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Sample records for injections subcutaneous

  1. Interferon Beta-1a Subcutaneous Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS, a disease in which ... under the skin). It is usually injected three times a week. You should inject this medication on ...

  2. Localized interstitial granuloma annulare induced by subcutaneous injections for desensitization.

    PubMed

    Spring, Philipp; Vernez, Maxime; Maniu, Christa-Maria; Hohl, Daniel

    2013-06-15

    We describe a patient with interstitial granuloma annulare associated with subcutaneous injection therapy (SIT) for desensitization to a type I allergy. Asymptomatic, erythematous, violaceous annular patches were located at the injection sites on both her arms. Medical history revealed perennial rhinoconjonctivitis treated with SIT (Phostal Stallergen® cat 100% and D. pteronyssinus/D.farinae 50%:50%).

  3. Influence of circulating epinephrine on absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Fernqvist, E.; Gunnarsson, R.; Linde, B.

    1988-06-01

    Effects of epinephrine (Epi) infusion on the absorption of subcutaneously injected 125I-labeled soluble human insulin (10 U) from the thigh or the abdomen were studied in 16 healthy subjects and from the thigh in 10 insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) patients. Epi was infused at 0.3 (high dose) or 0.1 (low dose; healthy subjects) nmol.kg-1.min-1 i.v., resulting in arterial plasma Epi levels of approximately 6 and 2 nM, respectively. Saline was infused on a control day. Insulin absorption was measured as disappearance of radioactivity from the injection site and as appearance of plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured with the 133Xe clearance technique. First-order disappearance rate constants of 125I from the thigh depot decreased approximately 40-50% during the high dose of Epi compared with control (P less than .001). The corresponding decrease from the abdominal depot was approximately 40% (P less than .001), whereas no significant change was found during the low Epi dose. IRI fell compared with control in all groups at the high Epi dose. The Epi-induced depression of insulin absorption occurred despite unaltered or even slightly increased subcutaneous blood flow. The results indicate that circulating Epi at levels seen during moderate physical stress depresses the absorption of soluble insulin from subcutaneous injection sites to an extent that might be important for glycemic control in IDDM patients. Furthermore, dissociation is found between changes in insulin absorption and subcutaneous blood flow during Epi infusion, suggesting that factors other than blood flow may also influence the absorption of subcutaneously injected insulin.

  4. Two cases of accidental injection of epinephrine into a digit treated with subcutaneous phentolamine injections.

    PubMed

    Bodkin, Ryan P; Acquisto, Nicole M; Gunyan, Holly; Wiegand, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Accidental injection into the digit from an epinephrine autoinjection device can cause discoloration, pain, and paresthesias. Although loss of digit is rare, treatment in the emergency department is commonly aimed at vasodilation of the affected tissue. We report two cases of accidental injection of epinephrine into the digits that were successfully treated with subcutaneous phentolamine injection with no adverse events.

  5. [Security evaluation of subcutaneous injection with water-based dextran-coated magnetic fluid].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yu; Wang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xuman; Xie, Hong; Gu, Hongchen

    2006-12-01

    Water-based magnetic fluid was synthesized by using 50% dextran 40,000 as coated reagent. The acute toxicity and irritant of the magnetic fluid injected into mice subcutaneous tissues were examined. The lethal dosage 50 of dextran-coated magnetic fluid was 4409.61 +/- 514.93 mg/kg. Twenty four h after subcutaneous injecting with 30 mg/0.3 ml dextran-coated magnetic fluid, no more inflammation than hemangiectasia and leucocytes infiltration had been seen in subcutaneous tissues, 72 h later the reaction phenomena disappeared. While, injection with 30 mg/0.3 ml water-based oleate sodium-coated magnetic fluid, ulceration and break-off of cutis had been seen in the seventh days. That is to say, the dextran-coated magnetic fluid was safe and well tolerate, however, the oleate sodium-coated magnetic fluid was not fit to subcutaneous injection.

  6. Model Study of the Pressure Build-Up during Subcutaneous Injection

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Maria; Hernandez-Garcia, Anier; Mathiesen, Joachim; Poulsen, Mette; Sørensen, Dan N.; Tarnow, Lise; Feidenhans'l, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we estimate the subcutaneous tissue counter pressure during drug infusion from a series of injections of insulin in type 2 diabetic patients using a non-invasive method. We construct a model for the pressure evolution in subcutaneous tissue based on mass continuity and the flow laws of a porous medium. For equivalent injection forces we measure the change in the infusion rate between injections in air at atmospheric pressure and in tissue. From a best fit with our model, we then determine the flow permeability as well as the bulk modulus of the tissue, estimated to be of the order 10−11–10−10 m2 and 105 Pa, respectively. The permeability is in good agreement with reported values for adipose porcine tissue. We suggest our model as a general way to estimate the pressure build-up in tissue during subcutaneous injection. PMID:25122138

  7. Prolonged local retention of subcutaneously injected polymers monitored by noninvasive SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Chie; Niki, Yuichiro; Ogawa, Mikako; Magata, Yasuhiro

    2014-12-10

    Polymers are widely applied to drug delivery systems because polymers are generally excreted from the body more slowly than small molecules. Subcutaneous injection is one plausible means of administration. In this study, the in vivo behaviors of subcutaneously injected polymers, linear poly(glutamic acid) (Poly-Glu), acetylated dendrimer (Ac-den) and collagen peptide-conjugated dendrimer (CP-den), were investigated. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging was used to noninvasively monitor the in vivo behaviors. Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) was conjugated to these polymers, which were labeled with radioactive (111)In. These (111)In-DTPA-bearing polymers (Poly-Glu-DTPA, Ac-den-DTPA and CP-den-DTPA) and unconjugated DTPA were subcutaneously injected into tumor-bearing mice, which were subjected to SPECT imaging. These (111)In-DTPA-bearing polymers were largely retained at the injection site for at least 1 day, whereas the unconjugated DTPA was rapidly cleared from the whole body through excretion. Poly-Glu-DTPA and Ac-den-DTPA were partly accumulated in the kidney (and the liver), but the CP-den-DTPA was not. However, these (111)In-DTPA-bearing polymers were accumulated in the liver and the kidney following intravenous administration. These results indicate that the subcutaneously injected polymers did not largely gain substantial access to the systemic circulation, which is useful for a depot of drug around the injection site.

  8. Best infection control practices for intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular needle injections.

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Yvan; Hauri, Anja; Chiarello, Linda; Catlin, Mary; Stilwell, Barbara; Ghebrehiwet, Tesfamicael; Garner, Julia

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To draw up evidence-based guidelines to make injections safer. METHODS: A development group summarized evidence-based best practices for preventing injection-associated infections in resource-limited settings. The development process included a breakdown of the WHO reference definition of a safe injection into a list of potentially critical steps, a review of the literature for each of these steps, the formulation of best practices, and the submission of the draft document to peer review. FINDINGS: Eliminating unnecessary injections is the highest priority in preventing injection-associated infections. However, when intradermal, subcutaneous, or intramuscular injections are medically indicated, best infection control practices include the use of sterile injection equipment, the prevention of contamination of injection equipment and medication, the prevention of needle-stick injuries to the provider, and the prevention of access to used needles. CONCLUSION: The availability of best infection control practices for intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular injections will provide a reference for global efforts to achieve the goal of safe and appropriate use of injections. WHO will revise the best practices five years after initial development, i.e. in 2005. PMID:12973641

  9. Elemental mercury poisoning caused by subcutaneous and intravenous injection: An unusual self-injury.

    PubMed

    Wale, Jaywant; Yadav, Pankaj K; Garg, Shairy

    2010-05-01

    Elemental mercury poisoning most commonly occurs through vapor inhalation as mercury is well absorbed through the lungs. Administering subcutaneous and intravenous elemental mercury is very uncommon but with only a few isolated case reports in the literature. We present an unusual case of elemental mercury poisoning in a 20-year-old young male who presented with chest pain, fever, and hemoptysis. He had injected himself subcutaneously with elemental mercury obtained from a sphygmomanometer. The typical radiographic findings in the chest, forearm, and abdomen are discussed, with a review of the literature.

  10. A new electronic device for subcutaneous injection of IFN-β-1a.

    PubMed

    Exell, Simon; Verdun, Elisabetta; Driebergen, Reinoud

    2011-09-01

    Disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) can provide important benefits for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), but nonadherence to treatment is associated with an increased risk of relapse. All first-line DMDs used in MS require regular injection, but injection-related problems are common barriers to treatment adherence. Autoinjectors that allow automatic injection at the press of a button have increased the ease and convenience of injection, compared with manual injection. A new electronic autoinjector has recently been introduced for the administration of subcutaneous IFN-β-1a. This device is the first electronic autoinjector for use with any MS therapy, and includes several innovative features that may be advantageous to patients. One of these features is an accurate electronic dosing log, which can be viewed by the patient and the healthcare provider. This article discusses this new electronic device in the context of other autoinjectors currently used to self-inject first-line DMDs in MS.

  11. Hypotensive Effect and Accumulation of Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes in Blood and Tissues after Intravenous and Subcutaneous Injection.

    PubMed

    Timoshin, A A; Lakomkin, V L; Abramov, A A; Ruuge, E K; Vanin, A F

    2016-12-01

    Subcutaneous injection of Oxacom with glutathione-bound dinitrosyl iron complex as the active principle produced a slower drop of mean BP and longer accumulation of protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes in whole blood and tissues than intravenous injection of this drug, while durations of hypotensive effect in both cases were practically identical. In contrast to intravenous injection of the drug, its subcutaneous administration was not characterized by a high concentration of protein-bound dinitrosyl iron complexes in the blood at the onset of experiment; in addition, accumulation of these NO forms in the lungs was more pronounced after subcutaneous injection than after intravenous one.

  12. Ultrasound and Histologic Examination after Subcutaneous Injection of Two Volumizing Hyaluronic Acid Fillers: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Besse, Stéphanie; Sarazin, Didier; Quinodoz, Pierre; Elias, Badwi; Safa, Marva; Vandeputte, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study examined the influence of hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinking technology on the ultrasound and histologic behavior of HA fillers designed for subcutaneous injection. Methods: One subject received subcutaneous injections of 0.25 ml Cohesive Polydensified Matrix (CPM) and Vycross volumizing HA in tissue scheduled for abdominoplasty by bolus and retrograde fanning techniques. Ultrasound analyses were performed on days 0 and 8 and histologic analyses on days 0 and 21 after injection. A series of simple rheologic tests was also performed. Results: Day 0 ultrasound images after bolus injection showed CPM and Vycross as hypoechogenic papules in the hypodermis. CPM appeared little changed after gentle massage, whereas Vycross appeared more hyperechogenic and diminished in size. Ultrasound images at day 8 were similar. On day 0, both gels appeared less hypoechogenic after retrograde fanning than after bolus injection. Vycross was interspersed with hyperechogenic areas (fibrous septa from the fat network structure) and unlike CPM became almost completely invisible after gentle massage. On day 8, CPM appeared as a hypoechogenic pool and Vycross as a long, thin rod. Day 0 histologic findings confirmed ultrasound results. Day 21 CPM histologic findings showed a discrete inflammatory reaction along the injection row after retrograde fanning. Vycross had a more pronounced inflammatory reaction, particularly after retrograde fanning, with macrophages and giant cells surrounding the implant. Rheologic tests showed CPM to have greater cohesivity and resistance to traction forces than Vycross. Conclusions: CPM HA volumizer appears to maintain greater tissue integrity than Vycross after subcutaneous injection with less inflammatory activity. PMID:28280664

  13. Tolerability of Velcade (Bortezomib) subcutaneous administration using a maximum volume of 3 mL per injection site.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pamela; Incekol, Diana; Lee, Roy; Paisley, Emma; Dara, Celina; Brandle, Ian; Kaufman, Marina; Chen, Christine; Trudel, Suzanne; Tiedemann, Rodger; Reece, Donna; Kukreti, Vishal

    2015-08-01

    Subcutaneous injection is now commonly used as a standard for bortezomib administration. The bortezomib (Velcade(®)) product monograph recommends that intravenous injections be prepared at a concentration of 1 mg/mL, while subcutaneous injections may be prepared at a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL. Many institutions and subcutaneous administration guidelines use 2 mL as the maximum volume for subcutaneous injection. Using 2 mL as the maximum volume for injection would mean that many patients receiving bortezomib will receive two injections during each visit with common dosing parameters. In this prospective study evaluating a change to subcutaneous administration, bortezomib 1 mg/mL was administered subcutaneously at a higher maximum of 3 mL per injection site. For 57 individual patients, 339 doses were administered. Skin reactions were noted in 42% with all reactions being Grade 1 or 2. Patients tolerated subcutaneous injections well and only four patients were switched back to intravenous route. This is the first time that subcutaneous bortezomib of a volume up to a maximum of 3 mL (bortezomib 3 mg) per injection site has been reported. This higher single dose is well tolerated with limited skin reactions, no significant hypotension and facilitates ease of administration with only 5 patients needing two injections per visit. If the maximum volume for injection was kept at 2 mL, a total of 46 patients would have received two injections per visit.

  14. Efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy versus subcutaneous injection immunotherapy in allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Saporta, Diego

    2012-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that Subcutaneous Injection Immunotherapy (SCIT) and Sublingual Immunotherapy (SLIT) are both efficacious, there is not yet a significant amount of information regarding their comparative efficacy. In this paper, we performed a retrospective chart review and compared treatment results in two groups of patients (both with nasal allergies with or without asthma) that were treated either with SCIT or SLIT. Both treatment modalities were found to be of similar efficacy.

  15. Effect of hydrogen injected subcutaneously on testicular tissues of rats exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most common reasons inducing reactive oxygen species in semen. High concentration of active oxygen will cause decrease of sperm density and viability and induce oxidative injury of sperm DNA which has become the hot spot in male infertility. Although hydrogen was found to be an effective remover of active oxygen in liver, heart, kidney and brain, the same effect has not been discussed in reproductive system. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of hydrogen against cigarette smoke-induced damage in rat reproductive system. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups to conduct this experiment, results showed that rats in SK+HSI group (passive smoking and hydrogen subcutaneous injection group) exhibited larger amount of sperm count, smaller sperm deformation rate, higher levels of testosterone and SOD in serum and testis, lower levels of MDA in testis and less morphologic abnormalities compared to SK+NSI group (passive smoking and nitrogen subcutaneous injection group). As a consequence, we concluded that injected subcutaneously exerted protective effects on reproductive system injury of male rats exposed to cigarette smoke through inhibiting oxidative damage. PMID:26131139

  16. Visualization of subcutaneous insulin injections by x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M.; Poulsen, M.; Bech, M.; Velroyen, A.; Herzen, J.; Beckmann, F.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2012-11-01

    We report how the three-dimensional structure of subcutaneous injections of soluble insulin can be visualized by x-ray computed tomography using an iodine based contrast agent. The injections investigated are performed ex vivo in porcine adipose tissue. Full tomography scans carried out at a laboratory x-ray source with a total acquisition time of about 1 min yield CT-images with an effective pixel size of 109 × 109 μm2. The depots are segmented using a modified Chan-Vese algorithm and we are able to observe differences in the shape of the injection depot and the position of the depot in the skin among equally performed injections. To overcome the beam hardening artefacts, which affect the quantitative prediction of the volume injected, we additionally present results concerning the visualization of two injections using synchrotron radiation. The spatial concentration distribution of iodine is calculated to show the dilution of the insulin drug inside the depot. Characterisation of the shape of the depot and the spatial concentration profile of the injected fluid is important knowledge when improving the clinical formulation of an insulin drug, the performance of injection devices and when predicting the effect of the drug through biomedical simulations.

  17. Comparison of Intramuscular or Subcutaneous Injections vs. Castration in Pigs—Impacts on Behavior and Welfare

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, John; Guay, Kimberly; Garcia, Arlene

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Physical castration (PC) of piglets is a painful and stressful procedure and alternatives are being sought to improve animal well-being, such as immunological castration (IC). However, IC requires injections which may also cause pain and stress during handling. In this study, piglets and finishing pigs were placed in the following treatment groups: no handling or treatment (NO), sham-handling (SHAM), intramuscular injection (IM), subcutaneous injection (SQ), or PC on piglets only. Behavior was monitored for 1 h prior and 1 h post treatment in each age group. Social behavior and feeding behavior, and signs of pain were recorded. Physical castration caused measurable pain-like behaviors and general behavioral dysregulation at a much higher level than changes associated with handling associated with IM or SQ injections. Overall, injections did not cause a change in weaning pig behaviors. Finishing pigs given SQ injections showed a lower number of feeding behaviors post treatment but other changes were not observed in the other treatment groups. Abstract Physical castration (PC) is painful and stressful for nursing piglets. One alternative to PC is immunological castration (IC), but the pain and stress of handling associated with injections have not been assessed. The objectives of this study were to measure the pain and distress of subcutaneous (SQ) and intramuscular (IM) injections compared to PC in piglets, and to compare SQ or IM injections in finishing pigs. After farrowing, 3 to 5 d old male piglets were randomly assigned to (control) no handling treatment (NO), sham-handling (SHAM), IM, SQ, or PC. Finishing pigs were assigned to NO, SHAM, IM, or SQ. Behavior was monitored for 1 h prior and 1 h post treatment in each age group. Social, feeding behaviors, and signs of pain were recorded. Finishing pigs treated with SQ injections had higher feeding behaviors pre-treatment than they did post-treatment. Overall, physical castrations caused measurable

  18. Pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin after single and multiple subcutaneous injections in domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus).

    PubMed

    Clothier, K A; Leavens, T; Griffith, R W; Wetzlich, S E; Baynes, R E; Riviere, J E; Tell, L A

    2011-10-01

    Tulathromycin, a novel triamilide in the macrolide class, is labeled for treatment of bacterial pneumonia in cattle and swine. This manuscript evaluates pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin in goats. In two different studies, six juvenile and ten market-age goats received a single injection of 2.5 mg/kg of tulathromycin subcutaneously; in a third study, 18 juvenile goats were treated with 2.5, 7.5, or 12.5 mg/kg tulathromycin weekly with three subcutaneous injections. Pharmacokinetic parameters estimated from the plasma concentrations from single injections were similar between the two groups of goats and to previously reported parameters in cattle and swine. Mean terminal half-lives were 59.1 ± 7.6 and 61.2 ± 8.7 h for juvenile and market-age goats, respectively. In the multi-dose study, pharmacokinetic parameters estimated from plasma concentrations demonstrated significant differences at P < 0.05 among repeated injections but not among doses. Overall, pharmacokinetic parameters in goats are similar to those reported in cattle and swine, and tulathromycin may prove a useful drug for treating respiratory disease in goats.

  19. HUMIRA pen: a novel autoinjection device for subcutaneous injection of the fully human monoclonal antibody adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Kivitz, Alan; Segurado, Oscar G

    2007-03-01

    The HUMIRA (adalimumab) Pen is a novel, integrated, disposable autoinjection delivery system for the subcutaneous injection of adalimumab. Adalimumab is a biological disease modifier for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic debilitating diseases mediated by tumor necrosis factor. Sustaining long-term efficacy with a biological therapy is influenced by patient adherence to the therapeutic regimen, which is often affected by the route of drug administration. Self-administered injectables offer several advantages over intravenous injections (i.e., portability, convenience and flexible scheduling). In particular, patients with chronic, debilitating diseases may need a self-administered medication available in an easy-to-use and convenient delivery device that minimizes pain and facilitates adherence to therapy. The adalimumab Pen offers these benefits and recent evidence indicates that patients overwhelmingly prefer the adalimumab Pen to the prefilled syringe.

  20. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-01-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells. DO11·10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2–/– background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA323−339) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4+ cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4+ CD25+ T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4+ T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA323−339 peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells. PMID:17490400

  1. Daily subcutaneous injections of peptide induce CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, P E; Schartner, J M; Timmel, A; Seroogy, C M

    2007-08-01

    Peptide immunotherapy is being explored to modulate varied disease states; however, the mechanism of action remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the ability of a subcutaneous peptide immunization schedule to induce of CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells. DO11.10 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice on a Rag 2(-/-) background were injected subcutaneously with varied doses of purified ovalbumin (OVA(323-339)) peptide daily for 16 days. While these mice have no CD4(+) CD25(+) T regulatory cells, following this injection schedule up to 30% of the CD4(+) cells were found to express CD25. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed increased expression of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3), suggesting that these cells may have a regulatory function. Proliferation and suppression assays in vitro utilizing the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells revealed a profound anergic phenotype in addition to potent suppressive capability. Importantly, co-injection of the induced CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells with 5,6-carboxy-succinimidyl-fluorescence-ester (CFSE)-labelled naive CD4(+) T cells (responder cells) into BALB/c recipient mice reduced proliferation and differentiation of the responder cells in response to challenge with OVA(323-339) peptide plus adjuvant. We conclude that repeated subcutaneous exposure to low-dose peptide leads to de novo induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells with potent in vitro and in vivo suppressive capability, thereby suggesting that one mechanism of peptide immunotherapy appears to be induction of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T regulatory cells.

  2. Effect of pH modification by bicarbonate on pain after subcutaneous lidocaine injection

    PubMed Central

    Parham, Shelley M.; Pasieka, Janice L.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To quantify the pain experienced on subcutaneous injection of lidocaine, lidocaine with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and saline. Design A double-blind randomized prospective study. Setting A clinical research unit in a university-affiliated hospital. Participants Forty-two healthy adult volunteers who did not have a history of adverse reaction to lidocaine or peripheral neuropathy and were not pregnant. The study was performed in two phases. In Phase 1, 1 mL each of thee solutions (2 mL of 8.4% NaHCO3 in 20 mL 1% lidocaine, 2 mL saline in 20 mL lidocaine and saline alone) were injected by an investigator, blinded as to the identity of the solutions, in random order to five volunteers to measure onset and duration of anesthesia and the perceived pain on injection. In Phase 2, 37 volunteers were injected with the three solutions in random order, by an investigator blinded as to the identity of the solutions. Main Outcome Measure Pain on injection measured with the visual analogue scale. Results There were no clinically significant differences between onset and duration of action of lidocaine with and without NaHCO3, as determined by Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance and the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test. Injection of lidocaine with NaHCO3 was significantly less painful than injection of plain lidocaine (p = 0.041). Injection of saline was the most painful. Conclusion The addition of NaHCO3 to lidocaine produces significant reduction in pain experienced on injection without significantly affecting the onset or duration of action. PMID:8599788

  3. Immune responses of BALB/c mice to subcutaneously injected multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jie; Yang, Man; Jia, Fumin; Xu, Zhen; Kong, Hua; Xu, Haiyan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been shown to have the ability to transport therapeutic and detective reagents into cells. However, the rapid advances in new carbon nanotube-based materials and technologies have raised concerns about their safety. Such concerns require a fundamental understanding of the toxicological properties of carbon nanotubes. In particular, the use of carbon nanotubes as drug or probe delivery platforms may depend on the prevention of stimulatory side-effects to the immune system. In this study, we investigated the immunological properties of oxidized water dispersible multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in healthy BALB/c mice. We injected the MWCNTs subcutaneously, and the immune responses of the mice were monitored over time. We show that the MWCNTs induce complement activation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines early after injection of the mice, and that the levels of complement and cytokines return to normal levels over time. With the exception of the lymph nodes, there was no obvious accumulation of MWCNTs observed in the liver, spleen, kidney, or heart. In addition, we did not observe injury in the organs or lymph nodes. Our results indicate that local, subcutaneous administration of MWCNTs induces obvious short-term immunological reactions, which can be eliminated over time.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin after subcutaneous injection in North American bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Bachtold, K; Alcorn, J; Matus, J; Boison, J; Woodbury, M

    2015-10-01

    Tulathromycin is approved for the treatment of respiratory disease in cattle and swine. It is intended for long-acting, single-dose injection therapy (Draxxin), making it particularly desirable for use in bison due to the difficulty in handling and ease of creating stress in these animals. The pharmacokinetic properties of tulathromycin in bison were investigated. Ten wood bison received a single 2.5 mg/kg subcutaneous injection of Draxxin. Serum concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) detection. Tulathromycin demonstrated early maximal serum concentrations, extensive distribution, and slow elimination characteristics. The mean maximum serum concentration (Cmax) was 195 ng/mL at 1.04 h (tmax) postinjection. The mean area under the serum concentration-time curve, extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-inf ), was 9341 ng · h/mL. The mean apparent volume of distribution (Vd /F) and clearance (Cls/F) was 111 L/kg and 0.4 L/h/kg, respectively, and the mean half-life (t1/2) was 214 h (8.9 days). Compared to values for cattle, Cmax and AUC0-inf were lower in bison, while the Vd /F was larger and the t1/2 longer. Tissue distribution and clinical efficacy studies in bison are needed to confirm the purported extensive distribution of tulathromycin into lung tissue and to determine whether a 2.5 mg/kg subcutaneous dosage is adequate for bison.

  5. Factors influencing adverse skin responses in rats receiving repeated subcutaneous injections and potential impact on neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Levoe, S. Nikki; Flannery, Brenna M.; Brignolo, Laurie; Imai, Denise M.; Koehne, Amanda; Austin, Adam T.; Bruun, Donald A.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is a common route of administration in chronic studies of neuroactive compounds. However, in a pilot study we noted a significant incidence of skin abnormalities in adult male Long-Evans rats receiving daily s.c. injections of peanut oil (1.0 ml/kg) in the subscapular region for 21 d. Histopathological analyses of the lesions were consistent with a foreign body reaction. Subsequent studies were conducted to determine factors that influenced the incidence or severity of skin abnormalities, and whether these adverse skin reactions influenced a specific neurobehavioral outcome. Rats injected daily for 21 d with food grade peanut oil had an earlier onset and greater incidence of skin abnormalities relative to rats receiving an equal volume (1.0 ml/kg/d) of reagent grade peanut oil or triglyceride of coconut oil. Skin abnormalities in animals injected daily with peanut oil were increased in animals housed on corncob versus paper bedding. Comparison of animals obtained from different barrier facilities exposed to the same injection paradigm (reagent grade peanut oil, 1.0 ml/kg/d s.c.) revealed significant differences in the severity of skin abnormalities. However, animals from different barrier facilities did not perform differently in a Pavlovian fear conditioning task. Collectively, these data suggest that environmental factors influence the incidence and severity of skin abnormalities following repeated s.c. injections, but that these adverse skin responses do not significantly influence performance in at least one test of learning and memory. PMID:25705100

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of monthly subcutaneous injection of daclizumab in relapsing multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohan, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of multiple disease-modifying therapies for relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS), there remains a need for highly efficacious targeted therapy with a favorable benefit–risk profile and attributes that encourage a high level of treatment adherence. Daclizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CD25, the α subunit of the high-affinity interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, that reversibly modulates IL-2 signaling. Daclizumab treatment leads to antagonism of proinflammatory, activated T lymphocyte function and expansion of immunoregulatory CD56bright natural killer cells, and has the potential to, at least in part, rectify the imbalance between immune tolerance and autoimmunity in relapsing MS. The clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and safety of subcutaneous daclizumab have been evaluated extensively in a large clinical study program. In pivotal studies, daclizumab demonstrated superior efficacy in reducing clinical and radiologic measures of MS disease activity compared with placebo or intramuscular interferon beta-1a, a standard-of-care therapy for relapsing MS. The risk of hepatic disorders, cutaneous events, and infections was modestly increased. The monthly subcutaneous self-injection dosing regimen of daclizumab may be advantageous in maintaining patient adherence to treatment, which is important for optimal outcomes with MS disease-modifying therapy. Daclizumab has been approved in the US and in the European Union and represents an effective new treatment option for patients with relapsing forms of MS, and is currently under review by other regulatory agencies. PMID:27672308

  7. A Patient Care Program for Adjusting the Autoinjector Needle Depth According to Subcutaneous Tissue Thickness in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis Receiving Subcutaneous Injections of Glatiramer Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Masid, Maria Luisa Sánchez; Ocaña, Rosalía Horno; Gil, María Jesús Díaz; Ramos, Maria Concepción Ramírez; Roig, Matilde Escutia; Carreño, Maria Rosario Coll; Morales, Jaime Cordero; Carrasco, Maria Luisa Vergara; Hidalgo, Leonor Mariana Rubio; Felices, Ana Maria Bernad; Castaño, Adela Harto; Romero, Purificación Castañeda; Martinez, Pablo Francoli; Sánchez-De la Rosa, Rainel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The perceived pain on injection site caused by subcutaneous (SC) self-injection may negatively affect acceptance and adherence to treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Pain on injection may be caused by inaccurate injection technique, inadequate needle length adjustment, or repeated use of the same injection body area. However, information is lacking concerning the optimal needle depth to minimize the injection pain. Objective: The purpose of this program was to characterize the perceived injection-site pain associated with the use of various injection depths of the autoinjector of glatiramer acetate (GA) based on SC tissue thickness (SCT) of the injection site. Methods: This was a pilot program performed by MS-specialized nurses in patients with MS new to GA. Patients were trained by MS nurses on the preparation and administration of SC injection and on an eight-site rotation (left and right arms, thighs, abdomen, and upper quadrant of the buttock). The needle length setting was selected based on SCT measures as follows: 4 or 6 mm for SCT < 25 mm, 6 or 8 mm for SCT between 25 and 50 mm, and 8 or 10 mm for SCT > 50 mm. Injection pain was rated using a visual analog scale (VAS) at 5- and 40-minute postinjection and during two 24-day treatment periods. Results: Thirty-eight patients with MS were evaluated. The mean SCT ranged from 15.5 mm in the upper outer quadrant of the buttocks to 29.2 mm in the thighs. The mean perceived pain on injection was below 3 for all the injection sites, at both time points (5 and 40 minutes) and during both 24-day evaluation periods. The mean VAS scores were significantly greater after 5 minutes of injection compared with that reported 40-minute postinjection during both 24-day treatment periods and for all the injection areas. Mean VAS measures at 5- and 40-minute postinjection significantly decreased during the second 24-day treatment period with respect to that reported during the first 24 SC

  8. Removal rate of ( sup 3 H)hyaluronan injected subcutaneously in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.K.; Laurent, U.B.; Fraser, J.R.; Laurent, T.C. )

    1990-08-01

    Hyaluronan is an important constituent of the extracellular matrix in skin, and recent studies suggest that there is a pool of easily removable (free) hyaluronan drained by lymph. The removal rate of free hyaluronan in skin was measured from the elimination of ({sup 3}H)hyaluronan, injected subcutaneously in 13 rabbits. The removal of radioactivity was determined from appearance of {sup 3}H in plasma. During the first 24 h after injection, 10-87% of the tracer entered blood, less in injectates with high concentrations of hyaluronan. The removal was monoexponential with a half-life of 0.5-1 day when concentration of hyaluronan was 5 mg/ml or less. When hyaluronan concentration was 10 mg/ml or higher, the removal was slow for about 24 h and then became similar to that in experiments with low hyaluronan concentration. Free hyaluronan at physiological concentrations is thus turned over with the same rate as serum albumin, supporting the concept that hyaluronan is removed essentially by lymph flow to be degraded in lymph nodes and liver.

  9. Thoracic duct lymphography by subcutaneous contrast agent injection in a dog with chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, T.; Tokunaga, S.; Momoi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    A 4-year-old male Japanese Shiba Inu presented with recurrent chylothorax. The thoracic duct was successfully imaged using computed tomography after the injection of an iodine contrast agent into the subcutaneous tissue surrounding the anus. The thoracic duct was successfully ligated and pericardectomy performed via an open thoracotomy. Pleural effusion improved but relapsed a week after the surgery. A second lymphography revealed a collateral thoracic duct that was not detected during the first lymphography. The collateral duct was ligated and chylothorax was resolved after the second surgery. The lymphography applied in this study was minimally-invasive and easily provided images of the thoracic duct in a dog with chylothorax. PMID:27995081

  10. Evaluation of the optimal positioning of subcutaneous butterfly when administering injectable opioids in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    MITREA, NICOLETA; MOSOIU, DANIELA; VOSIT-STELLER, JULIE; ROGOZEA, LILIANA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The increasing number of cancer patients, together with the development of new palliative care services in Romania, warrants the evaluation of nursing strategies meant to improve the level of comfort of patients who are suffering from advanced cancer. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the optimal positioning of the subcutaneous (sc) butterfly, in accordance with its resistance in the insertion tissue, the local complications that may occur, and the evaluation of the time of resistance at the insertion site (puncture) with the daily frequency of injectable opioid administration. Methods A prospective experimental pilot study was designed and conducted between January and May 2011. Patients admitted to the Hospice Casa Sperantei (Brasov, Romania) with moderate or severe cancer pain, who were receiving subcutaneously opioids, over the age of 18, with normal body index ranging from 18.5 – 22.0, were assigned randomly to one of two groups, after signing the informed consent. In group one, the butterfly was positioned with the needle bevel up – this was considered to be the control group as this modality of inserting the needle is considered standard practice; in group two the butterfly was positioned with the needle bevel down – experimental group. The drugs used for pain relief were sc tramadol for moderate pain and sc morphine for severe pain. Results Our research supported the hypothesis that the occurrence of local complications coincides with the decrease of sc butterfly resistance in time at the place of insertion, and the sc butterfly has a higher rate of resistance in time at the insertion site if the frequency of injectable opioids administration is lower (twice per day). Conclusion The positioning of the butterflies with the bevel down (experimental group) is associated with a longer resistance in time at the site of insertion, and causes fewer local complications compared to the sc butterflies positioned with the bevel

  11. Central Retinal and Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion After Intralesional Injection of Sclerosant to Glabellar Subcutaneous Hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Fujiwara, Hiroyasu; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2009-03-15

    The aim of this study is to describe vision loss caused by central retinal artery and posterior ciliary artery occlusion as a consequence of sclerotherapy with a polidocanol injection to a glabellar hemangioma. An 18-year-old man underwent direct injection with a 23-gauge needle of 1 mL of a polidocanol-carbon dioxide emulsion into the glabellar subcutaneous hemangioma under ultrasound visualization of the needle tip by radiologists. He developed lid swelling the next day, and 3 days later at referral, the visual acuity in the left eye was no light perception. Funduscopy revealed central retinal artery occlusion and fluorescein angiography disclosed no perfusion at all in the left fundus, indicating concurrent posterior ciliary artery occlusion. The patient also showed mydriasis, blepharoptosis, and total external ophthalmoplegia on the left side. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the swollen medial rectus muscle. In a month, blepharoptosis and ophthalmoplegia resolved but the visual acuity remained no light perception. Sclerosing therapy for facial hemangioma may develop a severe complication such as permanent visual loss.

  12. Utilities associated with subcutaneous injections and intravenous infusions for treatment of patients with bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Matza, Louis S; Cong, Ze; Chung, Karen; Stopeck, Alison; Tonkin, Katia; Brown, Janet; Braun, Ada; Van Brunt, Kate; McDaniel, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although cost-utility models are often used to estimate the value of treatments for metastatic cancer, limited information is available on the utility of common treatment modalities. Bisphosphonate treatment for bone metastases is frequently administered via intravenous infusion, while a newer treatment is administered as a subcutaneous injection. This study estimated the impact of these treatment modalities on health state preference. Methods Participants from the UK general population completed time trade-off interviews to assess the utility of health state vignettes. Respondents first rated a health state representing cancer with bone metastases. Subsequent health states added descriptions of treatment modalities (ie, injection or infusion) to this basic health state. The two treatment modalities were presented with and without chemotherapy, and infusion characteristics were varied by duration (30 minutes or 2 hours) and renal monitoring. Results A total of 121 participants completed the interviews (52.1% female, 76.9% white). Cancer with bone metastases had a mean utility of 0.40 on a standard utility scale (1 = full health; 0 = dead). The injection, 30-minute infusion, and 2-hour infusion had mean disutilities of −0.004, −0.02, and −0.04, respectively. The mean disutility of the 30-minute infusion was greater with renal monitoring than without. Chemotherapy was associated with substantial disutility (−0.17). When added to health states with chemotherapy, the mean disutilities of injection, 30-minute infusion, and 2-hour infusion were −0.02, −0.03, and −0.04, respectively. The disutility associated with injection was significantly lower than the disutility of the 30-minute and 2-hour infusions (P < 0.05), regardless of chemotherapy status. Conclusion Respondents perceived an inconvenience with each type of treatment modality, but injections were preferred over infusions. The resulting utilities may be used in cost-utility models

  13. Lack of tumorigenic activity of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine in Syrian golden hamsters treated by subcutaneous injection.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J Y; Kamino, K

    1993-02-01

    Syrian golden hamsters were treated throughout their lifespan by weekly subcutaneous injections of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (1,1-DMH) at doses of 0, 8, 17 and 35 mg/kg body weight. In contrast to our previous study using European hamsters, no treatment-related tumors occurred in this study.

  14. The optimal choice of medication administration route regarding intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous injection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing-fen; Zhu, Ling-ling; Chen, Meng; Xu, Hui-min; Wang, Hua-fen; Feng, Xiu-qin; Zhu, Xiu-ping; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Background Intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM), and subcutaneous (SC) are the three most frequently used injection routes in medication administration. Comparative studies of SC versus IV, IM versus IV, or IM versus SC have been sporadically conducted, and some new findings are completely different from the dosage recommendation as described in prescribing information. However, clinicians may still be ignorant of such new evidence-based findings when choosing treatment methods. Methods A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Web of Sciences™ Core Collection to analyze the advantages and disadvantages of SC, IV, and IM administration in head-to-head comparative studies. Results “SC better than IV” involves trastuzumab, rituximab, antitumor necrosis factor medications, bortezomib, amifostine, recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, recombinant interleukin-2, immunoglobulin, epoetin alfa, heparin, and opioids. “IV better than SC” involves ketamine, vitamin K1, and abatacept. With respect to insulin and ketamine, whether IV has advantages over SC is determined by specific clinical circumstances. “IM better than IV” involves epinephrine, hepatitis B immu-noglobulin, pegaspargase, and some antibiotics. “IV better than IM” involves ketamine, morphine, and antivenom. “IM better than SC” involves epinephrine. “SC better than IM” involves interferon-beta-1a, methotrexate, human chorionic gonadotropin, hepatitis B immunoglobulin, hydrocortisone, and morphine. Safety, efficacy, patient preference, and pharmacoeconomics are four principles governing the choice of injection route. Safety and efficacy must be the preferred principles to be considered (eg, epinephrine should be given intramuscularly during an episode of systemic anaphylaxis). If the safety and efficacy of two injection routes are equivalent, clinicians should consider more about patient preference and

  15. Patient compliance with new oral anticoagulants after major orthopaedic surgery: rivaroxaban and dabigatran compared with subcutaneous injection of fondaparinux

    PubMed Central

    DI BENEDETTO, PAOLO; VETRUGNO, LUIGI; DE FRANCESCHI, DANIA; GISONNI, RENATO; CAUSERO, ARALDO; ROCCA, GIORGIO DELLA

    2016-01-01

    Purpose the main purpose of our study was to compare patient compliance with the orally administered new oral anticoagulants (NOCs) dabigatran and rivaroxaban compared with subcutaneously injected fondaparinux after major orthopaedic surgery, and to assess patient preference for the oral vs subcutaneous administration route. Methods prophylactic antithrombotic drug therapy with dabigatran (group D; GD, n=32 patients), rivaroxaban (group R; GR, n=38 patients) or fondaparinux (group F; GF, n=30 patients), to prevent deep vein thrombosis, was started immediately after surgery in 100 patients submitted to total hip arthroplasty. Results the patients had a mean age of 68.7±11 years and 62% were female. In GD, 87.5% of patients indicated that they preferred oral intake of medications to subcutaneous injection (12.5%). In GR, 84.2% declared a preference for oral administration over subcutaneous injection (15.8%). In GF, a surprisingly high proportion of patients (73.3%; p < 0.001) declared that they preferred subcutaneous administration of medications over the oral route (26.7%). Overall, the rate of compliance with antithrombotic drug therapy was very high, at 99%. Conclusions intake of the NOAs dabigatran and rivaroxaban following hospital discharge is entirely the responsibility of the patient; a high level of patient compliance with these drugs must therefore be demonstrated in order for them to become well accepted within the medical community. The results of this study showed a very high level of compliance both with orally and subcutaneously administered drugs. Level of evidence Level I, randomized clinical study. PMID:28217657

  16. The safe use of epidural anesthesia after subcutaneous injection of low-dose heparin in general abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, Jeannine; Fugère, François; Dubé, Serge

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine if epidural anesthesia after the subcutaneous injection of low-dose unfractionated heparin (LDUH) in patients who undergo elective bowel surgery is safe with respect to hemorrhagic complications. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Two hospitals affiliated with the Université de Montréal. Patients Fifty patients scheduled for elective bowel surgery. Intervention Subcutaneous injection of 5000 units of LDUH and elective surgery for colonic carcinoma, chronic diverticulosis or inflammatory bowel disease. Main outcome measures Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), anti-IIa and anti-Xa heparin levels measured before and 2 and 4 hours after injection of LDUH. Results In no case was the heparin anti-IIa or anti-Xa level higher than 0.20 U/mL, which is considered a significant detectable level of heparin. Conclusion LDUH given subcutaneously is not associated with significant detectable heparin levels, so epidural anesthesia should be safe when performed 2 hours after LDUH injection in patients who undergo general abdominal surgery in the absence of any other impairment of hemostasis. PMID:10948690

  17. Study of severe scorpion envenoming following subcutaneous venom injection into dogs: Hemodynamic and concentration/effect analysis.

    PubMed

    Elatrous, Souheil; Ouanes-Besbes, Lamia; Ben Sik-Ali, Habiba; Hamouda, Zineb; BenAbdallah, Saoussen; Tilouche, Nejla; Jalloul, Faten; Fkih-Hassen, Mohamed; Dachraoui, Fahmi; Ouanes, Islem; Abroug, Fekri

    2015-09-15

    To evaluate the dose-effects of Androctonus australis hector (Aah) venom injected subcutaneously on hemodynamics and neurohormonal secretions, 10 anesthetized and ventilated mongrel dogs, were split in two groups (n = 5/group). Subcutaneous injection was done with either 0.2 mg/kg or 0.125 mg/kg of the purified G50 scorpion toxic fraction. Hemodynamic parameters using right heart catheter were recorded and plasma concentrations of catecholamine, troponin, and serum toxic fraction were measured sequentially from baseline to 120 min. We identified the dose of toxic fraction evoking characteristic hemodynamic perturbation of severe envenomation, the time-lapse to envenomation, and the associated plasma level. The injection of 0.125 mg/kg toxic fraction was not associated with significant variations in hemodynamic parameters, whereas the 0.2 mg/kg dose caused envenomation characterized by significant increase in plasma catecholamines, increased pulmonary artery occluded pressure, mean arterial pressure, and systemic vascular resistance (p < 0.05), in association with sustained decline in cardiac output (p < 0.001). Envenomation occurred by the 30th minute, and the corresponding concentration of toxic fraction was 1.14 ng/ml. The current experiment allowed the identification of the sub-lethal dose (0.2 mg/kg) of the toxic fraction of Aah administered by the subcutaneous route. Two parameters with potential clinical relevance were also uncovered: the time-lapse to envenomation and the corresponding concentration of toxic fraction.

  18. Tulathromycin assay validation and tissue residues after single and multiple subcutaneous injections in domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus).

    PubMed

    Clothier, K A; Leavens, T; Griffith, R W; Wetzlich, S E; Baynes, R E; Riviere, J E; Tell, L A

    2012-04-01

    Tulathromycin is a macrolide antimicrobial labeled for treatment of bacterial pneumonia in cattle and swine. The purpose of the present research was to evaluate tissue concentrations of tulathromycin in the caprine species. A tandem mass spectrometry regulatory analytical method that detects the common fragment of tulathromycin in cattle and swine was validated with goat tissues. The method was used to study tulathromycin depletion in goat tissues (liver, kidney, muscle, fat, injection site, and lung) over time. In two different studies, six juvenile and 25 market-age goats received a single injection of 2.5 mg/kg of tulathromycin subcutaneously; in a third study, 18 juvenile goats were treated with 2.5, 7.5, or 12.5 mg/kg tulathromycin weekly with three subcutaneous injections. Mean tulathromycin tissue concentrations were highest at injection site samples in all studies and all doses. Lung tissue concentrations were greatest at day 5 in market-age goats while in the multi-dose animals concentrations demonstrated dose-dependent increases. Concentrations were below limit of quantification in injection site and lung by day 18 and in liver, kidney, muscle, and fat at all time points. This study demonstrated that tissue levels in goats are very similar to those seen in swine and cattle.

  19. Subcutaneous injection of water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes in tumor-bearing mice boosts the host immune activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jie; Yang, Man; Jia, Fumin; Kong, Hua; Zhang, Weiqi; Wang, Chaoying; Xing, Jianmin; Xie, Sishen; Xu, Haiyan

    2010-04-01

    The immunological responses induced by oxidized water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a hepatocarcinoma tumor-bearing mice model via a local administration of subcutaneous injection were investigated. Experimental results show that the subcutaneously injected carbon nanotubes induced significant activation of the complement system, promoted inflammatory cytokines' production and stimulated macrophages' phagocytosis and activation. All of these responses increased the general activity of the host immune system and inhibited the progression of tumor growth.

  20. Widespread subcutaneous emphysema and barotrauma resulting from high pressure gas injection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Barnaby; Brown, Troy

    2012-09-21

    Widespread subcutaneous emphysema is an unusual emergency presentation. We present a case of accidental high pressure insufflation, the pathophysiology and subsequent medical management in the acute setting. Such presentations are rare but dramatic and can have important life-threatening consequences that require immediate treatment.

  1. Interferon-gamma-induced local leukocytoclastic vasculitis at the subcutaneous injection site*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Juan-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Kun; Luo, Di-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous reactions associated with interferons (IFNs) treatment are either localized or generalized. The most common presentation of localized reactions at IFNs injection site is usually an erythematous patch or plaque. Local leukocytoclastic vasculitis presenting with cutaneous necrosis is extremely rare. We report a 19-year-old man with hepatitis B who had local leukocytoclastic vasculitis induced by interferon-gama injection at the injection site. After changing the injection sites and using the combined treatment of prednisone and colchicine, the previous lesion healed and no other cutaneous lesion occurred. We also made a mini review of such cases.

  2. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion versus multiple daily injections in individuals with type 1 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Benkhadra, Khalid; Alahdab, Fares; Tamhane, Shrikant U; McCoy, Rozalina G; Prokop, Larry J; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-01-01

    The relative efficacy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple daily injections in individuals with type 1 diabetes is unclear. We sought to synthesize the existing evidence about the effect of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on glycosylated hemoglobin, hypoglycemic events, and time spent in hypoglycemia compared to multiple daily injections. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus from January 2008 through November 2015 for randomized controlled trials that enrolled children or adults with type 1 diabetes. Trials identified in a previous systematic review and published prior to 2008 were also included. We included 25 randomized controlled trials at moderate risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed a significant reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin in patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion compared to multiple daily injections (mean difference 0.37; 95 % confidence interval, 0.24-0.51). This effect was demonstrated in both children and adults. There was no significant difference in minor or severe hypoglycemic events. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion was associated with lower incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia. There was no significant difference in the time spent in hypoglycemia. In children and adults with type 1 diabetes and compared to multiple daily injections, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is associated with a modest reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin. There was no difference in severe or minor hypoglycemia, but likely a lower incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

  3. Bioequivalence of subcutaneous injections of recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (Puregon(R)) by Pen-injector and syringe.

    PubMed

    Voortman, G; van de Post, J; Schoemaker, R C; van Gerven, J M

    1999-07-01

    A randomized, single-centre, cross-over study was designed to compare the bioavailability of two pharmaceutical formulations of recombinant human follicle stimulating hormone (recFSH; Puregon(R)): (i) a dissolved cake injected by a normal syringe; and (ii) a ready-for-use solution injected using a device referred to as Puregon(R)Pen. Twenty-two healthy female volunteers underwent one of two administration sequences: Puregon(R)Pen/syringe or syringe/Puregon(R)Pen, by which they received a single subcutaneous dose of recFSH (150 IU). Endogenous gonadotrophin production had been previously suppressed using an oral contraceptive (Lyndiol(R)). Pharmacokinetic parameters characterizing rate [peak concentration (Cmax) and time of peak concentration (tmax)] and extent [area under the curve (AUC) and clearance (CL)] of absorption were obtained from 20 subjects. After injection with both formulations, serum FSH concentrations reached a peak of 3.4 IU/l at 13 h after injection. The elimination half-life was approximately 34 h, irrespective of formulation. A difference of approximately 18% was found between serum FSH concentrations obtained using the two formulations, which was caused by differences between the anticipated and the actual volume injected with the normal syringe. After correction for injection losses by weighing the amount injected with a normal syringe, the two formulations were found to be bioequivalent with respect to Cmax, AUC and CL. For tmax, bioequivalence could not be proven due to high intra-subject variability and broad absorption peaks of FSH. Both methods were well tolerated, local reactions being generally mild and short-lived.

  4. Uptake and distribution of specific and control monoclonal antibodies in subcutaneous xenografts following intratumor injection

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlinson-Busza, G.; Bamias, A.; Krausz, T.; Epenetos, A.A. )

    1991-06-15

    Nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of the human colon adenocarcinoma HT29 were given intratumor injections of a mixture of 125I-labeled specific antibody (AUA1) and 131I-labeled control antibody (HMFG1), or with the labels reversed. After dissection at 1 and 4 h postadministration, both specific and control antibodies had 47-63% of the injected dose (% ID) in the tumor. By 24 h, the tumor contained 43 {plus minus} 11% ID of AUA1 which persisted at around this level for 5 days and remained at nearly 20% ID at 18 days. In contrast, the HMFG1 activity was 23 {plus minus} 9% ID at 24 h, which continued to fall and was less than 5% ID by 7 days. Normal organ levels were less than 2% ID/g for both antibodies, with HMFG1 being higher than AUA1 at all times, resulting in specificity indices greater than 20 by 5 days. Autoradiography of tumors removed 2 h postinjection of 125I-labeled AUA1 or HMFG1 showed high levels of antibody at the injection site. At 48 h and 7 days postinjection, the specific antibody was bound to the surface of tumor cells in islands remote from the injection site, whereas the control antibody was found only in the stroma and blood vessels, or as diffuse nonspecific uptake. These data indicate that intratumor injection of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies may achieve high radiation doses in accessible tumors without systemic irradiation.

  5. Subcutaneous injections of low doses of humanized anti-CD20 veltuzumab: a phase I study in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kalaycio, Matt E; George Negrea, O; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Abbasi, Rashid M; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of subcutaneous (SC) injections with anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 21 patients received 80, 160, or 320 mg injections every 2 weeks × 4 doses (n = 11) or 160 or 320 mg twice-weekly × 16 doses (n = 10). Treatment was well tolerated with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions. Lymphocytosis decreased in all patients (maximum decrease, 5-91%), with 12 patients obtaining >50% decreases. Of 14 patients with lymphadenopathy on CT imaging, 5 (36%) achieved 14-61% reductions (sum of perpendicular diameters). By NCI-WG criteria, two patients achieved partial responses (10%). SC veltuzumab appeared active in all dose groups, with no obvious exposure-response relationship, despite cumulative doses ranging from 320-5120 mg. Overall median progression-free survival was 7.7 months; three patients remained progression-free >1 year (2 ongoing at 2-year study completion). These data suggest further studies of SC veltuzumab in CLL are warranted.

  6. Subcutaneous Injection of Percocet: A Case of Severe Soft Tissue Loss.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Sean M; Abboud, Christine; Chen, Wendy; Tolchin, Eric; Kelly, Robert W; Aballay, Ariel M

    2015-07-01

    Prescription drug abuse ranks as the second most common class of illicit drug use in the United States, and one mechanism of opiate abuse involves intravenous injection of enteral narcotics such as oxycodone or hydrocodone. The authors describe a patient who sustained significant soft tissue necrosis after intravenously injecting a solution made from crushed enteral narcotics, with a focus on the operative course that resulted due to a delay in initial definitive treatment. The patient's wounds encompassed 8% total body surface area and covered 247 cm2. A 55-year-old female was admitted to the burn unit (West Penn Burn Center, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA) after she initially presented with infection and cellulitis to her bilateral upper extremities 3 weeks after intravenously injecting herself with crushed oxycodone/acetaminophen. She underwent numerous sequential operative repairs including initial debridement, placement of dermal replacement templates, and several split-thickness autografts and xenografts. Her total length of stay was 59 days, broken into an initial 47-day stay, and a subsequent 12-day readmission due to graft failure secondary to poor follow-up. As the number of prescription drug abusers rises, it is possible that an increase in attempts to intravenously abuse enteral narcotics may also rise. As such, burn centers should be prepared for the extent of potential limb necrosis and the operative treatment that may ensue.

  7. Subcutaneous Oleomas Following Sunflower Oil Injection: A Novel Case and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarıca, Özgür; Kayhan, Arda; Demirkürek, Hüseyin Cengiz; İğdem, Ayşenur Akyıldız

    2016-01-01

    Liquid foreign material injection has been used as an early medical intervention since the end of nineteenth century for the augmentation of body shape. Nowadays, these types of procedures have been abandoned by health professionals due to late onset of serious complications. However, it is still misused by some subcultures such as bodybuilders, passive homosexuals, transsexuals, and patients with mental illness. This article discusses a male patient who injected himself with a large amount of sunflower oil, which became complicated by an inflammatory response-abscess formation and sclerosing lipogranuloma of breasts. The radiologic and pathologic signs of this entity are discussed with a review of the relevant literature. Lack of suspicion of this entity may cause a great delay in establishment of definitive diagnosis, giving rise to prominent morbidity and mortality. It is necessary to know the diagnosis and treatment of this phenomenon because illegal substances that cause factitial panniculitis are widely available on websites and threaten thousands of people, which is anecdotally referred in medical literature. Chronic or recurrent lesions of a bizarre or atypical morphology should alert the physician to this artificial phenomenon. Radiologic findings are most important criteria for diagnosis because self-injection is denied by the patient. PMID:28331751

  8. Cutaneous analgesia after subcutaneous injection of memantine and amantadine and their systemic toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Shieh, Ja-Ping; Chen, Yu-Chung; Leung, Yuk-Man; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2012-10-15

    The purpose of the study is to find subcutaneous equianalgesic doses of memantine, amantadine and bupivacaine and use these doses to quantify the cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity of these agents after intravenous administration. Memantine, amantadine and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic, in a dose-related fashion were determined for cutaneous analgesia by a block of the cutaneous trunci muscle reflex in rats, and equipotent doses were calculated. Following rapid intravenous infusion of equianalgesic bupivacaine, memantine, amantadine and saline (vehicle) in rats, we observed the onset time of seizure, apnea and impending death, and monitored mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate. Memantine and amantadine elicited dose-dependent cutaneous analgesia. At the 50% effective dose (ED(50)), the rank of potencies was bupivacaine [1.8 (1.7-2.0)]>memantine [19.1 (17.6-21.8)]>amantadine [36.1 (32.0-40.3)] (P<0.05). On ED(25), ED(50) and ED(75) basis, the duration caused by bupivacaine was similar to that caused by memantine or amantadine. At equianalgesic doses, the infusion time of memantine or amantadine required to induce seizure, impending death, and apnea was longer than that of bupivacaine during rapid intravenous infusion (P<0.01). The decreasing slope in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate was slower with memantine and amantadine when compared with bupivacaine at equivalent doses (P<0.01). Our data showed that memantine and amantadine (i) were equal to bupivacaine at producing durations of cutaneous analgesia but (ii) were less likely than bupivacaine to cause cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity.

  9. A Single Subcutaneous Injection of Cellulose Ethers Administered Long before Infection Confers Sustained Protection against Prion Diseases in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Oguma, Ayumi; Nishizawa, Keiko; Kawata, Maki; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal, progressive, neurodegenerative diseases caused by prion accumulation in the brain and lymphoreticular system. Here we report that a single subcutaneous injection of cellulose ethers (CEs), which are commonly used as inactive ingredients in foods and pharmaceuticals, markedly prolonged the lives of mice and hamsters intracerebrally or intraperitoneally infected with the 263K hamster prion. CEs provided sustained protection even when a single injection was given as long as one year before infection. These effects were linked with persistent residues of CEs in various tissues. More effective CEs had less macrophage uptake ratios and hydrophobic modification of CEs abolished the effectiveness. CEs were significantly effective in other prion disease animal models; however, the effects were less remarkable than those observed in the 263K prion-infected animals. The genetic background of the animal model was suggested to influence the effects of CEs. CEs did not modify prion protein expression but inhibited abnormal prion protein formation in vitro and in prion-infected cells. Although the mechanism of CEs in vivo remains to be solved, these findings suggest that they aid in elucidating disease susceptibility and preventing prion diseases. PMID:27973536

  10. Pentosan Polysulfate: Oral Versus Subcutaneous Injection in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Simonaro, Calogera M.; Tomatsu, Shunji; Sikora, Tracy; Kubaski, Francyne; Frohbergh, Michael; Guevara, Johana M.; Wang, Raymond Y.; Vera, Moin; Kang, Jennifer L.; Smith, Lachlan J.; Schuchman, Edward H.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of pentosan polysulfate (PPS) in a rat model of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI. Reduction of inflammation, reduction of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) storage, and improvement in the skeletal phenotype were shown. Herein, we evaluate the long-term safety and therapeutic effects of PPS in a large animal model of a different MPS type, MPS I dogs. We focused on the arterial phenotype since this is one of the most consistent and clinically significant features of the model. Methodology/Principal Findings MPS I dogs were treated with daily oral or biweekly subcutaneous (subQ) PPS at a human equivalent dose of 1.6 mg/kg for 17 and 12 months, respectively. Safety parameters were assessed at 6 months and at the end of the study. Following treatment, cytokine and GAG levels were determined in fluids and tissues. Assessments of the aorta and carotid arteries also were performed. No drug-related increases in liver enzymes, coagulation factors, or other adverse effects were observed. Significantly reduced IL-8 and TNF-alpha were found in urine and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). GAG reduction was observed in urine and tissues. Increases in the luminal openings and reduction of the intimal media thickening occurred in the carotids and aortas of PPS-treated animals, along with a reduction of storage vacuoles. These results were correlated with a reduction of GAG storage, reduction of clusterin 1 staining, and improved elastin integrity. No significant changes in the spines of the treated animals were observed. Conclusions PPS treatment led to reductions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and GAG storage in urine and tissues of MPS I dogs, which were most evident after subQ administration. SubQ administration also led to significant cytokine reductions in the CSF. Both treatment groups exhibited markedly reduced carotid and aortic inflammation, increased vessel integrity, and improved histopathology. We conclude that PPS may be a

  11. Pharmacokinetics of tulathromycin in plasma and milk samples after a single subcutaneous injection in lactating goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Grismer, B; Rowe, J D; Carlson, J; Wetzlich, S E; Tell, L A

    2014-04-01

    Eight adult female dairy goats received one subcutaneous administration of tulathromycin at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg body weight. Blood and milk samples were assayed for tulathromycin and the common fragment of tulathromycin, respectively, using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic disposition of tulathromycin was analyzed by a noncompartmental approach. Mean plasma pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following single-dose administration of tulathromycin were as follows: C(max) (121.54 ± 19.01 ng/mL); T(max) (12 ± 12-24 h); area under the curve AUC(0→∞) (8324.54 ± 1706.56 ng·h/mL); terminal-phase rate constant λz (0.01 ± 0.002 h⁻¹); and terminal-phase rate constant half-life t1/2λz (67.20 h; harmonic). Mean milk pharmacokinetic parameters (±SD) following 45 days of sampling were as follows: Cmax (1594 ± 379.23 ng/mL); Tmax (12 ± 12-36 h); AUC(0→∞) (72,250.51 ± 18,909.57 ng·h/mL); λz (0.005 ± 0.001 h⁻¹); and t(1/2λz) (155.28 h; harmonic). All goats had injection-site reactions that diminished in size over time. The conclusions from this study were that tulathromycin residues are detectable in milk samples from adult goats for at least 45 days following subcutaneous administration, this therapeutic option should be reserved for cases where other treatment options have failed, and goat milk should be withheld from the human food chain for at least 45 days following tulathromycin administration.

  12. Serum and tissue concentrations of doxycycline in broilers after the sub-cutaneous injection of a long-acting formulation.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, L; Vargas-Estrada, D; Rosario, C; Sumano, H

    2012-01-01

    1. The antibacterial agent doxycycline hyclate (Dox) is usually administered to broilers in drinking water or as a feed supplement. Parenteral injection is not the usual route for administration, so a long-acting formulation (Dox-LA) was tested to evaluate if serum concentrations can achieve the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) ratios regarded as adequate for the drug. 2. A poloxamer-based matrix was used to provide Dox-LA. Serum and tissue concentrations of Dox vs time were determined in two day-old broilers after subcutaneous (SC) injection of Dox-LA or oral administration of a single bolus of aqueous Dox (Dox-PO), at a dose of 20 mg/kg. Weight gain, feed conversion rate, haematological variables, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities, blood urea and creatinine were determined and compared for Dox-LA with Dox-PO and non-medicated controls. 3. Dox-LA had a high relative bioavailability (1200%). Maximum serum concentrations were not statistically different (5·1 ± 1·1 µg/ml for Dox-LA and 6·1 ± 1.4 µg/ml for Dox-PO), but half-life of Dox-LA was much greater than the value obtained for Dox-PO (73·0 ± 0·9 h and 2·0 ± 0·02 h, respectively). Tissue concentrations were higher, and stayed higher for longer periods in the Dox-LA group. 4. In conclusion, considering the minimum effective serum concentration against Mycoplasma spp is 0·5 µg/ml, a dose-interval of 180 h can be achieved with Dox-LA, but only for 24 h after Dox-PO. Better PK/PD ratios for Dox-LA should result in improved clinical outcomes compared with Dox-PO.

  13. Effectiveness of multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for children with type 1 diabetes mellitus in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chun-Xiu; Wei, Li-Ya; Wu, Di; Cao, Bing-Yan; Meng, Xi; Wang, Lin-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Aims. To determine whether multiple daily injections (MDIs) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) contributes to better glucose control in children with different type 1 diabetes duration. Methods. Subjects were grouped according to early (≤1 year after disease onset; 1A) or late (1-3 years after onset; 2A) MDIs/CSII treatment initiation. Corresponding control groups (1B, 2B) received insulin injections twice daily. Results. HbA1c levels were consistently lower in group 1A than in group 1B (6 months (T2): 7.37% versus 8.21%; 12 months (T3): 7.61% versus 8.41%; 24/36 months (T4/T5): 7.61% versus 8.72%; all P < 0.05), but were lower in group 2A than in group 2B only at T2 (8.36% versus 9.19%; P = 0.04). Levels were lower in group 1A than in group 2A when disease duration was matched (7.61% versus 8.49%; P < 0.05). Logistic regression revealed no correlation between HbA1c level and MDIs/CSII therapy. HbA1c levels were only negatively related to insulin dosage. Conclusions. Blood glucose control was better in patients receiving MDIs/CSII than in those receiving conventional treatment. Early MDIs/CSII initiation resulted in prolonged maintenance of low HbA1c levels compared with late initiation. MDIs/CSII therapy should be combined with comprehensive management.

  14. Effects of Subcutaneous Injection MnO2 Micro- and Nanoparticles on Blood Glucose Level and Lipid Profile in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Zahra; Hassanpourezatti, Majid; Najafizadeh, Parvaneh; Rezagholian, Shiva; Rhamanifar, Mohammad Safi; Nosrati, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of nanotechnology has led to rapid growth in various areas. Thus, health and safety issues of nanoparticles (NPs) should be promptly addressed. Manganese oxide (MnO2) nanoparticles (NPs) are typically used for biomedical and industrial applications. However, characterizing the potential human health effects of MnO2 NPs is required before fully exploiting these materials. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of MnO2 micro- and nanoparticles on blood glucose level and lipid profile in male Wistar rats. Methods: A total of 105 rats were divided into one control and two experimental groups. Each experimental group received a single subcutaneous injection of MnO2 micro- and nanoparticles (100 μg/kg), respectively, every two weeks for 14 weeks. Their blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, and HDL levels were then measured. The data presented as mean±SEM and compared with the repeated measures using the Prism statistical software (version 6.0). Results: Biochemical assessment in plasma samples showed that MnO2 micro- and nanoparticles injection significantly (P<0.01) increased the plasma glucose and cholesterol levels in all and few weeks, respectively. MnO2 nanoparticles significantly (P<0.01) decreased the HDL level in weeks 6, 12, and 14, but MnO2 microparticles decreased the HDL level only in week 12. In both MnO2 micro- and nanoparticles groups, LDL alterations were near to the control group, except for week 10. However, the same treatment had no effect on triglycerides concentrations compared to the control group. Conclusion: Our results show that exposure to nanosized particles at subchronic doses caused adverse changes in animal biochemical profiles, especially in glucose level. It seems that the high oxidative power of these particles is the main reason for these disturbances. PMID:27853332

  15. Effect of methacrylic acid beads on the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway and macrophage polarization in a subcutaneous injection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lisovsky, Alexandra; Zhang, David K Y; Sefton, Michael V

    2016-08-01

    Poly(methacrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) (MAA) beads promote a vascular regenerative response when used in diabetic wound healing. Previous studies reported that MAA beads modulated the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh) and inflammation related genes in diabetic wounds. The aim of this work was to follow up on these observations in a subcutaneous injection model to study the host response in the absence of the confounding factors of diabetic wound healing. In this model, MAA beads improved vascularization in healthy mice of both sexes compared to control poly(methyl methacrylate) (MM) beads, with a stronger effect seen in males than females. MAA-induced vessels were perfusable, as evidenced from the CLARITY-processed images. In Shh-Cre-eGFP/Ptch1-LacZ non-diabetic transgenic mice, the increased vessel formation was accompanied by a higher density of cells expressing GFP (Shh) and β-Gal (patched 1, Ptch1) suggesting MAA enhanced the activation of the Shh pathway. Ptch1 is the Shh receptor and a target of the pathway. MAA beads also modulated the inflammatory cell infiltrate in CD1 mice: more neutrophils and more macrophages were noted with MAA relative to MM beads at days 1 and 7, respectively. In addition, MAA beads biased macrophages towards a MHCII-CD206+ ("M2") polarization state. This study suggests that the Shh pathway and an altered inflammatory response are two elements of the complex mechanism whereby MAA-based biomaterials effect vascular regeneration.

  16. Human neuroblastoma cell growth in xenogeneic hosts: comparison of T cell-deficient and NK-deficient hosts, and subcutaneous or intravenous injection routes.

    PubMed

    Turner, W J; Chatten, J; Lampson, L A

    1990-04-01

    We have examined two features of neuroblastoma cells that had not been well-characterized in a xenogeneic model: The cells display unusual immunologic properties in other experimental systems, and the original tumors display widespread and characteristic patterns of metastasis. To determine the most appropriate immunodeficient host for primary tumor growth, T cell-deficient nude mice, NK-deficient beige mice, beige-nudes, and controls were injected with the well-characterized line CHP-100. To define the pattern of tumor spread, complete autopsies were performed following subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous injections. CHP-100 consistently formed subcutaneous tumors in T cell-deficient mice (nude and beige-nude), but not in T cell-competent mice (beige, heterozygous nu/+ and bg/+, or wild-type). The growth rate and final size of the subcutaneous tumors were not greater in beige-nudes than in nudes. All mice showed early CHP-100 cell death after subcutaneous injection; the nature of the immunodeficiency was more relevant for the surviving subpopulation. Widespread dissemination was seen following intravenous injection, particularly in beige-nudes. Aspects of the growth patterns were appropriate to the tumor of origin. The behavior in immunodeficient mice suggests that T cells can play a role in controlling the growth of these cells; the next steps will be to define the effector mechanisms, and to determine if they can be exploited for human patients. The hematogenous spread following intravenous injection suggests that insights into the control of blood-borne tumor may also come from further study of this model.

  17. Subcutaneous Construction of Engineered Adipose Tissue with Fat Lobule-Like Structure Using Injectable Poly-Benzyl-L-Glutamate Microspheres Loaded with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wentao; Fang, Jianjun; Yong, Qi; Li, Sufang; Xie, Qingping; Yin, Jingbo; Cui, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Porous microcarriers were fabricated from synthesized poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG) polymer to engineer adipose tissue with lobule-like structure via the injectable approach. The adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) seeded on porous PBLG microcarriers was determined by adipogenic gene expression and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme activity. In vitro adipogenic cultivation was performed for 7 days, and induced hASC/PBLG complex (Adi-ASC/PBLG group) was subcutaneously injected into nude mice. Injections of PBLG microcarriers alone (PBLG group) and non-induced hASC/PBLG complex (ASC/PBLG group) served as controls. Newly formed tissues were harvested after 4 and 8 weeks. Generation of subcutaneous adipose tissue with typical lobule-like structure separated by fibrous septa was observed upon injection of adipogenic-induced hASC/microsphere complex. Adipogenesis significantly increased in the Adi-ASC/PBLG group compared with the control groups. The angiogenesis in the engineered adipose tissue was comparable to that in normal tissue as determined by capillary density and luminal diameter. Cell tracking assay demonstrated that labeled hASCs remained detectable in the neo-generated tissues 8 weeks post-injection using green fluorescence protein-labeled hASCs. These results indicate that adipose tissue with typical lobule-like structure could be engineered using injectable porous PBLG microspheres loaded with adipogenic-induced hASCs.

  18. Effect of vaccination with N-glycolyl GM3/VSSP vaccine by subcutaneous injection in patients with advanced cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Marta; Gracia, Elias; Reigosa, Edmundo; Hernandez, Julio; de la Torre, Ana; Saurez, Giselle; Perez, Kirenia; Viada, Carmen; Cepeda, Meylán; Carr, Adriana; Avila, Yisel; Rodríguez, Migdalia; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    NeuGc-containing gangliosides have been described in melanoma cells and are an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy because they are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissues. Melanoma patients treated with a vaccine based on N-glycolyl gangliosides have shown benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. We conducted a multicenter Phase I/II clinical trial in patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma treated with the N-gycolyl GM3/very-small-size proteoliposomes vaccine by the subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological dose of the vaccine was the principal objective based on immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety results. Six dose levels were studied and the treatment schedule consisted of five doses administered every 2 weeks and then monthly until 15 doses had been given. Dose levels evaluated were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200, and 1500 μg with five patients included in each dose level except the 900 μg dose (n = 10). Immunogenicity was determined by antibody titers generated in patients after vaccination. Antitumor effect was measured by response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors and safety was evaluated by common toxicity criteria of adverse events. The vaccine was safe and immunogenic at all doses levels. The most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild to moderate injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibody responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 38.46% of patients. Global median overall survival was 20.20 months. Two patients achieved overall survival duration of about 4 and 5 years, respectively. The 900 μg dose resulted in overall survival duration of 19.40 months and was selected as the biological optimal dose.

  19. A field trial of autogenous Moraxella bovis bacterin administered through either subcutaneous or subconjunctival injection on the development of keratoconjunctivitis in a beef herd

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Harriet J.; Stokka, Gerald L.

    2003-01-01

    The primary purpose of these experiments was to evaluate an autogenous Moraxella bovis bacterin administered through 2 separate routes of inoculation. An autogenous bacterin was manufactured by using M. bovis recovered from the herd. The bacterin was administered by subcutaneous injection or subconjunctival injection. In each experiment, unvaccinated animals served as controls. Random selection methods were used to place calves into a vaccination or control group. There was no statistical difference in development of infectious keratoconjunctivitis between the vaccinated and unvaccinated calves. There was a statistically significant difference between the sexes; heifers had a higher rate of keratoconjunctivitis. PMID:12892288

  20. [Induction of cutaneous or subcutaneous fibroblastic tumors in the Afghan pika (Ochotona rufescens rufescens) by injection or bovine papilloma virus].

    PubMed

    Puget, A; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1975-06-23

    Newborn Afghan pikas have been inoculated with bovine papilloma virus via the subcutaneous route. Cutaneous or subcutaneous fibromas and fibrosarcomas were observed after a mean incubation period of nine months. The transmission of these tumors by homograft has been obtained. Bovine papilloma virus antibodies have been demonstrated in most of the animals inoculated at birth. They have not been detected in animals bearing transplanted tumors.

  1. Time Savings with Rituximab Subcutaneous Injection versus Rituximab Intravenous Infusion: A Time and Motion Study in Eight Countries

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Erwin; Kritikou, Persefoni; Sandoval, Mariana; Tao, Sunning; Wiesner, Christof; Carella, Angelo Michele; Ngoh, Charles; Waterboer, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Rituximab is a standard treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The SABRINA trial (NCT01200758) showed that a subcutaneous (SC) rituximab formulation did not compromise efficacy or safety compared with intravenous (IV) infusion. We aimed to quantify active healthcare professional (HCP) time and patient chair time for rituximab SC and IV, including potential time savings. Methods This non-interventional time and motion study was run in eight countries and 30 day oncology units. Rituximab SC data were collected alongside the MabCute trial (NCT01461928); IV data were collected per routine real-world practice. Trained observers recorded active HCP time for pre-specified tasks (stopwatch) and chair time (time of day). A random intercept model was used to analyze active HCP time (by task and for all tasks combined) in the treatment room and drug preparation area, drug administration duration, chair time and patient treatment room time by country and/or across countries. Active HCP and chair time were extrapolated to a patient’s first year of treatment (11 rituximab sessions). Results Mean active HCP time was 35.0 and 23.7 minutes for IV and SC process, respectively (-32%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction in time was 27–58%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated active HCP time (first year of treatment) was 1.1–5.2 hours. Mean chair time was 262.1 minutes for IV, including 180.9 minutes infusion duration, vs. 67.3 minutes for SC, including 8.3 minutes SC injection administration (-74%, p <0.0001). By country, relative reduction was 53–91%. Absolute reduction in extrapolated chair time for the first year of treatment was 3.1–5.5 eight-hour days. Conclusions Compared with rituximab IV, rituximab SC was associated with reduced chair time and active HCP time. The latter could be invested in other activities, whereas the former may lead to more available appointments, reducing waiting lists and increasing the efficiency of day oncology units. Trial

  2. Induction of sarcomas by a single subcutaneous injection of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene into neonatal male Sprague-Dawley rats: histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Shuuhei; Kuriwaki, Kazumi; Souda, Masakazu; Funato, Mamoru; Ninomiya, Kenjiro; Umekita, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2006-01-01

    Animal experiments have shown that carcinogenicity of chemicals is higher in fetal or neonatal periods than adult. We investigated sensitivities to a carcinogen in peri-neonatal rats with a model of sarcomas-induction by a subcutaneous injection of chemo-carcinogen that has rarely done in neonatal rats. Neonatal male SD rats were injected with 7,12-DMBA 10, 100, and 500 microg, which resulted in sarcomas-induction in 0, 62, and 94% of rats. Male SD rats were injected with DMBA 500 microg at 0, 3, 7, 14, and 21 days, which resulted in sarcomas-induction in 94, 70, 64, 50, and 44% of rats. Although the induced sarcomas were occasionally in mixed morphological feature as previous reports for sarcomas of rat, each was immunohistochemically in almost monotonous pattern, and classification was feasible. The incidence of rhabdomyosarcomas was higher in rats neonatally injected with a higher dose of DMBA than a lower dose, and in rats injected at peri-neonatal periods than later periods. In histological observations for the site of injection before overt sarcomas develop, clusters of atypical mesenchymal cells emerged as previous studies, but also those were immunohistochemically differentiated into rhabdomyocytes and other mesenchymal cells. We consider these findings may contribute a little to elucidation of process of sarcomas-induction in rats.

  3. Effect of subcutaneous injection of a long-acting analogue of somatostatin (SMS 201-995) on plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone in normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, S.; Tanaka, K.; Kumagae, M.; Takeda, F.; Morio, K.; Kogure, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Horiuchi, T.; Watabe, T.; Miyabe, S.

    1988-01-01

    SMS 201-995 (SMS), a synthetic analogue of somatostatin (SRIF) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the hypersecretion of hormones such as in acromegaly. However, little is known about the effects of SMS on the secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in normal subjects. In this study, plasma TSH was determined with a highly sensitive immunoradiometric assay, in addition to the concentration of SMS in plasma and urine with a radioimmunoassay, following subcutaneous injection of 25, 50, 100 ..mu..g of SMS or a placebo to normal male subjects, at 0900 h after an overnight fast. The plasma concentrations of SMS were dose-responsive and the peak levels were 1.61 +/- 0.09, 4.91 +/- 0.30 and 8.52 +/- 1.18 ng/ml, which were observed at 30, 15 and 45 min after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, respectively. Mean plasma disappearance half-time of SMS was estimated to be 110 +/- 3 min. Plasma TSH was suppressed in a dose dependent manner and the suppression lasted for at least 8 hours. At 8 hours after the injection of 25, 50, and 100 ..mu..g of SMS, the plasma TSH levels were 43.8 +/- 19.4, 33.9 +/- 9.4 and 24.9 +/- 3.2%, respectively, of the basal values.

  4. Intramuscular injections of slow-release lanreotide (BIM 23014) in acromegalic patients previously treated with continuous subcutaneous infusion of octreotide (SMS 201-995).

    PubMed

    Caron, P; Cogne, M; Gusthiot-Joudet, B; Wakim, S; Catus, F; Bayard, F

    1995-03-01

    Nine acromegalic patients (five females and four males), mean age 50 +/- 4 years, presented macroadenomas (N = 7), microadenoma (N = 1) or normal computed tomography scans (N = 1). Patients were treated with continuous subcutaneous infusion of octreotide (range 200-600 micrograms/day). Following a washout period of 7 days, the patients were injected im with 30 mg slow-release lanreotide every 10 days for the first month and then twice monthly. In case of elevated growth hormone (GH) levels at 3 months, the patients were injected every 10 days for the next three months. Plasma GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGH-I) decreased in all patients during octreotide treatment. After 6 months of octreotide treatment, seven patients were considered as well controlled (mean 8 h GH < 5 micrograms/l, IGF-I normal) whereas in two patients the mean 8-h GH and/or IGF-I levels remained increased. Serum GH and IGH-I increased after octreotide withdrawal. In one patient, serum GH and IGF-I increased during slow-release lanreotide administration and injections were stopped after 45 days. After 3 months of lanreotide, three patients were well controlled while in five patients GH or IGF-I levels were not normalized. At 6 months, five patients were injected twice monthly and three patients had one injection every 10 days. Six patients were well controlled and in two patients the mean 8-h GH level remained increased. The pituitary tumor volume decreased by 20-30% in two patients during octreotide, as well as in one other during slow-release lanreotide therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Twice-Daily Subcutaneous Injection of Kisspeptin-54 Does Not Abolish Menstrual Cyclicity in Healthy Female Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jayasena, C. N.; Comninos, A. N.; Nijher, G. M. K.; Abbara, A.; De Silva, A.; Veldhuis, J. D.; Ratnasabapathy, R.; Izzi-Engbeaya, C.; Lim, A.; Patel, D. A.; Ghatei, M. A.; Bloom, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Kisspeptin is a critical hypothalamic regulator of reproductive function. Chronic kisspeptin administration causes profound tachyphylaxis in male monkeys and in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. The pharmacological effects of chronic kisspeptin exposure in healthy women with normal menstrual cycles have not been studied previously. Aim: Our aim was to determine the effects of follicular-phase kisspeptin-54 treatment on menstrual cyclicity in healthy women. Methods: We performed a prospective, single-blinded, 1-way crossover study. Healthy women received twice-daily sc injections of kisspeptin (6.4 nmol/kg) or 0.9% saline during menstrual days 7–14 (n = 5 per treatment arm). Serial assessments of basal reproductive hormones, ultrasound parameters, LH pulsatility, and acute sensitivity to GnRH and kisspeptin-54 injection were performed. Results: Menstrual cyclicity persisted in all women after follicular-phase kisspeptin-54 treatment. Chronic exposure to kisspeptin-54 did not abolish acute stimulation of LH after injection of kisspeptin-54 or GnRH. In addition, kisspeptin-54 treatment was associated with a shorter mean length of the menstrual cycle (mean length of menstrual cycle was 28.6 ± 1.4 days with saline vs 26.8 ± 3.1 days with kisspeptin, P < .01), earlier onset of highest recorded serum LH (mean menstrual day of highest LH was 15.2 ± 1.3 with saline vs 13.0 ± 1.9 with kisspeptin, P < .05), and earlier onset of the luteal phase (mean menstrual day of progesterone increase was 18.0 ± 2.1 with saline vs 15.8 ± 0.9 with kisspeptin, P < .05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that 1 week of exogenous kisspeptin-54 does not abolish menstrual cyclicity in healthy women. Further work is needed to determine whether kisspeptin could be used to treat certain anovulatory disorders. PMID:24030945

  6. Application of ice cube prior to subcutaneous injection of heparin in pain perception and ecchymosis of patients with cardiovascular problems.

    PubMed

    Batra, Gaytri

    2014-01-01

    In this experimental study of patients with cardiovascular problems, conducted at Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, purposive sampling technique was done from cardiology ward and CCU to obtain adequate samples. The sample comprised of 30 experimental group patients and 30 control group patients. The conceptual framework was based on the system model proposed by Ludwig Van Bertalanffy in 1957. Quasi experimental research approach was adopted for the study with post-test only control group design. The independent variable for the study was the ice cube application for 3 min and the dependent variables were pain perception and ecchymosis. The tools used for data collection were, structured interview schedule for sample characteristics, numerical rating scale for pain for subjective assessment, transparent ruler scale to measure the total surface area of ecchymosis, and for treatment ice-cubes in latex glove for giving cold compress. Subjects were asked to rate pain by showing the flash chart of standard pain rating scale immediately after the needle was withdrawn and ecchymosis was observed 48 hrs after the day of injection. The obtained difference between experimental and control group ecchymosis score, and pain perception score was statistically significant as evident from t-value at 0.05 level of significance.

  7. Subcutaneous injection of exosomes reduces symptom severity and mortality induced by Echinostoma caproni infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Trelis, Maria; Galiano, Alicia; Bolado, Anabel; Toledo, Rafael; Marcilla, Antonio; Bernal, Dolores

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown the importance of exosomes in the host-parasite relationship. These vesicles are an important part of the excretory/secretory pathway for proteins with the potential to alter immune responses. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the immunomodulatory role of exosomes in BALB/c mice using Echinostoma caproni as an experimental model of intestinal helminth infection. For this purpose, BALB/c mice were injected twice s.c. with purified exosomes of E. caproni, followed by experimental infection. We report a delay in the development of the parasite in mice immunised with exosomes, a concomitant reduced symptom severity and increased survival upon infection. Immunisations with exosomes evoked systemic antibody responses with high levels of IgM and IgG. IgG1, IgG2b and IgG3 are the subtypes responsible for the IgG increase. These antibodies showed specific recognition of exosomal proteins, indicating that these vesicles carry specific antigens that are involved in the humoral response. The administration of exosomes induced an increase of IFN-γ, IL-4 and TGF-β levels in the spleen of mice prior to infection. The subsequent infection with E. caproni resulted in a further increase of IL-4 and TGF-β, together with an abrupt overproduction of IL-10, suggesting the development of a Th2/Treg immune response. Our results show that the administration of exosomes primes the immune response in the host, which in turn can contribute to tolerance of the invader, reducing the severity of clinical signs in E. caproni infection.

  8. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Marcoval, Joaquim; Moreno, Abelardo; Mañá, Juan; Peyri, Jordi

    2008-10-01

    Subcutaneous sarcoidosis has been reported to occur in 1.4% to 6% of patients with systemic sarcoidosis. Most reported cases are in women, most often in their fifth and sixth decades, and appear as multiple, asymptomatic, hardly indurated subcutaneous nodules without changes in the overlying epidermis. The lesions are characteristically located in the upper extremities, mainly in the forearms, and usually are bilateral and asymmetric. In most cases the lesions appear at the beginning of systemic sarcoidosis and are not associated with chronic fibrotic disease. Histopathologically, sarcoidosis is characterized by noncaseating naked granulomas involving fat lobules, with minimal to no septal involvement.

  9. Mortality rate and gross pathology due to tuberculosis in wild brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) following low dose subcutaneous injection of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Graham; Yockney, Ivor; Whitford, Jackie; Cross, Martin L

    2013-04-01

    Gross pathology due to tuberculosis can be established experimentally in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) within 7 weeks of injection of virulent Mycobacterium bovis into subcutaneous connective tissues of the peripheral limbs. This pathology involves lymphadenomegaly and development of gross lesions in peripheral lymph nodes, with subsequent gross lesions in the lungs and reticuloendothelial organs. Using this artificial infection model, we here assessed the mortality rate for possums in the wild, to provide new information on the likely survival period for New Zealand's major wildlife host. Possums were trapped and inoculated with <50 CFU of M. bovis, then fitted with mortality signal emitting radio tracking collars, released and re-tracked for 6 months. Possum survival probability was 89% up to 12 weeks post-injection (p.i.), but cumulative mortality was rapid from then on. The median survival period, based on study of 38 possums, was 18 weeks p.i.; this corresponds with a predicted time interval of 11 weeks between first presentation of TB as palpable lymphadenomegaly and death for an average possum, shorter than period values currently used in possum TB epidemiological modelling. We also examined gross pathology in 11 possums by post mortem necropsy, and confirmed lymphadenomegaly and tuberculous lesions at 7 and 12 weeks p.i. Extra-peripheral gross lesions were more frequent among possums at 12 weeks p.i. than at 7 weeks, while the occurrence of lung lesions (the most likely cause of disease-induced mortality) was apparent in animals at 12 weeks but not at 7 weeks p.i. Our results suggest that the time course of TB from development of gross lesions to mortality may be shorter than previously estimated from field studies of naturally tuberculous possums.

  10. No effect of route of exposure (oral; subcutaneous injection) on plasma bisphenol A throughout 24h after administration in neonatal female mice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julia A; Welshons, Wade V; Vom Saal, Frederick S

    2008-02-01

    Route of administration of chemicals in adults is an important factor in pharmacokinetics of chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA), the monomer with estrogenic activity used to make polycarbonate plastic products and to line food and beverage cans. Based on findings in adults it has been proposed (CERHR, 2007) that non-oral routes of administration in newborn rodents would also lead to high exposure relative to oral administration. However, in fetuses and neonates, the enzyme that conjugates BPA (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase) is expressed at low levels, suggesting that there may be no differences in pharmacokinetics between oral and non-oral dosing. We thus conducted an analysis of plasma concentrations of unconjugated 3H-BPA after HPLC separation in postnatal day 3 female mice throughout the 24h after administering 3H-BPA orally or via subcutaneous injection at doses above and below the current EPA reference dose. We found no significant difference in plasma BPA based on route of administration in neonatal mice at either dose. However, compared to data from other studies conducted with adults, there was a markedly higher plasma BPA level after oral administration of BPA in newborn mice. This finding sets aside the belief that non-oral administration of BPA renders data as not suitable for consideration of the hazard posed by low-dose exposure to BPA during neonatal life. Therefore the large numbers of BPA studies that used non-oral administration at very low doses during the neonatal period should not be dismissed by scientists or the regulatory community based on route of administration.

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of perorally administered glutamic acid-chelated iron and iron-dextran injected subcutaneously in Duroc and Norwegian Landrace piglets.

    PubMed

    Egeli, A K; Framstad, T

    1998-02-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of orally administered amino acid-chelated iron (Fe) compared to injected Fe-dextran on haematology and weight gain in two different breeds raised under commercial conditions. Altogether 92 Duroc (D) pigs and 84 Norwegian Landrace (L) pigs from two different herds were included in the study. The day after birth the litters were divided in two groups (split litters). Group (Gr.) 1 was given 4 ml of a 50% solution of Super Fe-MAX (52 mg glutamic acid-chelated Fe in a water solution) orally, while Gr. 2 was subcutaneously (s.c.) injected with Idofer (180 mg Fe as ferridextran). Until weaning at 5 weeks, all the piglets had free access to a 3% solution of Super Fe-MAX (0.78 mg Fe/ml), access to pelleted food being given from 1 week of age. The piglets were weighed and bled before treatment the day after birth (day 1) and on days 4, 7, 14, 21 and 35. All piglets were weighed on days 28 and 49, while 72 of the L pigs were also weighed on days 77, 98 and 119. At weaning D pigs in Gr. 1 and Gr. 2 had a mean body weight of 8.64 kg and 8.30 kg, respectively, the corresponding figures for the L pigs being 10.82 kg and 10.34 kg. As regards the 72 L pigs followed to day 119, the mean weight in Gr. 1 and Gr. 2 was 80.6 kg and 80.2 kg, respectively. A significantly lower weight gain in the piglets with a birth weight below 1.2 kg in Gr. 2 compared with Gr. 1 indicated that excess administration of Fe to small piglets may have a detrimental effect on weight gain. From day 7 (D pigs) and on days 14 and 21 (L pigs), Gr. 2 had a significantly higher haemoglobin concentration (Hb) than Gr. 1. Nevertheless, Hb levels were also adequate in Gr. 1 in both breeds. There was a negative correlation between changes in Hb during the first weeks and the initial value. Though haematological values seemed to show inter-breed differences, with higher average erythrocyte counts (RBC) and Hb and lower mean cell volume (MCV) in the D pigs, the

  12. Immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro®) and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX®) by intramuscular or subcutaneous routes at separate injection sites: a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Yves; Habermehl, Pirmin; Thomas, Stéphane; Eymin, Cécile; Fiquet, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Background When this trial was initiated, the combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine was licensed for subcutaneous administration in all European countries and for intramuscular administration in some countries, whereas varicella vaccine was licensed only for subcutaneous administration. This study evaluated the intramuscular administration of an MMR vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro®) and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX®) compared with the subcutaneous route. Methods An open-label randomised trial was performed in France and Germany. Healthy children, aged 12 to18 months, received single injections of M-M-RvaxPro and VARIVAX concomitantly at separate injection sites. Both vaccines were administered either intramuscularly (IM group, n = 374) or subcutaneously (SC group, n = 378). Immunogenicity was assessed before vaccination and 42 days after vaccination. Injection-site erythema, swelling and pain were recorded from days 0 to 4 after vaccination. Body temperature was monitored daily between 0 and 42 days after vaccination. Other adverse events were recorded up to 42 days after vaccination and serious adverse events until the second study visit. Results Antibody response rates at day 42 in the per-protocol set of children initially seronegative to measles, mumps, rubella or varicella were similar between the IM and SC groups for all four antigens. Response rates were 94 to 96% for measles, 98% for both mumps and rubella and 86 to 88% for varicella. For children initially seronegative to varicella, 99% achieved the seroconversion threshold (antibody concentrations of ≥ 1.25 gpELISA units/ml). Erythema and swelling were the most frequently reported injection-site reactions for both vaccines. Most injection-site reactions were of mild intensity or small size (≤ 2.5 cm). There was a trend for lower rates of injection-site erythema and swelling in the IM group. The incidence and nature of systemic adverse events were comparable for the two routes of administration

  13. [A phase II pharmacological study of leuprolide acetate 6-month depot, TAP-144-SR (6M), in treatment-Nazve patients with prostatic cancer who received a single subcutaneous or intramuscular injection].

    PubMed

    Komura, Emiko; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Takabayashi, Nobuyoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of a 6- month depot formulation of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist, TAP-144-SR (6M), in Japanese treatment-naÏve patients with prostatic cancer. Each subject received a single subcutaneous or intramuscular injection of TAP- 144-SR (6M) and was monitored for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change in serum testosterone levels. The serum testosterone level in six subjects who received 22.5 mg of TAP-144 (SR) subcutaneously decreased below the castrate level after 4 weeks and remained suppressed during the 24 weeks of follow-up. With regard to safety, TAP-144-SR (6M)was not associated with any additional concerns compared to those reported for the approved 1-month and 3-month depot formulations of TAP-144-SR. In addition, 30 mg of TAP-144-SR (6M) was administered subcutaneously to six subjects, and, on the basis of the results, the optimal clinical dosage of TAP-144-SR (6M) in Japan was considered to be 22.5 mg. Outcomes with 22.5mg TAP-144-SR (6M) administered intramuscularly were similar to those with TAP-144-SR (6M) administered subcutaneously.

  14. [Experimental observation on the histopathological and ultrastructural pathology of Great Gerbils (Rhombomys opimus) in the Junggar Basin by subcutaneous injecting of Yersinia pestis].

    PubMed

    Li, B; Azhati, Rehemu; Meng, W W; Luo, T; Li, B; Abulimiti, Maituohuti; Wang, X H; Dai, X; Zhang, Y J

    2017-02-06

    Objective: To understand the histopathological and ultrastructural pathology changes of great gerbils in the Junggar Basin to Yersinia pestis infection. Methods: Forty captured great gerbils from the Junggar Basin that tested negative for anti-F1 antibodies were infected. The Y. pestis strain 2504, isolated from a live great gerbil in the natural plague foci of the Junggar Basin in 2005 with a median lethal dose (LD(50)) of <10 CFU/ml, was used in this study. Forty great gerbils were divided into seven infection groups and were subcutaneously infected with 7.4×10(5), 7.4×10(6), 7.4×10(7), 7.4×10(8), 7.4×10(9), 7.4×10(10), or 3.0×10(11) CFU/ml of 2504. One milliliter of physiological saline was injected in the noninfected group as a control. We collected the liver, spleen, heart, and lung from all animals for histopathologic and ultrastructural pathology examination. Results: Great gerbils in the 7.4×10(8)-3.0×10(11) CFU/ml groups did not survive and exhibited pathological changes and altered ultrastructural pathology. The liver tissue of infected great gerbils showed spotty necrosis and fatty degeneration, intranuclear canaliculi with increased hepatocytes, and uneven distribution of organelles. Additionally, reactive proliferation of lymphoid tissue in the spleen, blood sinusoid lacunae with neutrophil infiltration, and phagocytosed bacteria in phagocyte cells were observed. Myocardial fiber hypertrophy and interstitial indistinction, nuclear matrices decreased in cardiac myocytes, and loose arrangement of myogenic fibers in myocardial cells were also observed. Angiectasia, capillary congestion, and tissue necrosis were found in the lung. No significant difference in histopathological and ultrastructural pathology in the parenchymal organ was observed between the 7.4×10(5)-7.4×10(7) CFU/ml groups and the 7.4×10(8)-3.0×10(11) CFU/ml groups, and no specific death caused by Y. pestis infection was apparent in the 7.4×10(5)-7.4×10(7) CFU/ml groups

  15. Leuprolide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Leuprolide injection comes as a long-acting suspension (Lupron) that is injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) by a doctor or nurse in a medical ... Depot-4 month, Lupron Depot-6 Month). Leuprolide injection also comes as a long-acting suspension (Eligard) that is injected subcutaneously (just under ...

  16. Interferon Alfa-2b Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week. HBV, inject the medication either subcutaneously or intramuscularly three times a week usually for 16 weeks. hairy cell leukemia, inject ...

  17. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling After Repeated Administrations of RBP-6000, a New, Subcutaneously Injectable, Long-Acting, Sustained-Release Formulation of Buprenorphine, for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Laffont, Celine M; Gomeni, Roberto; Heidbreder, Christian; Jones, J P; Nasser, Azmi F

    2016-07-01

    RBP-6000 is a novel sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder, which has been designed for once-monthly (28 days) subcutaneous (SC) injections. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model was developed to describe the time course of buprenorphine plasma concentrations after repeated SC injections of RBP-6000 at 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, or 300 mg in treatment-seeking opioid-dependent subjects previously on sublingual buprenorphine (Subutex(®) ) treatment. The μ-opioid receptor occupancy was predicted using a previously developed PK/PD Emax model. The results of the population PK analysis jointly with the predicted level of μ-opioid receptor occupancy provided quantitative criteria for clinical dose selection for RBP-6000: the dose of 300 mg every 28 days seems appropriate for immediately achieving an effective exposure after the first SC injection and to maintain effective levels of exposure during chronic treatment. Furthermore, simulations conducted to evaluate the potential impact of a holiday in drug intake indicated that in the unexpected event of a 2-week holiday, levels of μ-opioid receptor occupancy remained consistently above 70% with no significant loss of drug efficacy. This analysis indicated that RBP-6000 has the potential for becoming an effective treatment for opioid-dependent subjects by addressing compliance issues associated with the current once-a-day treatments.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin and ceftiofur in plasma, interstitial fluid, and gastrointestinal tract of calves after subcutaneous injection, and bactericidal impacts on representative enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Foster, D M; Jacob, M E; Warren, C D; Papich, M G

    2016-02-01

    This study's objectives were to determine intestinal antimicrobial concentrations in calves administered enrofloxacin or ceftiofur sodium subcutaneously, and their impact on representative enteric bacteria. Ultrafiltration devices were implanted in the ileum and colon of 12 steers, which received either enrofloxacin or ceftiofur sodium. Samples were collected over 48 h after drug administration for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis. Enterococcus faecalis or Salmonella enterica (5 × 10(5) CFU/mL of each) were exposed in vitro to peak and tail (48 h postadministration) concentrations of both drugs at each location for 24 h to determine inhibition of growth and change in MIC. Enrofloxacin had tissue penetration factors of 1.6 and 2.5 in the ileum and colon, while ciprofloxacin, an active metabolite of enrofloxacin, was less able to cross into the intestine (tissue penetration factors of 0.7 and 1.7). Ceftiofur was rapidly eliminated leading to tissue penetration factors of 0.39 and 0.25. All concentrations of enrofloxacin were bactericidal for S. enterica and significantly reduced E. faecalis. Peak ceftiofur concentration was bactericidal for S. enterica, and tail concentrations significantly reduced growth. E. faecalis experienced growth at all ceftiofur concentrations. The MICs for both organisms exposed to peak and tail concentrations of antimicrobials were unchanged at the end of the study. Enrofloxacin and ceftiofur achieved intestinal concentrations capable of reducing intestinal bacteria, yet the short exposure of ceftiofur in the intestine may select for resistant organisms.

  19. Intranasal Human Growth Hormone (hGH) Induces IGF-1 Levels Comparable With Subcutaneous Injection With Lower Systemic Exposure to hGH in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Andrew L.; Patel, Tina; Jeffery, Kirk; King, Gareth; Savage, Martin; Shalet, Stephen; Illum, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Context: The development of an improved, efficacious human GH (hGH) product administered by a noninjectable route of delivery such as the nasal route is highly desirable. We have developed a novel nasal hGH product (CP024) that showed excellent nasal absorption in animal models; however, the translation of these results into the clinical setting is essential because past attempts to develop such formulations by other groups have been unable to induce IGF-1 in man. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and tolerability of CP024 compared with a sc hGH injection. Design: This was a single-center, nonrandomized placebo-controlled, open-label, five-way crossover study in eight healthy volunteers. Setting: The study was carried out at a contract research organization, Quotient Bioresearch. Volunteers: Eight healthy male volunteers, given an iv infusion of octreotide to suppress the endogenous GH secretion during the study period, participated in the study. No volunteers were withdrawn due to side effects. Main Outcome Measures: Measurement of hGH and IGF-1 levels and tolerability of the drug product was performed. Results: No serious adverse events were reported and no subjects withdrawn from study due to the treatment. After the nasal administration of CP024, 3-fold higher hGH blood levels were obtained as compared with hGH nasal control. The relative bioavailability was about 3%. CP024 (given twice daily) induced a significant increase in IGF-1 levels up to 19 hours after administration, with no significant difference to those obtained after the sc injection of hGH. Conclusions: The study indicates that CP024 is a promising candidate for an efficacious nasal product for the treatment of GH deficiency due to induction of IGF-1 similar to that after a sc injection, despite the lower plasma hGH concentration obtained. A dose-response study is needed to evaluate the optimal nasal dose. PMID:26425883

  20. Skin regeneration with conical and hair follicle structure of deep second-degree scalding injuries via combined expression of the EPO receptor and beta common receptor by local subcutaneous injection of nanosized rhEPO

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Augustinus; Ebert, Sabine; Giri, Shibashish; Kremer, Mathias; Liu, Shuhua; Nerlich, Andreas; Günter, Christina I; Smith, Dagmar U; Machens, Hans-Günther

    2012-01-01

    Background Acceleration of skin regeneration is still an unsolved problem in the clinical treatment of patients suffering from deep burns and scalds. Although erythropoietin (EPO) has a protective role in a wide range of organs and cells during ischemia and after trauma, it has been recently discovered that EPO is not tissue-protective in the common β subunit receptor (βCR) knockout mouse. The protective capacity of EPO in tissue is mediated via a heteroreceptor complex comprising both the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) and βCR. However, proof of coexpression of these heterogenic receptors in regenerating skin after burns is still lacking. Methods To understand the role of nanosized recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) in wound healing, we investigated the effects of subcutaneous injections of EPO on skin regeneration after deep second-degree scalding injuries. Our aim was to determine if joint expression of EPOR and βCR is a prerequisite for the tissue-protective effect of rhEPO. The efficiency in wound regeneration in a skin scalding injury mouse model was examined. A deep second-degree dermal scald injury was produced on the backs of 20 female Balb/c mice which were subsequently randomized to four experimental groups, two of which received daily subcutaneous injections of rhEPO. At days 7 and 14, the mice were sacrificed and the effects of rhEPO were analyzed with respect to grade of re-epithelialization (wound closure) and stage of epidermal maturation. This was investigated using different histological parameters of epithelial covering, such as depth of the epidermal layer, epidermal stratification, and presence of conical and hair follicle structures. Results Expression of EPOR, βCR, and growth hormone receptor at the mRNA and protein levels was demonstrated with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. After rhEPO treatment, the rate of re-epithelialization of the scalding injury was increased and the time to final

  1. Evaluation of Subcutaneous Phenobarbital Administration in Hospice Patients.

    PubMed

    Hosgood, Jessica Richards; Kimbrel, Jason M; McCrate Protus, Bridget; Grauer, Phyllis A

    2016-04-01

    Phenobarbital is used in hospice and palliative care to treat refractory symptoms. In end-of-life care, Food and Drug Administration approved routes of administration may be unreasonable based on patients' status. In these cases, phenobarbital may be administered subcutaneously for symptom management. However, according to the American Hospital Formulary Service, subcutaneous administration of commercially available injectable phenobarbital is cautioned due to possible skin reactions. This study evaluates the tolerability of phenobarbital administered subcutaneously. Of 69 patients and 774 distinct subcutaneous phenobarbital injections, 2 site reactions were recorded (2.9% of patients; 0.3% of injections). Both were mild, grade 1 reactions. Each patient continued to receive subcutaneous phenobarbital via newly placed ports with no additional reactions. Based on these findings, phenobarbital appears to be well tolerated when administered subcutaneously.

  2. ExtaviJect® 30G device for subcutaneous self-injection of interferon beta-1b for multiple sclerosis: a prospective European study

    PubMed Central

    Boeru, Gabriel; Milanov, Ivan; De Robertis, Francesca; Kozubski, Wojciech; Lang, Michael; Rojas-Farreras, Sònia; Tomlinson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background The ExtaviJect® 30G autoinjector was developed to facilitate parenteral self-administration of interferon beta-1b (Extavia®), a first-line disease-modifying therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to assess patient compliance with treatment when using the autoinjector, patients’ and nurses’ experiences of using the device, its tolerability, and patient satisfaction. Methods This was a 12-week, real-world, prospective, observational, noninterventional study conducted in nine European countries. Questionnaires were used to measure patient compliance and to assess patients’ and nurses’ experiences. All adverse events were recorded by severity, including injection site reactions or pain. Patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life were assessed using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-9 (TSQM-9) and EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) instruments, respectively. Results Of 582 patients enrolled, 568 (98%) received at least one injection and attended the first follow-up visit at 6 weeks, and 542 (93%) attended the second follow-up visit at 12 weeks. For the whole study, 548 of 568 (97%) patients were compliant with treatment. Among the various questions assessing whether the device was easy and quick to use accurately, without fear of the needle, 56%–98% of patients and 59%–98% of nurses were in agreement. There were nine serious adverse events (four disease-related) reported among the 227 (39%) patients reporting adverse events. Scores increased in the TSQM-9 convenience domain between weeks 6 and 12 (P=0.0009), and in the EQ-5D visual analog scale between baseline and week 12 (P<0.0001), indicating improvement in health-related quality of life. Conclusion ExtaviJect 30G was convenient to use and was associated with high levels of compliance. PMID:24255602

  3. Involvement of peripheral NMDA and non-NMDA receptors in development of persistent firing of spinal wide-dynamic-range neurons induced by subcutaneous bee venom injection in the cat.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Li, H; Luo, C; Li, Z; Zheng, J

    1999-10-09

    To study the roles of peripheral excitatory amino acids receptor subtypes N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors in persistent nociception, extracellular single unit recording technique was used to assess the effects of a single dose NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonists, AP(5) (5-aminophosphonovaleric acid) and CNQX (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) or DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), on s.c. bee venom-induced increase in firing of wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons in the spinal dorsal horn of the urethane-chloralose anesthetized cats. Subcutaneous bee venom injection into the cutaneous receptive field resulted in a single phase of increased firing of WDR neurons over the background activity for more than 1 h. Local pre-administration of AP(5) (200 microg/100 microl) or CNQX (8.3 microg/100 microl) into the bee venom injection site produced 94% (1.01+/-0.96 spikes/s, n=5) or 76% (2.97+/-0.58 spikes/s, n=4) suppression of the increased neuronal firing when compared with local saline (16.32+/-4.55 spikes/s, n=10) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (12.37+/-6.36 spikes/s, n=4) pre-treated group, respectively. Local post-administration of the same dose of AP(5) produced a similar result to the pre-treatment group with a 67% inhibition of the mean firing rate, however, the same treatment with CNQX and even a higher dose of DNQX (100 microg/100 microl) did not produce any inhibition of the neuronal firing induced by s.c. bee venom injection (DNQX vs. DMSO: 23.91+/-0. 25 vs. 22.14+/-0.04 spikes/s, P=0.0298, n=5). In the control experiments, local pre-administration of the same dose of AP(5) or CNQX into a region on the contralateral hindpaw symmetrical to the bee venom injection site produced no significant influence on the increased firing of the WDR neurons [contralateral AP(5) vs. saline: 14.17+/-6.27 spikes/s (n=5) vs. 16.32+/-4.55 spikes/s (n=10), P0.05; contralateral CNQX vs. DMSO: 12.85+/-6.38 spikes/s (n=4) vs. 12. 37+/-6.36 spikes/s (n=4), P0

  4. Immunization of chickens with an agonistic monoclonal anti-chicken CD40 antibody-hapten complex: rapid and robust IgG response induced by a single subcutaneous injection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Hsin; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Waghela, Suryakant D; Chou, Wen-Ko; Farnell, Morgan B; Mwangi, Waithaka; Berghman, Luc R

    2012-04-30

    Producing diagnostic antibodies in chicken egg yolk represents an alternate animal system that offers many advantages including high productivity at low cost. Despite being an excellent counterpart to mammalian antibodies, chicken IgG from yolk still represents an underused resource. The potential of agonistic monoclonal anti-CD40 antibodies (mAb) as a powerful immunological adjuvant has been demonstrated in mammals, but not in chickens. We recently reported an agonistic anti-chicken CD40 mAb (designated mAb 2C5) and showed that it may have potential as an immunological adjuvant. In this study, we examined the efficacy of targeting a short peptide to chicken CD40 [expressed by the antigen-presenting cells (APCs)] in enhancing an effective IgG response in chickens. For this purpose, an immune complex consisting of one streptavidin molecule, two directionally biotinylated mAb 2C5 molecules, and two biotinylated peptide molecules was produced. Chickens were immunized subcutaneously with doses of this complex ranging from 10 to 90 μg per injection once, and relative quantification of the peptide-specific IgG response showed that the mAb 2C5-based complex was able to elicit a strong IgG response as early as four days post-immunization. This demonstrates that CD40-targeting antigen to chicken APCs can significantly enhance antibody responses and induce immunoglobulin isotype-switching. This immunization strategy holds promise for rapid production of hapten-specific IgG in chickens.

  5. Inflammatory granulocytes decrease subcutaneous growth of melanoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Madalena M; Aguas, Artur P

    2004-12-01

    Growing melanomas invade the subcutaneous tissues. We have compared the size of tumors implanted in the subcutaneous cavities of C57BL/6 mice where inflammatory reactions were induced before the injection of 5 x 10(5) melanoma cells (B16F10 cell line). Granulocytic inflammation of the subcutaneous cavities resulted in a significant decrease in the growth of the implanted melanomas, whereas monocytic inflammation had no effect on tumor growth. We conclude that granulocytes, but not monocytes/macrophages, have anti-tumor action on melanoma that invade the subcutaneous tissues.

  6. The relationship between the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose and glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or on multiple daily injections

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takashi; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Yoshioka, Fumi; Okada, Hiroshi; Kishi, Junichiro; Yamada, Kazunori; Sakane, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction We investigated the relationship between the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or on multiple daily injections (MDI) using data management software. Materials and Methods We recruited 148 adult type 1 diabetes mellitus patients (CSII n = 42, MDI n = 106) and downloaded their SMBG records to the MEQNET™ SMBG Viewer software (Arkray Inc., Kyoto, Japan). The association between the SMBG frequency and the patients' hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels was analyzed using the χ2-test and linear regression analysis was carried out to clarify their relationship. Results The odds ratio of achieving a target HbA1c level of <8% (63.9 mmol/mol) was significantly higher in subjects with SMBG frequencies of ≥3.5 times/day compared with those with SMBG frequencies of <3.5 times/day in the CSII group (odds ratio 7.00, 95% confidence interval 1.72–28.54), but not in the MDI group (odds ratio 1.35, 95% CI 0.62–2.93). A significant correlation between SMBG frequency and the HbA1c level was detected in the CSII group (HbA1c [%] = –0.24 × SMBG frequency [times/day] + 8.60 [HbA1c {mmol/L} = –2.61 × SMBG frequency {times/day} + 70.5], [r = –0.384, P = 0.012]), but not in the MDI group. Conclusions A SMBG frequency of <3.5 times per day appeared to be a risk factor for poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥8%) in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients on CSII. PMID:26543543

  7. Chromomycosis: Subcutaneous cystic type.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, S N; Bhise, P R; Sony, P R

    2000-01-01

    A 38-year -old male farmer presented with a solitary, asymptomatic, cystic lesion on the palm since last four years. He underwent excision of this cyst two times during this period but the lesion recurred near the same site. The histopathology and the microbiological examination led to the diagnosis of the rare subcutaneous cystic type of chromomycosis.

  8. Subcutaneous electrode structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A subcutaneous electrode structure suitable for a chronic implant and for taking a low noise electrocardiogram of an active animal, comprises a thin inflexible, smooth disc of stainless steel having a diameter as of 5 to 30 mm, which is sutured in place to the animal being monitored. The disc electrode includes a radially directed slot extending in from the periphery of the disc for approximately 1/3 of the diameter. Electrical connection is made to the disc by means of a flexible lead wire that extends longitudinally of the slot and is woven through apertures in the disc and held at the terminal end by means of a spot welded tab. Within the slot, an electrically insulative sleeve, such as silicone rubber, is placed over the wire. The wire with the sleeve mounted thereon is captured in the plane of the disc and within the slot by means of crimping tabs extending laterally of the slot and over the insulative wire. The marginal lip of the slot area is apertured and an electrically insulative potting material such as silicone rubber, is potted in place overlaying the wire slot region and through the apertures.

  9. [Nephrocalcinosis and subcutaneous fat necrosis].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cláudia; Lobo, Luísa; Azevedo, António Siborro; Simão, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn is an uncommon, transient and self-healing panniculits. This entity generally follows an uncomplicated course, however there are rare and important complications. The authors present a case of a newborn with subcutaneous fat necrosis complicated by hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. The pathogenesis of hypercalcemia is not fully understood and the nephrocalcinosis can evolve to chronic kidney disease. Clinicians should be aware of subcutaneous fat necrosis as a possible risk factor for hypercalcemia and patients should have serial serum and urinary calcium determinations for up to 6 months after the appearance of the skin lesions. The early diagnosis and prompt treatment of hypercalcemia are essential to prevent severe complications.

  10. Fabrication of subcutaneous veins phantom for vessel visualization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kai; Narita, Kazuyuki; Morita, Yusuke; Nakamachi, Eiji; Honda, Norihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-09-01

    The technique of subcutaneous veins imaging by using NIR (Near Infrared Radiation) is widely used in medical applications, such as the intravenous injection and the blood sampling. In the previous study, an automatic 3D blood vessel search and automatic blood sampling system was newly developed. In order to validate this NIR imaging system, we adopted the subcutaneous vein in the human arm and its artificial phantom, which imitate the human fat and blood vessel. The human skin and subcutaneous vein is characterized as the uncertainty object, which has the individual specificity, non-accurate depth information, non-steady state and hardly to be fixed in the examination apparatus. On the other hand, the conventional phantom was quite distinct from the human's characteristics, such as the non-multilayer structure, disagreement of optical property. In this study, we develop a multilayer phantom, which is quite similar with human skin, for improvement of NIR detection system evaluation. The phantom consists of three layers, such as the epidermis layer, the dermis layer and the subcutaneous fat layer. In subcutaneous fat layer, we built a blood vessel. We use the intralipid to imitate the optical scattering characteristics of human skin, and the hemoglobin and melanin for the optical absorption characteristics. In this study, we did two subjects. First, we decide the fabrication process of the phantom. Second, we compared newly developed phantoms with human skin by using our NIR detecting system, and confirm the availability of these phantoms.

  11. Host defenses in subcutaneous mycoses.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Waksman, Noemi; Messeguer-Pérez, Jonathan; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Welsh, Oliverio

    2012-01-01

    Subcutaneous mycoses include diverse clinical syndromes, characterized by invasion of the skin and subcutaneous tissue by saprobic fungi. Individuals living in rural areas constantly suffer lesions or trauma; however, only a few of them develop disease. In this contribution, we describe recent advances in the understanding of the virulence of these organisms, focusing on the most prevalent infections, sporotrichosis, chromoblastomycosis, and mycetoma. Although these infectious diseases are considered neglected tropical diseases, modern molecular techniques have been able to identify the etiologic agents and observe variations in the former monolithic concept of the species, which was based mostly on morphologic characteristics. The complete genetic characterization of the causative agents, along with that of their host, will help in the understanding of the factors on which the development of these infections depends.

  12. Subcutaneous blood flow in psoriasis

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.

    1985-03-01

    The simultaneously recorded disappearance rates of /sup 133/xe from subcutaneous adipose tissue in the crus were studied in 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris using atraumatic labeling of the tissue in lesional skin (LS) areas and symmetrical, nonlesional skin (NLS) areas. Control experiments were performed bilaterally in 10 younger, healthy subjects. The subcutaneous washout rate constant was significantly higher in LS, 0.79 +/- 0.05 min-1 x 10(2) compared to the washout rate constant of NLS, 0.56 +/- 0.07 min-1. 10(2), or the washout rate constant in the normal subjects, 0.46 +/- 0.17 min-1 x 10(2). The mean washout rate constant in NLS was 25% higher than the mean washout rate constant in the normal subjects. The difference was, however, not statistically significant. Differences in the washout rate constants might be due to abnormal subcutaneous tissue-to-blood partition (lambda) in the LS--and therefore not reflecting the real differences in the subcutaneous blood flow (SBF). The lambda for /sup 133/Xe was therefore measured--using a double isotope washout method (/sup 133/Xe and (/sup 131/I)antipyrine)--in symmetrical sites of the lateral crus in LS and NLS of 10 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and in 10 legs of normal subjects. In LS the lambda was 4.52 +/- 1.67 ml/g, which was not statistically different from that of NLS, 5.25 +/- 2.19 ml/g, nor from that of normal subcutaneous tissue, 4.98 +/- 1.04 ml/g. Calculations of the SBF using the obtained lambda values gave a significantly higher SBF in LS, 3.57 +/- 0.23 ml/100 g/min, compared to SBF in the NLS, 2.94 +/- 0.37 ml/100 g/min. There was no statistically significant difference between SBF in NLS and SBF in the normal subjects. The increased SBF in LS of psoriatics might be a secondary phenomenon to an increased heat loss in the lesional skin.

  13. Presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung Mo; Lee, Sang Min; Kang, Haeyoun; Choi, Hye Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts have been described rarely, particularly among adolescents. Only a few reports have described the ultrasonographic features of bronchogenic cysts, characterizing them as nonspecific cystic masses with or without internal echogenic foci or debris. Therefore, it is hard to differentiate subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts from other subcutaneous cystic tumors ultrasonographically. We report a case of presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst in an 18-year-old man with unusual ultrasonographic findings. Ultrasonography revealed a small, oval, cystic mass containing a well-circumscribed, heterogeneously hypoechoic, egg-shaped lesion in the dependent portion of the mass within the subcutaneous fat layer overlying the sternum. Surgical excision was performed, and the cystic mass was diagnosed as a bronchogenic cyst. On pathological examination, the internal, heterogeneously hypoechoic, ball-like lesion was found to be mucous material within the cyst. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a presternal subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst presenting with a ball-like lesion inside of the cyst. This unusual ultrasonographic feature can be a clue to the diagnosis of subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst. In conclusion, if an anechoic cyst containing an internal, well-circumscribed, hypoechoic ball-like lesion is seen in the presternal subcutaneous fat layer, subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous cystic masses. PMID:28151916

  14. Unveiling in Vivo Subcutaneous Thermal Dynamics by Infrared Luminescent Nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Ximendes, Erving Clayton; Santos, Weslley Queiroz; Rocha, Uéslen; Kagola, Upendra Kumar; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Fernández, Nuria; Gouveia-Neto, Artur da Silva; Bravo, David; Domingo, Agustín Martín; del Rosal, Blanca; Brites, Carlos D S; Carlos, Luís Dias; Jaque, Daniel; Jacinto, Carlos

    2016-03-09

    The recent development of core/shell engineering of rare earth doped luminescent nanoparticles has ushered a new era in fluorescence thermal biosensing, allowing for the performance of minimally invasive experiments, not only in living cells but also in more challenging small animal models. Here, the potential use of active-core/active-shell Nd(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped nanoparticles as subcutaneous thermal probes has been evaluated. These temperature nanoprobes operate in the infrared transparency window of biological tissues, enabling deep temperature sensing into animal bodies thanks to the temperature dependence of their emission spectra that leads to a ratiometric temperature readout. The ability of active-core/active-shell Nd(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped nanoparticles for unveiling fundamental tissue properties in in vivo conditions was demonstrated by subcutaneous thermal relaxation monitoring through the injected core/shell nanoparticles. The reported results evidence the potential of infrared luminescence nanothermometry as a diagnosis tool at the small animal level.

  15. A single subcutaneous dose of tramadol for mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Alejandro; Silva, Carlos; Dominguez, Luis; Botero, Beatriz; Zambrano, Paulo; Bareno, Jose

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma is a common cause for an emergency room visit, and frequent pain is one of the cardinal symptoms of consultation. The objective of this study is to assess the perception of a single subcutaneous dose of 50 mg tramadol for pain management in patients with mild to moderate musculoskeletal trauma, likewise to appraise the perception of pain by subcutaneous injection. METHODS: A total of 77 patients, who met inclusion criteria, received a single subcutaneous dose of tramadol. Pain control was evaluated based on the verbal numerical pain scale (0–10) at baseline, 20 and 60 minutes; similarly, pain perception was evaluated secondary to subcutaneous injection of the analgesic. RESULTS: On admission, the average pain perceived by patients was 8; twenty minutes later, 89% of the patients reported five or less, and after sixty minutes, 94% had three or less on the verbal numerical pain scale. Of the patients, 88% reported pain perception by verbal numeric scale of 3 or less by injection of the drug, and 6.5% required a second analgesic for pain control. Two events with drug administration (soft tissue infection and mild abdominal rectus injection) were reported. CONCLUSION: We conclude that a single subcutaneous dose of tramadol is a safe and effective option for the management of patients with mild to moderate pain and musculoskeletal disease in the emergency department. PMID:25548601

  16. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short-term and long-term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid-acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion over multiple daily injections in adult and paediatric populations with T1DM include superior glycaemic control, lower insulin requirements and better health-related quality of life/patient satisfaction. An association between continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and reduced hypoglycaemic risk is more consistent in children/adolescents than in adults. The use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is widely recommended in both adult and paediatric T1DM populations but is limited in pregnant patients and those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. All available rapid-acting insulin analogues are approved for use in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. However, minimum patient age varies (insulin lispro: no minimum; insulin aspart: ≥2 years; insulin glulisine: ≥6 years) and experience in pregnancy ranges from extensive (insulin aspart, insulin lispro) to limited (insulin glulisine). Although more expensive than multiple daily injections, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is cost-effective in selected patient groups. This comprehensive review focuses on the European situation and summarises evidence for the efficacy and safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, particularly when used with rapid-acting insulin analogues, in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. The review also discusses relevant European guidelines; reviews issues that surround use of this technology; summarises the effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on patients

  17. Spontaneous orbital subcutaneous emphysema after sneezing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wei-Chieh; Lih, Ma; Huang, Tien-Yi; Ku, Wan-Chen; Wang, Warren

    2008-03-01

    Orbital subcutaneous emphysema develops when air enters the surrounding soft tissue. This occurs as a result facial bone trauma, iatrogenic dental and otolaryngeal procedures, and gas-producing infectious microorganisms. Case reports regarding this phenomenon after sneezing are very uncommon. Although orbital subcutaneous emphysema is not a true emergency, it can be distressful to patients. This case serves to bring awareness to emergency department physicians regarding the possibility of a nontraumatic orbital subcutaneous emphysema and its related complications.

  18. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin substitution and therapy].

    PubMed

    Gulácsy, Vera; Maródi, László

    2011-01-09

    Patients with combined primary immunodeficiency or B-cell deficiency with low serum concentration of immunoglobulin G can be efficiently treated with immunoglobulin G concentrates. From the 1950s IgG was used intramuscularly, and from the 1980s intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) replacement has become widely available for replacement therapy. Among the potential side effects of IVIG (including anaphylaxis), further disadvantages of IVIG are hospitalization during treatment and varying concentrations of IgG. Over the past ten years, subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) preparations have become reasonable alternatives to IVIG. SCIG given weekly assures a more balanced serum IgG level, side affects are mostly local and temporary; systemic, severe adverse events have not been observed. In addition, SCIG can be used for home treatment of patients which improves their quality of life remarkably.

  19. [Subcutaneous cervical emphysema secondary to tooth extraction].

    PubMed

    Calvo Boizas, E; Sancipriano Hernández, J A; Rincón Esteban, L; Diego Pérez, C; Santiago Andrés, J; Hermosa Finamor, P; Gómez Toranzo, F

    1997-01-01

    Cervical emphysema is rare and its diagnosis involves the ENT specialist. A case of cervical subcutaneous emphysema secondary to lower molar extraction is reported. The patient had no signs or symptoms other than cervical emphysema. Simple radiography and CT are recommended for early diagnosis. The etiopathogenic mechanisms of subcutaneous cervical emphysema are reviewed. Recent literature contains few cases of dental origin.

  20. Subcutaneous Hyalohyphomycosis Caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Guarro, Josep; Svidzinski, Terezinha E.; Zaror, Luís; Forjaz, Maily H.; Gené, Josepa; Fischman, Olga

    1998-01-01

    The coelomycete Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was isolated in pure culture from subcutaneous nodules of the left forearm and elbow of a farmer after traumatic injury. To our knowledge, we report the first case involving this fungus as an etiological agent of subcutaneous infection. The in vitro inhibitory activities of amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole, flucytosine, and fluconazole were studied. PMID:9738070

  1. Outbreak of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Subcutaneous Infections Related to Multiple Mesotherapy Injections▿

    PubMed Central

    Carbonne, Anne; Brossier, Florence; Arnaud, Isabelle; Bougmiza, Iheb; Caumes, Eric; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Dubrou, Sylvie; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Astagneau, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    We describe an outbreak of severe subcutaneous infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria following mesotherapy. Epidemiological studies and molecular comparisons of Mycobacterium chelonae strains from different patients and the environment suggested that contamination may be associated with inappropriate cleaning of the multiple-injection device with tap water. PMID:19386853

  2. Indwelling intrathecal catheter with subcutaneous abdominal reservoir: a viable baclofen delivery system in severely cachectic patients.

    PubMed

    Waqar, Mueez; Ellenbogen, Jonathan R; Kumar, Ram; Sneade, Christine; Zebian, Bassel; Williams, Dawn; Pettorini, Benedetta L

    2014-10-01

    Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) is a reversible treatment that reduces muscle tone to ameliorate spasticity and dystonia in patients with cerebral palsy (CP). The resulting decrease in energy expenditure allows patients to gain much-needed weight, albeit temporarily. Modern techniques require sufficient abdominal musculature and subcutaneous fat to permit the implantation of an indwelling pump. In patients with extremely low muscle bulk, visceral pumps may be impractical or impossible, with increased risks of dehiscence and infection. The authors describe a variation of the classical procedure in a young patient with severe cachexia. A 10-year-old boy with spastic-dystonic quadriplegic CP was admitted to the neuromedical unit. Numerous drug trials had failed, and surgical intervention was deemed necessary but was complicated by his cachectic body habitus. The authors inserted a lumbar intrathecal catheter and subcutaneously tunneled it to the anterolateral abdomen, where it was connected to a subcutaneous injection port. Baclofen was continuously infused into the subcutaneous port using a noncoring needle connected to an external pump. The needle and line were changed every 5 days to minimize the risk of sepsis. Although other techniques, such as intraventricular baclofen delivery, have been described, these are largely dependent upon sufficient musculature to support a visceral pump. A subcutaneous injection port system represents an alternative approach that reduces the risk of sepsis and may be better tolerated in cachectic patients.

  3. Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum after Tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Koukoutsis, George; Balatsouras, Dimitrios G.; Ganelis, Panayotis; Fassolis, Alexandros; Moukos, Antonis; Katotomichelakis, Michael; Kaberos, Antonis

    2013-01-01

    Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of tonsillectomy that often resolves spontaneously but may progress to obstruct upper airways or spread to the thorax causing pneumomediastinum or pneumothorax. The mechanisms by which subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum may develop after tonsillectomy are poorly understood. A case of a 21-year-old female undergoing routine adenotonsillectomy, who developed cervicofacial emphysema and pneumomediastinum, is presented. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment options are discussed. PMID:24379978

  4. A Prospective, Randomized Trial of Intravenous Prochlorperazine Versus Subcutaneous Sumatriptan in Acute Migraine Therapy in the Emergency Department(Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    were effective . However, IV prochlorperazine with diphenhydramine was superior to subcutaneous sumatriptan in the abortive therapy of migraine...College of Emergency Physicians. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2009.11.020INTRODUCTION Background Intravenous (IV) prochlorperazine is safe and effective in...migraine abortive therapy.1-5 It is often given in conjunction with diphenhydramine to minimize the risk of akathisia.6 Subcutaneously injected

  5. Frontal subcutaneous blood flow, and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures during scalp cooling in normal man.

    PubMed

    Bülow, J; Friberg, L; Gaardsting, O; Hansen, M

    1985-10-01

    Cooling of the scalp has been found to prevent hair loss following cytostatic treatment, but in order to obtain the hair preserving effect the subcutaneous temperature has to be reduced below 22 degrees C. In order to establish the relationship between epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures during cooling and rewarming and to measure the effect of scalp cooling on subcutaneous scalp blood flow, subcutaneous blood flow and epi- and subcutaneous temperatures were measured in the frontal region at the hairline border before and during cooling with a cooling helmet, during spontaneous rewarming of the cooling helmet and after removal of the rewarmed helmet in 10 normal subjects. Subcutaneous blood flow was reduced to about 25% of the postcooling control level during cooling. The flow was constantly reduced until the subcutaneous temperature exceeded 30-32 degrees C. A linear relationship between epicutaneous and subcutaneous temperatures could be demonstrated with the regression equation: s = 0.9 c + 4.9 (r = 0.99). In eight of the 10 subjects the subcutaneous temperature could be reduced below 22 degrees C with the applied technique. It is concluded that the hair preserving effect of scalp cooling during cytostatic treatment is mainly due to the metabolic effect of cooling, and only to a minor extent due to the flow reducing effect.

  6. Aluminium overload after 5 years in skin biopsy following post-vaccination with subcutaneous pseudolymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Olivier; Fauconneau, Bernard; Pineau, Alain; Marrauld, Annie; Bellocq, Jean-Pierre; Chenard, Marie-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Aluminium hydroxide is used as an effective adjuvant in a wide range of vaccines for enhancing immune response to the antigen. The pathogenic role of aluminium hydroxide is now recognized by the presence of chronic fatigue syndrome, macrophagic myofasciitis and subcutaneous pseudolymphoma, linked to intramuscular injection of aluminium hydroxide-containing vaccines. The aim of this study is to verify if the subcutaneous pseudolymphoma observed in this patient in the site of vaccine injection is linked to an aluminium overload. Many years after vaccination, a subcutaneous nodule was discovered in a 45-year-old woman with subcutaneous pseudolymphoma. In skin biopsy at the injection site for vaccines, aluminium (Al) deposits are assessed by Morin stain and quantification of Al is performed by Zeeman Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Morin stain shows Al deposits in the macrophages, and Al assays (in μg/g, dry weight) were 768.10±18 for the patient compared with the two control patients, 5.61±0.59 and 9.13±0.057. Given the pathology of this patient and the high Al concentration in skin biopsy, the authors wish to draw attention when using the Al salts known to be particularly effective as adjuvants in single or repeated vaccinations. The possible release of Al may induce other pathologies ascribed to the well-known toxicity of this metal.

  7. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in treating inflammatory neuromuscular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Gold, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intravenous immunoglobulin administration has long been used in the treatment of autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. Immunoglobulins may be administered by intramuscular, intravenous or subcutaneous routes. Methods: This is a report on the long-term clinical follow up of six patients with inflammatory neuromuscular disorders, that is, three chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), one multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), one inclusion body myositis (IBM) and one myasthenia gravis (MG), treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins for a mean of 3.25 years. Results: One MMN and two CIDP patients received a weekly dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins equivalent to intravenous immunoglobulin. One CIDP patient received a 50% dose reduction, the IBM patient received a 30% reduction and the MG patient a 20% reduction. The lower dose chosen in the majority of patients was based not only on clinical effects, but also on studies of primary immunodeficiency syndromes. One patient with CIDP showed clinical fluctuation, which was successfully treated with an adaptation of the dose of subcutaneous immunoglobulins, while the remaining patients with neuromuscular disorders had a stable clinical course for 2 years. No serious side effects were observed. Conclusions: Our results suggest that subcutaneous immunoglobulins can be an attractive alternative therapy in autoimmune neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26136842

  8. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Improves the Symptomatology of Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Edmir Américo; Caldeira, Eduardo José; Carvalho, César Alexandre Fabrega; Cunha, Marcelo Rodriques; Carvalho, Marcus Vinícius Henriques; Passos, Saulo Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relevance of allergic rhinitis is unquestionable. This condition affects people's quality of life and its incidence has increased over the last years. Objective Thus, this study aims to analyze the effectiveness of subcutaneous injectable immunotherapy in cases of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea and nasal congestion in allergic rhinitis patients. Methods In the present study, the same researcher analyzed the records of 281 patients. Furthermore, the researchers identified allergens through puncture cutaneous tests using standardized extracts containing acari, fungi, pet hair, flower pollen, and feathers. Then, the patients underwent treatment with subcutaneous specific immunotherapy, using four vaccine vials for desensitization, associated with environmental hygiene. The authors analyzed conditions of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion throughout the treatment, and assigned them with a score ranging from zero (0), meaning absence of these symptoms to three (3), for severe cases. The symptoms were statistically compared in the beginning, during, and after treatment. Results In this study, authors analyzed the cases distribution according to age and the evolution of symptomatology according to the scores, comparing all phases of treatment. The average score for the entire population studied was 2.08 before treatment and 0.44 at the end. These results represent an overall improvement of ∼79% in symptomatology of allergic rhinitis in the studied population. Conclusion The subcutaneous immunotherapy as treatment of allergic rhinitis led to a reduction in all symptoms studied, improving the quality of life of patients, proving itself as an important therapeutic tool for these pathological conditions. PMID:26722338

  9. Histological study of subcutaneous fat at NIR laser treatment of the rat skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, I. Y.; Svenskaya, Yu. I.; Navolokin, N. A.; Matveeva, O. V.; Bucharskaya, A. B.; Maslyakova, G. N.; Gorin, D. A.; Sukhorukov, G. B.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify impact of in vivo photochemical treatment using indocyanine green (ICG) or encapsulated ICG and NIR laser irradiation through skin of rat with obesity by the follow up tissue sampling and histochemistry. After 1 hour elapsed since 1-min light exposure samples of rat skin with subcutaneous tissue of thickness of 1.5-2.5 mm were taken by surgery from rats within marked 4-zones of the skin site. For hematoxylin-eosin histological examination of excised tissue samples, fixation was carried out by 10%-formaldehyde solution. For ICG and encapsulated ICG subcutaneous injection and subsequent 1-min diode laser irradiation with power density of 8 W/cm2, different necrotic regions with lipolysis of subcutaneous fat were observed. The obtained data can be used for safe layer-by-layer laser treatment of obesity and cellulite.

  10. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a rhinoplasty scar

    PubMed Central

    Dulguerov, Nicolas; Vankatova, Lenka; Landis, Basile Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a subcutaneous hard bony-like lump at the lateral nasal wall after a septorhinoplasty procedure is an unfavourable result. The reported patient developed this complication 2 years after a revision surgery, in which percutaneous osteotomies were performed. An excision biopsy of the lump took place and the histopathological analysis revealed a granulomatous gigantocellular inflammation with absence of birefringent particles on polarised lamp and negative mycobacteria culture. After additional investigations, the final diagnosis was consistent with grade 2 pulmonary sarcoidosis associated with subcutaneous sarcoidosis. No treatment was initiated. The facial symptoms resolved without any additional treatment and the pulmonary function tests have not deteriorated after 1 year of follow-up. The polymorphism of cutaneous lesions in sarcoidosis, the absence of systemic symptoms and the unrecognised entity of subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a scar illustrate the diagnostic challenge with this patient. PMID:25819832

  11. Augmented reality based real-time subcutaneous vein imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Zhao, Yitian; Song, Xianzheng; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-01-01

    A novel 3D reconstruction and fast imaging system for subcutaneous veins by augmented reality is presented. The study was performed to reduce the failure rate and time required in intravenous injection by providing augmented vein structures that back-project superimposed veins on the skin surface of the hand. Images of the subcutaneous vein are captured by two industrial cameras with extra reflective near-infrared lights. The veins are then segmented by a multiple-feature clustering method. Vein structures captured by the two cameras are matched and reconstructed based on the epipolar constraint and homographic property. The skin surface is reconstructed by active structured light with spatial encoding values and fusion displayed with the reconstructed vein. The vein and skin surface are both reconstructed in the 3D space. Results show that the structures can be precisely back-projected to the back of the hand for further augmented display and visualization. The overall system performance is evaluated in terms of vein segmentation, accuracy of vein matching, feature points distance error, duration times, accuracy of skin reconstruction, and augmented display. All experiments are validated with sets of real vein data. The imaging and augmented system produces good imaging and augmented reality results with high speed. PMID:27446690

  12. Augmented reality based real-time subcutaneous vein imaging system.

    PubMed

    Ai, Danni; Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Zhao, Yitian; Song, Xianzheng; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-07-01

    A novel 3D reconstruction and fast imaging system for subcutaneous veins by augmented reality is presented. The study was performed to reduce the failure rate and time required in intravenous injection by providing augmented vein structures that back-project superimposed veins on the skin surface of the hand. Images of the subcutaneous vein are captured by two industrial cameras with extra reflective near-infrared lights. The veins are then segmented by a multiple-feature clustering method. Vein structures captured by the two cameras are matched and reconstructed based on the epipolar constraint and homographic property. The skin surface is reconstructed by active structured light with spatial encoding values and fusion displayed with the reconstructed vein. The vein and skin surface are both reconstructed in the 3D space. Results show that the structures can be precisely back-projected to the back of the hand for further augmented display and visualization. The overall system performance is evaluated in terms of vein segmentation, accuracy of vein matching, feature points distance error, duration times, accuracy of skin reconstruction, and augmented display. All experiments are validated with sets of real vein data. The imaging and augmented system produces good imaging and augmented reality results with high speed.

  13. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in diabetes: patient populations, safety, efficacy, and pharmacoeconomics

    PubMed Central

    Battelino, Tadej; Danne, Thomas; Hovorka, Roman; Jarosz‐Chobot, Przemyslawa; Renard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary The level of glycaemic control necessary to achieve optimal short‐term and long‐term outcomes in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) typically requires intensified insulin therapy using multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. For continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the insulins of choice are the rapid‐acting insulin analogues, insulin aspart, insulin lispro and insulin glulisine. The advantages of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion over multiple daily injections in adult and paediatric populations with T1DM include superior glycaemic control, lower insulin requirements and better health‐related quality of life/patient satisfaction. An association between continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and reduced hypoglycaemic risk is more consistent in children/adolescents than in adults. The use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is widely recommended in both adult and paediatric T1DM populations but is limited in pregnant patients and those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. All available rapid‐acting insulin analogues are approved for use in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. However, minimum patient age varies (insulin lispro: no minimum; insulin aspart: ≥2 years; insulin glulisine: ≥6 years) and experience in pregnancy ranges from extensive (insulin aspart, insulin lispro) to limited (insulin glulisine). Although more expensive than multiple daily injections, continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is cost‐effective in selected patient groups. This comprehensive review focuses on the European situation and summarises evidence for the efficacy and safety of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, particularly when used with rapid‐acting insulin analogues, in adult, paediatric and pregnant populations. The review also discusses relevant European guidelines; reviews issues that surround use of this technology; summarises the effects of continuous subcutaneous insulin

  14. Subcutaneous sacral ependymoma--a histopathological challenge.

    PubMed

    Helbig, Doris

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous myxopapillary or sacral ependymoma are rare tumors mostly developing in children or adolescents. The majority occurs in the sacrococcygeal region. There are numerous clinical and histopathological differential diagnoses. Owing to the fact that there have been rare reported cases that followed an aggressive course and in which the patient succumbed to metastatic disease, long term follow-up is necessary despite complete excision. We describe here a 25-year-old male patient with a histological unusual subcutaneous sacral ependymoma and discuss the differential diagnosis as well as treatment options.

  15. Subcutaneous mycoses: chromoblastomycosis, sporotrichosis and mycetoma.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Perusquía-Ortiz, Ana María

    2010-08-01

    Subcutaneous mycoses are common in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. They are rarely observed in Europe. These mycoses are heterogeneous, but all are caused by penetrating trauma of the skin. Most cases in Europe are observed in returning travelers, aid workers, archaeologists and immigrants. Therefore, a careful, thorough history is essential in order to reach a proper diagnosis. We provide up-to-date epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic data on the three most important imported subcutaneous mycoses in Europe: chromoblastomycosis, sporotrichosis and mycetoma.

  16. Sustained Release of Protein Therapeutics from Subcutaneous Thermosensitive Biocompatible and Biodegradable Pentablock Copolymers (PTSgels)

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Elizabeth; Walsh, Mary; Newman, Donna; Salmon, Jacklyn; Amin, Rasidul; Weiss, Sidney; Grau, Ulrich; Velagaleti, Poonam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate thermosensitive, biodegradable pentablock copolymers (PTSgel) for sustained release and integrity of a therapeutic protein when injected subcutaneously. Materials and Methods. Five PTSgels with PEG-PCL-PLA-PCL-PEG block arrangements were synthesized. In vitro release of IgG from PTSgels and concentrations was evaluated at 37°C. Released IgG integrity was characterized by SDS-PAGE. In vitro disintegration for 10GH PTSgel in PBS was monitored at 37°C over 72 days using gravimetric loss and GPC analysis. Near-infrared IgG in PTSgel was injected subcutaneously and examined by in vivo imaging and histopathology for up to 42 days. Results. IgG release was modulated from approximately 7 days to more than 63 days in both in vitro and in vivo testing by varying polymer composition, concentration of PTSgel aqueous solution, and concentration of IgG. Released IgG in vitro maintained structural integrity by SDS-PAGE. Subcutaneous PTSgels were highly biocompatible and in vitro IgG release occurred in parallel with the disappearance of subcutaneous gel in vivo. Conclusions. Modulation of release of biologics to fit the therapeutic need can be achieved by varying the biocompatible and biodegradable PTSgel composition. Release of IgG parallels disappearance of the polymeric gel; hence, little or no PTSgel remains after drug release is complete. PMID:27800184

  17. Elephantine but not elephantiasis: Subcutaneous zygomycosis.

    PubMed

    Girish, Meenakshi; Arora, Amit; Bhalla, Lucky; Salodkar, Atul

    2011-09-01

    Subcutaneous zygomycosis is an unusual disorder caused by a rare fungus, Basidiobolus ranarum. We report this entity in a 4- yr- old boy. Biopsy showed the Splendore Hoeppli phenomenon and the culture yielded Basidiobolus ranarum. The child responded to saturated solution of potassium iodide within 1 month of starting treatment.

  18. Cabazitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with prednisone to treat prostate cancer (cancer of a male reproductive organ) that has ... cabazitaxel injection is usually used in men with prostate cancer. If used by pregnant women, cabazitaxel injection can ...

  19. Fondaparinux Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... fondaparinux injection.Talk to your doctor about the risk of using fondaparinux injection. ... Fondaparinux injection is used to prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT; a blood ... Xa inhibitors. It works by decreasing the clotting ability of the blood.

  20. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Morphine injection is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Morphine is in a class of medications called opiate ( ... Morphine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to inject intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a ...

  1. Dexamethasone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Dexamethasone injection is used to treat severe allergic reactions. It is used in the management of certain types of ... gastrointestinal disease, and certain types of arthritis. Dexamethasone injection is also used for diagnostic testing. Dexamethasone injection ...

  2. Romidepsin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romidepsin injection is used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL; a group of cancers of the immune system ... one other medication given by mouth or by injection. Romidepsin injection is in a class of medications ...

  3. Ondansetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zofran® Injection ... Ondansetron injection is used to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy and surgery. Ondansetron is in a ... medications: or any of the ingredients in ondansetron injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ...

  4. Pharmacokinetics of oxycodone after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in Japanese patients with cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Kokubun, Hideya; Yoshimoto, Tetsusuke; Hojo, Minoru; Fukumura, Kazuya; Matoba, Motohiro

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT In Japan, Oxycodone hydrochloride injection formulation has been approved in 2012. However, its pharmacokinetics has been poorly studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of oxycodone after intravenous and subcutaneous administration of oxycodone hydrochloride injection in Japanese patients with cancer pain. Noncompartmental analysis and population pharmacokinetic analysis were performed. We conducted a multicenter open-label study of oxycodone hydrochloride administered as constant infusion with the dose titrated individually according to the pain intensity in patients with cancer pain. Pharmacokinetic parameters for plasma oxycodone and its metabolites were estimated using pharmacokinetics of oxycodone was evaluated using a total of 344 plasma concentrations obtained from 89 patients. The estimated geometric mean clearance (CL) of oxycodone was 24.3 L per hour after constant intravenous infusion and 29.5 L per hour after constant subcutaneous infusion, respectively. Population pharmacokinetic analysis indicated that body surface area was the influencing factor on CL and there were no pharmacokinetic differences for CL between intravenous and subcutaneous infusion. These results provide important information for the clinical use of oxycodone injection.

  5. Injection of Vaseline under Penis Skin for the Purpose of Penis Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Karakan, Tolga; Ersoy, Erim; Hasçiçek, Metin; Ozgür, Berat Cem; Ozcan, Serkan; Aydın, Arif

    2012-01-01

    Penile foreign body injection is an uncommon entity produced by penile paraffin, mineral oil, and vaseline injections for the purpose of penile enlargement. Generally, penile subcutaneous and glandular injections for penile augmentation are performed by a nonmedical person, under unacceptable conditions. It will be an aim to share our experiences about penile vaseline injection.

  6. Ibandronate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Boniva® Injection ... Ibandronate injection is used to treat osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become thin and weak and break ... Ibandronate injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be injected into a vein by a doctor or nurse in ...

  7. Development, differentiation, and vascular components of subcutaneous and intrahepatic Hepa129 tumors in a mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Richard T; Gutierrez, Paula M; Baratta, Janie L; Thordarson, Kristoffer; Braslow, Joshua; Haynes, Sherry M; Longmuir, Kenneth J

    2016-04-01

    Tumor models in mice offer opportunities for understanding tumor formation and development of therapeutic treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, subcutaneous or intra-hepatic Hepa129 tumors were established in C3H mice. Tumor growth was determined by daily measurements of subcutaneous tumors and post-mortem studies of subcutaneous and intrahepatic tumors. Administration of Edu was used to determine cell generation dates of tumor cells. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies directed at CD31 or CD34, and intravenous injection of labeled tomato lectin revealed tumor vasculature. Tissue sections also were processed for immunohistochemistry using a panel of antibodies to proteoglycans. Comparison of Edu labeled cells with immunoreactivity allowed determination of development and differentiation of tumor cells after cell generation. Subcutaneous and intrahepatic tumors displayed similar growth over 3 weeks. Immunohistochemistry showed strong labeling for glypican-3, 9BA12, and chondroitin sulfate of tumors in both loci, while normal liver was negative. Tumor regions containing Edu labeled cells did not show significant immunohistochemical labeling for the tumor markers until 2-3 days after Edu treatment; overlap of Edu labeled cells and immunohistochemically labeled tumor regions appeared to reach a maximum at 5 days after Edu treatment. Ectopic subcutaneous tumors displayed vascular ingrowth as the tumor cells expressed immunocytochemical markers; subcutaneous tumors displayed significantly more vascular elements than did intrahepatic tumors.

  8. Patient reactions to long-term outpatient treatment with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    PubMed Central

    Pickup, J C; Keen, H; Viberti, G C; Bilous, R W

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen of the first 15 insulin-dependent diabetics to be treated in our unit by three weeks or more of outpatient continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with a portable syringe pump completed a questionnaire about their reactions to the system. Motivation was more important to a favourable response than occupation or intelligence. Most patients thought that diabetic control was better with the pump than conventional injection treatment and several felt subjectively better. Features such as the greater flexibility of diet and insulin delivery rates during continuous subcutaneous infusion were appreciated. The most consistent adverse criticism was about the size of the device used, nearly all patients thinking that smaller and lighter infusion systems should be developed. Psychological reactions to the infusion and difficulties with interpersonal relationships were identified; these must be clearly appreciated and discussed with patients and family before and during treatment. Nine of the 14 patients said they would undertake continuous subcutaneous infusion for one year and a further two said they would do so if the infuser was smaller. These results provide guidance on future technological development of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and indicate that the major constraint to long-term trials of the present system is the size of the pump. PMID:6783163

  9. 21 CFR 522.1451 - Moxidectin microspheres for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 522.1451 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS... single subcutaneous injection. (2) Indications for use. For prevention of heartworm disease caused...

  10. Self injection of foreign materials into the penis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, U; Freeman, A; Kirkham, A; Ralph, D J; Minhas, S; Muneer, A

    2017-02-01

    Injection of the subcutaneous tissues of the penis for enlargement of penile girth has been practised for many years by laypeople and medical practitioners alike. However, with recognition of the complications, the practice has died out. We report a series of five patients who presented having injected foreign materials into the subcutaneous tissues of their penises, including paraffin and mineral oils. Our patients had a variable time course of presentation ranging from 1 day following injection to over 26 years. Self-injection of the subcutaneous tissues of the penis is an unusual presentation for a penile mass but should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with a long latent period to presentation or with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging and histological appearances.

  11. Subcutaneous mycoses. Part 1: subcutaneous mycoses due to non-dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Romano, C

    2013-12-01

    Subcutaenous mycoses are increasingly reported in the literature for various reasons. Firstly, life expectancy has increased and even patients with cancer and/or immunodepression live longer, making them susceptible to these infections. Secondly, diagnostic techniques for mycoses have improved. Dermatologists have now begun to suspect subcutaneous mycoses when faced with certain clinical pictures and are aware of the need for histopathological examination and culture of lesion biopsy material on appropriate culture media. This review considers the clinical, histopathological and mycological aspects of the most common subcutaneous mycoses and outlines how to treat them. A better understanding of these mycoses enables early diagnosis and treatment of infections that are sometimes life-threatening.

  12. Comparison of subcutaneous hydromorphone with intramuscular meperidine for immediate postoperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Chan, W H; Lin, C J; Sun, W Z; Tsai, S P; Tsai, S K; Hsieh, C Y

    1999-07-01

    Intramuscular (i.m.) injection with meperidine is the most common analgesic approach to treat postoperative pain in Taiwan. Hydromorphone (Dilaudid) can provide very potent and rapid analgesic effect through subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Although hydromorphone is widely used in North America, no study has compared the analgesic efficacy, side effect profiles and patients' satisfaction with the method of injection of hydromorphone s.c. and meperidine i.m. for the immediate post-operative analgesia. In this randomized and double-blind study, 60 female patients scheduled for abdominal total hysterectomy were treated either with 1 mg hydromorphone s.c. (n = 30) or 50 mg meperidine i.m. (n = 30) when they regained consciousness and asked for analgesic treatment in the recovery room. Visual analogue score (VAS) of wound pain was obtained at 0, 10 and 30 min after injection by a blinded observer. The occurrence and severity of nausea, vomiting, dizziness, drowsiness, flatus passage and respiratory depression were recorded. Post-operative analgesia in the ward was maintained by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with intravenous morphine. Time to first PCA demand, the number of demands, delivery, delivery/demand ratio and 24 h morphine consumption were documented. We found that VAS was reduced at 10 min and, to a greater extent, at 30 min postinjection in both groups but with no significant difference between the two groups. The occurrence and severity of side effect profiles were similar in both groups except that dizziness was more frequently observed after meperidine injection. Delivery, demand, delivery/demand ratio and 24 hr morphine consumption by PCA were not significantly different between the two groups. Time to first PCA trigger was also similar. Patients receiving hydromorphone s.c. injection exhibited higher satisfactory score than those receiving meperidine i.m. injection. Hydromorphone 1 mg, injected subcutaneously, was as effective as intramuscular

  13. Surgical management of subcutaneous Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Allton, David R; Parvez, Najma; Ranganath, Sangeetha; Jinadatha, Chetan

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old male patient with a history of sarcoidosis and over 10 years of chronic low-dose glucocorticoid use, cirrhosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with two painful, enlarging subcutaneous nodules ultimately identified as Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Two attempts at needle aspiration of the larger nodule resulted in rapid reaccumulation. Complete surgical excision of both nodules resulted in complete resolution without the use of any concomitant antifungals. Patient had no recurrence at 2 years of follow-up. PMID:25737220

  14. In vitro-in vivo evaluation of nanosuspension release from subcutaneously implantable osmotic pumps.

    PubMed

    Hill, A; Geissler, S; Meyring, M; Hecht, S; Weigandt, M; Mäder, K

    2013-07-15

    Utilizing poorly soluble drug candidates in pharmacokinetic studies remains challenging in preclinical drug development. We investigated a nanosuspension-based delivery system to achieve constant drug plasma levels by applying the nanoparticles via subcutaneously implanted micro-osmotic pumps. Various nanosuspension formulations were characterized in vitro prior to Alzet® pump release by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and rheological measurements. In vitro formulation release was checked by HPLC/UV. The in vivo experiments compared plasma-concentration time profiles of subcutaneously injected nanosuspensions with those of formulations delivered by pumps. Two Poloxamer 338 containing nanosuspensions with different viscosities were found to be stable over observation time, physically resistant against biorelevant media and showed only a low amorphous part after preparation. The more viscous nanosuspension with 31.65 mPas revealed in vitro the expected zero-order release, while the low viscous formulation with 2.18 mPas showed first order release. In in vivo experiments, the higher viscous nanosuspension released from osmotic pumps exhibited elevated plasma levels compared to the lower viscous formulation. Compared to bolus injected nanosuspensions constant plasma levels could be maintained by adapting the viscosity of the nanosuspension. Subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps prove to be a valuable delivery system for nanosuspensions in pharmacokinetic studies by consideration of the key parameter viscosity in release kinetics.

  15. Subcutaneous Heparin Versus Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin as Thromboprophylaxis in Patients Undergoing Colorectal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Robin S.; Geerts, William H.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Greenwood, Celia; Gregoire, Roger C.; Taylor, Brian M.; Silverman, Richard E.; Atkinson, Kenneth G.; Burnstein, Marcus; Marshall, John C.; Burul, Claude J.; Anderson, David R.; Ross, Theodore; Wilson, Stephanie R.; Barton, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness and safety of low-dose unfractionated heparin and a low-molecular-weight heparin as prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism after colorectal surgery. Methods In a multicenter, double-blind trial, patients undergoing resection of part or all of the colon or rectum were randomized to receive, by subcutaneous injection, either calcium heparin 5,000 units every 8 hours or enoxaparin 40 mg once daily (plus two additional saline injections). Deep vein thrombosis was assessed by routine bilateral contrast venography performed between postoperative day 5 and 9, or earlier if clinically suspected. Results Nine hundred thirty-six randomized patients completed the protocol and had an adequate outcome assessment. The venous thromboembolism rates were the same in both groups. There were no deaths from pulmonary embolism or bleeding complications. Although the proportion of all bleeding events in the enoxaparin group was significantly greater than in the low-dose heparin group, the rates of major bleeding and reoperation for bleeding were not significantly different. Conclusions Both heparin 5,000 units subcutaneously every 8 hours and enoxaparin 40 mg subcutaneously once daily provide highly effective and safe prophylaxis for patients undergoing colorectal surgery. However, given the current differences in cost, prophylaxis with low-dose heparin remains the preferred method at present. PMID:11224634

  16. A novel subcutaneous infusion delivery system based on osmotic pump: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei; Ma, Rui; Mei, Danyu; Jing, Pei; Dong, Xiao; Li, Bingsheng; Yang, Yanfang; Du, Lina; Mei, Xing-Guo; Hu, Fu-Qiang

    2014-02-01

    An economical, convenient portable drug delivery system combining osmotic pump with subcutaneous infusion was developed, which was composed of three primary components: water chamber, osmotic pump chamber and support base. Ceftriaxone sodium (CRO) was selected as the model drug and osmotic pump tablets were prepared. The influence of osmotic agents on drug release profiles was evaluated. As the adjustment made by the osmotic agents was limited, the compositions of semipermeable membrane were investigated to determine significant associations of factors based on orthogonal design. The in vitro release profiles of the optimum formulation achieved to the predetermined value (15 ± 3 min for the initial release time T(i) and 5.75 ± 0.25 h for the extent release time T(e)). The pharmacokinetic profiles of this drug delivery system were evaluated in Beagle dogs. In vivo results demonstrated that the osmotic pump subcutaneous infusion administration was equivalent to intravenous injection administration in terms of bioavailability. Moreover, constant drug plasma levels with minimized fluctuations could be achieved with this osmotic pump subcutaneous infusion system, compared with intravenous injection.

  17. Depletion of the residues of colistin and amoxicillin in turkeys following simultaneous subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, L; Giovannetti, L; Rondolotti, A; Della Rocca, G; Stracciari, G L

    1996-01-01

    The tissue distribution and depletion of colistin and amoxicillin were studied in 84 turkeys dosed subcutaneously on 4 consecutive days with a formulation containing the two drugs at 0.2 ml/kg per day, corresponding to 50 000 IU of colistin sulphate/kg and 20 mg of amoxicillin trihydrate/kg. All the turkeys were killed 1-30 days after the final dose and samples of muscle, liver, kidney and cutaneous-subcutaneous tissues and of the injection site were taken for analysis for colistin and amoxicillin residues. The colistin concentrations in the liver (117.5 +/- 26.0 ng/g) and cutaneous-subcutaneous tissue (100.0 +/- 35.6 ng/g) were higher than those in kidney (92.0 +/- 34.4 ng/g) or muscle (67.5 +/- 16.9 ng/g) 1 day after the final dose. The concentration of this drug then increased for 9-14 days, followed by a slow decrease. The antibiotic was still present at low concentrations in the kidneys of all the treated birds and in the livers of two turkeys 30 days after the end of treatment. Amoxicillin concentrations were greatest in muscle (389.2 +/- 195.0 ng/g) and at the injection sites (440.3 +/- 213.9 ng/g) 1 day after treatment ceased, with a subsequent rapid decline. This drug was undetectable in the livers and kidneys by 10 days after dosing ceased.

  18. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... body and causes pain, swelling, and damage) including: rheumatoid arthritis (condition in which the body attacks its own ... doctor.If golimumab injection is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, it may also be injected intravenously (into a ...

  19. Adalimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes pain, swelling, and damage) including the following: rheumatoid arthritis (a condition in which the body attacks its ... If you are using adalimumab injection to treat rheumatoid arthritis, your doctor may tell you to inject the ...

  20. Aripiprazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... aripiprazole injection and aripiprazole extended-release injection developed gambling problems or other intense urges or behaviors that ... even if you do not realize that your gambling or any other intense urges or unusual behaviors ...

  1. Teduglutide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... mix and inject it.Teduglutide comes as a kit containing vials of teduglutide powder for injection, prefilled syringes containing diluent (liquid to be mixed with teduglutide powder), needles to attach to the diluent syringe, dosing syringes ...

  2. Degarelix Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Degarelix injection is used to treat advanced prostate cancer (cancer that begins in the prostate [a male reproductive gland]). Degarelix injection is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) ...

  3. Cyclosporine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used with other medications to prevent transplant rejection (attack of the transplanted organ by the ... people who have received kidney, liver, and heart transplants. Cyclosporine injection should only be used to treat ...

  4. Colistimethate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Colistimethate injection is in a class of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as colistimethate injection will not work ...

  5. Chloramphenicol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain types of serious infections caused by bacteria when other antibiotics cannot be used. Chloramphenicol injection ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria..Antibiotics such as chloramphenicol injection will not work ...

  6. Estrogen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot flashes; sudden strong feelings of heat and sweating) ... If you are using estrogen injection to treat hot flushes, your symptoms should improve within 1 to ...

  7. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medroxyprogesterone injection is a very effective method of birth control but does not prevent the spread of human ... you have been using a different method of birth control and are switching to medroxyprogesterone injection, your doctor ...

  8. Etanercept Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... areas causing pain and joint damage), chronic plaque psoriasis (a skin disease in which red, scaly patches ... etanercept injection is used to treat chronic plaque psoriasis, it may be injected twice a week during ...

  9. Levoleucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Levoleucovorin injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of cancer. Levoleucovorin injection is also used to treat people ...

  10. Leucovorin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Leucovorin injection is used to prevent harmful effects of methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall; cancer chemotherapy medication) when methotrexate is used to to treat certain types of cancer. Leucovorin injection is used to ...

  11. Teniposide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... in men. You should not become pregnant or breast-feed while you are receiving teniposide injection. If you or your partner become pregnant while receiving teniposide injection, call your doctor. Teniposide may harm the fetus.

  12. Ipilimumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving ipilimumab injection, call your doctor. Ipilimumab injection may cause your baby to be born too early or to die before birth.

  13. Pralatrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Pralatrexate injection is used to treat peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL; a form of cancer that begins in a ... come back after treatment with other medications. Pralatrexate injection has not been shown to help people who ...

  14. Cyanocobalamin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cyanocobalamin injection is used to treat and prevent a lack of vitamin B12 that may be caused by any ... organs) and permanent damage to the nerves. Cyanocobalamin injection also may be given as a test to ...

  15. Paclitaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Paclitaxel injection manufactured with human albumin is used to treat breast cancer that has not improved or that has come back after treatment with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to ...

  16. Diphenhydramine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Diphenhydramine injection is used to treat allergic reactions, especially for people who are unable to take diphenhydramine by mouth. ... is used also to treat motion sickness. Diphenhydramine injection is also used alone or along with other ...

  17. Peramivir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Peramivir injection is used to treat some types of influenza infection ('flu') in people who have had symptoms of ... flu for no longer than 2 days. Peramivir injection is in a class of medications called neuraminidase ...

  18. Cefotetan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Cefotetan injection is used to treat infections of the lungs, skin, bones, joints, stomach area, blood, female reproductive organs, and urinary tract. Cefotetan injection is also used before surgery to prevent infections. ...

  19. Mipomersen Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Mipomersen injection is used to decrease levels of cholesterol and other fatty substances in the blood in people who ... that removes LDL from the blood), but mipomersen injection should not be used along with this treatment. ...

  20. Romiplostim Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Romiplostim injection is used to increase the number of platelets (cells that help the blood to clot) in order ... low number of platelets in the blood). Romiplostim injection should only be used in people who cannot ...

  1. Hydrocortisone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrocortisone injection is used to treat symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced ... also used to treat severe allergic reactions. Hydrocortisone injection is used in the management of multiple sclerosis ( ...

  2. Palivizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Palivizumab injection is used to help prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; common virus that can cause serious lung infections) ... or have certain heart or lung diseases. Palivizumab injection is not used to treat the symptoms of ...

  3. Naltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Naltrexone injection is used along with counseling and social support to help people who have stopped drinking large amounts of alcohol to avoid drinking again. Naltrexone injection is also used along with counseling and social ...

  4. Tesamorelin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Tesamorelin injection is used to decrease the amount of extra fat in the stomach area in adults with human ... fat in certain areas of the body). Tesamorelin injection is not used to help with weight loss. ...

  5. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are forms of testosterone injection used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in ... are low before you begin to use testosterone injection. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are ...

  6. Tigecycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Tigecycline injection used to treat certain serious infections including community acquired pneumonia (a lung infection that developed in a ... area between the chest and the waist). Tigecycline injection should not be used to treat pneumonia that ...

  7. Eculizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Eculizumab injection is used to treat paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH: a type of anemia in which too many red ... oxygen to all parts of the body). Eculizumab injection is also used to treat atypical hemolytic uremic ...

  8. Pembrolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Pembrolizumab injection is used to treat melanoma (a type of skin cancer) that cannot be treated with surgery or ... spread to other parts of the body. Pembrolizumab injection is also used to treat a certain type ...

  9. Methylprednisolone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic reactions. Methylprednisolone injection is used in the management of multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the ... laboratory test, tell your doctor and the laboratory personnel that you are using methylprednisolone injection.If you ...

  10. Obinutuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Obinutuzumab injection is used with chlorambucil (Leukeran) to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer of the white blood cells). Obinutuzumab injection is in a class of medications called ...

  11. [On the history of injection].

    PubMed

    Norn, Svend; Kruse, Poul R; Kruse, Edith

    2006-01-01

    Although the effect of snake bites and poisoned arrows was known from ancient time, the development of the syringe and the needle lasted several centuries. Forms of intravenous injection and infusion are clearly documented in the 1650s. Sir Christopher Wren used a syringe made of animal bladder fixed to a goose quill to inject wine and opium into the veins of dogs. J.D. Major from Kiel and J.S. Elsholtz from Berlin probably were the first to deliberately administer intravenous injections to people in the 1660s. However, these early injections were not successful and injections did not come into fashion again until the latter part of the 1800s. Forerunners of subcutaneous administration were either the introduction of the drug under the epidermis by means of a vaccination-lancet or the application of a vesicant to remove the epidermis, after which the drug was applied to the denuded cutis. Lafargue, Lembert and Lesieur described these methods in the first half of the 1800s, and the methods continued to be of use in the second part of the century until the advent of subcutaneous injection. Alexander Wood of Edinburgh and Charles-Gabriel Pravaz from Lyon are known commonly as the inventors of the syringe for subcutaneous injection, but other pioneers such as Taylor, Washington and Rynd had already begun this form of administration. Increased use, safety and accuracy were accomplished by the progressive steps introduced by Wood, Pravaz and Luer. Thus, the syringe of Luer was fitted for aseptic heating, and a sharp needle readily perforated the skin. Sterilization by heating in an autoclave was developed by Pasteur, Chamberland and Koch, after managing aseptic conditions by the addition of preservatives such as carbolic acid. A safe method for the storage of sterile injectates was provided by Limousin's ampoule from 1886, and later by the introduction of multi-dose containers. The evolution of the syringe and its needle continues with the introduction of transdermal

  12. Busulfan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Busulfex® Injection ... Busulfan injection is used to treat a certain type of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML; a type of cancer of ... of 16 doses) before bone marrow transplant.Busulfan injection may cause seizures during therapy with the medication. ...

  13. Inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; He, X J; Xu, H Q; Chen, Z W; Fan, H H

    2016-05-06

    The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1 and its mechanism. For this study, athymic nude mice were injected with either normal pituitary tumor RC-4B/C cells or LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells. We then calculated the volume inhibition rate of the tumors, as well as the apoptosis index of tumor cells and the expression of Ras, Raf, AKt, and ERK mRNA in tumor cells. Tumor cell morphological and structural changes were also observed under electron microscope. Our data showed that subcutaneous tumor growth was slowed or even halted in LRIG1-transfected tumors. The tumor volumes were significantly different between the two groups of mice (χ2 = 2.14, P < 0.05). The tumor apoptosis index was found to be 8.72% in the control group and 39.7% in LRIG1-transfected mice (χ2 = 7.59, P < 0.05). The levels of Ras, Raf, and AKt mRNA in LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells were significantly reduced after transfection (P < 0.01). Transfected subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be in early or late apoptosis under an electron microscope, while only a few subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be undergoing apoptosis in the control group. In conclusion, the LRIG1 gene is able to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumors in nude mice. The mechanism of LRIG1 may involve the inhibition of the PI3K/ Akt and Ras/Raf/ERK signal transduction pathways.

  14. Effect of subcutaneous administration of calcium channel blockers on nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    White, D M; Cousins, M J

    1998-08-10

    Recent studies suggest that calcium contributes to peripheral neural mechanisms of hyperalgesia associated with nerve damage. In this animal behavioural study, we examined further the contribution of calcium in neuropathic pain by testing whether subcutaneous administration of either a calcium chelating agent or voltage-dependent calcium channel blockers attenuate nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation. Studies were carried out in animals with partially ligated sciatic nerves, an established animal model of neuropathic pain. The nociceptive flexion reflex was quantified using an Ugo Basile Analgesymeter. Partial nerve injury induced a significant decrease in mechanical threshold compared to the sham operated controls. Daily subcutaneous injections of the calcium chelating agent, Quin 2 (20 microgram/2.5 microliter), significantly attenuated the nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia. Similarly, SNX-111, a N-type channel blocker, also significantly attenuated the nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia. SNX-230, a P and/or Q-type channel blocker, and nifedipine, a L-type channel blocker, had no effect on the hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation. In control experiments, SNX-111 had no effect on mechanical thresholds when administered subcutaneously in either the hindpaw of normal animals or the back of the neck in nerve injury animals. This study shows that neuropathic pain involves a local calcium-dependent mechanism in the receptive field of intact neurons of an injured nerve, since it can be alleviated by subcutaneous injections of either a calcium chelating agent or SNX-111, a N-type calcium channel blocker. These agents may be effective, peripherally acting therapeutic agents for neuropathic pain.

  15. Debridement increases survival in a mouse model of subcutaneous anthrax.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Zachary P; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Cardani, Amber N; Barr, John R; Glomski, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming gram-positive bacterium. A major virulence factor for B. anthracis is an immunomodulatory tripartite exotoxin that has been reported to alter immune cell chemotaxis and activation. It has been proposed that B. anthracis infections initiate through entry of spores into the regional draining lymph nodes where they germinate, grow, and disseminate systemically via the efferent lymphatics. If this model holds true, it would be predicted that surgical removal of infected tissues, debridement, would have little effect on the systemic dissemination of bacteria. This model was tested through the development of a mouse debridement model. It was found that removal of the site of subcutaneous infection in the ear increased the likelihood of survival and reduced the quantity of spores in the draining cervical lymph nodes (cLN). At the time of debridement 12 hours post-injection measurable levels of exotoxins were present in the ear, cLN, and serum, yet leukocytes within the cLN were activated; countering the concept that exotoxins inhibit the early inflammatory response to promote bacterial growth. We conclude that the initial entry of spores into the draining lymph node of cutaneous infections alone is not sufficient to cause systemic disease and that debridement should be considered as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy.

  16. Massive spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema. Acute management with infraclavicular "blow holes".

    PubMed

    Herlan, D B; Landreneau, R J; Ferson, P F

    1992-08-01

    Four patients who recently developed massive spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema in our intensive care unit are reported. No obviously remediable intrathoracic process was found in any of these patients. The acute physiologic impairment and grotesque cosmetic deformity were immediately alleviated by making bilateral 3-cm infraclavicular incisions down to the pectoralis fascia. These acutely decompressed the progressive subcutaneous dissection and each patient's subcutaneous emphysema resolved without any additional invasive therapy.

  17. [ANSYS simulation of subcutaneous pustule electrical characteristics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohua; Wang, Xuan; Zhu, Honglian; Wang, Guoyong

    2011-12-01

    With the growing number of clinical surgery, post-operative surgical wound infection has become a very difficult clinical problem. In the treatments of it, non-invasive test of wound infection and healing status has a significance in clinical medicine practice. In this paper, beginning with the electrical properties of skin tissue structure and on the basis of the electromagnetism and the human anatomy, using the finite element analysis software, we applied safe voltage on the 3D skin model, performed the subcutaneous pustule simulation study and gained the relational curve between depth and radius of the pustule model. The simulation results suggested that the method we put forward could be feasible, and it could provide basis for non-invasive detection of wound healing and wound infection status.

  18. Delivering optical power to subcutaneous implanted devices.

    PubMed

    Ayazian, Sahar; Hassibi, Arjang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a new, easy-to-implement, and MRI-compatible approach for delivering power to implantable devices is presented. The idea is to harvest the energy of light within the therapeutic window wavelengths, where the optical absorption is small, by using subcutaneous photovoltaic (PV) cells. Depending on the application, this energy can then be used to directly drive the embedded electronics of an implanted device or recharge its battery. To show the feasibility of this system, a CMOS chip based on this concept has been implemented and tested. The experimental results demonstrate that μW's of power in ambient light conditions can be harvested using mm(2)-size PV cells. This amount of power is sufficient to address the needs of many low-power applications.

  19. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  20. Relative Bioavailability of a Single Dose of Belimumab Administered Subcutaneously by Prefilled Syringe or Autoinjector in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Thomas; Gilbert, Jane; Barton, Matthew E.; Fire, Joseph; Groark, James; Fox, Norma Lynn; Roth, David; Gordon, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intravenous belimumab is approved for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus; subcutaneous self‐administration would enable greater patient access. This study assessed relative bioavailability, tolerability, and safety of 1 subcutaneous dose of self‐administered belimumab by healthy subjects using a single‐use autoinjector or prefilled syringe. Subjects (randomized 1:1:1:1) self‐administered belimumab 200 mg subcutaneously (abdomen or thigh) by prefilled syringe or autoinjector. Pharmacokinetics, adverse events (AEs), injection‐site pain, and administration errors were recorded. Of 81 subjects, 5 experienced administration errors and were excluded from pharmacokinetic analyses. Mean serum belimumab concentration profiles were similar for both devices, with a weak trend toward higher concentrations for thigh injection compared with abdominal injections. Maximum observed serum concentration was slightly higher with the autoinjector (27.0 vs 25.3 µg/mL) and area under the concentration–time curve slightly lower (701 vs 735 day · μg/mL), compared with the prefilled syringe. Incidence of AEs was 51% (41 of 81 subjects; headache was most common), with no serious or severe AEs. Median injection‐site pain scores were low (0 after 1 hour). Device handling was reported as acceptable by ≥95% of autoinjector users and ≥90% of prefilled syringe users for each characteristic assessed. These results support the use of either device for belimumab subcutaneous administration. PMID:27163500

  1. Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sugeeth, Mangalapilly T.; Jayasudha, Arundhathi V.; Nair, Rekha A.

    2017-01-01

    Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is a rare form of skin lymphoma that is localized primarily to the subcutaneous adipose tissue without involvement of the lymph nodes. Clinically, the skin lesions mimic lipomas, while histologically they resemble panniculitis. We report a case of a young woman with SPTCL. She achieved complete remission after combination chemotherapy. PMID:28127142

  2. Musculoskeletal Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wittich, Christopher M.; Ficalora, Robert D.; Mason, Thomas G.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Patients commonly present to primary care physicians with musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinicians certified in internal medicine must be knowledgeable about the diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal diseases, yet they often receive inadequate postgraduate training on this topic. The musculoskeletal problems most frequently encountered in our busy injection practice involve, in decreasing order, the knees, trochanteric bursae, and glenohumeral joints. This article reviews the clinical presentations of these problems. It also discusses musculoskeletal injections for these problems in terms of medications, indications, injection technique, and supporting evidence from the literature. Experience with joint injection and the pharmacological principles described in this article should allow primary care physicians to become comfortable and proficient with musculoskeletal injections. PMID:19720781

  3. Sublingual or subcutaneous immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis?

    PubMed

    Durham, Stephen R; Penagos, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is effective in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and, unlike antiallergic drugs, has been shown to modify the underlying cause of the disease, with proved long-term benefits. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been the gold standard, whereas sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has emerged as an effective and safe alternative. Previous Cochrane systematic reviews and meta-analyses have confirmed that both SLIT and SCIT are effective in patients with seasonal AR, whereas evidence for their efficacy in patients with perennial disease has been less convincing. Recent large, adequately powered trials have demonstrated reductions in both symptoms and use of rescue medication in patients with seasonal and those with perennial AR. Here we appraise evidence for SCIT versus SLIT based on indirect evidence from Cochrane reviews and recent well-powered double-blind, randomized controlled trials versus placebo and the limited direct evidence available from randomized blind head-to-head comparisons. At present, based on an overall balance of efficacy and side effects, the patient is in equipoise. Pending definitive comparative trials, choice might be determined largely by the local availability of SCIT and SLIT products of proved value and personal (patient) preference.

  4. Subcutaneous fat necrosis, hypercalcemia, and prostaglandin E.

    PubMed

    Sharata, H; Postellon, D C; Hashimoto, K

    1995-03-01

    We present two patients with subcutaneous fat necroses (SCFN) in whom endocrinologic studies revealed an association with elevated prostaglandin E (PGE) levels. A boy born after prolonged labor complicated by meconium aspiration developed erythematous, indurated plaques over the back, arms, buttocks, and cheeks at 4 days of age. A biopsy specimen of involved skin showed panniculitis with foci of necrotic adipocytes containing radially arranged, needle-shaped clefts and a granulomatous infiltrate in the septae. Laboratory studies revealed hypercalcemia of 13.6 mg/dl (normal 8.8-10.1 mg/dl), elevated 1.25-1.25(OH)2D3, and increased urinary excretion of PGE2. The child was hospitalized and treated with systemic steroids and diuretics, with resolution of SCFN and hypercalcemia. The second patient was a girl born with cyanotic heart disease. A diagnosis of Ebstein anomaly was made, and intravenous PGE1 was started to keep patent the ductus arteriosus. Four days later erythematous, indurated plaques were noted on the knee, back, and anterior chest. A skin biopsy specimen revealed SCFN. There was no associated laboratory abnormality. On discontinuing PGE1, no new lesions formed and the existing panniculitis resolved. These two cases demonstrate the association between SCFN and elevated PGE levels (endogenous in patient 1, exogenous in patient 2). No previous reports of SCFN after the administration of PGE1 have appeared in the literature.

  5. Effect of plantar subcutaneous administration of bergamot essential oil and linalool on formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Soh; Otowa, Akira; Kamio, Satomi; Sato, Kazuma; Yagi, Tomomi; Kishikawa, Yukinaga; Komatsu, Takaaki; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of bergamot essential oil (BEO) or linalool, a major volatile component of BEO, on the nociceptive response to formalin. Plantar subcutaneous injection of BEO or linalool into the ipsilateral hindpaw reduced both the first and late phases of the formalin-induced licking and biting responses in mice. Plantar subcutaneous injection of BEO or linalool into the contralateral hindpaw did not yield an antinociceptive effect, suggesting that the antinociceptive effect of BEO or linalool in the formalin test occurred peripherally. Intraperitoneal and plantar subcutaneous injection pretreatment with naloxone hydrochloride, an opioid receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated both BEO- and linalool-induced antinociception. Pretreatment with naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonists, also significantly antagonized the antinociceptive effects of BEO and linalool. Our results provide evidence for the involvement of peripheral opioids in antinociception induced by BEO and linalool. These results suggest that activation of peripheral opioid receptors may play an important role in reducing formalin-induced nociception.

  6. Certolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has not improved when treated with other medications, rheumatoid arthritis (a condition in which the body attacks its ... continues. When certolizumab injection is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, it is usually given every other week and ...

  7. Natalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevent episodes of symptoms in people who have Crohn's disease (a condition in which the body attacks the ... If you are receiving natalizumab injection to treat Crohn's disease, your symptoms should improve during the first few ...

  8. Vedolizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for several hours afterward. A doctor or ... of the following symptoms during or after your infusion: rash; itching; swelling of the face, eyes, mouth, ...

  9. Panitumumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a solution (liquid) to be given by infusion (injected into a vein). It is usually given ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. Panitumumab is usually given once every 2 ...

  10. Methotrexate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman's uterus while she is pregnant), breast cancer, lung cancer, certain cancers of the head and neck; certain ... Methotrexate injection is also used along with rest, physical therapy and ... treat rheumatoid arthritis by decreasing the activity of the immune system.

  11. Alirocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with diet and certain cholesterol-lowering medications (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors [statins]) in ... familial heterozygous hypercholesterolemia (an inherited condition in which cholesterol cannot be removed from the body normally) or ...

  12. Evolocumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used along with diet and certain cholesterol-lowering medications, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), in ... heterozygous hypercholesterolemia (HeFH; an inherited condition in which cholesterol cannot be removed from the body normally) or ...

  13. Pentamidine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Pentamidine injection is used to treat pneumonia caused by a fungus called Pneumocystis carinii. It is in a class of medications called antiprotozoals. It works by stopping the growth of protozoa that can cause pneumonia.

  14. Oxytocin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Oxytocin injection is used to begin or improve contractions during labor. Oxytocin also is used to reduce bleeding after childbirth. ... other medications or procedures to end a pregnancy. Oxytocin is in a class of medications called oxytocic ...

  15. Ibritumomab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes. It works by attaching to cancer ... you receive ibritumomab injection, your body may develop antibodies (substances in the blood that help the immune ...

  16. Ganciclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems, eye problems other than CMV retinitis, or kidney disease.tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Ganciclovir injection may cause infertility (difficulty becoming pregnant). However, if you are a ...

  17. Bendamustine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of cancer of the white blood cells). Bendamustine injection is also used to treat a ... that begins in a type of white blood cell that normally fights infection) that is slow spreading, ...

  18. Vancomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called glycopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as vancomycin injection ... infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

  19. Levofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as levofloxacin injection ... infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

  20. Doxycycline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications called tetracycline antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as doxycycline injection ... infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

  1. Sumatriptan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to sound and light). Sumatriptan injection is also used to treat the ... children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, excess heat, and moisture (not in the bathroom). ...

  2. Alemtuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection, the medication is usually given three times weekly on alternate days (usually Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) ... that you eat foods that are rich in iron such as meats, leafy green vegetables, and fortified ...

  3. Epinephrine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Epinephrine injection is used along with emergency medical treatment to treat life-threatening allergic reactions caused by ... or stings, foods, medications, latex, and other causes. Epinephrine is in a class of medications called alpha- ...

  4. Mitoxantrone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications to relieve pain in people with advanced prostate cancer who did not respond to other medications. Mitoxantrone ... doses). When mitoxantrone injection is used to treat prostate cancer, it is usually given once every 21 days. ...

  5. Trastuzumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications to treat certain types of stomach cancer that have spread to other parts of the ... weeks. When trastuzumab injection is used to treat stomach cancer, it is usually given once every 3 weeks. ...

  6. Topotecan Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs where eggs are formed) and small cell lung cancer (a type of cancer that begins in the ... topotecan injection is used to treat ovarian or lung cancer, it is usually given once a day for ...

  7. Palonosetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may occur several days after receiving certain chemotherapy medications. Palonosetron injection is in a class of medications called 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. It works by blocking the action of serotonin, a natural ...

  8. Meropenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin and abdominal (stomach area) infections caused by bacteria and meningitis (infection of the membranes that surround ... of medications called antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria that cause infection.Antibiotics such as meropenem injection ...

  9. Amikacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as amikacin injection will not work ...

  10. Ertapenem Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. It is also used for the prevention of ... medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ertapenem injection will not work ...

  11. Moxifloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia; ; and , skin, and abdominal (stomach ... antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as moxifloxacin injection ...

  12. Cefepime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia, and skin, urinary tract, and kidney ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefepime injection will not work ...

  13. Cefazolin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including skin, bone, joint, genital, blood, heart valve, ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as cefazolin injection will not work ...

  14. Daptomycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood infections or serious skin infections caused by bacteria. Daptomycin injection is in a class of medications called cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria. Antibiotics will not work for treating colds, flu, ...

  15. Aztreonam Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria, including respiratory tract (including pneumonia and bronchitis), urinary ... abdominal (stomach area) infections, that are caused by bacteria. Aztreonam injection also may be used before, during, ...

  16. Ceftazidime Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory tract (lung) ... medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftazidime injection will not work ...

  17. Tobramycin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as tobramycin injection will not work ...

  18. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria such as pneumonia; and infections of the skin, ... of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.Antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin injection ...

  19. Gentamicin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat certain serious infections that are caused by bacteria such as meningitis (infection of the membranes that ... medications called aminoglycoside antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as gentamicin injection will not work ...

  20. Ceftaroline Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and pneumonia (lung infection) caused by certain bacteria. Ceftaroline is in a class of medications called cephalosporin antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ceftaroline injection will not work ...

  1. Daclizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... course of disease where symptoms flare up from time to time) of multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which ... injections. Before you use daclizumab yourself the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. ...

  2. Risperidone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... release (long-acting) injection is used to treat schizophrenia (a mental illness that causes disturbed or unusual ... do not already have diabetes. If you have schizophrenia, you are more likely to develop diabetes than ...

  3. Acyclovir Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... chickenpox in the past) in people with weak immune systems. It is also used to treat first-time ... from time to time) in people with normal immune systems. Acyclovir injection is used to treat herpes simplex ...

  4. Omalizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... steroids. Omalizumab is also used to treat chronic hives without a known cause that cannot successfully be ... is not used to treat other forms of hives or allergic conditions. Omalizumab injection is in a ...

  5. Pegloticase Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency (an inherited blood disease). Your doctor may test you for G6PD deficiency before you start to receive pegloticase injection. If ...

  6. Lacosamide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with other medications to control certain types of seizures in people who cannot take oral medications. Lacosamide ... If you suddenly stop using lacosamide injection, your seizures may happen more often. Your doctor will probably ...

  7. Oxacillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to oxacillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  8. Nafcillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to nafcillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin, cefdinir, ...

  9. Ampicillin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as ... and pharmacist if you are allergic to ampicillin; penicillins; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin (Ancef, ...

  10. Naloxone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emergency medical treatment to reverse the life-threatening effects of a known or suspected opiate (narcotic) overdose. ... is also used after surgery to reverse the effects of opiates given during surgery. Naloxone injection is ...

  11. Omacetaxine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cannot take these medications due to side effects. Omacetaxine injection is in a class of medications ... a treatment cycle if you experience serious side effects of the medication or if blood tests show ...

  12. Methylnaltrexone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat constipation caused by opioid (narcotic) pain medications in patients with chronic (on-going) pain that is not caused by ... by protecting the bowel from the effects of opioid (narcotic) medications.

  13. Denosumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... menstrual periods), who have an increased risk for fractures (broken bones) or who cannot take or did ... receiving certain treatments that increase their risk for fractures. Denosumab injection (Xgeva) is used to reduce fractures ...

  14. Rasburicase Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... break down) in people with certain types of cancer who are being treated with chemotherapy medications. Rasburicase injection is in a class of medications called enzymes. It works by breaking down uric acid so that the body can eliminate it.

  15. Gemcitabine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... with surgery. Gemcitabine is also used to treat cancer of the pancreas that has spread to other parts of the ... 4 weeks. When gemcitabine is used to treat cancer of pancreas it may be injected once every week. The ...

  16. Doxercalciferol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Doxercalciferol injection is used to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism (a condition in which the body produces too much parathyroid hormone [PTH; a natural substance needed to control the amount of calcium in ...

  17. Granisetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may occur after surgery. Granisetron extended-release (long-acting) injection is used with other medications to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy that may occur immediately ...

  18. Fluconazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to treat fungal infections, including yeast infections of the mouth, throat, esophagus (tube leading ... by fungus. Fluconazole is also used to prevent yeast infections in patients who are likely to become ...

  19. Docetaxel Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic to docetaxel injection or drugs made with polysorbate 80, an ingredient found in some medications. Ask ... if a medication you are allergic to contains polysorbate 80. If you experience any of the following ...

  20. Haloperidol Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... emotions). Haloperidol injection is also used to control motor tics (uncontrollable need to repeat certain body movements) ... people who have Tourette's disorder (condition characterized by motor or verbal tics). Haloperidol is in a class ...

  1. Subcutaneous sumatriptan delivery devices: comparative ease of use and preference among migraineurs

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Anthony D; Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Ramirez, Margarita; Munjal, Sagar; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Background Several sumatriptan subcutaneous autoinjector devices for acute treatment of migraine patients are available, each device differs with respect to design and features. Determining device preference and ease of use is important because patients experiencing a migraine attack are often functionally impaired. Objective The objective of this human factors study was to compare migraine patients’ device use performance and preferences for three sumatriptan subcutaneous autoinjectors: a disposable two-step device (Zembrace® SymTouch®), a disposable three-step device (Sumavel® DosePro®), and a multistep reloadable device (Imitrex® STATdose®), using simulated injections. Methods Each study subject performed two unaided simulated injections with each of three different drug delivery devices, which were presented in counterbalanced order. The participants were then asked to rate the three devices on various subjective measures. The primary end point was overall device preference using a visual analog scale. Results A total of 54 subjects participated and each subject performed two simulated injections with each of the three devices. Most subjects preferred the two-step device (88.9%) to the three-step (13.0%) and the reloadable (1.9%). The two-step device had higher mean overall preference ratings (F (2, 159)=56.6, P<0.01) and higher ratings for ease of use, intuitiveness, convenience, portability, and control. The two-step device had a first injection full-dose delivery success rate of 44.4%, higher than both the reloadable (24.1%) and the three-step (3.7%) devices. The number of errors with the two-step device (n=3) was ~90% lower than the three-step (n=49) and reloadable (n=44) devices. Conclusion In this human factors study, 54 migraineurs used simulated injections to compare three sumatriptan subcutaneous delivery devices. Zembrace SymTouch, a two-step device, was most preferred compared with Sumavel DosePro and Imitrex STATdose. It also ranked highest

  2. [Is Herceptin(®) (trastuzumab) by subcutaneous a mini revolution? Pharmaco-economic study].

    PubMed

    Lieutenant, Vincent; Toulza, Émilie; Pommier, Martine; Lortal-Canguilhem, Barbara

    2015-03-01

    Herceptin(®) injected by intravenous (IV) is one of the key treatment of breast cancer HER2+. The improvement of galenic form allowed a new way of administration, the sub-cutaneous way (SC), authorized by EMEA in 2013. This new way enables a 5-minute infusion, a fixed dose and a fixed volume of preparation. On 2012, saving-time and financial impacts were calculated by extrapolation of the IV way in a cancer treatment center. The study showed a preparing time-saving of 7.5min/loading dose and of 6.5min/maintenance dose, and a nurse time-saving of 4.5min/loading dose and 4.25min/maintenance dose. Moreover, it can be added a saving of consumable of 13,31€ per injection in case of monotherapy. The SC leads to a new adaptation and reorganization in the preparation of monoclonal antibodies and day hospitals.

  3. Clinical experience with patient administered subcutaneous dihydroergotamine mesylate in refractory headaches.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J A; Stanton, J

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the practicality and efficacy of dihydroergotamine mesylate (DHE) when self-administered subcutaneously in a population of refractory headache patients. Forty-three patients with chronic daily headache or migraine headache without aura, who had been taught self-injection of DHE either through the Raskin Protocol or in an outpatient headache clinic, were contacted by telephone and administered a questionnaire regarding usage and results from DHE injection. Ninety-two percent of patients could successfully administer DHE. Forty-six percent of patients experienced 90% or greater relief of pain and the majority of patients (77%) had greater than 50% relief. Emergency room use was decreased in 83% and 80% preferred DHE to their previous therapy. While side effects were common (79%), only four patients (9%) stopped DHE for this reason. No convincing evidence for the development of rebound headaches due to DHE was found in this sample.

  4. Subcutaneous administration of paclitaxel in dogs with cancer: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniella M.; Franciosi, Aline I.; Pezzini, Paula C.F.; Guérios, Simone D.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous paclitaxel has been underused in dogs due to severe and acute hypersensitivity reactions. Subcutaneous (SC) administration of paclitaxel and its safety are unknown. In this preliminary study, SC administration of paclitaxel was evaluated for hypersensitivity reactions and toxicity in 21 dogs with advanced cancer. Dogs received 1 to 5 paclitaxel doses, ranging from 85 to 170 mg/m2, SC every 14 or 21 days. A total of 40 paclitaxel doses were administered and none of the 21 dogs developed systemic or acute local hypersensitivity reactions. Severe skin lesions at the injection site developed in 2 dogs after the 4th injection at the same location. Grade 4 neutropenia was observed in 50% of the dogs 5 days after the first treatment at 115 mg/m2 (n = 14). Two animals developed Grade 5 diarrhea and died likely due to hemodynamic failure or sepsis. Paclitaxel can be administered SC in dogs with no hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:26246628

  5. Subcutaneous administration of paclitaxel in dogs with cancer: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniella M; Franciosi, Aline I; Pezzini, Paula C F; Guérios, Simone D

    2015-08-01

    Intravenous paclitaxel has been underused in dogs due to severe and acute hypersensitivity reactions. Subcutaneous (SC) administration of paclitaxel and its safety are unknown. In this preliminary study, SC administration of paclitaxel was evaluated for hypersensitivity reactions and toxicity in 21 dogs with advanced cancer. Dogs received 1 to 5 paclitaxel doses, ranging from 85 to 170 mg/m(2), SC every 14 or 21 days. A total of 40 paclitaxel doses were administered and none of the 21 dogs developed systemic or acute local hypersensitivity reactions. Severe skin lesions at the injection site developed in 2 dogs after the 4th injection at the same location. Grade 4 neutropenia was observed in 50% of the dogs 5 days after the first treatment at 115 mg/m(2) (n = 14). Two animals developed Grade 5 diarrhea and died likely due to hemodynamic failure or sepsis. Paclitaxel can be administered SC in dogs with no hypersensitivity reaction.

  6. Injection overview

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, S.

    1983-12-01

    The test program was initiated at the Raft River Geothermal Field in southern Idaho in September 1982. A series of eight short-term injection and backflow tests, followed by a long-term injection test, were conducted on one well in the field. Tracers were added during injection and monitored during backflow as well. The principal objective was to determine if tracers could be effectively used as a means to assess reservoir characteristics in a one-well test. The test program resulted in a unique data set which shows promise as a means to improve understanding of the reservoir characteristics. In December 1982, an RFP was issued to obtain an industrial partner to obtain follow-on data on the injection/backflow technique in a second field, and to study any alternate advanced concepts for injection testing which the industrial community might recommend. The East Mesa Geothermal Field was selected for the second test series. Two wells were utilized for testing, and a series of ten tests were conducted in July and August 1983, aimed principally at further evaluation of the injection/backflow technique.

  7. Bioavailability and feasibility of subcutaneous 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Borner, M M; Kneer, J; Crevoisier, C; Brunner, K W; Cerny, T

    1993-09-01

    Continuous intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been shown to be superior to bolus regimens in terms of response rates and toxicity. However, a continuous infusion is more expensive and prone to complications such as thromboembolism and infections. A way to circumvent these problems would be to administer 5-FU subcutaneously (s.c.). To assess feasibility and bioavailability of s.c. 5-FU, eight patients with advanced cancer received 250 mg 5-FU as an infusion over 90 min either intravenously (i.v.) or s.c. into the abdominal wall. The mean +/- s.d. bioavailability of s.c. 5-FU was 0.89 +/- 0.23. The interpatient variability for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 48% for the s.c. and 36% for the i.v. infusion. No local side effects were observed. To test the local tolerance of a more prolonged administration three patients received 930-1,000 mg m-2 5-FU by 24-h continuous s.c. infusion. The steady-state plasma levels were comparable to i.v. infusion. One patient developed a painless skin pigmentation at the s.c. infusion site. However, the same reaction was observed at the forearm after i.v. infusion. We conclude that at the dose studied s.c. 5-FU has an almost complete bioavailability and is well tolerated. Further work will show, whether prolonged s.c. infusion can be used as a safe and economical alternative to i.v. infusion.

  8. Bioavailability and feasibility of subcutaneous 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed Central

    Borner, M. M.; Kneer, J.; Crevoisier, C.; Brunner, K. W.; Cerny, T.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been shown to be superior to bolus regimens in terms of response rates and toxicity. However, a continuous infusion is more expensive and prone to complications such as thromboembolism and infections. A way to circumvent these problems would be to administer 5-FU subcutaneously (s.c.). To assess feasibility and bioavailability of s.c. 5-FU, eight patients with advanced cancer received 250 mg 5-FU as an infusion over 90 min either intravenously (i.v.) or s.c. into the abdominal wall. The mean +/- s.d. bioavailability of s.c. 5-FU was 0.89 +/- 0.23. The interpatient variability for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 48% for the s.c. and 36% for the i.v. infusion. No local side effects were observed. To test the local tolerance of a more prolonged administration three patients received 930-1,000 mg m-2 5-FU by 24-h continuous s.c. infusion. The steady-state plasma levels were comparable to i.v. infusion. One patient developed a painless skin pigmentation at the s.c. infusion site. However, the same reaction was observed at the forearm after i.v. infusion. We conclude that at the dose studied s.c. 5-FU has an almost complete bioavailability and is well tolerated. Further work will show, whether prolonged s.c. infusion can be used as a safe and economical alternative to i.v. infusion. PMID:8353044

  9. Hyaluronidase facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jolles, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)-replacement therapy represents the mainstay of treatment for patients with primary antibody deficiency and is administered either intravenously (IVIg) or subcutaneously (SCIg). While hyaluronidase has been used in clinical practice for over 50 years, the development of a high-purity recombinant form of this enzyme (recombinant human hyaluronidase PH20) has recently enabled the study of repeated and more prolonged use of hyaluronidase in facilitating the delivery of SC medicines. It has been used in a wide range of clinical settings to give antibiotics, local anesthetics, insulin, morphine, fluid replacement, and larger molecules, such as antibodies. Hyaluronidase has been used to help overcome the limitations on the maximum volume that can be delivered into the SC space by enabling dispersion of SCIg and its absorption into lymphatics. The rate of facilitated SCIg (fSCIg) infusion is equivalent to that of IVIg, and the volume administered at a single site can be greater than 700 mL, a huge increase over conventional SCIg, at 20–40 mL. The use of fSCIg avoids the higher incidence of systemic side effects of IVIg, and it has higher bioavailability than SCIg. Data on the long-term safety of this approach are currently lacking, as fSCIg has only recently become available. fSCIg may help several areas of patient management in primary antibody deficiency, and the extent to which it may be used in future will depend on long-term safety data and cost–benefit analysis. PMID:27471693

  10. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis in an immunocompetent Individual: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chintagunta, Sudharani; Arakkal, Geetakiran; Damarla, Sudha V.; Vodapalli, Akshay K.

    2017-01-01

    Phaeohyphomycosis is a rare mycotic infection caused by various heterogenous groups of phaeoid (dematiaceous) fungi involving the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Common clinical manifestations are subcutaneous abscesses or cystic swellings. Here, we report a case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis presenting as multiple asymptomatic cystic swellings over the hands and feet without any predisposing factors. Histopathology showed granulomatous inflammation and special stain with Grocott's methanamine silver stain revealed broad pigmented hyphae. Culture showed black-colored colonies identified as Exophiala jeanselmi. The patient was treated with surgical excision of the lesions. PMID:28217468

  11. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient. PMID:27630637

  12. Subcutaneous IgG in the Myositis Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Maria Giovanna; Gelardi, Chiara; Pedini, Veronica; Logullo, Francesco; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-03-14

    The efficacy of subcutaneous immunoglobulin is reported in several neurological disorders and, more recently, its use has been extended to other inflammatory diseases, such as the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, including polymyositis and dermatomyositis. Due to the rarity of these disorders, the role of immunoglobulin, administered intravenously or subcutaneously, remains unclear and poorly investigated. We report our experience about the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in myositis spectrum disorders, from idiopathic inflammatory myopathies to more complex conditions, such as overlap and cancer-associated myositis or pregnancy.

  13. Application of subcutaneous talc in hernia repair and wide subcutaneous dissection dramatically reduces seroma formation and postoperative wound complications.

    PubMed

    Klima, David A; Brintzenhoff, Rita A; Tsirline, Victor B; Belyansky, Igor; Lincourt, Amy E; Getz, Stanley; Heniford, B Todd

    2011-07-01

    Wound complications after large ventral hernia repairs when combined with wide subcutaneous dissection (OVHR/WSD) are common (33 to 66%). We evaluate a novel technique of applying talc to wound subcutaneous tissues to decrease wound complications. We accessed our prospectively collected surgical outcomes database for OVHR/WSD procedures performed. Patients were divided into those that did and did not receive subcutaneous talc (TALC vs NOTALC). Demographics intraoperative and outcomes data were collected and analyzed. The study included 180 patients (n = 74 TALC, n = 106 NOTALC). Demographics were all similar, but hernias were larger in the TALC group. TALC patients had their drains removed earlier (14.6 vs 25.6 days; P < 0.001) with dramatic reduction in postoperative seromas requiring intervention (20.8 to 2.7%; P < 0.001) and cellulitis (39.0 to 20.6%; P = 0.007). Short-term follow-up demonstrates significantly higher recurrence rates in the NOTALC group with each recurrence related to infection. The use of talc in the subcutaneous space of OVHR/WSD results in significantly earlier removal of subcutaneous drains, fewer wound complications, and a decrease in early hernia recurrence. Use of talc in the subcutaneous space at the time of wound closure is an excellent technique to decrease wound complications in large subcutaneous dissections.

  14. Subcutaneous emphysema secondary to dental extraction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tan, S; Nikolarakos, D

    2017-03-01

    Although less frequently encountered in dental practices, subcutaneous emphysema of the face and neck has been reported in patients following dental extractions, particularly when lower molar teeth are extracted with the use of a high-speed air-turbine drill designed for restorative treatment, which forces air into the cervical fascial spaces. As facial swelling and pain are the most common presentations, subcutaneous emphysema can often be misdiagnosed as an allergic reaction or odontogenic infection. While usually a benign and self-limiting condition, subcutaneous emphysema may have life-threatening complications such as tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, air embolism, tracheal compression and mediastinitis, which are important to recognize in an emergency setting. Dentists should be aware of the serious risks of inducing subcutaneous emphysema and avoid performing tooth extractions with high-speed air-turbine drills which are specifically designed for use for restorative treatments only.

  15. Intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulin G replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Francisco A

    2016-11-01

    Human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) for therapeutic use has been available for decades. This drug was developed for treatment of antibody deficiency (replacement therapy), although its use has expanded into many anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory applications in recent years. This review focuses on IgG prescribing for replacement therapy. IgG for replacement is most often administered via the intravenous IgG (IVIG) or subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) routes. IVIG is usually administered every 34 weeks, and SCIG is usually administered weekly, although variations may be considered in all cases. Recently, a new product became available that uses hyaluronidase to facilitate absorption of large doses of SCIG less frequently (every 34 weeks, as with IVIG). There are important differences between the pharmacokinetics of these three routes of administration. IVIG therapy leads to high peaks and low troughs between infusions. IgG concentration fluctuates much less over time with SCIG. Hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIG is intermediate. SCIG may have lower bioavailability in comparison with IVIG and may require higher doses over time; this is not true for hyaluronidase SCIG. However, there are large variations in IgG half-life among individuals and with different products. Therefore, individualization of therapy is essential. Mild systemic flu-like adverse effects may affect up to 2025% of patients who receive IVIG, smaller fractions may experience more-severe symptoms, whereas anaphylaxis is exceedingly rare. General flu-like systemic adverse effects are minimal with SCIG (intermediate with hyaluronidase SCIG), but transient (24 hours), mild, local inflammatory symptoms at infusion sites are relatively common with both forms. Additional rare but important complications of IgG therapy include thrombotic events and hemolysis that can be seen at high doses with any route of administration. Renal adverse effects may occur with IVIG as well. The variety of IgG products and routes of

  16. Pyrenochaeta romeroi causing subcutaneous phaeohyphomycotic cyst in a diabetic female

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sarita; Agarwal, Ruchi; Singh, Sundeep; Goel, Shikha

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing in present times due to increasing incidence of many medical conditions causing immunosupression like diabetes, AIDS, organ transplant recipients and anticancer therapy. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the dematiaceae group, first described by Borelli in 1959, is saprophyte to soil and plants.We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycotic cyst in a diabetic female caused by P. romeroi. PMID:25941632

  17. Liquid injectable silicone for soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Prather, Chad L; Jones, Derek H

    2006-01-01

    Liquid injectable silicone is a unique soft tissue augmenting agent that may be effectively utilized for the correction of specific cutaneous and subcutaneous atrophies. Although historical complications have occurred, resulting likely from the presence of adulterants and impurities, modern purified silicone products approved by the Food and Drug Administration for injection into the human body may be employed with minimal complications when strict protocol is followed. In this article the present authors review the history and controversy regarding silicone as well as describe the appropriate indications, patient selection, instrumentation, treatment protocol, and anticipated complications involved with the use of liquid injectable silicone for soft tissue augmentation. Although its use is controversial, the present authors maintain that liquid injectable silicone is an important and effective augmenting agent for the long-term correction of scars and facial contour defects such as HIV facial lipoatrophy. Furthermore, it is a treatment modality deserving of continued investigation.

  18. Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics of etanercept, rheumatoid arthritis biologics, after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Yo; Kwon, Kwang-Il; Kim, Min-Soo; Baek, In-Hwan

    2016-08-01

    Etanercept was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2010 as a biologic agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic properties of etanercept after intravenous and subcutaneous injection in rats. The plasma concentration of etanercept was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Intravenous and subcutaneous administration of 2 mg/kg of etanercept to rats showed that etanercept was slowly absorbed (time to reach the peak drug concentration [T max] = 1.60 days, bioavailability [F] = 47.18 %) and slowly eliminated (half-life [t 1/2], 2.33 days after intravenous administration and 3.31 days after subcutaneous administration). The area under the curve values on day 13 (AUC13day) were 121.25 ± 14.37 and 48.56 ± 6.78 μg day/mL after intravenous and subcutaneous administration, respectively. A two-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics (V max = 94.28 µg/day; K m = 10.88 µg/mL) was used to describe the pharmacokinetic profile of etanercept. Our results describe the pharmacokinetic profile of etanercept, and these results could be used for the development of etanercept biosimilars.

  19. Identification of Mouse Mesenteric and Subcutaneous in vitro Adipogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yugo; Otsuki, Michio; Kita, Shunbun; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-02-17

    Fat accumulation and the dysfunction of visceral white adipose tissue (WAT), but not subcutaneous WAT, cause abnormalities in whole body metabolic homeostasis. However, no current drugs specifically target visceral WAT. The primary reason for this is that a practical in vitro culture system for mesenteric adipocytes has not been established. To resolve this issue, we sought to identify in vitro adipogenic cells in mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs. First, we examined the expression pattern of surface antigens in stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) cells from mouse mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs, and found the expression of 30 stem cell-related surface antigens. Then, to evaluate the adipogenic ability of each fraction, we performed in vitro screening, and identified five candidate markers for mesenteric adipogenic cells and one candidate marker for subcutaneous adipogenic cells. To investigate whether in vitro adipogenic ability accurately reflects the conditions in vivo, we performed transplantation experiments, and identified CD9(-) CD201(+) Sca-1(-) cells and CD90(+) cells as mesenteric and subcutaneous in vitro adipogenic cells, respectively. Furthermore, mature adipocytes derived from mesenteric and subcutaneous adipogenic cells maintained each characteristic phenotype in vitro. Thus, our study should contribute to the development of a useful culture system for visceral adipocytes.

  20. Identification of Mouse Mesenteric and Subcutaneous in vitro Adipogenic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Yugo; Otsuki, Michio; Kita, Shunbun; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-01-01

    Fat accumulation and the dysfunction of visceral white adipose tissue (WAT), but not subcutaneous WAT, cause abnormalities in whole body metabolic homeostasis. However, no current drugs specifically target visceral WAT. The primary reason for this is that a practical in vitro culture system for mesenteric adipocytes has not been established. To resolve this issue, we sought to identify in vitro adipogenic cells in mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs. First, we examined the expression pattern of surface antigens in stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) cells from mouse mesenteric and subcutaneous WATs, and found the expression of 30 stem cell-related surface antigens. Then, to evaluate the adipogenic ability of each fraction, we performed in vitro screening, and identified five candidate markers for mesenteric adipogenic cells and one candidate marker for subcutaneous adipogenic cells. To investigate whether in vitro adipogenic ability accurately reflects the conditions in vivo, we performed transplantation experiments, and identified CD9− CD201+ Sca-1− cells and CD90+ cells as mesenteric and subcutaneous in vitro adipogenic cells, respectively. Furthermore, mature adipocytes derived from mesenteric and subcutaneous adipogenic cells maintained each characteristic phenotype in vitro. Thus, our study should contribute to the development of a useful culture system for visceral adipocytes. PMID:26884347

  1. Immune globulin subcutaneous (human) 20%: in primary immunodeficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L

    2012-05-28

    Immune globulin subcutaneous 20% is a new high-concentration (200 g/L) solution of highly purified human IgG (≥98%) indicated in the EU and the US for antibody replacement therapy in patients with primary immunodeficiency with antibody deficiency, and in the EU for replacement therapy in humoral immunodeficiency secondary to myeloma or chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Immune globulin subcutaneous 20% is formulated with L-proline, which imparts long-term stability at room temperature and a relatively low viscosity. In two pivotal phase III trials in stably treated patients with primary immunodeficiency, immune globulin subcutaneous 20% at weekly subcutaneous dosages either equivalent to each patient's previous intravenous or subcutaneous replacement therapy, or providing equivalent systemic exposure to previous intravenous therapy, produced mean serum IgG trough levels equal to or greater than pre-study levels. In each trial, there were no serious bacterial infections during treatment throughout the 28-week or 12-month efficacy periods. The rates of infectious episodes, days missed from work/school, days hospitalized or days with antibiotics were low. Immune globulin subcutaneous 20% was generally well tolerated. A high proportion of patients experienced local infusion-site reactions, but infusion-related systemic adverse events were relatively infrequent. Most adverse events were of mild or moderate intensity and did not interfere with therapy.

  2. Inflammatory responses following intramuscular and subcutaneous immunization with aluminum-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted vaccines.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Maeda, Mika; Kawashima, Hisashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2014-06-05

    Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines are administered through an intramuscular injection (IM) in the US and EU, however, a subcutaneous injection (SC) has been recommended in Japan because of serious muscle contracture previously reported following multiple IMs of antibiotics. Newly introduced adjuvanted vaccines, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, have been recommended through IM. In the present study, currently available vaccines were evaluated through IM in mice. Aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines induced inflammatory nodules at the injection site, which expanded into the intra-muscular space without any muscle degeneration or necrosis, whereas non-adjuvanted vaccines did not. These nodules consisted of polymorph nuclear neutrophils with some eosinophils within the initial 48h, then monocytes/macrophages 1 month later. Inflammatory nodules were observed 6 months after IM, had decreased in size, and were absorbed 12 months after IM, which was earlier than that after SC. Cytokine production was examined in the injected muscular tissues and AS04 adjuvanted HPV induced higher IL-1β, IL-6, KC, MIP-1, and G-CSF levels in muscle tissues than any other vaccine, but similar serum cytokine profiles were observed to those induced by the other vaccines. Currently available vaccines did not induce muscular degeneration or fibrotic scar as observed with muscle contracture caused by multiple IMs of antibiotics in the past.

  3. Biodistribution and metabolism of immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide CPG 7909 in mouse and rat tissues following subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Noll, Bernhard O; McCluskie, Michael J; Sniatala, Tanja; Lohner, Angela; Yuill, Stephanie; Krieg, Arthur M; Schetter, Christian; Davis, Heather L; Uhlmann, Eugen

    2005-03-15

    To evaluate pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution, CPG 7909, a 24-mer immunostimulatory fully phosphorothioated oligodeoxynucleotide (PS-ODN), was administered by subcutaneous injection at 2, 5 and 12.5mg/kg to mice and at 9mg/kg to rats. Parent compound and metabolites were isolated from plasma and tissues and quantified by capillary gel electrophoresis with UV detection (CGE-UV) and molecular masses were determined by matrix-assisted-laser-desorption-ionization time of flight detection (MALDI-TOF). An established method for PS-ODN isolation from plasma and tissue was modified to prevent oxidation of the phosphorothioate bonds during the extraction process, significantly increasing sensitivity in the subsequent MALDI-TOF analysis. Concentrations of CPG 7909 and metabolites were highest at the injection site (>600mg/kg at 4h). Maximal concentrations in local (draining) lymph nodes (LLN), kidney and liver were 10-15% of that at the injection site. The highest total amount of PS-ODN (percentage of administered dose) was found in the liver (32% at 4h), followed closely by the injection site (23% at 4h). Only very low levels of CPG 7909 and metabolites were found in plasma and only during the first hours. Metabolites identified by MALDI-TOF were similar for both species and all analyzed tissues, although the relative amounts of the different metabolites varied with tissue and over time. Degradation of CPG 7909 in vivo occurred predominantly by 3'exonucleases with additional cleavage by endonucleases.

  4. Antinociceptive and side-effects of hydromorphone after subcutaneous administration in cats.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sheilah A; Wegner, Kirsten; Lascelles, Benedict Duncan X

    2009-02-01

    The subcutaneous (SC) route is often chosen for drug administration in cats because it is easier to perform than intravenous (IV) injection and is perceived as less painful than intramuscular (IM) injection. However, little is known of how the route of administration influences the pharmacodynamics of drugs. This study measured the changes in skin temperature and thermal threshold (TT) and recorded the side-effects after SC injection of 0.1mg/kg of hydromorphone in six cats. Time to peak TT was 105min. Skin temperature was elevated at 15min and between 45 and 360min. Five cats vomited and two exhibited marked dysphoria. Compared to previously published studies of IV and IM administration of hydromorphone, the SC route results in a slower onset of peak effect, a shorter duration of antinociception and is associated with more undesirable side-effects. As with IV and IM injections, SC administration of hydromorphone at 0.1mg/kg is associated with a significant elevation in skin temperature. Overall, the SC route appears to have the least utility.

  5. Pegaptanib Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you have or have ever had diabetes, high blood pressure, a heart attack, or a stroke.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using pegaptanib injection, ...

  6. Ramucirumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, a wound that has not healed, or liver disease.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. Ramucirumab injection may harm your unborn baby. You ...

  7. Reslizumab Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the infusion or for a short period of time after the infusion has finished.You will receive each injection of reslizumab in a doctor's office or medical facility. You will stay in the office for some time after you receive the medication so your doctor ...

  8. Dexrazoxane Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... are used to treat or prevent certain side effects that may be caused by chemotherapy medications. Dexrazoxane ... Dexrazoxane injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: pain or swelling in the place ...

  9. Subcutaneous intralesional Ksharodaka injection: A novel treatment for the management of Warts: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Gundeti, Manohar S.; Reddy, R. Govind; Muralidhar, Jangle Vidya

    2014-01-01

    Warts are generally managed using cryosurgery, keratolytic ointments, curettage and electrodessication. Warts, vis-a-vis Charmakila, in Ayurvedic classical texts are classified into different types depending on the dominance of dosha. Ayurveda prescribes oral medications, topical use of Kshara (alkaline ash of herbs), Agni (thermal cautery) and Shastrakarma (surgery) for removal of Charmakila. Use of topical Kshara in the form of powder, aqueous solution i.e. Ksharodaka and Ksharasutra (thread smeared with Kshara) for warts has been reported. However, these methods necessitate multiple sittings and takea longer duration for removal of the warts. Herewith, we report a case series of different types of warts treated with intralesional infiltration of Apamarga Ksharodaka (AK), i.e. aqueous solution of Apamarga (Achyranthes aspera) Kshara. We observed that all these warts took a minimum of 2-6 days to shed off, leaving minor scars. There were no adverse reactions reported in any of these cases. PMID:25624698

  10. Toluene-induced ototoxicity by subcutaneous administration

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, G.T.; Howd, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Inhalation exposure of rats to toluene causes irreversible hearing loss (e.g., Pryor et al.). To determine whether noise emanating from the inhalation system was a major contributing factor and whether exposure by a noninhalation route would cause a similar effect, weanling, male Fischer-344 rats were injected SC twice daily in a quiet environment with PEG-300 (control) or with 1.5 or 1.7 g/kg of toluene for 7 days. After being trained to perform a multisensory conditioned avoidance response (CAR) task, tone intensity-response functions were generated at 4, 8, 12, and 20 kHz, and behavioral auditory response thresholds were estimated. Toluene caused a dose-related hearing loss at frequencies of 8 kHz and above, with no effect on performance of the CAR in response to light, nonaversive footshock, or the 4-kHz tone. The similarity of this effect to that observed following inhalation exposure indicates that noise is not a major factor in the toluene-induced hearing loss, although possible interactions between noise and toluene remain to be investigated. These results also demonstrate that direct penetration of the toluene vapors through the external ear structure, as might occur during inhalation exposure, is not a necessary condition for inducing the hearing loss.

  11. Characterization of alendronic- and undecylenic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles for the targeted delivery of rosiglitazone to subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Saatchi, Katayoun; Tod, Sarah E; Leung, Donna; Nicholson, Kenton E; Andreu, Irene; Buchwalder, Christian; Schmitt, Veronika; Häfeli, Urs O; Gray, Sarah L

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a state of positive energy balance where excess white adipose tissue accumulates to the detriment of metabolic health. Improving adipocyte function with systemic administration of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) improves metabolic outcomes in obesity, however TZD use is limited clinically due to undesirable side effects. Here we evaluate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a tool to target rosiglitazone (Rosi) specifically to adipose tissue. Results show Rosi can be adsorbed to MNPs (Rosi-MNPs) with hydrophobic coatings for which we present binding and release kinetics. Rosi adsorbed to MNPs retained the ability to induce PPARγ target gene expression in cells. Biodistribution analysis of radiolabeled Rosi-MNPs revealed a fat-implanted magnet significantly enhanced localization of Rosi to the targeted adipose tissue when administered by subcutaneous injection to obese mice. We propose MNPs for targeted delivery of anti-diabetic agents to superficially located subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  12. [Role of continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Marics, Gábor; Koncz, Levente; Körner, Anna; Mikos, Borbála; Tóth-Heyn, Péter

    2013-07-07

    Critical care associated with stress hyperglycaemia has gained a new view in the last decade since the demonstration of the beneficial effects of strong glycaemic control on the mortality in intensive care units. Strong glycaemic control may, however, induce hypoglycaemia, resulting in increased mortality, too. Pediatric population has an increased risk of hypoglycaemia because of the developing central nervous system. In this view there is a strong need for close monitoring of glucose levels in intensive care units. The subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring developed for diabetes care is an alternative for this purpose instead of regular blood glucose measurements. It is important to know the limitations of subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring in intensive care. Decreased tissue perfusion may disturb the results of subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring, because the measurement occurs in interstitial fluid. The routine use of subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring in intensive care units is not recommended yet until sufficient data on the reliability of the system are available. The Medtronic subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring system is evaluated in the review partly based on the authors own results.

  13. Oral, subcutaneous, and intravenous pharmacokinetics of ondansetron in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Quimby, J M; Lake, R C; Hansen, R J; Lunghofer, P J; Gustafson, D L

    2014-08-01

    Ondansetron is a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that is an effective anti-emetic in cats. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ondansetron in healthy cats. Six cats with normal complete blood count, serum biochemistry, and urinalysis received 2 mg oral (mean 0.43 mg/kg), subcutaneous (mean 0.4 mg/kg), and intravenous (mean 0.4 mg/kg) ondansetron in a cross-over manner with a 5-day wash out. Serum was collected prior to, and at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after administration of ondansetron. Ondansetron concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic modeling and dose interval modeling were performed. Repeated measures anova was used to compare parameters between administration routes. Bioavailability of ondansetron was 32% (oral) and 75% (subcutaneous). Calculated elimination half-life of ondansetron was 1.84 ± 0.58 h (intravenous), 1.18 ± 0.27 h (oral) and 3.17 ± 0.53 h (subcutaneous). The calculated elimination half-life of subcutaneous ondansetron was significantly longer (P < 0.05) than oral or intravenous administration. Subcutaneous administration of ondansetron to healthy cats is more bioavailable and results in a more prolonged exposure than oral administration. This information will aid management of emesis in feline patients.

  14. Role of hyaluronidase in subcutaneous spread and growth of group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Starr, Clarise Rivera; Engleberg, N Cary

    2006-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) depends on a hyaluronic acid (HA) capsule to evade phagocytosis and to interact with epithelial cells. Paradoxically, GAS also produces hyaluronidase (Hyl), an enzyme that cleaves HA. A common assumption is that Hyl digests structurally identical HA in human tissue to promote bacterial spread. We inactivated the gene encoding extracellular hyaluronidase, hylA, in a clinical Hyl(+) isolate. Hyl(+) and an isogenic Hyl(-) mutant were injected subcutaneously into mice with or without high-molecular-weight dextran blue. The Hyl(-) strain produced small lesions with dye concentrated in close proximity. The Hyl(+) strain produced identical lesions, but the dye diffused subcutaneously. However, Hyl(+) bacteria were not isolated from unaffected skin stained by dye diffusion. Thus, Hyl digests tissue HA and facilitates spread of large molecules but is not sufficient to cause subcutaneous diffusion of bacteria or to affect lesion size. GAS capsule expression was assayed periodically during broth culture and was reduced in Hyl(+) strains relative to Hyl(-) strains at the onset and the end of active capsule synthesis but not during peak synthesis in mid-exponential phase. Thus, Hyl is not sufficiently active to remove capsule during peak synthesis. To demonstrate a possible nutritional role for Hyl, GAS was shown to grow with N-acetylglucosamine but not d-glucuronic acid (both components of HA) as a sole carbon source. However, only Hyl(+) strains could grow utilizing HA as a sole carbon source, suggesting that Hyl may permit the organism to utilize host HA or its own capsule as an energy source.

  15. Oral and subcutaneous therapy of canine atopic dermatitis with recombinant feline interferon omega.

    PubMed

    Litzlbauer, Petra; Weber, Karin; Mueller, Ralf S

    2014-03-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) is a common allergic skin disease that has been treated with subcutaneously administered interferons (IFN). Recombinant feline IFN-ω (rFeIFN-ω) was reported to be efficacious for CAD. Whether dogs develop neutralizing antibodies against rFeIFN-ω during long-term treatment and whether orally administered IFNs are efficacious in CAD is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential development of antibodies against rFeIFN-ω in atopic dogs and to compare subcutaneous and oral IFN therapy. Twenty-six atopic dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. The first group (n=15) received eight subcutaneous injections of rFeIFN-ω (Virbagen® omega, Virbac, Carros, France) over four months, the second group (n=11) received rFeIFN-ω daily orally. Concurrent medication was permitted, except systemically acting glucocorticoids and cyclosporin, which had to be withdrawn at least two weeks prior to the study. Serum samples for antibody detection were collected before and after the study. On days 0, 60 and 120 skin lesions and pruritus were evaluated using a validated lesion score (Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index=CADESI) and a validated pruritus score. Concurrent medications were recorded. For every visit a total score, consisting of CADESI, pruritus score and medication score was created. For antibody detection an indirect ELISA, using Virbagen® omega as antigen, was performed. Comparison of pruritus scores, CADESI and total scores between days 0 and 120 showed improvement in both groups, however, significant improvement could only be detected in the oral group with CADESI and total scores (61%, P=0.04 and 36%, P=0.02 respectively). Serum antibodies against rFeIFN-ω could not be detected in any of the dogs. In this study antibody production could not be demonstrated. It suggests better efficacy with oral IFN administration, which should be further verified in larger, randomized, controlled studies.

  16. Continuous amperometric monitoring of glucose in a brittle diabetic chimpanzee with a miniature subcutaneous electrode

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J. G.; Schmidtke, D. W.; Quinn, C. P.; Fleming, T. F.; Bernacky, B.; Heller, A.

    1998-01-01

    The performance of an amperometric biosensor, consisting of a subcutaneously implanted miniature (0.29 mm diameter, 5 × 10−4 cm2 mass transporting area), 90 s 10–90% rise/decay time glucose electrode, and an on-the-skin electrocardiogram Ag/AgCl electrode was tested in an unconstrained, naturally diabetic, brittle, type I, insulin-dependent chimpanzee. The chimpanzee was trained to wear on her wrist a small electronic package and to present her heel for capillary blood samples. In five sets of measurements, averaging 5 h each, 82 capillary blood samples were assayed, their concentrations ranging from 35 to 400 mg/dl. The current readings were translated to blood glucose concentration by assaying, at t = 1 h, one blood sample for each implanted sensor. The rms error in the correlation between the sensor-measured glucose concentration and that in capillary blood was 17.2%, 4.9% above the intrinsic 12.3% rms error of the Accu-Chek II reference, through which the illness of the chimpanzee was routinely managed. Linear regression analysis of the data points taken at t>1 h yielded the relationship (Accu-Chek) = 0.98 × (implanted sensor) + 4.2 mg/dl, r2 = 0.94. The capillary blood and the subcutaneous glucose concentrations were statistically indistinguishable when the rate of change was less than 1 mg/(dl⋅min). However, when the rate of decline exceeded 1.8 mg/(dl⋅min) after insulin injection, the subcutaneous glucose concentration was transiently higher. PMID:9600973

  17. Successful treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus with subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, A; Fonseca Oliveira, J; Pinheiro, S; Paiva-Lopes, M J

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is well established. However, side effects might limit its use and lead to the consideration of therapeutic alternatives, such as the subcutaneous formulation of immunoglobulin, which has been used in some patients with other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of SLE refractory to classical therapies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin was effective, but gave rise to significant side effects. The patient was successfully treated with subcutaneous human immunoglobulin, achieving and maintaining clinical and laboratory remission. A lower immunoglobulin dose was needed and no side effects were observed, compared to the intravenous administration. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be a better-tolerated and cost-saving therapeutic option for select SLE patients.

  18. Subcutaneous Emphysema, Pneumomediastinum and Pneumothorax in a Patient with Dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshaee, Mehdi; Jokar, Mohammad Hassan; Mirfeizi, Zahra; Atabati, Elham; Tarighat, Somayeh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and subcutaneous emphysema are rare, but serious complications of inflammatory myopathies and occur more commonly in DM than PM. complications of dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM), both of which can be fatal. Case Report: A 20-year-old woman was admitted with neck pain, dyspnea, cough, and fever. She had been diagnosed with dermatomyositis 21 months prior. A thorax computed tomography (CT) scan revealed ground glass opacities in her lungs, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and subcutaneous emphysema. Despite intensive immunosuppressive therapy, clinical deterioration and radiological progression were observed, ultimately the patient died. Conclusion: During the care for a patient with dermatomyositis, the otorhinolaryngologist should be cautious of rapidly progressive and fatal neck subcutaneous emphysema. For a patient with dermatomyositis and with normal bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy, the main treatment is control of dermatomyositis with medical therapy. Therefore, a tracheostomy and/or mechanical ventilation may not be necessary.

  19. [Measles and subcutaneous emphysema. Presentation of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Montesano-Delfín, J R; Mascareñas-Ponce, A

    1991-03-01

    This is a three case study report of children with measles which later progressed to bronchopneumonia and subcutaneous emphysema. All three children were from farming families, and none had been previously vaccinate against measles. For a period of six months, 183 cases of measles were treated at our hospital of which only three worsened to subcutaneous emphysema, demonstrating an incidence rate of 1.6%; they also showed to have bronchopneumonia, with severe coughing episodes; which made us recall the possible physiopathology principle of the pressure gradient theory behind this complication proposed by Bloch in 1968. The factors related to our patients suggested a more severe and aggresive type of measles with a greater probability of having complications. The prognostic value of the severity of this type of measles in the presence of subcutaneous emphysema is limited and its management should be primarly focused on treating the added bronchial problem.

  20. Severe subcutaneous and deep cervicofacial emphysema of unusual etiology.

    PubMed

    Terzic, Andrej; Becker, Minerva; Masterson, Karen; Scolozzi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Subcutaneous and deep cervical emphysema (SCE) in the head and neck are found in a wide spectrum of conditions. Most of them are seen in patients with midfacial trauma or oropharyngeal infections. Subcutaneous and deep cervical emphysema can also be a symptom of life-threatening mediastinitis and/or necrotizing fasciitis, both of which need immediate surgery. Rarely however does SCE occur in isolation as a consequence of elevated intraoral pressure in combination with or without visible lacerations of the oral mucosa. As a consequence, air penetrates the mucosal tears and results in subcutaneous emphysema even extending down to the mediastinum in severe cases. This article describes a series of five cases of isolated SCE. It discusses the diagnosis, the pathomechanism, the differential diagnosis and the treatment. It underlines the importance of anamnesis and careful physical and laboratory examinations in order to differentiate isolated SCE from more severe conditions such as necrotizing fasciitis or mediastinitis, which necessitate immediate surgery.

  1. Iatrogenic subcutaneous cervicofacial emphysema with pneumomediastinum after class V restoration

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Subcutaneous facial emphysema after dental treatment is an uncommon complication caused by the invasion of high-pressure air; in severe cases, it can spread to the neck, mediastinum, and thorax, resulting in cervical emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and pneumothorax. The present case showed subcutaneous cervicofacial emphysema with pneumomediastinum after class V restoration. The patient was fully recovered after eight days of conservative treatment. The cause of this case was the penetration of high-pressure air through the gingival sulcus, which had a weakened gingival attachment. This case indicated that dentists should be careful to prevent subcutaneous emphysema during common dental treatments using a high-speed hand piece and gingival retraction cord. PMID:28280711

  2. Subcutaneous Infection Model Facilitates Treatment Assessment of Secondary Alveolar Echinococcosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Küster, Tatiana; Hermann, Corina; Hemphill, Andrew; Gottstein, Bruno; Spiliotis, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in humans is a parasitic disease characterized by severe damage to the liver and occasionally other organs. AE is caused by infection with the metacestode (larval) stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, usually infecting small rodents as natural intermediate hosts. Conventionally, human AE is chemotherapeutically treated with mebendazole or albendazole. There is, however still the need for improved chemotherapeutical options. Primary in vivo studies on drugs of interest are commonly performed in small laboratory animals such as mice and Mongolian jirds, and in most cases, a secondary infection model is used, whereby E. multilocularis metacestodes are directly injected into the peritoneal cavity or into the liver. Disadvantages of this methodological approach include risk of injury to organs during the inoculation and, most notably, a limitation in the macroscopic (visible) assessment of treatment efficacy. Thus, in order to monitor the efficacy of chemotherapeutical treatment, animals have to be euthanized and the parasite tissue dissected. In the present study, mice were infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes through the subcutaneous route and were then subjected to chemotherapy employing albendazole. Serological responses to infection were comparatively assessed in mice infected by the conventional intraperitoneal route. We demonstrate that the subcutaneous infection model for secondary AE facilitates the assessment of the progress of infection and drug treatment in the live animal. PMID:23717701

  3. The effect of oral and subcutaneous meperidine on the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) in mice.

    PubMed

    Yillar, D O; Akkan, A G; Akcasu, A; Ozüner, Z; Eşkazan, E; Küçukhüseyin, C

    2009-01-01

    The likely effect of oral and subcutaneous meperidine on maximal electroshock seizure (MES) in mice was studied. Convulsive current fifty (CC50) was assessed to be 46m A, an electrical pulse causing seizure in 50% of test animals. Doses of 15, 30, 60, or 120 mg/kg meperidine given orally or subcutaneously increased the convulsion threshold of MES as evidenced by a significant dose-dependent reduction of MES below control value (p < .05). An initial hyperactivity reaction that was worsened by noisy and tactile stimuli and tail erection followed by sedation was observed after s.c. injection of 60 or 120 mg/kg meperidine. No significant difference was found between meperidine-induced reductions of control MES values obtained one and two hours after oral doses; the depressed MES values obtained one hour after oral administration of meperidine were significantly different and more powerful than those obtained two hours after s.c. drug administrations (p < .05). Combining previous literature information with the present results, we conclude that such an effect of meperidine can be attributed to cerebellar stimulation.

  4. Subcutaneous implants for long-acting drug therapy in laboratory animals may generate unintended drug reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Michael; Tyler, Betty M.; DeTolla, Louis; Zhao, Ming; Kobrin, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Background: Long-acting therapy in laboratory animals offers advantages over the current practice of 2-3 daily drug injections. Yet little is known about the disintegration of biodegradable drug implants in rodents. Objective: Compare bioavailability of buprenorphine with the biodegradation of lipid-encapsulated subcutaneous drug pellets. Methods: Pharmacokinetic and histopathology studies were conducted in BALB/c female mice implanted with cholesterol-buprenorphine drug pellets. Results: Drug levels are below the level of detection (0.5 ng/mL plasma) within 4-5 days of implant. However, necroscopy revealed that interstitial tissues begin to seal implants within a week. Visual inspection of the implant site revealed no evidence of inflammation or edema associated with the cholesterol-drug residue. Chemical analyses demonstrated that the residues contained 10-13% of the initial opiate dose for at least two weeks post implant. Discussion: The results demonstrate that biodegradable scaffolds can become sequestered in the subcutaneous space. Conclusion: Drug implants can retain significant and unintended reservoirs of drugs. PMID:24459402

  5. The time-course of hindbrain neuronal activity varies according to location during either intraperitoneal or subcutaneous tumor growth in rats: single Fos and dual Fos/dopamine β-hydroxylase immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Lackovicova, Lubica; Gaykema, Ronald P; Banovska, Lucia; Kiss, Alexander; Goehler, Lisa E; Mravec, Boris

    2013-07-15

    Neuronal activity in the nucleus of the solitary tract, ventrolateral medulla, area postrema, and parabrachial nucleus was studied in rats with intraperitoneal or subcutaneous tumors on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th day after injection of fibrosarcoma tumor cells. We found that the number of Fos and dopamine β-hydroxylase immunopositive neurons differs between animals with intraperitoneal and subcutaneous tumors and also between tumor-bearing rats at different times following injection. Our data indicate that responses of the brainstem structures to peripheral tumor growth depend on the localization as well as the stage of the tumor growth.

  6. Subcutaneous endometriosis: a rare cause of deep dyspareunia.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Aruna

    2014-01-06

    Endometriosis is a growth of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity which is responsive to hormonal stimulation. Extrapelvic endometriosis is less common of which skin is the most common site. The patient presents with mass, pain and cyclic symptoms. Subcutaneous endometriosis is very rare and has been reported only thrice in the literature. We report a case where the patient with lower abdominal pain and dyspareunia. Dyspareunia due to subcutaneous endometriosis has not been reported before when there is no evidence of intrapelvic endometriosis on laparoscopy.

  7. Anisotropic bioelectrical impedance determination of subcutaneous fat thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Becerra, P. A. I.; Delgadillo-Holtfort, I.; Balleza-Ordaz, M.; Huerta-Franco, M. R.; Vargas-Luna, M.

    2014-11-01

    Preliminary results have shown that bioelectrical impedance measurements performed on different parts of the human body strongly depend upon the subcutaneous fat of the considered region. In this work, a method for the determination of subcutaneous fat thickness is explored. Within this method the measurement of the bioelectrical impedance response of the fat-muscle system, both along the direction defined by the muscle fibers and along the corresponding perpendicular direction, are performed. Measurements have been carried out on human female and male subjects of ages around 25 years old at the region of the biceps. Correlation has been performed with skinfold caliper measurements.

  8. Injection Adipolysis: Mechanisms, Agents, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive procedures targeting the elimination of unwanted adipose tissues have recently been developed. injection adipolysis is the term for the injection of cytotoxic substances into these tissues, with the intent of cosmetic improvement by volume reduction. initial attempts in the field utilized intravenous preparations of sodium deoxycholate and soy-derived phosphatidylcholine, approved for the intravenous treatment of fat emboli and dyslipidemias in countries outside the United States. it was initially purported that the active ingredient in these injections was phosphatidylcholine. Subsequent research discovered that injections of sodium deoxycholate alone were capable of inducing cellular lysis in vitro. These compounds also demonstrated an affinity for adipose tissue, sparing the overlying dermis and epidermis. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved a formulation of sodium deoxycholate 10mg/mL for subcutaneous injection with the indication of aesthetic improvement of excess submental fat. it has shown moderate efficacy with appropriate patient selection and good patient satisfaction. However, previous research leading to the development of this drug proposed that including phosphatidylcholine to a more appealing cosmetic result, with decreased severity of injection-site reactions. Future drugs in the field of injection adipolysis may attempt to combine these ingredients for improved cosmesis and tolerability. PMID:28210398

  9. Treatment of lipoma by injection lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Soni

    2011-05-01

    Injection lipolysis or lipodissolve is the practice of injecting phosphatidyl choline/ sodium deoxycholate (PDC/DC) compounds in the subcutaneous fat. Though this practice is being used extensively for nonsurgical contouring of body and dissolving localized collections of excess fat, it's use as a treatment modality for lipomas needs further evaluation. We present a case where this technique was used for treating a lipoma, with no recurrence after 9 months of follow up. Injection lipolysis as a treatment modality for lipomas needs to be evaluated for safety and efficacy in trials on larger population. This could prove to be a very valuable adjunct to the current practice of excision, if done by a trained person in a properly selected patient. Also the side effects and the controversies regarding this procedure have been discussed in detail in the present paper.

  10. Tolerability and Plasma Drug Level Monitoring of Prolonged Subcutaneous Teicoplanin Treatment for Bone and Joint Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bennis, Youssef; Diouf, Momar; Saroufim, Carlo; Brunschweiler, Benoit; Rousseau, Florence; Joseph, Cédric; Hamdad, Farida; Ait Amer Meziane, Mohamed; Routier, Simon; Schmit, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Teicoplanin is a key drug for the treatment of multiresistant staphylococcal bone and joint infections (BJI), yet can only be administered via a parenteral route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of subcutaneous (s.c.) teicoplanin for that indication over 42 days. Thirty patients with Gram-positive cocci BJI were included. Once the target of 25 to 40 mg/liter trough serum concentration was achieved, treatment was switched from an intravenous to an s.c. route. No discontinuation of teicoplanin related to injection site reaction and no severe local adverse event were observed. On multivariate analysis, better tolerability was observed at the beginning of treatment, in patients over 70 years old, and for dosages less than 600 mg. In conclusion, we recommend s.c. administration of teicoplanin when needed. PMID:27458228

  11. Bilateral subcutaneous fibrosarcomas in a cat following feline parvo-, herpes- and calicivirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    De Man, Marc M G; Ducatelle, Richard V

    2007-10-01

    A crossbred cat developed a subcutaneous fibrosarcoma on the left side of the thorax at the site of previous administration of a feline parvo-, herpes- and calicivirus vaccine. A few months later the cat developed a second mass on the right side of the thorax after a booster vaccine had been administered at this site. This unique case of bilateral fibrosarcomas in a cat shortly after vaccination with parvo-, herpes- and caliciviruses suggests an individual disposition for the development of vaccine-associated sarcomas and a possible triggering of this type of pathological response which could have precipitated the development of the second tumour. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of vaccine-induced fibrosarcomas occurring bilaterally after injection of a feline parvo-, herpes- and calicivirus containing vaccine at different sides of the thorax.

  12. Plasma concentrations of buprenorphine following a single subcutaneous administration of a sustained release formulation of buprenorphine in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Zullian, Chiara; Lema, Pablo; Lavoie, Melissa; Dodelet-Devillers, Aurore; Beaudry, Francis; Vachon, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the potential use of slow release buprenorphine in sheep. Twelve adult female sheep (6 Dorset and 6 Suffolk, 12 months of age) were used for this project and were divided into 2 experimental groups (n = 6/group comprising 3 Dorset and 3 Suffolk sheep). Sustained release (SR) buprenorphine was administered subcutaneously in the scapular region at a concentration of 0.1 mg/kg body weight (BW) for group 1 and of 0.05 mg/kg BW for group 2. Following blood collections at selected time points, plasma concentrations of buprenorphine was performed by tandem liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Mean buprenorphine concentration was above 0.1 ng/mL at 48 h up to 192 h post-injection for group 1 and it was above 0.1 ng/mL at 48 h up to 72 h post-injection for group 2. In conclusion, a long lasting potential analgesic plasma level of buprenorphine is attained following a single subcutaneous injection of 0.1 mg/kg BW of SR buprenorphine in sheep. However the effective analgesic plasma threshold still needs to be determined in sheep. PMID:27408341

  13. Long-lasting concentrations of cefovecin after subcutaneous and intramuscular administration to Patagonian sea lions (Otaria flavescens).

    PubMed

    García-Párraga, D; Gilabert, J A; García-Peña, F J; Álvaro, T; Ros-Rodríguez, J M; Valls, M; Encinas, T

    2016-02-01

    Cefovecin is a third-generation cephalosporin developed as an aqueous solution for use by the subcutaneous route in dogs and cats. This study evaluated the duration of cefovecin plasma concentrations after single intramuscular (IM) or subcutaneous (SC) injection at different doses in 10 Patagonian sea lions (Otaria flavescens). Blood samples were collected serially from the day of the injection up to 60-90 days post-injection. Plasma drug concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-UV detection and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by non-compartmental analysis. No reactions or side effects associated with the drug were observed in any of the studied animals. Both routes showed very similar pharmacokinetic behaviour. Elimination half-life (11.3-21.6 days, SC; 13.1-15.9 days, IM) and mean residence time (17.6-36.8 days SC; 16.5-25.4 days IM) were, in all cases and doses, considerably longer than those previously reported for any other species. Based on these findings, and preliminary data on specific pathogen sensitivity, cefovecin was found to be a very promising antimicrobial for Patagonian sea lions, in particular those that are difficult to access or that are under certain rehabilitation conditions.

  14. Plasma concentrations of buprenorphine following a single subcutaneous administration of a sustained release formulation of buprenorphine in sheep.

    PubMed

    Zullian, Chiara; Lema, Pablo; Lavoie, Melissa; Dodelet-Devillers, Aurore; Beaudry, Francis; Vachon, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the potential use of slow release buprenorphine in sheep. Twelve adult female sheep (6 Dorset and 6 Suffolk, 12 months of age) were used for this project and were divided into 2 experimental groups (n = 6/group comprising 3 Dorset and 3 Suffolk sheep). Sustained release (SR) buprenorphine was administered subcutaneously in the scapular region at a concentration of 0.1 mg/kg body weight (BW) for group 1 and of 0.05 mg/kg BW for group 2. Following blood collections at selected time points, plasma concentrations of buprenorphine was performed by tandem liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Mean buprenorphine concentration was above 0.1 ng/mL at 48 h up to 192 h post-injection for group 1 and it was above 0.1 ng/mL at 48 h up to 72 h post-injection for group 2. In conclusion, a long lasting potential analgesic plasma level of buprenorphine is attained following a single subcutaneous injection of 0.1 mg/kg BW of SR buprenorphine in sheep. However the effective analgesic plasma threshold still needs to be determined in sheep.

  15. Pharmacokinetics of spiramycin after intravenous, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Sanders, P; Moulin, G; Guillot, P; Dagorn, M; Perjant, P; Delepine, B; Gaudiche, C; Mourot, D

    1992-03-01

    Spiramycin is a macrolide antibiotic that is active against most of the microorganisms isolated from the milk of mastitic cows. This work investigated the disposition of spiramycin in plasma and milk after intravenous, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration. Twelve healthy cows were given a single injection of spiramycin at a dose of 30,000 IU/kg by each route. Plasma and milk were collected post injection. Spiramycin concentration in the plasma was determined by a high performance liquid chromatography method, and in the milk by a microbiological method. The mean residence time after intravenous administration was significantly longer (P less than 0.01) in the milk (20.7 +/- 2.7 h) than in plasma (4.0 +/- 1.6 h). An average milk-to-plasma ratio of 36.5 +/- 15 was calculated from the area concentration-time curves. Several pharmacokinetic parameters were examined to determine the bioequivalence of the two extravascular routes. The dose fraction adsorbed after intramuscular or subcutaneous administration was almost 100% and was bioequivalent for the extravascular routes, but the rates of absorption, the maximal concentrations and the time to obtain them differed significantly between the two routes. Spiramycin quantities excreted in milk did not differ between the two extravascular routes but the latter were not bioequivalent for maximal concentration in the milk. However, the two routes were bio-equivalent for the duration of time the milk concentration exceeded the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of various pathogens causing infections in the mammary gland.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Determination of the subcutaneous tissue to blood partition coefficient in patients with severe leg ischaemia by a double isotope washout technique.

    PubMed

    Bjerre-Jepsen, K; Faris, I; Henriksen, O; Tønnesen, K H

    1982-12-01

    Knowledge of the tissue to blood partition coefficient (lambda) is essential for calculation of the perfusion coefficient in a single tissue based on measurements of the washout of locally injected isotopes. No measurements of lambda for Xenon in subcutaneous tissue in the leg have been done in patients with occlusive arterial disease. In 12 patients with occlusive arterial disease in the legs lambda for Xenon was determined in subcutaneous tissue in the calf region and foot as the ratio between the washout rate constant of 131I-Antipyrine and 133Xe. A mixture of the two indicators was injected subcutaneously laterally on the calf and in the first interosseous space on the foot. The time until the curves followed a monoexponential course varied between 15 and 45 min in the calf and 5 and 45 min in the foot. The calculated lambda for Xe showed a great variance between individuals in calf as well as foot. Mean value was 3.7 ml X g-1 (range: 1 X 7-10 X 7) in the calf and 2 X 7 ml X g-1 (range: 1 X 2-4 X 9) in the foot. It is concluded that lambda measurements are necessary for determination of subcutaneous blood flow from 133Xe washout curves in these patients. Determination of lambda is especially important when comparisons are made between individuals.

  17. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-01-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin®) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra®) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2–75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin. PMID:25761372

  18. Efficacy and tolerability of 16% subcutaneous immunoglobulin compared with 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Niebur, H B; Duff, C M; Shear, G F; Nguyen, D; Alberdi, T K; Dorsey, M J; Sleasman, J W

    2015-09-01

    Multiple subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) products are available to treat primary antibody deficiency (PAD). The efficacy and tolerability of 16% SCIG (Vivaglobin(®) ) was compared with 20% SCIG (Hizentra(®) ) in PAD subjects. The study was a prospective, single-centre, open-label study of PAD subjects transitioning Vivaglobin to equivalent Hizentra doses, rounded to the nearest vial size. Comparisons included immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels; tetanus, varicella and Streptococcus pneumoniae titres; adverse events (AEs), annual infection rate and quality of life during 8 weeks of Vivaglobin and 24 weeks of Hizentra. Thirty-two subjects (aged 2-75 years) participated. Rounding to the nearest Hizentra vial size resulted in a 12·8% (± 2·9%) increase in SCIG dose. Median immunoglobulin (Ig)G level following 8 weeks of Vivaglobin was similar to 24 weeks of Hizentra (1050 versus 1035 mg/dl, respectively; P = 0·77). Both products had similar protective titres to tetanus, varicella and serotypes of S. pneumoniae, which were variable but well above protective levels. After 12 weeks of Hizentra, subjects reported fewer local site reactions compared with Vivaglobin. Switching products resulted in increased systemic AEs in some subjects but, overall, not significantly higher than during Vivaglobin treatment. Average infusion time decreased from 104·7 min (3·3 sites) with Vivaglobin to 70·7 min (2·2 sites) with Hizentra (P = 0·0005). Acute serious bacterial infections were similar. Treatment satisfaction was superior with Hizentra. Hizentra and Vivaglobin have similar pharmacokinetics and efficacy. Although transition to a different SCIG product initially increased AEs, Hizentra is well tolerated and can be infused more rapidly and with fewer sites compared to Vivaglobin.

  19. Pneumoperitoneum with Subcutaneous Emphysema after Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Karip, Bora; Ozcabi, Yetkin; Ağca, Birol; Alahdab, Yesim; Memisoglu, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is a safe way for enteral nutrition in selected patients. Generally, complications of this procedure are very rare but due to patients general health condition, delayed diagnosis and treatment of complications can be life threatening. In this study, we present a PEG-related massive pneumoperitoneum and subcutaneous emphysema in a patient with neuro-Behçet. PMID:25120935

  20. Human omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibit specific lipidomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Despite their differential effects on human metabolic pathophysiology, the differences in omental and subcutaneous lipidomes are largely unknown. To explore this field, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for lipidome analyses of adipose tissue samples (visceral and subcutaneous) selected from a group of obese subjects (n=38). Transcriptomics and in vitro studies in adipocytes were used to confirm the pathways affected by location. The analyses revealed the existence of obesity-related specific lipidome signatures in each of these locations, attributed to selective enrichment of specific triglycerides, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, because these were not observed in adipose tissues from nonobese individuals. The changes were compatible with subcutaneous enrichment in pathways involved in adipogenesis, triacylglyceride synthesis, and lipid droplet formation, as well as increased α-oxidation. Marked differences between omental and subcutaneous depots in obese individuals were seen in the association of lipid species with metabolic traits (body mass index and insulin sensitivity). Targeted studies also revealed increased cholesterol (Δ56%) and cholesterol epoxide (Δ34%) concentrations in omental adipose tissue. In view of the effects of cholesterol epoxide, which induced enhanced expression of adipocyte differentiation and α-oxidation genes in human omental adipocytes, a novel role for cholesterol epoxide as a signaling molecule for differentiation is proposed. In summary, in obesity, adipose tissue exhibits a location-specific differential lipid profile that may contribute to explaining part of its distinct pathogenic role.

  1. Pneumomediastinum, bilateral pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema complicating acute silicosis.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ramakant; Meena, Manoj; Patil, Chetan B

    2015-01-01

    A case of acute silicosis complicating as spontaneous pneumomediastinum, bilateral pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema is described in a 35-year-old male engaged in stone crusher unit. Diagnosis was established on clinical and radiological assessment and supported by occupational history of the patient. This case is unique one as all these 3 complications at the same time are very uncommon in acute silicosis.

  2. Subcutaneous emphysema during third molar surgery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Umberto; Galanakis, Alexandros; Lerario, Francesco; Daniele, Gabriele Maria; Tenore, Gianluca; Palaia, Gaspare

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of third molars is the most common surgical procedure performed in oral surgery on a daily basis and, despite surgical skills and expertise, complications may occur. Complications observed during or after third molar removal may include pain, swelling, bleeding, infection, sinus perforation and nerve damage. Fortunately, with a proper management and a good surgical technique, the incidence of such events is low. Subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental extraction occurs when the air from the high-speed dental handpiece is forced into the soft tissue through the reflected flap and invades the adjacent tissues, leading to swelling, crepitus on palpation and occasionally spreading through the tissue spaces of the fascial planes. Although rare, iatrogenic subcutaneous emphysema can have serious and potentially life-threatening consequences. Care should be taken when using air-driven handpieces. The access of air into the facial tissues is not limited to tooth extractions, but may also occur through other portals of entrance, such as endodontically treated teeth, periodontium and lacerations of intraoral soft tissues. When subcutaneous emphysema occurs, it must be quickly diagnosed and properly managed to reduce the risk of further complications. This report presents a case of subcutaneous emphysema occurred during extraction of a mandibular third molar extraction with the use of an air turbine handpiece. Case management is described and issues relative to the diagnosis and prevention of this surgical complication are discussed.

  3. Characterization of needle-assisted jet injections.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxin; Ruddy, Bryan; Taberner, Andrew

    2016-12-10

    Hypodermic injections have been the standard for transcutaneous drug delivery for many years. However, needle phobia, pain, and risks of needle-stick injuries have manifested in poor patient compliance. Needle-free jet injections (NFJI) have been developed to address these drawbacks but the reliability of dose and depth of delivery have been limited by a lack of control over jet parameters, and by variability in the skin's mechanical properties among individuals. Moreover, the device size and cost have been restrained by the high pressure (>20MPa) required to penetrate the skin. Needle-assisted jet injections have been proposed to improve delivery reliability of conventional jet injectors by penetrating the skin with a short needle (<5mm) and thereby allowing jet delivery to a desired injection depth at a reduced pressure. This study characterized needle-assisted jet injections performed after first penetrating the skin with a 1.5mm needle, examining the effect of needle size on jet parameters, and evaluating injection performance in porcine skin. A voice-coil actuated jet injector was modified to incorporate needles of 30G, 31G and 32G. A series of pulse tests was performed to compare jet velocity and injection volume across the needle sizes, where it was found that the jet velocity and injection volume achieved with 32G needles were 13% and 16% lower, respectively, than with 30G. In contrast, there was no significant difference in jet velocity and injection volume between 30G and 31G needles, suggesting that a reduction of 10μm in the mean inner diameter of the 31G needle has minimal impact on jet velocity and injection volume. Injection studies performed in porcine skin revealed that injections driven by fluid pressures ranging between 0.8MPa and 1.4MPa were able to achieve substantial injectate penetration (~10mm) and delivery (~100μL) into subcutaneous fat regardless of needle size, in a period of 40ms. The required pressures are an order of magnitude lower

  4. Pharmacokinetics and absolute bioavailability of mepolizumab following administration at subcutaneous and intramuscular sites.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Hector; Yancey, Steve; Cozens, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This study characterized the pharmacokinetics (PK) of mepolizumab, after a single intravenous (IV), subcutaneous (SC), or intramuscular (IM) dose in healthy adults and determined the absolute bioavailability of SC and IM mepolizumab delivered at different anatomical regions. Sixty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of either mepolizumab 250 mg by IV, SC injection (upper arm, abdomen, or thigh); or IM injection (thigh). Following IV administration, the mean maximum observed plasma mepolizumab concentration (Cmax ) and the mean area under the concentration versus time curves from time zero to infinity (AUC(0-∞) ) were 109 ± 17 µg/mL and 1,557 ± 250 µg d/mL, respectively. After SC administration, the mean (±SD) values of Cmax and AUC(0-∞) were 34.1-38.2 ± 7.3-12.1 µg/mL and 1,110-1,238 ± 228-372 µg d/mL, respectively. Following IM administration, the mean values of Cmax and AUC(0-∞) were 46.9 ± 10.6 µg/mL and 1,395 ± 348 µg d/mL. The median terminal half-life was similar for SC, IM and IV administration (17.9-20.4, 19.2, and 18.5 days, respectively). The overall mean bioavailability of SC mepolizumab was 64-75%, and absorption was relatively similar for the three SC injection sites. Mepolizumab 250 mg was generally well tolerated in this study. These results support flexibility in the SC injection site for mepolizumab.

  5. Induction of systemic TH1-like innate immunity in normal volunteers following subcutaneous but not intravenous administration of CPG 7909, a synthetic B-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotide TLR9 agonist.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Arthur M; Efler, Susan M; Wittpoth, Michael; Al Adhami, Mohammed J; Davis, Heather L

    2004-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of normal human volunteers with a B-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist, CPG 7909, induced a TH1-like pattern of systemic innate immune activation manifested by expression of IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-alpha, and IFN-inducible chemokines. Serum IP-10 was found to be the most sensitive assay for subcutaneous CPG 7909 stimulation; its level was significantly increased in all subjects at all dose levels, including the lowest tested dose of just 0.0025 mg/kg. This pattern of chemokine and cytokine induction was markedly different from that previously reported to be induced by TLR9 stimulation in rodents, most likely reflecting species-specific differences in the cell types expressing TLR9. Subcutaneous CPG 7909 injection induced transient shifts in blood neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes, consistent with the increased chemokine expression. Levels of acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein were also increased. A second subcutaneous CPG 7909 injection administered 2 weeks after the first elicited similar immune responses, showing little or no tolerance to the effects of repeated in vivo TLR9 stimulation. Subjects developed dose-dependent transient injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms but otherwise tolerated injection well, with no evidence of organ toxicity or systemic autoimmunity. The activation of innate immunity was dependent on the route of ODN administration, since intravenous injection caused no such effects. These studies indicate that in vivo activation of TLR9 by subcutaneous administration of CPG 7909 could be a well-tolerated immunotherapeutic approach for induction of TH1 innate immune activation.

  6. Injected phytosterols/stanols suppress plasma cholesterol levels in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Vanstone, C A.; Raeini-Sarjaz, M; Jones, P J.H.

    2001-10-01

    Although plant sterols are known to suppress intestinal cholesterol absorption, whether plasma and hepatic lipid levels are influenced through non-gut related internal mechanisms has not been established. To examine this question 50 male hamsters were divided into 5 groups and fed semi-purified diets containing 20% energy as fat and 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol ad libitum for 60 days. The control group (i) received diet alone, while four additional groups consumed the diet plus one of four equivalent phytosterol mixtures (5 mg/kg/day) given either as (ii) tall oil phytosterols/stanols mixed with diet (oralSA), (iii) tall oil phytosterols/stanols subcutaneously injected (subSA), (iv) soybean oil phytosterols alone mixed with diet (oralSE), or (v) soybean oil subcutaneous injected phytosterols alone (subSE). The control group and both orally supplemented groups also received placebo subcutaneous sham injections. Neither food consumption, body weight, nor liver weight differed across treatment groups. Subcutaneous administration of SA and SE decreased plasma total cholesterol levels by 21% and 23% (p < 0.0001) and non-apolipoprotein-A cholesterol concentrations by 22% and 15% (p < 0.0002), respectively, compared to control. HDL cholesterol and TG concentrations remained unchanged across all groups, except for a decline of 25% (p < 0.0001) in HDL concentration in the subSE group versus control. Plasma campesterol levels were lower (p < 0.05) in the subSA group relative to all other groups. Plasma campesterol:cholesterol and campesterol:sitosterol ratios were, however, higher (p < 0.0001) for both the oral and subSE groups. Hepatic cholesterol levels were higher (p < 0.0001) in the oral and subSE phytosterol groups by 30% and 31%, respectively, relative to control. We conclude that low doses of subcutaneously administered plant sterols reduce circulating cholesterol levels through mechanisms other than inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption.

  7. Administrative risk quantification of subcutaneous and intravenous therapies in Italian centers utilizing the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    Ponzetti, Clemente; Canciani, Monica; Farina, Massimo; Era, Sara; Walzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background In oncology, an important parameter of safety is the potential treatment error in hospitals. The analyzed hypothesis is that of subcutaneous therapies would provide a superior safety benefit over intravenous therapies through fixed-dose administrations, when analyzed with trastuzumab and rituximab. Methods For the calculation of risk levels, the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis approach was applied. Within this approach, the critical treatment path is followed and risk classification for each individual step is estimated. For oncology and hematology administration, 35 different risk steps were assessed. The study was executed in 17 hematology and 16 breast cancer centers in Italy. As intravenous and subcutaneous were the only injection routes in medical available for trastuzumab and rituximab in oncology at the time of the study, these two therapies were chosen. Results When the risk classes were calculated, eight high-risk areas were identified for the administration of an intravenous therapy in hematology or oncology; 13 areas would be defined as having a median-risk classification and 14 areas as having a low-risk classification (total risk areas: n=35). When the new subcutaneous formulation would be applied, 23 different risk levels could be completely eliminated (65% reduction). Important high-risk classes such as dose calculation, preparation and package labeling, preparation of the access to the vein, pump infusion preparation, and infusion monitoring were included in the eliminations. The overall risk level for the intravenous administration was estimated to be 756 (ex-ante) and could be reduced by 70% (ex-post). The potential harm compensation for errors related to pharmacy would be decreased from eight risk classes to only three risk classes. Conclusion The subcutaneous administration of trastuzumab (breast cancer) and rituximab (hematology) might lower the risk of administration and treatment errors for patients and could hence indirectly have

  8. Morphine Attenuates Testosterone Response to Central Injection of Kisspeptin in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Fariba; Khazali, Homayoun; Janahmadi, Mahyar

    2014-01-01

    Background Kisspeptin and naloxone stimulate the reproductive axis while morphine inhibits its function. We have investigated the effect of central injection of kisspeptin-10 on mean plasma testosterone concentration in morphine or naloxone pretreated rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, 60 male Wistar rats that were divid- ed into 12 groups (n=5 per group) received saline, kisspeptin (1 nmol, ICV), naloxone (2 mg/kg, subcutaneously), morphine (5 or 10 mg/kg, sc) or co-administrations of kisspeptin, morphine and naloxone at 09:00 - 09:30. In the co-administrated groups, kisspeptin was injected 15 minutes following morphine or naloxone injections. Blood samples were collected 60 minutes following injections via the tail vein. Plasma testosterone concentration was measured by a rat testosterone ELISA kit. Results Central injection of kisspeptin or subcutaneous injection of naloxone significantly increased the mean plasma testosterone concentration compared to saline while subcutaneous injections of different doses of morphine (5 or 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased testosterone compared to saline. The results revealed that morphine significantly attenuated the testosterone increase after kisspeptin injection compared to kisspeptin while a stimulatory additive effect was observed in the kisspeptin/naloxone group compared to either naloxone or kisspeptin. Conclusion Morphine and kisspeptin systems may interact with each other to control the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. PMID:25083187

  9. Impact of adherence on subcutaneous interferon beta-1a effectiveness administered by Rebismart® in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Edo Solsona, María Dolores; Monte Boquet, Emilio; Casanova Estruch, Bonaventura; Poveda Andrés, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    Background Adherence to disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) is one of the key factors for achieving optimal clinical outcomes. Rebismart® is an injection device for subcutaneous administration of interferon beta-1a (INF β-1a) that is also able to monitor adherence objectively. The aim of this study was to describe adherence to INF β-1a using the said electronic autoinjection device and to explore the relationship between adherence and relapses in a Spanish cohort. Methods This is a retrospective observational study in which 110 Spanish patients self-administered INF β-1a subcutaneously using an electronic autoinjection device between June 2010 and June 2015. The primary end point was the percentage of adherence measured by Rebismart® to subcutaneous INF β-1a injections calculated as number of injections received in time period versus number of injections scheduled in time period. Other variables recorded were demographic and clinical data. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 19.0 software. Results Median adherence for the total study period was 96.5% (interquartile range [IQR]: 91.1–99.1). Similar values were observed during the first 6 months: 98.7% (IQR: 91.3–100), and the last 6 months: 97.6% (IQR: 91.1–99.8). Median duration of treatment was 979 days (IQR: 613.8–1,266.8). During the entire treatment period, 77.3% of patients were relapse free and mean annualized relapse rate was 0.14 (standard deviation: 0.33). Increased adherence was associated with better clinical outcomes, leading to lower relapse risk (odds ratio: 0.953; 95% confidence interval: 0.912–0.995). Specifically, every percentage unit increase in adherence resulted in a 4.7% decrease in relapse. Conclusion Patients with multiple sclerosis who self-injected INF β-1a with Rebismart® had excellent adherence, correlating with a high proportion of relapse-free patients and very low annualized relapse rate. PMID:28280313

  10. Management and prevention of complications of subcutaneous intravenous infusion port.

    PubMed

    Jan, Hsiang-Chun; Chou, Shao-Jiun; Chen, Tzu-Hung; Lee, Chuin-I; Chen, Tze-Kai; Lou, Mary Ann

    2012-03-01

    Subcutaneous intravenous infusion port (SIIP) has become an increasingly and widely adopted technique in the management of oncology patients. This route has been used not only for chemotherapy but also for parenteral nutrition provision, blood transfusion, medication administration, blood sample collection, hemodialysis, and so on. This system provides a safe vascular access with low complication rate which helps preventing patients from vascular infection and catheter associated thrombosis. In this study, we reviewed 1247 cases of breast cancer patients that had subcutaneous intravenous infusion port implanted for chemotherapy in our general surgery department from 1990 to 2008. The result indicates that complication decreases as our technique and experience mature. We hereby share our accrued experience and improved technique, hoping to be of help to young surgeons.

  11. Conductivities of epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue at intermediate frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, K.; Sasaki, K.; Watanabe, S.

    2016-06-01

    Novel data for the conductivities of the tissues composing the skin, which are the epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous tissue, were obtained at intermediate frequencies by in vitro measurement. The conductivity of the epidermis was determined from those of the dermis and bulk skin. The conductivities of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue were almost constant from 10 kHz to 1 MHz. On the other hand, a frequency dependence was observed for the epidermis; the conductivity decreases with decreasing frequency. It was found that the conductivity of bulk skin is not determined by that of the dermis but by that of the epidermis. The presented data are expected to contribute to the assessment of safety and to the research and development of medical applications.

  12. Catamenial hemoptysis accompanied by subcutaneous endometriosis treated with combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hye-In; Kim, Sung-Eun; Lee, Yoo-Young; Choi, Chel-Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Extra pelvic endometriosis is considered to be rare. This paper reports a case of catamenial hemoptysis accompanied by subcutaneous endometriosis in 26-year-old woman. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed a focal ground-glass opacity lesion in the posterior segment of the right upper lobe. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of endometriosis of right lung and concurrent subcutaneous endometriosis. She was treated with surgical resection of the endometriosis lesions on two different sites and perioperative gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist therapy. The 6-month follow-up after combination treatment showed no recurrence. Though long-term follow-up result is needed, aggressive treatment using combination treatment (surgery and perioperative medication) should be considered for symptomatic extra pelvic endometriosis. PMID:28344969

  13. Conductivities of epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue at intermediate frequencies.

    PubMed

    Wake, K; Sasaki, K; Watanabe, S

    2016-06-21

    Novel data for the conductivities of the tissues composing the skin, which are the epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous tissue, were obtained at intermediate frequencies by in vitro measurement. The conductivity of the epidermis was determined from those of the dermis and bulk skin. The conductivities of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue were almost constant from 10 kHz to 1 MHz. On the other hand, a frequency dependence was observed for the epidermis; the conductivity decreases with decreasing frequency. It was found that the conductivity of bulk skin is not determined by that of the dermis but by that of the epidermis. The presented data are expected to contribute to the assessment of safety and to the research and development of medical applications.

  14. Simple technique for evacuation of traumatic subcutaneous haematomas under tension

    PubMed Central

    Chami, George; Chami, Belinda; Hatley, Edward; Dabis, Hossam

    2005-01-01

    Background Traumatic subcutaneous haematomas are common cases in the accident and emergency department. Occasionally, urgent evacuation is required to prevent skin necrosis. Methods We present a simple and safe technique, based on a principle similar to liposuction to evacuate traumatic subcutaneous haematomas under tension. Instruments readily available in the accident and emergency department are used without the need of general anaesthesia. Results The technique was performed in six cases without complication such as infection or re-collection of the haematoma under tension. We present two typical scenarios where urgent evacuation was indicated and the technique performed. Conclusion The technique is useful as an urgent and safe procedure in the accident and emergency department setting. PMID:16351725

  15. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion during general anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    White, William A; Montalvo, Helen; Monday, Joshua M

    2004-10-01

    Care of the patient with diabetes mellitus presents numerous challenges to the anesthesia practitioner. There is no perfect way to care for these patients nor are any 2 patients with diabetes exactly alike. With the advent of subcutaneous insulin pumps, the anesthesia practitioner has another tool to assist him or her in giving high quality care. This case study describes the anesthesia care provided to a patient with type 1 diabetes who wore his continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump during general anesthesia for surgical repair of a herniated lumbar disk. Importantly, the anesthesia plan involved a collaborative effort with the patient. Blood glucose levels were stable throughout the perioperative period. Little or no extra work was required of the CRNA. This case showed that the CSII could be used to minimize perioperative fluctuations in blood sugar. Postoperatively, the patient expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the anesthetic.

  16. Methotrexate-conjugated PEGylated dendrimers show differential patterns of deposition and activity in tumor-burdened lymph nodes after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaminskas, Lisa M; McLeod, Victoria M; Ascher, David B; Ryan, Gemma M; Jones, Seth; Haynes, John M; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Chan, Linda J; Sloan, Erica K; Finnin, Benjamin A; Williamson, Mark; Velkov, Tony; Williams, Elizabeth D; Kelly, Brian D; Owen, David J; Porter, Christopher J H

    2015-02-02

    The current study sought to explore whether the subcutaneous administration of lymph targeted dendrimers, conjugated with a model chemotherapeutic (methotrexate, MTX), was able to enhance anticancer activity against lymph node metastases. The lymphatic pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity of PEGylated polylysine dendrimers conjugated to MTX [D-MTX(OH)] via a tumor-labile hexapeptide linker was examined in rats and compared to a similar system where MTX was α-carboxyl O-tert-butylated [D-MTX(OtBu)]. The latter has previously been shown to exhibit longer plasma circulation times. D-MTX(OtBu) was well absorbed from the subcutaneous injection site via the lymph, and 3 to 4%/g of the dose was retained by sentinel lymph nodes. In contrast, D-MTX(OH) showed limited absorption from the subcutaneous injection site, but absorption was almost exclusively via the lymph. The retention of D-MTX(OH) by sentinel lymph nodes was also significantly elevated (approximately 30% dose/g). MTX alone was not absorbed into the lymph. All dendrimers displayed lower lymph node targeting after intravenous administration. Despite significant differences in the lymph node retention of D-MTX(OH) and D-MTX(OtBu) after subcutaneous and intravenous administration, the growth of lymph node metastases was similarly inhibited. In contrast, the administration of MTX alone did not significantly reduce lymph node tumor growth. Subcutaneous administration of drug-conjugated dendrimers therefore provides an opportunity to improve drug deposition in downstream tumor-burdened lymph nodes. In this case, however, increased lymph node biodistribution did not correlate well with antitumor activity, possibly suggesting constrained drug release at the site of action.

  17. Cervicothoracic Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum After Third Molar Extraction.

    PubMed

    Picard, Maxime; Pham Dang, Nathalie; Mondie, Jean Michel; Barthelemy, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Third molar extraction is one of the most common interventions in dental and maxillofacial surgery. Complications are frequent and well documented, with swelling, pain, bleeding, infection, and lingual or alveolar nerve injury being the most common. This report describes a case of subcutaneous extensive emphysema and pneumomediastinum that occurred 4 days after extraction of an impacted right mandibular third molar. The management and etiology of this case and those reported in the literature are discussed.

  18. Gonococcal Subcutaneous Abscess and Pyomyositis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jitmuang, Anupop; Boonyasiri, Adhiratha; Keurueangkul, Nukool; Leelaporn, Amornrut; Leelarasamee, Amorn

    2012-01-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI) is an uncommon complication of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection, its manifestation varies from a classic arthritis-dermatitis syndrome to uncommon pyogenic infections of several organs. Herein, we reported atypical presentation of DGI with subcutaneous abscess of right knee, pyomyositis of right lower extremity, and subsequently complicated by Escherichia coli pyomyositis. This infection responded to appropriate antimicrobial therapy and prompt surgical management with good clinical outcome. PMID:22919521

  19. Pneumoperitoneum, Retropneumoperitoneum, Pneumomediastinum, and Diffuse Subcutaneous Emphysema following Diagnostic Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Falidas, Evangelos; Anyfantakis, Georgios; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Goudeli, Christina; Stavros, Boutzouvis; Villias, Constantinos

    2012-01-01

    Colonoscopy is a widely used diagnostic and curative procedure. Extraperitoneal perforation with pneumoretroperitoneum, pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema combined with intraperitoneal perforation is an extremely rare complication. We report a case of a 78-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and diffuse abdominal, chest, neck, and facial swelling appeared after a diagnostic colonoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are discussed. PMID:23024878

  20. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  1. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  2. 21 CFR 880.5965 - Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion... Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5965 Subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port and catheter. (a) Identification. A subcutaneous, implanted, intravascular infusion port...

  3. Sonographic evaluation of visceral and subcutaneous fat in obese children*

    PubMed Central

    Sakuno, Telma; Tomita, Letícia Mary; Tomita, Carolina Mywa; Giuliano, Isabela de Carlos Back; Ibagy, Amanda; Perin, Nilza Maria Medeiros; Poeta, Lisiane Schilling

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sonographic measurements of visceral and subcutaneous fat in children, and to investigate the usefulness of preperitoneal fat (PF) and the abdominal wall fat index (AFI) as parameters to determine visceral fat and presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in obese children. Materials and Methods A case-control study of a sample including 44 children (22 cases and 22 controls) matched by sex and age. The Student t test and the Fisher exact test were utilized in the descriptive and bivariate analysis. Results The sonographic parameters evaluated - subcutaneous cell tissue, PF and intraperitoneal fat, and NAFLD - presented high statistical association with body mass index. NAFLD was observed in eight obese patients (36.36%), and PF and AFI were the variables with highest statistical significance, with p < 0.0001. Conclusion Ultrasonography is useful tool in the differentiation and quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat in children. The measures of PF and AFI are useful in the assessment of visceral fat and NAFLD in obese children. PMID:25741071

  4. BCG vaccination as a cause of osteomyelitis and subcutaneous abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, H; Salmi, I; Vahvanen, V; Ahlqvist, J

    1984-01-01

    Ten patients with osteomyelitis and three with a subcutaneous abscess, all caused by BCG vaccination, are described. All patients were less than 3 years old and had as newborns been vaccinated intracutaneously in the left gluteal or hip area. Pain, limping, or a slightly tender subcutaneous induration were the primary symptoms. The sites of predilection of osteomyelitis were the metaphysis or epiphysis of the femur, these being affected in five out of 10 cases. All three subcutaneous abscesses were in the thoracic region. Prolonged (up to 30 months) combined tuberculostatic medication, in addition to appropriate surgical procedures, resulted in healing, but two cases of arthritis and two of secondary abscesses developed. In addition, sequestrectomy and two late operations, for coxa valga and hip subluxation, were deemed to be necessary. Radiographs showed femoral overgrowth of up to 1 cm in two symptomless patients three to seven years after the first discharge. We conclude that the benefits of BCG vaccination should be weighed against the risk of complications, especially in countries with a low incidence of tuberculosis. PMID:6703766

  5. [Establishment of endometriosis subcutaneous model in immunodeficient nude mice].

    PubMed

    Ni, H J; Zhang, Z; Dai, Y D; Zhang, S Y

    2016-09-06

    Objective: To establish a model of endometriosis in immunodeficient nude mice and compare the outcome of the model construction between two different techniques. Methods: Eighteen nude mice were divided into 2 groups, with 9 mice in each group. All nude mice received a subcutaneous transplantation of endometrial fragments, followed by sutured the wounded skin (sutured group) or not (no-sutured group). Then the success rate of the model construction, inflammation of the wounds and the animal survival rate in the two groups were analyzed. Result: In no-sutured group, the survival rate of animal and the success rate of the model construction were 9/9 and 8/9 respectively, with 8/9 survival rate and 7/9 success rate in sutured group. No significant difference was found between the two groups. And no obvious inflammation was presented in the wounds for both groups. Conclusion: It is an effective method to establish animal model of endometriosis by subcutaneous transplantation in nude mice. After transplantation, it does not affect the outcome of the survival rate of the animal and the success rate of the model construction whether we suture the wounded skin. Considering the shorter operation time, we found it's a simpler and time saving method to establish endometriosis by subcutaneously transplanting endometrial fragments in nude mice with no skin-sutured. And this model is worth of promotion.

  6. The use of long acting subcutaneous levonorgestrel (LNG) gel depot as an effective contraceptive option for cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Wheaton, C J; Savage, A; Shukla, A; Neiffer, D; Qu, W; Sun, Y; Lasley, B L

    2011-01-01

    Cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) are a critically endangered species that have been bred successfully in captivity for many years. For two decades, the Cotton-top Tamarin SSP(©) has been challenged with a high rate of reproduction combined with a history of contraceptive failures and nonrecommended births using the current Depo Provera(®) (medroxyprogesterone acetate) injection followed by MGA (melengestrol acetate) implant contraception combination. To address these issues we have developed and tested the use of levonorgestrel (LNG) as an effective contraception option for cotton-top tamarins. LNG was delivered in an injectable, gel matrix consisting of polylactic-co-glycolic acid, triethyl citrate and N-methylpyrrolidone. This gel matrix forms a biodegradable depot at the subcutaneous injection site providing slow release of the active ingredient. Gel matrix composition and LNG concentration were adjusted in four gel formulations to maximize the duration of contraceptive efficacy while minimizing immediate post-injection increases in fecal LNG concentration. LNG treatment (68.44 ± 8.61 mg/kg) successfully eliminated ovarian cycles (fecal pregnanediol-3-glucuronide (PdG) and estrone conjugates (E(1) C)) for 198.8 ± 70.3 days (formulation four; range 19-50 weeks). It was demonstrated that subcutaneous LNG depot injection was an effective, reversible contraceptive option for the management of cotton-top tamarins in captivity.

  7. Autologous tissue patch rich in stem cells created in the subcutaneous tissue

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gomez, Ignacio; Gudehithlu, Krishnamurthy P; Arruda, Jose A L; Singh, Ashok K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether we could create natural autologous tissue patches in the subcutaneous space for organ repair. METHODS: We implanted the following three types of inert foreign bodies in the subcutaneous tissue of rats to produce autologous tissue patches of different geometries: (1) a large-sized polyvinyl tube (L = 25 mm, internal diameter = 7 mm) sealed at both ends by heat application for obtaining a large flat piece of tissue patch for organ repair; (2) a fine polyvinyl tubing (L = 25 mm, internal diameter = 3 mm) for creating cylindrically shaped grafts for vascular or nerve repair; and (3) a slurry of polydextran particle gel for inducing a bladder-like tissue. Implantation of inert materials was carried out by making a small incision on one or either side of the thoracic-lumbar region of rats. Subcutaneous pockets were created by blunt dissection around the incision into which the inert bodies were inserted (1 or 2 per rat). The incisions were closed with silk sutures, and the animals were allowed to recover. In case of the polydextran gel slurry 5 mL of the slurry was injected in the subcutaneous space using an 18 gauge needle. After implanting the foreign bodies a newly regenerated encapsulating tissue developed around the foreign bodies. The tissues were harvested after 4-42 d of implantation and studied by gross examination, histology, and histochemistry for organization, vascularity, and presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (CD271+CD34+ cells). RESULTS: Implanting a large cylindrically shaped polyvinyl tube resulted in a large flat sheet of tissue that could be tailored to a specific size and shape for use as a tissue patch for repairing large organs. Implanting a smaller sized polyvinyl tube yielded a cylindrical tissue that could be useful for repairing nerves and blood vessels. This type of patch could be obtained in different lengths by varying the length of the implanted tube. Implanting a suspension of inert polydextran suspension

  8. Pharmacokinetics of 1-methyl-L-tryptophan after single and repeated subcutaneous application in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Wirthgen, Elisa; Kanitz, Ellen; Tuchscherer, Margret; Tuchscherer, Armin; Domanska, Grazyna; Weitschies, Werner; Seidlitz, Anne; Scheuch, Eberhard; Otten, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Increased activity of the tryptophan-metabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is associated with immunological and neurological disorders, and inhibition of its enzyme activity could be a therapeutic approach for treatment of these disorders. The aim of the present study was to establish a large animal model to study the accumulation of the potential IDO inhibitor 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT) in blood and different organs of domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domestica). Because 1-MT has not been previously evaluated in pigs, the pharmacokinetics of a single subcutaneous 1-MT application was investigated. Based on this kinetic study, a profile for repeated 1-MT applications over a period of five days was simulated and tested. The results show that a single administration of 1-MT increases its concentrations in blood, with the maximum concentration being obtained at 12 h. Repeated daily injections of 1‑MT generated increasing plasma concentrations followed by a steady-state after two days. Twelve hours after the final application, accumulation of 1-MT was observed in the brain and other organs, with a substantial variability among various tissues. The concentrations of 1-MT measured in plasma and tissues were similar to, or even higher, than those of tryptophan. Our data indicate that repeated subcutaneous injections of 1-MT provide a suitable model for accumulation of 1-MT in plasma and tissues of domestic pigs. These findings provide a basis for further research on the immunoregulatory functions of IDO in a large animal model. PMID:26725587

  9. Comparison of sarin and cyclosarin toxicity by subcutaneous, intravenous and inhalation exposure in Gottingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Hulet, Stanley W; Sommerville, Douglas R; Miller, Dennis B; Scotto, Jacqueline A; Muse, William T; Burnett, David C

    2014-02-01

    Sexually mature male and female Gottingen minipigs were exposed to various concentrations of GB and GF vapor via whole-body inhalation exposures or to liquid GB or GF via intravenous or subcutaneous injections. Vapor inhalation exposures were for 10, 60 or 180 min. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to calculate the median effect levels for severe effects (ECT50 and ED50) and lethality (LCT50 and LD50). Ordinal regression was used to model the concentration × time profile of the agent toxicity. Contrary to that predicted by Haber's rule, LCT50 values increased as the duration of the exposures increased for both nerve agents. The toxic load exponents (n) were calculated to be 1.38 and 1.28 for GB and GF vapor exposures, respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures to vapor GB in male minipigs were 73, 106 and 182 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60 - and 180-min exposures to vapor GB in female minipigs were 87, 127 and 174 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures to vapor GF in male minipigs were 218, 287 and 403 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures in female minipigs were 183, 282 and 365 mg min/m(3), respectively. For GB vapor exposures, there was a tenuous gender difference which did not exist for vapor GF exposures. Surprisingly, GF was 2-3 times less potent than GB via the inhalation route of exposure regardless of exposure duration. Additionally GF was found to be less potent than GB by intravenous and subcutaneous routes.

  10. Prevention of Hereditary Angioedema Attacks with a Subcutaneous C1 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, Hilary; Cicardi, Marco; Craig, Timothy; Bork, Konrad; Grattan, Clive; Baker, James; Li, Huamin H; Reshef, Avner; Bonner, James; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Anderson, John; Lumry, William R; Farkas, Henriette; Katelaris, Constance H; Sussman, Gordon L; Jacobs, Joshua; Riedl, Marc; Manning, Michael E; Hebert, Jacques; Keith, Paul K; Kivity, Shmuel; Neri, Sergio; Levy, Donald S; Baeza, Maria L; Nathan, Robert; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Caballero, Teresa; Yang, William; Crisan, Ioana; Hernandez, María D; Hussain, Iftikhar; Tarzi, Michael; Ritchie, Bruce; Králíčková, Pavlina; Guilarte, Mar; Rehman, Syed M; Banerji, Aleena; Gower, Richard G; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Edelman, Jonathan; Feuersenger, Henrike; Lawo, John-Philip; Machnig, Thomas; Pawaskar, Dipti; Pragst, Ingo; Zuraw, Bruce L

    2017-03-23

    Background Hereditary angioedema is a disabling, potentially fatal condition caused by deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) of the C1 inhibitor protein. In a phase 2 trial, the use of CSL830, a nanofiltered C1 inhibitor preparation that is suitable for subcutaneous injection, resulted in functional levels of C1 inhibitor activity that would be expected to provide effective prophylaxis of attacks. Methods We conducted an international, prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging, phase 3 trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of self-administered subcutaneous CSL830 in patients with type I or type II hereditary angioedema who had had four or more attacks in a consecutive 2-month period within 3 months before screening. We randomly assigned the patients to one of four treatment sequences in a crossover design, each involving two 16-week treatment periods: either 40 IU or 60 IU of CSL830 per kilogram of body weight twice weekly followed by placebo, or vice versa. The primary efficacy end point was the number of attacks of angioedema. Secondary efficacy end points were the proportion of patients who had a response (≥50% reduction in the number of attacks with CSL830 as compared with placebo) and the number of times that rescue medication was used. Results Of the 90 patients who underwent randomization, 79 completed the trial. Both doses of CSL830, as compared with placebo, reduced the rate of attacks of hereditary angioedema (mean difference with 40 IU, -2.42 attacks per month; 95% confidence interval [CI], -3.38 to -1.46; and mean difference with 60 IU, -3.51 attacks per month; 95% CI, -4.21 to -2.81; P<0.001 for both comparisons). Response rates were 76% (95% CI, 62 to 87) in the 40-IU group and 90% (95% CI, 77 to 96) in the 60-IU group. The need for rescue medication was reduced from 5.55 uses per month in the placebo group to 1.13 uses per month in the 40-IU group and from 3.89 uses in the placebo group to 0

  11. Pharmacokinetics of gamithromycin after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Watteyn, A; Plessers, E; Wyns, H; De Baere, S; De Backer, P; Croubels, S

    2013-06-01

    Gamithromycin is a new macrolide antibiotic that is only registered for use in cattle to treat respiratory disorders such as bovine respiratory disease. The aim of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of gamithromycin in broiler chickens. Gamithromycin (6 mg/kg of BW) was injected intravenously (IV) or subcutaneously (SC) to six 4-wk-old chickens in a parallel study design, and blood was collected at different time points postadministration. Quantification of gamithromycin in plasma was performed using an in-house validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method and the pharmacokinetics analyzed according to a 2-compartmental model. Following IV administration, the mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0→∞), and α and β half-life of elimination (t1/2el α and t1/2el β) were 3,998 h•ng/mL, 0.90 h, and 14.12 h, respectively. Similar values were obtained after a SC bolus injection, i.e., 4,095 h•ng/mL, 0.34 h, and 11.63 h, for AUC0→∞, t1/2el α, and t1/2el β, respectively. The mean maximum plasma concentration (889.46 ng/mL) appeared at 0.13 h. Gamithromycin showed a large volume of distribution after IV as well as SC administration, 27.08 and 20.89 L/kg, respectively, and a total body clearance of 1.61 and 1.77 L/h•kg, respectively. The absolute bioavailability was 102.4%, showing that there is a complete absorption of gamithromycin after a SC bolus injection of 6 mg/kg of BW.

  12. Use of an implantable pump for controlled subcutaneous insulin delivery in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Padrutt, I; Macha, K; Riederer, A; Pesaresi, M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the safety and reliability of a research-grade implantable pump for controlled delivery of insulin glargine in cats. For this purpose, a small telemetrically controlled drug delivery pump with a refillable reservoir was implanted into the subcutaneous tissues of the dorsal neck in 10 clinically healthy cats. The reservoir was filled with insulin glargine, and the pump was programmed to deliver four boluses of 0.25 IU/kg, 2-3 weeks apart. As a control, insulin glargine (0.25 IU/kg) was injected SC. Blood glucose and plasma insulin glargine concentrations were measured before each bolus and SC injection and for 8 h afterward. Cats were monitored for signs of discomfort. Pumps were easily implanted and well tolerated by all cats. The experiment was completed in five of 10 cats. In four, the pump failed because of technical reasons; another cat developed severe hypoglycaemia attributable to insulin leakage. Overall, plasma insulin glargine increased after six of eight (75%) initial boluses and after one of 16 (6%) successive boluses. Glucose decreased after seven of eight (88%) initial boluses and after four of 16 (25%) successive boluses. Only the first bolus significantly increased plasma insulin glargine (P = 0.008) and decreased glucose (P = 0.008). Of 20 SC injections, 10 (50%) increased plasma insulin glargine (P <0.001) and 12 (60%) decreased glucose (P <0.001). The pump did not cause discomfort in cats, but life-threatening hypoglycaemia occurred in one. Frequent device problems suggest that the pump needs improvements. Because successive boluses did not increase plasma insulin glargine, this type of insulin may not be appropriate with the pump.

  13. Oral Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins and Peptides: An Overview of Current Technologies and Recommendations for Bridging from Approved Intravenous or Subcutaneous Administration to Novel Oral Regimens.

    PubMed

    Philippart, M; Schmidt, J; Bittner, B

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 1980s, therapeutic proteins and peptides have become established as an important class of pharmaceuticals. Due to their low oral bioavailability, which results from pre-systemic degradation and poor gastrointestinal absorption, most therapeutic proteins and peptides are administered intravenously. While subcutaneous formulations of some therapeutic proteins and peptides have been shown to improve patient convenience and reduce medical resource utilization, oral administration is generally the preferred administration route. Some therapeutic proteins and peptides employing novel oral delivery technologies have reached late-stage clinical development. To develop a new oral formulation of a therapeutic protein or peptide currently marketed as an injectable product, technical, nonclinical, and clinical studies are required to demonstrate similar safety and efficacy compared with the existing administration route. Since there is little experience with oral therapeutic proteins and peptides, this review provides recommendations for bridging from an approved intravenous or subcutaneous regimen to novel oral administration of the same therapeutic protein or peptide, based on precedents from intravenous-to-subcutaneous bridging approaches for trastuzumab, rituximab, tocilizumab, and bortezomib. If the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship is well characterized, demonstration of comparability in prespecified pharmacokinetic parameters might form a basis for establishing similar efficacy and safety of the oral formulation vs. the reference product. Although oral administration of therapeutic proteins and peptides remains challenging, given recent progress with novel delivery technologies, intravenous/subcutaneous-to-oral nonclinical and clinical bridging programs may soon be utilized to support approval of new oral formulations.

  14. Sensitization by subcutaneous route is superior to intraperitoneal route in induction of asthma by house dust mite in a murine mode

    PubMed Central

    Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; de Almeida, Francine Maria; Brüggemann, Thayse Regina; Kalil, Jorge; Martins, Milton de Arruda; Arantes-Costa, Fernanda Magalhães; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To develop a new experimental model of chronic allergic pulmonary disease induced by house dust mite, with marked production of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE), eosinophilic inflammatory infiltrate in the airways and remodeling, comparing two different routes of sensitization. Methods The protocol lasted 30 days. BALB/c mice were divided into six groups and were sensitized subcutaneously or intraperitoneally with saline (negative control), Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p) 50 or 500mcg in three injections. Subsequently they underwent intranasal challenge with Der p or saline for 7 days and were sacrificed 24 hours after the last challenge. We evaluated the titration of specific IgE anti-Der p, eosinophilic density in peribronchovascular space and airway remodeling. Results Both animals sensitized intraperitoneally and subcutaneously produced specific IgE anti-Der p. Peribronchovascular eosinophilia increased only in mice receiving lower doses of Der p. However, only the group sensitized with Der p 50mcg through subcutaneously route showed significant airway remodeling. Conclusion In this murine model of asthma, both pathways of sensitization led to the production of specific IgE and eosinophilia in the airways. However, only the subcutaneously route was able to induce remodeling. Furthermore, lower doses of Der p used in sensitization were better than higher ones, suggesting immune tolerance. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of this model in the development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, but it can already be replicated in experiments to create new therapeutic drugs or immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26761554

  15. Temporal fossa defects: techniques for injecting hyaluronic acid filler and complications after hyaluronic acid filler injection.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2015-09-01

    Facial changes with aging include thinning of the epidermis, loss of skin elasticity, atrophy of muscle, and subcutaneous fat and bony changes, all which result in a loss of volume. As temporal bones become more concave, and the temporalis atrophies and the temporal fat pad decreases, volume loss leads to an undesirable, gaunt appearance. By altering the temporal fossa and upper face with hyaluronic acid filler, those whose specialty is injecting filler can achieve a balanced and more youthful facial structure. Many techniques have been described to inject filler into the fossa including a "fanned" pattern of injections, highly diluted filler injection, and the method we describe using a three-injection approach. Complications of filler in the temporal fossa include bruising, tenderness, swelling, Tyndall effect, overcorrection, and chewing discomfort. Although rare, more serious complications include infection, foreign body granuloma, intravascular necrosis, and blindness due to embolization into the ophthalmic artery. Using reversible hyaluronic acid fillers, hyaluronidase can be used to relieve any discomfort felt by the patient. Injectors must be aware of the complications that may occur and provide treatment readily to avoid morbidities associated with filler injection into this sensitive area.

  16. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Epidural Injections An epidural injection provides temporary or prolonged relief ... limitations of Epidural Injection? What is an Epidural Injection? An epidural injection is an injection of medication ...

  17. The use of subcutaneous infusion in medication administration.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Janice

    The subcutaneous administration of medications is an area that receives little attention compared with other types of parenteral therapy. Parenteral administration is used by many thousands of patients who self-administer their medication on a daily basis-for example, those using insulin to manage diabetes, recipients of some types of hormone therapy and so on. It is also an effective route for the continuous administration of medication(s) in individuals who are terminally ill. Patients approaching the end of their life may be unable to tolerate the administration of oral medication to control their symptoms and make them more comfortable. This paper will discuss how subcutaneous infusion can be used to deliver these medications, but at the same time how important the selection of the most appropriate subcutaneous infusion device is to the overall comfort of the patient, and to reduce the potential for sharps-related injuries to healthcare workers. Appropriate device selection, together with its management, is an important contributing factor to patient safety and comfort. It will diminish the potential for premature device loss, which can lead to repeated insertion procedures for the patient, as well as delaying their medication. There is also a resource implication for the NHS, as the replacement of any device involves the use of additional equipment and staff time. Additionally, the use of any infusion device poses a risk to healthcare workers of acquiring a bloodborne infection should they experience a percutaneous injury. Knowledge of what equipment is available will reduce the potential risk to these staff.

  18. Differentiation and characterization of human facial subcutaneous adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Pappas, Apostolos

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with the loss of facial subcutaneous fat and with increased abdominal subcutaneous fat. Site specific differences in adipocyte phenotype and/or gene expression may play a role in these age-related changes. In this study, we isolated and characterized human facial preadipocytes and investigated distinct metabolic properties such as a differentiation pattern in relation to abdominal preadipocytes. Subcutaneous preadipocytes were isolated from human facial and abdominal skin and cultured in the presence of differentiation factors including rosiglitazone, a known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist, isobutyl-methyl xanthine (IBMX) and insulin. Differentiation was characterized microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR. Unexpected superior adipogenic capacity of facial preadipocytes was observed; more facial preadipocytes differentiated in response to rosiglitazone than abdominal preadipocytes and facial preadipocytes retained their ability to differentiate through passage 11 compared with passage 5 for abdominal preadipocytes. Experiments confirmed a reduced lipolysis response in facial versus abdominal adipocytes after exposure to isoproterenol, which was consistent with the reduced β2-adrenergic receptor expression by 60% in the facial cells. The expression of other lipid metabolic gene markers was similar in both facial and abdominal adipocytes with the exception of β3-adrenergic receptor which was only found in abdominal adipose tissue. Gene profiling, by microarray analysis, identified that several HOX genes are robustly reduced in facial adipocytes compared to abdominal adipocytes, suggesting different characteristics between the 2 fat depots. These differences may have implications for development of treatments for facial fat loss during aging. PMID:26167398

  19. Effective treatment of cutaneous and subcutaneous malignant tumours by electrochemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Mir, L. M.; Glass, L. F.; Sersa, G.; Teissié, J.; Domenge, C.; Miklavcic, D.; Jaroszeski, M. J.; Orlowski, S.; Reintgen, D. S.; Rudolf, Z.; Belehradek, M.; Gilbert, R.; Rols, M. P.; Belehradek, J.; Bachaud, J. M.; DeConti, R.; Stabuc, B.; Cemazar, M.; Coninx, P.; Heller, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy (ECT) enhances the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents by administering the drug in combination with short intense electric pulses. ECT is effective because electric pulses permeabilize tumour cell membranes and allow non-permeant drugs, such as bleomycin, to enter the cells. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the anti-tumour effectiveness of ECT with bleomycin on cutaneous and subcutaneous tumours. This article summarizes results obtained in independent clinical trials performed by five cancer centres. A total of 291 cutaneous or subcutaneous tumours of basal cell carcinoma (32), malignant melanoma (142), adenocarcinoma (30) and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (87) were treated in 50 patients. Short and intense electric pulses were applied to tumours percutaneously after intravenous or intratumour administration of bleomycin. The tumours were measured and the response to the treatment evaluated 30 days after the treatment. Objective responses were obtained in 233 (85.3%) of the 273 evaluable tumours that were treated with ECT. Clinical complete responses were achieved in 154 (56.4%) tumours, and partial responses were observed in 79 (28.9%) tumours. The application of electric pulses to the patients was safe and well tolerated. An instantaneous contraction of the underlying muscles was noticed. Minimal adverse side-effects were observed. ECT was shown to be an effective local treatment. ECT was effective regardless of the histological type of the tumour. Therefore, ECT offers an approach to the treatment of cutaneous and subcutaneous tumours in patients with minimal adverse side-effects and with a high response rate. PMID:9649155

  20. Subcutaneous and Sublingual Immunotherapy in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Laura; Nawijn, Martijn C

    2017-01-01

    Allergic asthma, caused by inhaled allergens such as house dust mite or grass pollen, is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, associated with an eosinophilic inflammation of the airways, as well as airway hyper responsiveness and remodeling. The inhaled allergens trigger a type-2 inflammatory response with involvement of innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) and Th2 cells, resulting in high production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. Consequently, renewed allergen exposure results in a classic allergic response with a distinct early and late phase, both resulting in bronchoconstriction and shortness of breath. Allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only treatment that is capable of modifying the immunological process underlying allergic responses including allergic asthma and both subcutaneous AIT (SCIT) as well as sublingual AIT (SLIT) have proven clinical efficacy in long term suppression of the allergic response. Although these treatments are very successful for rhinitis, application of AIT in asthma is hampered by variable efficacy, long duration of treatment, and the risk of severe side-effects. A more profound understanding of the mechanisms by which AIT achieves tolerance to allergens in sensitized individuals is needed to improve its efficacy. Mouse models have been very valuable as a preclinical model to characterize the mechanisms of desensitization in AIT and to evaluate novel approaches for improved efficacy. Here, we present a rapid and reproducible mouse model for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In this model, mice are sensitized with two injections of allergen absorbed to aluminum hydroxide to induce allergic sensitization, followed by subcutaneous injections (SCIT) or sublingual administrations (SLIT) of the allergen as immunotherapy treatment. Finally, mice are challenged by three intranasal allergen administrations. We will describe the protocols as well as the most important read-out parameters including measurement of invasive lung

  1. Subcutaneous and Pulmonary Dirofilariasis with Evidence of Splenic Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Selvachandran, Adarsha

    2016-01-01

    Cases of human dirofilariasis have been reported in several countries around the world, including a large number in the Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Most commonly, these cases have subcutaneous or pulmonary involvement; however, there have been few reports of dirofilariasis involving structures such as large vessels, mesentery, the spermatic cord, and liver. We present a case of an unusual presentation of human dirofilariasis presenting as a shoulder abscess and what is presumed to be pulmonary and splenic involvement in a 55-year-old female. PMID:27579206

  2. Subcutaneous Emphysema in Acute Asthma: A Cause for Concern?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patrick D; King, Thomas J; O'Shea, Donal B

    2015-08-01

    Pneumomediastinum has been described in patients with asthma. In this case report, we describe a young patient who presented to our medical assessment unit with an asthma exacerbation and progressive dyspnea. The patient developed pneumomediastinum, a rare complication of an asthma exacerbation. Pneumomediastinum is usually characterized by chest pain, dyspnea, and neck swelling caused by subcutaneous emphysema. Although the condition is usually benign and treatment is primarily supportive, surgical intervention may be needed if the patient develops hemodynamic compromise or respiratory failure through mechanisms similar to those seen in a tension pneumothorax.

  3. Massive subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and pneumopericardium in children.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Stefano; Franklin, Ashanti; Pierce, James; Ford, Henri; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2010-03-01

    Massive subcutaneous emphysema (SE), pneumomediastinum (PM), and pneumopericardium (PP) are rare conditions in the pediatric population. Air leak syndrome is a constellation of disorders that include SE, PM, PP, and pulmonary interstitial emphysema. In children, SE, PM, and PP are associated with obstructive airway disease most often in the case of asthma. Management may be conservative or involve invasive procedures that require surgical intervention. Here, we describe a case of massive SE, PM, and PP in a 10-year-old child after placement of a peripherally inserted central line and review the literature.

  4. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by Moniliella suaveolens in two cats.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, R A; Connole, M D; McGinnis, M R; Lepelaar, R

    1984-11-01

    Moniliella suaveolens was isolated in pure culture from histologically typical phaeohyphomycotic granulomas containing dematiaceous fungi in two cats. One cat had several slow-growing black lesions up to 2 cm in diameter in the abdominal subcutis. These lesions recurred after surgical excision was attempted. The second cat had a single black subcutaneous 0.5 X 1.5-cm lesion near one dewclaw. This lesion was successfully removed surgically without recurrence. M. suaveolens has not been isolated previously from lesions in animals including man.

  5. Secondary hypogammaglobulinemia in Waldmann's disease treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Patuzzo, G; Tinazzi, E; Micheletti, M; Puccetti, A; Lunardi, C

    2016-03-01

    Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL) is rare disorder characterized by congenital malformation or obstruction of intestinal lymphatic drainage; it is responsible for protein losing enteropathy leading to lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia and hypogammaglobulinemia. A low-fat diet associated with medium-chain triglyceride supplementation is the cornerstone of PIL management. The administration of intravenous immunoglobulins does not always lead to satisfactory plasma levels and therefore the replacement therapy with immunoglobulins is controversial. We describe here the case of a patient with PIL and severe hypogammaglobulinemia treated with immunoglobulins. The striking aspect of this case is the clinical and serological benefit obtained with the subcutaneous compared to the intravenous immunoglobulins administration.

  6. [Replacement therapy with subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiency in children].

    PubMed

    Pac, Małgorzata

    2011-06-01

    Primary antibody deficiency (PAD) is the most common form of primary immunodeficiency (PID), and presents up to 60-70% of PID. The hallmark of PAD are low antibody level and recurrent infections. Patients require life-long immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Now they can be treated either with intravenous (IVIG) or subcutaneous (SCIG) immunoglobulin. The last one is indicated in patients with unacceptable adverse reactions to the intravenous immunoglobulin preparations, with poor vein access or willing to improve the quality of their life. Several data and clinical trials proved that SCIG therapy is at least as safe and efficacious as IVIG to prevent infections in patients with PAD.

  7. 3D Multispectral Light Propagation Model For Subcutaneous Veins Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Paquit, Vincent C; Price, Jeffery R; Meriaudeau, Fabrice; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new 3D light propagation model aimed at understanding the effects of various physiological properties on subcutaneous vein imaging. In particular, we build upon the well known MCML (Monte Carlo Multi Layer) code and present a tissue model that improves upon the current state-of-the-art by: incorporating physiological variation, such as melanin concentration, fat content, and layer thickness; including veins of varying depth and diameter; using curved surfaces from real arm shapes; and modeling the vessel wall interface. We describe our model, present results from the Monte Carlo modeling, and compare these results with those obtained with other Monte Carlo methods.

  8. Clamping compared to cauterization for subcutaneous hemostasis in Pfannenstiel incision.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, Enis; Korkmaz, Vakkas; Kucukozkan, Tuncay

    2011-04-01

    We compared subcutaneous clamping and cauterization for hemostasis at laparotomy with Pfannenstiel incision with reference to surgical site infection, postoperative fever and time taken for incision. A total of 214 patients with consecutive hysterectomies were alternately assigned to incisional hemostasis by clamping (n= 107) or cauterization (n= 107). The groups were similar in terms of age, gravidity, parity, body mass index, uterine size and mean hemoglobin drop. Rates of surgical site infection, postoperative fever and time from skin incision to peritoneal cavity entry were significantly higher in the group with cauterization (p < 0.05).

  9. Orthorexia Nervosa with Hyponatremia, Subcutaneous Emphysema, Pneumomediastimum, Pneumothorax, and Pancytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung

    2011-01-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients. PMID:21998605

  10. Orthorexia nervosa with hyponatremia, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastimum, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung; Kwon, Young Joo

    2011-06-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients.

  11. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  12. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  13. Endoscopically Assisted Anterior Subcutaneous Transposition of Ulnar Nerve.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Ulnar nerve compression at the elbow is the most common neuropathy of the upper extremity. Surgical options include in situ decompression, decompression with anterior transposition of the ulnar nerve, and medial epicondylectomy with or without decompression. With the advancement of endoscopic surgery, techniques of endoscopic in situ decompression of the ulnar nerve and endoscopic anterior transposition of ulnar nerve have been reported. This article describes a technique of endoscopically assisted anterior subcutaneous transposition of ulnar nerve that is composed of an open release and mobilization of the ulnar nerve at and distal to the cubital tunnel and endoscopic release and mobilization of the ulnar nerve proximal to the cubital tunnel.

  14. A supersulfated low-molecular-weight heparin (IK-SSH) increases plasma levels of free and total tissue factor pathway inhibitor after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, B; Glusa, E; Hoppensteadt, D A; Breddin, H K; Amiral, J; Fareed, J

    1998-09-01

    Unfractionated as well as low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are known to cause an increase in blood levels of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). To study the effect of a newly developed supersulfated LMWH (IK-SSH, Iketon Farmaceutici) on TFPI concentrations in human plasma, the compound was injected into volunteers at doses of 0.14, 0.33 and 0.66 mg/kg intravenously or 0.33, 0.66 and 1.0 mg/kg subcutaneously. At certain known times blood was drawn and plasma levels of both total and free TFPI were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methodology. Baseline plasma concentrations of TFPI were 72.2+/-3.1 ng/ml for total and 10.8+/-0.8 ng/ml for free TFPI. Intravenous or subcutaneous injection of IK-SSH led to a strong and long-lasting rise in TFPI levels which were increased more than 5-fold for total TFPI and more than 30-fold for free TFPI. Maximum TFPI levels were reached 5-10 min after intravenous and 60 min after subcutaneous administration. IK-SSH caused prolongation of ex-vivo clotting times in the APTT and Heptest assay, whereas thrombin time was not affected. Anticoagulant actions of IK-SSH showed a significant correlation to plasma concentrations of TFPI and they are thought to be based at least partially on the release of TFPI from vascular sites.

  15. Detection and volume estimation of artificial hematomas in the subcutaneous fatty tissue: comparison of different MR sequences at 3.0 T.

    PubMed

    Ogris, Kathrin; Petrovic, Andreas; Scheicher, Sylvia; Sprenger, Hanna; Urschler, Martin; Hassler, Eva Maria; Yen, Kathrin; Scheurer, Eva

    2017-03-01

    In legal medicine, reliable localization and analysis of hematomas in subcutaneous fatty tissue is required for forensic reconstruction. Due to the absence of ionizing radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is particularly suited to examining living persons with forensically relevant injuries. However, there is limited experience regarding MRI signal properties of hemorrhage in soft tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate MR sequences with respect to their ability to show high contrast between hematomas and subcutaneous fatty tissue as well as to reliably determine the volume of artificial hematomas. Porcine tissue models were prepared by injecting blood into the subcutaneous fatty tissue to create artificial hematomas. MR images were acquired at 3T and four blinded observers conducted manual segmentation of the hematomas. To assess segmentability, the agreement of measured volume with the known volume of injected blood was statistically analyzed. A physically motivated normalization taking into account partial volume effect was applied to the data to ensure comparable results among differently sized hematomas. The inversion recovery sequence exhibited the best segmentability rate, whereas the T1T2w turbo spin echo sequence showed the most accurate results regarding volume estimation. Both sequences led to reproducible volume estimations. This study demonstrates that MRI is a promising forensic tool to assess and visualize even very small amounts of blood in soft tissue. The presented results enable the improvement of protocols for detection and volume determination of hemorrhage in forensically relevant cases and also provide fundamental knowledge for future in-vivo examinations.

  16. Apomorphine injection stimulates beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotropin, and cortisol release in healthy man.

    PubMed

    Jezova, D; Vigas, M

    1988-01-01

    The effect of single injections of a dopaminergic agonist, apomorphine, on pituitary-adrenocortical function was investigated in healthy adult men by the measurement of plasma ACTH, beta-endorphin, cortisol and GH immunoreactivities. Single, subcutaneous injection of a subemetic dose of apomorphine (0.75 mg) resulted in a pronounced increase in plasma concentrations of GH, as well as ACTH, beta-endorphin, and cortisol, without induction of any serious adverse drug effects. These findings were confirmed in two separate experiments.

  17. Beam Injection into RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mackay, W. W.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. We describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks, the application program to steer the beam and the injection kickers. We report on the commissioning of the injection systems and on measurements of the kickers.

  18. Method measuring oxygen tension and transport within subcutaneous devices

    PubMed Central

    Weidling, John; Sameni, Sara; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Botvinick, Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cellular therapies hold promise to replace the implantation of whole organs in the treatment of disease. For most cell types, in vivo viability depends on oxygen delivery to avoid the toxic effects of hypoxia. A promising approach is the in situ vascularization of implantable devices which can mediate hypoxia and improve both the lifetime and utility of implanted cells and tissues. Although mathematical models and bulk measurements of oxygenation in surrounding tissue have been used to estimate oxygenation within devices, such estimates are insufficient in determining if supplied oxygen is sufficient for the entire thickness of the implanted cells and tissues. We have developed a technique in which oxygen-sensitive microparticles (OSMs) are incorporated into the volume of subcutaneously implantable devices. Oxygen partial pressure within these devices can be measured directly in vivo by an optical probe placed on the skin surface. As validation, OSMs have been incorporated into alginate beads, commonly used as immunoisolation devices to encapsulate pancreatic islet cells. Alginate beads were implanted into the subcutaneous space of Sprague–Dawley rats. Oxygen transport through beads was characterized from dynamic OSM signals in response to changes in inhaled oxygen. Changes in oxygen dynamics over days demonstrate the utility of our technology. PMID:25162910

  19. Anterior subcutaneous internal fixation for treatment of unstable pelvic fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fractures of the pelvic ring including disruption of the posterior elements in high-energy trauma have both high morbidity and mortality rates. For some injury pattern part of the initial resuscitation includes either external fixation or plate fixation to close the pelvic ring and decrease blood loss. In certain situations – especially when associated with abdominal trauma and the need to perform laparotomies – both techniques may put the patient at risk of either pintract or deep plate infections. We describe an operative approach to percutaneously close and stabilize the pelvic ring using spinal implants as an internal fixator and report the results in a small series of patients treated with this technique during the resuscitation phase. Findings Four patients were treated by subcutaneous placement of an internal fixator. Screw fixation was carried out by minimally invasive placement of two supra-acetabular iliac screws. Afterwards, a subcutaneous transfixation rod was inserted and attached to the screws after reduction of the pelvic ring. All patients were allowed to fully weight-bear. No losses of reduction or deep infections occurred. Fracture healing was uneventful in all cases. Conclusion Minimally invasive fixation is an alternative technique to stabilize the pelvic ring. The clinical results illustrate that this technique is able to achieve good results in terms of maintenance of reduction the pelvic ring. Also, abdominal surgeries no longer put the patient at risk of infected pins or plates. PMID:24606833

  20. Measurement of subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness by near-infrared.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Yang, Zeqiang; Hao, Dongmei; Zhang, Song; Yang, Yimin; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-06-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with the risks of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and there is a need to measure the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) layer thickness and to understand the distribution of body fat. A device was designed to illuminate the body parts by near-infrared (NIR), measure the backscattered light, and predict the SAT layer thickness. The device was controlled by a single-chip microcontroller (SCM), and the thickness value was presented on a liquid crystal display (LCD). There were 30 subjects in this study, and the measurements were performed on 14 body parts for each subject. The paper investigated the impacts of pressure and skin colour on the measurement. Combining with principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector regression (SVR), the measurement accuracy of SAT layer thickness was 89.1 % with a mechanical caliper as reference. The measuring range was 5-11 mm. The study provides a non-invasive and low-cost technique to detect subcutaneous fat thickness, which is more accessible and affordable compared to other conventional techniques. The designed device can be used at home and in community.

  1. Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, S; Iwai, T; Kitajima, H; Yajima, Y; Ohya, T; Hirota, M; Mitsudo, K; Aoki, N; Yamashita, Y; Omura, S; Tohnai, I

    2013-12-01

    Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of dental procedures. Although most cases of emphysema occur incidentally with the use of a high-speed air turbine handpiece, there have been some reports over the past decade of cases caused by dental laser treatment. Emphysema as a complication caused by the air cooling spray of a dental laser is not well known, even though dental lasers utilize compressed air just as air turbines and syringes do. In this study, we comprehensively reviewed cases of emphysema attributed to dental laser treatment that appeared in the literature between January 2001 and September 2012, and we included three such cases referred to us. Among 13 cases identified in total, nine had cervicofacial subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Compared with past reviews, the incidence of mediastinal emphysema caused by dental laser treatment was higher than emphysema caused by dental procedure without dental laser use. Eight patients underwent CO2 laser treatment and two underwent Er:YAG laser treatment. Nine patients had emphysema following laser irradiation for soft tissue incision. Dentists and oral surgeons should be cognizant of the potential risk for iatrogenic emphysema caused by the air cooling spray during dental laser treatment and ensure proper usage of lasers.

  2. Hyaluronic acid content of deep and subcutaneous bursae of man.

    PubMed Central

    Canoso, J J; Stack, M T; Brandt, K D

    1983-01-01

    To provide a comparison of the contents of subcutaneous and deep bursae we dissected these structures from unfixed cadavers without apparent joint disease. No free fluid was found within any olecranon or prepatellar bursae (examples of subcutaneous bursae), while viscous fluid was invariably present in the (deep) retrocalcaneal bursae. The hyaluronic acid content of the washings of 5 rectrocalcaneal bursae ranged from 142 to 591 nmol hexosamine (mean = 281 nmol hexosamine). In contrast, the hyaluronic acid content of 4 olecranon bursae was much lower (range 35-72 nmol, mean 53 nmol hexosamine), and hyaluronate was not detected in washings from either of 2 prepatellar bursae. The greater hyaluronate content of the retrocalcaneal bursae did not appear to be due to a greater surface area, since on the basis of calculations made from plaster casts the surface areas of the olecranon and prepatellar bursae were approximately 3 times and 2 times, respectively, greater than that of the retrocalcaneal bursae. The data suggest that, although hyaluronic acid may lubricate deep bursae, other factors may be more important in reducing friction within superficial bursae. Images PMID:6847262

  3. Measurement of dielectric properties of subcutaneous fat with open-ended coaxial sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanen, Esko; Lahtinen, Tapani; Nuutinen, Jouni

    1998-03-01

    A three-layer model of stratum corneum, epidermis/dermis and subcutaneous fat has been developed for the capacitance of an open-ended coaxial line in contact with human skin. Applying the model, the electrical properties of subcutaneous fat can be calculated from skin dielectric measurements with three probes of different sizes. The three-layer model is based on a variational formula for the capacitance of the coaxial probe. An accurate approximation for the dielectric constant of the multilayer cutaneous structure is presented for the inverse problem of solving the dielectric constants of various layers. The method was tested at 300 MHz with breast cancer patients who often have radiotherapy-induced late alterations in the structure of subcutaneous fat due to the development of subcutaneous fibrosis. Measurements from 206 sites yielded a good agreement between the dielectric constant of subcutaneous fat and the clinical score for subcutaneous fibrosis.

  4. Measurement of dielectric properties of subcutaneous fat with open-ended coaxial sensors.

    PubMed

    Alanen, E; Lahtinen, T; Nuutinen, J

    1998-03-01

    A three-layer model of stratum corneum, epidermis/dermis and subcutaneous fat has been developed for the capacitance of an open-ended coaxial line in contact with human skin. Applying the model, the electrical properties of subcutaneous fat can be calculated from skin dielectric measurements with three probes of different sizes. The three-layer model is based on a variational formula for the capacitance of the coaxial probe. An accurate approximation for the dielectric constant of the multilayer cutaneous structure is presented for the inverse problem of solving the dielectric constants of various layers. The method was tested at 300 MHz with breast cancer patients who often have radiotherapy-induced late alterations in the structure of subcutaneous fat due to the development of subcutaneous fibrosis. Measurements from 206 sites yielded a good agreement between the dielectric constant of subcutaneous fat and the clinical score for subcutaneous fibrosis.

  5. The pharmacokinetics of cytarabine in dogs when administered via subcutaneous and continuous intravenous infusion routes.

    PubMed

    Crook, K I; Early, P J; Messenger, K M; Muñana, K R; Gallagher, R; Papich, M G

    2013-08-01

    This crossover study compared the pharmacokinetics of cytarabine in six healthy dogs following intravenous constant rate infusion (CRI) and subcutaneous (SC) administrations, as these are two routes of administration commonly employed in the treatment of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology. Each dog received a SC cytarabine injection of 50 mg/m(2) or an 8 h CRI of 25 mg/m(2) per hour, with a 7-day washout before receiving the alternative treatment. Blood samples were collected for 16 h after CRI initiation and for 8 h after SC injection. Plasma concentrations were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using the best-fit compartmental analysis for both CRI and SC routes. Terminal half-life (T(1/2) ) of cytarabine was 1.35 ± 0.3 and 1.15 ± 0.13 h after SC administration and CRI, respectively. Mean peak concentration (Cmax ) was 2.88 and 2.80 μg/mL for SC and CRI administration, respectively. Volume of distribution was 0.66 ± 0.07 l/kg. The 8-h CRI produced steady-state plasma concentrations as determined by consecutive measurement that did not decline until the end of the infusion. The SC administration did not achieve steady-state concentrations because cytarabine administered by this route was rapidly absorbed and eliminated quickly. The steady state achieved with the cytarabine CRI may produce a more prolonged exposure of cytarabine at cytotoxic levels in plasma compared to the concentrations after SC administration.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimonate after intramuscular and subcutaneous administration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Valladares, J E; Freixas, J; Alberola, J; Franquelo, C; Cristofol, C; Arboix, M

    1997-10-01

    Controlling canine leishmaniasis may reduce the incidence of human leishmaniasis, which affect immunocompromised persons, especially those with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Thus, the pharmacokinetics of liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimonate (LMA) in dogs was studied after intramuscular (I.M.) and subcutaneous (S.C.) administration. Serum concentration-time data for both forms of administration were best described by a triexponential open model. The absorption phase showed statistically significant differences between I.M. and S.C. administrations (K01(I.M.) = 0.046/min, K01(S.C.) = 0.025/min). The first phase of decrease of plasma concentrations showed a longer half-life for S.C. than for I.M. administration, with the delay being caused by the slow absorption process after S.C. injection. Mean terminal phase half-lives after administration of I.M. and S.C. were 904.1 min and 637.4 min, respectively. Peak plasma concentrations after administration of I.M. (Cmax = 43.8 microg/ml) and S.C. (Cmax = 24.9 microg/ml) were detected at 42.8 min and 79.8 min, respectively. Urinary excretion of antimony for both routes surpassed 80% during the first 6 hr, with the rest of the drug being excreted slowly over the following 18 hr. The results obtained with this formulation suggest that for treating canine leishmaniasis, it would be more advisable to inject LMA intramuscularly if we assume that the significantly higher Cmax observed after I.M. administration is more relevant to dog's clinical outcome than is maintenance of concentrations over longer periods.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine in northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn; Knych, Heather K; Chinnadurai, Sathya K; Wack, Raymund F

    2015-03-01

    Information regarding analgesics in pinnipeds is limited. This study aimed to establish the pharmacokinetic parameters of a single subcutaneous dose of sustained release buprenorphine (Buprenorphine SR) in juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) with regard to its potential to provide long-lasting analgesia that requires infrequent dosing. Seals (n=26) were administered a single dose of sustained release buprenorphine at 0.12 mg/kg s.c. Blood samples were collected from the extradural intervertebral vein at 0 hr and at three or four of the following time points: 0.5, 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 96, 120, and 144 hr. Seals were examined daily for systemic and local adverse reactions. Plasma was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine concentrations. A noncompartmental analysis for pharmacokinetic parameters was calculated using standard methods and equations. An average maximum concentration of 1.21 ng/ml (0.3-2.9 ng/ml) was detected 12 hr postadministration. Concentrations were quantifiable up to 144 hr postadministration but were below those expected to provide analgesia in some other species. No systemic adverse effects were noted in healthy seals receiving sustained release buprenorphine. Cellulitis or abscesses at the injection site were observed in 6/26 (23%) seals between 24 and 168 hr postadministration. Adverse local effects suggest that this drug should be used with caution in northern elephant seals.

  8. Human eccrine sweat gland cells reconstitute polarized spheroids when subcutaneously implanted with Matrigel in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Mingjun; Chen, Liyun; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Bingna

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that maintenance of cell polarity plays a pivotal role in the regulation of glandular homeostasis and function. We examine the markers for polarity at different time points to investigate the formation of cell polarity during 3D reconstitution of eccrine sweat glands. Mixtures of eccrine sweat gland cells and Matrigel were injected subcutaneously into the inguinal regions of nude mice. At 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks post-implantation, Matrigel plugs were removed and immunostained for basal collagen IV, lateral β-catenin, lateroapical ZO-1 and apical F-actin. The results showed that the cell polarity of the spheroids appeared in sequence. Formation of basal polarity was prior to lateral, apical and lateroapical polarity. Collagen IV was detected basally at 2 weeks, β-catenin laterally and ZO-1 lateroapically at 3 weeks, and F-actin apically at 4 weeks post-implantation. At week 5 and week 6, the localization and the positive percentage of collagen IV, β-catenin, ZO-1 or F-actin in spheroids was similar to that in native eccrine sweat glands. We conclude that the reconstituted 3D eccrine sweat glands are functional or potentially functional.

  9. FAST: towards safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy of persistent life-threatening food allergies.

    PubMed

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K; Neubauer, Angela; Asturias, Juan; Blom, Lars; Boye, Joyce; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Clausen, Michael; Ferrara, Rosa; Garosi, Paula; Huber, Hans; Jensen, Bettina M; Koppelman, Stef; Kowalski, Marek L; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Maillere, Bernard; Mari, Adriano; Martinez, Alberto; Mills, Clare En; Nicoletti, Claudio; Opstelten, Dirk-Jan; Papadopoulos, Nikos G; Portoles, Antonio; Rigby, Neil; Scala, Enrico; Schnoor, Heidi J; Sigurdardottir, Sigurveig T; Stavroulakis, George; Stolz, Frank; Swoboda, Ines; Valenta, Rudolf; van den Hout, Rob; Versteeg, Serge A; Witten, Marianne; van Ree, Ronald

    2012-03-09

    The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused by a single major allergen, parvalbumin (Cyp c 1) and lipid transfer protein (Pru p 3), respectively. Two approaches are being evaluated for achieving hypoallergenicity, i.e. site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. The most promising hypoallergens will be produced under GMP conditions. After pre-clinical testing (toxicology testing and efficacy in mouse models), SCIT with alum-absorbed hypoallergens will be evaluated in phase I/IIa and IIb randomized double-blind placebo-controlled (DBPC) clinical trials, with the DBPC food challenge as primary read-out. To understand the underlying immune mechanisms in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold for fish or peach intake, thereby decreasing their anxiety and dependence on rescue medication.

  10. Effect of subcutaneously administered diclazuril on the output of Eimeria species oocysts by experimentally infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pan, B L; Zhang, Y F; Suo, X; Xue, Y

    2008-02-02

    The effect of subcutaneously injected diclazuril on the output of Eimeria species oocysts was studied in experimentally infected rabbits. Diclazuril was administered either prophylactically at 0.5, 1 or 2 mg/kg bodyweight two days before each rabbit was inoculated with 20,000 oocysts of a mixed-species field isolate of Eimeria or therapeutically at 1, 2 or 4 mg/kg bodyweight five days after they were inoculated. The prophylactic treatments significantly reduced (P<0.05) the output of oocysts in faeces and the numbers in the rabbits' livers at all doses. The therapeutic treatment at 4 mg/kg also caused a significant reduction (P<0.05) in oocyst shedding, but the lower doses resulted in only a moderate reduction. The shedding of the pathogenic species Eimeria stiedae, Eimeria magna, Eimeria irresidua, Eimeria flavescens, Eimeria piriformis and Eimeria intestinalis was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in all the treated groups. The burden of oocysts in the livers of the therapeutic groups (4000 to 9000) were significantly lower (P<0.05) than in the inoculated but untreated control group (23,000), but higher than in the prophylactic groups (around 1000).

  11. Subcutaneous administration of monosodium glutamate to pregnant mice reduces weight gain in pups during lactation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hun; Choi, Tae-Saeng

    2016-04-01

    Administering monosodium glutamate (MSG) to neonatal rodents induces obesity and type 2 diabetes. In addition, several studies have shown that MSG administered to pregnant animals can cross the placenta and reach the foetus. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of administering MSG to pregnant ICR mice on dam and neonatal growth. Pregnant mice were treated with 60 or 120 mg MSG once daily from day 5 of pregnancy to one day before parturition by subcutaneous injection. In addition, the body weights of the neonates were determined until nine weeks of age. The birth weights of neonates were not different between the control and MSG-treated groups. However, MSG treatment resulted in a lower body weight gain of neonates during lactation. In addition, this underweight of the MSG-treated group at weaning returned to normal compared with the control group at five weeks of age. Cross-fostering experiments indicated that the lower body weight gain of neonates in the MSG-treated group during lactation was due to its effects on the dam. Serum prolactin levels and mammary gland development of the mice were examined next to determine the reasons for this lactation problem. Although there were no differences in prolactin levels, morphological analyses of the mammary glands revealed apparent differences, including low numbers and altered phenotype of alveoli, between the control and MSG-treated groups. Taken together, our results show that treating pregnant mice with excess MSG induced lower neonate body weight gain during lactation.

  12. Subcutaneous emphysema of periorbital region after stainless steel crown preparation in a young child

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Agrawal, Piyush; Agrawal, Deepak; Nayak, Prathibha Anand

    2013-01-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema occurs when air is forced beneath the tissue, leading to swelling, crepitus on palpation and has the potential to spread along the fascial planes. This report describes the youngest case of subcutaneous emphysema related to dental treatment that has been documented to date. In addition to the patient's age, the case is of interest because periorbital subcutaneous emphysema is a rarest complication of stainless steel crown procedure. PMID:23704466

  13. Effect of subcutaneous treatment with human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Ju; Yoon, Tae Gyoon; Kang, Moonkyu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aim to determine the in vivo effect of human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) on neuropathic pain, using three, principal peripheral neuropathic pain models. Four weeks after hUCB-MSC transplantation, we observed significant antinociceptive effect in hUCB-MSC–transplanted rats compared to that in the vehicle-treated control. Spinal cord cells positive for c-fos, CGRP, p-ERK, p-p 38, MMP-9 and MMP 2 were significantly decreased in only CCI model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats, while spinal cord cells positive for CGRP, p-ERK and MMP-2 significantly decreased in SNL model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats and spinal cord cells positive for CGRP and MMP-2 significantly decreased in SNI model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats, compared to the control 4 weeks or 8weeks after transplantation (p<0.05). However, cells positive for TIMP-2, an endogenous tissue inhibitor of MMP-2, were significantly increased in SNL and SNI models of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats. Taken together, subcutaneous injection of hUCB-MSCs may have an antinociceptive effect via modulation of pain signaling during pain signal processing within the nervous system, especially for CCI model. Thus, subcutaneous administration of hUCB-MSCs might be beneficial for improving those patients suffering from neuropathic pain by decreasing neuropathic pain activation factors, while increasing neuropathic pain inhibition factor. PMID:28280408

  14. Subcutaneous pedicled V-Y advancement flap for surgical reconstruction of the auricle of the ear.

    PubMed

    González-Sixto, B; Pérez-Bustillo, A; Otero-Rivas, M M; Rodríguez-Prieto, M Á

    2014-05-01

    The subcutaneous pedicled V-Y advancement flap is useful for the repair of small and medium-sized defects in areas where it is easy to obtain a good subcutaneous pedicle (upper lip, cheek, eyebrow, and nasal tip and ala). The almost complete absence of subcutaneous tissue on the anterior aspect of the auricle of the ear can limit the use of this approach in this region. We present 4 patients in whom subcutaneous pedicled V-Y advancement flaps were used to repair surgical defects of the helix, scaphoid fossa, and antitragus, achieving a good functional and aesthetic result in all cases.

  15. Two Cases of Subcutaneous Infection Due to Phaeoacremonium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Guarro, Josep; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Gené, Josepa; Grazziotin, Neiva Aparecida; Mazzuco, Rosemari; Dalmagro, Cristiane; Capilla, Javier; Zaror, Luis; Mayayo, Emilio

    2003-01-01

    We describe two cases in Brazil of human subcutaneous infections due to Phaeoacremonium spp. The first case was caused by Phaeoacremonium aleophilum. The patient presented with a unique fistulized nodule on the left ankle. The fungus was detected by direct microscopic examination and was isolated repeatedly from material collected from the lesion. This is the first reported case of human infection caused by this fungus. The second case was caused by Phaeoacremonium rubrigenum. The patient presented with multiple nodules around the left ankle and foot. The fungus was detected by direct examination of pus and histological sections of the nodules. It was repeatedly isolated from the clinical specimens. This is the second reported case of human infection caused by this species. PMID:12624080

  16. [Subcutaneous immunoglobulin. Treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculo-neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nogués, Martín A; Varela, Francisco J; Seminario, Gisela; Insúa, María C; Bezrodnik, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an acquired disease that may affect nerve roots and peripheral nerves. Despite its low incidence, diagnosis is particularly important because there are different effective treatments. Human immunoglobulin is one of the mainstays of the treatment. Although there are few studies up to date, subcutaneous immunoglobulin (IgSC) has been proposed as an alternative to intravenous administration with similar efficacy. We present three cases with definite CIDP, classified according to the European Federation of Neurological Societies / Peripheral Nerve, Society (EFNS /PNS) criteria in which was used SCIgG as a treatment after success with the intravenous route. The Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale (ONLS) was used to estimate the changes in the muscular strength before and after treatment.

  17. Roussoella percutanea, a novel opportunistic pathogen causing subcutaneous mycoses.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sarah A; Stevens, David A; van de Sande, Wendy W J; Meis, Jacques F; de Hoog, G S

    2014-10-01

    We report the isolation of a novel agent of subcutaneous mycosis from a 45-year-old Indian male immigrant in the United States. Phylogenetic analysis of partial small ribosomal subunit and large ribosomal subunit, internal transcribed spacer, partial translation elongation factor (TEF1), and RNA polymerase second largest subunit (rPB2) loci revealed that the strain was identical to another isolate previously reported as "Madurella mycetomatis." Both strains clustered in the order Pleosporales, nested in the family Arthopyreniaceae/Roussoellaceae. The fungus differed from known species and hence a new taxon, Roussoella percutanea, is introduced, typified by a strain that showed delayed production of pycnidial conidiomata. Antifungal susceptibility testing suggested that the new species is resistant to echinocandins and flucytosine, with variable results with azoles and amphotericin B.

  18. In vivo volumetric imaging of subcutaneous microvasculature by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao F.; Maslov, Konstantin; Li, Meng-Lin; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2006-10-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy was developed to achieve volumetric imaging of the anatomy and functions of the subcutaneous microvasculature in both small animals and humans in vivo with high spatial resolution and high signal-to-background ratio. By following the skin contour in raster scanning, the ultrasonic transducer maintains focusing in the region of interest. Furthermore, off-focus lateral resolution is improved by using a synthetic-aperture focusing technique based on the virtual point detector concept. Structural images are acquired in both rats and humans, whereas functional images representing hemoglobin oxygen saturation are acquired in rats. After multiscale vesselness filtering, arterioles and venules in the image are separated based on the imaged oxygen saturation levels. Detailed structural information, such as vessel depth and spatial orientation, are revealed by volume rendering.

  19. Subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum complicating a dental procedure.

    PubMed

    Döngel, Isa; Bayram, Mehmet; Uysal, Ismail Onder; Sunam, Güven Sadi

    2012-07-01

    Cervicofacial emphysema and pneumomediastinum are rarely observed complications of dental interventions. The complications are associated with the use of a high-speed air-turbine dental drill. It is a potentially life-threatening condition, but the majority of cases are self-limiting and benign. We describe a patient with remarkable subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and partial pneumothorax after right second mandibular molar extraction. Dentists and physicians more often attribute the rapid onset of dyspnea in patients after a dental procedure to an allergic reaction to the anesthesia used during the procedure. Dentists and physicians should be aware that soft tissue emphysema can cause acute swelling of the cervicofacial region after dental procedures, which may mimic an allergic reaction.

  20. Subcutaneous Nerve Activity and Spontaneous Ventricular Arrhythmias in Ambulatory Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Doytchinova, Anisiia; Patel, Jheel; Zhou, Shengmei; Chen, Lan S.; Lin, Hongbo; Shen, Changyu; Everett, Thomas H; Lin, Shien-Fong; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Stellate ganglion nerve activity (SGNA) is important in ventricular arrhythmogenesis. However, because thoracotomy is needed to access the stellate ganglion, it is difficult to use SGNA for risk stratification. Objective To test the hypothesis that subcutaneous nerve activity (SCNA) in canines can be used to estimate SGNA and predict ventricular arrhythmia. Methods We implanted radio transmitters to continuously monitor left stellate ganglion and subcutaneous electrical activities in 7 ambulatory dogs with myocardial infarction, complete heart block and nerve growth factor infusion to the left stellate ganglion. Results Spontaneous ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF) was documented in each dog. SCNA preceded a combined 61 episodes of VT and VF, 61 frequent bigeminy or couplets and 61 premature ventricular contractions within 15 s in 70%, 59% and 61% of arrhythmias, respectively. Similar incidence of 75%, 69% and 62% was noted for SGNA. Progressive increase in SCNA (48.9 (95% CI 39.3–58.5) vs. 61.8 (95% CI 45.9–77.6) vs. 75.1 (95% CI 57.5–92.7) mV-s) and SGNA (48.6 (95% CI 40.9–56.3) vs. 58.5 (95% CI 47.5–69.4) vs. 69.0 (95% CI 53.8–84.2) mV-s) integrated over 20 s intervals was demonstrated 60 s, 40 s and 20 s prior to VT/VF (p<0.05). The Pearson’s correlation coefficient for integrated SCNA and SGNA was 0.73±0.18 (p<0.0001 for all dogs, n=5). Both SCNA and SGNA exhibited circadian variation. Conclusions SCNA can be used as an estimate of SGNA to predict susceptibility to VT and VF in a canine model of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. PMID:25460171

  1. Facilitated subcutaneous immunoglobulin (fSCIg) therapy--practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ponsford, M; Carne, E; Kingdon, C; Joyce, C; Price, C; Williams, C; El-Shanawany, T; Williams, P; Jolles, S

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing range of therapeutic options for primary antibody-deficient patients who require replacement immunoglobulin. These include intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIg), rapid push SCIg and most recently recombinant human hyaluronidase-facilitated SCIg (fSCIg). Advantages of fSCIg include fewer needle punctures, longer infusion intervals and an improved adverse effect profile relative to IVIg. Limited real-life experience exists concerning the practical aspects of switching or starting patients on fSCIg. We describe the first 14 patients who have been treated with fSCIg at the Immunodeficiency Centre for Wales (ICW), representing more than 6 patient-years of experience. The regimen was well tolerated, with high levels of satisfaction and no increase in training requirement, including for a treatment-naive patient. Two patients discontinued fSCIg due to pain and swelling at the infusion site, and one paused therapy following post-infusion migraines. Ultrasound imaging of paired conventional and facilitated SCIg demonstrated clear differences in subcutaneous space distribution associated with a 10-fold increase in rate and volume delivery with fSCIg. Patient profiles for those choosing fSCIg fell into two main categories: those experiencing clinical problems with their current treatment and those seeking greater convenience and flexibility. When introducing fSCIg, consideration of the type and programming of infusion pump, needle gauge and length, infusion site, up-dosing schedule, home training and patient information are important, as these may differ from conventional SCIg. This paper provides guidance on practical aspects of the administration, training and outcomes to help inform decision-making for this new treatment modality.

  2. Metabolic characteristics of human subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissueafter overnight fast

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Sandy M.

    2012-01-01

    Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue is one of the largest fat depots and contributes the major proportion of circulating nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). Little is known about aspects of human adipose tissue metabolism in vivo other than lipolysis. Here we collated data from 331 experiments in 255 healthy volunteers over a 23-year period, in which subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue metabolism was studied by measurements of arterio-venous differences after an overnight fast. NEFA and glycerol were released in a ratio of 2.7:1, different (P < 0.001) from the value of 3.0 that would indicate no fatty acid re-esterification. Fatty acid re-esterification was 10.2 ± 1.4%. Extraction of triacylglycerol (TG) (fractional extraction 5.7 ± 0.4%) indicated intravascular lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase, and this contributed 21 ± 3% of the glycerol released. Glucose uptake (fractional extraction 2.6 ± 0.3%) was partitioned around 20–25% for provision of glycerol 3-phosphate and 30% into lactate production. There was release of lactate and pyruvate, with extraction of the ketone bodies 3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, although these were small numerically compared with TG and glucose uptake. NEFA release (expressed per 100 g tissue) correlated inversely with measures of fat mass (e.g., with BMI, rs = −0.24, P < 0.001). We examined within-person variability. Systemic NEFA concentrations, NEFA release, fatty acid re-esterification, and adipose tissue blood flow were all more consistent within than between individuals. This picture of human adipose tissue metabolism in the fasted state should contribute to a greater understanding of adipose tissue physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:22167523

  3. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  4. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  5. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... age; episodes of symptoms in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS; a disease in which the nerves do ... When corticotropin repository injection is used to treat multiple sclerosis, it is usually injected once a day for ...

  6. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  7. Amphotericin B Liposomal Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Amphotericin B liposomal injection is used to treat fungal infections such as cryptococcal meningitis (a fungal infection of the ... infections in people who cannot receive conventional amphotericin B therapy. Amphotericin B liposomal injection is in a ...

  8. Calcitonin Salmon Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to weaken and break more easily. Calcitonin salmon injection is also used to ...

  9. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  10. Slit injection device

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.; Schlitt, Leland G.; Bradley, Laird P.

    1976-06-15

    A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

  11. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007633.htm Hip joint injection To use the sharing features on this ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ...

  12. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  13. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  14. A Phase II trial of subcutaneous amifostine and radiation therapy in patients with head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Anne, Pramila Rani . E-mail: rani.anne@mail.tju.edu; Machtay, Mitchell; Rosenthal, David I.; Brizel, David M.; Morrison, William H.; Irwin, David H.; Chougule, Prakash B.; Estopinal, Noel C.; Berson, Anthony; Curran, Walter J.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Intravenous amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} reduces xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients. This Phase II study evaluated subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine in a similar patient population. Patients and Methods: Patients received amifostine 500 mg, administered as two 250-mg s.c. injections 60 min before once-daily radiation for head-and-neck cancer (50-70 Gy in 5-7 weeks). The primary endpoint was the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia. Results: Fifty-four patients received s.c. amifostine and radiotherapy. The incidence of {>=}Grade 2 acute xerostomia was 56% (95% CI, 43-69%) and the incidence of {>=}Grade 2 late xerostomia at 1 year was 45% (95% CI, 29-61%). The incidence of acute xerostomia was lower than reported previously with no amifostine in a controlled study; rates of acute xerostomia were similar between s.c. and i.v. amifostine in the two studies. The rate of late xerostomia with s.c. amifostine was intermediate between rates for i.v. amifostine and no amifostine, and not statistically significantly different from either historical control. Grades 1-2 nausea and emesis were the most common amifostine-related adverse events. Grade 3 amifostine-related adverse events reported by >1 patient included: dehydration (11%); rash (6%); and weight decrease, mucositis, dyspnea, and allergic reaction (each 4%). Seven patients (13%) had serious cutaneous adverse events outside the injection site. One-year rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 78%, 75%, and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Subcutaneous amifostine provides a well-tolerated yet simpler alternative to i.v. amifostine for reducing acute xerostomia in head-and-neck cancer patients.

  15. Rich catalytic injection

    DOEpatents

    Veninger, Albert

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  16. Injectable silk foams for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bellas, Evangelia; Lo, Tim J; Fournier, Eric P; Brown, Joseph E; Abbott, Rosalyn D; Gil, Eun S; Marra, Kacey G; Rubin, J Peter; Leisk, Gary G; Kaplan, David L

    2015-02-18

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration is demonstrated. Adipose-derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10-d period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3-month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure is applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate.

  17. Injectable Silk Foams for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bellas, E.; Lo, T.J.; Fournier, E.P.; Brown, J.E.; Abbott, R.D.; Gil, E.S.; Marra, K.G.; Rubin, J.P.; Leisk, G.G.; Kaplan, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue fillers are needed for restoration of a defect or augmentation of existing tissues. Autografts and lipotransfer have been under study for soft tissue reconstruction but yield inconsistent results, often with considerable resorption of the grafted tissue. A minimally invasive procedure would reduce scarring and recovery time as well as allow for the implant and/or grafted tissue to be placed closer to existing vasculature. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of an injectable silk foam for soft tissue regeneration. Adipose derived stem cells survive and migrate through the foam over a 10 day period in vitro. The silk foams are also successfully injected into the subcutaneous space in a rat and over a 3 month period integrating with the surrounding native tissue. The injected foams are palpable and soft to the touch through the skin and returning to their original dimensions after pressure was applied and then released. The foams readily absorb lipoaspirate making the foams useful as a scaffold or template for existing soft tissue filler technologies, useful either as a biomaterial alone or in combination with the lipoaspirate. PMID:25323438

  18. Beam injection into RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  19. Phase I Randomized Clinical Trial of VRC DNA and rAd5 HIV-1 Vaccine Delivery by Intramuscular (IM), Subcutaneous (SC) and Intradermal (ID) Administration (VRC 011)

    PubMed Central

    Enama, Mary E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Novik, Laura; Nason, Martha C.; Gordon, Ingelise J.; Holman, LaSonji; Bailer, Robert T.; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Phase 1 evaluation of the VRC HIV DNA and rAd5 vaccines delivered intramuscularly (IM) supported proceeding to a Phase 2 b efficacy study. Here we report comparison of the IM, subcutaneous (SC) and intradermal (ID) routes of administration. Methods Sixty subjects were randomized to 6 schedules to evaluate the IM, SC or ID route for prime injections. Three schedules included DNA primes (Wks 0,4,8) and 3 schedules included rAd5 prime (Wk0); all included rAd5 IM boost (Wk24). DNA vaccine dosage was 4 mg IM or SC, but 0.4 mg ID, while all rAd5 vaccinations were 1010 PU. All injections were administered by needle and syringe. Results Overall, 27/30 subjects completed 3 DNA primes; 30/30 subjects completed rAd5 primes. Mild local pruritus (itchiness), superficial skin lesions and injection site nodules were associated with ID and SC, but not IM injections. All routes induced T-cell and antibody immune responses after rAd5 boosting. Overall, >95% had Env antibody and >80% had Env T-cell responses. Conclusions The pattern of local reactogenicity following ID and SC injections differed from IM injections but all routes were well-tolerated. There was no evidence of an immunogenicity advantage following SC or ID delivery, supporting IM delivery as the preferred route of administration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00321061 PMID:24621858

  20. Injectable, porous, and cell-responsive gelatin cryogels

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Sandeep T.; Ferrante, Thomas C.; Lewin, Sarah A.; Mooney, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of biomaterials-based therapies can be hindered by complications associated with surgical implant, motivating the development of materials systems that allow minimally invasive introduction into the host. In this study, we created cell-adhesive and degradable gelatin scaffolds that could be injected through a conventional needle while maintaining a predefined geometry and architecture. These scaffolds supported attachment, proliferation, and survival of cells in vitro and could be degraded by recombinant matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9. Prefabricated gelatin cryogels rapidly reassumed their original shape when injected subcutaneously into mice and elicited only a minor host response following injection. Controlled release of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor from gelatin cryogels resulted in complete infiltration of the scaffold by immune cells and promoted matrix metalloproteinase production leading to cell-mediated degradation of the cryogel matrix. These findings suggest that gelatin cryogels could serve as a cell-responsive platform for biomaterial-based therapy. PMID:24345735

  1. Injectable, porous, and cell-responsive gelatin cryogels.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Sandeep T; Ferrante, Thomas C; Lewin, Sarah A; Mooney, David J

    2014-03-01

    The performance of biomaterials-based therapies can be hindered by complications associated with surgical implant, motivating the development of materials systems that allow minimally invasive introduction into the host. In this study, we created cell-adhesive and degradable gelatin scaffolds that could be injected through a conventional needle while maintaining a predefined geometry and architecture. These scaffolds supported attachment, proliferation, and survival of cells in vitro and could be degraded by recombinant matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9. Prefabricated gelatin cryogels rapidly resumed their original shape when injected subcutaneously into mice and elicited only a minor host response following injection. Controlled release of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor from gelatin cryogels resulted in complete infiltration of the scaffold by immune cells and promoted matrix metalloproteinase production leading to cell-mediated degradation of the cryogel matrix. These findings suggest that gelatin cryogels could serve as a cell-responsive platform for biomaterial-based therapy.

  2. Endoscopic resection of subcutaneous lipoma and tumor-like lesion of the foot.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-03-01

    Open resection is the standard surgical treatment for subcutaneous lipoma. However, it may result in cosmetically non-desirable scars in case of large lesion. Endoscopic resection of subcutaneous lipoma and tumor-like lesions may result in better cosmetic result and patient satisfaction. The basis of the endoscopic technique is described.

  3. Strategies for safe injections.

    PubMed Central

    Battersby, A.; Feilden, R.; Stoeckel, P.; Da Silva, A.; Nelson, C.; Bass, A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, faced with growing international concern, WHO set out an approach for achieving injection safety that encompassed all elements from patients' expectations and doctors' prescribing habits to waste disposal. This article follows that lead and describes the implications of the approach for two injection technologies: sterilizable and disposable. It argues that focusing on any single technology diverts attention from the more fundamental need for health services to develop their own comprehensive strategies for safe injections. National health authorities will only be able to ensure that injections are administered safely if they take an approach that encompasses the whole system, and choose injection technologies that fit their circumstances. PMID:10680247

  4. Subcutaneous dirofilariasis caused by Dirofilaria repens in Greece: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tzanetou, Konstantina; Gasteratos, Stephanos; Pantazopoulou, Akrivi; Gogou, Charalambos; Konidaris, Dimitrios; Fragia, Konstantina

    2009-08-01

    Dirofilaria repens (formerly Dirofilaria conjunctiva) is a natural parasite of the subcutaneous tissues of dogs, cats and wild carnivores in Europe, Africa and Asia. Microfilariae are transmitted to humans by various species of mosquito. An autochthonous case of subcutaneous dirofilariasis is reported in a Greek patient from the island of Corfu. The clinical manifestation of the infection was a palpable, painless, subcutaneous nodule in the region of the groin, which 2 days before the patient consulted the doctor developed symptoms and signs of inflammation (pain, edema and redness). The entire lesion was surgically removed, and the nematode worm D. repens was identified on histological sections of biopsy material. The aim of this report was (a) to describe the microscopic morphological features of D. repens that enable identification of the parasite on histological examination and (b) to emphasize the importance of consideration of subcutaneous dirofilariasis in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous nodules with inflammatory eosinophilic infiltration in countries where the infection is endemic.

  5. Cervicofacial subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema caused by air cooling spray of dental laser.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Sachiyo; Iwai, Toshinori; Aoki, Noriaki; Yamashita, Yosuke; Omura, Susumu; Matsui, Yoshiro; Maegawa, Jiro; Hirota, Makoto; Mitsudo, Kenji; Tohnai, Iwai

    2013-06-01

    Cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema is a rare complication of dental procedures with an air turbine or syringe, and dentists and oral surgeons sometimes encounter mediastinal emphysema following the presentation of extensive subcutaneous emphysema. Most emphysema occurs incidentally during tooth extraction, restorative treatment, or endodontic treatment, with only a few cases reported of cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema associated with dental laser treatment. We report a case of cervicofacial subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema caused by the air cooling spray of dental laser during dental treatment in a 76-year-old woman. After she underwent dental laser treatment, cervicofacial swelling was noted and she was referred to our department. Computed tomography showed both cervicofacial subcutaneous emphysema and mediastinal emphysema. Antibiotics were administered prophylactically and the emphysema disappeared 5 days after the dental laser treatment, without any complications.

  6. Thickness estimation of the subcutaneous fat using coaxial probe.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein; Nadimi, Esmaeil S

    2016-03-01

    In this Letter, a non-invasive method for thickness estimation of the subcutaneous fat layer of abdominal wall is presented by using a coaxial probe. Fat layer has the highest impact on the averaged attenuation parameter of the abdominal wall due to its high thickness and low permittivity. The abdominal wall is modelled as a multi-layer medium and an analytical model for the probe is derived by calculation of its aperture admittance facing to this multi-layer medium. The performance of this model is then validated by a numerical simulation using finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) analysis. Simulation results show the high impact of the probe dimension and fat layer thickness on the sensitivity of the measured permittivity. The authors further investigate this sensitivity by statistical analysis of the permittivity variations. Finally, measuring in different locations relative to the body surface is presented as a solution to estimate the fat layer thickness in the presence of uncertainty of model parameters.

  7. Recent advances in the entirely subcutaneous ICD System

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Florian; Rath, Benjamin; Köbe, Julia; Eckardt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD®) is emerging as a widely accepted therapeutic alternative to a conventional implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for prevention of sudden cardiac death. Essentially, the S-ICD® is promising in terms of reduction of electrode-related complications such as lead failure and infections. The conventional transvenous ICD has proven efficacy in various randomized clinical trials. The first results of S-ICD® studies confirm efficacy and safety in primary and secondary prevention as well. Owing to basic differences between S-ICD® and transvenous ICD—such as limited programming options and lack of pacing—not all patients are eligible for the S-ICD®. Concerns exist regarding inappropriate shocks due to T-wave oversensing, dimensions of the device, and shorter battery longevity. However, the S-ICD® should be considered a useful supplementation of ICD therapy in those patients at risk for sudden cardiac death who are not expected to require pacing due to bradycardia or antitachycardic pacing. PMID:26097719

  8. Selection of patients for sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Larenas Linnemann, Désirée E S; Blaiss, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is the sole treatment for IgE-mediated allergic diseases directed at the underlying mechanism. The two widely accepted administration routes are sublingual (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT). We reviewed how patients should best be selected for immunotherapy and how the optimal administration route can be defined. Before deciding SCIT or SLIT, appropriate selection of patients for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is mandatory. To be eligible for AIT, subjects must have a clear medical history of allergic disease, with exacerbation of symptoms on exposure to one or more allergens and a corresponding positive skin or in vitro test. Then the route of administration should be based on: published evidence of clinical and immunologic efficacy (which varies per allergic disease and per allergen); mono- or multi-allergen immunotherapy, for SLIT multi-allergen immunotherapy was not effective; safety: adverse events with SLIT are more frequent, but less severe; and, costs and patient preferences, closely related to adherence issues. All these are discussed in the article.

  9. Thickness estimation of the subcutaneous fat using coaxial probe

    PubMed Central

    Nadimi, Esmaeil S.

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, a non-invasive method for thickness estimation of the subcutaneous fat layer of abdominal wall is presented by using a coaxial probe. Fat layer has the highest impact on the averaged attenuation parameter of the abdominal wall due to its high thickness and low permittivity. The abdominal wall is modelled as a multi-layer medium and an analytical model for the probe is derived by calculation of its aperture admittance facing to this multi-layer medium. The performance of this model is then validated by a numerical simulation using finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) analysis. Simulation results show the high impact of the probe dimension and fat layer thickness on the sensitivity of the measured permittivity. The authors further investigate this sensitivity by statistical analysis of the permittivity variations. Finally, measuring in different locations relative to the body surface is presented as a solution to estimate the fat layer thickness in the presence of uncertainty of model parameters. PMID:27222737

  10. Fuel injection apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Omori, T.; Sakakibara, S.; Kato, M.; Masuda, A.

    1986-06-10

    A fuel injection apparatus is described for supplying fuel from a fuel tank to at least one combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, comprising: an injector housing defining therein a pressure cylinder bore, an injection cylinder bore and a timing cylinder bore connected in series with the pressure cylinder bore; a pressure plunger, fitted in the pressure cylinder bore and having one end defining, in the pressure cylinder bore, a pressure pump chamber communicating with the injection cylinder bore and the timing cylinder bore; first fuel supply means for supplying fuel from the fuel tank to the pressure pump chamber; pressurizing means for reciprocating the pressure plunger in the pressure cylinder bore in synchronism with the engine operation so as to pressurize fuel in the pressure pump chamber; an injection plunger, having a diameter smaller than the pressure plunger, fitted in the injection cylinder bore and having two ends defining, in the injection cylinder bore, an injection pump chamber and a first communicating chamber communicating with the pressure pump chamber; second fuel supply means for adjusting the quantity of the fuel from the fuel tank in accordance with engine operation conditions so as to supply the adjusted fuel quantity to the injection pump chamber; injection valve means for injecting the fuel into the fuel pump chamber toward a combustion chamber of the engine when the pressure in the pressure pump chamber is applied to the injection plunger through the first communicating chamber, and the fuel pressure in the injection pump chamber reaches a predetermined injection pressure.

  11. A Classic Case of Subcutaneous Cysticercosis: A Rare Case with Sonological Findings and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Naren Satya, Srinivas M.; Mayilvaganan, Kamala Retnam; Amogh, V.N.; Balakrishna, B.V.; Gautam, Munnangi Satya; Prathyusha, Ivvala Sai

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Cysticercosis is a parasitic infection caused by the larval stages of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium. The subcutaneous form of the disease is a relatively rare clinical entity. Despite its rarity, it is imperative for a radiologist to be aware of this subcutaneous form of the disease and its various radiological patterns while evaluating any subcutaneous swelling. In this paper, we aimed to describe a typical case of ‘subcutaneous cysticercosis involving the left anterior chest wall’ with high resolution ultrasound findings. We also discussed the role of other imaging modalities in a case of subcutaneous cysticercosis. To the best of our knowledge, our case is only the second documented case report of sonological evaluation of subcutaneous cysticercosis involving the left anterior chest wall and the first case with high resolution ultrasound images of the lesion. Case Report An 11-year-old male presented with a painless, subcutaneous swelling over the left anterior chest wall for the last 2 months. High resolution ultrasound showed a well-defined, thin-walled, cystic lesion with an eccentric, echogenic focus in the subcutaneous plane. On change of the posture of the patient, this focus showed mobility. The hypoechoic area surrounding this cyst showed significant exudative fluid collection with diffuse, floating echoes and thin, incomplete internal septations. The adjacent soft tissues were thickened and irregular, suggestive of edema. This was followed by an excision biopsy. Histopathological examination revealed cysticercus cellulose parasite with an extensive mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate in the surrounding tissue. The patient was also administered oral antihelminthic therapy. Repeat ultrasound examination at the end of this management regimen showed complete healing with no e/o any remnant or recurrent cystic lesion, abscess or edema in the subcutaneous plane. Conclusions Subcutaneous cysticercosis is a relatively rare form of

  12. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... pillow under your stomach. If this position causes pain, you either sit up or lie on your ...

  13. [Pharmacokinetic and analgesic properties of the injectable dosage form of a new imidazobenzimidazole derivative RU-1205 with kappa agonist activity].

    PubMed

    Spasov, A A; Smirnova, L A; Grechko, O U; Raschenko, A I; Shtareva, D M; Anisimova, V A

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic properties of imidazobenzimidazole derivative compound RU-1205 were investigated after subcutaneous administration to rabbits as a substance and a dosage form (lyophilisates for injection) at a dose of 25 mg/kg. The lyophilisate was characterized by high values of the relative bioavailability. In tests, the "hot plate" and "vinegar cramps" the dosage form and the substance exhibited the same analgesic effect.

  14. Diclofenac sodium injection (akis(®), dicloin (®)): a review of its use in the management of pain.

    PubMed

    Blair, Hannah A; Plosker, Greg L

    2015-06-01

    A novel formulation of diclofenac sodium suitable for subcutaneous or intramuscular injection (Akis(®), Dicloin(®)) has been developed using the complexing agent hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) as a solubility enhancer. Diclofenac HPβCD is available in several European countries, where it is indicated for use in adults with acute forms of pain, including postoperative pain. Clinical trials have demonstrated the analgesic efficacy of diclofenac HPβCD in terms of relieving moderate to severe postoperative pain in patients undergoing dental surgery or minor orthopaedic surgery. Subcutaneous diclofenac HPβCD also effectively relieved moderate to severe neuropathic pain, related to cancer or not. Diclofenac HPβCD was generally well tolerated in clinical trials, with injection-site reactions among the most commonly reported adverse events. The local tolerability of diclofenac HPβCD was consistently rated as 'good' or 'excellent' across all studies. Subcutaneous administration of diclofenac is a valid alternative to intramuscular delivery, with the advantages of easier administration, the availability of additional body sites suitable for injection and the potential for self-administration. Thus, diclofenac HPβCD 25, 50 or 75 mg/mL solution for subcutaneous or intramuscular injection extends the treatment options available for use in the management of pain in adults.

  15. Serum amyloid A  renal amyloidosis in a chronic subcutaneous (“skin popping”) heroin user

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad; Bilbao, Jorge E.; Said, Sarmad; Alkhateeb, Haider; Bizet, Jorge; Elfar, Ahmed; Davalos, Olinamyr; Meza, Ana T.; Hernandez, German T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Systemic AA amyloidosis is a long-term complication of several chronic inflammatory disorders. Organ damage results from the extracellular deposition of proteolytic fragments of the acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A (SAA) as amyloid fibrils. Drug users that inject drug by a subcutaneous route (“skin popping”) have a higher chance of developing secondary amyloidosis. The kidneys, liver, and spleen are the main target organs of AA amyloid deposits. More than 90% of patients with renal amyloidosis will present with proteinuria, nephrotic syndrome, or renal function. Case presentation: A 37 year-old female presented to the hospital with a one-week history of pain and redness in her right axilla. Her relevant medical history included multiple skin abscesses secondary to “skin popping”, heroin abuse for 18 years, and hepatitis C. The physical examination revealed “skin popping” lesions, bilateral costovertebral angle tenderness, and bilateral knee swelling. The laboratory workup was significant for renal insufficiency with a serum creatinine of 5 mg/dL and 14.8 grams of urine protein per 1 gram of urine creatinine. The renal biopsy findings were consistent with a diagnosis of renal amyloidosis due to serum amyloid A deposition and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. Conclusions: AA renal amyloidosis among heroin addicts seems to be associated with chronic suppurative skin infection secondary to “skin popping”. It is postulated that the chronic immunologic stimulation by one or more exogenous antigens or multiple acute inflammatory episodes is an important factor in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis in these patients. Therefore, AA renal amyloidosis should always be considered in chronic heroin users presenting with proteinuria and renal impairment. PMID:24475449

  16. Disposition Kinetic of Moxifloxacin following Intravenous, Intramuscular, and Subcutaneous Administration in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harshad B.; Mody, Shailesh K.; Patel, Hitesh B.; Patel, Vipul A.; Patel, Urvesh D.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate disposition kinetics of moxifloxacin following single-dose intravenous (i.v.), intramuscular (i.m.), and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration at a dose rate of 5 mg/kg of body weight (b.wt.) in goats. Plasma samples collected after treatments were analyzed for drug concentration using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After i.v. administration, distribution of the drug was rapid and wide as reflected by high steady-state volume of distribution. Drug elimination was relatively faster with a total body clearance of 0.59 ± 0.03 L/h/kg. Following i.m. injection, the drug has shown the rapid and near-to-complete absorption with bioavailability of 98.20 ± 3.96 per cent. The maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) of 1.21 ± 0.04 μg/mL was attained at 1 h (Tmax). The drug was widely distributed as reflected by high apparent volume of distribution. The elimination half-life (t1/2β) of the drug was 6.26 ± 0.08  h. Following s.c. administration, the drug was rapidly absorbed (Cmax: 1.16 ± 0.02 μg/mL; tmax: 1 h) and slowly eliminated from the body. The elimination half-life and total body clearance (ClB) were 5.61 ± 0.10 h and 0.60 ± 0.03 L/h/kg, respectively. The bioavailability of moxifloxacin following s.c. administration was 90.44 ± 3.96 per cent. PMID:23738101

  17. Susceptibility of the Siberian polecat to subcutaneous and oral Yersinia pestis exposure.

    PubMed

    Castle, K T; Biggins, D; Carter, L G; Chu, M; Innes, K; Wimsatt, J

    2001-10-01

    To determine if the Siberian polecat (Mustela eversmannii) represents a suitable model for the study of plague pathogenesis and prevention in the black-footed ferret (Mustela nigripes), polecats were exposed to 10(3), 10(7), or 10(10) Yersinia pestis organisms by subcutaneous injection; an additional group was exposed to Y. pestis via ingestion of a plague-killed mouse. Plague killed 88% of polecats exposed to Y. pestis (71% mortality in the 10(3) group, 100% mortality in the 10(7) and 10(10) groups, and 83% mortality in the mouse-fed group). Within the challenged group, mean day of death post-challenge ranged from 3.6 to 7.6 days; all polecats died on or before day 12 post-challenge. Animals receiving the lowest parenteral dose survived significantly longer than those receiving higher parenteral doses. Within challenged animals, mean survival time was lower in those presenting with significant weight loss by day 3, lethargy, and low fecal output; time to onset of lethargy and other signs was also related to risk of dying and/or plague dose. Six polecats developed serum antibody titers to the Y. pestis F1 protein. Three seropositive polecats survived the initial challenge and a subsequent exposure to a plague-killed mouse, while two seropositive animals later died. This study confirms that the Siberian polecat is susceptible to plague and suggests that this species will offer an appropriate surrogate for black-footed ferrets in future plague studies and related vaccine trials.

  18. Influence of glucosamine on the bioactivity of insulin delivered subcutaneously and in an oral nanodelivery system.

    PubMed

    Al-Kurdi, Zakieh I; Chowdhry, Babur Z; Leharne, Stephen A; Qinna, Nidal A; Al Omari, Mahmoud M H; Badwan, Adnan A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work reported herein was to study the effect of glucosamine HCl (GlcN·HCl) on the bioactivity (BA) of insulin, administered via subcutaneous (SC) and oral routes, in adult male Sprague Dawley rats. The oral insulin delivery system (insulin-chitosan reverse micelle [IC-RM]) was prepared by solubilizing insulin-chitosan (13 kDa) polyelectrolyte complex in a RM system consisting of oleic acid, PEG-8 caprylic/capric glycerides, and polyglycerol-6-dioleate. The BA of insulin in vivo was evaluated by measuring blood glucose level using a blood glucose meter; the results revealed that the extent of hypoglycemic activity of SC insulin was GlcN·HCl dose dependent when they were administered simultaneously. A significant reduction in blood glucose levels (P<0.05) was found for the insulin:GlcN·HCl at mass ratios of 1:10 and 1:20, whereas lower ratios (eg, 1:1 and 1:4) showed no significant reduction. Furthermore, enhancement of the action of SC insulin was achieved by oral administration of GlcN·HCl for 5 consecutive days prior to insulin injection (P<0.05). For oral insulin administration via the IC-RM system, the presence of GlcN·HCl increased the hypoglycemic activity of insulin (P<0.05). The relative BA were 6.7% and 5.4% in the presence and absence of GlcN·HCl (ie, the increase in the relative BA was approximately 23% due to incorporating GlcN·HCl in the IC-RM system), respectively. The aforementioned findings offer an opportunity to incorporate GlcN·HCl in oral insulin delivery systems in order to enhance a reduction in blood glucose levels.

  19. Further investigations of the etiology of subcutaneous neoplasms in native gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, A.D.; Ostrander, G.K.

    1995-10-01

    Aspects of the etiology of subcutaneous spindle-cell neoplasms in feral gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) collected from Lake of the Arbuckles, Oklahoma, were investigated. Field collections of adult and juvenile gizzard shad were conducted to determine the prevalence and seasonality of neoplasms and site specificity of neoplasms-bearing fish. Overall neoplasm prevalence for adult gizzard shad was 22.1%; no juveniles exhibited neoplasms. Neoplasm occurrence did not appear seasonal. Neoplasm-bearing gizzard shad were found at all three sampling sites within Lake of the Arbuckles with similar neoplasm prevalence rates (Guy Sandy Creek 22.1%, Rock creek, 17.9%, and Buckhorn Creek 22.4%). No gizzard shad (juvenile or adult) collected from Lake Carl Blackwell, Oklahoma, the reference site, exhibited neoplasms. Water, sediment, and shad liver tissue from Lake of the Arbuckles and the reference site were analyzed for total recoverable metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, and lead, by graphite furnace atomic absorption). Chromium, copper, and nickel were found in the water samples at concentrations of >1 to 8.6 {micro}g/L. Low concentrations (>1 to 13.6 {micro}g/g wet weight) of all the metals were found in the sediment and liver tissue for both sites. Heavy metal contamination does not appear linked to neoplasm occurrence. To determine if a nonbacterial infectious agent was responsible for tumor formation, cell-free neoplasm homogenates were injected into healthy rainbow trout. Neoplasms were not transmitted into rainbow trout. Neoplasms were not transmitted into rainbow trout. The etiology of these neoplasms remains unknown.

  20. Adipose tissue is the first colonization site of Leptospira interrogans in subcutaneously infected hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Ozuru, Ryo; Saito, Mitsumasa; Kanemaru, Takaaki; Miyahara, Satoshi; Villanueva, Sharon Y. A. M.; Murray, Gerald L.; Adler, Ben; Fujii, Jun; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses in the world, and its most severe form in humans, “Weil’s disease,” may lead to jaundice, hemorrhage, renal failure, pulmonary hemorrhage syndrome, and sometimes,fatal multiple organ failure. Although the mechanisms underlying jaundice in leptospirosis have been gradually unraveled, the pathophysiology and distribution of leptospires during the early stage of infection are not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the hamster leptospirosis model, which is the accepted animal model of human Weil’s disease, by using an in vivo imaging system to observe the whole bodies of animals infected with Leptospira interrogans and to identify the colonization and growth sites of the leptospires during the early phase of infection. Hamsters, infected subcutaneously with 104 bioluminescent leptospires, were analyzed by in vivo imaging, organ culture, and microscopy. The results showed that the luminescence from the leptospires spread through each hamster’s body sequentially. The luminescence was first detected at the injection site only, and finally spread to the central abdomen, in the liver area. Additionally, the luminescence observed in the adipose tissue was the earliest detectable compared with the other organs, indicating that the leptospires colonized the adipose tissue at the early stage of leptospirosis. Adipose tissue cultures of the leptospires became positive earlier than the blood cultures. Microscopic analysis revealed that the leptospires colonized the inner walls of the blood vessels in the adipose tissue. In conclusion, this is the first study to report that adipose tissue is an important colonization site for leptospires, as demonstrated by microscopy and culture analyses of adipose tissue in the hamster model of Weil’s disease. PMID:28245231

  1. Subcutaneous administration of Kiss1 pentadecapeptide accelerates spermatogenesis in prepubertal male chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus).

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sethu; Ohga, Hirofumi; Nyuji, Mitsuo; Kitano, Hajime; Nagano, Naoki; Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Michiya

    2013-10-01

    Kisspeptins, encoded by kiss genes, have emerged as critical regulator of reproductive function in vertebrates. Our previous studies demonstrated that the chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) brain expresses kiss1 and kiss2 and peripheral administration of synthetic Kiss1 pentadecapeptide (Kiss1-15) but not Kiss2 dodecapeptide (Kiss2-12) induces spermiation in sexually immature adult chub mackerel. In the present study, we evaluated the potency of Kiss1-15, Kiss2-12, and GnRH analogue (GnRHa) to induce pubertal onset in prepubertal chub mackerel. Peptides were administered through subcutaneous injection for three times (bi-weekly) over 6weeks. Interestingly, gonadosomatic index (GSI) of Kiss1-15 treated fish increased significantly in comparison to other treatments. Histologically, 66.7% of Kiss1-15 treated fish exhibited presence of spermatozoa (SPZ) in the testes with only 28.6% of GnRHa treated fish. However, Kiss2-12 treated fish showed only spermatocytes (SC) as the advanced germ cells in the testes. In contrast, only spermatogonia (SPG) were observed in the testes of control fish. Changes in the number of testicular germ cells among treatments revealed a significantly higher number of SC, spermatids and SPZ in the Kiss1-15 treated fish. Gene expression analyses revealed no significant changes in gnrh1 in the telencephalon-preoptic region of the brain, including fshβ and lhβ in the pituitary of experimental fish. However, GnRHa treated fish showed significantly higher lhβ expression. Levels of sex steroids, 11-ketotestosterone and estradiol-17β were significantly higher in Kiss1-15 treated fish. These results indicate application of Kiss1-15 peptides for accelerating pubertal onset in chub mackerel.

  2. Development and preclinical pharmacokinetics of a novel subcutaneous thermoresponsive system for prolonged delivery of heparin.

    PubMed

    Matanović, Maja Radivojša; Grabnar, Pegi Ahlin; Voinovich, Dario; Golob, Samuel; Mijovski, Mojca Božič; Grabnar, Iztok

    2015-12-30

    Heparin is still widely used for treatment and prevention of thromboembolic diseases. Due to specific physicochemical properties, it requires frequent parenteral injections. In this study we present the development and in vitro evaluation of an advanced delivery system for prolonged subcutaneous release of heparin. The delivery system consisted of an in situ forming thermoresponsive poloxamer-based platform combined with pH-responsive polyelectrolyte heparin/chitosan nanocomplexes. Thermoresponsive hydrogels were tested for gelation temperature, gel dissolution and in vitro heparin release, whereas polyelectrolyte nanocomplexes were physico-chemically characterized, as well as tested for in vitro cytotoxicity and in vitro heparin release. Hydrogel combined of two poloxamers demonstrated the highest gelation temperature (28.6°C), while the addition of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose prolonged gel dissolution. On the other hand, nanocomplexes' dispersions, prepared at 1:1 heparin/chitosan mass ratio and in the concentration range 0.375-1.875mg/mL, demonstrated mean diameter <400nm and zeta potential >34mV. Pharmacokinetics of selected formulations (thermoresponsive hydrogel, nanocomplexes and a dual system consisting of nanocomplexes incorporated into thermoresponsive hydrogel) were studied in rats. Heparin plasma concentration-time profiles revealed a double-peak phenomenon, probably due to heparin diffusion inside the polymer matrix and gel dissolution. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by a non-linear mixed effects modeling approach. It was demonstrated that thermoresponsive hydrogel with heparin/chitosan nanocomplexes enabled the lowest absorption rate of heparin into systemic circulation and provided heparin concentration above the prophylaxis threshold for 5 days. In situ gelling thermoresponsive matrix combined with chitosan nanocomplexes present a promising delivery system for heparin, requiring less frequent administration during long-term treatment.

  3. Injection-water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, C.C. )

    1990-10-01

    Ideally, injection water should enter the reservoir free of suspended solids or oil. It should also be compatible with the reservoir rock and fluids and would be sterile and nonscaling. This paper discusses how the objective of any water-injection operation is to inject water into the reservoir rock without plugging or permeability reduction from particulates, dispersed oil, scale formation, bacterial growth, or clay swelling. In addition, souring of sweet reservoirs by sulfate-reducing bacteria should be prevented if possible.

  4. [Stability of liensinine injection].

    PubMed

    Hu, X M; Zhou, B H; Luo, S D

    1993-06-01

    The stability of liensinine injection was studied by accelarating test with classical isothermal method. Results of the study showed that the decomposition of the injection was found to be a first-order reaction. The activation energy was 75030 J.mol-1. The shelf life at 10 degrees C and 25 degrees C was predicted to be about 15 months and 3 months respectively. This experiment provides a reference for the storage of the injection.

  5. Glucose sensing in the peritoneal space offers faster kinetics than sensing in the subcutaneous space.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Daniel R; Huyett, Lauren M; Zisser, Howard C; Doyle, Francis J; Mensh, Brett D

    2014-07-01

    The paramount goal in the treatment of type 1 diabetes is the maintenance of normoglycemia. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technologies enable frequent sensing of glucose to inform exogenous insulin delivery timing and dosages. The most commonly available CGMs are limited by the physiology of the subcutaneous space in which they reside. The very same advantages of this minimally invasive approach are disadvantages with respect to speed. Because subcutaneous blood flow is sensitive to local fluctuations (e.g., temperature, mechanical pressure), subcutaneous sensing can be slow and variable. We propose the use of a more central, physiologically stable body space for CGM: the intraperitoneal space. We compared the temporal response characteristics of simultaneously placed subcutaneous and intraperitoneal sensors during intravenous glucose tolerance tests in eight swine. Using compartmental modeling based on simultaneous intravenous sensing, blood draws, and intraarterial sensing, we found that intraperitoneal kinetics were more than twice as fast as subcutaneous kinetics (mean time constant of 5.6 min for intraperitoneal vs. 12.4 min for subcutaneous). Combined with the known faster kinetics of intraperitoneal insulin delivery over subcutaneous delivery, our findings suggest that artificial pancreas technologies may be optimized by sensing glucose and delivering insulin in the intraperitoneal space.

  6. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    MedlinePlus

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox-larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography-guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy- ...

  7. Underground Injection Control (UIC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Provide information on: individual injection well classes; regulations specific to each well class; technical guidance; compliance assistance; federal, state, and tribal/territory roles and responsibilities.

  8. Piezoelectric Injection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mock, R.; Lubitz, K.

    The origin of direct injection can be doubtlessly attributed to Rudolf Diesel who used air assisted injection for fuel atomisation in his first self-ignition engine. Although it became apparent already at that time that direct injection leads to reduced specific fuel consumption compared to other methods of fuel injection, it was not used in passenger cars for the moment because of its disadvantageous noise generation as the requirements with regard to comfort were seen as more important than a reduced specific consumption.

  9. Iatrogenic catheter-related cardiac tamponade: a case report of fatal hydropericardium following subcutaneous implantation of a chemotherapeutic injection port.

    PubMed

    Shields, Lisa B E; Hunsaker, Donna M; Hunsaker, John C

    2003-03-01

    The need to obtain dependable access to the vascular system constitutes a significant component in the treatment and management of critically ill patients. Intravenous chemotherapy administered to cancer patients over an extended period of time often results in loss of peripheral vascular access due to vein sclerosis, "exhaustion" or tissue necrosis. Medical investigators have designed and steadily upgraded a variety of devices constructed to improve venous access for long-term utilization. As with the introduction of any foreign object into the body, each of these devices has complications which may be life threatening and occasionally fatal. We present an unusual case of iatrogenic acute hydropericardium and cardiac tamponade caused by the percutaneous infusion of chemotherapeutic fluid via a right subclavian central venous implant system (Port-a-Cath). Failure to implant and monitor the device with a radiograph following placement according to manufacturer's guidelines and accepted standards of medical practice were causally related to an unusual complication, namely, perforation of the right cardiac ventricle by the catheter tip, resulting in sudden and unexpected cardiac death.

  10. Effect of the Subcutaneous Environment on Phase Sensitive In Situ Forming Implant Drug Release, Degradation, and Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Luis; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    In situ forming implants are a promising platform used for the release of therapeutic agents. Significant changes in behavior occur when the implants are used in vivo relative to implants formed in vitro. To understand how the injection site effects implant behavior, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) implants were examined after injection in the subcutaneous space of a Sprague Dawley rat model to determine how the environment altered implant erosion, degradation, swelling, microstructure and mock drug release. Changes in implant microstructure occurred over time for implants formed in vivo, where it was observed that the porosity was lost over the course of 5 d. Implants formed in vivo had a significantly greater burst release (p<0.05) relative to implants formed in vitro. However during the diffusion period of release, implants formed in vitro had a significantly higher daily release (2.1%/day, p<0.05), which correlated to changes in implant microstructure. Additionally, implants formed in vitro had a 2 fold increase in the first order degradation kinetics relative to the implants formed in vivo. These findings suggest that the changes in implant behavior occur as a result of changes in the implant microstructure induced by the external environment. PMID:26506522

  11. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia induced by radiofrequency capacitive field for the treatment of transplanted subcutaneous tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu-Hong; Rong, Peng-Fei; Jin, He-Kun; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jin-Tian

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) induced by a magnetic field has become a new heating technology for the treatment of malignant tumors due to its ability to heat the tumor tissue precisely and properly, and due to its significant therapeutic effects. In this study, MFH induced by radiofrequency capacitive field (RCF) for the treatment of transplanted subcutaneous tumors in rats, was investigated. A total of 50 rats bearing subcutaneous tumors were randomly divided into five groups, including i) a pseudo-treatment (PT) control group, ii) magnetic fluid (MF) group, iii) pure hyperthermia (PH) group, iv) magnetic fluid hyperthermia 1 (MFH1) group, and v) magnetic fluid hyperthermia 2 (MFH2) group. Tumors were irradiated for 30 min in the MFH1 group 24 h following injection of MF. Tumors were irradiated for 30 min in the MFH2 group 24 h following injection of MF, and irradiation was repeated for 30 min 72 h following injection of MF. Tumor volumes, tumor volume inhibition ratios and survival times in the rat model were examined. Temperatures of tumor cores and rims both rapidly reached the desired temperature (∼50°C) for tumor treatment within 5 to 10 min in the MFH1 and MFH2 groups, and we maintained this temperature level by manually adjusting the output power (70-130 W). Tumor volumes of the MFH1 and MFH2 groups were reduced compared to those of the PT, MF and PH groups. The inhibitory effect on tumor growth in the MFH2 group (91.57%) was higher compared to that in the MFH1 group (85.21%) and the other groups. The survival time of the MFH2 group (51.62±2.28 days) and MFH1 group (43.10±1.57 days) was increased compared to that of the PH, MF and PT groups. The results obtained show that MFH induced by RCF may serve as a potential and promising method for the treatment of tumors.

  12. Subcutaneous electrocardiogram monitors and their field of view.

    PubMed

    Arzbaecher, Robert; Hampton, David R; Burke, Martin C; Garrett, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring of cardiac patients on a long-term, even permanent, basis has become possible. Postsurgical cases, those with significant risk factors, or patients with chronic conditions are candidates for these procedures to assess evolving risk factors and detect life-threatening events. A small sensing device can be implanted subcutaneously to assess the ECG, transmitting status and alerts to local caregivers or a remote monitoring service. We and others have shown that a differential electrode pair with only 2- to 3-cm spacing can produce QRS amplitudes greater than 1 mV, sufficient to accurately identify asystole, tachyarrhythmias, and ST-segment changes. Medtronic's REVEAL and St Jude Medical's CONFIRM are implantable look recorders (ILRs) with a single pair of subcutaneous electrodes mounted on the surface of the case (6 × 2 × 0.7 cm). They store representative rhythm strips when the heart rate exceeds preset limits or when the patient presses a button on the accompanying actuator. These records may be transferred for physician review during a subsequent office visit. Transoma's SLEUTH is a similar ILR, except that one of the electrodes is at the end of a 6-cm lead tunneled under the skin and the wider separation may result in a larger ECG amplitude. Instead of storing the records, SLEUTH transmits them through the skin to a home base unit, which sends them via telephone to a monitoring service. Angel Medical's ALERT system also has a tunneled lead, but one that is introduced pervenously into the right ventricle hoping to detect ST changes in addition to rhythm abnormalities. Advanced multivector ILR devices with integrated event alerting are rapidly approaching commercialization. AJ Medical Devices' CARDIOALARM (4 × 4 × 0.6 cm) has 4 electrodes at the corners of the square package, arranged as 2 orthogonal recording pairs that can produce a robust signal that is relatively immune to signal fluctuations caused by changes in

  13. Biocompatibility of Subcutaneously Implanted Plant-Derived Cellulose Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Pelling, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    There is intense interest in developing novel biomaterials which support the invasion and proliferation of living cells for potential applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Decellularization of existing tissues have formed the basis of one major approach to producing 3D scaffolds for such purposes. In this study, we utilize the native hypanthium tissue of apples and a simple preparation methodology to create implantable cellulose scaffolds. To examine biocompatibility, scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in wild-type, immunocompetent mice (males and females; 6–9 weeks old). Following the implantation, the scaffolds were resected at 1, 4 and 8 weeks and processed for histological analysis (H&E, Masson’s Trichrome, anti-CD31 and anti-CD45 antibodies). Histological analysis revealed a characteristic foreign body response to the scaffold 1 week post-implantation. However, the immune response was observed to gradually disappear by 8 weeks post-implantation. By 8 weeks, there was no immune response in the surrounding dermis tissue and active fibroblast migration within the cellulose scaffold was observed. This was concomitant with the deposition of a new collagen extracellular matrix. Furthermore, active blood vessel formation within the scaffold was observed throughout the period of study indicating the pro-angiogenic properties of the native scaffolds. Finally, while the scaffolds retain much of their original shape they do undergo a slow deformation over the 8-week length of the study. Taken together, our results demonstrate that native cellulose scaffolds are biocompatible and exhibit promising potential as a surgical biomaterial. PMID:27328066

  14. Microstructural Inhomogeneity of Electrical Conductivity in Subcutaneous Fat Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kruglikov, Ilja L.

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic peculiarities stemming from a temperature increase in subcutaneous adipose tissue (sWAT) after applying a radio-frequency (RF) current, must be strongly dependent on the type of sWAT. This effect is connected with different electrical conductivities of pathways inside (triglycerides in adipocytes) and outside (extra-cellular matrix) the cells and to the different weighting of these pathways in hypertrophic and hyperplastic types of sWAT. The application of the RF current to hypertrophic sWAT, which normally has a strongly developed extracellular matrix with high concentrations of hyaluronan and collagen in a peri-cellular space of adipocytes, can produce, micro-structurally, a highly inhomogeneous temperature distribution, characterized by strong temperature gradients between the peri-cellular sheath of the extra-cellular matrix around the hypertrophic adipocytes and their volumes. In addition to normal temperature effects, which are generally considered in body contouring, these temperature gradients can produce thermo-mechanical stresses on the cells’ surfaces. Whereas these stresses are relatively small under normal conditions and cannot cause any direct fracturing or damage of the cell structure, these stresses can, under some supportive conditions, be theoretically increased by several orders of magnitude, causing the thermo-mechanical cell damage. This effect cannot be realized in sWAT of normal or hyperplastic types where the peri-cellular structures are under-developed. It is concluded that the results of RF application in body contouring procedures must be strongly dependent on the morphological structure of sWAT. PMID:25734656

  15. Paragonimiasis in the abdominal cavity and subcutaneous tissue: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Ho; Kim, Jong Hun; Moon, Woo Sung; Lee, Min Ro

    2012-12-01

    Paragonimiasis is a parasitic disease caused by the lung fluke, Paragonimus spp. Lung flukes may be found in various organs, such as the brain, peritoneum, subcutaneous tissues, and retroperitoneum, other than the lungs. Abdominal paragonimiasis raises a considerable diagnostic challenge to clinicians, because it is uncommon and may be confused with other abdominopelvic inflammatory diseases, particularly peritoneal tuberculosis, and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Also, subcutaneous paragonimiasis does not easily bring up clinical suspicion, due to its rarity. We herein report 2 cases of abdominal paragonimiasis and 1 case of subcutaneous paragonimiasis in Korea.

  16. Increasing recognition of dermatomyositis with subcutaneous edema - is this a poorer prognostic marker?

    PubMed

    Tu, Jenny; McLean-Tooke, Andrew; Junckerstorff, Reimar

    2014-01-15

    Subcutaneous edema as a presenting feature of dermatomyositis has infrequently been described and is thought to signify a more aggressive disease course. We report a case involving a 38-year-old man who presented with significant subcutaneous edema involving his neck and upper body; he later developed clinical features and biopsy results consistent with dermatomyositis. Only sixteen previous cases of dermatomyositis with subcutaneous edema involving adults have been published in the literature and we aim to review disease progression, prognosis, and optimal treatment of the condition.

  17. Subcutaneous emphysema of the scrotum (pneumoscrotum) due to traumatic pneumothorax: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Simaioforidis, Vasileios; Kontos, Stylianos; Fokitis, Ioannis; Lefakis, Georgios; Koritsiadis, Sotirios

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Subcutaneous emphysema of the scrotum due to traumatic pneumothorax is a rare medical situation and only a few cases are reported in the literature. Case report We present the case of a 22 year old man who was admitted to the emergency department after a motorcycle accident having a painless crepitant scrotum and chest excoriations. Further evaluation revealed subcutaneous emphysema of the scrotum caused by left pneumothorax. Conclusion In conclusion, subcutaneous emphysema of the scrotum (or pneumoscrotum) due to traumatic pneumothorax is not an urgent condition and assessment should be supportive with intervention directed at the etiology, e.g. the pneumothorax. PMID:18976497

  18. Successful intermuscular implantation of subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator in a Japanese patient with pectus excavatum.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yusuke; Ueda, Marehiko; Winter, Joachim; Nakano, Miyo; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishimura, Masayuki; Miyazawa, Kazuo; Tateno, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2017-02-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) system was developed to provide a life-saving defibrillation therapy that does not affect the heart and vasculature. The subcutaneous ICD is preferred over the transvenous ICD for patients with a history of recurrent infection presenting major life-threatening rhythms. In this case report, we describe the first successful intermuscular implantation of a completely subcutaneous ICD in a Japanese patient with pectus excavatum. There were no associated complications with the device implantation or lead positioning. Further, the defibrillation threshold testing did not pose any problem with the abnormal anatomy of the patient.

  19. Electromechanical method coupling non-invasive skin impedance probing and in vivo subcutaneous liquid microinjection: controlling the diffusion pattern of nanoparticles within living soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Sung, Baeckkyoung; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Byung-Cheon; Soh, Kwang-Sup

    2014-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is the way to transport drug carriers, such as nanoparticles, across the skin barrier to the dermal and/or subcutaneous layer. In order to control the transdermal drug delivery process, based on the heterogeneous and nonlinear structures of the skin tissues, we developed a novel electromechanical method combining in vivo local skin impedance probing, subcutaneous micro-injection of colloidal nanoparticles, and transcutaneous electrical stimulation. Experiments on the nude mice using in vivo fluorescence imaging exhibited significantly different apparent diffusion patterns of the nanoparticles depending on the skin impedance: Anisotropic and isotropic patterns were observed upon injection into low and high impedance points, respectively. This result implies that the physical complexity in living tissues may cause anisotropic diffusion of drug carriers, and can be used as a parameter for controlling drug delivery process. This method also can be combined with microneedle-based drug release systems, micro-fabricated needle-electrodes, and/or advanced in vivo targeting/imaging technologies using nanoparticles.

  20. Human mesenchymal stromal cells could deliver erythropoietin and migrate to the basal layer of hair shaft when subcutaneously implanted in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Mok, P L; Cheong, S K; Leong, C F; Chua, K H; Ainoon, O

    2012-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are an attractive cell-targeting vehicle for gene delivery. MIDGE (an acronym for Minimalistic, Immunologically Defined Gene Expression) construct is relatively safer than the viral or plasmid expression system as the detrimental eukaryotic and prokaryotic gene and sequences have been eliminated. The objective of this study was to test the ability of the human MSC (hMSC) to deliver the erythropoietin (EPO) gene in a nude mice model following nucleofection using a MIDGE construct. hMSC nucleofected with MIDGE encoding the EPO gene was injected subcutaneously in Matrigel at the dorsal flank of nude mice. Subcutaneous implantation of nucleofected hMSC resulted in increased hemoglobin level with presence of human EPO in the peripheral blood of the injected nude mice in the first two weeks post-implantation compared with the control groups. The basal layer of the hair shaft in the dermal layer was found to be significantly positive for immunohistochemical staining of a human EPO antibody. However, only a few basal layers of the hair shaft were found to be positively stained for CD105. In conclusion, hMSC harboring MIDGE-EPO could deliver and transiently express the EPO gene in the nude mice model. These cells could be localized to the hair follicle and secreted EPO protein might have possible role in hair regeneration.

  1. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  2. Injection rate control cam

    SciTech Connect

    Perr, J.P.; Liang, E.; Yu, R.C.; Ghuman, A.S.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a cam for controlling the injection rate of fuel in a fuel injection system of an engine. The fuel injection system including a cyclically operating unit injector having a body, an injector plunger mounted for reciprocating movement in the injector body between an advanced position and a retracted portion to pump into the engine during each cycle a variable quantity of fuel up to a maximum quantity under rated engine conditions, and a drive train for converting rotational movement of the cam into reciprocating movement of the pumping plunger depending on the profile of the cam. The cam profile comprises at least a plunger retraction segment and a plunger advancement segment for controlling the velocity if injector plunger retraction and advancement, respectively, the plunger advancement segment including a pre-injection subsequent shaped to cause an initial quantity of fuel to be injected into the engine during each cycle at rated engine conditions while the pre-injection subsegment is in contact with the drive train, and an injection subsegment following the pre-injection subsegment.

  3. Health Instruction Packages: Injections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkleman, Ellie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in this set of four learning modules designed to instruct nursing students in techniques and equipment utilized for intramuscular injections. The first module, "Equipment for Intramuscular Injections" by Ellie Dunkleman, presents guidelines for selecting needles of the proper length and…

  4. Regulation of local subcutaneous blood flow in patients with psoriasis and effects of antipsoriatic treatment on subcutaneous blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Klemp, P.

    1985-08-01

    Local regulation of the doubled subcutaneous blood flow (SBF) rates in psoriatic lesional skin was studied in 8 patients using a traumatic epicutaneous /sup 133/Xe labeling washout technique. Venous stasis of 40 mm Hg induced a significant reduction in the SBF (-34%, p less than 0.01), i.e., a normal vasoconstrictor response. Limb elevation of 40 cm above heart level induced no statistical changes in the SBF (p = 0.50), i.e., a normal local autoregulation response. This indicates normal, local regulation mechanisms of SBF in psoriasis. In another 8 patients, the effect on SBF of a 4-week antipsoriatic treatment with tar was studied in lesional and symmetrically nonlesional skin areas. One patient was clear of psoriasis on day 22, and was followed only to that time. The mean pretreatment SBF in lesional skin areas was 3.87 +/- SD 0.78 ml X (100 g X min)-1, which was not statistically different from measurements on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 after treatment had started. Between day 21 and day 28, the SBF decreased significantly to 3.38 +/- SD 0.78 ml X (100 g X min)-1, p less than 0.05. The difference between the pretreatment SBF and SBF at the end of treatment was statistically significant, p less than 0.05. The changes in SBF in symmetrically nonlesional skin areas were statistically nonsignificant during the period of treatment. Pretreatment SBF was 2.60 +/- SD 1.08 (N = 8), and on day 28 was 1.91 +/- SD 0.74 ml X (100 g X min)-1 (N = 7). However, the tendency of a decreasing SBF at the end of treatment was a clear trend, since SBF in 6 of 7 patients decreased during the third week and in the patient who was discharged on day 22, a decrease in the SBF was observed on days 14 and 21.

  5. Freon injection injury to the hand. A report of four cases

    SciTech Connect

    Goetting, A.T.; Carson, J.; Burton, B.T. )

    1992-08-01

    During a 6-month period, the poison center was consulted on three occasions for advice regarding accidental injection of hexafluorethane (Freon) used in the manufacturing process of athletic shoes. A fourth case was later identified after consulting physicians near the manufacturing facility. Little information exists in the medical literature concerning injection of freon or other volatile substances. In each of these cases, workers inadvertently injected concentrated hexafluorethane into a finger while holding the shoe component and attempting to inject hexafluorethane. Each case presented with edema, limitation of motion, and crepitation. Hand roentgenogram revealed subcutaneous gas. Treatment was nonsurgical, consisting of splinting, tetanus immunization, and antibiotics. Rapid resolution of symptoms occurred in all four cases. Hexafluorethane is relatively inert when injected and has low toxicity. However, potential rapid expansion warrants observation for pressure injury.

  6. Design and in silico evaluation of an intraperitoneal-subcutaneous (IP-SC) artificial pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin J; Dassau, Eyal; Zisser, Howard; Doyle, Francis J

    2014-11-05

    Prandial glucose regulation is a major challenge for the artificial pancreas using subcutaneous insulin (without a feedforward bolus) due to insulin's slow absorption-peak (50-60 min). Intraperitoneal insulin, with a fast absorption peak (20-25 min), has been suggested as an alternative to address these limitations. An artificial pancreas using intraperitoneal insulin was designed and evaluated on 100 in silico subjects and compared with two designs using subcutaneous insulin with and without a feedforward bolus, following the three meal (40-70 g-carbohydrates) evaluation protocol. The design using intraperitoneal insulin resulted in a significantly lower postprandial blood glucose peak (38 mg/dL) and longer time in the clinically accepted region (13%) compared to the design using subcutaneous insulin without a feedforward bolus and comparable results to a subcutaneous feedforward bolus design. This superior regulation with minimal user interaction may improve the quality of life for people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  7. High-dose monoclonal antibodies via the subcutaneous route: challenges and technical solutions, an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Chakravarthy; Mach, Henryk; Shameem, Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    This review summarizes the various challenges in product development involved in subcutaneous administration of high-dose monoclonal antibodies and attempts to provide an industry perspective of some of the available technologies and potential avenues to overcome these challenges.

  8. Novel Closing Method Using Subcutaneous Continuous Drain for Preventing Surgical Site Infections in Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Yasuhiko; Ando, Ryosuke; Nakane, Akihiro; Etani, Toshiki; Iida, Keitaro; Akita, Hidetoshi; Okamura, Takehiko; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after radical cystectomy, a new closing method using subcutaneous continuous aspiration drain was developed and compared to the conventional closing method. The new method involved (a) closed aspiration with an indwelling aspiration drain without suture of the subcutaneous fat and (b) covering with hydrocolloid wound dressing after suture of the dermis with 4-0 absorbable thread and reinforcement using strips. The incidence of SSI was significantly improved by using the new method. Furthermore, univariate and multivariate analysis associated with SSI revealed that the new closing method was statistically correlated with 85% reduction of SSI (odds ratio: 0.15, 95% confidence interval: 0.03–0.69).Our new method using continuous aspiration with subcutaneous drain is useful for preventing SSI through removal of effusions and reduction of dead space by apposition of the subcutaneous fat. PMID:24734201

  9. [Subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum and retropneumoperitoneum following a colonoscopy with mucosectomy].

    PubMed

    Cirt, Nadia; de Lajarte-Thirouard, Anne-Sophie; Olivié, Damien; Pagenault, Mael; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2006-05-01

    The occurrence of associated intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal colonic perforation is uncommon after colonoscopy. We report a case of this complication revealed by subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum and retro-pneumoperitoneum after colonic mucosectomy.

  10. Anterior subcutaneous transposition for persistent ulnar neuropathy after neurolysis.

    PubMed

    van Gent, Jort A N; Datema, Mirjam; Groen, Justus L; Pondaag, Willem; Eekhof, Job L A; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Little is known about optimal treatment if neurolysis for ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow fails. The authors evaluated the clinical outcome of patients who underwent anterior subcutaneous transposition after failure of neurolysis of ulnar nerve entrapment (ASTAFNUE). METHODS A consecutive series of patients who underwent ASTAFNUE performed by a single surgeon between 2009 and 2014 was analyzed retrospectively. Preoperative and postoperative complaints in the following 3 clinical modalities were compared: pain and/or tingling, weakness, and numbness. Six-point satisfaction scores were determined on the basis of data from systematic telephonic surveys. RESULTS Twenty-six patients were included. The median age was 56 years (range 22-79 years). The median duration of complaints before ASTAFNUE was 23 months (range 8-78 months). The median interval between neurolysis and ASTAFNUE was 11 months (range 5-34 months). At presentation, 88% of the patients were experiencing pain and/or tingling, 46% had weakness, and 50% had numbness of the fourth and fifth fingers. Pain and/or tingling improved in 35%, motor function in 23%, and sensory disturbances in 19% of all the patients. Improvement in at least 1 of the 3 clinical modalities was found in 58%. However, a deterioration in 1 of the 3 modalities was noted in 46% of the patients. On the patient-satisfaction scale, 62% reported a good or excellent outcome. Patients with a good/excellent outcome were a median of 11 years younger than patients with a fair/poor outcome. No other factor was significantly related to satisfaction score. CONCLUSIONS A majority of the patients were satisfied after ASTAFNUE, even though their symptoms only partly resolved or even deteriorated. Older age is a risk factor for a poor outcome. Other factors that affect outcome might play a role, but they remain unidentified. One of these factors might be earlier surgical intervention. The modest results of ASTAFNUE should be mentioned when

  11. Analysis of Subcutaneous and Visceral Fat After Gastric Balloon Treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Gustavo L.; de Melo, Rayssa A. B.; de Moura, Fernanda M.; Leite, Ana Paula D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This project is a continuation of a larger project entitled “Treatment with intragastric balloon (IGB) in patients with overweight and obesity in Recife” developed by Professor Dr. Gustavo Lopes de Carvalho. It is a project studying the effectiveness of treatment with IGB evaluating the loss of weight and body mass index and its impact on blood pressure, blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol and fractions. It also assesses the lifestyle of patients studying whether treatment with IGB interferes in smoking, alcohol consumption, eating habits and physical exercises performed by patients. The present study added a larger project, the separate evaluation of the different types of abdominal fat—visceral fat and subcutaneous cell tissue fat — and was conducted to discover which of the 2 types of fat undergoes the greater reduction after IGB treatment. To measure these 2 types of fat, we used the ultrasonography technique, because it has been shown to be accurate and noninvasive. Methods: Twenty-five patients were evaluated before and after 6 months of IGB treatment. Results: The patients' ages ranged from 20 to 61 years, with 60% being 40 years of age or older. The majority (72%) were women. All variables (weight, body mass index [BMI], VF, and SCTF) showed a significant reduction (P < .05) in mean values after treatment. The difference was highest in the SCTF (17.5%) and ranged from an 11.4% to an 11.6% reduction in all other variables. The average loss of SCTF was highest among the patients who had lost up to 10.0% of their initial weight (19.2% for the ≤10.0% group vs 15.9% for the >10.0% group); however, the difference was not significant (P = .66). The average loss of VF was higher in the subgroup of patients who had lost >10.0% of their initial weight (16.2% vs 6.3%; P = .003). The Pearson correlation between the reductions in SCTF vs VF was negative, low, and nonsignificant (−0.17; P = .41). Conclusions: After 6

  12. Cutaneous Involvement in the Deep Mycoses: A Literature Review. Part I-Subcutaneous Mycoses.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Zuber, J E; Navarrete-Dechent, C; Bonifaz, A; Fich, F; Vial-Letelier, V; Berroeta-Mauriziano, D

    2016-12-01

    The deep mycoses are uncommon in our setting. These fungal infections occur mainly in immunosuppressed patients or in tropical climates, and include subcutaneous infections and systemic infections. The skin is always involved in the former. In the first part of this review, we describe the main subcutaneous mycoses: sporotrichosis, chromoblastomycosis, mycetoma, phaeohyphomycosis, hyalohyphomycosis, and lacaziosis. Early recognition and treatment is important, as these infections are frequently associated with high morbidity.

  13. Regression of subcutaneous lymphoma following removal of an ovarian granulosatheca cell tumor in a horse.

    PubMed

    Henson, K L; Alleman, A R; Cutler, T J; Ginn, P E; Kelley, L C

    1998-05-01

    A 9-year-old Arabian mare was admitted for evaluation of multiple subcutaneous nodules and infertility. Fine-needle aspiration of one of the subcutaneous nodules resulted in a cytologic diagnosis of histiolymphocytic lymphoma. Palpation per rectum and transrectal ultrasonography revealed a mass associated with the left ovary. Excision of the ovarian tumor was performed, and a histopathologic diagnosis of granulosa-theca cell tumor was made. After removal of the granulosa-theca cell tumor, subcutaneous nodules regressed. The referring veterinarian reported that the nodules had also disappeared and then recurred after administration of a synthetic progestin. To further characterize the lymphoma and investigate this possible hormonal relationship, immunophenotyping and estrogen and progesterone receptor assays were performed. The subcutaneous lymphoma was classified as a T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma, results of estrogen receptor assays were negative, and results of progesterone receptor assays were positive. Clinical observations of subcutaneous lymphoma in horses indicate that the waxing and waning nature of these tumors may be associated with the estrous cycle, pregnancy, foaling, and lactation. Clinical observations and identification of progesterone receptors suggest that a relationship between serum steroid hormone concentrations, such as estrogen and progesterone, and subcutaneous lymphoma may exists.

  14. Subcutaneous Fungal Cyst Masquerading as Benign Lesions – A Series of Eight Cases

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Renu G’Boy; Phansalkar, Manjiri; Ramdas, Anita; K, Authy; G, Thangiah

    2015-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous fungal infections are caused by penetration of the causative fungi into the subcutaneous layer and are usually localised. We present a series of eight cases with subcutaneous fungal cystic lesions masquerading as benign lesions. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted on subcutaneous fungal infections seen between January 2007 to July 2014 in the Department of Pathology. Eight patients with biopsy proven subcutaneous fungal infection were included. We collected and analysed their demographic, clinical and histopathological details. Results Among eight patients, six were male and two were female. The mean age was 47 years (Range: 21-70). All the eight patients presented with non-tender cystic swelling. The size of the swellings varied from a minimum of 3x3 cm to maximum of 10x4 cm. Out of eight, hand was involved in three, forearm in one, elbow in two, leg in one and foot in one. On H&E staining, all the cases showed fibro collagenous cyst wall, lined by histiocytes, granulomatous reaction, foreign body type of giant cells with acute and chronic inflammatory infiltrate containing fungal elements. Six were identified as hyalohyphomycosis and two were identified as phaeohyphomycotic cysts based on pigmentation of hyphae. Conclusion Fungal infection should be suspected in all subcutaneous cystic lesions. Excised tissue should always be sent for culture and histopathology. PMID:26557537

  15. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin in CIDP and MMN: a short-term nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Cocito, Dario; Merola, Aristide; Peci, Erdita; Mazzeo, Anna; Fazio, Raffaella; Francia, Ada; Valentino, Paola; Liguori, Rocco; Filosto, Massimiliano; Siciliano, Gabriele; Clerici, Angelo Maurizio; Lelli, Stefania; Marfia, Girolama Alessandra; Antonini, Giovanni; Cecconi, Ilaria; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Lopiano, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    This multi-center Italian prospective observational study reports the 4 months follow-up data of 87 patients affected by chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) shifted from intravenous to subcutaneous immunoglobulin treatment. A therapeutic shift from intravenous to subcutaneous immunoglobulin was performed in 87 patients (66 CIDP; 21 MMN) affected by immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies with evidence of a sustained clinical response to intravenous immunoglobulin. Patients were evaluated by means of the Overall Neuropathy Limitation Scale, Medical Research Council Scale and Life Quality Index questionnaire, both at the time of therapeutic shift and after 4 months of subcutaneous immunoglobulin treatment. A sustained clinical efficacy was observed after the switch to subcutaneous immunoglobulin: the Overall Neuropathy Limitation Scale score improved in the group of 66 CIDP patients (P = 0.018), with only one subject reporting a worsening of 1 point, and remained stable in the group of 21 MMN patients (P = 0.841), with one subject reporting a worsening of two points. An improvement in the patient's perception of therapeutic setting was reported in both groups. This large multi-center study confirms the short-term clinical equivalence of subcutaneous versus intravenous immunoglobulin and a possible improvement in the patient's perception of therapeutic setting with the subcutaneous administration. However, further studies are required to extend the results to a longer observational period.

  16. THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

    1999-03-29

    The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

  17. Multisystem organ failure after large volume injection of castor oil.

    PubMed

    Smith, Silas W; Graber, Nathan M; Johnson, Rudolph C; Barr, John R; Hoffman, Robert S; Nelson, Lewis S

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of multisystem organ failure after large volume subcutaneous injection of castor oil for cosmetic enhancement. An unlicensed practitioner injected 500 mL of castor oil bilaterally to the hips and buttocks of a 28-year-old male to female transsexual. Immediate local pain and erythema were followed by abdominal and chest pain, emesis, headache, hematuria, jaundice, and tinnitus. She presented to an emergency department 12 hours postinjection. Persistently hemolyzed blood samples complicated preliminary laboratory analysis. She rapidly deteriorated despite treatment and developed fever, tachycardia, hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, hepatitis, respiratory distress, and anuric renal failure. An infectious diseases evaluation was negative. After intensive supportive care, including mechanical ventilation and hemodialysis, she was discharged 11 days later, requiring dialysis for an additional 1.5 months. Castor oil absorption was inferred from recovery of the Ricinus communis biomarker, ricinine, in the patient's urine (41 ng/mL). Clinicians should anticipate multiple complications after unapproved methods of cosmetic enhancement.

  18. Common injections in musculoskeletal medicine.

    PubMed

    Monseau, Aaron J; Nizran, Parminder Singh

    2013-12-01

    Musculoskeletal injections are a common procedure in primary care and sports medicine but can be intimidating for some clinicians. This article addresses current evidence for corticosteroid injections, and common injection indications and techniques, namely knee, subacromial bursa, glenohumeral joint, lateral epicondyle, de Quervain tenosynovitis, and greater trochanteric bursa injections. Preparation for injections and some evidence for ultrasound guidance are also reviewed.

  19. Influence of injection timing on severity of cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Katsumi; Yanagiba, Yukie; Ashimori, Atsushige; Takeuchi, Asuka; Takada, Naoko; Togawa, Masako; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Masayuki; Miura, Nobuhiko

    2013-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the endocrine disrupter and is a well-known testicular toxicant. Recently, we reported that Cd-induced mortality was markedly different by injection timing. In this report, we investigated whether severity of testicular toxicity was affected by injection timing of Cd. C57BL/6J mice (male, 7 w) were received single intraperitoneal injection of CdCl(2) (4.5 mg/kg) at zeitgeber time 6 (ZT6) or ZT18; these injection timings showed highest (ZT6) or lowest (ZT18) mortality in our previous study (Miura, 2012). After one week of the injection, several parameters for testicular toxicity such as epididymal sperm motility and numbers of sperm head both in cauda epididymidis and testis were measured. At ZT6 injection group, all parameters examined were significantly reduced compared to the control group. However, very interestingly, no significant changes were observed at ZT18 injection group. We obtained similar results by another experiment in which mice were received single subcutaneous injection of CdCl(2) (4 or 6 mg/kg) followed by measuring the parameters ten days after the injection. This diurnal variation was not contradictory to the result of the lethal toxicity which we showed earlier. Therefore, our results indicate that the testicular toxicity of Cd is also influenced by the injection timing.

  20. Low Viscosity Highly Concentrated Injectable Nonaqueous Suspensions of Lysozyme Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Maria A.; Engstrom, Joshua D.; Ludher, Baltej S.; Johnston, Keith P.

    2011-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of concentrated protein and peptide solutions, in the range of 100–400 mg/mL, is often not possible with a 25- to 27-gauge needle, as the viscosity can be well above 50 cP. Apparent viscosities below this limit are reported for suspensions of milled lysozyme microparticles up to nearly 400 mg/mL in benzyl benzoate or benzyl benzoate mixtures with safflower oils through a syringe with a 25- to 27-gauge needle at room temperature. These apparent viscosities were confirmed using a cone-and-plate rheometer. The intrinsic viscosity regressed from the Kreiger–Dougherty model was only slightly above the Einstein value of 2.5, indicating the increase in viscosity relative to that of the solvent was caused primarily by the excluded volume. Thus, the increases in viscosity from electrical double layer interactions (electroviscous effects), solvation of the particles, or deviations of the particle shape from a spherical geometry were minimal, and much smaller than typically observed for proteins dissolved in aqueous solutions. The small electroviscous effects are expected given the negligible zeta potential and thin double layers in the low dielectric constant organic solvent. The suspensions were resuspendable after a year, with essentially constant particle size after two months as measured by static light scattering. The lower apparent viscosities for highly concentrated protein suspensions relative to protein solutions, coupled with these favorable characteristics upon resuspension, may offer novel opportunities for subcutaneous injection of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19803503

  1. In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Charles H N; Lang, Sommer A; Bilal, Haris; Rammohan, Kandadai S

    2014-06-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: 'In patients with extensive subcutaneous emphysema, which technique achieves maximal clinical resolution: infraclavicular incisions, subcutaneous drain insertion or suction on in situ chest drain?'. Altogether more than 200 papers were found using the reported search, of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Subcutaneous emphysema is usually a benign, self-limiting condition only requiring conservative management. Interventions are useful in the context of severe patient discomfort, respiratory distress or persistent air leak. In the absence of any comparative study, it is not possible to choose definitively between infraclavicular incisions, drain insertion and increasing suction on an in situ drain as the best method for managing severe subcutaneous emphysema. All the three techniques described have been shown to provide effective relief. Increasing suction on a chest tube already in situ provided rapid relief in patients developing SE following pulmonary resection. A retrospective study showed resolution in 66%, increasing to 98% in those who underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery with identification and closure of the leak. Insertion of a drain into the subcutaneous tissue also provided rapid sustained relief. Several studies aided drainage by using regular compressive massage. Infraclavicular incisions were also shown to provide rapid relief, but were noted to be more invasive and carried the potential for cosmetic defect. No major complications were illustrated.

  2. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... years of age and older; treat severe underarm sweating in people 18 years of age and older ... the muscle. When onabotulinumtoxinA is injected into a sweat gland, it decreases the activity of the gland ...

  3. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease (a thickening of tissue [plaque] inside the penis that causes the penis to curve). Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is in ... the plaque of thickened tissue and allows the penis to be straightened.

  4. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor or nurse in a doctor's office or infusion center. It is usually given once every 2 ... injection may cause serious allergic reactions during an infusion and for about 30 minutes afterwards. A doctor ...

  5. Albumin injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a nuclear scan test that is performed to measure the supply of blood through the lungs. After the injection, the lungs are scanned to detect the location of the radioactive particles as blood flows through the lungs.

  6. Talimogene Laherparepvec Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Talimogene laherparepvec injection is used to treat certain melanoma (a type of skin cancer) tumors that cannot ... had radiation treatment in the area of the melanoma tumors, multiple myeloma (cancer of the plasma cells ...

  7. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the area where the medication was injected brown skin discoloration numbness, burning, or tingling in the arms, hands, feet, or legs sweating changes in taste Some side effects can be serious. If you experience these symptoms ...

  8. Supersonic Pulsed Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Harding, G. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    2001-01-01

    An injector has been developed to provide high-speed high-frequency (order 10 kHz) pulsed a supersonic crossflow. The injector nozzle is formed between the fixed internal surface of the nozzle and a freely rotating three- or four-sided wheel embedded within the device. Flow-induced rotation of the wheel causes the nozzle throat to open and close at a frequency proportional to the speed of sound of the injected gas. Measurements of frequency and mass flow rate as a function of supply pressure are discussed for various injector designs. Preliminary results are presented for wall-normal injection of helium into a Mach-2 ducted airflow. The data include schlieren images in the injectant plume in a plane normal to the flow, downstream of injection.

  9. Co-trimoxazole Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat certain infections that are caused by bacteria such as infection of the intestine, lungs (pneumonia), ... of medications called sulfonamides. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such as co-trimoxazole injection will not ...

  10. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  11. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  12. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery to decrease the chance that blood transfusions (transfer of one person's blood to another person's body) ... wheezing difficulty breathing or swallowing hoarseness lack of energy dizziness fainting Epoetin alfa injection may cause other ...

  13. AbobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the area of injection and cause symptoms of botulism, including severe or life-threatening difficulty breathing or ... effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch ...

  14. RimabotulinumtoxinB Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the area of injection and cause symptoms of botulism, including severe or life-threatening difficulty breathing or ... effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch ...

  15. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the area of injection and cause symptoms of botulism, including severe or life threatening difficulty breathing or ... effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch ...

  16. Incorporating a Generic Model of Subcutaneous Insulin Absorption into the AIDA v4 Diabetes Simulator 3. Early Plasma Insulin Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; Tarín, Cristina; Bondia, Jorge; Teufel, Edgar; Deutsch, Tibor

    2009-01-01

    Introduction AIDA is an interactive educational diabetes simulator that has been available without charge via the Internet for over 12 years. Recent articles have described the incorporation of a novel generic model of insulin absorption into AIDA as a way of enhancing its capabilities. The basic model components to be integrated have been overviewed, with the aim being to provide simulations of regimens utilizing insulin analogues, as well as insulin doses greater than 40 IU (the current upper limit within the latest release of AIDA [v4.3a]). Some preliminary calculated insulin absorption results have also recently been described. Methods This article presents the first simulated plasma insulin profiles from the integration of the generic subcutaneous insulin absorption model, and the currently implemented model in AIDA for insulin disposition. Insulin absorption has been described by the physiologically based model of Tarín and colleagues. A single compartment modeling approach has been used to specify how absorbed insulin is distributed in, and eliminated from, the human body. To enable a numerical solution of the absorption model, a spherical subcutaneous depot for the injected insulin dose has been assumed and spatially discretized into shell compartments with homogeneous concentrations, having as its center the injection site. The number of these compartments will depend on the dose and type of insulin. Insulin inflow arises as the sum of contributions to the different shells. For this report the first bench testing of plasma insulin determinations has been done. Results Simulated plasma insulin profiles are provided for currently available insulin preparations, including a rapidly acting insulin analogue (e.g., lispro/Humalog or aspart/Novolog), a short-acting (regular) insulin preparation (e.g., Actrapid), intermediate-acting insulins (both Semilente and neutral protamine Hagedorn types), and a very long-acting insulin analogue (e.g., glargine/Lantus), as

  17. Subcutaneous Botulinum toxin type A reduces capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain and vasomotor reactions in human skin.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Pedersen, Natalia Spicina; Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The present human study aimed at investigating the effect of subcutaneous administration of Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) on capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain, neurogenic inflammation and experimentally induced cutaneous pain modalities. Fourteen healthy males (26.3+/-2.6 years) were included in this double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. The subjects received subcutaneous BoNT/A (22.5U) and isotonic saline in the mirror sides of their forehead. Pain and neurogenic inflammation was induced by four intradermal injections of capsaicin (100mug/muL) (before, and days 1, 3 and 7 after treatments). The capsaicin-induced pain intensity, pain area, the area of secondary hyperalgesia, the area of visible flare and vasomotor reactions were recorded together with cutaneous heat, electrical and pressure pain thresholds. BoNT/A reduced the capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain intensity compared to saline (F=37.9, P<0.001). The perceived pain area was smaller for the BoNT/A-treated side compared to saline (F=7.8, P<0.05). BoNT/A reduced the capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia (F=5.3, P<0.05) and flare area (F=10.3, P<0.01) compared to saline. BoNT/A reduced blood flow (F(1,26)=109.5, P<0.001) and skin temperature (F(1,26)=63.1, P<0.001) at the capsaicin injection sites compared to saline and its suppressive effect was maximal at days 3 and 7 (P<0.05, post hoc test). BoNT/A elevated cutaneous heat pain thresholds (F=17.1, P<0.001) compared to saline; however, no alteration was recorded for electrical or pressure pain thresholds (P>0.05). Findings from the present study suggest that BoNT/A appears to preferentially target Cfibers and probably TRPV1-receptors, block neurotransmitter release and subsequently reduce pain, neurogenic inflammation and cutaneous heat pain threshold.

  18. Fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Herth, H.; Kraus, B.; Sautter, W.; Wessel, W.

    1983-03-15

    A fuel injection system for an internal combustion engine includes electromagnetic injection valves controlled by a fuel control unit which receives signals from a camshaft actuated switch, a position-dependent throttle transducer and an oxygen sensor. When the oxygen sensor changes output levels, the transmission of this information is delayed, by the action of a switching transistor controlled by a monostable multivibrator, for a period of time equal to the internal time constant of the multivibrator.

  19. Gas chromatograph injection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Henderson, M. E.; Donaldson, R. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An injection system for a gas chromatograph is described which uses a small injector chamber (available in various configurations). The sample is placed in the chamber while the chamber is not under pressure and is not heated, and there is no chance of leakage caused by either pressure or heat. It is injected into the apparatus by changing the position of a valve and heating the chamber, and is volatilized and swept by a carrier gas into the analysis apparatus.

  20. Session 20: Injection Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Prestwich, Susan

    1983-12-01

    The test program was initiated at the Raft River Geothermal Field in southern Idaho in September 1982. A series of eight short-term injection and backflow tests, followed by a long-term injection test, were conducted on one well in the field. Tracers were added during injection and monitored during backflow as well. The principal objective was to determine if tracers could be effectively used as a means to assess reservoir characteristics in a one-well test. The test program resulted in a unique data set which shows promise as a means to improve understanding of the reservoir characteristics. In December 1982, an RFP was issued to obtain an industrial partner to obtain follow-on data on the injection/backflow technique in a second field, and to study any alternate advanced concepts for injection testing which the industrial community might recommend. The East Mesa Geothermal Field was selected for the second test series. Two wells were utilized for testing, and a series of ten tests were conducted in July and August 1983, aimed principally at further evaluation of the injection/backflow technique.

  1. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, following multiple ascending subcutaneous administrations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Marier, Jean-Francois; Beliveau, Martin; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Shaw, Paula; Cyran, Jane; Kesavan, Jothi; Wallens, John; Zahir, Hamim; Wells, David; Caminis, John

    2008-11-01

    Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) analog, is currently being evaluated for the treatment of short-bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease, and other gastrointestinal disorders. The pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of teduglutide in healthy subjects (N = 64) were assessed following daily subcutaneous administrations for 8 days in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose study. Teduglutide treatments were administered as a 50-mg/mL (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50, and 80 mg) or 20-mg/mL (20 mg) formulation. Blood samples were collected on days 1 and 8, and plasma concentrations of teduglutide were measured using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method. Mean systemic exposures to teduglutide were very similar on days 1 and 8, suggesting minimal, if any, accumulation following once-daily repeated administrations. The apparent clearance of teduglutide following administration of the 50-mg/mL formulation was constant over the dose range, with mean values in male and female subjects of 0.155 and 0.159 L/h/kg, respectively. Peak plasma concentrations and total exposure of teduglutide after subcutaneous injection of a 20-mg/mL formulation (1.0 mL) were approximately 15% and 78% higher than those observed with the 50-mg/mL formulation (0.4 mL), respectively. Teduglutide treatments were safe and well tolerated. All but 1 adverse event was assessed as mild or moderate in severity. No relationship between teduglutide treatments and frequency of adverse events was observed, with the exception of injection site pain, which increased as a function of dose and injected volume. Results from the current study will assist in the dose selection in future efficacy studies.

  2. The effect of animal health products on the formation of injection site lesions in subprimals of experimentally injected beef calves.

    PubMed Central

    Van Donkersgoed, J; Dubeski, P L; VanderKop, M; Aalhus, J L; Bygrove, S; Starr, W N

    2000-01-01

    Two hundred and twenty beef calves were used in an experimental study to determine the occurrence of injection site lesions at slaughter (15 to 18 months of age) following subcutaneous and intramuscular injection of various products into the top hip (top butt), thigh (round), and neck or rib of calves at birth, branding, or weaning. Products tested were: 2 different preparations of selenium; a 2-way, a 7-way, and an 8-way clostridial bacterin; 2 combination 7-way clostridial and Haemophilus somnus bacterins; 2 H. somnus bacterins; 2 different 4-way modified-live viral respiratory vaccines; a 4-way killed viral and H. somnus vaccine; and penicillin, florfenicol, ceftiofur, trimethoprim-sulfa, and tilmicosin. The occurrence of lesions, number of steaks affected with lesions, the trim weight of lesions, the histological class of lesions, and the estimated economic losses are described. Generally, products administered subcutaneously in the neck produced minimal tissue damage and economic losses. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:10945127

  3. Subcutaneous Implant-based Breast Reconstruction with Acellular Dermal Matrix/Mesh: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Salibian, Ara A.; Frey, Jordan D.; Choi, Mihye

    2016-01-01

    Background: The availability of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) and synthetic mesh products has prompted plastic surgeons to revisit subcutaneous implant-based breast reconstruction. The literature is limited, however, with regards to evidence on patient selection, techniques, and outcomes. Methods: A systematic review of the Medline and Cochrane databases was performed for original studies reporting breast reconstruction with ADM or mesh, and subcutaneous implant placement. Studies were analyzed for level of evidence, inclusion/exclusion criteria for subcutaneous reconstruction, reconstruction characteristics, and outcomes. Results: Six studies (186 reconstructions) were identified for review. The majority of studies (66.7%) were level IV evidence case series. Eighty percent of studies had contraindications for subcutaneous reconstruction, most commonly preoperative radiation, high body mass index, and active smoking. Forty percent of studies commenting on patient selection assessed mastectomy flap perfusion for subcutaneous reconstruction. Forty-five percent of reconstructions were direct-to-implant, 33.3% 2-stage, and 21.5% single-stage adjustable implant, with ADM utilized in 60.2% of reconstructions versus mesh. Pooled complication rates included: major infection 1.2%, seroma 2.9%, hematoma 2.3%, full nipple-areola complex necrosis 1.1%, partial nipple-areola complex necrosis 4.5%, major flap necrosis 1.8%, wound healing complication 2.3%, explantation 4.1%, and grade III/IV capsular contracture 1.2%. Conclusions: Pooled short-term complication rates in subcutaneous alloplastic breast reconstruction with ADM or mesh are low in preliminary studies with selective patient populations, though techniques and outcomes are variable across studies. Larger comparative studies and better-defined selection criteria and outcomes reporting are needed to develop appropriate indications for performing subcutaneous implant-based reconstruction. PMID:27975034

  4. Spatial anisotropy analyses of subcutaneous tissue layer: potential insights into its biomechanical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Andrew C; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2011-01-01

    As the intermediate layer between the muscle and skin, the subcutaneous tissue frequently experiences shear and lateral stresses whenever the body is in motion. However, quantifying such stresses in vivo is difficult. The lack of such measures is partly responsible for our poor understanding of the biomechanical behaviors of subcutaneous tissue. In this study, we employ both ultrasound imaging and a novel spatial anisotropy measure – incorporating Moran's I spatial autocorrelation calculations – to investigate the structuromechanical features of subcutaneous tissues within the extremities of 16 healthy volunteers. This approach is based on the understanding that spatial anisotropy can be an effective surrogate for the summative, tensile forces experienced by biological tissue. We found that spatial anisotropy in the arm, thigh and calf was attributed to the echogenic bands spanning the width of the ultrasound images. In both univariable and multivariable analyses, the calf was significantly associated with greater anisotropy compared with the thigh and arm. Spatial anisotropy was inversely related to subcutaneous thickness, and was significantly increased with longitudinally oriented probe images compared with transversely orientated images. Maximum peaks in spatial anisotropy were frequently observed when the longitudinally oriented ultrasound probe was swept across the extremity, suggesting that longitudinal channels with greater tension exist in the subcutaneous layer. These results suggest that subcutaneous biomechanical tension is mediated by collagenous/echogenic bands, greater in the calf compared with the thigh and arm, increased in thinner individuals, and maximal along longitudinal trajectories parallel to the underlying muscle. Spatial anisotropy analysis of ultrasound images has yielded meaningful patterns and may be an effective means to understand the biomechanical strain patterns within the subcutaneous tissue of the extremities. PMID:21722103

  5. A comparative study of vascular injection fluids in fresh-frozen and embalmed human cadaver forearms.

    PubMed

    Doomernik, D E; Kruse, R R; Reijnen, M M P J; Kozicz, T L; Kooloos, J G M

    2016-10-01

    Over the years, various vascular injection products have been developed to facilitate anatomical dissections. This study aimed to compare the most commonly used vascular injection products in fresh-frozen and formalin-embalmed cadaver specimens. An overview of the properties, advantages and limitations of each substance was given, and a comparison of vascular infusion procedures in both preservation methods was made. A literature search was performed in order to identify the most commonly used vascular injection products. Acrylic paint, latex, gelatin, silicone, Araldite F and Batson's No. 17 were selected for the study. One fresh-frozen and one embalmed cadaver forearm were infused with each injection product according to a uniform protocol. The curing time, skin- and subcutaneous tissue penetration, degree of filling of the arterial tree, extravasations, consistency of the injected vessels during dissection, and the costs of each injection fluid were noted. There was a large variation between the injection fluids in processing- and curing time, colour intensity, flexibility, fragility, elasticity, strength, toxicity and costs. All fluids were suitable for infusion. The penetration of injection fluid into the skin and subcutaneous tissue was significantly better in fresh-frozen specimens (P = 0.002 and P = 0.009, respectively), with significantly smaller branches casted (P = 0.004). Vascular infusion of fresh-frozen cadaver specimens results in a significantly better filled coloured arterial tree, enabling more detail to be achieved and smaller branches casted. The biomechanical properties of fresh-frozen soft tissues are less affected compared with formalin fixation. All the injection fluids studied are suitable for vascular infusion, but their different properties ensure that certain products and procedures are more suitable for specific study purposes.

  6. High-pressure injection injury of the finger - a case presentation

    PubMed Central

    ŞTEFĂNESCU, RALUCA LAURA; BORDEIANU, ION

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure injection injuries are uncommon traumas characterized by a great discrepancy between a deceptively small entrance site and the extensive and underestimated subcutaneous tissue injury and destruction. Without early and correct treatment these lesions lead to disability and local extensive destruction. This paper presents a case of high-pressure injection injury to the metacarpal-phalangeal articulation of the finger from industrial paint; the extent of the injury was underestimated at presentation and improperly treated. This case required surgical staged management, with a total time of medical leave of three months. PMID:26527921

  7. Targeted two-photon photodynamic therapy for the treatment of subcutaneous tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Charles W.; Starkey, Jean R.; Meng, Fanqing; Gong, Aijun; Drobizhev, Mikhail; Rebane, Aleksander; Moss, B.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has developed into a mature technology over the past several years, and is currently being exploited for the treatment of a variety of cancerous tumors, and more recently for age-related wet macular degeneration of the eye. However, there are still some unresolved problems with PDT that are retarding a more general acceptance in clinical settings, and thus, for the most part, the treatment of most cancerous rumors still involves some combination of invasive surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatment, particularly subcutaneous tumors. Currently approved PDT agents are activated in the Visible portion of the spectrum below 700 nm, Laser light in this spectral region cannot penetrate the skin more than a few millimeters, and it would be more desirable if PDT could be initiated deep in the Near-infrared (NIR) in the tissue transparency window (700-1000 nm). MPA Technologies, Inc. and Rasiris, Inc. have been co-developing new porphyrin PDT designed to have greatly enhanced intrinsic two-photon cross-sections (>800 GM units) whose two-photon absorption maxima lie deep in the tissue transparency window (ca. 780-850 nm), and have solubility characteristics that would allow for direct IV injection into animal models. Classical PDT also suffers from the lengthy time necessary for accumulation at the tumor site, a relative lack of discrimination between healthy and diseased tissue, particularly at the tumor margins, and difficulty in clearing from the system in a reasonable amount of time post-PDT. We have recently discovered a new design paradigm for the delivery of our two-photon activated PDT agents by incorporating the porphyrins into a triad ensemble that includes a small molecule targeting agent that directs the triad to over-expressed tumor receptor sites, and a NIR one-photon imaging agent that allows the tracking of the triad in terms of accumulation and clearance rates. We are currently using these new two-photon PDT triads in efficacy

  8. [A 13-week subcutaneous toxicity study of prednisolone farnesylate (PNF) in rats].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, S; Yamazaki, E; Tamura, K; Hoshiya, T; Anabuki, K; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, G

    1992-11-01

    The toxicity of Prednisolone farnesylate (PNF), a synthetic glucocorticoid, was investigated in the Sprague-Dawley rat. PNF was injected subcutaneously at doses of 0.03, 0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg/day for 13 weeks. In addition, 18.7 mg/kg/day prednisolone (PN), which is approximate to 30 mg/kg/day PNF in prednisolone molarity, was also administered to the rat for comparison. The results are summarized as follows: 1. All animals from the PN 18.7 mg/kg/day group, and four(4) out of ten(10) males and three(3) out of ten(10) females from the PNF 30 mg/kg/day group died having shown weakened condition such as unkempt fur and emaciation. Histopathologically, systemic suppurative inflammation, as shown by pyeronephritis and abscess formation in many organs and tissues, was observed and it was considered that the administration of steroid induced weakened condition and systemic suppuration which resulted in death. In addition, atrophy was noted in the adrenal glands, lymphatic organs and skin, and histopathological lesions were also observed in the lungs, liver, pancreatic islets, bone, bone marrow and mammary glands. 2. Surviving animals in the PNF 30 mg/kg/day group showed almost the same changes as those observed in the dead animals that died. Hematological examination revealed an anemic change and a decrease in lymphocytes with an increase in segmented neutrophils and eosinophils. In the urinalysis and blood chemistry, the changes suggesting damages to the liver and kidneys were mainly observed. 3. In the PNF 3 and 0.3 mg/kg/day groups, several changes such as atrophy of the adrenal glands, lymphatic organs and skin were noted in a dose dependent manner. 4. In the PNF 0.03 mg/kg/day group, ther were no toxic signs. 5. Based on these results, it was concluded that the overt toxic dose of PNF was 0.3 mg/kg/day and the non-toxic dose was 0.03 mg/kg/day in the present study.

  9. Sustainable Efficacy of Switching From Intravenous to Subcutaneous Tocilizumab Monotherapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Tatsuya; Fukuda, Takaaki; Hirabayashi, Yasuhiko; Inaba, Masaaki; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kai, Motokazu; Kawabata, Daisuke; Kida, Daihei; Kohsaka, Hitoshi; Matsumura, Ryutaro; Minota, Seiji; Mukai, Masaya; Sumida, Takayuki; Takasugi, Kiyoshi; Tamaki, Shigenori; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ueda, Atsuhisa; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Nomura, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of switching from intravenous (IV) tocilizumab (TCZ) to subcutaneous (SC) TCZ monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods Patients who had completed 24 weeks of TCZ‐SC (162 mg/2 weeks) or TCZ‐IV (8 mg/kg/4 weeks) monotherapy in the double‐blind period of the MUSASHI study were enrolled in an 84‐week open‐label extension period. All received TCZ‐SC (162 mg/2 weeks) monotherapy. Effects of the IV to SC switch were evaluated at week 36 (12 weeks after switching). Results Overall, 319 patients received ≥1 dose of TCZ‐SC during the open‐label extension period; 160 switched from TCZ‐IV to TCZ‐SC (TCZ IV/SC) and 159 continued TCZ‐SC (TCZ SC/SC). Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate clinical remission rates were 62.5% (100 of 160) for TCZ IV/SC and 50.0% (79 of 158) for TCZ SC/SC at week 24, and were maintained at 62.5% (100 of 160) and 57.0% (90 of 158), respectively, at week 36. In the TCZ IV/SC group, 9% of patients (9 of 100) who had achieved remission at week 24 could not maintain remission at week 36. In TCZ IV/SC patients weighing ≥70 kg, the percentage with a sufficient serum TCZ concentration (≥1 μg/ml) decreased from 90.9% (10 of 11) at week 24 to 45.5% (5 of 11) at week 36. Overall safety profiles were similar in TCZ IV/SC and TCZ SC/SC except for mild injection site reactions in TCZ IV/SC. Conclusion Efficacy is adequately maintained in most patients switching from TCZ‐IV (8 mg/kg/4 weeks) to TCZ‐SC (162 mg/2 weeks) monotherapy. Patients receiving TCZ‐IV can switch to TCZ‐SC without serious safety concerns. Clinical efficacy may be reduced after switching in some patients with high body weight. PMID:25832859

  10. Fuel injection nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Tojo, S.; Arai, K.

    1986-07-22

    A fuel injection nozzle is described connected to a fuel injection pump to inject fuel into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine consisting of: a nozzle housing defining therein a fuel sump chamber, an injection hole communicating with the sump chamber and opened at the outer surface of the nozzle housing, a stepped cylinder bore having a smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter bore section and a fuel passage communicating at one end with the sump chamber and at the other end with the smaller diameter bore section of the stepped cylinder bore; a stepped plunger fitted in the stepped cylinder bore and having a smaller diameter plunger section fitted into the smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter plunger section fitted into the larger diameter bore section in which the smaller diameter bore section together with the end face of the smaller diameter plunger section defines a pump chamber communicating with the fuel passage and the larger diameter bore section together with the end face of the larger diameter plunger section defines a main fuel chamber into which a main fuel is supplied from the fuel injection pump; auxiliary fuel supply means for supplying an auxiliary fuel into the sump chamber and pump chamber through the fuel passage; valve means for opening and closing an injection hole; communication means for permitting the main fuel chamber to communicate with the fuel passage when the main fuel is supplied from the injection pump into the main fuel chamber to cause the stepped plunger to be moved a predetermined distance in a direction in which the auxiliary fuel in the pump chamber is pressurized.

  11. Syringe injectable electronics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Seamless and minimally-invasive three-dimensional (3D) interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating syringe injection and subsequent unfolding of submicrometer-thick, centimeter-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 micrometers. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with > 90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with 3D structures, including (i) monitoring of internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (ii) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (iii) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, delivery of large volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics. PMID:26053995

  12. Fuel injection nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Nakatsuka, H.; Tojo, S.; Arai, K.

    1986-12-09

    A fuel injection nozzle is described which is adapted to be connected to a fuel injection pump and which serves to inject fuel into a combustion chamber in an internal combustion engine. The nozzle consists of: a body in which a suction passage and an accumulating chamber are defined, the suction passage being adapted to be connected with a fuel injection pump and the accumulating chamber being connected with the suction passage; a non-return valve means for allowing the fuel to flow from the suction passage to the accumulating chamber but prohibiting the fuel from flowing from the accumulating chamber to the suction passage; a needle valve means for injecting the fuel stored in the accumulating chamber into a combustion chamber in an engine, the needle valve means including a nozzle needle arranged coaxially and in series with the valve with end portions thereof being adjacent; a damping plunger coaxially fitted into the valve member in the manner that the damping plunger is urged toward the nozzle needle and has one end protruding into the damping chamber and engageable by the nozzle needle, throttle means disposed in the through hole in the damping plunger, for restricting the fuel flow between the damping chamber and the connector recess.

  13. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Luscomb, D.A.

    1984-05-22

    A fuel injection pump including a plunger and a piston movably disposed in a pumping chamber, means for initiating fuel injection and means for terminating fuel injection, the plunger periodically pressurizing fuel in a pressure chamber and the piston spaced from the plunger and allowing a metering chamber to fill with a metered quantity of fuel to be injected to an engine. The means for initiating injection comprises a pilot valve having a solenoid to selectively operate between either of two states and a control valve movable between first and second positions in response to the state of pilot valve, the first position filling the metering chamber with the metered quantity of fuel. The pilot valve determines the fuel quantity to be delivered to the engine relative to a signal from an electronic controller. An accumulator is pressurized during each cycle of the plunger to provide pressurized fuel during a metering phase. A variable orifice adjusts the rate of flow during the time fuel is being metered to metering chamber.

  14. Syringe-injectable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  15. Storage ring injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some basic issues involved in injecting the beam into storage rings with the principal parameters of those studied at the workshop have been considered. The main conclusion is that straightforward adjustments of the storage ring parameters makes injection easy. The largest number of injected turns is fourteen, and the phase space dilution allowance seems adequate to ensure very small beam loss during injection. The adjustments also result in lower bending magnet fields, and high field superconducting magnets (e.g., 5 Tesla) are not necessary. The design changes do not necessarily affect the Keil-Schnell criterion for stability of the longitudinal microwave instability, although that criterion appears to be irrelevant. Because the beams are expected to be unstable, but with slow growth rates, the vacuum chamber impedances required to give equal risetimes for the various designs are compared for systems posing various degrees of difficulty for injection. Finally, the impact of the parameters on cost is noted, and a system is considered that cuts the length of the linac in half by using doubly charged ions.

  16. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  17. Subcutaneous emphysema and pneumolabyrinth plus pneumocephalus as complications of middle ear implant and cochlear implant surgery.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Brian J; Watts, Tamara

    2013-07-01

    We conducted a retrospective case review at a tertiary academic medical center for the complications of pneumolabyrinth with pneumocephalus and subcutaneous emphysema after surgery for middle ear and cochlear implants. Charts of 76 cochlear implant and 2 middle ear implant patients from January 2001 through June 2009 were reviewed. We identified 1 cochlear implant recipient with pneumolabyrinth and pneumocephalus, and 1 middle ear implant recipient with subcutaneous emphysema. Surgical exploration was performed for the pneumolabyrinth with pneumocephalus; the subcutaneous emphysema was managed conservatively. The patient with the cochlear implant, who had had a ventriculoperitoneal shunt placed, experienced pneumolabyrinth with pneumocephalus 6 years after uneventful surgery. Middle ear exploration revealed no residual fibrous tissue seal at the cochleostomy. The middle ear and cochleostomy were obliterated with muscle, fat, and fibrin glue. The ventriculoperitoneal shunt was deactivated, with clinical and radiographic resolution. On postoperative day 5, the patient who had undergone the middle ear implant reported crepitance over the mastoid and implant device site after repeated Valsalva maneuvers. Computed tomography showed air surrounding the internal processor. A mastoid pressure dressing was applied and the subcutaneous emphysema resolved. These 2 cases support the importance of recognizing the clinical presentation of pneumolabyrinth with associated pneumocephalus, as well as subcutaneous emphysema. Securing the internal processor, adequately sealing the cochleostomy, and providing preoperative counseling regarding Valsalva maneuvers and the potential risk of cochlear implantation in the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt may prevent adverse sequelae.

  18. Massive Lumbosacral Subcutaneous Exudate After Surgical Treatment of a Large Lipomyelocele

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Kong, Xiangyi; Yang, Yi; Ma, Wenbin; Wang, Renzhi; Li, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lipomyelocele is an uncommon type of lipoma that occurs with spina bifida. We present the clinical course and therapeutic process of a female who underwent resection of a lipomyelocele and developed a massive lumbosacral subcutaneous exudate postoperatively. The therapeutic process is described in detail, and a review of the relevant literature on lipomyelocele is presented. A 23-year-old woman presented to our institution complaining of a large lumbosacral subcutaneous mass. She underwent surgical resection of the mass and untethering of the spinal cord under intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. A massive lumbosacral subcutaneous exudate developed postoperatively. After excluding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, we placed a suction drain. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report and any accompanying images. A copy of the written consent is available for review by the editor of this journal. Because of this, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary. Postoperative pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of lipomyelocele. Continuation of the negative-pressure drain for 1 week yielded >1000 mL of fluid. The patient recovered well and developed no further subcutaneous exudate. In a patient with massive lumbosacral subcutaneous exudate after surgical treatment of a large lipomyelocele, continuous negative-pressure drainage can be an effective treatment method after excluding CSF leakage. PMID:26426667

  19. Pattern specification and immune response transcriptional signatures of pericardial and subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lau, Frank H; Deo, Rahul C; Mowrer, Gregory; Caplin, Joshua; Ahfeldt, Tim; Kaplan, Adam; Ptaszek, Leon; Walker, Jennifer D; Rosengard, Bruce R; Cowan, Chad A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Recent studies suggest that pericardial adipose tissue (PCAT) secretes inflammatory factors that contribute to the development of CVD. To better characterize the role of PCAT in the pathogenesis of disease, we performed a large-scale unbiased analysis of the transcriptional differences between PCAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue, analysing 53 microarrays across 19 individuals. As it was unknown whether PCAT-secreted factors are produced by adipocytes or cells in the supporting stromal fraction, we also sought to identify differentially expressed genes in isolated pericardial adipocytes vs. isolated subcutaneous adipocytes. Using microarray analysis, we found that: 1) pericardial adipose tissue and isolated pericardial adipocytes both overexpress atherosclerosis-promoting chemokines and 2) pericardial and subcutaneous fat depots, as well as isolated pericardial adipocytes and subcutaneous adipocytes, express specific patterns of homeobox genes. In contrast, a core set of lipid processing genes showed no significant overlap with differentially expressed transcripts. These depot-specific homeobox signatures and transcriptional profiles strongly suggest different functional roles for the pericardial and subcutaneous adipose depots. Further characterization of these inter-depot differences should be a research priority.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging of angiogenesis in a subcutaneous islet transplant site in a murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Pawlick, Rena; Bruni, Antonio; Rafiei, Yasmin; Pepper, Andrew R.; Gala-Lopez, Boris; Choi, Min; Malcolm, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J.; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2016-06-01

    Islet transplantation (IT) is an established clinical therapy for select patients with type-1 diabetes. Clinically, the hepatic portal vein serves as the site for IT. Despite numerous advances in clinical IT, limitations remain, including early islet cell loss posttransplant, procedural complications, and the inability to effectively monitor islet grafts. Hence, alternative sites for IT are currently being explored, with the subcutaneous space as one potential option. When left unmodified, the subcutaneous space routinely fails to promote successful islet engraftment. However, when employing the previously developed subcutaneous "deviceless" technique, a favorable microenvironment for islet survival and function is established. In this technique, an angiocatheter was temporarily implanted subcutaneously, which facilitated angiogenesis to promote subsequent islet engraftment. This technique has been employed in preclinical animal models, providing a sufficient means to develop techniques to monitor functional aspects of the graft such as angiogenesis. Here, we utilize photoacoustic imaging to track angiogenesis during the priming of the subcutaneous site by the implanted catheter at 1 to 4 weeks postcatheter. Quantitative analysis on vessel densities shows gradual growth of vasculature in the implant position. These results demonstrate the ability to track angiogenesis, thus facilitating a means to optimize and assess the pretransplant microenvironment.