network of reproductive health services. MSI gained experience in delivering reproductive health services in refugee situations in the former Yugoslavia and among Mozambican refugees in Malawi. MSI is investigating sources of information from several countries about refugees' needs. The consortium is also collecting information on the most effective ways of delivering reproductive health services in refugee situations. The aim is to institutionalize reproductive health services into all humanitarian responses. MSI has developed refugee programs over the past 3 years in the former Yugoslavia, Malawi, Sri Lanka, and Sierra Leone. MSI expects to establish projects in 1996 for refugees in Zaire, Guinea, and Mozambique. The numbers of displaced persons or refugees is continuing to increase worldwide, and there is a continued need to provide for these vulnerable communities.

  15. Initiation Train Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Elizabeth; Johnson, Carl; Liechty, Gary; Whitley, Von

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to evaluate and qualify a new detonator diagnostic, booster selection and main charge configuration, a variety of small-scale tests have been conducted. This paper will describe the needs, testing approach and model validation. Because of the limited size available some novel approaches were made to understand the observed phenomenon. Function time and time of arrival at various locations in the initiation train are desirable data points. Knowing when each segment initiates the next segment and the time to run up to detonation is critical. Results of our experiments were modeled for timing accuracy, wave shape and pressure. Agreement between the experiments and models will be discussed. The testing that will be discussed is time of arrival wires, PDV, and fiber optic arrays. The time of arrival wire measures the detonator cup breakout time. When correlated to bridge burst, an absolute time is collected. This data point also gives time zero for the booster initiation. Many models actually start at the booster, rather than the detonator, so the inclusion of this data point will improve modeling efforts.

  16. ON THE INITIAL CONDITIONS FOR STAR FORMATION AND THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2011-04-10

    Density probability distribution functions (PDFs) for turbulent self-gravitating clouds should be convolutions of the local log-normal PDF, which depends on the local average density {rho}{sub ave} and Mach number M, and the PDFs for {rho}{sub ave} and M, which depend on the overall cloud structure. When self-gravity drives a cloud to increased central density, the total PDF develops an extended tail. If there is a critical density or column density for star formation, then the fraction of the local mass exceeding this threshold becomes higher near the cloud center. These elements of cloud structure should be in place before significant star formation begins. Then the efficiency is high so that bound clusters form rapidly, and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) has an imprint in the gas before destructive radiation from young stars can erase it. The IMF could arise from a power-law distribution of mass for cloud structure. These structures should form stars down to the thermal Jeans mass M{sub J} at each density in excess of a threshold. The high-density tail of the PDF, combined with additional fragmentation in each star-forming core, extends the IMF into the brown dwarf regime. The core fragmentation process is distinct from the cloud structuring process and introduces an independent core fragmentation mass function (CFMF). The CFMF would show up primarily below the IMF peak.

  17. Longitudinal Density Modulation and Energy Conversion in Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J; Neumann, J; Tian, K; O'Shea, P

    2006-02-17

    Density modulation of charged particle beams may occur as a consequence of deliberate action, or may occur inadvertently because of imperfections in the particle source or acceleration method. In the case of intense beams, where space charge and external focusing govern the beam dynamics, density modulation may under some circumstances be converted to velocity modulation, with a corresponding conversion of potential energy to kinetic energy. Whether this will occur depends on the properties of the beam and the initial modulation. This paper describes the evolution of discrete and continuous density modulations on intense beams, and discusses three recent experiments related to the dynamics of density-modulated electron beams.

  18. Density-dependent acoustic properties of PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; Deluca, Racci; Hartline, Ernest L; Hagelberg, Stephanie I

    2009-07-31

    We have measured the longitudinal and shear acoustic velocities of PBX 9502 as a function of density for die-pressed samples over the range 1.795 g/cc to 1.888 g/cc. The density dependence of the velocities is linear. Thermal cycling of PBX 9502 is known to induce irreversible volume growth. We have measured this volume growth dependence on density for a subset of the pressed parts and find that the most growth occurs for the samples with lowest initial density. The acoustic velocity changes due to the volume growth are significant and reflect damage in the samples.

  19. Gulf Petro Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Fathi Boukadi

    2011-02-05

    In this report, technologies for petroleum production and exploration enhancement in deepwater and mature fields are developed through basic and applied research by: (1) Designing new fluids to efficiently drill deepwater wells that can not be cost-effectively drilled with current technologies. The new fluids will be heavy liquid foams that have low-density at shallow dept to avoid formation breakdown and high density at drilling depth to control formation pressure. The goal of this project is to provide industry with formulations of new fluids for reducing casing programs and thus well construction cost in deepwater development. (2) Studying the effects of flue gas/CO{sub 2} huff n puff on incremental oil recovery in Louisiana oilfields bearing light oil. An artificial neural network (ANN) model will be developed and used to map recovery efficiencies for candidate reservoirs in Louisiana. (3) Arriving at a quantitative understanding for the three-dimensional controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) geophysical response of typical Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon reservoirs. We will seek to make available tools for the qualitative, rapid interpretation of marine CSEM signatures, and tools for efficient, three-dimensional subsurface conductivity modeling.

  20. The high density Z-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    During the past few years techniques have been developed for producing pinches in solid deuterium. The conditions which exist in these plasmas are quiet different from those produced earlier. The pinch is formed from a fiber of solid deuterium rather than from a low density gas, and the current is driven by a low impedance, high voltage pulse generator. Because of the high initial density, it is not necessary to compress the pinch to reach thermonuclear conditions, and the confinement time required for energy production is much shorter than for a gas. The experimental results, which have been verified by experiments performed at higher current were quite surprising and encouraging. The pinch appeared to be stable for a time much longer than the Alfven radial transit time. In this paper, however, I argue that the pinch is not strictly stable, but it does not appear to disassemble in a catastrophic fashion. It appears that there may be a distinction between stability and confinement in the high density pinch. In the discussion below I will present the status of the high density Z-pinch experiments at laboratories around the world, and I will describe some of the calculational and experimental results. I will confine my remarks to recent work on the high density pinch. 17 refs. 10 figs.

  1. High Energy Density Capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: Recapping is developing a capacitor that could rival the energy storage potential and price of today’s best EV batteries. When power is needed, the capacitor rapidly releases its stored energy, similar to lightning being discharged from a cloud. Capacitors are an ideal substitute for batteries if their energy storage capacity can be improved. Recapping is addressing storage capacity by experimenting with the material that separates the positive and negative electrodes of its capacitors. These separators could significantly improve the energy density of electrochemical devices.

  2. Discrete density of states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Alhun; Sisman, Altug

    2016-03-01

    By considering the quantum-mechanically minimum allowable energy interval, we exactly count number of states (NOS) and introduce discrete density of states (DOS) concept for a particle in a box for various dimensions. Expressions for bounded and unbounded continua are analytically recovered from discrete ones. Even though substantial fluctuations prevail in discrete DOS, they're almost completely flattened out after summation or integration operation. It's seen that relative errors of analytical expressions of bounded/unbounded continua rapidly decrease for high NOS values (weak confinement or high energy conditions), while the proposed analytical expressions based on Weyl's conjecture always preserve their lower error characteristic.

  3. Simulation of Initiation in Hexanitrostilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan; Shan, Tzu-Ray; Yarrington, Cole; Wixom, Ryan

    We report on the effect of isolated voids and pairs of nearby voids on hot spot formation, growth and chemical reaction initiation in hexanitrostilbene (HNS) crystals subjected to shock loading. Large-scale, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS software. The ReaxFF force field description for HNS has been validated previously by comparing the isothermal equation of state to available diamond anvil cell (DAC) measurements and density function theory (DFT) calculations. Micron-scale molecular dynamics simulations of a supported shockwave propagating in HNS crystal along the [010] orientation are performed (up = 1.25 km/s, Us =4.0 km/s, P = 11GPa.) We compare the effect on hot spot formation and growth rate of isolated cylindrical voids up to 0.1 µm in size with that of two 50nm voids set 100nm apart. Results from the micron-scale atomistic simulations are compared with hydrodynamics simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lock- heed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Effects of density on growth, metamorphosis, and survivorship in tadpoles of Scaphiopus holbrooki

    SciTech Connect

    Semlitsch, R.D.; Caldwell, J.P.

    1982-08-01

    Density-dependent aspects of growth, metamorphosis, and survivorship of Scaphiopus holbrooki tadpoles were examined in the laboratory under two experimental regimes. In the first density experiment, the growth index (W) of tadpoles decreased exponentially with density. Mean growth rate varied from 0.023 mL/d at the lowest density to 0.006 mL/d at the highest density. The mean number of days to metamorphic climax was positively associated with the initial density treatment: 27 d at the lowest density to 86 d at the highest density. The body size of tadpoles at metamorphosis showed a concave curvilinear relationship to initial density, indicating tadpoles at the highest densities are apparently capable to growth recovery once released from density stress. The survival of tadpoles decreased exponentially with initial density, from 90% at the lowest density to 20% at the highest initial density. In the second experiment a cross-classified design was used to examine the effects of density and duration of treatment (time) on growth and metamorphosis. Density and time had significant effects on body size at metamorphosis and days to metamorphosis. There was no significant interaction between density and time. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of density stress varies with the duration of the stress. Scaphiopus holbrooki tadpoles exhibit developmental traits (rapid growth, short larval period, small body size at metamorphosis) that should be favored by natural selection in high density habitats. Dispersability may be a mechanism whereby S. holbrooki can minimize the detrimental effects of density stress.

  5. Shock initiation experiments on ratchet grown PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Richard L; Thompson, Darla G; Olinger, Barton W; Deluca, Racci; Bartram, Brian D; Pierce, Timothy H; Sanchez, Nathaniel J

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the shock initiation behavior of PBX 9502 pressed to less than nominal density (nominal density is 1.890 {+-} 0.005 g/cm{sup 3}) with PBX 9502 pressed to nominal density and then ''ratchet grown'' to low density. PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic bonded explosive consisting of 95 weight % dry-aminated tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) and 5 weight % Kel-F 800 plastic binder. ''Ratchet growth'' - an irreversible increase in specific volume - occurs when an explosive based on TATB is temperature cycled. The design of our study is as follows: PBX 9502, all from the same lot, received the following four treatments. Samples in the first group were pressed to less than nominal density. These were not ratchet grown and used as a baseline. Samples in the second group were pressed to nominal density and then ratchet grown by temperature cycling 30 times between -54 C and +80 C. Samples in the final group were pressed to nominal density and cut into 100 mm by 25.4 mm diameter cylinders. During thermal cycling the cylinders were axially constrained by a 100 psi load. Samples for shock initiation experiments were cut perpendicular (disks) and parallel (slabs) to the axial load. The four sample groups can be summarized with the terms pressed low, ratchet grown/no load, axial load/disks, and axial load/slabs. All samples were shock initiated with nearly identical inputs in plate impact experiments carried out on a gas gun. Wave profiles were measured after propagation through 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm of explosive. Side by side comparison of wave profiles from different samples is used as a measure of relative sensitivity. All reduced density samples were more shock sensitive than nominal density PBX 9502. Differences in shock sensitivity between ratchet grown and pressed to low density PBX 9502 were small, but the low density pressings are slightly more sensitive than the ratchet grown samples.

  6. Oblique dust density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  7. Through bulkhead initiator studies

    SciTech Connect

    Begeal, D.R.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes recent work done to demonstrate feasibility of a fail-safe Through Bulkhead Initiator with minimum dimensions and suitable for use in cyclical thermal environments. Much of the ground work for a fail-safe TBI was previously done by A.C. Schwartz. This study is an expansion of Schwartz`s work to evaluate devices with bulkheads of 304 stainless steel and Inconel 718; explosive donors of PETN, BNCP, and a 0.005 inch thick steel flying plate donor traveling at 2.6 mm/{micro}s; and explosive acceptors of PETN and BNCP. Bulkhead thickness were evaluated in the range of 0.040 to 0.180 inch. The explosive acceptors initiated a small HMX pellet to drive a 0.005 inch thick steel flying plate, and VISAR histories of the HMX-driven flying plates were the measure of acceptable performance. A companion set of samples used a PMMA acceptor to measure the particle velocities at the bulkhead/PMMA interface with VISAR. These data were used to compute the input pressure to the acceptor explosives in an attempt to measure initiation threshold. Unfortunately, the range of bulkhead thicknesses tested did not give any failures, thus the threshold was not determined. It was found that either explosive or the flying plate would perform as a TBI in the bulkhead thickness range tested. The optimum TBI is about 0.060 inches thick, and steel bulkheads seem to be more structurally sound than those made of Inconel. That is, cross section views of the Inconel bulkheads showed it to be more prone to stress cracking than was the 304 stainless steel. Both PETN and BNCP showed good performance when tested at {minus}65 F following thermal cycling of {minus}65 F to +165 F. Analysis of the TBI function times showed that BNCP acceptor explosives were undergoing the classical deflagration to detonation process. The PETN acceptors were undergoing prompt detonation.

  8. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the Initial Blood Storage Experiment (IBSE) was based upon a carefully controlled comparison between identical sets of human blood cell suspensions - red cells, white cell, and platelets - one set of which was transported aboard the Columbia on a 6 day 11 hour mission, and the other held on the ground. Both sets were carried inside stainless steel dewars within specially fabricated flight hardware. Individual bags of cell suspensions were randomly assigned with respect to ground vs orbit status, dewar chamber, and specific location within the dewar. To foster optimal preservation, each cell type was held under specific optimal conditions of pH, ionic strength, solute concentration, gas tension, and temperature. An added variable in this initial experiment was provided by the use of three different polymer/plasticizer formulations for the sealed bags which held the blood cells. At termination of the experiment, aliquots of the suspensions, identified only by code, were distributed to be assayed. Assays were selected to constitute a broad survey of cellular properties and thereby maximize the chances of detection of gravitational effects. A total of 74 different outcome measurements were reported for statistical analysis. When the measurements were completed, the results were entered into the IBSE data base, at which time the data were matched with the original blood bag numbers to determine their status with respect to polymer/plasticizer type, orbit status (orbit or ground), and storage position within the experimental hardware. The data were studied by analysis of variance. Initially, type of bag and orbital status were main factors; later more detailed analyses were made on specific issues such as position in the hardware and specific plastic. If the analysis of variance indicated a statistical significance at the 5 percent level the corresponding p-value was reported.

  9. Stirling to Flight Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, Kenneth E.; Mason, Lee S.; Ndu, Obi; Smith, Clayton; Withrow, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Flight (S2F) initiative with the objective of developing a 100-500 We Stirling generator system. Additionally, a different approach is being devised for this initiative to avoid pitfalls of the past, and apply lessons learned from the recent ASRG experience. Two key aspects of this initiative are a Stirling System Technology Maturation Effort, and a Surrogate Mission Team (SMT) intended to provide clear mission pull and requirements context. The S2F project seeks to lead directly into a DOE flight system development of a new SRG. This paper will detail the proposed S2F initiative, and provide specifics on the key efforts designed to pave a forward path for bringing Stirling technology to flight.

  10. UNLV Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hechanova, Anthony E.; Johnson, Allen; O'Toole, Brendan; Trabia, Mohamed; Peterson, Per

    2012-10-25

    Evaluation of the Crack growth rate (CGR) of Alloy 617 and Alloy 276 under constant K at ambient temperature has been completed. Creep deformation of Alloy 230 at different temperature range and load level has been completed and heat to heat variation has been noticed. Creep deformation study of Alloy 276 has been completed under an applied initial stress level of 10% of yield stress at 950ºC. The grain size evaluation of the tested creep specimens of Alloy 276 has been completed.

  11. Space Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An overview of President Bush's Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) and it's three main components, Space Station Freedom, a Permanent Lunar Base, and a Manned Mission to Mars is provided. Computer simulations of the Space Station Freedom and Permanent Lunar Base are shown, and an animated sequence describes a Mars mission where heavy lift vehicle will bring components of a Mars Spacecraft into orbit, where it will be put together by astronauts using a robotic arm. The Mars spacecraft is shown orbiting Mars and discharging a lander to the surface, carrying human explorers. The video also details the SEI's Outreach Program, designed to garner interest in and ideas for Space Exploration.

  12. Initiation of slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hanratty, T.J.; Woods, B.D.

    1995-12-31

    The initiation of slug flow in a horizontal pipe can be predicted either by considering the stability of a slug or by considering the stability of a stratified flow. Measurements of the shedding rate of slugs are used to define necessary conditions for the existence of a slug. Recent results show that slugs develop from an unstable stratified flow through the evolution of small wavelength waves into large wavelength waves that have the possibility of growing to form a slug. The mechanism appears to be quite different for fluids with viscosities close to water than for fluids with large viscosities (20 centipoise).

  13. Human Research Initiative (HRI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motil, Brian

    2003-01-01

    A code U initiative starting in the FY04 budget includes specific funding for 'Phase Change' and 'Multiphase Flow Research' on the ISS. NASA GRC developed a concept for two facilities based on funding/schedule constraints: 1) Two Phase Flow Facility (TphiFFy) which assumes integrating into FIR; 2) Contact Line Dynamics Experiment Facility (CLiDE) which assumes integration into MSG. Each facility will accommodate multiple experiments conducted by NRA selected PIs with an overall goal of enabling specific NASA strategic objectives. There may also be a significant ground-based component.

  14. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-07-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System`s tank waste retrieval Program.

  15. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  16. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  17. Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzio, Adalberto

    2015-03-01

    In Brazil there is intense research activity in nanotechnology, most of these developed in universities and research institutes. The Brazilian Nanotechnology Initiative (BNI) aims to integrate government actions to promote the competitiveness of the Brazilian industry. This initiative is founded on support for research and development in the laboratories of the National Laboratories for Nanotechnology (SisNANO), starting from an improvement in infrastructure and opening of laboratories for users of academia and business, promoting interaction and transfer knowledge between academia and business. Country currently has 26 thematic networks of nanotechnology, 16 -Virtual-National Institutes of Technology, seven National- Laboratories and 18 Associate Laboratories, which comprise the SisNANO. Seeking to expand and share governance with other government actors, the Interministries Committee for Nanotechnology was set up, composed of 10 ministries, and has the task of coordinating the entire program of the Federal Government Nanotechnology.Cooperation activities are an important part of BNI. Currently Brazil has cooperation programs with U.S., China, Canada and European Union among others. Recently, Brazil decided to join the European NanoReg program where 60 research groups are joining efforts to provide protocols and standards that can help regulatory agencies and governments.

  18. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway.

  19. Precision flyer initiator

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.M.; Lee, R.S.

    1998-05-26

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or ``flyer`` is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices. 10 figs.

  20. Precision flyer initiator

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Alan M.; Lee, Ronald S.

    1998-01-01

    A precision flyer initiator forms a substantially spherical detonation wave in a high explosive (HE) pellet. An explosive driver, such as a detonating cord, a wire bridge circuit or a small explosive, is detonated. A flyer material is sandwiched between the explosive driver and an end of a barrel that contains an inner channel. A projectile or "flyer" is sheared from the flyer material by the force of the explosive driver and projected through the inner channel. The flyer than strikes the HE pellet, which is supported above a second end of the barrel by a spacer ring. A gap or shock decoupling material delays the shock wave in the barrel from predetonating the HE pellet before the flyer. A spherical detonation wave is formed in the HE pellet. Thus, a shock wave traveling through the barrel fails to reach the HE pellet before the flyer strikes the HE pellet. The precision flyer initiator can be used in mining devices, well-drilling devices and anti-tank devices.

  1. Strategic defense initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Division has a leading role, including that of program management, in a major new programmatic thrust of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is in support of the national Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). It is appropriate for the Laboratory to become significantly involved in the program because several of the most promising SDI technologies are in areas for which ORNL (together with Y-12 and K-25) have strong capabilities and significant resources. The initial ORNL work in support of the SDI program is focused on three technologies in which ORNL has extensive experience and traditionally strong research and development programs: (1) space nuclear power, (2) flywheel energy storage, and (3) neutral particle beams. The space nuclear program will utilize our capabilities in areas such as refractory materials, high-temperature alkali metal systems, shielding, and instrumentation. Space nuclear reactors capable of supplying multimegawatt levels of electrical power on a continuous and long-term basis are envisioned to be required for a variety of SDI surveillance satellites and space-borne weapons platforms. The feasibility of an alkali metal Rankine power conversion cycle, which has promise of providing high power with a very low system mass, is planned for study.

  2. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  3. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, J.D.

    1991-11-19

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

  4. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular from which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  5. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Curro, J.G.; Quintana, C.A.; Russick, E.M.; Shaw, M.T.

    1985-10-02

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the reusltant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 ..mu..m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  6. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Curro, John G.; Quintana, Carlos A.; Russick, Edward M.; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    1987-01-01

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the resultant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Means for subjecting such a solvent to one-dimensional cooling are also provided. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 .mu.m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  7. Instrumented Pipeline Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Piro; Michael Ream

    2010-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative agreement between Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) and U.S. Department of Energy to address the need for a for low-cost monitoring and inspection sensor system as identified in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Gas Infrastructure Research & Development (R&D) Delivery Reliability Program Roadmap.. The Instrumented Pipeline Initiative (IPI) achieved the objective by researching technologies for the monitoring of pipeline delivery integrity, through a ubiquitous network of sensors and controllers to detect and diagnose incipient defects, leaks, and failures. This report is organized by tasks as detailed in the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO). The sections all state the objective and approach before detailing results of work.

  8. [Advanced Composites Technology Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This final report closes out the W02 NASA Grant #NCC5-646. The FY02 grant for advanced technology initiatives through the Advanced Composites Technology Institute in Bridgeport, WV, at the Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) Bridgeport Manufacturing Technology Center, is complete; all funding has been expended. RCBI continued to expand access to technology; develop and implement a workforce-training curriculum; improve material development; and provide prototyping and demonstrations of new and advanced composites technologies for West Virginia composites firms. The FY 02 efforts supported workforce development, technical training and the HST development effort of a super-lightweight composite carrier prototype and expanded the existing technical capabilities of the growing aerospace industry across West Virginia to provide additional support for NASA missions. Additionally, the Composites Technology and Training Center was awarded IS0 9001 - 2000 certification and Cleanroom Class 1000 certification during this report period.

  9. The Knowledge Stealing Initiative?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goshorn, Larry

    2005-01-01

    I have the honor of being on the Academy of Program and Project Leadership (APPL) Knowledge Sharing Feedback and Assessment Team (FAA), and as such, I am privileged to receive the feedback written by many of you as attendees of the Project Management (PM) Master s Forums. It is the intent of the FAA Team and APPL leadership to use this feedback as a tool for continuous program improvement. As a retired (sort of) PM in the payload contracting industry, I'm a big supporter of NASA s Knowledge Sharing Initiative (KSI), especially the Master's Forums. I really enjoy participating in them. Unfortunately I had to miss the 8th forum in Pasadena this past Spring, but I did get the feedback package for the Assessment Team work. So here I was, reviewing twelve pages of comments, reflections, learning notes and critiques from attendees of the 8th forum.

  10. Quality initiative at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupprecht, Gero; Arsenault, Robin; Hanuschik, Reinhard; Kraus, Maximilian; Sivera, Paola; Tromp, Arnout; Verzichelli, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    An initiative is under way at ESO Headquarters to optimise operations, in particular in the engineering, technical and associated management areas. A systematic approach to strengthen the operating processes is in preparation, starting with a mapping of the extensive existing process network. Processes identified as sufficiently important and complex to merit an in-depth analysis will be properly specified and their implementation optimised to strike a sensible balance between organisational overhead (documentation) and efficiency. By applying methods and tools tried and tested in industry we expect to achieve a more unified approach to address recurrent tasks. This will enable staff to concentrate more on new challenges and improvement and avoid spending effort on issues already resolved in the past.

  11. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1982-09-01

    Report III, Volume 1 contains those specifications numbered A through J, as follows: General Specifications (A); Specifications for Pressure Vessels (C); Specifications for Tanks (D); Specifications for Exchangers (E); Specifications for Fired Heaters (F); Specifications for Pumps and Drivers (G); and Specifications for Instrumentation (J). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project, and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available to the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors. Report III, Volume 1 also contains the unique specifications prepared for Plants 8, 15, and 27. These specifications will be substantially reviewed during Phase I of the project, and modified as necessary for use during the engineering, procurement, and construction of this project.

  12. MONTANA PALLADIUM RESEARCH INITIATIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, John; McCloskey, Jay; Douglas, Trevor; Young, Mark; Snyder, Stuart; Gurney, Brian

    2012-05-09

    Project Objective: The overarching objective of the Montana Palladium Research Initiative is to perform scientific research on the properties and uses of palladium in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program. The purpose of the research will be to explore possible palladium as an alternative to platinum in hydrogen-economy applications. To achieve this objective, the Initiatives activities will focus on several cutting-edge research approaches across a range of disciplines, including metallurgy, biomimetics, instrumentation development, and systems analysis. Background: Platinum-group elements (PGEs) play significant roles in processing hydrogen, an element that shows high potential to address this need in the U.S. and the world for inexpensive, reliable, clean energy. Platinum, however, is a very expensive component of current and planned systems, so less-expensive alternatives that have similar physical properties are being sought. To this end, several tasks have been defined under the rubric of the Montana Palladium Research Iniative. This broad swath of activities will allow progress on several fronts. The membrane-related activities of Task 1 employs state-of-the-art and leading-edge technologies to develop new, ceramic-substrate metallic membranes for the production of high-purity hydrogen, and develop techniques for the production of thin, defect-free platinum group element catalytic membranes for energy production and pollution control. The biomimetic work in Task 2 explores the use of substrate-attached hydrogen-producing enzymes and the encapsulation of palladium in virion-based protein coats to determine their utility for distributed hydrogen production. Task 3 work involves developing laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a real-time, in situ diagnostic technique to characterize PGEs nanoparticles for process monitoring and control. The systems engineering work in task 4 will

  13. Green Power Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Patrick Barry

    2013-01-28

    National energy policy supports the gathering of more detailed and authoritative data on the introduction of renewable bio-based fuels into new and existing district energy systems via the application of biomass gasification. The University of Iowa developed a biomass-fueled, university-scale steam generation system based on biomass gasification technologies. The system serves as a state-of-the-art research and educational facility in the emerging application of gasification in steam generation. The facility, which includes a smaller down-draft gasifier and a larger multi-stage biomass boiler, was designed to operate primarily on wood-based fuels, but has provisions for testing other biomass fuel sources produced within a 100-mile radius, providing enough flexibility to meet the fluctuating local supply of biomass from industry and Midwest agriculture. The equipment was installed in an existing, staffed facility. The down-draft gasifier unit is operated by College of Engineering staff and students, under the direct technical supervision of qualified Utilities plant staff. The Green Power Initiative also includes a substantial, innovative educational component. In addition to an onsite, graduate-level research program in biomass fuels, the investigators have integrated undergraduate and graduate level teaching – through classroom studies and experiential learning – and applied research into a biomass-based, university-scale, functioning power plant. University of Iowa is unique in that it currently has multiple renewable energy technologies deployed, including significant biomass combustion (oat hulls) at its Main Power Plant and a new reciprocating engine based renewable district energy system. This project complements and supports the national energy policy and State of Iowa initiatives in ethanol and biodiesel. Byproducts of ethanol and biodiesel processes (distiller grains) as well as industry residues (oat hulls, wood chips, construction and demolition

  14. Kazakhstan Space Weather Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryakunova, Olga

    2012-07-01

    Kazakhstan experimental complex is a center of experimental study of space weather. This complex is situated near Almaty, Kazakhstan and includes experimental setup for registration of cosmic ray intensity (neutron monitor) at altitude of 3340 m above sea level, geomagnetic observatory and setup for registration of solar flux density with frequency of 1 and 3 GHz with 1 second time resolution. Results of space environment monitoring in real time are accessible via Internet. This experimental information is used for space weather investigations and different cosmic ray effects. Almaty mountain cosmic ray station is one of the most suitable and sensitive stations for investigation and forecasting of the dangerous situations for satellites; for this reason Almaty cosmic ray station is included in the world-wide neutron monitor network for the real-time monitoring of the space weather conditions and European Database NMDB (www.nmdb.eu). All data are represented on the web-site of the Institute of Ionosphere (www.ionos.kz) in real time. Since July, 2006 the space environment prediction laboratory represents the forecast of geomagnetic activity every day on the same site (www.ionos.kz/?q=en/node/21).

  15. Two-point density correlations of quasicondensates in free expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, S.; Buecker, R.; Betz, T.; Koller, Ch.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hofferberth, S.; Demler, E.; Mazets, I. E.; Imambekov, A.; Perrin, A.; Schumm, T.

    2010-03-15

    We measure the two-point density correlation function of freely expanding quasicondensates in the weakly interacting quasi-one-dimensional (1D) regime. While initially suppressed in the trap, density fluctuations emerge gradually during expansion as a result of initial phase fluctuations present in the trapped quasicondensate. Asymptotically, they are governed by the thermal coherence length of the system. Our measurements take place in an intermediate regime where density correlations are related to near-field diffraction effects and anomalous correlations play an important role. Comparison with a recent theoretical approach described by Imambekov et al. yields good agreement with our experimental results and shows that density correlations can be used for thermometry of quasicondensates.

  16. Density of Mars' south polar layered deposits.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Maria T; Phillips, Roger J; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C; Asmar, Sami W; Konopliv, Alexander S; Lemoine, Frank G; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Smith, David E; Smrekar, Suzanne E

    2007-09-21

    Both poles of Mars are hidden beneath caps of layered ice. We calculated the density of the south polar layered deposits by combining the gravity field obtained from initial results of radio tracking of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter with existing surface topography from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and basal topography from the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding on the Mars Express spacecraft. The results indicate a best-fit density of 1220 kilograms per cubic meter, which is consistent with water ice that has approximately 15% admixed dust. The results demonstrate that the deposits are probably composed of relatively clean water ice and also refine the martian surface-water inventory.

  17. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  18. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  19. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I measure the density of a... Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5395 How do I measure the density of a finish? (a) To determine the density of a finish, the reference method is EPA Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60. You may...

  20. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I measure the density of a... and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5395 How do I measure the density of a finish? (a) To determine the density of a finish, the reference method is EPA Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part...

  1. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I measure the density of a... Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5395 How do I measure the density of a finish? (a) To determine the density of a finish, the reference method is EPA Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60. You may...

  2. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I measure the density of a... and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5395 How do I measure the density of a finish? (a) To determine the density of a finish, the reference method is EPA Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR part...

  3. Effect of implant design on initial stability of tapered implants.

    PubMed

    Chong, Linus; Khocht, Ahmed; Suzuki, Jon B; Gaughan, John

    2009-01-01

    Implant design is one of the parameters for achieving successful primary stability. This study aims to examine the effect of a self-tapping blades implant design on initial stability in tapered implants. Polyurethane blocks of different densities were used to simulate different bone densities. The two different implant designs included one with self-tapping blades and one without self-tapping blades. Implants were placed at 3 different depths: apical third, middle third, and fully inserted at 3 different densities of polyurethane blocks. A resonance frequency (RF) analyzer was then used to measure stability of the implants. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the effect of implant design, insertion depth, and block density on RF. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the strength of association between RF and the aforementioned factors. In both medium-density (P = .017) and high-density (P = .002) blocks, fully inserted non-self-tapping implants showed higher initial stability than self-tapping implants. No differences were noted between the 2 implant designs that were not fully inserted. The highest strength of association was with insertion depth (standardized beta [std beta] = -0.60, P = .0001), followed by block density (std beta = -0.15, P = .0002). Implant design showed a weak association (std beta = -0.07, P = .09). In conclusion, fully inserted implants without self-tapping blades have higher initial stability than implants with self-tapping blades. However, the association strength between implant design and initial stability is less relevant than other factors, such as insertion depth and block density. Thus, if bone quality and quantity are optimal, they may compensate for design inadequacy.

  4. Method for determining transport critical current densities and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, Ulf E. (Inventor); Strayer, Donald M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A contact-less method for determining transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in bulk superconductor material. A compressor having a hollow interior and a plunger for selectively reducing the free space area for distribution of the magnetic flux therein are formed of superconductor material. Analytical relationships, based upon the critical state model, Maxwell's equations and geometrical relationships define transport critical current density and flux penetration depth in terms of the initial trapped magnetic flux density and the ratio between initial and final magnetic flux densities whereby data may be reliably determined by means of the simple test apparatus for evaluating the current density and flux penetration depth.

  5. ALOS-2 initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  6. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  7. Urban Environment Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Urban Environment Initiative (UEI), has been established as part of a Cooperative Agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The UEI is part of NASA's overall High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) and the Information Infrastructure Technology Applications (IITA) programs. The goal of the UEI is to provide public access to Earth Science information and promote its use with a focus on the environment of urban areas. This goal will be accomplished through collaborative efforts of the UEI team with both community-based and local/regional governmental organizations. The UEI team is comprised of four organizations representing private industry, NASA, and universities: Prime Technologies Service Corporation, NASA's Minority University Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) California State University, at Los Angeles, and Central State University (Wilberforce, OH). "Urban Environment" refers to the web of environmental, economic, and social factors that combine to create the urban world in which we live. Examples of these factors are population distribution, neighborhood demographic profiles, economic resources, business activities, location and concentration of environmental hazards and various pollutants, proximity and level of urban services, which form the basis of the urban environment and ultimately affect our lives and experiences. The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing allows data to be visualized in the forms of maps and spatial images. The use of these tools allow analysis of information about urban environments. Also included are descriptions of the four query types which will assist in understanding the maps.

  8. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the Breckinridge Project and summarizes the results achieved during the development phase of the project performed under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States Department of Energy. The Breckinridge Project provides for the design, construction and operation of a 50,000 barrel per day coal liquefaction facility in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. The development of the basic technology used in the Breckinridge Project dates back to the late 1950's and the invention by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., (HRI) of the ebullated-bed reactor and the H-OIL process. The H-COAL process is based on the H-OIL technology. This coal liquefaction process produces clean low-sulfur petroleum substitutes suitable for most types of hydrocarbon-based fuel and chemical uses regardless of the sulfur content of the coal. A large H-COAL Pilot Plant in operation at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, is converting 220 tons of coal per day into 600 barrels of distillate products by catalytic hydrogenation. The estimated capital cost of the commercial facility is $3.17 billion, and the associated out-of-pocket operating cost is $18 per barrel, both in January 1981 dollars. Financial analysis shows the project to be an attractive investment under certain leveraged conditions which are possible through the assistance of the Synthetic Fuels Corporation. Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. is currently working with the Synthetic Fuels Corporation and potential partners to develop financing for the commercial venture. Critical permits are being obtained and an Environmental Impact Statement is being prepared pursuant to initiating site preparation in early 1983. Commercial operations are expected to start up in early 1988.

  9. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as

  10. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact

  11. Low-density lipoprotein density determination by electric conductivity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Higuero, José A; Salvador, Ana M; Arrondo, José L R; Milicua, José Carlos G

    2011-10-15

    The predominance of small dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease. A simple but precise method has been developed, based on electrical conductivity of an isopycnic gradient of KBr, to obtain density values of human LDL fraction. The results obtained can distinguish LDL density populations and their subfractions from different patients. These data were corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) (structure) and light-scattering analyses (size).

  12. Density limit experiments on FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucella, G.; Tudisco, O.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Belli, F.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Buratti, P.; Calabrò, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cianfarani, C.; Cocilovo, V.; Dimatteo, L.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Giovannozzi, E.; Granucci, G.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Martines, E.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Nowak, S.; Ramogida, G.; Romano, A.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Zeng, L.; Zuin, M.

    2013-08-01

    One of the main problems in tokamak fusion devices concerns the capability to operate at a high plasma density, which is observed to be limited by the appearance of catastrophic events causing loss of plasma confinement. The commonly used empirical scaling law for the density limit is the Greenwald limit, predicting that the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord depends only on the average plasma current density. However, the Greenwald density limit has been exceeded in tokamak experiments in the case of peaked density profiles, indicating that the edge density is the real parameter responsible for the density limit. Recently, it has been shown on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) that the Greenwald density limit is exceeded in gas-fuelled discharges with a high value of the edge safety factor. In order to understand this behaviour, dedicated density limit experiments were performed on FTU, in which the high density domain was explored in a wide range of values of plasma current (Ip = 500-900 kA) and toroidal magnetic field (BT = 4-8 T). These experiments confirm the edge nature of the density limit, as a Greenwald-like scaling holds for the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a peripheral chord passing at r/a ≃ 4/5. On the other hand, the maximum achievable line-averaged density along a central chord does not depend on the average plasma current density and essentially depends on the toroidal magnetic field only. This behaviour is explained in terms of density profile peaking in the high density domain, with a peaking factor at the disruption depending on the edge safety factor. The possibility that the MARFE (multifaced asymmetric radiation from the edge) phenomenon is the cause of the peaking has been considered, with the MARFE believed to form a channel for the penetration of the neutral particles into deeper layers of the plasma. Finally, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) analysis has shown that also the central line

  13. Comparison of density determination of liquid samples by density meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, C.; Wolf, H.; Vámossy, C.; Lorefice, S.; Lenard, E.; Spohr, I.; Mares, G.; Perkin, M.; Parlic-Risovic, T.; Grue, L.-L.; Tammik, K.; van Andel, I.; Zelenka, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrostatic density determinations of liquids as reference material are mainly performed by National Metrology Institutes to provide means for calibrating or checking liquid density measuring instruments such as oscillation-type density meters. These density meters are used by most of the metrology institutes for their calibration and scientific work. The aim of this project was to compare the results of the liquid density determination by oscillating density meters of the participating laboratories. The results were linked to CCM.D.K-2 partly via Project EURAMET.M.D.K-2 (1019) "Comparison of liquid density standards" by hydrostatic weighing piloted by BEV in 2008. In this comparison pentadecane, water and of oil with a high viscosity were measured at atmospheric pressure using oscillation type density meter. The temperature range was from 15 °C to 40 °C. The measurement results were in some cases discrepant. Further studies, comparisons are essential to explore the capability and uncertainty of the density meters Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Laser Initiation and Radiofrequency Sustainment of Seeded Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    pressure plasma that projects well away from the antenna by this means that could not be obtained by RF alone. The initial plasma ionization also...a much lower RF power levels and with more enhanced axial projection away from the antenna with laser initiation than without. Power densities of 1...SCIENTECH ( Astral AD30). In order to account for the laser attenuation by the UV window, the UV window is placed in front of the energy meter. A laser

  15. High Power Density Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  16. The national geomagnetic initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field, through its variability over a spectrum of spatial and temporal scales, contains fundamental information on the solid Earth and geospace environment (the latter comprising the atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere). Integrated studies of the geomagnetic field have the potential to address a wide range of important processes in the deep mantle and core, asthenosphere, lithosphere, oceans, and the solar-terrestrial environment. These studies have direct applications to important societal problems, including resource assessment and exploration, natural hazard mitigation, safe navigation, and the maintenance and survivability of communications and power systems on the ground and in space. Studies of the Earth's magnetic field are supported by a variety of federal and state agencies as well as by private industry. Both basic and applied research is presently supported by several federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) (through the Navy, Air Force, and Defense Mapping Agency). Although each agency has a unique, well-defined mission in geomagnetic studies, many areas of interest overlap. For example, NASA, the Navy, and USGS collaborate closely in the development of main field reference models. NASA, NSF, and the Air Force collaborate in space physics. These interagency linkages need to be strengthened. Over the past decade, new opportunities for fundamental advances in geomagnetic research have emerged as a result of three factors: well-posed, first-order scientific questions; increased interrelation of research activities dealing with geomagnetic phenomena; and recent developments in technology. These new opportunities can be exploited through a national geomagnetic initiative to define objectives and

  17. Radial propagation in population dynamics with density-dependent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamsaad, Waipot

    2014-01-01

    Population dynamics that evolve in a radial symmetric geometry are investigated. The nonlinear reaction-diffusion model, which depends on population density, is employed as the governing equation for this system. The approximate analytical solution to this equation is found. It shows that the population density evolves from the initial state and propagates in a traveling-wave-like manner for a long-time scale. If the distance is insufficiently long, the curvature has an ineluctable influence on the density profile and front speed. In comparison, the analytical solution is in agreement with the numerical solution.

  18. Density Fluctuations in Liquid Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Niall J.; Tse, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The density distributions and fluctuations in grids of varying size in liquid water at ambient pressure, both above the freezing point and in the supercooled state, are analyzed from the trajectories obtained from large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the occurrence of low- and high-density regions (LDL and HDL) is transient and their respective residence times are dependent on the size of the simulated system. The spatial extent of density-density correlation is found to be within 7 Å or less. The temporal existence of LDL and HDL arises as a result of natural density fluctuations of an equilibrium system. The density of bulk water at ambient conditions is homogenous.

  19. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol: current perspective for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2009-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins are regarded as ''good guys'' but not always. Situations involving high-density lipoproteins are discussed and medication results are considered. Clinicians usually consider high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Nicotinic acid is the best available medication to elevate high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and this appears beneficial for cardiovascular risk. The major problem with nicotinic acid is that many patients do not tolerate the associated flushing. Laropiprant decreases this flushing and has an approval in Europe but not in the United States. The most potent medications for increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol are cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors. The initial drug in this class, torcetrapib, was eliminated by excess cardiovascular problems. Two newer cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors, R1658 and anacetrapib, initially appear promising. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol may play an important role in improving cardiovascular risk in the 60% of patients who do not receive cardiovascular mortality/morbidity benefit from low-density lipoproteins reduction by statins.

  20. Fiber Initiation in 18 Cultivars and Experimental Lines of Three Gossypium Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new technique was developed to study the fiber initiation process and fiber initial densities. The objectives were to assess whether the fiber initiation patterns reported for some G. hirsutum and G. barbadense cultivars extend to a more diverse range of cultivars/lines; and to test if there is a...

  1. Density waves in granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. J.; Flekkøy, E.; Nagel, K.; Peng, G.; Ristow, G.

    Ample experimental evidence has shown the existence of spontaneous density waves in granular material flowing through pipes or hoppers. Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations we show that several types of waves exist and find that these density fluctuations follow a 1/f spectrum. We compare this behaviour to deterministic one-dimensional traffic models. If positions and velocities are continuous variables the model shows self-organized criticality driven by the slowest car. We also present Lattice Gas and Boltzmann Lattice Models which reproduce the experimentally observed effects. Density waves are spontaneously generated when the viscosity has a nonlinear dependence on density which characterizes granular flow.

  2. Density Estimation with Mercer Kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macready, William G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method for density estimation based on Mercer kernels. The density estimate can be understood as the density induced on a data manifold by a mixture of Gaussians fit in a feature space. As is usual, the feature space and data manifold are defined with any suitable positive-definite kernel function. We modify the standard EM algorithm for mixtures of Gaussians to infer the parameters of the density. One benefit of the approach is it's conceptual simplicity, and uniform applicability over many different types of data. Preliminary results are presented for a number of simple problems.

  3. SOP - Determination of Requirement Density

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, John G.; Martz, Jr., Harry E.

    2010-10-26

    The purpose of this Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) is to give guidelines on how to determine the density of a sample that will be used as the requirement density. This will be the requirement density of record for the specimens examined by Micro CT and EDS measurements. This density will then be set as the formulation requirement for radiography measurements. This SOP is referred to in TP 48— Preparation of Hydrogen Peroxide/Icing Sugar Specimens for X-ray Measurements by J. G. Reynolds and H. E. Martz.

  4. The surface density of haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.; Lee, Xi-Guo

    We study the correlation between the central surface density and the core radius of the dark matter haloes of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. We find that the surface density within the halo characteristic radius r* is not a universal quantity as claimed by some authors (e.g., Milgrom 2009), but it correlates with several physical quantities (e.g., the halo mass M200, and the magnitude MB). The slope of the surface density-mass relation is 0.18 ± 0.05, leaving small room to the possibility of a constant surface density. Finally, we compare the results with MOND predictions.

  5. Simultaneous density contrast is bidirectional.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Chun; Baker, Curtis L; Kingdom, Frederick A A

    2016-11-01

    Simultaneous density contrast, or SDC, is the phenomenon in which the perceived density of a textured region is altered by a surround of different density (Mackay, 1973). SDC provides an experimental tool to investigate mechanisms of density coding, yet has not been systematically examined. We measured SDC with a 2AFC staircase procedure in which human observers judged which of two patterns, one with and one without a surround, appeared more dense. We used a range of surround densities varying from very sparse to very dense (0-76.8 dots/deg2), and two center test densities (6.4 and 12.8 dots/deg2). Psychometric functions were used to estimate both the points of subjective equality (PSE) and their precision. Unexpectedly we find a bidirectional SDC effect across the five observers: Not only does a denser surround reduce perceived density of the center, but a sparser surround enhances its perceived density. We also show that SDC is not mediated by either contrast-contrast or spatial-frequency contrast. Our results suggest the presence of multiple channels selective for texture density, with lateral inhibitory interactions between them.

  6. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring

  7. Consistent Initial Conditions for the DNS of Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ristorcelli, J. R.; Blaisdell, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    Relationships between diverse thermodynamic quantities appropriate to weakly compressible turbulence are derived. It is shown that for turbulence of a finite turbulent Mach number there is a finite element of compressibility. A methodology for generating initial conditions for the fluctuating pressure, density and dilatational velocity is given which is consistent with finite Mach number effects. Use of these initial conditions gives rise to a smooth development of the flow, in contrast to cases in which these fields are specified arbitrarily or set to zero. Comparisons of the effect of different types of initial conditions are made using direct numerical simulation of decaying isotropic turbulence.

  8. Effects of Sediment Nitrogen Availability and Plant Density on Interactions Between the Growth of Hydrilla Verticillata and Potamogeton Americanus. Aquatic Plant Control Research Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    fractions. Suppression coefficients for each species were calculated to summarize competitive effects in mixtures relative to grow*.h of plants alone...11 4 Discussion Responses to Density A long-standing criticism of plant competition experiments has been the use of a single initial plant density... competitive superiority may be more sensitive than others to initial plant density (for review, see Rousch et al. 1989). However, initial plant density

  9. Nonideal detonation regimes in low density explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, A. P.; Kashkarov, A. O.; Pruuel, E. R.; Satonkina, N. P.; Sil'vestrov, V. V.; Yunoshev, A. S.; Plastinin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Measurements using Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) were performed for three high explosives at densities slightly above the natural loose-packed densities. The velocity histories at the explosive/window interface demonstrate that the grain size of the explosives plays an important role. Fine-grained materials produced rather smooth records with reduced von Neumann spike amplitudes. For commercial coarse-grained specimens, the chemical spike (if detectable) was more pronounced. This difference can be explained as a manifestation of partial burn up. In fine-grained explosives, which are more sensitive, the reaction can proceed partly within the compression front, which leads to a lower initial shock amplitude. The reaction zone was shorter in fine-grained materials because of higher density of hot spots. The noise level was generally higher for the coarse-grained explosives, which is a natural stochastic effect of the highly non-uniform flow of the heterogeneous medium. These results correlate with our previous data of electrical conductivity diagnostics. Instead of the classical Zel'dovich-von Neumann-Döring profiles, violent oscillations around the Chapman-Jouguet level were observed in about half of the shots using coarse-grained materials. We suggest that these unusual records may point to a different detonation wave propagation mechanism.

  10. The Reliability of Density Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crothers, Charles

    1978-01-01

    Data from a land-use study of small- and medium-sized towns in New Zealand are used to ascertain the relationship between official and effective density measures. It was found that the reliability of official measures of density is very low overall, although reliability increases with community size. (Author/RLV)

  11. Instrumentation for bone density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meharg, L. S.

    1968-01-01

    Measurement system evaluates the integrated bone density over a specific cross section of bone. A digital computer converts stored bone scan data to equivalent aluminum calibration wedge thickness, and bone density is then integrated along the scan by using the trapezoidal approximation integration formula.

  12. Density-orbital embedding theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsenko, O. V.; Visscher, L.

    2010-09-15

    In the article density-orbital embedding (DOE) theory is proposed. DOE is based on the concept of density orbital (DO), which is a generalization of the square root of the density for real functions and fractional electron numbers. The basic feature of DOE is the representation of the total supermolecular density {rho}{sub s} as the square of the sum of the DO {phi}{sub a}, which represents the active subsystem A and the square root of the frozen density {rho}{sub f} of the environment F. The correct {rho}{sub s} is obtained with {phi}{sub a} being negative in the regions in which {rho}{sub f} might exceed {rho}{sub s}. This makes it possible to obtain the correct {rho}{sub s} with a broad range of the input frozen densities {rho}{sub f} so that DOE resolves the problem of the frozen-density admissibility of the current frozen-density embedding theory. The DOE Euler equation for the DO {phi}{sub a} is derived with the characteristic embedding potential representing the effect of the environment. The DO square {phi}{sub a}{sup 2} is determined from the orbitals of the effective Kohn-Sham (KS) system. Self-consistent solution of the corresponding one-electron KS equations yields not only {phi}{sub a}{sup 2}, but also the DO {phi}{sub a} itself.

  13. Chronic acceleration and brain density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, L. F.; Smith, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Tests carried out on rabbits show that the effect of chronic acceleration is not uniform among the various tissues studied. Although body mass is reduced by the treatment, as expected, no change is apparent in brain mass or in the density of cerebrospinal fluid. Acceleration-induced changes are encountered in tissue density, the myocardium exhibiting a transient increase followed by an exponential decrease toward a limit and the brain showing an arithmetic increase in density with continued exposure to 2.5 G. The data are seen as suggesting that a specific brain load is not a regulated phenomenon and that no physiological processes occur to attenuate the increased load imposed by the hyperdynamic environment. An equation is derived indicating that the stimulus potential per unit of brain load increases with body size, even though brain density decreases and cerebrospinal fluid density increases.

  14. High-Energy-Density Shear Flow and Instability Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    High-energy-density shear experiments have been performed by LANL at the OMEGA Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments have been simulated using the LANL radiation-hydrocode RAGE and have been used to assess turbulence models' ability to function in the high-energy-density, inertial-fusion-relevant regime. Beginning with the basic configuration of two counter-oriented shock-driven flows of > 100 km/s, which initiate a strong shear instability across an initially solid-density, 20 μm thick Al plate, variations of the experiment to details of the initial conditions have been performed. These variations have included increasing the fluid densities (by modifying the plate material from Al to Ti and Cu), imposing sinusoidal seed perturbations on the plate, and directly modifying the plate's intrinsic surface roughness. Radiography of the unseeded layer has revealed the presence of emergent Kelvin-Helmholtz structures which may be analyzed to infer fluid-mechanical properties including turbulent energy density. This work is conducted by the US DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  15. Initiation Pressure Thresholds from Three Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2007-02-28

    Pressure thresholds are minimum pressures needed to start explosive initiation that ends in detonation. We obtain pressure thresholds from three sources. Run-to-detonation times are the poorest source but the fitting of a function gives rough results. Flyer-induced initiation gives the best results because the initial conditions are the best known. However, very thick flyers are needed to give the lowest, asymptotic pressure thresholds used in modern models and this kind of data is rarely available. Gap test data is in much larger supply but the various test sizes and materials are confusing. We find that explosive pressures are almost the same if the distance in the gap test spacers are in units of donor explosive radius. Calculated half-width time pulses in the spacers may be used to create a pressure-time curve similar to that of the flyers. The very-large Eglin gap tests give asymptotic thresholds comparable to extrapolated flyer results. The three sources are assembled into a much-expanded set of near-asymptotic pressure thresholds. These thresholds vary greatly with density: for TATB/LX-17/PBX 9502, we find values of 4.9 and 8.7 GPa at 1.80 and 1.90 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively.

  16. Laser initiation of secondary explosives: Renlund paper No. 115

    SciTech Connect

    Renlund, A.M.; Stanton, P.L.; Trott, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Several experiments were performed to investigate the effects of explosive material parameters on energy thresholds for direct laser initiation of secondary explosives. Laser energy requirements for initiation of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were decreased for small particle size powder and low density pressings. Promptness of detonation, however, was aided by higher densities. Initiation of PETN was achieved at energies at or below 10 mJ (power densities /approximately/0.2 GW cm/sup /minus/2/) at laser wavelengths of 1.06 /mu/m, 532 nm and 355 nm and strong confinement of the explosive sample assisted build-up to detonation. At 355 and 308 nm PETN could be initiated by irradiation on the bare explosive surface. Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-s-triazine (RDX) was initiated at 308 nm but not at 1.06 /mu/m. Hexanitrostibene (HNS) by direct irradiation at any of these wavelengths was successful. The results suggest that if sufficient energy is deposited, a fast deflagration or convective burn is achieved and that this grows to detonation via a conventional deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT). 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Home initiation of parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Newton, Alyce F; DeLegge, Mark H

    2007-02-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has been successfully initiated in the home since the early 1990s. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Standards for Specialized Nutrition Support: Home Care Patients, Safe Practices for Parenteral Nutrition, and Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients do not contain specific information on the initiation of home PN (HPN). Peer-reviewed, published guidelines are necessary to provide safe and appropriate initiation of HPN. Certain patients should not have PN initiated in the home, such as those with organ failure, uncontrolled diabetes, or uncorrectable electrolyte abnormalities. Excellent candidates for initiation of HPN include patients who have failed enteral feedings, have gastrointestinal (GI) diseases without excessive GI losses, or those with an oncology diagnosis and inability to tube feed. One concern of initiation of HPN is the potential for refeeding syndrome. Refeeding syndrome can be prevented when patients are properly evaluated and managed before initiation of PN. Refeeding syndrome can be avoided by rehydration with fluid and electrolytes before initiation of HPN to normalize blood chemistry when necessary and by starting with a moderate-volume, low-carbohydrate HPN solution compounded with optimal potassium, phosphorus, and magnesium content, and slowly advanced to goal. The "start low and go slow" motto of nutrition support should continue to be followed, but more specific guidelines are needed to assist nutrition support clinicians with safe and appropriate initiation of HPN.

  18. Initiation into Adolescent Marijuana Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Judith S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relationship of three domains (personality/attitudinal orientations, peer relationships, and family socialization factors) with initiation into adolescent marihuana use. (Author/DB)

  19. Accurate ab Initio Spin Densities.

    PubMed

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Marti, Konrad H; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-12

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as a basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys.2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CASCI-type wave function provides insight into chemically interesting features of the molecule under study such as the distribution of α and β electrons in terms of Slater determinants, CI coefficients, and natural orbitals. The methodology is applied to an iron nitrosyl complex which we have identified as a challenging system for standard approaches [J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2740].

  20. Attractor comparisons based on density

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, T. L.

    2015-01-15

    Recognizing a chaotic attractor can be seen as a problem in pattern recognition. Some feature vector must be extracted from the attractor and used to compare to other attractors. The field of machine learning has many methods for extracting feature vectors, including clustering methods, decision trees, support vector machines, and many others. In this work, feature vectors are created by representing the attractor as a density in phase space and creating polynomials based on this density. Density is useful in itself because it is a one dimensional function of phase space position, but representing an attractor as a density is also a way to reduce the size of a large data set before analyzing it with graph theory methods, which can be computationally intensive. The density computation in this paper is also fast to execute. In this paper, as a demonstration of the usefulness of density, the density is used directly to construct phase space polynomials for comparing attractors. Comparisons between attractors could be useful for tracking changes in an experiment when the underlying equations are too complicated for vector field modeling.

  1. iDensity: an automatic Gabor filter-based algorithm for breast density assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamdonkar, Ziba; Tay, Kevin; Ryder, Will; Brennan, Patrick C.; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Although many semi-automated and automated algorithms for breast density assessment have been recently proposed, none of these have been widely accepted. In this study a novel automated algorithm, named iDensity, inspired by the human visual system is proposed for classifying mammograms into four breast density categories corresponding to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). For each BI-RADS category 80 cases were taken from the normal volumes of the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). For each case only the left medio-lateral oblique was utilized. After image calibration using the provided tables of each scanner in the DDSM, the pectoral muscle and background were removed. Images were filtered by a median filter and down sampled. Images were then filtered by a filter bank consisting of Gabor filters in six orientations and 3 scales, as well as a Gaussian filter. Three gray level histogram-based features and three second order statistics features were extracted from each filtered image. Using the extracted features, mammograms were separated initially separated into two groups, low or high density, then in a second stage, the low density group was subdivided into BI-RADS I or II, and the high density group into BI-RADS III or IV. The algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 94% in the first stage, sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 95% when classifying BIRADS I and II cases, and a sensitivity of 88% and 91% specificity when classifying BI-RADS III and IV.

  2. Maps of current density using density-functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soncini, A.; Teale, A. M.; Helgaker, T.; de Proft, F.; Tozer, D. J.

    2008-08-01

    The performance of several density-functional theory (DFT) methods for the calculation of current densities induced by a uniform magnetic field is examined. Calculations are performed using the BLYP and KT3 generalized-gradient approximations, together with the B3LYP hybrid functional. For the latter, both conventional and optimized effective potential (OEP) approaches are used. Results are also determined from coupled-cluster singles-and-doubles (CCSD) electron densities by a DFT constrained search procedure using the approach of Wu and Yang (WY). The current densities are calculated within the CTOCD-DZ2 distributed origin approach. Comparisons are made with results from Hartree-Fock (HF) theory. Several small molecules for which correlation is known to be especially important in the calculation of magnetic response properties are considered-namely, O3, CO, PN, and H2CO. As examples of aromatic and antiaromatic systems, benzene and planarized cyclooctatetraene molecules are considered, with specific attention paid to the ring current phenomenon and its Kohn-Sham orbital origin. Finally, the o-benzyne molecule is considered as a computationally challenging case. The HF and DFT induced current maps show qualitative differences, while among the DFT methods the maps show a similar qualitative structure. To assess quantitative differences in the calculated current densities with different methods, the maximal moduli of the induced current densities are compared and integration of the current densities to yield shielding constants is performed. In general, the maximal modulus is reduced in moving from HF to B3LYP and BLYP, and further reduced in moving to KT3, OEP(B3LYP), and WY(CCSD). The latter three methods offer the most accurate shielding constants in comparison with both experimental and ab initio data and hence the more reliable route to DFT calculation of induced current density in molecules.

  3. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  4. Density Estimations in Laboratory Debris Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz de Oliveira, Gustavo; Kulisch, Helmut; Malcherek, Andreas; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2016-04-01

    Bulk density and its variation is an important physical quantity to estimate the solid-liquid fractions in two-phase debris flows. Here we present mass and flow depth measurements for experiments performed in a large-scale laboratory set up. Once the mixture is released and it moves down the inclined channel, measurements allow us to determine the bulk density evolution throughout the debris flow. Flow depths are determined by ultrasonic pulse reflection, and the mass is measured with a total normal force sensor. The data were obtained at 50 Hz. The initial two phase material was composed of 350 kg debris with water content of 40%. A very fine pebble with mean particle diameter of 3 mm, particle density of 2760 kg/m³ and bulk density of 1400 kg/m³ in dry condition was chosen as the solid material. Measurements reveal that the debris bulk density remains high from the head to the middle of the debris body whereas it drops substantially at the tail. This indicates lower water content at the tail, compared to the head and the middle portion of the debris body. This means that the solid and fluid fractions are varying strongly in a non-linear manner along the flow path, and from the head to the tail of the debris mass. Importantly, this spatial-temporal density variation plays a crucial role in determining the impact forces associated with the dynamics of the flow. Our setup allows for investigating different two phase material compositions, including large fluid fractions, with high resolutions. The considered experimental set up may enable us to transfer the observed phenomena to natural large-scale events. Furthermore, the measurement data allows evaluating results of numerical two-phase mass flow simulations. These experiments are parts of the project avaflow.org that intends to develop a GIS-based open source computational tool to describe wide spectrum of rapid geophysical mass flows, including avalanches and real two-phase debris flows down complex natural

  5. Synthetic inversions for density using seismic and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Nienke; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Density variations drive mass transport in the Earth from plate tectonics to convection in the mantle and core. Nevertheless, density remains poorly known because most geophysical measurements used to probe the Earth's interior either have little sensitivity to density, suffer from trade-offs or from nonuniqueness. With the ongoing expansion of computational power, it has become possible to accurately model complete seismic wavefields in a 3-D heterogeneous Earth, and to develop waveform inversion techniques that account for complicated wavefield effects. This may help to improve resolution of density. Here we present a pilot study where we explore the extent to which waveform inversion may be used to better recover density as a separate, independent parameter. We perform numerical simulations in 2-D to investigate under which conditions, and to what extent density anomalies may be recovered in the Earth's mantle. We conclude that density can indeed be constrained by seismic waveforms, mainly as a result of scattering effects at density contrasts. As a consequence, the low-frequency part of the wavefield is the most important for constraining the actual extent of anomalies. While the impact of density heterogeneities on the wavefield is small compared to the effects of velocity variations, it is likely to be detectable in modern regional to global scale measurements. We also conclude that the use of gravity data as additional information does not help to further improve the recovery of density anomalies unless strong a priori constraints on the geometry of density variations are applied. This is a result of the inherent physical non-uniqueness of potential-field inverse problems. Finally, in the limited numerical setup that we employ, we find that the initially supplied anomalies in S- and P-velocity models are of minor importance.

  6. Effects of Snail Density on Growth, Reproduction and Survival of Biomphalaria alexandrina Exposed to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Mangal, T. D.; Paterson, S.; Fenton, A.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of snail density on Biomphalaria alexandrina parasitized with Schistosoma mansoni were investigated. Laboratory experiments were used to quantify the impact of high density on snail growth, fecundity, and survival. Density-dependent birth rates of snails were determined to inform mathematical models, which, until now, have assumed a linear relationship between density and fecundity. The experiments show that the rate of egg-laying followed a negative exponential distribution with increasing density and this was significantly affected by exposure to parasitic infection. High density also affected the weight of snails and survival to a greater degree than exposure to parasitic infection. Although snail growth rates were initially constrained by high density, they retained the potential for growth suggesting a reversible density-dependent mechanism. These experimental data can be used to parameterise models and confirm that snail populations are regulated by nonlinear density-dependent mechanisms. PMID:20700427

  7. Orbiter thermal pressure drop characteristics for shuttle orbiter thermal protection system components: High density tile, low density tile, densified low density tile, and strain isolation pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.; Nystrom, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure drop tests were conducted on available samples of low and high density tile, densified low density tile, and strain isolation pads. The results are presented in terms of pressure drop, material thickness and volume flow rate. Although the test apparatus was only capable of a small part of the range of conditions to be encountered in a Shuttle Orbiter flight, the data serve to determine the type of flow characteristics to be expected for each material type tested; the measured quantities also should serve as input for initial venting and flow through analysis.

  8. Density of very small meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-08-01

    Knowing the density of meteoroids helps to determine the physical structure and gives insight into the composition of their parent bodies. The density of meteoroids can provide clues to their origins, whether cometary or asteroidal. Density helps also to characterize the risk meteoroids may pose to artificial satellites.Ceplecha (1968) calculated the density of small meteoroids based on a parameter KB (meteoroid beginning height) and classified them in four categories (A,B,C,D) with densities going from 2700 to 180 kgm-3.Babadzhanov(2002) applied a model based on quasi-continuous fragmentation (QCF) on 413 photographic Super-Schmidt meteors by solely fitting their light curves. Their densities range from 400 to 7800 kgm-3. Bellot Rubio et al. (2002) analyzed the same 413 photographic meteors assuming the single body theory based on meteoroid dynamical properties and found densities ranging from 400 to 4800 kgm-3. A thermal erosion model was used by Borovicka et al. (2007) to analyze, simultaneously, the observed decelerations and light curves of six Draconid meteors. The density was found to be 300 kgm-3, consistent with the fact that the Draconid meteors are porous aggregates of grains associated with the Jupiter-family-comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner (Jacchia, L.G., 1950).We used the Campbell-Brown and Koschny (2004) model of meteoroid ablation to determine the density of faint meteoroids from the analysis of both observed decelerations and light curves of meteoroids (Kikwaya et al., 2009; Kikwaya et al., 2011). Our work was based on a collection of six and ninety-two sporadic meteors. The grain masses used in the modeling ranged from 10-12 Kg to 10-9 Kg. We computed the orbit of each meteoroid and determined its Tisserand parameter. We found that meteoroids with asteroidal orbits have bulk densities ranging from 3000-5000 kgm-3. Meteoroids consistent with HTC/NIC parents have bulk densities from 400 kgm-3 to 1600 kg m-3. JFC meteoroids were found to have surprisingly

  9. Breakup Densities of Hot Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, V. E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Natowitz, J. B.; Yennello, S. J.

    2004-09-01

    Breakup densities of hot 197Au-like residues have been deduced from the systematic trends of Coulomb parameters required to fit intermediate-mass-fragment kinetic-energy spectra. The results indicate emission from nuclei near normal nuclear density below an excitation energy E*/A≲2 MeV, followed by a gradual decrease to a near-constant value of ρ/ρ0˜0.3 for E*/A≳5 MeV. Temperatures derived from these data with a density-dependent Fermi-gas model yield a nuclear caloric curve that is generally consistent with those derived from isotope ratios.

  10. Phenomenological Relativistic Energy Density Functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Lalazissis, G. A.; Kartzikos, S.; Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.

    2009-08-26

    The framework of relativistic nuclear energy density functionals is applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of beta-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure is explored using the fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov model. Recent applications of energy density functionals with explicit density dependence of the meson-nucleon couplings are presented.

  11. Density in a Planetary Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Jackson; Kyle, Herbert L.

    1961-01-01

    A discussion of the Opik-Singer theory of the density of a planetary exosphere is presented. Their density formula permits the calculation of the depth of the exosphere. Since the correctness of their derivation of the basic formula for the density distribution has been questioned, an alternate method based directly on Liouville's theorem is given. It is concluded that the Opik-Singer formula seems valid for the ballistic component of the exosphere; but for a complete description of the planetary exosphere, the ionized and bound-orbit components must also be included.

  12. Shearing dynamics and jamming density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Peter; Vâgberg, Daniel; Teitel, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of a shearing dynamics on the properties of a granular system, by examining how the jamming density depends on the preparation of the starting configurations. Whereas the jamming density at point J was obtained by relaxing random configurations [O'Hern et al, Phys. Rev. E 68, 011306 (2003)], we apply this method to configurations obtained after shearing the system at a certain shear rate. We find that the jamming density increases somewhat and that this effect is more pronounced for configurations produced at smaller shear rates. Different measures of the order of the jammed configurations are also discussed.

  13. FOREWORD: Special issue on density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kenichi

    2004-04-01

    This special issue on density was undertaken to provide readers with an overview of the present state of the density standards for solids, liquids and gases, as well as the technologies developed for measuring density. This issue also includes topics on the refractive index of gases and on techniques used for calibrating hydrometers so that almost all areas concerned with density standards are covered in four review articles and seven original articles, most of which describe current research being conducted at national metrology institutes (NMIs). A review article was invited from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum to highlight research on the magnetic suspension densimeters. In metrology, the determinations of the volume of a weight and the density of air are of primary importance in establishing a mass standard because the effect of the buoyancy force of air acting on the weight must be known accurately to determine the mass of the weight. A density standard has therefore been developed at many NMIs with a close relation to the mass standard. Hydrostatic weighing is widely used to measure the volume of a solid. The most conventional hydrostatic weighing method uses water as a primary density standard for measuring the volume of a solid. A brief history of the determination of the density of water is therefore given in a review article, as well as a recommended value for the density of water with a specified isotopic abundance. The most modern technique for hydrostatic weighing uses a solid density standard instead of water. For this purpose, optical interferometers for measuring the diameters of silicon spheres have been developed to convert the length standard into the volume standard with a small uncertainty. A review article is therefore dedicated to describing the state-of-the-art optical interferometers developed for silicon spheres. Relative combined standard uncertainties of several parts in 108 have been achieved today for measuring the volume and density of

  14. Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Maureen; Prince, David

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative, an accountability system implemented in 2005-06 that measures students' gains in college readiness, college credits earned, and degree or certificate completion. The goal of the initiative is to increase educational attainment by focusing on the critical momentum points…

  15. Maine: Early Head Start Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Maine has two initiatives that build on Early Head Start (EHS). The first initiative, Fund for a Healthy Maine, has since 2001 provided tobacco settlement money to existing Head Start and EHS programs to expand the number of children who receive full-day, full-year services. Local programs have the option of using these funds for EHS, depending on…

  16. Career Technical Education Pathways Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2013

    2013-01-01

    California's education system--the largest in the United States--is an essential resource for ensuring strong economic growth in the state. The Career Technical Education Pathways Initiative (referred to as the Initiative in this report), which became law in 2005, brings together community colleges, K-12 school districts, employers, organized…

  17. Two black hole initial data

    SciTech Connect

    Leski, Szymon

    2005-06-15

    The Misner initial data are a standard example of time-symmetric initial data with two apparent horizons. Compact formulae describing such data are presented in the cases of equal or nonequal masses (i.e. isometric or nonisometric horizons). The interaction energy in the 'Schwarzschild + test-particle' limit of the Misner data is analyzed.

  18. The Internet 2 Middleware Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of middleware focuses on the Internet 2 Middleware Initiative. Topics include a description of middleware as a layer of software in a distributed system; middleware characteristics, including transparency, portability, reliability, scalability, and interoperability; and the Internet 2 Middleware Initiative which is focused on research…

  19. Density and pair-density scaling for deriving the Euler equation in density-functional and pair-density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, A.

    2011-09-15

    A link between density and pair density functional theories is presented. Density and pair density scaling are used to derive the Euler equation in both theories. Density scaling provides a constructive way of obtaining approximations for the Pauli potential. The Pauli potential (energy) of the density functional theory is expressed as the difference of the scaled and original exchange-correlation potentials (energies).

  20. Bulk Density Measurements of Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkison, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.

    1999-03-01

    We present density measurements of meteorites detailing the precision and errors associated with the modified Archimedian method of Consolmagno and Britt. We find that the method is accurate to better than 1%.