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Sample records for injector calorimeter panel

  1. Nondestructive testing of rocket engine injector panel using ultrasonic burst phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Cunlin; Wu, Naiming; Zeng, Zhi; Xing, Chunfei; Li, Yue; Zhao, Shibin; Ning, Tao

    2010-10-01

    As the key parts of the liquid rocket oxyhydrogen engine, the injector panel is a kind of transpiration material, which is braided and Sintered with stainless steel wire. If some hidden delaminition defects that are difficult to detect appear in the process of Sintering and rolling, a significant safety problem would occur. In this paper, we use the Ultrasonic Burst Phase Thermography (UBP) to detect the delamination defects in the injector panel, UBP is a rapid and reliable nondestructive technique derived from Ultrasonic Lock-in Thermography(ULT). It uses a controllable, adjustable ultrasonic burst as the heat source to stimulate the sample, the defects within the material are revealed through their heat generation caused by friction, clapping and thermoelastic effect, as the resulting surface temperature distribution is observed by an infrared camera. The original thermal images sequence is processed by Fast Fourier Transformation to obtain the phase information of the defects. In the experiments of the delamination sample, the UBP realized the selective heating of delamination defects in the injector panel, and the signal to noise of phase image is higher than the original thermal image because the phase information can not be disturbed by the initial conditions (such as the reflective surface of sample). However, the result of the detection of flat bottom hole transpiration panel sample reflects that UBP is not appropriate for the detection of this kind of defects, because it is difficult to induce frictional heating of flat bottom holes. As contrast, Flash Pulse Thermography is used to detect the flat bottom holes, all of the holes of different depth and sizes can be seen distinctly. The results show that PT is more appropriate for the detection of flat bottom holes defects than UBP, therefore, it is important to select the appropriate excitation method according to different defects.

  2. Characterization and wall compatibility testing of a 40K pound thrust class swirl-coaxial injector and calorimeter combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, E. L.; Rozelle, R.; Borgel, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Subscale injector-combustor tests under the NASA Space Transportation Engine Thrust Chamber Technology program measured characteristic velocity (c-asterisk) efficiencies and wall heat fluxes for the pressure range 1710 psia to 2360 psia and for the overall O2/H2 mixture ratio range 5.5 to 6.4. Tests involving radially-uniform mixture ratio profiles produced c-asterisk efficiencies above 99 percent; nonuniform profiles associated with wall durability-enhancement schemes resulted in lower efficiencies. Though all three wall protection methods proved successful at reducing wall heat flux, scarfing of the outer-row, swirl-coaxial injection elements was the technique which resulted in the least debit in c-asterisk per unit reduction in heat flux.

  3. GLD Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Tohru

    2006-10-01

    The GLD calorimeter, which is under study to aim as the calorimeter of ILC detector with an idea of Particle Flow, is described and discussed. The calorimeter consists of ECAL and HCAL. Both calorimeters are composed of plastic scintillator as the active medium. Fine granularity is required to achieve Particle Flow, so a small scintillator tile technique is developed with wavelength shifting fiber of MPPC read out. The requirements and our solutions for them are discussed and presented.

  4. Heavy hydrocarbon main injector technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, S. C.; Arbit, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    One of the key components of the Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a large liquid rocket, booster engine. To keep the overall vehicle size and cost down, this engine will probably use liquid oxygen (LOX) and a heavy hydrocarbon, such as RP-1, as propellants and operate at relatively high chamber pressures to increase overall performance. A technology program (Heavy Hydrocarbon Main Injector Technology) is being studied. The main objective of this effort is to develop a logic plan and supporting experimental data base to reduce the risk of developing a large scale (approximately 750,000 lb thrust), high performance main injector system. The overall approach and program plan, from initial analyses to large scale, two dimensional combustor design and test, and the current status of the program are discussed. Progress includes performance and stability analyses, cold flow tests of injector model, design and fabrication of subscale injectors and calorimeter combustors for performance, heat transfer, and dynamic stability tests, and preparation of hot fire test plans. Related, current, high pressure, LOX/RP-1 injector technology efforts are also briefly discussed.

  5. Design, fabrication and delivery of a high pressure LOX-methane injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valler, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    An injector for 3000 psia chamber pressure using liquid oxygen and gaseous methane propellants is presented. The injector is intended to be evaluated during a series of pressure-fed test firings using a water-cooled calorimeter chamber and a milled-slot regenerative chamber. Combustion efficiency, combustion stability, ignition and injector face heat transfer assessments were made for candidate injector body and pattern design approaches. This evaluation resulted in baselining an oxidizer post type manifold with a 60 element platelet coaxial swirler injector pattern. An axial acoustic resonator cavity was created at the injector/chamber interface.

  6. Fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Lambeth, Malcolm David Dick

    2001-02-27

    A fuel injector comprises first and second housing parts, the first housing part being located within a bore or recess formed in the second housing part, the housing parts defining therebetween an inlet chamber, a delivery chamber axially spaced from the inlet chamber, and a filtration flow path interconnecting the inlet and delivery chambers to remove particulate contaminants from the flow of fuel therebetween.

  7. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  8. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  9. Scramjet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Bulman, M.J.

    1993-06-22

    A fuel injector mounted flush to the wall of a combustor through which air flows at a predetermined air pressure in a direction defined as the air flow direction, the fuel injector is described comprising: a generally elongated body including a surface substantially flush with the wall, the surface having a proximate end and a distal end aligned with the air flow direction such that the air flow direction extends from the proximate end to the distal end; at least one fuel inlet port connected to the generally elongated body; a single elongated exit slot having a longitudinal axis parallel to the air flow direction, the elongated exit slot having an exit slot cross section perpendicular to the longitudinal axis, the exit slot cross section having a width parallel to the surface and a depth perpendicular to the surface, the width and depth increasing in the air flow direction; and at least one throat in the generally elongated body communicating the fuel inlet port with the single elongated exit slot, wherein the single elongated exit slot and the throat are configured to create and maintain a substantially streamlined supersonic fuel jet plume shape having a local exit pressure substantially equal to the predetermined air pressure.

  10. In-circuit fault injector user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    A fault injector system, called an in-circuit injector, was designed and developed to facilitate fault injection experiments performed at NASA-Langley's Avionics Integration Research Lab (AIRLAB). The in-circuit fault injector (ICFI) allows fault injections to be performed on electronic systems without special test features, e.g., sockets. The system supports stuck-at-zero, stuck-at-one, and transient fault models. The ICFI system is interfaced to a VAX-11/750 minicomputer. An interface program has been developed in the VAX. The computer code required to access the interface program is presented. Also presented is the connection procedure to be followed to connect the ICFI system to a circuit under test and the ICFI front panel controls which allow manual control of fault injections.

  11. Redirecting by Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.; Lee, Diana D.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Object Infrastructure Framework, a system that seeks to simplify the creation of distributed applications by injecting behavior on the communication paths between components. We touch on some of the ilities and services that can be achieved with injector technology, and then focus on the uses of redirecting injectors, injectors that take requests directed at a particular server and generate requests directed at others. We close by noting that OIF is an Aspect-Oriented Programming system, and comparing OIF to related work.

  12. Injector element characterization methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Characterization of liquid rocket engine injector elements is an important part of the development process for rocket engine combustion devices. Modern nonintrusive instrumentation for flow velocity and spray droplet size measurement, and automated, computer-controlled test facilities allow rapid, low-cost evaluation of injector element performance and behavior. Application of these methods in rocket engine development, paralleling their use in gas turbine engine development, will reduce rocket engine development cost and risk. The Alternate Turbopump (ATP) Hot Gas Systems (HGS) preburner injector elements were characterized using such methods, and the methodology and some of the results obtained will be shown.

  13. The Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.

    1992-11-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is a new 150 GeV proton synchrotron, designed to replace the Main Ring and improve the high energy physics potential of Fermilab. The status of the Fermilab accelerator complex upgrade will be discussed.

  14. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  15. Pulverized coal fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Rini, Michael J.; Towle, David P.

    1992-01-01

    A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

  16. The PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Kistenev, E.; White, S.; Belikov, S.; Kochetkov, V.

    1993-12-31

    The main features of the Phenix EM calorimeter are presented. This a Pb/scintillator calorimeter with ``shish-kebab`` fiber readout, designed for low energy electron and photon measurements. Prototype calorimeters have been built with longitudinal segmentation, {approximately} 100 psec time of flight resolution and 8% energy resolution at 1GeV/c. The laser based monitoring system which has been incorporated into large scale prototypes is described. The dependence of light yield on fiber choice and scintillator surface preparation has been studied.

  17. Fuel injector system

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Bertrand D.; Leonard, Gary L.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel injection system particularly adapted for injecting coal slurry fuels at high pressures includes an accumulator-type fuel injector which utilizes high-pressure pilot fuel as a purging fluid to prevent hard particles in the fuel from impeding the opening and closing movement of a needle valve, and as a hydraulic medium to hold the needle valve in its closed position. A fluid passage in the injector delivers an appropriately small amount of the ignition-aiding pilot fuel to an appropriate region of a chamber in the injector's nozzle so that at the beginning of each injection interval the first stratum of fuel to be discharged consists essentially of pilot fuel and thereafter mostly slurry fuel is injected.

  18. Subscale Injector Testing to Support Ares Engines Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Elam, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    The J-2X and RS-68B rocket engines are being developed for NASA's Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles. In support of the development of these engines, hot-fire testing on subscale coaxial injectors has been performed at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to evaluate performance data relative to injector type, liquid oxygen (LOX) post tip design features, element density and various operating conditions. Shear coaxial injectors with element densities of 1.1, 1.6, and 2.3 elements/in2 and a swirl coaxial injector with element density of 1.6 elements/in2 were evaluated at conditions relevant to the Ares applications. Chamber pressures with oxygen/hydrogen propellants ranged from 815-1630 psig with mixture ratios ranging from 4.7-6.9. Fuel manifold inlet temperatures were varied from 90 to 270 R. Shear coaxial LOX post tip thicknesses ranged from 0.006 in. to 0.0175 in. Modular, water cooled, calorimeter chamber assemblies were used to provide heating rate data and evaluate the effects of characteristic length (L*). Performance was evaluated relative to the resulting characteristic velocity (C*) efficiency. Testing with both the 2.3 and 1.1 elements/in2 shear coaxial injectors demonstrated no improvement in performance of the "thin" tip configuration versus the "thick" tip configuration. The loss in chamber pressure and associated performance loss seen in previous testing at low fuel temperatures could not be reliably repeated, indicating that this loss is not the result of a fluidic process in the injector elements. Further, no performance loss could be demonstrated once a faceplate seal specifically designed for operation with low temperature hydrogen was implemented in the 1.1 elements/sq in shear coaxial injector. Results for the 1.6 elements/sq in swirl injector at cold fuel temperatures showed performance higher than both the 1.6 elements/in2 shear coaxial injector and the 2.3 elements/in2 shear coaxial injector.

  19. Injector Mixing Efficiency Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, Marlow D.

    1998-01-01

    Various optical diagnostic techniques such as laser induce fluorescence, Raman spectroscopy, laser Doppler velocimetry, and laser light scattering have been employed to study the flowfield downstream of a single injector element in a optically accessible rocket chamber at Penn State for a number o years. These techniques have been used with both liquid and gaseous oxygen at pressures up to 1000 psia which is the limit of the facility. The purpose of the test programs at Penn State were to develop the techniques and to study the flow field from various injector designs. To extend these studies to higher pressure and ultimately to multiple injectors require the capabilities of the Marshall Space Flight Center. These studies will extend the data base available for the various injector designs to higher pressure as well as to determine the interaction between multiple injectors. During this effort the Princeton Instruments ICCD camera was set up and checked out. The functionality of the system has been thoroughly checked and the shutter compensation time was found to be not working. The controller was returned to the manufacturer for warranty repair. The sensitivity has been measured and found to be approximately 60 counts per photon at maximum gain which agrees with the test data supplied by the manufacturer. The actual value depends on wavelength. The Princeton Instruments camera was been installed in a explosion proof tube for use with the rocket combustor. A 35 mm camera was also made ready for taking still photos inside the combustor. A fiber optic was used to transmit the laser light from an argon-ion laser to the rocket combustor for the light scattering images. This images were obtained for a LOX-hydrogen swirl coax injector. Several still photos were also obtained with the 35 mm camera for these firings.

  20. The FNAL injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Bollinger, D.S.; Duel, K.L.; Lackey, J.R.; Pellico, W.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The present FNAL H{sup -} injector has been operational since the 1970s and consists of two magnetron H{sup -} sources and two 750 keV Cockcroft-Walton Accelerators. In the upgrade, both slit-type magnetron sources will be replaced with circular aperture sources, and the Cockcroft-Waltons with a 200 MHz RFQ (radio frequency quadrupole). Operational experience at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) has shown that the upgraded source and RFQ will be more reliable, improve beam quality and require less manpower than the present system. The present FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) injector has been operational since 1978 and has been a reliable source of H{sup -} beams for the Fermilab program. At present there are two Cockcroft-Walton injectors, each with a magnetron H{sup -} source with a slit aperture. With these two sources in operation, the injector has a reliability of better than 97%. However, issues with maintenance, equipment obsolescence, increased beam quality demands and retirement of critical personnel, have made it more difficult for the continued reliable running of the H{sup -} injector. The recent past has also seen an increase in both downtime and source output issues. With these problems coming to the forefront, a new 750 keV injector is being built to replace the present system. The new system will be similar to the one at BNL (Brookhaven National Laboratory) that has a similar magnetron source with a round aperture and a 200MHz RFQ. This combination has been shown to operate extremely reliably.

  1. Epinephrine auto-injector pandemic.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ronna L; Manivannan, Veena; Hartz, Martha F; Sadosty, Annie T

    2012-09-01

    Epinephrine is crucial in the treatment of anaphylaxis. As anaphylaxis frequently occurs in nonmedical settings, use of an epinephrine auto-injector is vital for prompt management. This article provides an overview of the increasing number of epinephrine auto-injector prescriptions and the underlying causes and contributing factors to these rising prescriptions. It also reviews the current indications for prescription of an epinephrine auto-injector, proper use of epinephrine auto-injectors, and the management of unintentional epinephrine injections.

  2. Downhole steam injector

    DOEpatents

    Donaldson, A. Burl; Hoke, Donald E.

    1983-01-01

    An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

  3. Magnetically Coupled Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Calorimeters that utilize the temperature sensitivity of magnetism have been under development for over 20 years. They have targeted a variety of different applications that require very high resolution spectroscopy. I will describe the properties of this sensor technology that distinguish it from other low temperature detectors and emphasize the types of application to which they appear best suited. I will review what has been learned so far about the best materials, geometries, and read-out amplifiers and our understanding of the measured performance and theoretical limits. I will introduce some of the applications where magnetic calorimeters are being used and also where they are in development for future experiments. So far, most magnetic calorimeter research has concentrated on the use of paramagnets to provide temperature sensitivity; recent studies have also focused on magnetically coupled calorimeters that utilize the diamagnetic response of superconductors. I will present some of the highlights of this research, and contrast the properties of the two magnetically coupled calorimeter types.

  4. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Henriques, A.

    2015-07-01

    TileCal is the Hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. It uses iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. Scintillation light produced in the tiles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibres to photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The resulting electronic signals from the approximately 10000 PMTs are measured and digitised every 25 ns before being transferred to off-detector data-acquisition systems. This contribution will review in a first part the performances of the calorimeter during run 1, obtained from calibration data, and from studies of the response of particles from collisions. In a second part it will present the solutions being investigated for the ongoing and future upgrades of the calorimeter electronics. (authors)

  5. Subscale Injector Testing to Support J-2X Engine Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Elam, Sandy; Weber, Jim; Miller, Ken

    2008-01-01

    The J-2X engine being pursued for the Ares I will be a derivative of the J-2 engine developed by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR). As part of the engine development, a subscale injector was fabricated by PWR and hot-fire tested at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to evaluate performance data. This subscale injector had a reduced injector diameter and fewer elements than the full scale design, but the element density (#elements / injector area), and element geometries nearly identical to the full scale design. Three different materials were used for the LOX posts in order to test for durability. The subscale injector included 46 standard elements and 6 baffle elements, corresponding to the ratio of baffled elements to core elements in the full scale design. The baffle elements were included to demonstrate thermal compatibility of the baffles and to more closely represent the full scale performance. Fifteen hot-fire tests were conducted totaling over 200 seconds of mainstage time on the injector. Chamber pressures with oxygen/hydrogen propellants ranged from 870-1380 psig with mixture ratios ranging from 4.8-6.1. Fuel manifold inlet temperatures were varied from 190 to 300 R. Modular, water cooled, calorimeter chamber assemblies were used to provide heating rate data and evaluate the effects of characteristic length (L*). Performance was evaluated relative to the resulting characteristic velocity (C*) efficiency. Performance met the value required in order to proceed with this design for the full scale hardware. Hardware inspections show no evidence of cracking at the tip of the LOX post for any of the materials tested. Minor erosion of the baffle element tips was observed in the early testing. A design change was quickly implemented and tested, and this change resolved the issue. Development of the J-2X is continuing with this element density and design.

  6. MAC calorimeters and applications

    SciTech Connect

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-03-01

    The MAC detector at PEP features a large solid-angle electromagnetic/hadronic calorimeter system, augmented by magnetic charged-particle tracking, muon analysis and scintillator triggering. Its implementation in the context of electron-positron annihilation physics is described, with emphasis on the utilization of calorimetry.

  7. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  8. D0 Silicon Upgrade: End Calorimeter Transfer Bridge Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.J.; /Fermilab

    1996-07-10

    submitted to the panel for review before the bridge is put into use. It is noted here, that M.Q.S. did perform an ultrasonic test on the critical welds of the EC-CC installation bridge on Oct. 2, 1990. That test demonstrated the weld penetrations between the T1 and A-36 materials. Copies were given to the committee at that time. A copy of the original North End Cap Calorimeter Installation Note is attached for reference.

  9. Secondary Emission Calorimeter (SEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. J.; Northrop, Richard; Frisch, Henry; Elagin, Andrey; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Ramberg, Erik; Spiropulu, Maria; Apresyan, Artur; Xie, Si

    2014-06-25

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) the experimenters of University of Chicago and California Institute of Technology, who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014-2015 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The TSW is intended primarily for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations. The experimenters propose using large-area micro-channel plates assembled without the usual bialkali photocathodes as the active element in sampling calorimeters, Modules without photocathodes can be economically assembled in a glove box and then pumped and sealed using the process to construct photomultipliers, This electromagnetic calorimeter is based on W and Pb absorber plates sandwiched with detectors. Measurements can be made with bare plates and absorber inside the vacuum vessel.

  10. Radionuclide calorimeter system

    DOEpatents

    Donohoue, Thomas P.; Oertel, Christopher P.; Tyree, William H.; Valdez, Joe L.

    1991-11-26

    A circuit for measuring temperature differentials in a calorimeter is disclosed. The temperature differential between the reference element and sample element containing a radioactive material is measured via a wheatstone bridge arrangement of thermistors. The bridge is driven with an alternating current on a pulsed basis to maintain the thermal floor of the calorimeter at a low reference value. A lock-in amplifier connected to the bridge phase locks a signal from the bridge to the input pulsed AC signal to provide a DC voltage. The DC voltage is sampled over time and provided to a digital computer. The digital computer, using curve fitting algorithms, will derive a function for the sample data. From the function, an equilibrium value for the temperature may be calculated.

  11. Radionuclide calorimeter system

    DOEpatents

    Donohoue, T.P.; Oertel, C.P.; Tyree, W.H.; Valdez, J.L.

    1991-11-26

    A circuit for measuring temperature differentials in a calorimeter is disclosed. The temperature differential between the reference element and sample element containing a radioactive material is measured via a Wheatstone bridge arrangement of thermistors. The bridge is driven with an alternating current on a pulsed basis to maintain the thermal floor of the calorimeter at a low reference value. A lock-in amplifier connected to the bridge phase locks a signal from the bridge to the input pulsed AC signal to provide a DC voltage. The DC voltage is sampled over time and provided to a digital computer. The digital computer, using curve fitting algorithms, will derive a function for the sample data. From the function, an equilibrium value for the temperature may be calculated. 7 figures.

  12. The HPS electromagnetic calorimeter

    DOE PAGES

    Balossino, I.; Baltzell, N.; Battaglieri, M.; ...

    2017-02-22

    The Heavy Photon Search experiment (HPS) is searching for a new gauge boson, the so-called "heavy photon". Through its kinetic mixing with the Standard Model photon, this particle could decay into an electron-positron pair. It would then be detectable as a narrow peak in the invariant mass spectrum of such pairs, or, depending on its lifetime, by a decay downstream of the production target. The HPS experiment is installed in Hall-B of Jefferson Lab. This article presents the design and performance of one of the two detectors of the experiment, the electromagnetic calorimeter, during the runs performed in 2015-2016. The calorimeter's main purpose is to provide a fast trigger and reduce the copious background from electromagnetic processes through matching with a tracking detector. Finally, the detector is a homogeneous calorimeter, made of 442 lead-tungsten (PbWOmore » $$_4$$) scintillating crystals, each read-out by an avalanche photodiode coupled to a custom trans-impedance amplifier.« less

  13. DSWA calorimeter bomb experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, B

    1998-10-01

    Two experiments were performed in which 25 grams of TNT were detonated inside an expended detonation calorimeter bomb. The bomb had a contained volume of approximately 5.28 liters. In the first experiment, the bomb was charged with 3 atmospheres of nitrogen. In the second, it was charged with 2.58 atmospheres (23.1 psi gage) of oxygen. In each experiment pressure was monitored over a period of approximately 1200 microseconds after the pulse to the CDU. Monitoring was performed via two 10,000 psi 102AO3 PCB high frequency pressure transducers mounted symmetrically in the lid of the calorimeter bomb. Conditioners used were PCB 482As. The signals from the transducers were recorded in digital format on a multi channel Tektronix scope. The sampling frequency was 10 Mhz (10 samples per microsecond). After a period of cooling following detonation, gas samples were taken and were subsequently submitted for analysis using gas mass spectrometry. Due to a late request for post shot measurement, it was only possible to make a rough estimate of the weight of debris (carbon) remaining in the calorimeter bomb following the second experiment.

  14. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  15. SLC injector modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hanerfeld, H; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; James, M.B.; Miller, R.H.

    1985-03-01

    The injector for the Stanford Linear Collider is being studied using the fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell program MASK. The program takes account of cylindrically symmetrical rf fields from the external source, as well as fields produced by the beam and dc magnetic fields. It calculates the radial and longitudinal motion of electrons and plots their positions in various planes in phase space. Bunching parameters can be optimized and insights into the bunching process and emittance growth have been gained. The results of the simulations are compared to the experimental results.

  16. Injectors and Annotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper, we presented the Object Infrastructure Framework. The goal of that system is to simplify the creation of distributed applications. The primary claim of that work is that non-functional 'ilities' could be achieved by controlling and manipulating the communications between components, thereby simplifying the development of distributed systems. A secondary element of that paper is to argue for extending the conventional distributed objects model in two important ways: 1) The ability to insert injectors (filters, wrappers) into the communication path between components; 2) The ability to annotate communications with additional information, and to propagate these annotations through an application. Here we express the descriptions of that paper.

  17. Deuterium pellet injector gun design

    SciTech Connect

    Lunsford, R.V.; Wysor, R.B.; Bryan, W.E.; Shipley, W.D.; Combs, S.K.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.; Fisher, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI), an eight-pellet pneumatic injector, is being designed and fabricated for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). It will accelerate eight pellets, 4 by 4 mm maximum, to greater than 1500 m/s. It utilizes a unique pellet-forming mechanism, a cooled pellet storage wheel, and improved propellant gas scavenging.

  18. Injector having multiple fuel pegs

    DOEpatents

    Hadley, Mark Allan; Felling, David Kenton

    2013-04-30

    A fuel injector is provided, including a fuel injector body, a plurality of fuel vanes, and a plurality of fuel pegs. The injector body includes a manifold and an inlet. The manifold is configured for receiving fuel, and the inlet is configured for receiving air. The fuel vanes are located within the injector body and are positioned in a direction that is generally parallel with a longitudinal axis of the injector body to orient the air flowing from the inlet. The plurality of fuel pegs are fluidly connected to the manifold and are arranged within the plurality of fuel vanes. The plurality of fuel pegs are each spaced at a distance that is about equal between each of the plurality of fuel pegs.

  19. Subscale LOX/hydrogen testing with a modular chamber and a swirl coaxial injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.

    1991-01-01

    To support basic injector and chamber technology, the response of a modular calorimeter chamber to an injector with swirl coaxial elements was investigated. The tests supported both the Advanced Launch System (ALS) and the Space Shuttle Main Engine programs. Original test plans included chamber pressures up to 2250 psia, the current ALS engine criteria, but hardware limitations forced conditions to be reduced. With four different chamber configurations, a variety of data was obtained with chamber pressures ranging from 1483 psia to 1679 psia and mixture ratios from 5.24 to 6.90. The swirl coaxial injector showed good chamber wall compatibility, despite misaligned elements, and its high performance was independent of fuel. Heating rates and wall temperatures were acceptable and close to predict profiles, and after scaling to a chamber pressure of 2250 psia, heating rates remained acceptable. In addition, a chamber spool made with the vacuum plasma spray process survived hot-fire testing with no detrimental effects.

  20. Electromagnetic calorimeter for Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle-ECL; Aulchenko, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Garmash, Yu; Goh, Y. M.; Kim, S. H.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Lee, I. S.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Nakamura, I.; Shebalin, V.; Shwartz, B.; Unno, Y.; Usov, Yu; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobjev, V.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2015-02-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter of the BELLE II detector for experiments at Super B-factory SuperKEKB is briefly described. The project of the calorimeter upgrade to meet severe background conditions expected at the upgraded KEK B factory is presented.

  1. Commissioning the LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Schmerge, J.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC. The injector section, from drive laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam was completed in August 2007, with the goal of a 1.2-micron emittance in a 1-nC bunch clearly demonstrated. The second phase of commissioning, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008, with FEL commissioning in 2009. We report experimental results and experience gained in the first phase of commissioning, including the photo-cathode drive laser, RF gun, photocathode, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  2. Injectors for Multipoint Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prociw, Lev Alexander (Inventor); Ryon, Jason (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An injector for a multipoint combustor system includes an inner air swirler which defines an interior flow passage and a plurality of swirler inlet ports in an upstream portion thereof. The inlet ports are configured and adapted to impart swirl on flow in the interior flow passage. An outer air cap is mounted outboard of the inner swirler. A fuel passage is defined between the inner air swirler and the outer air cap, and includes a discharge outlet between downstream portions of the inner air swirler and the outer air cap for issuing fuel for combustion. The outer air cap defines an outer air circuit configured for substantially unswirled injection of compressor discharge air outboard of the interior flow passage.

  3. CFD simulation of coaxial injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. Brian

    1993-01-01

    The development of improved performance models for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is an important, ongoing program at NASA MSFC. These models allow prediction of overall system performance, as well as analysis of run-time anomalies which might adversely affect engine performance or safety. Due to the complexity of the flow fields associated with the SSME, NASA has increasingly turned to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques as modeling tools. An important component of the SSME system is the fuel preburner, which consists of a cylindrical chamber with a plate containing 264 coaxial injector elements at one end. A fuel rich mixture of gaseous hydrogen and liquid oxygen is injected and combusted in the chamber. This process preheats the hydrogen fuel before it enters the main combustion chamber, powers the hydrogen turbo-pump, and provides a heat dump for nozzle cooling. Issues of interest include the temperature and pressure fields at the turbine inlet and the thermal compatibility between the preburner chamber and injector plate. Performance anomalies can occur due to incomplete combustion, blocked injector ports, etc. The performance model should include the capability to simulate the effects of these anomalies. The current approach to the numerical simulation of the SSME fuel preburner flow field is to use a global model based on the MSFC sponsored FNDS code. This code does not have the capabilities of modeling several aspects of the problem such as detailed modeling of the coaxial injectors. Therefore, an effort has been initiated to develop a detailed simulation of the preburner coaxial injectors and provide gas phase boundary conditions just downstream of the injector face as input to the FDNS code. This simulation should include three-dimensional geometric effects such as proximity of injectors to baffles and chamber walls and interaction between injectors. This report describes an investigation into the numerical simulation of GH2/LOX coaxial

  4. The CDF miniplug calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Lami, Stefano

    2002-06-28

    Two MiniPlug calorimeters, designed to measure the energy and lateral position of particles in the (forward) pseudorapidity region of 3.6 < |{nu}| < 5.2 of the CDF detector, have been recently installed as part of the Run II CDF upgrade at the Tevatron {bar p}p collider. They consist of lead/liquid scintillator read out by wavelength shifting fibers arranged in a pixel-type towerless geometry suitable for ''calorimetric tracking''. The design concept, the prototype performance and the final design of the MiniPlugs are here described. A recent cosmic ray test resulted in a light yield of approximately 100 pe/MIP, which exceeds our design requirements.

  5. Double beta decay: Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brofferio, Chiara

    2008-11-01

    Calorimeters or, with a more specific definition, low temperature detectors, have been used by now for more than 15 years in Double Beta Decay (DBD) searches, with excellent results: they compete with Ge diodes for the rank of detectors with the highest sensitivity to the effective neutrino mass, which is defined as a linear combination of the neutrino mass eigenvalues. After a brief introduction to the argument, with some notes on DBD and on bolometers, an update on the now closed experiment CUORICINO and on its successor, CUORE, is given. The fundamental role of background is then revealed and commented, introducing in this way the importance of the specific experiment now under construction, CUORE-0, that will precede CUORE to help optimizing the struggle against surface background. The possible future of this technique is then commented, quoting important R&D studies that are going on, for active shielding bolometers and for scintillating bolometers coupled with light detecting bolometers.

  6. Cerenkov fiber sampling calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, K.; Kefford, D.; Kennedy, J.; Pisani, R.; Sanzeni, C.; Segall, K.; Wall, D.; Winn, D.R. ); Carey, R.; Dye, S.; Miller, J.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W. ); Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Savin, A.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E. )

    1994-08-01

    Clear optical fibers were used as a Cerenkov sampling media in Pb (electromagnetic) and Cu (hadron) absorbers in spaghetti calorimeters, for high rate and high radiation dose experiments, such as the forward region of high energy colliders. The fiber axes were aligned close to the direction of the incident particles (1[degree]--7[degree]). The 7 [lambda] deep hadron tower contained 2.8% by volume 1.5 mm diameter core clear plastic fibers. The 27 radiation length deep electromagnetic towers had packing fractions of 6.8% and 7.2% of 1 mm diameter core quartz fibers as the active Cerenkov sampling medium. The energy resolution on electrons and pions, energy response, pulse shapes and angular studies are presented.

  7. High density fluoride glass calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Q.; Scheltzbaum, J.; Akgun, U.

    2014-04-01

    The unprecedented radiation levels in current Large Hadron Collider runs, and plans to even increase the luminosity creates a need for new detector technologies to be investigated. Quartz plates to replace the plastic scintillators in current LHC calorimeters have been proposed in recent reports. Quartz based Cherenkov calorimeters can solve the radiation damage problem, however light production and transfer have proven to be challenging. This report summarizes the results from a computational study on the performance of a high-density glass calorimeter. High-density, scintillating, fluoride glass, CHG3, was used as the active material. This glass has been developed specifically for hadron collider experiments, and is known for fast response time, in addition to high light yield. Here, the details of a Geant4 model for a sampling calorimeter prototype with 20 layers, and its hadronic as well as electromagnetic performances are reported.

  8. Electromagnetic Calorimeter for Hades Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugler, A.; Blume, C.; Czyžycki, W.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Galatyuk, T.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Hlaváč, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kajetanowic, M.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, W.; Lapidus, K.; Lisowski, E.; Pietraszko, J.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Salabura, P.; Sobolev, Y. G.; Svoboda, O.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.

    2014-06-01

    Electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is being developed to complement the dilepton spectrometer HADES currently operating at GSI Darmstadt, Germany. ECAL will enable the HADES@FAIR experiment to measure data on neutral meson production in heavy ion collisions at the energy range of 2-10 A GeV on the beam of future accelerator SIS100@FAIR. The calorimeter will also improve the electron-hadron separation and will as well be used for the detection of photons from strange resonances in elementary and heavy ion reactions. Calorimeter modules constructed of lead glass Cherenkov counter, photomultiplier, HV divider and optical fiber are described in the detail. Two prototypes of novel front-end electronics based on TRB3 are presented. A dedicated LED based system being developed to monitor the stability of the calorimeter during beamtime is introduced as well.

  9. A new biolistic intradermal injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouillette, M.; Doré, M.; Hébert, C.; Spooner, M.-F.; Marchand, S.; Côté, J.; Gobeil, F.; Rivest, M.; Lafrance, M.; Talbot, B. G.; Moutquin, J.-M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel intradermal needle-free drug delivery device which exploits the unsteady high-speed flow produced by a miniature shock tube to entrain drug or vaccine particles onto a skin target. A first clinical study of pain and physiological response of human subjects study is presented, comparing the new injector to intramuscular needle injection. This clinical study, performed according to established pain assessment protocols, demonstrated that every single subject felt noticeably less pain with the needle-free injector than with the needle injection. Regarding local tolerance and skin reaction, bleeding was observed on all volunteers after needle injection, but on none of the subjects following powder injection. An assessment of the pharmacodynamics, via blood pressure, of pure captopril powder using the new device on spontaneously hypertensive rats was also performed. It was found that every animal tested with the needle-free injector exhibited the expected pharmacodynamic response following captopril injection. Finally, the new injector was used to study the delivery of an inactivated influenza vaccine in mice. The needle-free device induced serum antibody response to the influenza vaccine that was comparable to that of subcutaneous needle injection, but without requiring the use of an adjuvant. Although no effort was made to optimize the formulation or the injection parameters in the present study, the novel injector demonstrates great promise for the rapid, safe and painless intradermal delivery of systemic drugs and vaccines.

  10. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    Although stable operating regimes for cryogenic coaxial injectors have been empirically determined, there is no knowledge of the spray characteristics corresponding to stable operation, or the physical processes which produce the atomization patterns that result in stable or unstable operation. The current engineering method for determining the stable operating regime of a cryogenic coaxial injector is the 'hydrogen temperature ramping' method, however there is no definitive knowledge of whether the hydrogen temperature influences the chamber stability by decreasing the injected gas velocity, by affecting a recirculation region at the base of the LOX Post, or by changing the pressure drop across the injector, allowing chamber pressure oscillations to couple to the fuel feed system. Results for the injector response from a linearized lumped-element model are presented as a function of temperature and frequency. LDV measurements in the recess region at the base of the LOX post show reverse flow indicative of a recirculation region. Finally, Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements of droplet size and velocity distributions are discussed for a coaxial injector element similar to the SSME preburner element operating with water and air at atmospheric pressure and liquid and gaseous nitrogen at 20 bars.

  11. Shear coaxial injector instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puissant, C.; Kaltz, T.; Glogowski, M.; Micci, M.

    1994-01-01

    There is no definitive knowledge of which of several concurrent processes ultimately results in unstable combustion within liquid rocket chambers employing shear coaxial injectors. Possible explanations are a detrimental change in the atomization characteristics due to a decrease in the gas-to-liquid velocity ratio, a change in the gas side injector pressure drop allowing acoustic coupling to the propellant feed system or the disappearance of a stabilizing recirculation region at the base of the LOX post. The aim of this research effort is to investigate these proposed mechanisms under conditions comparable to actual engine operation. Spray characterization was accomplished with flash photography and planar laser imaging to examine the overall spray morphology and liquid jet breakup processes and with a PDPA to quantify the spatial distribution of droplet size and mean axial velocity. A simplified stability model based on the Rayleigh criterion was constructed for the flow dynamics occurring within the chamber and injector to evaluate the potential coupling between the chamber and injector acoustic modes and was supported by high frequency measurements of chamber and injector pressure oscillations. To examine recirculation within the LOX post recess, velocity measurements were performed in the recess region by means of LDV. Present experiments were performed under noncombusting conditions using LOX/GH2 stimulants at pressures up to 4 MPa.

  12. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/GH2 Deep Throttling Pintle Injector Fabrication and Demonstration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, V. D.; Chianese, S.G.; Majamaki, A. N.; Litchford, R. J.; Foote, J. P.; Wall, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of in support of the Exploration Initiative with a particular focus on the needs of the Altair Lunar Lander. To address Altair's need for deep-throttling cryogenic engines, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine known as the TR202. This engine features independent turbopump assemblies and a variable area pintle injector similar to that used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). The TR202 program has completed a Conceptual Design (CoDR) of a possible throttling engine and has designed and built injector test hardware to demonstrate stable high performance over a 10:1 throttling range while providing the heat flux necessary to close the engine cycle. NGAS has partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which supplied the ablative and calorimeter thrust chambers for the injector test program and provided the test facility as well as test and engineering support personnel. An extensive hot-fire test campaign comprising more than 50 tests was initiated and successfully completed during 2009 on MSFC's Test Stand 116 using pressure-fed liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. All planned test objectives were met. The test program was structured in two distinct phases: Phase 1 relied on ablative chambers to demonstrate injector hardware durability and to obtain early deep-throttling results, while Phase 2 used a water-cooled calorimeter chamber to obtain detailed performance and heat flux measurements at various power levels and mixture ratios. This paper focuses on the early part of the test program and describes final hardware build and test integration efforts, injector water flow testing, igniter and engine operational sequence development, and results from the ablative chamber tests. Challenges

  13. The magnetized steel and scintillator calorimeters of the MINOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minos Collaboration; Michael, D. G.; Adamson, P.; Alexopoulos, T.; Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Anderson, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Arroyo, C.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D. S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barker, M. A.; Barnes, P. D.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W. L.; Beall, E.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, B. R.; Belias, A.; Bergfeld, T.; Bernstein, R. H.; Bhattacharya, D.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bocean, V.; Bock, B.; Bock, G. J.; Boehm, J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Border, P. M.; Bower, C.; Boyd, S.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Cabrera, A.; Chapman, J. D.; Chase, T. R.; Chernichenko, S. K.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Cobb, J. H.; Coleman, S. J.; Cossairt, J. D.; Courant, H.; Crane, D. A.; Culling, A. J.; Damiani, D.; Dawson, J. W.; de Jong, J. K.; Demuth, D. M.; de Santo, A.; Dierckxsens, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Dorman, M.; Drake, G.; Ducar, R.; Durkin, T.; Erwin, A. R.; Escobar, C. O.; Evans, J. J.; Fackler, O. D.; Falk Harris, E.; Feldman, G. J.; Felt, N.; Fields, T. H.; Ford, R.; Frohne, M. V.; Gallagher, H. R.; Gebhard, M.; Godley, A.; Gogos, J.; Goodman, M. C.; Gornushkin, Yu.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E. W.; Grossman, N.; Grudzinski, J. J.; Grzelak, K.; Guarino, V.; Habig, A.; Halsall, R.; Hanson, J.; Harris, D.; Harris, P. G.; Hartnell, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatcher, R.; Heller, K.; Hill, N.; Ho, Y.; Howcroft, C.; Hylen, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Indurthy, D.; Irwin, G. M.; James, C.; Jenner, L.; Jensen, D.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Kafka, T.; Kang, H. J.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kilmer, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, M. S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopp, S.; Kordosky, M.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kostin, M.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krakauer, D. A.; Kumaratunga, S.; Ladran, A. S.; Lang, K.; Laughton, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, R.; Lee, W. Y.; Libkind, M. A.; Liu, J.; Litchfield, P. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longley, N. P.; Lucas, P.; Luebke, W.; Madani, S.; Maher, E.; Makeev, V.; Mann, W. A.; Marchionni, A.; Marino, A. D.; Marshak, M. L.; Marshall, J. S.; McDonald, J.; McGowan, A. M.; Meier, J. R.; Merzon, G. I.; Messier, M. D.; Milburn, R. H.; Miller, J. L.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Moore, C. D.; Morfín, J.; Morse, R.; Mualem, L.; Mufson, S.; Murgia, S.; Murtagh, M. J.; Musser, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, C.; Nelson, J. K.; Newman, H. B.; Nezrick, F.; Nichol, R. J.; Nicholls, T. C.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oliver, J.; Oliver, W. P.; Onuchin, V. A.; Osiecki, T.; Ospanov, R.; Paley, J.; Paolone, V.; Para, A.; Patzak, T.; Pavlović, Ž.; Pearce, G. F.; Pearson, N.; Peck, C. W.; Perry, C.; Peterson, E. A.; Petyt, D. A.; Ping, H.; Piteira, R.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Plunkett, R. K.; Price, L. E.; Proga, M.; Pushka, D. R.; Rahman, D.; Rameika, R. A.; Raufer, T. M.; Read, A. L.; Rebel, B.; Reyna, D. E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rubin, H. A.; Ruddick, K.; Ryabov, V. A.; Saakyan, R.; Sanchez, M. C.; Saoulidou, N.; Schneps, J.; Schoessow, P. V.; Schreiner, P.; Schwienhorst, R.; Semenov, V. K.; Seun, S.-M.; Shanahan, P.; Shield, P. D.; Shivane, R.; Smart, W.; Smirnitsky, V.; Smith, C.; Smith, P. N.; Sousa, A.; Speakman, B.; Stamoulis, P.; Stefanik, A.; Sullivan, P.; Swan, J. M.; Symes, P. A.; Tagg, N.; Talaga, R. L.; Terekhov, A.; Tetteh-Lartey, E.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, J.; Thomson, M. A.; Thron, J. L.; Trendler, R.; Trevor, J.; Trostin, I.; Tsarev, V. A.; Tzanakos, G.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Vakili, M.; Vaziri, K.; Velissaris, C.; Verebryusov, V.; Viren, B.; Wai, L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watabe, M.; Weber, A.; Webb, R. C.; Wehmann, A.; West, N.; White, C.; White, R. F.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wright, D. M.; Wu, Q. K.; Yan, W. G.; Yang, T.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Yun, J. C.; Zheng, H.; Zois, M.; Zwaska, R.; MINOS Collaboration

    2008-11-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment uses an accelerator-produced neutrino beam to perform precision measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the "atmospheric neutrino" sector associated with muon neutrino disappearance. This long-baseline experiment measures neutrino interactions in Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beam with a near detector at Fermilab and again 735 km downstream with a far detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The two detectors are magnetized steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. They are designed to be as similar as possible in order to ensure that differences in detector response have minimal impact on the comparisons of event rates, energy spectra and topologies that are essential to MINOS measurements of oscillation parameters. The design, construction, calibration and performance of the far and near detectors are described in this paper.

  14. The magnetized steel and scintillator calorimeters of the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, : D.G.

    2008-05-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) experiment uses an accelerator-produced neutrino beam to perform precision measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters in the 'atmospheric neutrino' sector associated with muon neutrino disappearance. This long-baseline experiment measures neutrino interactions in Fermilab's NuMI neutrino beam with a near detector at Fermilab and again 735 km downstream with a far detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The two detectors are magnetized steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. They are designed to be as similar as possible in order to ensure that differences in detector response have minimal impact on the comparisons of event rates, energy spectra and topologies that are essential to MINOS measurements of oscillation parameters. The design, construction, calibration and performance of the far and near detectors are described in this paper.

  15. Diesel Injector Fouling Bench Test Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    was installed. 3. A diverter valve was installed on the injector effluent line. In order to differentiate fuel quality, the fuel injector pump...additive concentrates on the removal of indirect (pintle, chip, ana poppet nozzle) injector deposits, Olsen, et al. (11) developed a modification of the...fuel were investigated in a 1982 General Motors 4.3-L V-6 diesel car with CAV poppet -type injectors.(.3) Frequent severe fuel filter plugging was

  16. Downhole steam injector. [Patent application

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.B.; Hoke, E.

    1981-06-03

    An improved downhole steam injector has an angled water orifice to swirl the water through the device for improved heat transfer before it is converted to steam. The injector also has a sloped diameter reduction in the steam chamber to throw water that collects along the side of the chamber during slant drilling into the flame for conversion to steam. In addition, the output of the flame chamber is beveled to reduce hot spots and increase efficiency, and the fuel-oxidant inputs are arranged to minimize coking.

  17. 21 CFR 870.1660 - Indicator injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indicator injector. 870.1660 Section 870.1660 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1660 Indicator injector. (a) Identification. An indicator injector is an electrically or gas-powered device designed to inject accurately...

  18. 21 CFR 870.1660 - Indicator injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indicator injector. 870.1660 Section 870.1660 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1660 Indicator injector. (a) Identification. An indicator injector is an electrically or gas-powered device designed to inject accurately...

  19. 21 CFR 870.1660 - Indicator injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indicator injector. 870.1660 Section 870.1660 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1660 Indicator injector. (a) Identification. An indicator injector is an electrically or gas-powered device designed to inject accurately...

  20. 21 CFR 870.1660 - Indicator injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indicator injector. 870.1660 Section 870.1660 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1660 Indicator injector. (a) Identification. An indicator injector is an electrically or gas-powered device designed to inject accurately...

  1. 21 CFR 870.1660 - Indicator injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indicator injector. 870.1660 Section 870.1660 Food... DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1660 Indicator injector. (a) Identification. An indicator injector is an electrically or gas-powered device designed to inject accurately...

  2. A Neutral Beam Injector Upgrade for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    T. Stevenson; B McCormack; G.D. Loesser; M. Kalish; S. Ramakrishnan; L. Grisham; J. Edwards; M. Cropper; G. Rossi; A. von Halle; M. Williams

    2002-01-18

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) capability with a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) capable of 80 kiloelectronvolt (keV), 5 Megawatt (MW), 5 second operation. This 5.95 million dollar upgrade reused a previous generation injector and equipment for technical, cost, and schedule reasons to obtain these specifications while retaining a legacy capability of 120 keV neutral particle beam delivery for shorter pulse lengths for possible future NSTX experiments. Concerns with NBI injection included power deposition in the plasma, aiming angles from the fixed NBI fan array, density profiles and beam shine through, orbit losses of beam particles, and protection of the vacuum vessel wall against beam impingement. The upgrade made use of the beamline and cryo panels from the Neutral Beam Test Stand facility, existing power supplies and controls, beamline components and equipment not contaminated by tritium during DT [deuterium-tritium] experiments, and a liquid Helium refrigerator plant to power and cryogenically pump a beamline and three ion sources. All of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ion sources had been contaminated with tritium, so a refurbishment effort was undertaken on selected TFTR sources to rid the three sources destined for the NSTX NBI of as much tritium as possible. An interconnecting duct was fabricated using some spare and some new components to attach the beamline to the NSTX vacuum vessel. Internal vacuum vessel armor using carbon tiles was added to protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel from beam impingement in the absence of plasma and interlock failure. To date, the NBI has operated to 80 keV and 5 MW and has injected requested power levels into NSTX plasmas with good initial results, including high beta and strong heating characteristics at full rated plasma current.

  3. The segmentation of hadron calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, He Sheng

    1987-05-01

    Optimization of the segmentation of large hadron calorimeters is important in order to obtain good resolution for jet physics at minimum construction cost for the next generation of high energy experiments. The principles of the segmentation of hadron calorimeters are discussed. As an example, the Monte Carlo optimization of the segmentation of the L3 hadron calorimeter barrel at CERN is described. Comparisons of results for the reconstructed jet shapes show that the optimum number ADC channels is about 20K for the readout of 450K wires of the proportional chambers. The matching between the sandwiched φ towers and Z towers is the dominant factor for angular resolution. Based on these Monte Carlo simulations, an optimized tower structure is obtained.

  4. Precision Timing Calorimeter for High Energy Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; ...

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present studies on the performance and characterization of the time resolution of LYSO-based calorimeters. Results for an LYSO sampling calorimeter and an LYSO-tungsten Shashlik calorimeter are presented. We also demonstrate that a time resolution of 30 ps is achievable for the LYSO sampling calorimeter. Timing calorimetry is described as a tool for mitigating the effects due to the large number of simultaneous interactions in the high luminosity environment foreseen for the Large Hadron Collider.

  5. Robotic Welding Of Injector Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1992-01-01

    Brief report presents history, up through October 1990, of continuing efforts to convert from manual to robotic gas/tungsten arc welding in fabrication of main injector inlet manifold of main engine of Space Shuttle. Includes photographs of welding machinery, welds, and weld preparations. Of interest to engineers considering establishment of robotic-welding facilities.

  6. Tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Wilgen, J.B.; Schmidt, G.L.; Barnes, G.W.; Persing, R.G.

    1992-06-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector (DPI) has been modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed to provide pellets ranging from 3.3 to 4.5 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller. The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed, and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellet. Results of the limited testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI is being installed on TFTR to support the D-D run period in 1992. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and secondary tritium containment systems and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability.

  7. Tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Cole, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Wilgen, J.B. ); Schmidt, G.L.; Barnes, G.W.; Persing, R.G. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector (DPI) has been modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed to provide pellets ranging from 3.3 to 4.5 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller. The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed, and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellet. Results of the limited testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI is being installed on TFTR to support the D-D run period in 1992. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and secondary tritium containment systems and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability.

  8. Fuel injector testing device and method

    SciTech Connect

    Liebermann, L.N.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a device for determining the fuel flow condition of a fuel injector while the injector is in its operating position in an engine, which comprises: a measuring chamber; means to provide a liquid connection between the measuring chamber and the fuel inlet of the fuel injector: means to move liquid simultaneously through the measuring chamber and the fuel injector through the connection for a predetermined period of time under substantially constant pressure; and means associated with the measuring chamber to measure the quantity of the liquid passing through the fuel injector in the period of time, the quantity, relative to the quantity of like liquid passed in equal time by a reference fuel injector, being indicative of the fuel flow condition of the fuel injector.

  9. COE1 Calorimeter Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Santi, Peter Angelo

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the operations of the COE1 calorimeter which is used to measure the thermal power generated by the radioactive decay of plutonium-bearing materials for the purposes of assaying the amount of plutonium within the material.

  10. LHCb calorimeters high voltage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilitsky, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Perret, P.; Schopper, A.; Soldatov, M.; Yakimchuk, V.

    2007-02-01

    The calorimeter system in LHCb aims to identify electrons, photons and hadrons. All calorimeters are equipped with Hamamatsu photo tubes as devices for light to signal conversion. Eight thousand R7899-20 tubes are used for electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and two hundred 64 channels multi-anode R7600-00-M64 for Scintillator-Pad/Preshower detectors. The calorimeter high voltage (HV) system is based on a Cockroft Walton (CW) voltage converter and a control board connected to the Experiment Control System (ECS) by serial bus. The base of each photomultiplier tube (PMT) is built with a high voltage converter and constructed on an individual printed circuit board, using compact surface mount components. The base is attached directly to the PMT. There are no HV cables in the system. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is used on the control board as an interface between the ECS and the 200 control channels. The FPGA includes also additional functionalities allowing automated monitoring and ramp up of the high voltage values. This paper describes the HV system architecture, some technical details of the electronics implementation and summarizes the system performance. This safe and low power consumption HV electronic system for the photomultiplier tubes can be used for various biomedical apparatus too.

  11. Barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Shebalin, V. E. Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Ignatov, F. V.; Erofeev, A. L.; Kovalenko, O. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Ruban, A. A.; Shwartz, B. A.; Talyshev, A. A.; Titov, V. M.; Yudin, Yu. V.

    2015-12-15

    The structure of the barrel calorimeter of the CMD-3 detector is presented in this work. The procedure of energy calibration of the calorimeter and the method of photon energy restoration are described. The distinctive feature of this barrel calorimeter is its combined structure; it is composed of two coaxial subsystems: a liquid xenon calorimeter and a crystalline CsI calorimeter. The calorimeter spatial resolution of the photon conversion point is about 2 mm, which corresponds to an angular resolution of ∼6 mrad. The energy resolution of the calorimeter is about 8% for photons with energy of 200 MeV and 4% for photons with energy of 1 GeV.

  12. Direct Fuel Injector Temporal Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    type direct fuel injector. The manufacturing specification is listed in Table 1. An electromagnetic field is created in the air gap between the...signal stops. However, the current cannot increase or decrease instantaneously like a switch due to the inductance of the coil. Instead, a certain...voltage is limited, this unwanted delay due to the inductance becomes the main obstacle for fast switching. A Pulse-Width-Modulation (PWM) servo

  13. Heavy hydrocarbon main injector technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbit, H. A.; Tuegel, L. M.; Dodd, F. E.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Hydrocarbon Main Injector Program was an analytical, design, and test program to demonstrate an injection concept applicable to an Isolated Combustion Compartment of a full-scale, high pressure, LOX/RP-1 engine. Several injector patterns were tested in a 3.4-in. combustor. Based on these results, features of the most promising injector design were incorporated into a 5.7-in. injector which was then hot-fire tested. In turn, a preliminary design of a 5-compartment 2D combustor was based on this pattern. Also the additional subscale injector testing and analysis was performed with an emphasis on improving analytical techniques and acoustic cavity design methodology. Several of the existing 3.5-in. diameter injectors were hot-fire tested with and without acoustic cavities for spontaneous and dynamic stability characteristics.

  14. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.; Riepe, K.B.

    1985-01-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LBL). The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10/sup -7/ torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column.

  15. Diesel injector fouling bench test methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinoha, Leon L.; Yost, Douglas M.; Lestz, Sidney J.

    1992-06-01

    Compared to conventional compression ignition (CI) engine operation with the fuel being delivered at approximately 149 C (300 F), adiabatic engine operation potentially may deliver the fuel at temperatures as high as 260 C (500 F). Hypergolic CI engine combustion systems now in theoretical design stages will deliver fuel at temperatures approaching 427 to 538 C (800 to 1000 F). The ability of a fuel to resist formation of deposits on internal injector system surfaces is a form of thermal oxidative stability for which test methodology will be required. The injector Fouling Bench Test (IFBT) methodology evaluated in this report will assist in defining fuel contribution to injector fouling and control of fuel thermal stability in procurement specifications. The major observations from this project are discussed. Forty-hour cyclic IFB tests employing both Bosch APE 113 and Detroit Diesel (DD) N70 injectors are viable procedures for evaluating fuel effects on injector fouling. Cyclic operation appears to be superior to steady-state operation for both type injectors. Eighty-hour cyclic tests are more discriminating than 40-hour cyclic tests using the Bosch APE 113 injectors. JFTOT tests of fuels provide directional information on thermal stability-related deposits and filter plugging but show limited good correlation with IFBT DD N70 ratings, and none with IFBT Bosch APE 113 injector ratings. Deposition on injector pintles was more realistically rated by optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) than conventional visual and bench rating methods. High-sulfur fuel readily caused sticking of Detroit Diesel injectors. Injector sticking is an important mode of injector fouling.

  16. Coaxial Propellant Injectors With Faceplate Annulus Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, Mark D.; Miyata, Shinjiro; Farhangi, Shahram

    2010-01-01

    An improved design concept for coaxial propellant injectors for a rocket engine (or perhaps for a non-rocket combustion chamber) offers advantages of greater robustness, less complexity, fewer parts, lower cost, and less bulk, relative to prior injectors of equivalent functionality. This design concept is particularly well suited to small, tight-tolerance injectors, for which prior designs are not suitable because the practical implementation of those designs entails very high costs and difficulty in adhering to the tolerances.

  17. Self-Adjusting Liquid Injectors for Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Myers, William

    2010-01-01

    A class of self-adjusting injectors for spraying liquid oxidizers and/or fuels into combustion chambers has been proposed. The proposed injectors were originally intended for use in rocket-engine combustion chambers, but could also be used to improve control over flows of liquid propellants in other combustion chambers. The basic idea of the proposed injectors is to use simple mechanisms, inside the injectors themselves, to adjust inlet areas so as to keep injection pressure drops at or near optimum values through out wide throttling ranges. These mechanisms would be actuated by the very pressure drops that they are intended to regulate.

  18. The CLAS Forward Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    M. Amarian; Geram Asryan; Kevin Beard; Will Brooks; Volker Burkert; Tom Carstens; Alan Coleman; Raphael Demirchyan; Yuri Efremenko; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Herb Funsten; Vladimir Gavrilov; Kevin L. Giovanetti; R.M. Marshall; Berhard Mecking; R.C. Minehart; H. Mkrtchan; Mavrik Ohandjanyan; Youri Sharabian; L.C. Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; W.A. Stephens; T.Y. Tung; Carl Zorn

    2001-05-01

    The CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab utilizes six iron-free superconducting coils to provide an approximately toroidal magnetic field. The six sectors are instrumented individually to form six independent spectrometers. The forward region (8deg < (theta) < 45deg) of each sector is equipped with a lead-scintillator electromagnetic sampling calorimeter (EC), 16 radiation lengths thick, using a novel triangular geometry with stereo readout. With its good energy and position resolution, the EC is used to provide the primary electron trigger for CLAS. It is also used to reject pions, reconstruct pi-0 and eta decays and detect neutrons, This paper treats the design, construction and performance of the calorimeter.

  19. Compensation effects in hadron calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.; Brau, J.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Goodman, M.; Wilson, R.

    1984-01-01

    The pros and cons of utilizing a fissionable material such as /sup 238/U to compensate for the nuclear binding energy losses in a hadron calorimeter are discussed. Fissionable material can return some lost energy to the particle cascade in terms of low-energy neutrons and gamma rays, but electromagnetic sampling inefficiencies (often called transition effects) and the detection medium which tries to convert this energy to a useable signal are just as important. 12 references.

  20. Electromagnetic Calorimeter for HADES Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramos, P.; Chlad, L.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Galatyuk, T.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Hlaváč, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kajetanowic, M.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, W.; Korcyl, G.; Kugler, A.; Lapidus, K.; Linev, S.; Lisowski, E.; Neiser, A.; Ott, O.; Otte, O.; Pethukov, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Salabura, P.; Sobolev, Y. G.; Svoboda, O.; Thomas, A.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.

    2014-11-01

    Electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is being developed to complement dilepton spectrometer HADES. ECAL will enable the HADES@FAIR experiment to measure data on neutral meson production in heavy ion collisions at the energy range of 2-10 AGeV on the beam of future accelerator SIS100@FAIR. We will report results of the last beam test with quasi-monoenergetic photons carried out in MAMI facility at Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz.

  1. An elevated temperature titration calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Zanonato, P.L.; Choppin, G.R. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-06-01

    A variable-temperature (313 K to 353 K) titration calorimeter of high sensitivity has been constructed. The purpose of the calorimeter is to study temperature effects on the enthalpies of complex formation and of other reactions of metal cations such as hydrolysis and precipitation. Operation of the calorimetric system, including that final calculation of the heat released during titration, is automatic via computer control. Calibration tests of the calorimeter using 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol gave -(46.0 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(46.2 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} for the enthalpy of protonation, at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. For titrations of 2-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol, enthalpy of protonation values of -(28.4 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(29.3 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} were obtained at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Secondary Emission Calorimeter Sensor Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, David R.; Onel, Yasar

    2012-12-01

    In a Secondary Emission electron(SEe) detector module, Secondary Emission electrons (SEe) are generated from an SE surface/cathode, when charged hadronic or electromagnetic particles, particularly shower particles, penetrate an SE sampling module placed between absorber materials (Fe, Cu, Pb, W etc) in calorimeters. The SE cathode is a thin (10-50 nm thick) film (simple metal-oxides, or other higher yield materials) on the surface of a metal plate, which serves as the entrance “window” to a compact vacuum vessel (metal or metal-ceramic); this SE film cathode is analogous to a photocathode, and the SEe are similar to p.e., which are then amplified by dynodes, also is in a PMT. SE sensor modules can make use of electrochemically etched/machined or laser-cut metal mesh dynode sheets, as large as ~30 cm square, to amplify the Secondary Emission Electrons (SEe), much like those that compact metal mesh or mesh dynode PMT's use to amplify p.e.'s. The construction requirements easier than a PMT, since the entire final assembly can be done in air; there are no critical controlled thin film depositions, cesiation or other oxygen-excluded processes or other required vacuum activation, and consequently bake-out can be a refractory temperatures; the module is sealed by normal vacuum techniques (welding or brazing or other high temperature joinings), with a simple final heated vacuum pump-out and tip-off. The modules envisioned are compact, high gain, high speed, exceptionally radiation damage resistant, rugged, and cost effective, and can be fabricated in arbitrary tileable shapes. The SE sensor module anodes can be segmented transversely to sizes appropriate to reconstruct electromagnetic cores with high precision. The GEANT4 and existing calorimeter data estimated calorimeter response performance is between 35-50 Secondary Emission electrons per GeV, in a 1 cm thick Cu absorber calorimeter, with a gain per SEe > 105 per SEe, and an e/pi<1.2. The calorimeter pulse width is

  3. Mechanical Design of the DAMPE BGO Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yiming; Wu, Jian; Feng, Changqing; Zhang, Yunlong; Chen, Dengyi; Chang, Jin

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer, DAMPE, is a new designed satellite developed for the CASs new Innovation 2020 program. As the main component of DAMPE, the new designed BGO calorimeter consists of 308 BGO Crystals coupled with photomultiplier tube.The reliability and safety of the BGO Calorimeter structure play a very important role in the operation of whole detector. During the rocket launch, the calorimeter structure should be stable against vibration and environmental factors to ensure detector works in good conditions. In this article, we make the BGO calorimeter structure design, and then prove that it will work in the environments of rocket launch and flight.

  4. Implications of tritium in neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Stewart, L D

    1980-01-01

    Neutral injectors for heating plasmas of D-T burning fusion reactors are subject to tritium contamination. This paper discusses relevant questions and problem areas pertinent to tritium environment, including calculations of tritium contaminations in different neutral injectors, gas handling and pumping systems, and implications on beam line components.

  5. Apparatus for testing high pressure injector elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, William Neill (Inventor); Scott, Ewell M. (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for testing and evaluating the spray pattern of high pressure fuel injector elements for use in supplying fuel to combustion engines is presented. Prior art fuel injector elements were normally tested by use of low pressure apparatuses which did not provide a purge to prevent mist from obscuring the injector element or to prevent frosting of the view windows; could utilize only one fluid during each test; and had their viewing ports positioned one hundred eighty (180 deg) apart, thus preventing optimum use of laser diagnostics. The high pressure fluid injector test apparatus includes an upper hub, an upper weldment or housing, a first clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the upper hub to the upper weldment, a standoff assembly within the upper weldment, a pair of window housings having view glasses within the upper weldment, an injector block assembly and purge plate within the upper weldment for holding an injector element to be tested and evaluated, a lower weldment or housing, a second clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the lower weldment to the upper weldment, a lower hub, a third clamp and stud/nut assembly for securing the lower hub to the lower weldment, mechanisms for introducing fluid under high pressure for testing an injector element, and mechanisms for purging the apparatus to prevent frosting of view glasses within the window housings and to permit unobstructed viewing of the injector element.

  6. Characteristics of response factors of coaxial gaseous rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation undertaken to determine the frequency dependence of the response factors of various gaseous propellant rocket injectors subject to axial instabilities are presented. The injector response factors were determined, using the modified impedance-tube technique, under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in unstable rocket motors. The tested injectors included a gaseous-fuel injector element, a gaseous-oxidizer injector element and a coaxial injector with both fuel and oxidizer elements. Emphasis was given to the determination of the dependence of the injector response factor upon the open-area ratio of the injector, the length of the injector orifice, and the pressure drop across the injector orifices. The measured data are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the corresponding injector response factor data predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  7. Particle injector for fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Ruch, Jeffrey F.

    1997-01-01

    A particle injector device provides injection of particles into a liquid eam. The device includes a funnel portion comprising a conical member having side walls tapering from a top opening (which receives the particles) down to a relatively smaller exit opening. A funnel inlet receives a portion of the liquid stream and the latter is directed onto the side walls of the conical member so as to create a cushion of liquid against which the particles impact. A main section of the device includes an inlet port in communication with the exit opening of the funnel portion. A main liquid inlet receives the main portion of the liquid stream at high pressure and low velocity and a throat region located downstream of the main liquid inlet accelerates liquid received by this inlet from the low velocity to a higher velocity so as to create a low pressure area at the exit opening of the funnel portion. An outlet opening of the main section enables the particles and liquid stream to exit from the injector device.

  8. ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter front end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, N. J.; Chen, L.; Gingrich, D. M.; Liu, S.; Chen, H.; Damazio, D.; Densing, F.; Duffin, S.; Farrell, J.; Kandasamy, S.; Kierstead, J.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; Ma, H.; Makowiecki, D.; Muller, T.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Ruggiero, R.; Takai, H.; Wolniewicz, K.; Ghazlane, H.; Hoummada, A.; Hervas, L.; Hott, T.; Wilkens, H. G.; Ban, J.; Boettcher, S.; Brooijmans, G.; Chi, C.-Y.; Caughron, S.; Cooke, M.; Copic, K.; Dannheim, D.; Gara, A.; Haas, A.; Katsanos, I.; Parsons, J. A.; Simion, S.; Sippach, W.; Zhang, L.; Zhou, N.; Eckstein, P.; Kobel, M.; Ladygin, E.; Auge, E.; Bernier, R.; Bouchel, M.; Bozzone, A.; Breton, D.; de la Taille, C.; Falleau, I.; Fournier, D.; Imbert, P.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Perus, A.; Richer, J. P.; Seguin Moreau, N.; Serin, L.; Tocut, V.; Veillet, J.-J.; Zerwas, D.; Colas, J.; Dumont-Dayot, N.; Massol, N.; Perrodo, P.; Perrot, G.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Escalier, M.; Hubaut, F.; Laforge, B.; LeDortz, O.; Schwemling, Ph; Collot, J.; Dzahini, D.; Gallin-Martel, M.-L.; Martin, P.; Cwienk, W. D.; Fent, J.; Kurchaninov, L.; Citterio, M.; Mazzanti, M.; Tartarelli, F.; Bansal, V.; Boulahouache, C.; Cleland, W.; Liu, B.; McDonald, J.; Paolone, V.; Rabel, J.; Savinov, V.; Zuk, G.; Benslama, K.; Borgeaud, P.; de la Broïse, X.; Delagnes, E.; LeCoguie, A.; Mansoulié, B.; Pascual, J.; Teiger, J.; Dinkespiler, B.; Liu, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Ye, J.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Hansson, P.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Chu, M. L.; Lee, S.-C.; Su, D. S.; Teng, P. K.; Braun, H. M.

    2008-09-01

    The ATLAS detector has been designed for operation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. ATLAS includes a complex system of liquid argon calorimeters. This paper describes the architecture and implementation of the system of custom front end electronics developed for the readout of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters.

  9. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  10. Microscale ethanol vapor ejector and injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, William G.; Wang, Ivan; Brikner, Natalya A.; Jaworski, Justin W.; Protz, Jonathan M.

    2010-04-01

    Two non-rotating pumping components, a jet ejector and injector, were designed and tested. Two jet ejectors were designed and tested to induce a suction draft using a supersonic micronozzle. Three-dimensional axisymmetric nozzles were microfabricated to produce throat diameters of 187 μm and 733 μm with design expansion ratios near 2.5:1. The motive nozzles achieved design mass flow efficiencies above 95% compared to isentropic calculations. Ethanol vapor was used to motivate and entrain ambient air. Experimental data indicate that the ejector can produce a sufficient suction draft to satisfy both microengine mass flow and power off-take requirements to enable its substitution for high speed microscale pumping turbomachinery. An ethanol vapor driven injector component was designed and tested to pressurize feed liquid ethanol. The injector was supplied with 2.70 atmosphere ethanol vapor and pumped liquid ethanol up to a total pressure of 3.02 atmospheres. Dynamic pressure at the exit of the injector was computed by measuring the displacement of a cantilevered beam placed over the outlet stream. The injector employed a three-dimensional axisymmetric nozzle with a throat diameter of 733 μm and a three-dimensional converging axisymmetric nozzle. The experimental data indicate that the injector can pump feed liquid into a pressurized boiler, enabling small scale liquid pumping without any moving parts. Microscale injectors could enable microscale engines and rockets to satisfy pumping and feedheating requirements without high speed microscale turbomachinery.

  11. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  12. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  13. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  14. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  16. Pellet injector development and experiments at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Argo, B.E.; Barber, G.C.; Combs, S.K.; Cole, M.J.; Dyer, G.R.; Fehling, D.T.; Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Milora, S.L.; Qualls, A.L.; Schechter, D.E.; Sparks, D.O.; Tsai, C.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Whealton, J.H.

    1993-11-01

    The development of pellet injectors for plasma fueling of magnetic confinement fusion experiments has been under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the past 15 years. Recently, ORNL provided a tritium-compatible four-shot pneumatic injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) based on the in situ condensation technique that features three single-stage gas guns and an advanced two-stage light gas gun driver. In another application, ORNL supplied the Tore Supra tokamak with a centrifuge pellet injector in 1989 for pellet fueling experiments that has achieved record numbers of injected pellets into a discharge. Work is progressing on an upgrade to that injector to extend the number of pellets to 400 and improve pellet repeatability. In a new application, the ORNL three barrel repeating pneumatic injector has been returned from JET and is being readied for installation on the DIII-D device for fueling and enhanced plasma performance experiments. In addition to these experimental applications, ORNL is developing advanced injector technologies, including high-velocity pellet injectors, tritium pellet injectors, and long-pulse feed systems. The two-stage light gas gun and electron-beam-driven rocket are the acceleration techniques under investigation for achieving high velocity. A tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment has demonstrated the feasibility of tritium pellet production and acceleration. A new tritium-compatible, extruder-based, repeating pneumatic injector is being fabricated to replace the pipe gun in the TPOP experiment and will explore issues related to the extrudability of tritium and acceleration of large tritium pellets. The tritium pellet formation experiments and development of long-pulse pellet feed systems are especially relevant to the International Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER).

  17. Internal baffling for fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian

    2014-08-05

    A fuel injector includes a fuel delivery tube; a plurality of pre-mixing tubes, each pre-mixing tube comprising at least one fuel injection hole; an upstream tube support plate that supports upstream ends of the plurality of pre-mixing tubes; a downstream tube support plate that supports downstream ends of the plurality of pre-mixing tubes; an outer wall connecting the upstream tube support plate and the downstream tube support plate and defining a plenum therewith; and a baffle provided in the plenum. The baffle includes a radial portion. A fuel delivered in the upstream direction by the fuel delivery tube is directed radially outwardly in the plenum between the radial portion of the baffle and the downstream tube support plate, then in the downstream direction around an outer edge portion of the radial portion, and then radially inwardly between the radial portion and the upstream tube support plate.

  18. Nozzle insert for mixed mode fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith E.

    2006-11-21

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively, by first and second needle valve members. The homogeneous charged nozzle outlet set is defined by a nozzle insert that is attached to an injector body, which defines the conventional nozzle outlet set. The nozzle insert is a one piece metallic component with a large diameter segment separated from a small diameter segment by an annular engagement surface. One of the needle valve members is guided on an outer surface of the nozzle insert, and the nozzle insert has an interference fit attachment to the injector body.

  19. Mixed Mode Fuel Injector And Injection System

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Chris Lee; Tian, Ye; Wang, Lifeng; Shafer, Scott F.

    2005-12-27

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set that are controlled respectively by first and second three way needle control valves. Each fuel injector includes first and second concentric needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position for a homogenous charge injection event, while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. The fuel injector has the ability to operate in a homogenous charge mode with a homogenous charge spray pattern, a conventional mode with a conventional spray pattern or a mixed mode.

  20. Next linear collider test accelerator injector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, A.D.; Miller, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) is being constructed at SLAC to demonstrate multibunch beam loading compensation, suppression of higher order deflecting modes and measure transverse components of the accelerating fields in X-band accelerating structures. Currently a simple injector which provides the average current necessary for the beam loading compensations studies is under construction. An injector upgrade is planned to produce bunch trains similar to that of the NLC with microbunch intensity, separation and energy spread, identical to that of NLC. We discuss the design of the NLCTA injector upgrade.

  1. Injector for a laser linear collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailichenko, A. A.

    1999-07-01

    The injector for 2×1 km long laser driven linac considered. Basically injector is a race track with long straight sections. These sections squeezed together for a compact size (a Kayak-Paddle like ring). In straight section the short period wigglers and RF cavities installed in series one by one for keeping the energy along the straight section practically constant. This injector is able to provide the invariant emittances of the order 5 10-8 cm rad and 2 10-9 cm rad for horizontal and vertical directions correspondingly. Bunch population required below 107 reduces the IBS effects.

  2. Method for Determining Optimum Injector Inlet Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method for determining the optimum inlet geometry of a liquid rocket engine swirl injector includes obtaining a throttleable level phase value, volume flow rate, chamber pressure, liquid propellant density, inlet injector pressure, desired target spray angle and desired target optimum delta pressure value between an inlet and a chamber for a plurality of engine stages. The method calculates the tangential inlet area for each throttleable stage. The method also uses correlation between the tangential inlet areas and delta pressure values to calculate the spring displacement and variable inlet geometry of a liquid rocket engine swirl injector.

  3. Gas Turbine Engine Staged Fuel Injection Using Adjacent Bluff Body and Swirler Fuel Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A fuel injection array for a gas turbine engine includes a plurality of bluff body injectors and a plurality of swirler injectors. A control operates the plurality of bluff body injectors and swirler injectors such that bluff body injectors are utilized without all of the swirler injectors at least at low power operation. The swirler injectors are utilized at higher power operation.

  4. Space transportation booster engine thrust chamber technology, large scale injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Large Scale Injector (LSI) program was to deliver a 21 inch diameter, 600,000 lbf thrust class injector to NASA/MSFC for hot fire testing. The hot fire test program would demonstrate the feasibility and integrity of the full scale injector, including combustion stability, chamber wall compatibility (thermal management), and injector performance. The 21 inch diameter injector was delivered in September of 1991.

  5. [Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  6. Liquid atomization by coaxial rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, S. V.; Brena De La Rosa, A.; Isakovic, A.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    The atomization characteristics of a scaled-down version of a coaxial rocket injector was investigated using a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The injector was operated in the conventional mode with liquid being injected through its inner orifice and gas being injected through its outer annulus. The shearing action occurring at the liquid-gas interface causes the liquid jet to atomize. In this study, two different liquid-air systems, namely a water-air system and a liquid nitrogen-gaseous nitrogen system, were chosen for detailed investigation. This paper discusses the performance characteristics of the coaxial injector under different flow and geometric conditions. Specifically, the effects of injection gas pressure and the injector cavity size on variables such as the mean particle diameter, Sauter mean diameter, number density, volume flux, and velocity have been presented.

  7. Diesel injector carbonization by three alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrum, J.W.; Patel, V.C.; McClendon, R.W.

    1996-05-01

    Three alternative diesel fuels were screened by analysis of fuel injector tip deposits. The test engines were operated on the Peterson (torque) test cycle; the average carbon deposit volume on an injector tip was measured by a computer vision method. Relative coke deposit quantity was obtained by area analysis of injector tip images. Repetitive image areas varied less than 1%. Coke deposit areas for repetitive fuel tests also varied less than 1%. Injector coking tendencies of tested fuels decreased in the following order: peanut oil, no. 2 diesel, tricaprylin, and tributyrin/no. 2 diesel blend. The observed dependence of the relative coke quantity on fuel type was consistent with the results from a photographic technique used previously for fuel screening. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Injector linac for the MESA facility

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, R.

    2013-11-07

    In this paper we present several possible configurations of an injector linac for the upcoming Mainz Energy-recovering Superconducting Accelerator (MESA) [1] and discuss their suitability for the project.

  9. First results from the SLD silicon calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, S. C.; Bugg, W. M.; Kroeger, R. S.; Weidemann, A. W.; White, S. L.; Brau, J. E.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Huber, J.; Hwang, H.

    1992-07-01

    The small-angle calorimeters of the SLD were successfully operated during the recent SLC engineering run. The Luminosity Monitor and Small-Angle Tagger (LMSAT) covers the angular region between 28 and 68 milliradians from the beam axis, while the Medium-Angle Silicon Calorimeter (MASC) covers the 68-190 milliradian region. Both are silicon-tungsten sampling calorimeters; the LMSAT employs 23 layers of 0.86 X(sub 0) sampling, while the MASC has 10 layers of 1.74 X(sub 0) sampling. We present results from the first run of the SLC with the SLD on beamline.

  10. MARK II end cap calorimeter electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jared, R.C.; Haggerty, J.S.; Herrup, D.A.; Kirsten, F.A.; Lee, K.L.; Olson, S.R.; Wood, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An end cap calorimeter system has been added to the MARK II detector in preparation for its use at the SLAC Linear Collider. The calorimeter uses 8744 rectangular proportional counter tubes. This paper describes the design features of the data acquisition electronics that has been installed on the calorimeter. The design and use of computer-based test stands for the amplification and signal-shaping components is also covered. A portion of the complete system has been tested in a beam at SLAC. In these initial tests, using only the calibration provided by the test stands, a resolution of 18%/..sqrt..E was achieved.

  11. First results from the SLD silicon calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Berridge, S.C.; Bugg, W.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Weidemann, A.W.; White, S.L.; Brau, J.E.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Huber, J.; Hwang, H.; Park, H.; Pitts, K.T.; Zeitlin, C.J.; Gioumousis, A.; Haller, G.; Seward, P.

    1992-07-01

    The small-angle calorimeters of the SLD were successfully operated during the recent SLC engineering run. The Luminosity Monitor and Small-Angle Tagger (LMSAT) covers the angular region between 28 and 68 milliradians from the beam axis, while the Medium-Angle Silicon Calorimeter (MASC) covers the 68--190 milliradian region. Both are silicon-tungsten sampling calorimeters; the LMSAT employs 23 layers of 0.86 X{sub 0} sampling, while the MASC has 10 layers of 1.74 X{sub 0} sampling. We present results from the first run of the SLC with the SLD on beamline.

  12. End Calorimeter Warm Tube Heater

    SciTech Connect

    Primdahl, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-06

    The Tevatron accelerator beam tube must pass through the End Calorimeter cryostats of the D-Zero Collider Detector. Furthermore, the End Calorimeter cryostats must be allowed to roll back forty inches without interruption of the vacuum system; hence, the Tev tube must slide through the End Calorimeter cryostat as it is rolled back. The Tev pass through the End Calorimeter can actually be thought of as a cluster of concentric tubes: Tev tube, warm (vacuum vessel) tube, IS layers of superinsulation, cold tube (argon vessel), and Inner Hadronic center support tube. M. Foley generated an ANSYS model to study the heat load. to the cryostat. during collider physics studies; that is, without operation of the heater. A sketch of the model is included in the appendix. The vacuum space and superinsulation was modeled as a thermal solid, with conductivity derived from tests performed at Fermilab. An additional estimate was done. by this author, using data supplied by NR-2. a superinsulation manufacturer. The ANSYS result and hand calculation are in close agreement. The ANSYS model was modified. by this author. to incorporate the effect of the heater. Whereas the earlier model studied steady state operation only. the revised model considers the heater-off steady state mode as the initial condition. then performs a transient analysis with a final load step for time tending towards infinity. Results show the thermal gradient as a function of time and applied voltage. It should be noted that M. Foley's model was generated for one half the warm tube. implying the tube to be symmetric. In reality. the downstream connection (relative to the collision point) attachment to the vacuum shell is via several convolutions of a 0.020-inch wall bellows; hence. a nearly adiabatic boundary condition. Accordingly. the results reported in the table reflect extrapolation of the curves to the downstream end of the tube. Using results from the ANSYS analysis, that is, tube temperature and

  13. Numerical simulation of an accelerator injector

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.; Caporaso, G.J.; Cole, A.G.

    1985-05-09

    Accelerator injector designs have been evaluated using two computer codes. The first code self consistently follows relativistic particles in two dimensions. Fields are obtained in the Darwin model which includes inductive effects. This code is used to study cathode emission and acceleration to full injector voltage. The second code transports a fixed segment of a beam along the remainder of the beam line. Using these two codes the effects of electrode configuration on emittance, beam quality and beam transport have been studied.

  14. A Versatile Ion Injector at KACST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Behery, S. A.; Almuqhim, A. A.; Papash, A. I.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-10-01

    A versatile ion-beam injector is presently being constructed at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP) at the King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Saudi Arabia. This versatile injector will provide an electrostatic storage ring with high-quality ion beams of energies up to 30 keV per charge q. It will also allow for crossed-beams experiments in single-pass setups. The injector has been designed to include beams from two different ion sources, switched by a 90° deflection setup, and to allow for matching of the beam parameters to the Twiss parameters of the ring. The injector is equipped with two crossed beam-lines (inlets), with duplicated beam extraction and acceleration systems. As part of the initial setup, a simple electric discharge ion source has been developed for commissioning of the whole injector. In this paper, we report on the ion optics layout and the design parameters of the injector.

  15. Mixing Enhancement in a Lobed Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.; Majamaki, A. J.; Lam, I. T.; Delabroy, O.; Karagozian, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Smith, O. I.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the non-reactive mixing processes associated with a lobed fuel injector in a coflowing air stream is presented. The lobed fuel injector is a device which generates streamwise vorticity, producing high strain rates which can enhance the mixing of reactants while delaying ignition in a controlled manner. The lobed injectors examined in the present study consist of two corrugated plates between which a fuel surrogate, CO2, is injected into coflowing air. Acetone is seeded in the CO2 supply as a fuel marker. Comparison of two alternative lobed injector geometries is made with a straight fuel injector to determine net differences in mixing and strain fields due to streamwise vorticity generation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the seeded acetone yields two-dimensional images of the scalar concentration field at various downstream locations, from which local mixing and scalar dissipation rates are computed. It is found that the lobed injector geometry can enhance molecular mixing and create a highly strained flowfield, and that the strain rates generated by scalar energy dissipation can potentially delay ignition in a reacting flowfield.

  16. A Versatile Ion Injector at KACST

    SciTech Connect

    El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Behery, S. A.; Almuqhim, A. A.; Papash, A. I.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-10-27

    A versatile ion-beam injector is presently being constructed at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP) at the King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Saudi Arabia. This versatile injector will provide an electrostatic storage ring with high-quality ion beams of energies up to 30 keV per charge q. It will also allow for crossed-beams experiments in single-pass setups. The injector has been designed to include beams from two different ion sources, switched by a 90 deg. deflection setup, and to allow for matching of the beam parameters to the Twiss parameters of the ring. The injector is equipped with two crossed beam-lines (inlets), with duplicated beam extraction and acceleration systems. As part of the initial setup, a simple electric discharge ion source has been developed for commissioning of the whole injector. In this paper, we report on the ion optics layout and the design parameters of the injector.

  17. Combustion Stability Analyses of Coaxial Element Injectors with Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid rocket engines using oxygen and methane propellants are being considered by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for in-space vehicles. This propellant combination has not been previously used in a flight-qualified engine system, so limited test data and analysis results are available at this stage of early development. NASA has funded several hardware-oriented activities with oxygen and methane propellants over the past several years with the Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project, under the Exploration Technology Development Program. As part of this effort, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted combustion stability analyses of several of the configurations. This paper presents test data and analyses of combustion stability from the recent PCAD-funded test programs at the NASA MSFC. These test programs used swirl coaxial element injectors with liquid oxygen and liquid methane propellants. Oxygen was injected conventionally in the center of the coaxial element, and swirl was provided by tangential entry slots. Injectors with 28-element and 40-element patterns were tested with several configurations of combustion chambers, including ablative and calorimeter spool sections, and several configurations of fuel injection design. Low frequency combustion instability (chug) occurred with both injectors, and high-frequency combustion instability occurred at the first tangential (1T) transverse mode with the 40-element injector. In most tests, a transition between high-amplitude chug with gaseous methane flow and low-amplitude chug with liquid methane flow was readily observed. Chug analyses of both conditions were conducted using techniques from Wenzel and Szuch and from the Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis (ROCCID) code. The 1T mode instability occurred in several tests and was apparent by high-frequency pressure measurements as well as dramatic increases in calorimeter-measured heat flux

  18. Upgrading the ATLAS fast calorimeter simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubacek, Z.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Many physics and performance studies with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider require very large samples of simulated events, and producing these using the full Geant4 detector simulation is highly CPU intensive. Often, a very detailed detector simulation is not needed, and in these cases fast simulation tools can be used to reduce the calorimeter simulation time. In ATLAS, a fast simulation of the calorimeter systems was developed, called Fast Calorimeter Simulation (FastCaloSim). It provides a parametrized simulation of the particle energy response at the calorimeter read-out cell level. It is interfaced to the standard ATLAS digitization and reconstruction software and can be tuned to data more easily than Geant4. An improved parametrization is being developed, to eventually address shortcomings of the original version. It makes use of statistical techniques such as principal component analysis and a neural network parametrization to optimise the amount of information to store in the ATLAS simulation infrastructure.

  19. CDF End Plug calorimeter Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, G.; de Barbaro, P.; Mishina, M.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the status of the CDF End Plug Upgrade Project. In this project, the CDF calorimeters in the end plug and the forward regions will be replaced by a single scintillator based calorimeter. After an extensive R&D effort on the tile/fiber calorimetry, we have now advanced to a construction phase. We review the results of the R&D leading to the final design of the calorimeters and the development of tooling devised for this project. The quality control program of the production of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters is described. A shower maximum detector for the measurement of the shower centroid and the shower profile of electrons, {gamma} and {pi}{sup 0} has been designed. Its performance requirements, R&D results and mechanical design are discussed.

  20. The BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, A.

    1997-07-01

    The progress on the design and construction of the BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter including its mechanical structure, the readout system, the mechanical and optical properties of the crystals, and the schedule for the final assembly and testing is summarized.

  1. Accelerator Test of an Imaging Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Binns, R. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Kippen, R. M.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) utilizes a thin sampling calorimeter concept for direct measurements of high-energy cosmic rays. The ICA design uses arrays of small scintillating fibers to measure the energy and trajectory of the produced cascades. A test instrument has been developed to study the performance of this concept at accelerator energies and for comparison with simulations. Two test exposures have been completed using a CERN test beam. Some results from the accelerator tests are presented.

  2. PXIE: Project X Injector Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P.N.; Holmes, S.D.; Kephart, R.D.; Kerby, J.S.; Lebedev, V.A.; Mishra, C.S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Shemyakin, A.V.; Solyak, N.; Stanek, R.P.; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-05-01

    A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are planning a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of the Project X. This program is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. Integrated systems testing, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), will be accomplished with a new test facility under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-16. PXIE will include an H{sup -} ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

  3. Panel flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Criteria are presented for the prediction of panel flutter, determination of its occurrence, design for its prevention, and evaluation of its severity. Theoretical analyses recommended for the prediction of flutter stability boundaries, vibration amplitudes, and frequencies for several types of panels are described. Vibration tests and wind tunnel tests are recommended for certain panels and environmental flow conditions to provide information for design of verification analysis. Appropriate design margins on flutter stability boundaries are given and general criteria are presented for evaluating the severity of possible short-duration, limited-amplitude panel flutter on nonreusable vehicles.

  4. Transportable high sensitivity small sample radiometric calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, J.R.; Biddle, R.S.; Cordova, B.S.; Sampson, T.E.; Dye, H.R.; McDow, J.G.

    1998-12-31

    A new small-sample, high-sensitivity transportable radiometric calorimeter, which can be operated in different modes, contains an electrical calibration method, and can be used to develop secondary standards, will be described in this presentation. The data taken from preliminary tests will be presented to indicate the precision and accuracy of the instrument. The calorimeter and temperature-controlled bath, at present, require only a 30-in. by 20-in. tabletop area. The calorimeter is operated from a laptop computer system using unique measurement module capable of monitoring all necessary calorimeter signals. The calorimeter can be operated in the normal calorimeter equilibration mode, as a comparison instrument, using twin chambers and an external electrical calibration method. The sample chamber is 0.75 in (1.9 cm) in diameter by 2.5 in. (6.35 cm) long. This size will accommodate most {sup 238}Pu heat standards manufactured in the past. The power range runs from 0.001 W to <20 W. The high end is only limited by sample size.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of an actual segmented calorimeter: a study of calorimeter performance at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Bishop, B.L.; Goodman, M.S.; Sessoms, A.L.; Eisenstein, B.; Wright, S.C.; Kephart, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The calculated responses including energy resolution, angular resolution, and spatial energy deposition of a segmented iron and liquid-argon calorimeter to incident pions in the energy range of 10- to 250-GeV are presented. Experimental data for this calorimeter have been obtained in the 10- to 40- GeV energy range and these results compare favorably with the calculated data.

  6. Panel methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ashok

    1993-10-01

    A comprehensive description of panel methods has been given to enable an understanding of the underlying theory and the basic structure of the panel codes for aerodynamic applications. Panel methods have seen peak activity in the industry and remain as yet the sole technique for efficient and practical computations on complex-aircraft configurations. The method of the linearized approach of solving flow problems is well proven and till the turn of the century panel methods will continue to remain as the workhorse for computing aerodynamic characteristics of aircraft shapes in the industry. The alternative Euler and Navier-Stokes solvers have yet to mature for applications to complex shapes, hence panel methods will be in the light for at least another decade.

  7. Fermilab Main Injector Beam Position Monitor Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, B.; Barker, W.; Bledsoe, S.; Boes, T.; Briegel, C.; Capista, D.; Deuerling, G.; Dysert, R.; Forster, R.; Foulkes, S.; Haynes, W.; Hendricks, B.; Kasza, T.; Kutschke, R.; Marchionni, A.; Olson, M.; Pavlicek, V.; Piccoli, L.; Prieto, P.; Rapisarda, S.; Saewert, A.; Van Bogaert, J.; Votava, M.; Webber, R.; Wendt, M.; Wilcer, N.; Wolbers, S.

    2006-11-01

    An upgrade of the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) signal processing and data acquisition system for the Fermilab Main Injector is described. The Main Injector is a fast cycling synchrotron that accelerates protons or antiprotons from 8 to 150 GeV, Each Main Injector cycle can have a totally different magnet ramp, RF frequency configuration, beam bunch structure, and injection/extraction pattern from the previous cycle. The new BPM system provides the capabilities and flexibility required by the dynamic and complex machine operations. The system offers measurement capability in the 2.5 MHz and 53 MHz channels to detect the range of bunch structures for protons and antiprotons in both wideband (turn-by-turn) and narrowband (closed-orbit) modes. The new BPM read-out system is based on the digital receiver concept and is highly configurable, allowing the signal processing of nearly all Main Injector beam conditions, including the detection of individual batches. An overview of the BPM system in the Main Injector operating environment, some technology details and first beam measurements are presented.

  8. LAr calorimeter for SCC with a common vacuum bulkhead---a concept to improve hermeticity

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, W.L. ); Watt, R.D. )

    1989-11-01

    A new concept for a Barrel/Endcap LAr Calorimeter (LAC) is described in which the Barrel and Endcaps are in separate vacuum enclosures but share a common vacuum bulkhead (CVB). We explore 2 possible bulkhead construction types; welded plate sandwich panels, and brazed sandwich panels in which the core is an isotropic cellular solid--foamed aluminum. Gas lines and electric cables from he innermost Drift Chamber pass through radial holes in the core of the sandwich bulkhead. The CVB concept offers the potential to obtain a more hermetic calorimeter with significantly reduced dead material and/or space in the interface region common to conventional design LAr detectors for the SSC with Endcap features. To utilize a common additional steps to remove the Drift Chamber, a large increase in Endcap standby heat leak, and perhaps, new cryogenic safety issues. We find that significant amount of dead mass can be removed from critical regions of the vacuum shells when compared to a promising SSC LAC reference design. It is also shown that the increased standby heat leak of this concept can be easily removed by existing cooling capacity in another large LAr calorimeter. It is further shown that shut-downs need not be appreciably longer. Finally, it is argued that cryogen spill hazards can be avoided if the Endcap's LAr is removed during Drift chamber maintenance shutdowns, and that cryogenic safety is not compromised.

  9. High-pressure calorimeter chamber tests for liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) rocket combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, Philip A.; Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Price, Harold G.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate the rocket combustion and heat transfer characteristics of liquid oxygen/kerosene (LOX/RP-1) mixtures at high chamber pressures. Two water-cooled calorimeter chambers of different combustion lengths were tested using 37- and 61-element oxidizer-fuel-oxidizer triplet injectors. The tests were conducted at nominal chamber pressures of 4.1, 8.3, and 13.8 MPa abs (600, 1200, and 2000 psia). Heat flux Q/A data were obtained for the entire calorimeter length for oxygen/fuel mixture ratios of 1.8 to 3.3. Test data at 4.1 MPa abs compared favorably with previous test data from another source. Using an injector with a fuel-rich outer zone reduced the throat heat flux by 47 percent with only a 4.5 percent reduction in the characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency C* sub eff. The throat heat transfer coefficient was reduced approximately 40 percent because of carbon deposits on the chamber wall.

  10. Dispersion ring reduces injector orifice-to-orifice flow variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, R. L.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1972-01-01

    Technique substantially reduces machine complexity, improves injector performance and is useful for products mixed or homogenized by injector process. Method is applicable to pharmaceutical, food, dairy and petrochemical industries.

  11. Unit fuel injector and system therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Roosa, V.D.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a unit fuel injector for an internal combustion engine having a cylinder, an associated cylinder head and a cam shaft driven by the engine. The injector unit consists of: an injection nozzle received in a bore in the cylinder head, the nozzle including an injection valve and a discharge tip at one end to inject pressurized fuel into the cylinder; an injector housing having a pair of generally parallel, laterally offset, overlapping, contiguous bores, the housing being adapted to be mounted to the engine and the housing receiving the injection nozzle in one of the bores; a fuel injection pump mounted in the housing and including a pump plunger actuable by the cam shaft; a fuel inlet in the housing including a fuel inlet passage in the housing in communication with the pump chamber to supply fuel under low pressure to the pump chamber.

  12. Sample injector for high pressure liquid chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.; Neyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus and method for driving a sample, having a well-defined volume, under pressure into a chromatography column. A conventional high pressure sampling valve is replaced by a sample injector composed of a pair of injector components connected in series to a common junction. The injector components are containers of porous dielectric material constructed so as to provide for electroosmotic flow of a sample into the junction. At an appropriate time, a pressure pulse from a high pressure source, that can be an electrokinetic pump, connected to the common junction, drives a portion of the sample, whose size is determined by the dead volume of the common junction, into the chromatographic column for subsequent separation and analysis. The apparatus can be fabricated on a substrate for microanalytical applications.

  13. Status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T. Angot, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Sole, P. [LPSC, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS Barué, C.; Bertrand, P.; Canet, C.; Ferdinand, R.; Flambard, J.-L.; Jardin, P.; Lemagnen, F.; Maunoury, L.; Osmond, B. [GANIL, CNRS Biarrotte, J. L. [IPN Orsay, Université Paris Sud, CNRS Denis, J.-F.; Roger, A.; Touzery, R.; Tuske, O.; Uriot, D. [Irfu, CEA Saclay, DSM and others

    2016-02-15

    The SPIRAL2 injector, installed in its tunnel, is currently under commissioning at GANIL, Caen, France. The injector is composed of two low energy beam transport lines: one is dedicated to the light ion beam production, the other to the heavy ions. The first light ion beam, created by a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, has been successfully produced in December 2014. The first beam of the PHOENIX V2 18 GHz heavy ion source was analyzed on 10 July 2015. A status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning is given. An upgrade of the heavy ion source, named PHOENIX V3 aimed to replace the V2, is presented. The new version features a doubled plasma chamber volume and the high charge state beam intensity is expected to increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 up to the mass ∼50. A status of its assembly is proposed.

  14. Status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning.

    PubMed

    Thuillier, T; Angot, J; Barué, C; Bertrand, P; Biarrotte, J L; Canet, C; Denis, J-F; Ferdinand, R; Flambard, J-L; Jacob, J; Jardin, P; Lamy, T; Lemagnen, F; Maunoury, L; Osmond, B; Peaucelle, C; Roger, A; Sole, P; Touzery, R; Tuske, O; Uriot, D

    2016-02-01

    The SPIRAL2 injector, installed in its tunnel, is currently under commissioning at GANIL, Caen, France. The injector is composed of two low energy beam transport lines: one is dedicated to the light ion beam production, the other to the heavy ions. The first light ion beam, created by a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, has been successfully produced in December 2014. The first beam of the PHOENIX V2 18 GHz heavy ion source was analyzed on 10 July 2015. A status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning is given. An upgrade of the heavy ion source, named PHOENIX V3 aimed to replace the V2, is presented. The new version features a doubled plasma chamber volume and the high charge state beam intensity is expected to increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 up to the mass ∼50. A status of its assembly is proposed.

  15. Status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Barué, C.; Bertrand, P.; Biarrotte, J. L.; Canet, C.; Denis, J.-F.; Ferdinand, R.; Flambard, J.-L.; Jacob, J.; Jardin, P.; Lamy, T.; Lemagnen, F.; Maunoury, L.; Osmond, B.; Peaucelle, C.; Roger, A.; Sole, P.; Touzery, R.; Tuske, O.; Uriot, D.

    2016-02-01

    The SPIRAL2 injector, installed in its tunnel, is currently under commissioning at GANIL, Caen, France. The injector is composed of two low energy beam transport lines: one is dedicated to the light ion beam production, the other to the heavy ions. The first light ion beam, created by a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, has been successfully produced in December 2014. The first beam of the PHOENIX V2 18 GHz heavy ion source was analyzed on 10 July 2015. A status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning is given. An upgrade of the heavy ion source, named PHOENIX V3 aimed to replace the V2, is presented. The new version features a doubled plasma chamber volume and the high charge state beam intensity is expected to increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 up to the mass ˜50. A status of its assembly is proposed.

  16. Independent Stage Control of a Cascade Injector (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    AFRL-PR-WP-TP-2006-264 INDEPENDENT STAGE CONTROL OF A CASCADE INJECTOR (POSTPRINT) H.L. Meicenheimer, E.J. Gutmark, M.R. Gruber, D.R...SUBTITLE INDEPENDENT STAGE CONTROL OF A CASCADE INJECTOR (POSTPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2308 5e. TASK NUMBER AI...whether the number of active stages in the cascade injector could be used to control penetration and mixing characteristics. The injector was tested at

  17. X-Ray Radiography Measurements of Shear Coaxial Rocket Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Modeling and Simulation, 6th Liquid Propulsion , and 5th Space - craft Propulsion Joint Subcommittee Meeting, Huntsville, Alabama, December 2011, http...Conference, Pittsburgh, PA, 5-8 May 2013. 14. ABSTRACT Shear coaxial injectors are a common injector type for liquid-rocket- propulsion ...Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA Abstract Shear coaxial injectors are a common injector type for liquid-rocket- propulsion

  18. Solar panel

    SciTech Connect

    Bayles, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    A solar panel includes a base within which are mounted transversely extending conduits. A heat collector plate in the base is in heat conductive relationship with the conduits for the heating of a fluid medium. The base additionally supports a transparent cover outwardly spaced from the heat collector plate to provide a protective insulative air space over the plate. A manifold communicates one series of panels with those of an adjacent series. A modified base dispenses with a collector plate and is formed so as to define integral lengthwise extending passageways for the solar heated medium. Inserted nipples interconnect the passageways of adjacent panels.

  19. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, Ramkrishna G.

    1986-01-01

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, and which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  20. Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Phatak, R.G.

    1984-08-31

    A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is disclosed which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

  1. Challenges and Plans for the Proton Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garoby, R.

    The flexibility of the LHC injectors combined with multiple longitudinal beam gymnastics have significantly contributed to the excellent performance of the LHC during its first run, delivering beam with twice the ultimate brightness with 50 ns bunch spacing. To meet the requirements of the High Luminosity LHC, 25 ns bunch spacing is required, the intensity per bunch at injection has to double and brightness shall almost triple. Extensive hardware modifications or additions are therefore necessary in all accelerators of the injector complex, as well as new beam gymnastics.

  2. Subpicosecond, ultra-bright electron injector

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Milder, M.L.; Kinross-Wright, J.

    1995-07-01

    We have designed and are building a subpicosecond electron injector. The injector is based on a 7.5 MeV photoinjector, used previously at Los Alamos in the APEX experiment. The nominal design includes magnetically compressing a 20 ps long, 3 nC bunch to a FWHM bunch length of 2/3 ps (peak current in excess of 3 kA) using a four dipole chicane buncher. The geometrial averaged transverse normalized transverse emittance after compression is about 15 ir mm mrad.

  3. 21 CFR 872.4465 - Gas-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas-powered jet injector. 872.4465 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4465 Gas-powered jet injector. (a) Identification. A gas-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe...

  4. 21 CFR 872.4465 - Gas-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas-powered jet injector. 872.4465 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4465 Gas-powered jet injector. (a) Identification. A gas-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe...

  5. 21 CFR 872.4465 - Gas-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas-powered jet injector. 872.4465 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4465 Gas-powered jet injector. (a) Identification. A gas-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe...

  6. 21 CFR 872.4465 - Gas-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas-powered jet injector. 872.4465 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4465 Gas-powered jet injector. (a) Identification. A gas-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe...

  7. 21 CFR 872.4465 - Gas-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas-powered jet injector. 872.4465 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4465 Gas-powered jet injector. (a) Identification. A gas-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5430 - Nonelectrically powered fluid injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. 880.5430... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5430 Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. (a) Identification. A nonelectrically powered fluid injector is a nonelectrically powered device used by a health care provider to give...

  9. 21 CFR 880.5430 - Nonelectrically powered fluid injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. 880.5430... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5430 Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. (a) Identification. A nonelectrically powered fluid injector is a nonelectrically powered device used by a health care provider to give...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5430 - Nonelectrically powered fluid injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. 880.5430... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5430 Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. (a) Identification. A nonelectrically powered fluid injector is a nonelectrically powered device used by a health care provider to give...

  11. 21 CFR 880.5430 - Nonelectrically powered fluid injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. 880.5430... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5430 Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. (a) Identification. A nonelectrically powered fluid injector is a nonelectrically powered device used by a health care provider to give...

  12. 21 CFR 880.5430 - Nonelectrically powered fluid injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. 880.5430... Therapeutic Devices § 880.5430 Nonelectrically powered fluid injector. (a) Identification. A nonelectrically powered fluid injector is a nonelectrically powered device used by a health care provider to give...

  13. 49 CFR 230.57 - Injectors and feedwater pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Injectors and feedwater pumps. 230.57 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Injectors, Feedwater Pumps, and Flue Plugs § 230.57 Injectors and feedwater pumps. (a)...

  14. 49 CFR 230.57 - Injectors and feedwater pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Injectors and feedwater pumps. 230.57 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Injectors, Feedwater Pumps, and Flue Plugs § 230.57 Injectors and feedwater pumps. (a)...

  15. 49 CFR 230.57 - Injectors and feedwater pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Injectors and feedwater pumps. 230.57 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Injectors, Feedwater Pumps, and Flue Plugs § 230.57 Injectors and feedwater pumps. (a)...

  16. 49 CFR 230.57 - Injectors and feedwater pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Injectors and feedwater pumps. 230.57 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Injectors, Feedwater Pumps, and Flue Plugs § 230.57 Injectors and feedwater pumps. (a)...

  17. 49 CFR 230.57 - Injectors and feedwater pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Injectors and feedwater pumps. 230.57 Section 230... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Injectors, Feedwater Pumps, and Flue Plugs § 230.57 Injectors and feedwater pumps. (a)...

  18. Liver Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Liver Panel Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Liver Profile; Liver Function Tests; LFTs Formal name: Hepatic ...

  19. Vacuum-jacketed hydrofluoric acid solution calorimeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, R.A.

    1965-01-01

    A vacuum-jacketed metal calorimeter for determining heats of solution in aqueous HF was constructed. The reaction vessel was made of copper and was heavily gold plated. The calorimeter has a cooling constant of 0.6 cal-deg -1-min-1, approximately 1/4 that of the air-jacketed calorimeters most commonly used with HF. It reaches equilibrium within 10 min after turning off the heater current. Measurements of the heat of solution of reagent grade KCl(-100 mesh dried 2 h at 200??C) at a mole ratio of 1 KCl to 200 H2O gave ??H = 4198??11 cal at 25??C. ?? 1965 The American Institute of Physics.

  20. Temperature Effects in the ATIC BGO Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isbert, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K.; Chang, J.; Christl, M. J.; Fazely, A.; Ganel, O.; Gunasigha, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment contains a segmented calorimeter composed of 320 individual BGO crystals (18 radiation lengths deep) to determine the particle energy. Like all inorganic scintillation crystals the light output of BGO depends not only on the energy deposited by particles but also on the temperature of the crystal. ATIC had successful flights in 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 from McMurdo, Antarctica. The temperature of balloon instruments varies during their flights at altitude due to sun angle variations and differences in albedo from the ground and is monitored and recorded. In order to determine the temperature sensitivity of the ATIC calorimeter it was temperature cycled in the thermal vacuum chamber at the CSBF in Palestine, TX. The temperature dependence is derived from the pulse height response to cosmic ray muons at various temperatures.

  1. Central Calorimeter Thermal Gradient Module Connection Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; /Fermilab

    1987-08-07

    Two 20 kW condensing and one 10 kW steady state cooling coils will be used to cool and condense gaseous argon in the Central Calorimeter (CC) Cryostat. Since this cool down (300K to 90K) will inevitably cause shrinkage in the modules contained inside the cryostat, the connections between the modules have to be designed to withstand the increase in forces and moments induced by this contraction. This paper presents finite element analysis (ANSYS{reg_sign}) results to aid in the design or modification of the Central Calorimeter module connections.

  2. Precision Crystal Calorimeters in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2016-07-12

    Precision crystal calorimeters traditionally play an important role in high energy physics experiments. In the last two decades, it faces a challenge to maintain its precision in a hostile radiation environment. This paper reviews the performance of crystal calorimeters constructed for high energy physics experiments and the progress achieved in understanding crystal’s radiation damage as well as in developing high quality scintillating crystals for particle physics. Potential applications of new generation scintillating crystals of high density and high light yield, such as LSO and LYSO, in particle physics experiments is also discussed.

  3. Photodetectors for the CMS hadron calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, J. E.; CMS Hadron Calorimeter Readout Group

    1997-02-01

    Hadronic energy measurements in the central and end cap regions of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector will be made using sampling calorimeter techniques with plastic scintillator tiles as the sensitive layers. Plastic fibers doped with wavelength shifting fluors embedded in each tile are used to extract the scintillation light. Clear plastic wave guide fibers carry the shifted light to photodetectors located on the outer surface of the calorimeter structure. Environmental constraints and physics performance requirements for these photodetectors are presented. Candidate photodetector technologies are discussed, and the hybrid photomultiplier tube technology is identified as most promising.

  4. Injector-Wall Interactions in Gas-Centered Swirl Coaxial Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-05

    management. However, most studies of injectors utilize single, isolated elements. The ability of walls to affect the expansion and stability of single-phase...management. However, most studies of injectors utilize single, isolated elements. The ability of walls to affect the expansion and stability of...location of the film produced on the wall’s surface, the spreading of the spray and the stability of the spray. The attachment point affects the heat

  5. Mechanical fuel injector for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Beaty, K.D.

    1993-08-31

    An apparatus is described for injecting fuel into an internal combustion engine having an air inlet containing an adjustable air throttle valve, comprising: a hollow injector body having a cylindrical bore therein; a compression head closing one end of the bore; a pump head closing an opposite end of the bore; a plunger piston reciprocally moveable within the cylinder bore defining a variable volume fuel pumping chamber formed by the injector body, the compression head, and a first end of the piston, and a variable volume compression chamber formed by the injector body, the pump head and a second end of the piston; fuel supply means connected to the pumping chamber; fuel passage means interconnecting the pumping chamber, the compression chamber and the fuel supply means; air supply means connected to the fuel passage means; fuel/air discharge means connected to the compression chamber; an injection nozzle located in the engine and connected to the fuel/air discharge means for injecting a mixture of fuel and air into the engine for combustion therein; and actuator means operably interconnecting the piston and the engine for reciprocating the piston within the cylinder bore of the injector body.

  6. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    DOEpatents

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  7. High current injector for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Eylon, S.; Chupp, W. W.

    1993-05-01

    A 2 MV, 800 mA, K(+) injector for heavy ion fusion studies is under construction. This new injector is a one-beam version of the proposed 4-beam ILSE injector. A new 36-module MARX is being built to achieve a 5 micro-s flat top. The high voltage generator is stiff (less than 5k Omega) to minimize effects of beam-induced transients. A large (approximately 7 in. diameter) curved hot alumina-silicate source emits a 1 micro-s long beam pulse through a gridless extraction electrode, and the ions are accelerated to 1 MV in a diode configuration. Acceleration to 2 MV takes place in a set of electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) units, arranged to simultaneously focus and accelerate the ion beam. Heavy shields and other protection devices have been built in to minimize risks of high voltage breakdown. Beam aberration effects through the ESQ have been studied extensively with theory, simulations, and scaled experiments. The design, simulations, experiments, and engineering of the ESQ injector will be presented.

  8. Development of Nonuniformities in Swirling, Rocket Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    24th LASS -Americas, San Antonio, Texas in May 2012. 14. ABSTRACT A high-performing, stable rocket engine requires injectors which produce...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 ! LASS Americas, 24’h Annual Conference on Liquid Atomi=ation and Spray Systems, San Antonio, TX

  9. Update to the NLC Injector System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Scott D.

    2002-08-21

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) Injector System is designed to produce low emittance 8 GeV electron and positron beams at 120 hertz for injection into the NLC main linacs. Each beam consists of a 265 ns train of bunches (190 bunches spaced by 1.4 ns or 95 bunches spaced by 2.8 ns); each bunch has a population of up to 1.6 x 10{sup 10} particles for 2.8 ns (or 0.8 x 10{sup 10} particles for 1.4 ns). Horizontal and vertical emittances are specified to be {gamma}{var_epsilon}{sub x} = 3 x 10{sup -6} m-rad and {gamma}{var_epsilon}{sub y} = 2 x 10{sup -8} m-rad; bunch length at injection is variable from 90-140 {micro}m. Electron polarization of greater than 80% is required. Electron and positron beams are generated in separate accelerator complexes each of which contains the source, damping ring systems, linacs, bunch length compressors, and collimation regions. Investigation into the feasibility of polarized positrons for the NLC has begun; operations at 180 Hz and the centralization of the injector complex have been studied. The need for affordable, low technical risk, reliable injector subsystems is a major consideration in the design effort. This paper presents an overview of the NLC injector systems with an emphasis on changes in the design since 1999 [1] and discusses the planned R&D.

  10. Molten metal injector system and method

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas N.; Kinosz, Michael J.; Bigler, Nicolas; Arnaud, Guy

    2003-04-01

    Disclosed is a molten metal injector system including a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and a molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal having a metal oxide film surface. The bottom side of the mold faces the holder furnace. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The injector projects into the holder furnace and is in fluid communication with the mold cavity. The injector includes a piston positioned within a piston cavity defined by a cylinder for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace and injecting the molten metal into the mold cavity under pressure. The piston and cylinder are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder further includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity. The molten metal intake is located below the metal oxide film surface of the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. A method of injecting molten metal into a mold cavity of a casting mold is also disclosed.

  11. Injector-concentrator electrodes for microchannel electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Stefan P.

    2003-05-06

    An input port geometry, with injector-concentrator electrodes, for planar microchannel array for electrophoresis. This input port geometry enables efficient extraction and injection of the DNA sample from a single input port. The geometry, which utilizes injector-concentrator electrodes, allows simultaneous concentration, in different channels, of the sample into a longitudinally narrow strip just before releasing it for a run with enhanced injection spatial resolution, and time resolution. Optional multiple electrodes, at a different bias than the concentrator electrodes, may be used to discriminate against sample impurity ions. Electrode passivation can be utilized to prevent electrolysis. An additional electrode in or on the input hole can better define the initial loading. The injector-concentrator electrodes are positioned so that they cross the drift channel in a narrow strip at the bond plane between the top and bottom plates of the instrument and are located close to the inlet hole. The optional sample purification electrodes are located at a greater distance from the input hole than the injector-concentrate electrodes.

  12. Triaxial Swirl Injector Element for Liquid-Fueled Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muss, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    A triaxial injector is a single bi-propellant injection element located at the center of the injector body. The injector element consists of three nested, hydraulic swirl injectors. A small portion of the total fuel is injected through the central hydraulic injector, all of the oxidizer is injected through the middle concentric hydraulic swirl injector, and the balance of the fuel is injected through an outer concentric injection system. The configuration has been shown to provide good flame stabilization and the desired fuel-rich wall boundary condition. The injector design is well suited for preburner applications. Preburner injectors operate at extreme oxygen-to-fuel mass ratios, either very rich or very lean. The goal of a preburner is to create a uniform drive gas for the turbomachinery, while carefully controlling the temperature so as not to stress or damage turbine blades. The triaxial injector concept permits the lean propellant to be sandwiched between two layers of the rich propellant, while the hydraulic atomization characteristics of the swirl injectors promote interpropellant mixing and, ultimately, good combustion efficiency. This innovation is suited to a wide range of liquid oxidizer and liquid fuels, including hydrogen, methane, and kerosene. Prototype testing with the triaxial swirl injector demonstrated excellent injector and combustion chamber thermal compatibility and good combustion performance, both at levels far superior to a pintle injector. Initial testing with the prototype injector demonstrated over 96-percent combustion efficiency. The design showed excellent high -frequency combustion stability characteristics with oxygen and kerosene propellants. Unlike the more conventional pintle injector, there is not a large bluff body that must be cooled. The absence of a protruding center body enhances the thermal durability of the triaxial swirl injector. The hydraulic atomization characteristics of the innovation allow the design to be

  13. Swirl Coaxial Injector Testing with LOX/RP-J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Sandra Elam; Casiano, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Testing was conducted at NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the fall of 2012 to evaluate the operation and performance of liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP ]1) in an existing swirl coaxial injector. While selected Russian engines use variations of swirl coaxial injectors, component level performance data has not been readily available, and all previously documented component testing at MSFC with LOX/RP ]1 had been performed using a variety of impinging injector designs. Impinging injectors have been adequate for specific LOX/RP ]1 engine applications, yet swirl coaxial injectors offer easier fabrication efforts, providing cost and schedule savings for hardware development. Swirl coaxial elements also offer more flexibility for design changes. Furthermore, testing with LOX and liquid methane propellants at MSFC showed that a swirl coaxial injector offered improved performance compared to an impinging injector. So, technical interest was generated to see if similar performance gains could be achieved with LOX/RP ]1 using a swirl coaxial injector. Results would allow such injectors to be considered for future engine concepts that require LOX/RP ]1 propellants. Existing injector and chamber hardware was used in the test assemblies. The injector had been tested in previous programs at MSFC using LOX/methane and LOX/hydrogen propellants. Minor modifications were made to the injector to accommodate the required LOX/RP ]1 flows. Mainstage tests were performed over a range of chamber pressures and mixture ratios. Additional testing included detonated gbombs h for stability data. Test results suggested characteristic velocity, C*, efficiencies for the injector were 95 ]97%. The injector also appeared dynamically stable with quick recovery from the pressure perturbations generated in the bomb tests.

  14. Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Mark S.

    2009-12-17

    A selection of ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter commissioning studies is presented. It includes a coherent noise study, a measurement of the quality of the ionization pulse shape prediction, and energy and time reconstruction analyses with cosmic and single beam signals.

  15. Steel specification for the Atlas calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.

    1998-02-10

    As part of a collaborative experimental High Energy Physics experiment at the LHC Facility, CERN Laboratory, Geneva Switzerland, a group of US institutions has accepted the responsibility for constructing a large portion of the calorimeter for this experiment. This device is referred to as the Tile Calorimeter. The Tile Calorimeter has three major elements, a large center section (Barrel), and two end sections (Extended Barrel). The US group will be responsible for the construction of one of these extended barrel sections. All of the components that are required to construct this device will be fabricated in the US over a period of three years commencing in 1998. Another similar element and the barrel element will be constructed in both eastern and western Europe by parallel groups. The extended barrel is a cylindrical device approximately 8.5 meters (28 ft.) OD x 4.5 meters (14 ft.) ID, made up of 64 wedges. Each of these wedges (see Attachment 1) is constructed by bolting submodules to a strongback girder. Each submodule is constructed of a series of sheets that are welded and glued together. This document summarizes the characteristics and specifications of these steel sheets. The Tile Calorimeter is the return path for the magnet flux of the ATLAS internal superconducting 2T solenoid, therefore its steel magnetic properties are important.

  16. SLD liquid argon calorimeter prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, R.; Eigen, G.; Au, Y.; Sleeman, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brau, J.; Ludgate, G.A.; Oram, C.J.; Cook, V.; Johnson, J.

    1985-10-01

    The results of the SLD test beam program for the selection of a calorimeter radiator composition within a liquid argon system are described, with emphasis on the study of the use of uranium to obtain equalization of pion and electron responses.

  17. Performance of the GEM electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Ma

    1993-06-25

    The GEM EM calorimeter is optimized for the best energy, position, angular resolution and jet rejection. The detailed simulation results are presented. In the barrel with LKr, an energy resolution of about 6%/{radical}{direct_sum}0.4%, pointing resolution of 40mrad/{radical}E + 0.5mrad, and jet rejection of a factor of 5 are expected.

  18. Panel Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Lists the speakers and summarizes the issues addressed for 12 panel sessions on topics related to networking, including libraries and national networks, federal national resources and energy programs, multimedia issues, telecommuting, remote image serving, accessing the Internet, library automation, scientific information, applications of Z39.50,…

  19. Media Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish Media Panel is a research program about children and young persons and their use of mass media. The aim of the ten-year (1975-1985) project is to explain how media habits originate, how they change as children grow older, what factors on the part of children themselves and in their surroundings may be connected with a certain use of…

  20. Flash X-Ray Injector Study

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A C

    2004-03-26

    The study described in this report1 models the FXR injector from the cathode to the exit of the injector. The calculations are compared to actual experimental measurements, table 1. In these measurements the anode voltage was varied by changing the Marks-Bank charging voltage. The anode-cathode spacing was varied by adjusting the location of the cathode in hopes of finding an island of minimum emittance (none found). The bucking coil current was set for zero field on the cathode. In these measurements, a pepper-pot mask was inserted into FXR at beam bug 135 and viewed downstream via a wiggle probe diagnostic at cell gap J21, figure 1. The observed expansion of the beamlets passing through the mask of known geometric layout and hole size allow a calculation of the phase space beam properties.

  1. Compact and stable multibeam fiber injector

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L. F., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    A compact and stable 20-beam injector was built for launching laser light into fibers for Fabry Perot velocity measurements of shock-driven surfaces. The fiber injector uses commercial mounts on mini-rails. Dielectric-coated beamsplitters provide accurate amplitude division. Minimal adjustments for stable operation are permitted by the use of a real-time video-viewer. The video system includes a non-linear camera for CW alignment and a linearized camera with a frame grabber for pulsed measurement and analysis. All 20-injection points are displayed on a single monitor. Optical requirements are given for image relay and magnification. Stimulated Brillouin scattering limitations on high-power are quantified.

  2. Tune control in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    G. Wu et al.

    1999-04-16

    We describe methods used to measure and control tunes in the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI). Emphasis is given to software implementation of the operator interface, to the front-end embedded computer system, and handling of hysteresis of main dipole and quadrupole magnets. Techniques are developed to permit control of tune of the Main Injector through several acceleration cycles: from 8.9 GeV/c to 120 GeV/c, from 8.9 GeV/c to 150 GeV/c, and from 150 GeV/c to 8.9 GeV/c. Systems which automate the complex interactions between tune measurement and the variety of ramping options are described. Some results of tune measurements and their comparison with the design model are presented.

  3. Vorticity generation by contoured wall injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waitz, I.A.; Marble, F.E.; Zukoski, E.E. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena )

    1992-07-01

    A class of contoured wall fuel injectors was designed to enable shock-enhancement of hypervelocity mixing for supersonic combustion ramjet applications. Previous studies of these geometries left unresolved questions concerning the relative importance of various axial vorticity sources in mixing the injectant with the freestream. The present study is a numerical simulation of two generic fuel injectors which is aimed at elucidating the relative roles of axial vorticity sources including: baroclinic torque through shock-impingement, cross-stream shear, turning of boundary layer vorticity, shock curvature, and diffusive flux. Both the magnitude of the circulation, and the location of vorticity with respect to the mixing interface were considered. Baroclinic torque and cross-stream shear were found to be most important in convectively mixing the injectant with the freestream, with the former providing for deposition of vorticity directly on the fuel/air interface. 19 refs.

  4. Vorticity generation by contoured wall injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.; Marble, Frank E.; Zukoski, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    A class of contoured wall fuel injectors was designed to enable shock-enhancement of hypervelocity mixing for supersonic combustion ramjet applications. Previous studies of these geometries left unresolved questions concerning the relative importance of various axial vorticity sources in mixing the injectant with the freestream. The present study is a numerical simulation of two generic fuel injectors which is aimed at elucidating the relative roles of axial vorticity sources including: baroclinic torque through shock-impingement, cross-stream shear, turning of boundary layer vorticity, shock curvature, and diffusive flux. Both the magnitude of the circulation, and the location of vorticity with respect to the mixing interface were considered. Baroclinic torque and cross-stream shear were found to be most important in convectively mixing the injectant with the freestream, with the former providing for deposition of vorticity directly on the fuel/air interface.

  5. Supercritical Mixing in a Shear Coaxial Injector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-27

    bottom, a circular hole acts as an outlet to the injected fluid, discharging into the outer chamber. The shear co-axial injector consists of inner...as to enable such an investigation. A line contour of 80% inner fluid is shown in black , indicating the intact core flow. The drop in the inner fluid...core( black line). D. Acoustic Excitation Two cases are chosen to examine the impact of acoustic excitation on the mixing of the coaxial jets. The

  6. Diesel injector additives for a clean exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Herbstman, S.; Virk, K.S.

    1988-08-01

    Increased public awareness of clean air is causing closer examination of potential health problems associated with diesel exhaust particulates. Recently, the EPA published standards mandating a sixfold reduction in diesel exhaust particulates for heavy duty engines from 0.60 gm/bhp-hr in 1988-1990 to 0.10 gm/bhp-hr in 1994. NOx exhaust concentrations were also reduced. For some time now, we have been interested in ways to reduce black smoke from diesel engines since it is one of the prime contributors to exhaust particulates. One of its causes is dirty or clogged fuel injectors due to deposit buildup. During operation with dirty injectors, the spray pattern of fuel into the combustion chamber is distorted, usually resulting in a fuel-rich environment. Incomplete burning of the rich fuel mixture results in an excess of carbonaceous material which is discharged in the exhaust as black smoke. We are engaged in evaluating additives with detergency and antioxidant properties to reduce deposit buildup in the injectors. Long chain alkylamines, and other types of surfactant molecules have been reported as active in preventing deposit buildup. However, little practical information was available concerning structure-activity relationships for use in developing a commercially acceptable additive package. We decided to investigate additives which are active either as gasoline carburetor detergents or as lubricant dispersants; both categories appear to have the necessary surfactant behavior and oil solubility to satisfy our needs for a diesel injector keep clean agent. Our approach to the problem was to develop an additive package for future use in Texaco fuels to reduce black smoke.

  7. Visualisation of diesel injector with neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, E.; Grünzweig, C.; Jollet, S.; Kaiser, M.; Hansen, H.; Dinkelacker, F.

    2015-12-01

    The injection process of diesel engines influences the pollutant emissions. The spray formation is significantly influenced by the internal flow of the injector. One of the key parameters here is the generation of cavitation caused by the geometry and the needle lift. In modern diesel engines the injection pressure is established up to 3000 bar. The details of the flow and phase change processes inside the injector are of increasing importance for such injectors. With these experimental measurements the validation of multiphase and cavitation models is possible for the high pressure range. Here, for instance, cavitation effects can occur. Cavitation effects in the injection port area destabilize the emergent fuel jet and improve the jet break-up. The design of the injection system in direct-injection diesel engines is an important challenge, as the jet breakup, the atomization and the mixture formation in the combustion chamber are closely linked. These factors have a direct impact on emissions, fuel consumption and performance of an engine. The shape of the spray at the outlet is determined by the internal flow of the nozzle. Here, geometrical parameters, the injection pressure, the injection duration and the cavitation phenomena play a major role. In this work, the flow dependency in the nozzles are analysed with the Neutron-Imaging. The great advantage of this method is the penetrability of the steel structure while a high contrast to the fuel is given due to the interaction of the neutrons with the hydrogen amount. Compared to other methods (optical with glass structures) we can apply real components under highest pressure conditions. During the steady state phase of the injection various cavitation phenomena are visible in the injector, being influenced by the nozzle geometry and the fuel pressure. Different characteristics of cavitation in the sac and spray hole can be detected, and the spray formation in the primary breakup zone is influenced.

  8. Radiation shielding of the main injector

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; Martin, P.S.

    1995-05-01

    The radiation shielding in the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) complex has been carried out by adopting a number of prescribed stringent guidelines established by a previous safety analysis. Determination of the required amount of radiation shielding at various locations of the FMI has been done using Monte Carlo computations. A three dimensional ray tracing code as well as a code based upon empirical observations have been employed in certain cases.

  9. Development of Nonuniformities in Swirling, Rocket Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    annular liquid. The prior studies have shown that this type of injector exhibits a rich and complex behavior [3]. Several geometries and/or...frequency was higher than 100 Hz compared to the spectral power of dominant frequencies below this value. There is a general cascade of energy from low...these spray show a general cascade of energy from the low frequencies and very little spectral energy above a few hundred (200-400) Hz. When dominant

  10. Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

  11. Wakefield Computations for the Injector (Part I)

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.

    2010-12-13

    In this document, we report on basic wakefield computations used to establish the impedance budget for the LCLS injector. Systematic comparisons between analytic formulae and results from ABCI are done. Finally, a comparison between 2D and 3D wakefield calculations are given for a cross. The three parts of the document are presented as follows: (1) ABCI computations for a few structures (Flange, Bellows...); (2) Comparison analytic with ABCI runs; and (3) Comparison Cross and Cavity using MAFIA.

  12. Proposed Fermilab upgrade main injector project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate a Fermilab Main Injector'' (FMI), a 150 GeV proton injector accelerator, at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. The purpose and need for this action are given of this Environmental Assessment (EA). A description of the proposed FMI and construction activities are also given. The proposed FMI would be housed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of approximately 2.1 miles (3.4 kilometers), and the construction would affect approximately 135 acres of the 6,800 acre Fermilab site. The purpose of the proposed FMI is to construct and bring into operation a new 150 GeV proton injector accelerator. This addition to Fermilab's Tevatron would enable scientists to penetrate ever more deeply into the subatomic world through the detection of the super massive particles that can be created when a proton and antiproton collide head-on. The conversion of energy into matter in these collisions makes it possible to create particles that existed only an instant after the beginning of time. The proposed FMI would significantly extend the scientific reach of the Tevatron, the world's first superconducting accelerator and highest energy proton-antiproton collider.

  13. Design status of heavy ion injector program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, E.O.; Meyer, E.A.; Riepe, K.B.; Rutkowski, H.L.; Shurter, R.P.; Van Haaften, F.W.

    1985-10-01

    Design and development of a sixteen beam, heavy ion injector is in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to demonstrate the injector technology for the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The injector design provides for individual ion sources mounted to a support plate defining the sixteen beam array. The beamlets are electrostatically accelerated through a series of electrodes inside an evacuated (10 X torr) high voltage (HV) accelerating column. The column consists of two 28-inch diameter insulator modules made of 85 percent Al2O3 ceramic rings brazed to niobium feedthrough rings to which the electrodes are mechanically attached. Field shaping is used to minimize electron avalanche induced flashover along the inside surface of the ceramic rings. The column is self-supporting and is cantilevered from one end of the containment vessel. A brazed assembly was chosen to provide the required bond strength and high vacuum capability. The HV pulsed power supply is a 2MV Marx generator cantilevered from the opposite end of the containment vessel. The stainless steel pressure vessel (PV) contains a 65 psig mixture of SF6(30%) and nitrogen (70%) to provide the electrical insulation.

  14. X-Ray Calorimeter Arrays for Astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the evolving universe. The grating spectrometers on the XMM and Chandra satellites started a new era in x-ray astronomy, but there remains a need for instrumentation that can provide higher spectral resolution with high throughput in the Fe-K band (around 6 keV) and can enable imaging spectroscopy of extended sources, such as supernova remnants and galaxy clusters. The instrumentation needed is a broad-band imaging spectrometer - basically an x-ray camera that can distinguish tens of thousands of x-ray colors. The potential benefits to astrophysics of using a low-temperature calorimeter to determine the energy of an incident x-ray photon via measurement of a small change in temperature was first articulated by S. H. Moseley over two decades ago. In the time since, technological progress has been steady, though full realization in an orbiting x-ray telescope is still awaited. A low-temperature calorimeter can be characterized by the type of thermometer it uses, and three types presently dominate the field. The first two types are temperature-sensitive resistors - semiconductors in the metal-insulator transition and superconductors operated in the superconducting-normal transition. The third type uses a paramagnetic thermometer. These types can be considered the three generations of x-ray calorimeters; by now each has demonstrated a resolving power of 2000 at 6 keV, but only a semiconductor calorimeter system has been developed to spaceflight readiness. The Soft X-ray Spectrometer on Astro-H, expected to launch in 2013, will use an array of silicon thermistors with I-IgTe x-ray absorbers that will operate at 50 mK. Both the semiconductor and superconductor calorimeters have been implemented in small arrays, kilo-pixel arrays of the superconducting calorimeters are just now being produced, and it is anticipated that much larger arrays will require the non-dissipative advantage of magnetic thermometers.

  15. 61. Upper panel in cornerpower panel lcpa lower panel in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Upper panel in corner-power panel lcpa lower panel in corner-oxygen regeneration unit, at right-air conditioner control panel, on floor-bio-pack 45 for emergency breathing, looking northwest - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  16. Driving of combustor oscillations by gaseous propellant injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of reactive admittances that describe the capabilities of the combustion processes associated with coaxial gaseous fuel injectors to amplify combustor oscillations are presented. These admittances are needed in (1) stability analyses of rocket motors and gas turbine combustors; (2) for the evaluation of 'driving' capabilities of injectors; and (3) for checking the applicability of a theoretical model. The modified standing-wave technique was used to determine the admittances of the combustion processes in coaxial injectors utilizing air-acetylene mixtures. The measurements indicated that (1) coaxial injectors can sustain combustion instabilities over wide frequency ranges; (2) the maximum driving capability of an injector decreases with an increased equivalence ratio; (3) the frequency at which maximum driving is observed decreases with the increased equivalence ratio; and (4) the characteristic combustion time of an injector design decreases with increased frequency.

  17. Recent Flash X-Ray Injector Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Blackfield, D; Burke, J; Chen, Y; Javedani, J; Paul, A C

    2004-11-10

    The injector of the Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator has a significantly larger than expected beam emittance. A computer modeling effort involving three different injector design codes was undertaken to characterize the FXR injector and determine the cause of the large emittance. There were some variations between the codes, but in general the simulations were consistent and pointed towards a much smaller normalized, rms emittance (36 cm-mr) than what was measured (193 cm-mr) at the exit of the injector using a pepperpot technique. The simulations also indicated that the present diode design was robust with respect to perturbations to the nominal design. Easily detected mechanical alignment/position errors and magnet errors did not lead to appreciable increase in the simulated emittance. The physics of electron emission was not modeled by any of the codes and could be the source of increased emittance. The nominal simulation assumed uniform Child-Langmuir Law emission from the velvet cathode and no shroud emission. Simulations that looked at extreme non-uniform cathode and shroud emission scenarios resulted in doubling of the emittance. An alternative approach was to question the pepperpot measurement. Simulations of the measurement showed that the pepperpot aperture foil could double the emittance with respect to the non-disturbed beam. This leads to a diplomatic explanation of the discrepancy between predicted and measured emittance where the fault is shared. The measured value is too high due to the effect of the diagnostic on the beam and the simulations are too low because of unaccounted cathode and/or shroud emission physics. Fortunately there is a relatively simple experiment that can resolve the emittance discrepancy. If the large measured emittance value is correct, the beam envelope is emittance dominated at modest values of focusing field and beam radius. Measurements of the beam envelope on an imaging foil at the exit of the injector would lead to an

  18. Architectural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Alliance Wall Corporation's Whyteboard, a porcelain enamel on steel panels wall board, owes its color stability to a KIAC engineering background study to identify potential technologies and manufacturers of equipment which could be used to detect surface flaws. One result of the data base search was the purchase of a spectrocolorimeter which enables the company to control some 250 standard colors, and match special colors.

  19. Independent Stage Control of a Cascade Injector (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AFRL-PR-WP-TP-2006-250 INDEPENDENT STAGE CONTROL OF A CASCADE INJECTOR (POSTPRINT) Heidi L. Meicenheimer, Ephraim J. Gutmark, Campbell D...house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INDEPENDENT STAGE CONTROL OF A CASCADE INJECTOR (POSTPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62203F 5d...investigation was to determine whether the number of active stages in the cascade injector could be used to control penetration and mixing characteristics

  20. The Fermilab Main Injector: current status and future

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.

    1996-09-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is a 8-150 GeV proton synchrotron being built as a high intensity injector to the Tevatron. The design incorporates many novel features to achieve {ital p{anti p}} luminosity in the Tevatron exceeding 8 x 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}sec{sup -1}. An overview of the Main Injector project, current status and future prospects will be discussed.

  1. Effect of dead material in a calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1995-10-01

    The existence of dead material in any practical calorimeter system is simply a fact of life. The task for the designer, then, is to understand the impact on the Physics in question, and strive to minimize it. The aim of this note is to use the ``Hanging File`` test data, which has fined grained individual readout of about 100 depth segments, to explore impact of dead material on the mean and r.m.s. of the hadronic distribution. The amount and location of the dead material is varied. It important to remember that the Hanging File data was calibrated, EM to HCAL compartment, so as to minimize the electron to pion energy dependence. In practical terms e/pie was made = 1.0 at an incident energy of about 100 GeV. Note that the PB(EM) + FE(HCAL) calorimeter was not a compensating device.

  2. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  3. Improving calorimeter resolution using temperature compensation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiga, Joseph; Purschke, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The sPHENIX experiment is an upgrade of the existing PHENIX apparatus at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The new detector improves upon measurements of various physical processes, such as jets of particles created during heavy-ion collisions. Prototypes of various calorimeter components were tested at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF). This analysis tries to compensate the effects of temperature drifts in the silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Temperature data were used to calculate an appropriate compensation factor. This analysis will improve the achievable resolution and will also determine how accurately the temperature must be controlled in the final experiment. This will improve the performance of the calorimeters in the sPHENIX experiment. This project was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  4. Sources of compensation in hadronic calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, M.S.; Gabriel, T.A.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Wilson, R.

    1988-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are presented using the CALOR code system to study the design of a large hybrid hadron calorimeter system employing a warm liquid active medium (tetramethylsilane, Si(CH/sub 3/)/sub 4/) and uranium plates in addition to a conventional Fe/plastic system. In the system described here, the uranium provides partial compensation by suppressing the electromagnetic cascade produced by incident electrons due to sampling inefficiencies. The results of the simulations also indicate that significant compensation is achieved (given small enough saturation) due to low energy recoil protons produced in collisions with low energy (1--20 MeV) cascade and fission neutrons in the active medium. Both compensation mechanisms are important to help balance the response of a calorimeter to incident electrons and hadrons, that is, to achieve a ratio of pulse heights (e/h approx. 1) which will lead to the best energy resolution. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Tile Calorimeter System, ATLAS

    2015-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. The TileCal readout consists of about 10000 channels. The bulk of its upgrade will occur for the High Luminosity LHC phase (Phase-II) where the peak luminosity will increase 5 times compared to the design luminosity (1034 cm-2s-1) but with maintained energy (i.e. 7+7 TeV). An additional increase of the average luminosity with a factor of 2 can be achieved by luminosity levelling. This upgrade is expected to happen around 2024. The TileCal upgrade aims at replacing the majority of the on- and off- detector electronics to the extent that all calorimeter signals will be digitized and sent to the off-detector electronics in the counting room. To achieve the required reliability, redundancy has been introduced at different levels. Three different options are presently being investigated for the front-end electronic upgrade. Extensive test beam studies will determine which option will be selected. 10 Gbps optical links are used to read out all digitized data to the counting room while 5 Gbps down-links are used for synchronization, configuration and detector control. For the off-detector electronics a pre-processor (sROD) is being developed, which takes care of the initial trigger processing while temporarily storing the main data flow in pipeline and derandomizer memories. One demonstrator prototype module with the new calorimeter module electronics, but still compatible with the present system, is planned to be inserted in ATLAS this year.

  6. A no-load RF calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    The described device can be used to measure the output of any dc powered RF source. No dummy load is required for the measurements. The device is, therefore, called the 'no-load calorimeter' (NLC). The NLC measures the power actually fed to the antenna or another useful load. It is believed that the NLC can compete successfully with directional coupler type systems in measuring the output of high-power RF sources.

  7. Static and transient behavior of the flow positioned injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Qizhi; Lu, Zhenglin

    1991-06-01

    The flow positioned injector can ensure invariant injecting speed and gives high combustion performance for variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engines. Static and dynamic mathematical models of the injector are developed, and basic design rules to ensure invariant injection pressure drop are deduced from the static model. In practical situations, the effect of the flow-coefficient variation on the injecting speed must be compensated by a special structure design. Based on the dynamic model, transient response of the injector is analyzed via a digital simulation method. The results show that the injector can maintain almost constant injecting speed during transient process if it has an adequate dynamic resistant coefficient.

  8. 2-MV electrostatic quadrupole injector for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Prost, L.; Seidl, P.A.

    2004-11-10

    High current and low emittance are principal requirements for heavy-ion injection into a linac driver for inertial fusion energy. An electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) injector is capable of providing these high charge density and low emittance beams. We have modified the existing 2-MV Injector to reduce beam emittance and to double the pulse length. We characterize the beam delivered by the modified injector to the High Current Transport Experiment (HCX) and the effects of finite rise time of the extraction voltage pulse in the diode on the beam head. We demonstrate techniques for mitigating aberrations and reducing beam emittance growth in the injector.

  9. Application of advanced diagnostics to airblast injector flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, John B.; Kennedy, Jan B.; Russell, Sid

    1987-01-01

    This effort is concerned with the application of both conventional laser velocimetry and phase Doppler anemometry to the flow produced by an airblast nozzle. The emphasis is placed on the acquisition of data using actual engine injector/swirler components at (noncombusting) conditions simulating those encountered in the engine. The objective of the effort was to test the applicability of the instrumentation to real injector flows, to develop information on the behavior of injectors at high flow, and to provide data useful in the development of physical models of injector flows.

  10. Influence of variable thrust parameters on swirl injector fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Robert J.

    Current swirl injector design methodologies do not consider elevated chamber pressure and less than design mass flow rate operation found in variable thrust liquid rocket engines. The objective of this work is to study the effects of elevated chamber pressure and off-design mass flow rate operation on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a high pressure chamber, water flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of elevated chamber pressure and reduced mass flow rate. The optically-accessible swirl injector allowed for determination of the film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section. High speed video and digital stills showed significant increases in the film thickness profile at high chamber pressure and low mass flow rate operation. At prescribed combinations of chamber pressure and mass flow rate, a jump was noted in the film thickness profile. This jump was assumed related to a vortex breakdown phenomenon. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber pressure at low mass flow rate operation as opposed to near-design mass flow rate operation. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber pressure worked to decrease the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. A new set of fundamental relations linking swirl injector design parameters to injector geometry and flow conditions were derived. Impacts of the research findings to the swirl injector design process were assessed.

  11. Gas velocity and temperature near a liquid rocket injector face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boylan, D. M.; Ohara, J.

    1973-01-01

    The gas flow near the injector of a liquid propellant rocket was investigated by rapidly inserting butt-welded platinum-platinum rhodium thermocouples through the injector into the chamber. The transient responses of the thermocouples were analyzed to determine average gas temperatures and velocities. A method of fitting exponential curves to repeated measurements of the transient temperature at several positions near the injector face produced consistent results. Preliminary tests yielded gas flow directions and gas compositions at the injector face. Average gas temperatures were found to be between 3100 (1700) and 3500 F (1950 C) and the average gas velocities between 550 (170) and 840 feet/second (260 m/sec).

  12. Precision timing calorimeter for high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Duarte, Javier; Peña, Cristián; Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Ronzhin, Anatoly

    2016-07-01

    Scintillator based calorimeter technology is studied with the aim to achieve particle detection with a time resolution on the order of a few 10 ps for photons and electrons at energies of a few GeV and above. We present results from a prototype of a 1.4×1.4×11.4 cm3 sampling calorimeter cell consisting of tungsten absorber plates and Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal scintillator plates. The LYSO plates are read out with wave lengths shifting fibers which are optically coupled to fast photo detectors on both ends of the fibers. The measurements with electrons were performed at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) and the CERN SPS H2 test beam. In addition to the baseline setup plastic scintillation counter and a MCP-PMT were used as trigger and as a reference for a time of flight measurement (TOF). We also present measurements with a fast laser to further characterize the response of the prototype and the photo sensors. All data were recorded using a DRS4 fast sampling digitizer. These measurements are part of an R&D program whose aim is to demonstrate the feasibility of building a large scale electromagnetic calorimeter with a time resolution on the order of 10 ps, to be used in high energy physics experiments.

  13. Preliminary conceptual design about the CEPC calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haijun

    2016-11-01

    The Circular Electron Positron Collider (CEPC) as a Higgs factory was proposed in September 2013. The preliminary conceptual design report was completed in 2015.1 The CEPC detector design was using International Linear Collider Detector — ILD2 as an initial baseline. The CEPC calorimeters, including the high granularity electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) and the hadron calorimeter (HCAL), are designed for precise energy measurements of electrons, photons, taus and hadronic jets. The basic resolution requirements for the ECAL and HCAL are about 16%E (GeV) and 50%E (GeV), respectively. To fully exploit the physics potential of the Higgs, W, Z and related Standard Model processes, the jet energy resolution is required to reach 3%-4%, or 30%/E (GeV) at energies below about 100 GeV. To achieve the required performance, a Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA) — oriented calorimetry system is being considered as the baseline design. The CEPC ECAL detector options include silicon-tungsten or scintillator-tungsten structures with analog readout, while the HCAL detector options have scintillator or gaseous detector as the active sensor and iron as the absorber. Some latest R&D studies about ECAL and HCAL within the CEPC working group is also presented.

  14. Fiber and crystals dual readout calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cascella, Michele; Franchino, Silvia; Lee, Sehwook

    2016-11-01

    The RD52 (DREAM) collaboration is performing R&D on dual readout calorimetry techniques with the aim of improving hadronic energy resolution for future high energy physics experiments. The simultaneous detection of Cherenkov and scintillation light enables us to measure the electromagnetic fraction of hadron shower event-by-event. As a result, we could eliminate the main fluctuation which prevented from achieving precision energy measurement for hadrons. We have tested the performance of the lead and copper fiber prototypes calorimeters with various energies of electromagnetic particles and hadrons. During the beam test, we investigated the energy resolutions for electrons and pions as well as the identification of those particles in a longitudinally unsegmented calorimeter. Measurements were also performed on pure and doped PbWO4 crystals, as well as BGO and BSO, with the aim of realizing a crystal based dual readout detector. We will describe our results, focusing on the more promising properties of homogeneous media for the technique. Guidelines for additional developments on crystals will be also given. Finally we discuss the construction techniques that we have used to assemble our prototypes and give an overview of the ones that could be industrialized for the construction of a full hermetic calorimeter.

  15. The Zeus calorimeter first level trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    The design of the Zeus Detector Calorimeter Level Trigger is presented. The Zeus detector is being built for operation at HERA, a new storage ring that will provide collisions between 820 GeV protons and 30 GeV electrons in 1990. The calorimeter is made of depleted uranium plates and plastic scintillator read out by wavelength shifter bars into 12,864 photomultiplier tubes. These signals are combined into 974 trigger towers with separate electromagnetic and hadronic sums. The calorimeter first level trigger is pipelined with a decision provided 5 {mu}sec after each beam crossing, occurring every 96 nsec. The trigger determines the total energy, the total transverse energy, the missing energy, and the energy and number of isolated electrons and muons. It also provides information on the number and energy of clusters. The trigger rate needs to be held to 1 kHz against a rate of proton-beam gas interactions of approximately 500 kHz. The summed trigger tower pulseheights are digitized by flash ADC`s. The digital values are linearized, stored and used for sums and pattern tests.

  16. Calibrating the Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolnik, Marianne

    2012-10-01

    The Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) is a subsystem of the PHENIX detector. The MPC, an electromagnetic calorimeter, is effective at measuring the energy of photons and electrons produced from collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The MPC outputs a voltage signal that we then convert into an energy reading. One common way to calibrate electromagnetic calorimeters is to use photons from π^0 decays. Since many of the photons that enter the detector are the result of natural pion decay, we can pair up the photons and create π^0 candidates. We then plot their masses tower by tower and with the correct cuts a mass peak will appear close to the position predicted by the simulation PISA of the PHENIX detector. Then, we relate the mass peaks from the measured data to mass peaks from simulated data to adjust the gains. Once the MPC is calibrated we can use it to study Au+Au collisions. Previously, the detector has been used to study spin physics using data collected from p+p collisions, and cold nuclear matter effects using d+Au collisions. These new calibrations will allow us to measure new global variables such as transverse energy in both the forward and backward kinematic regions, 3.1< |η| < 3.9.

  17. A hadron calorimeter with scintillators parallel to the beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, V.; Goncharov, P.; Gorin, A.; Gurzhiev, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Evdokimov, V.; Kolosov, V.; Korablev, A.; Korneev, Yu.; Kostritskii, A.; Krinitsyn, A.; Kryshkin, V.; Podstavkov, V.; Polyakov, V.; Shtannikov, A.; Tereschenko, S.; Turchanovich, L.; Zaichenko, A.

    1997-02-01

    A hadron calorimeter in which scintillators are arranged nearly parallel to the incident particle direction and light is collected by optical fibres with WLS, has been built. The iron absorber plates are of the tapered shape to fit a barrel structure of the collider geometry. The performance of the calorimeter studied with hadron beam is presented as a function of tilt angle without and with electromagnetic calorimeter in front of the hadron one.

  18. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  19. Test beam performance of the CDF plug upgrade hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    de Barbaro, P.; CDF Plug Upgrade Group

    1998-01-13

    We report on the performance of the CDF End Plug Hadron Calorimeter in a test beam. The sampling calorimeter is constructed using 2 inch iron absorber plates and scintillator planes with wavelength shifting fibers for readout. The linearity and energy resolution of the calorimeter response to pions, and the transverse uniformity of the response to muons and pions are presented. The parameter e/h, representing the ratio of the electromagnetic to hadronic response, is extracted from the data.

  20. Performance of CDF calorimeter simulation for Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect

    C. Currat

    2002-09-19

    The upgraded CDF II detector has collected first data during the initial operation of the Tevatron accelerator in Run II. The simulation of the CDF electromagnetic and hadronic central and upgraded plug (forward) calorimeter is based on the Gflash calorimeter parameterization package used within the GEANT based detector simulation of the Run II CDF detector. We present the results of tuning the central and plug calorimeter response to test beam data.

  1. A calorimeter for neutron flux measurement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1993-04-01

    A calorimeter for absolute neutron flux measurement has been built and tested. The calorimeter measures the heat produced in a 10{degrees}K thick LiPb target when neutrons are captured via the {sup 6}Li(n,{sup 3}H){sup 4}He reaction. The sensitivity achieved was 1.3x10{sup 6} n/s for a 1 hour measurement. Separate flux measurements with the calorimeter and a {sup 238}U fission chamber are in agreement and show that systematic errors are less than 3%. An improved calorimeter has been built which is sensitive to 10{sup 5} n/s for a 1 hour measurement.

  2. sPHENIX Calorimeter Design and Jet Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, John S.

    2016-12-01

    The PHENIX collaboration is planning a detector upgrade, sPHENIX, which consists of large acceptance calorimetry and tracking detectors built around the superconducting solenoid recently shipped to Brookhaven from the decommissioned BaBar experiment at SLAC. The sPHENIX calorimeter system includes three radial layers of sampling calorimeters, a tungsten-scintillating fiber electromagnetic calorimeter, and two longitudinally segmented sampling hadron calorimeters that are made of scintillator tiles and steel plates. Together, they provide hermetic coverage in | η | < 1 for calorimetry based jet measurements as well as minimal bias jet trigger capability, which coupled with high resolution tracking, enable an extremely rich jet physics program at RHIC.

  3. CFD Simulation of Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen; Garcia, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Detailed design issues associated with liquid rocket engine injectors and combustion chamber operation require CFD methodology which simulates highly three-dimensional, turbulent, vaporizing, and combusting flows. The primary utility of such simulations involves predicting multi-dimensional effects caused by specific injector configurations. SECA, Inc. and Engineering Sciences, Inc. have been developing appropriate computational methodology for NASA/MSFC for the past decade. CFD tools and computers have improved dramatically during this time period; however, the physical submodels used in these analyses must still remain relatively simple in order to produce useful results. Simulations of clustered coaxial and impinger injector elements for hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels, which account for real fluid properties, is the immediate goal of this research. The spray combustion codes are based on the FDNS CFD code' and are structured to represent homogeneous and heterogeneous spray combustion. The homogeneous spray model treats the flow as a continuum of multi-phase, multicomponent fluids which move without thermal or velocity lags between the phases. Two heterogeneous models were developed: (1) a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model which represents the liquid core of coaxial or impinger jets and their atomization and vaporization, and (2) a Blob model which represents the injected streams as a cloud of droplets the size of the injector orifice which subsequently exhibit particle interaction, vaporization, and combustion. All of these spray models are computationally intensive, but this is unavoidable to accurately account for the complex physics and combustion which is to be predicted, Work is currently in progress to parallelize these codes to improve their computational efficiency. These spray combustion codes were used to simulate the three test cases which are the subject of the 2nd International Workshop on-Rocket Combustion Modeling. Such test cases are considered by

  4. Main Chamber and Preburner Injector Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1999-01-01

    This document reports the experimental and analytical research carried out at the Penn State Propulsion Engineering Research Center in support of NASA's plan to develop advanced technologies for future single stage to orbit (SSTO) propulsion systems. The focus of the work is on understanding specific technical issues related to bi-propellant and tri-propellant thrusters. The experiments concentrate on both cold flow demonstrations and hot-fire uni-element tests to demonstrate concepts that can be incorporated into hardware design and development. The analysis is CFD-based and is intended to support the design and interpretation of the experiments and to extrapolate findings to full-scale designs. The research is divided into five main categories that impact various SSTO development scenarios. The first category focuses on RP-1/gaseous hydrogen (GH2)/gaseous oxygen (GO2) tri-propellant combustion with specific emphasis on understanding the benefits of hydrogen addition to RP-1/oxygen combustion and in developing innovative injector technology. The second category investigates liquid oxygen (LOX)/GH2 combustion at main chamber near stoichiometric conditions to improve understanding of existing LOX/GH2 rocket systems. The third and fourth categories investigate the technical issues related with oxidizer-rich and fuel-rich propulsive concepts, issues that are necessary for developing the full-flow engine cycle. Here, injector technology issues for both LOX/GH2 and LOX/RP-1 propellants are examined. The last category, also related to the full-flow engine cycle, examines injector technology needs for GO2/GH2 propellant combustion at near-stoichiometric conditions for main chamber application.

  5. High-brightness injectors for hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    The counterrotating beams in collider rings consist of trains of beam bunches with N{sub B} particles per bunch, spaced a distance S{sub B} apart. When the bunches collide, the interaction rate is determined by the luminosity, which is defined as the interaction rate per unit cross section. For head-on collisions between cylindrical Gaussian beams moving at speed {beta}c, the luminosity is given by L = N{sub B}{sup 2}{beta}c/4{pi}{sigma}{sup 2}S{sub B}, where {sigma} is the rms beam size projected onto a transverse plane (the two transverse planes are assumed identical) at the interaction point. This beam size depends on the rms emittance of the beam and the focusing strength, which is a measure of the 2-D phase-space area in each transverse plane, and is defined in terms of the second moments of the beam distribution. Our convention is to use the rms normalized emittance, without factors of 4 or 6 that are sometimes used. The quantity {tilde {beta}} is the Courant-Synder betatron amplitude function at the interaction point, a characteristic of the focusing lattice and {gamma} is the relativistic Lorentz factor. Achieving high luminosity at a given energy, and at practical values of {tilde {beta}} and S{sub B}, requires a large value for the ratio N{sub B}{sup 2}/{var epsilon}{sub n}, which implies high intensity and small emittance. Thus, specification of the luminosity sets the requirements for beam intensity and emittance, and establishes the requirements on the performance of the injector to the collider ring. In general, for fixed N{sub B}, the luminosity can be increased if {var epsilon}{sub n} can be reduced. The minimum emittance of the collider is limited by the performance of the injector; consequently the design of the injector is of great importance for the ultimate performance of the collider.

  6. Charge injectors of ALICE Silicon Drift Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashevsky, A.; Batigne, G.; Beole, S.; Coli, S.; Crescio, E.; Deremigis, P.; Giraudo, G.; Mazza, G.; Prino, F.; Riccati, L.; Rivetti, A.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Vacchi, A.; Wheadon, R.; Zampa, G.

    2007-03-01

    Large area, 7.25×8.76 cm2, Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) has been developed for the ALICE experiment at CERN [A. Vacchi, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 306 (1991) 187; A. Rashevsky, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 461 (2001) 133-138; A. Rashevsky, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 485 (2002) 54; P. Burger, C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, A. Roncastri, A. Vacchi, INFN/TC-02/07; C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, INFN/TC-02/08; C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, D. Nouais, INFN/TC-00/04. C. Piemonte, A. Rashevsky, A. Vacchi, ALICE-INT-2002-15, 2002; Inner Tracking System, CERN/LHCC, June 1999]. SDDs form two out of six cylindrical layers of the ALICE inner tracking system. The 260 high-quality SDDs needed to equip these two layers have been selected. One of the detector design elements devoted to allow controlled operating conditions is the on-board arrays of point-like charge injectors [D. Nouais, et al., CERN-ALICE-PUB-99-31; V. Bonvicini, et al., Il Nuovo Cimento 112AN (1-2) (1999) 137-146]. In the case of an SDD they are essential to trace, with the required frequency and precision, the changes in drift velocity induced by temperature variations. In order to ensure operating stability during the 10 years of the ALICE experiment the bias scheme of the charge injectors exploits the electrical properties not only of a detector itself, but also those of the cables mounted onto it, thus constituting a module. Computer simulations of the equivalent circuit revealed a significant improvement of the injection efficiency. Subsequent experimental tests of the first assembled modules confirmed the predicted performances. We report the layout of the charge injectors integrated in the ALICE SDD, as well as test results.

  7. Fuel-injector/air-swirl characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, J. B.; Kennedy, J. B.; Russell, S.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental data on the characteristics of the spray produced by a gas-turbine engine airblast fuel injector are reported. The data acquired include the mass-flux distribution measured by use of a high-resolution spray patternator; the gas-phase velocity field measured by use of a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter, and the liquid droplet size and velocity distributions measured by use of a single-component phase-Doppler anemometer. The data are intended for use in assessments of two-phase flow computational methods as applied to combustor design procedures.

  8. Transition crossing in the main injector

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes the study of various longitudinal problems pertaining to the transition-energy crossing in the proposed Fermi Lab Main Injector. The theory indicates that the beam loss and bunch-area growth are mainly caused by the chromatic non-linear effect, which is enhanced by the space-charge force near transition. Computer simulation using the program TIBETAN shows that a {gamma}{sub T} jump'' of about 1.5 unit within 1 ms is adequate to achieve a clean'' crossing in the currently proposed h{equals}588 scenario. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  9. An induction linac injector for scaled experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Faltens, A.; Pike, C.; Brodzik, D.; Johnson, R.M.; Vanecek, D. ); Hewett, D.W. )

    1991-04-01

    An injector is being developed at LBL that would serve as the front end of a scaled induction linac accelerator technology experiment for heavy ion fusion. The ion mass being used is in the range 10--18. It is a multi-beam device intended to accelerate up to 2 MeV with 500 mA in each beam. The first half of the accelerating column has been built and experiments with one carbon beam are underway at the 1 MeV level. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Kaon physics at Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Y.

    1992-03-01

    For high precision and high sensitivity studies of the physics of kaon physics of kaon decays, the important characteristics of the new Main Injector at Fermilab are its high energy (relative to other factories'') and its high intensity. Experiments of this kind are becoming increasingly important in the study of CP violation and for searches for new interactions. An extracted beam of 120 GeV will produce a source of high energy kaons (10--50 GeV) that will not be surpassed in intensity by any facility new under consideration world-wide.

  11. Kaon physics at Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Y.

    1992-03-01

    For high precision and high sensitivity studies of the physics of kaon physics of kaon decays, the important characteristics of the new Main Injector at Fermilab are its high energy (relative to other ``factories``) and its high intensity. Experiments of this kind are becoming increasingly important in the study of CP violation and for searches for new interactions. An extracted beam of 120 GeV will produce a source of high energy kaons (10--50 GeV) that will not be surpassed in intensity by any facility new under consideration world-wide.

  12. Component of astronauts survival equipment backpack - medical injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The automatic medical injectors were carried on the Mercury-Atlas 9 flight. The injectors provide the astronaut with injection tubes of Tigan, for preventing motion sickness and Demerol, for relieving pain. The tubes encased in the block are stowed in the astronauts survival kit. The single injection tubes are placed in a pocket of the astronauts space suit.

  13. Designing Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors for Performance, Stability, and Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; West, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing the Space Launch System (SLS) for crewed exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is designing rocket engines for the SLS Advanced Booster (AB) concepts being developed to replace the Shuttle-derived solid rocket boosters. One AB concept uses large, Rocket-Propellant (RP)-fueled engines that pose significant design challenges. The injectors for these engines require high performance and stable operation while still meeting aggressive cost reduction goals for access to space. Historically, combustion stability problems have been a critical issue for such injector designs. Traditional, empirical injector design tools and methodologies, however, lack the ability to reliably predict complex injector dynamics that often lead to combustion stability. Reliance on these tools alone would likely result in an unaffordable test-fail-fix cycle for injector development. Recently at MSFC, a massively parallel computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program was successfully applied in the SLS AB injector design process. High-fidelity reacting flow simulations were conducted for both single-element and seven-element representations of the full-scale injector. Data from the CFD simulations was then used to significantly augment and improve the empirical design tools, resulting in a high-performance, stable injector design.

  14. Transverse Injection into Subsonic Crossflow with Various Injector Orifice Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Lancert E.; Zaman, Khairul B.

    2010-01-01

    Computational and experimental results are presented for a case study of single injectors employed in 90 deg transverse injection into a non-reacting subsonic flow. Different injector orifice shapes are used (including circular, square, diamond-shaped, and wide rectangular slot), all with constant cross-sectional area, to observe the effects of this variation on injector penetration and mixing. Whereas the circle, square, and diamond injector produce similar jet plumes, the wide rectangular slot produces a plume with less vertical penetration than the others. There is also some evidence that the diamond injector produces slightly faster penetration with less mixing of the injected fluid. In addition, a variety of rectangular injectors were analyzed, with varying length/width ratios. Both experimental and computational data show improved plume penetration with increased streamwise orifice length. 3-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) results are obtained for the various injector geometries using NCC (National Combustion Code) with the kappa-epsilon turbulence model in multi-species modes on an unstructured grid. Grid sensitivity results are also presented which indicate consistent qualitative trends in the injector performance comparisons with increasing grid refinement.

  15. NOx Emissions from a Lobed Fuel Injector/Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. G.; Smith, L. L.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.

    1996-01-01

    The present experimental study examines the performance of a novel fuel injector/burner configuration with respect to reduction in nitrogen oxide NOx emissions. The lobed injector/burner is a device in which very rapid initial mixing of reactants can occur through strong streamwise vorticity generation, producing high fluid mechanical strain rates which can delay ignition and thus prevent the formation of stoichiometric diffusion flames. Further downstream of the rapid mixing region. this flowfield produces a reduced effective strain rate, thus allowing ignition to occur in a premixed mode, where it is possible for combustion to take place under locally lean conditions. potentially reducing NOx emissions from the burner. The present experiments compare NO/NO2/NOx emissions from a lobed fuel injector configuration with emissions from a straight fuel injector to determine the net effect of streamwise vorticity generation. Preliminary results show that the lobed injector geometry can produce lean premixed flame structures. while for comparable flow conditions, a straight fuel injector geometry produces much longer. sooting diffusion flames or slightly rich pre-mixed flames. NO measurements show that emissions from a lobed fuel injector/burner can be made significantly lower than from a straight fuel injector under comparable flow conditions.

  16. Micro injector sample delivery system for charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    1999-11-09

    A micro injector sample delivery system for charged molecules. The injector is used for collecting and delivering controlled amounts of charged molecule samples for subsequent analysis. The injector delivery system can be scaled to large numbers (>96) for sample delivery to massively parallel high throughput analysis systems. The essence of the injector system is an electric field controllable loading tip including a section of porous material. By applying the appropriate polarity bias potential to the injector tip, charged molecules will migrate into porous material, and by reversing the polarity bias potential the molecules are ejected or forced away from the tip. The invention has application for uptake of charged biological molecules (e.g. proteins, nucleic acids, polymers, etc.) for delivery to analytical systems, and can be used in automated sample delivery systems.

  17. Injector design guidelines for gas/liquid propellant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falk, A. Y.; Burick, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Injector design guidelines are provided for gas/liquid propellant systems. Information was obtained from a 30-month applied research program encompassing an analytical, design, and experimental effort to relate injector design parameters to simultaneous attainment of high performance and component (injector/thrust chamber) compatibility for gas/liquid space storable propellants. The gas/liquid propellant combination studied was FLOX (82.6% F2)/ ambient temperature gaseous methane. Design criteria that provide for simultaneous attainment of high performance and chamber compatibility are presented for both injector types. Parametric data are presented that are applicable for the design of circular coaxial and like-doublet injectors that operate with design parameters similar to those employed. However, caution should be exercised when applying these data to propellant combinations whose elements operate in ranges considerably different from those employed in this study.

  18. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Rocket Engine Calorimeter Heat Transfer Measurements and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    1997-01-01

    A set of analyses was conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of metallized gelled liquid propellants in a rocket engine. The analyses used the data from experiments conducted with a small 30- to 40-lbf thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-wt %, 5-wt%, and 55-wt% loadings of aluminum with silicon dioxide gellant, and gaseous oxygen as the oxidizer. Heat transfer was computed based on measurements using calorimeter rocket chamber and nozzle hardware with a total of 31 cooling channels. A gelled fuel coating formed in the 0-, 5- and 55-wt% engines, and the coating was composed of unburned gelled fuel and partially combusted RP-1. The coating caused a large decrease in calorimeter engine heat flux in the last half of the chamber for the 0- and 5-wt% RP-1/Al. This heat flux reduction effect was analyzed by comparing engine runs and the changes in the heat flux during a run as well as from run to run. Heat transfer and time-dependent heat flux analyses and interpretations are provided. The 5- and 55-wt% RP-1/Al fueled engines had the highest chamber heat fluxes, with the 5-wt% fuel having the highest throat flux. This result is counter to the predicted result, where the 55 wt% fuel has the highest combustion and throat temperature, and therefore implies that it would deliver the highest throat heat flux. The 5-wt% RP-1/Al produced the most influence on the engine heat transfer and the heat flux reduction was caused by the formation of a gelled propellant layer in the chamber and nozzle.

  19. Hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics of subscale, plug-nozzle rocket calorimeter chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.; Roncace, Elizabeth A.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics for a liquid-hydrogen-cooled, subscale, plug-nozzle rocket test apparatus. This apparatus has been used since 1975 to evaluate rocket engine advanced cooling concepts and fabrication techniques, to screen candidate combustion chamber liner materials, and to provide data for model development. In order to obtain the data, a water-cooled calorimeter chamber having the same geometric configuration as the plug-nozzle test apparatus was tested. It also used the same two showerhead injector types that were used on the test apparatus: one having a Rigimesh faceplate and the other having a platelet faceplate. The tests were conducted using liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen as the propellants over a mixture ratio range of 5.8 to 6.3 at a nominal chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia). The two injectors showed similar performance characteristics with the Rigimesh faceplate having a slightly higher average characteristic-exhaust-velocity efficiency of 96 percent versus 94.4 percent for the platelet faceplate. The throat heat flux was 54 MW/m(sup 2) (33 Btu/in.(sup 2)-sec) at the nominal operating condition, which was a chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia), a hot-gas-side wall temperature of 730 K (1314 R), and a mixture ratio of 6.0. The chamber throat region correlation coefficient C(sub g) for a Nusselt number correlation of the form Nu =C(sub g)Re(sup 0.8)Pr(sup 0.3) averaged 0.023 for the Rigimesh faceplate and 0.026 for the platelet faceplate.

  20. Hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics of subscale, plug-nozzle rocket calorimeter chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.; Roncace, Elizabeth A.

    1993-07-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the hot-gas-side heat transfer characteristics for a liquid-hydrogen-cooled, subscale, plug-nozzle rocket test apparatus. This apparatus has been used since 1975 to evaluate rocket engine advanced cooling concepts and fabrication techniques, to screen candidate combustion chamber liner materials, and to provide data for model development. In order to obtain the data, a water-cooled calorimeter chamber having the same geometric configuration as the plug-nozzle test apparatus was tested. It also used the same two showerhead injector types that were used on the test apparatus: one having a Rigimesh faceplate and the other having a platelet faceplate. The tests were conducted using liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen as the propellants over a mixture ratio range of 5.8 to 6.3 at a nominal chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia). The two injectors showed similar performance characteristics with the Rigimesh faceplate having a slightly higher average characteristic-exhaust-velocity efficiency of 96 percent versus 94.4 percent for the platelet faceplate. The throat heat flux was 54 MW/m(sup 2) (33 Btu/in.(sup 2)-sec) at the nominal operating condition, which was a chamber pressure of 4.14 MPa abs (600 psia), a hot-gas-side wall temperature of 730 K (1314 R), and a mixture ratio of 6.0. The chamber throat region correlation coefficient C(sub g) for a Nusselt number correlation of the form Nu =C(sub g)Re(sup 0.8)Pr(sup 0.3) averaged 0.023 for the Rigimesh faceplate and 0.026 for the platelet faceplate.

  1. T-1018 UCLA Spacordion Tungsten Powder Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Trentalange, Stephen; Tsai, Oleg; Igo, George; Huang, Huan; Pan, Yu Xi; Dunkelberger, Jay; Xu, Wen Qin; Soha, Aria; Heppelmann, Steven; Gagliardi, Carl; /Texas A-M

    2011-11-16

    The present experiments at the BNL-RHIC facility are evolving towards physics goals which require the detection of medium energy electromagnetic particles (photons, electrons, neutral pions, eta mesons, etc.), especially at forward angles. New detectors will place increasing demands on energy resolution, hadron rejection and two-photon resolution and will require large area, high performance electromagnetic calorimeters in a variety of geometries. In the immediate future, either RHIC or JLAB will propose a facility upgrade (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with physics goals such as electron-heavy ion collisions (or p-A collisions) with a wide range of calorimeter requirements. An R and D program based at Brookhaven National Laboratory has awarded the group funding of approximately $110,000 to develop new types of calorimeters for EIC experiments. The UCLA group is developing a method to manufacture very flexible and cost-effective, yet high quality calorimeters based on scintillating fibers and tungsten powder. The design and features of the calorimeter can be briefly stated as follows: an arbitrarily large number of small diameter fibers (< 0.5 mm) are assembled as a matrix and held rigidly in place by a set of precision screens inside an empty container. The container is then back-filled with tungsten powder, compacted on a vibrating table and infused with epoxy under vacuum. The container is then removed. The resulting sub-modules are extremely uniform and achieve roughly the density of pure Lead. The sub-modules are stacked together to achieve a final detector of the desired shape. There is no dead space between sub-modules and the fibers can be in an accordion geometry bent to prevent 'channeling' of the particles due to accidental alignment of their track with the module axis. This technology has the advantage of being modular and inexpensive to the point where the construction work may be divided among groups the size of typical university physics departments

  2. Target Injector and Sabot Remover for IFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroki; Kameyama, Nobukazu

    2012-10-01

    Target injectors for IFE are required to inject targets to the reactor center at a velocity of over 100 m/s with accuracy of several millimeters. A target injector system with a magnetic sabot remover is developed to demonstrate injection of polystyrene targets. A typical target used in this study is 4.0 mm in diameter and 0.8 mg in weight. It is inserted in to an aluminum sabot that is 9.2 mm in outer diameter and 40 mm in length. They are accelerated together by a pneumatic gun. Before injection into the reactor, the sabot is removed for laser irradiation. The sabot remover is composed of Neodymium magnets array that generates Lorentz force as a result of interaction between the magnets' field and induced current on the sabot. The Neodymium magnets are 14 mm at inner diameter and 316 mT on its surface. The magnetic array is designed and optimized its magnets number for complete target extraction. The theoretically and experimentally confirmed deceleration rate of the sabot is 60.2 m/s/s per one meter. The targets are shot into the vacuum chamber after extraction from the sabot at accelerated velocity of 30 m/s. The experimentally obtained injection accuracy is 5.3 mm in horizontal direction and 4.8 mm in vertical direction.

  3. Supersonic gas injector for plasma fueling

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Kugel, H W; Kaita, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M; Blanchard, W; Bush, C; Gernhardt, R; Gettelfinger, G; Gray, T; Majeski, R; Menard, J; Provost, T; Sichta, P; Raman, R

    2005-09-30

    A supersonic gas injector (SGI) has been developed for fueling and diagnostic applications on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). It is comprised of a graphite converging-diverging Laval nozzle and a commercial piezoelectric gas valve mounted on a movable probe at a low field side midplane port location. Also mounted on the probe is a diagnostic package: a Langmuir probe, two thermocouples and five pickup coils for measuring toroidal, radial, vertical magnetic field components and magnetic fluctuations at the location of the SGI tip. The SGI flow rate is up to 4 x 10{sup 21} particles/s, comparable to conventional NSTX gas injectors. The nozzle operates in a pulsed regime at room temperature and a reservoir gas pressure up to 0.33 MPa. The deuterium jet Mach number of about 4, and the divergence half-angle of 5{sup o}-25{sup o} have been measured in laboratory experiments simulating NSTX environment. In initial NSTX experiments reliable operation of the SGI and all mounted diagnostics at distances 1-20 cm from the plasma separatrix has been demonstrated. The SGI has been used for fueling of ohmic and 2-4 MW NBI heated L- and H-mode plasmas. Fueling efficiency in the range 0.1-0.3 has been obtained from the plasma electron inventory analysis.

  4. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  5. Proportional wire calorimeter for magnet pole tips

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D; Ludlam, T; Renardy, J; Willis, W; Zurfluh, E

    1980-01-01

    A total absorption calorimeter is designed to have magnetic properties comparable to those of ordinary steel, and thus can be incorporated into the poles of a spectrometer magnet without compromising the field quality. A test device has been built which consists of an iron structure penetrated by a finegrain pattern of holes, each acting as a proportional tube such that 90% of the volume is occupied by iron. Measurements of the energy and space resolution of this device in a high energy beam will be presented.

  6. The simulation of the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossutti, F.

    2008-07-01

    The CMS Collaboration has developed a detailed simulation of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), which has been fully integrated in the collaboration software framework CMSSW. The simulation is based on the Geant4 detector simulation toolkit for the modelling of the passage of particles through matter and magnetic field. The geometrical description of the detector is being re-implemented using the DetectorDescription language, combining an XML based description with the algorithmic definition of the position of the elements. The ECAL simulation software is fully operational and has been validated using real data from the ECAL test beam experiment that took place in summer 2006.

  7. Calorimeter measurements of low wattage items

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, T.L.; Camp, K.L.; Hildner, S.S.; Sedlacek, W.A.

    1993-08-01

    The transition of DOE facilities from production to decontamination and decommissioning has led to more measurements of waste, scrap, and other less attractive materials. The difficulty that these materials pose for segmented gamma scanning and neutron counting has increased the use of calorimetric assay for very low wattage items (< 250 millwatts). We have measured well characterized {sup 238}Pu oxide ranging in wattage from 25 to 500 milliwatts in the calorimeters at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility and report the error and the precision of the measurements.

  8. Isothermal drop calorimeter provides measurements for alpha active, pyrophoric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, H.

    1969-01-01

    Isothermal drop calorimeter measures the heat content of intensely alpha active and pyrophoric materials in inert atmospheres. It consists of a furnace, calorimeter, and aluminum isothermal jacket contained within an inert-atmosphere glove box, which permits the use of unencapsulated materials without exposing personnel to alpha contamination.

  9. Ac loss calorimeter for three-phase cable

    SciTech Connect

    Daney, D.E.; Boenig, H.J.; Maley, M.P.; McMurry, D.E.; DeBlanc, B.G.

    1996-10-01

    A calorimeter for measuring ac losses in meter-long lengths of HTS superconducting power transmission line cables is described. The calorimeter, which is based on a temperature difference technique, has a precision of 1 mW and measures single, two-phase (coupling), and three-phase losses. The measurements show significant coupling losses between phases.

  10. Physics design of the injector source for ITER neutral beam injector (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, V.; Agostinetti, P.; Aprile, D.; Chitarin, G.; Fonnesu, N.; Marconato, N.; Pilan, N.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G. Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-02-15

    Two Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are foreseen to provide a substantial fraction of the heating power necessary to ignite thermonuclear fusion reactions in ITER. The development of the NBI system at unprecedented parameters (40 A of negative ion current accelerated up to 1 MV) requires the realization of a full scale prototype, to be tested and optimized at the Test Facility under construction in Padova (Italy). The beam source is the key component of the system and the design of the multi-grid accelerator is the goal of a multi-national collaborative effort. In particular, beam steering is a challenging aspect, being a tradeoff between requirements of the optics and real grids with finite thickness and thermo-mechanical constraints due to the cooling needs and the presence of permanent magnets. In the paper, a review of the accelerator physics and an overview of the whole R and D physics program aimed to the development of the injector source are presented.

  11. Physics design of the injector source for ITER neutral beam injector (invited).

    PubMed

    Antoni, V; Agostinetti, P; Aprile, D; Cavenago, M; Chitarin, G; Fonnesu, N; Marconato, N; Pilan, N; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Veltri, P

    2014-02-01

    Two Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI) are foreseen to provide a substantial fraction of the heating power necessary to ignite thermonuclear fusion reactions in ITER. The development of the NBI system at unprecedented parameters (40 A of negative ion current accelerated up to 1 MV) requires the realization of a full scale prototype, to be tested and optimized at the Test Facility under construction in Padova (Italy). The beam source is the key component of the system and the design of the multi-grid accelerator is the goal of a multi-national collaborative effort. In particular, beam steering is a challenging aspect, being a tradeoff between requirements of the optics and real grids with finite thickness and thermo-mechanical constraints due to the cooling needs and the presence of permanent magnets. In the paper, a review of the accelerator physics and an overview of the whole R&D physics program aimed to the development of the injector source are presented.

  12. A merged quadrupole-calorimeter for CEPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talman, Richard; Hauptman, John

    2016-11-01

    The luminosity ℒ of colliding beams in a storage ring such as CEPC depends strongly on l∗, the half-length of the free space centered on the intersection point (IP). l∗ is also the length from the IP to the front edges of the two near-in quadrupoles that are focusing the counter-circulating beams to the IP spot. The detector length cannot, therefore, exceed 2l∗. Since ℒ increases strongly with decreasing l∗, there is incentive for reducing l∗; but this requires the detector to be shorter than desirable. This paper proposes a method for integrating these adjacent quadrupoles into the particle detector to retain (admittedly degraded) active particle detection of those forward going particles that would otherwise be obscured by the quadrupole. A gently conical quadrupole shape is more natural for merging the quadrupole into the particle detector than is the analytically exact cylindrical shape. This is true whether or not the calorimeter is integrated. It will be the task of accelerator physicists to determine the extent to which deviation from the pure quadrupole field compromises (or improves) accelerator performance. Superficially, both the presence of strongest gradient close to the IP and largest aperture farther from the IP seem to be advantageous. A tentative design for this merged, quadrupole-calorimeter is given.

  13. Electronic controlled fuel supply system for high pressure injector

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, L.L.; Perr, J.P.; Smith, E.D.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes an electronically controlled fuel supply system for supplying fuel and timing fluid to a plurality of fuel injectors in an internal combustion engine, wherein each of the injectors includes a hydraulic link formed by the timing fluid which cooperates with a serially arranged plunger assembly to pressurize the fuel to be injected wherein the hydraulic link may have a variable effective length in response to variations in pressure of the timing fluid supplied to the the injector, the fuel supply system. It includes pump means fluidically connected to a fuel reservoir for pumping fuel from the reservoir to fuel channel means for supplying fuel to the injections and to timing means for supplying timing fluid to the injectors at a sufficient flow rate and pressure to operate the system; valve means fluidically interposed between the pump means and the fuel channel means and the timing fluid channel means for regulating the fuel supply to the fuel channel means and to the timing fluid channel means; electronically controlled fuel pressure regulating means fluidically connected to the pump means and to the injectors for regulating the pressure of the fuel to be supplied through the fuel channel means to the injectors for controlling the quantity of fuel to be injected by the injector.

  14. Injector for scattering measurements on fully solvated biospecies.

    PubMed

    Weierstall, U; Spence, J C H; Doak, R B

    2012-03-01

    We describe a liquid jet injector system developed to deliver fully solvated microscopic target species into a probe beam under either vacuum or ambient conditions. The injector was designed specifically for x-ray scattering studies of biological nanospecies using x-ray free electron lasers and third generation synchrotrons, but is of interest to any application in which microscopic samples must be delivered in a fully solvated state and with microscopic precision. By utilizing a gas dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) to generate a sample-containing liquid jet of diameter ranging from 300 nm to 20 μm, the injector avoids the clogging problems associated in this size range with conventional Rayleigh jets. A differential pumping system incorporated into the injector shields the experimental chamber from the gas load of the GDVN, making the injector compatible with high vacuum systems. The injector houses a fiber-optically coupled pump laser to illuminate the jet for pump-probe experiments and a hermetically sealed microscope to observe the liquid jet for diagnostics and alignment during operation. This injector system has now been used during several experimental runs at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Recent refinements in GDVN design are also presented.

  15. Injector for scattering measurements on fully solvated biospecies

    SciTech Connect

    Weierstall, U.; Spence, J. C. H.; Doak, R. B.

    2012-03-15

    We describe a liquid jet injector system developed to deliver fully solvated microscopic target species into a probe beam under either vacuum or ambient conditions. The injector was designed specifically for x-ray scattering studies of biological nanospecies using x-ray free electron lasers and third generation synchrotrons, but is of interest to any application in which microscopic samples must be delivered in a fully solvated state and with microscopic precision. By utilizing a gas dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) to generate a sample-containing liquid jet of diameter ranging from 300 nm to 20 {mu}m, the injector avoids the clogging problems associated in this size range with conventional Rayleigh jets. A differential pumping system incorporated into the injector shields the experimental chamber from the gas load of the GDVN, making the injector compatible with high vacuum systems. The injector houses a fiber-optically coupled pump laser to illuminate the jet for pump-probe experiments and a hermetically sealed microscope to observe the liquid jet for diagnostics and alignment during operation. This injector system has now been used during several experimental runs at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Recent refinements in GDVN design are also presented.

  16. Coaxial injector spray characterization using water/air as simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle M.; Klem, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is required to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability of liquid propellant rocket engines. An experimental program is being conducted at NASA-Lewis to measure the drop size and velocity distributions in shear coaxial injector sprays. A phase/Doppler interferometer is used to obtain drop size data in water air shear coaxial injector sprays. Droplet sizes and axial component of droplet velocities are measured at different radii for various combinations of water flow rate, air flow rate, injector liquid jet diameter, injector annular gap, and liquid post recess. Sauter mean diameters measured in the spray center 51 mm downstream of the liquid post tip range from 28 to 68 microns, and mean axial drop velocities at the same location range from 37 to 120 m/s. The shear coaxial injector sprays show a high degree of symmetry; the mean drop size and velocity profiles vary with liquid flow rate, post recess, and distance from the injector face. The drop size data can be used to estimate liquid oxygen/hydrogen spray drop sizes by correcting property differences between water-air and liquid oxygen/hydrogen.

  17. Single element injector cold flow testing for STME swirl coaxial injector element design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J.; Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    An oxidizer-swirled coaxial element injector is being investigated for application in the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME). Single element cold flow experiments were conducted to provide characterization of the STME injector element for future analysis, design, and optimization. All tests were conducted to quiescent, ambient backpressure conditions. Spray angle, circumferential spray uniformity, dropsize, and dropsize distribution were measured in water-only and water/nitrogen flows. Rupe mixing efficiency was measured using water/sucrose solution flows with a large grid patternator for simple comparative evaluation of mixing. Factorial designs of experiment were used for statistical evaluation of injector geometrical design features and propellant flow conditions on mixing and atomization. Increasing the free swirl angle of the liquid oxidizer had the greatest influence on increasing the mixing efficiency. The addition of gas assistance had the most significant effect on reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing droplet size distribution. Increasing the oxidizer injection velocity had the greatest influence for reducing oxidizer droplet size parameters and increasing size distribution for non-gas assisted flows. Single element and multi-element subscale hot fire testing are recommended to verify optimized designs before committing to the STME design.

  18. Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, James

    1997-03-01

    Panelists: Arthur Bienenstock, Stanford University Cherry Ann Murray, Lucent Technologies Venkatesh Narayanamurti, University of California-Santa Barbara Paul Peercy, SEMI-SEMATECH Robert Richardson, Cornell University James Roberto, Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Board on Physics and Astronomy is undertaking a series of reassessments of all branches of physics as the foundation of a new physics survey. As part of this project, a Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics has been established under the leadership of Venkatesh Narayanamurti of the University of California-Santa Barbara. The committee has been working since June on a study that will include an illustrative recounting of major recent achievements; identification of new opportunities and challenges facing the field; and articulation-for leaders in government, industry, universities, and the public at large-of the important roles played by the field in modern society. An especially urgent issue is how to maintain the intellectual vitality of condensed matter and materials physics, and its contributions to the well-being of the United States, in an era of limited resources. The forum will feature a panel of materials researchers who are members of the Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics. They will give a brief report on the status of the study and engage in a dialogue with the audience about issues facing the condensed matter and materials physics community. Broad community input is vital to the success of the study. Please come and make your voice heard!

  19. String cavitation formation inside fuel injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, B. A.; Gavaises, M.; Mitroglou, N.; Hargrave, G. K.; Garner, C. P.; McDavid, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of vortex or ‘string’ cavitation has been visualised at pressures up to 2000 bar in an automotive-sized optical diesel fuel injector nozzle. The multi-hole nozzle geometry studied allowed observation of the hole-to-hole vortex interaction and, in particular, that of a bridging vortex in the sac region between the holes. Above a threshold Reynolds number, their formation and appearance during a 2 ms injection event was repeatable and independent of upstream pressure and cavitation number. In addition, two different hole layouts and threedimensional flow simulations have been employed to describe how, the relative positions of adjacent holes influenced the formation and hole-to-hole interaction of the observed string cavitation vortices, with good agreement between the experimental and simulation results being achieved.

  20. Commissioning Results of the LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Akre, R.; Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Schmerge, J.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Frohlich, L.; Limberg, T.; Prat, E.; /DESY

    2007-11-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE xray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC. The injector section, from drive-laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam has recently been completed. The second phase of construction, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008. In this paper, we report experimental results and experience gained during the first phase of machine commissioning. This includes the cathode, drive laser, RF photocathode gun, linac booster section, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  1. Initial Commissioning Experience With the LCLS Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Akre, R.; Castro, J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.H.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, A.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Rivetta, C.; Saleski, M.; Schmerge, J.F.; Schultz, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; /SLAC /DESY

    2007-11-02

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE xray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) project presently under construction at SLAC [1]. The injector section, from drive-laser and RF photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in fall 2006. Initial system commissioning with an electron beam is taking place during the spring and summer of 2007. The second phase of construction, including second bunch compressor and full linac, will begin later, in the fall of 2007. We report here on experience gained during the first phase of machine commissioning, including RF photocathode gun, linac booster section, S-band and X-band RF systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  2. 3 GeV Injector Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-12-16

    This Design Handbook is intended to be the main reference book for the specifications of the 3 GeV SPEAR booster synchrotron project. It is intended to be a consistent description of the project including design criteria, key technical specifications as well as current design approaches. Since a project is not complete till it's complete changes and modifications of early conceptual designs must be expected during the duration of the construction. Therefore, this Design Handbook is issued as a loose leaf binder so that individual sections can be replaced as needed. Each page will be dated to ease identification with respect to latest revisions. At the end of the project this Design Handbook will have become the 'as built' reference book of the injector for operations and maintenance personnel.

  3. Siberian snakes for the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Anferov, V.A.; Baiod, R.; Courant, E.D.

    1993-04-01

    Appropriate Siberian snakes were designed to maintain the proton beam polarization during acceleration in the Fermilab Main Injector from 8 to 150 GeV. Various snake designs were investigated to find one fitting into the 14 m straight section spaces with the required spin rotation axis and the minimum orbit excursion. The authors studied both cold and warm discrete magnet snakes as well as warm snakes with helical magnets. For the warm discrete magnet snake, obtaining small orbit excursions required a nearly longitudinal snake axis, while axes near {+-}45{degrees} are needed when using two snakes in a ring. The authors found acceptable snakes either by using superconducting magnets or by using warm magnets with a helical dipole field.

  4. Attempts to prevent injector coking with sunflower oil by engine modifications and fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    van der Walt, A.N.; Hugo, F.J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of injector tip temperature on coking propencity when sunflower oil is used as a fuel for direct injection engines, was tested. Partial retraction of the injector, the addition of a heat shield to the injector and cooling the injector with water was tried. Also, injector temperature was increased by reducing heat transferred to the cylinder head and preheating the sunflower oil. None of these measures could prevent coking of the injector tip. Coating the injector tip with Teflon and increasing the back leakage rate was also tried without success. Only a few of many additives tested, showed some promise of being able to prevent coking. 5 figures, 1 table.

  5. 30-kV proton injector for PIGMI

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W.; Mueller, D.W.; Sturgess, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A 30-kV proton injector designed for matching a 31-mA proton beam into the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) section of the PIGMI accelerator has been constructed and tested. This injector uses a small efficient duoplasmatron ion source and a single-gap extraction system for creating a convergent ion beam, and a three-element unipotential einzel lens for focusing the ion beam into the RFQ. A description of this prototype injector is presented, along with the experimental data obtained during the testing of this system.

  6. Performance and Modeling of the JLAB IR FEL Upgrade Injector

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Beard; S. Benson; G. Biallas; D. Bullard; D. Douglas; H. F. Dylla; R.Evans; A. Grippo; J. Gubeli; K. Jordan; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; B. Yunn; S.Zhang

    2004-09-01

    The JLab IR Upgrade Injector has delivered up to 9.1 mA of CW electron beam current at 9 MeV. The injector is driven by a 350 kV DC Photocathode Gun. Injector behavior and beam-based measurements are in good agreement with PARMELA simulations. The injected beam envelopes were established by measuring beam spot sizes and comparing them with those predicted by a transpart matrix based model. The emittances were measured by fitting an initial trial beam matrix to the measured data. The injected bunch length was established by measuring the energy spread downstream of the Linac while operating at either side of crest.

  7. Designing Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors for Performance, Stability, and Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Douglas G.; West, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, Brian R.; Tucker, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to lower the cost and increase the performance and stability of fuel injector designs for next-generation liquid rocket engines (LREs). The Loci-STREAM CFD code is used to simulate the complex combustion processes inside the LRE. These analyses enable efficient evaluation of the performance and stability characteristics of injector design concepts, while decreasing reliance on the costly test-fail-fix cycle of traditional design approaches. These injector simulations were recently employed as a key part of the design process for an Advanced Booster concept for NASA's heavy-lift Space Launch System (SLS).

  8. Progress in the injector for FEL at CIAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tianlu Yang; Wenzhen Zhou; Shinian Fu

    1995-12-31

    An intense current RF-linac for the far-infrared FEL is now under construction at CIAE. The normalized brightness of 3.4 x 10{sup 9} A/(m-rad) was obtained from the injector of the linac. An acceleration section with 9 cells will be connected with the injector to provide an electron beam for the 200 {mu}m FEL oscillator. In this paper, the late results from the injector beam test will be reported. The physical design and research progress in the acceleration section, beam transport, undulator as well as optical cavity will be introduced respectively.

  9. A wire calorimeter for the SPIDER beam: Experimental tests and feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Pasqualotto, R. Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cervaro, V.; Fasolo, D.; Mario, I.; Zanini, M.

    2015-04-08

    To study and optimize negative ion production and acceleration, in view of the use of neutral beam injectors in the ITER project, the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A, distributed over 1280 beamlets) is under construction in Padova, with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation, by means of several diagnostic systems. An array of tungsten wires, directly exposed to the beam and consequently heated to high temperature, is used in similar experiments at IPP-Garching to study the beam optics, which is one of the most important issues, in a qualitative way. The present contribution gives a description of an experimental investigation of the behavior of tungsten wires under high heat loads in vacuum. Samples of tungsten wires are heated by electrical currents and the emitted light is measured by a camera in the 400-1100nm wavelength range, which is proposed as a calibration tool. Simultaneously, the voltage applied to the wire is measured to study the dependency of emissivity on temperature. The feasibility study of a wire calorimeter for SPIDER is finally proposed; to this purpose, the expected behaviour of tungsten with the two-dimensional beam profile in SPIDER is numerically addressed.

  10. (Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders). [State Univ. of New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  11. A wire calorimeter for the SPIDER beam: Experimental tests and feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Mario, I.; Veltri, P.; Zanini, M.; Cervaro, V.; Fasolo, D.

    2015-04-01

    To study and optimize negative ion production and acceleration, in view of the use of neutral beam injectors in the ITER project, the SPIDER test facility (particle energy 100keV; beam current 50A, distributed over 1280 beamlets) is under construction in Padova, with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation, by means of several diagnostic systems. An array of tungsten wires, directly exposed to the beam and consequently heated to high temperature, is used in similar experiments at IPP-Garching to study the beam optics, which is one of the most important issues, in a qualitative way. The present contribution gives a description of an experimental investigation of the behavior of tungsten wires under high heat loads in vacuum. Samples of tungsten wires are heated by electrical currents and the emitted light is measured by a camera in the 400-1100nm wavelength range, which is proposed as a calibration tool. Simultaneously, the voltage applied to the wire is measured to study the dependency of emissivity on temperature. The feasibility study of a wire calorimeter for SPIDER is finally proposed; to this purpose, the expected behaviour of tungsten with the two-dimensional beam profile in SPIDER is numerically addressed.

  12. High-sensitivity microfluidic calorimeters for biological and chemical applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhee; Fon, Warren; Axelrod, Blake W.; Roukes, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    High-sensitivity microfluidic calorimeters raise the prospect of achieving high-throughput biochemical measurements with minimal sample consumption. However, it has been challenging to realize microchip-based calorimeters possessing both high sensitivity and precise sample-manipulation capabilities. Here, we report chip-based microfluidic calorimeters capable of characterizing the heat of reaction of 3.5-nL samples with 4.2-nW resolution. Our approach, based on a combination of hard- and soft-polymer microfluidics, provides both exceptional thermal response and the physical strength necessary to construct high-sensitivity calorimeters that can be scaled to automated, highly multiplexed array architectures. Polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic valves and pumps are interfaced to parylene channels and reaction chambers to automate the injection of analyte at 1 nL and below. We attained excellent thermal resolution via on-chip vacuum encapsulation, which provides unprecedented thermal isolation of the minute microfluidic reaction chambers. We demonstrate performance of these calorimeters by resolving measurements of the heat of reaction of urea hydrolysis and the enthalpy of mixing of water with methanol. The device structure can be adapted easily to enable a wide variety of other standard calorimeter operations; one example, a flow calorimeter, is described. PMID:19706406

  13. Method and system for improved resolution of a compensated calorimeter detector

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved method and system for a depleted uranium calorimeter detector used in high energy physics experiments. In a depleted uranium calorimeter detector, the energy of a particle entering the calorimeter detector is determined and the output response of the calorimeter detector is compensated so that the ratio of the integrated response of the calorimeter detector from a lepton to the integrated response of the calorimeter detector from a hadron of the same energy as the lepton is approximately equal to 1. In the present invention, the energy of a particle entering the calorimeter detector is determined as a function of time and the hadron content of the response of the calorimeter detector is inferred based upon the time structure of the energy pulse measured by the calorimeter detector. The energy measurement can be corrected based on the inference of the hadron content whereby the resolution of the calorimeter can be improved.

  14. Data Analysis for the Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, Mark J.

    1997-01-01

    The scintillating optical fiber calorimeter is a hybrid instrument with both active and passive components for measuring the proton and helium cosmic ray spectra from 0.2 to IO TeV kinetic energy. A thin emulsion/x-ray film chamber is situated between a cerenkov counter and an imaging calorimeter. Scintillating optical fibers sample the electromagnetic showers that develop in the calorimeter and identify the trajectory of cosmic rays that interact in SOFCAL. The emulsion/x-ray film data provide an in flight calibration for SOFCAL. The data reduction techniques used will be discussed and interim results of the analysis from a 20 hour balloon flight will be presented.

  15. New tools for the simulation and design of calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Womersley, W.J.

    1989-07-10

    Two new approaches to the simulation and design of large hermetic calorimeters are presented. Firstly, the Shower Library scheme used in the fast generation of showers in the Monte Carlo of the calorimeter for the D-Zero experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron is described. Secondly, a tool for the design future calorimeters is described, which can be integrated with a computer aided design system to give engineering designers an immediate idea of the relative physics capabilities of different geometries. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Optical System of the STAR Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachov, O. A.

    2000-04-01

    The STAR Barrel Electromagnetic Calorimeter(BEMC) is a sampling calorimeter and the core of structure consist of a lead-scintillator plate stack. The plastic scintillator in the form of Mega-tile with 40 optically isolated tiles in each layer. The tile/fiber system uses a wavelength shifting fiber to read out the signal of a tile and a optical clear fiber carry the light through the magnet structure to the electronic-PMT box. A discription of the Optical system of BEMC is presented along with a current status of the quality control program of the calorimeter production.

  17. sPHENIX Calorimeter Design and Jet Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty J. S.

    2016-09-27

    The PHENIX collaboration is planning a detector upgrade, sPHENIX, which consists of large acceptance calorimetry and tracking detectors built around the superconducting solenoid recently shipped to Brookhaven from the decommissioned BaBar experiment at SLAC. The sPHENIX calorimeter system includes three radial layers of samplingcalorimeters, a tungsten-scintillating fiber electromagnetic calorimeter, and two longitudinally segmented samplinghadron calorimeters that are made of scintillator tiles and steel plates. Together, they provide hermetic coverage in n < 1 for calorimetry based jet measurements as well as minimal bias jet trigger capability, which coupled with high resolution tracking, enable an extremely rich jet physics program at RHIC.

  18. Multi-phase simulations of coaxial injector combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, P. Y.; Ungewitter, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    A multiphase computational fluid dynamics code (ARICC-3D) is presented and results of two simulations are discussed. The numerical framework of the CFD code is reviewed as well as some of the two-phase physical submodels. The simulations performed include a single coaxial element injector and a multielement injector using LOX/Hydrogen reactants. The single element injector simulation verified the interaction among the code's submodels. The multielement injector simulation transient results include the chamber response to a transverse pressure wave with and without a chamber baffle. The results of these simulations demonstrate the current capabilities and their limitations to model complex two-phase combustion phenomena. Possible ways to exceed these limitations are suggested.

  19. Method and apparatus for a substantially coaxial injector element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, Mark D. (Inventor); Miyata, Shinjiro (Inventor); Farhangi, Shahram (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A system to provide a two piece robust fluid injector. According to various embodiments, the fluid injector is a fuel injector for a combustion engine. The injector includes two coaxially formed annuluses. One annulus is formed in a face plate and the second annulus or hole is defined by a tube extending through the face plate. The tube extends through the face plate in a portion of a through bore which also is used to define the second annulus. The second annulus is formed using a throughbore through which the tube extends. This allows the second annulus to always be formed inherently and precisely substantially coaxial with the first annulus. Moreover, the second annulus can be formed with a much greater tolerance than if other independent components needed to be added.

  20. Development of a plasma injector for supersonic drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macnab, Angus; Hashim, Akel; Graham, Robert; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth

    2013-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. is developing and optimizing a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma injector, designed to reduce viscous skin friction of supersonic aircraft. The broad goals are to 1. Computationally investigate and verify the dominant physical mechanisms for MHD plasma drag reduction; 2. Develop a proof of concept plasma injector demo, which performs within the power limitations of an onboard flight-relevant system; and 3. Use insights gained through computational investigations to optimize the performance of our MHD plasma injector for maximum efficiency. This investigation focuses on flight-relevant Reynolds and magnetic Reynolds numbers at low supersonic (1 injector.

  1. Injector for the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehne, D.; Godlove, T.; Haldemann, P.; Bernal, S.; Guharay, S.; Kishek, R.; Li, Y.; O'Shea, P.; Reiser, M.; Yun, V.; Zou, Y.; Haber, I.

    2001-05-01

    The electron beam injector constructed by FM technologies for the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) program is described. The program will use an electron beam to model space-charge-dominated ion beams in a recirculating linac for heavy ion inertial fusion, as well as for high-current muon colliders. The injector consists of a 10 keV, 100 mA electron gun with 50-100 nsec pulse width and a repetition rate of 120 Hz. The e-gun system includes a 6-mask, rotatable aperture plate, a Rogowski current monitor, an ion pump, and a gate valve. The injector beamline consists of a solenoid, a five-quadrupole matching section, two diagnostic chambers, and a fast current monitor. An independent diagnostic chamber also built for UMER will be used to measure horizontal and vertical emittance, current, energy, energy spread, and the evolution of the beam envelope and profile along the injector beamline.

  2. 21 CFR 872.4475 - Spring-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... A spring-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe is powered by a spring mechanism which provides the pressure to force the anesthetic out of...

  3. 21 CFR 872.4475 - Spring-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... A spring-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe is powered by a spring mechanism which provides the pressure to force the anesthetic out of...

  4. 21 CFR 872.4475 - Spring-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... A spring-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe is powered by a spring mechanism which provides the pressure to force the anesthetic out of...

  5. 21 CFR 872.4475 - Spring-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... A spring-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe is powered by a spring mechanism which provides the pressure to force the anesthetic out of...

  6. 21 CFR 872.4475 - Spring-powered jet injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... A spring-powered jet injector is a syringe device intended to administer a local anesthetic. The syringe is powered by a spring mechanism which provides the pressure to force the anesthetic out of...

  7. Microwave heated resin injector for advanced composite production.

    PubMed

    Stanculovic, Sebastijan; Feher, Lambert

    2008-01-01

    A novel microwave (MW) injector at 2.45 GHz for resin infiltration has been developed at the Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology (IHM), Research Center Karlsruhe (FZK), Germany. Resin injection is an essential step in the production of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) for aerospace applications. A compact, low-cost and automated MW injector provides an efficient and safe energy transfer from the MW source to the resin and supports an appropriate electromagnetic field structure for homogeneous infiltration. The system provides temperature monitoring and an automatized MW power switching, which ensures a fast response of the MW system to rapid changes in the temperature for high flow rates of the resin. In low power measurements with a vector network analyzer, the geometry of the injector cavity has been adjusted to provide an efficient system. The MW injector has been tested for specific resin systems infiltrations.

  8. Trigger circuits for the PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, S.S.; Britton, C.L. Jr.; Winterberg, A.L.; Young, G.R.

    1997-11-01

    Monolithic and discrete circuits have been developed to provide trigger signals for the PHENIX electromagnetic calorimeter detector. These trigger circuits are deadtimeless and create overlapping 4 by 4 energy sums, a cosmic muon trigger, and a 144 channel energy sum. The front end electronics of the PHENIX system sample the energy and timing channels at each bunch crossing (BC) but it is not known immediately if this data is of interest. The information from the trigger circuits is used to determine if the data collected is of interest and should be digitized and stored or discarded. This paper presents details of the design, issues affecting circuit performance, characterization of prototypes fabricated in 1.2 {micro}m Orbit CMOS, and integration of the circuits into the EMCal electronics system.

  9. SCA controller for the ATLAS calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gingrich, D.M.; Hewlett, J.C.; Holm, L.

    1997-12-31

    The front-end readout of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter will store data locally in analog pipeline memories at the LHC beam crossing frequency of 40 MHz. Switched capacitor array chips meeting the ATLAS readout requirements will be used. These new chips axe capable of simultaneous read and write operations, and allow random access to storage locations. To utilize these essential design features requires a substantial amount of fast control and address bookkeeping logic. We have designed a controller capable of operating the pipelines as analog random access memories and that satisfies the ATLAS readout requirements. The pipeline controller manages the data of 144 time samples and can operate at a mean trigger rate of about 75 kHz, when reading out five time samples per event. We are currently prototyping an integrated version of the controller implemented in a FPGA from Xilinx.

  10. Calorimeter Simulation with Hadrons in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Piperov, Stefan; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    CMS is using Geant4 to simulate the detector setup for the forthcoming data from the LHC. Validation of physics processes inside Geant4 is a major concern in view of getting a proper description of jets and missing energy for signal and background events. This is done by carrying out an extensive studies with test beam using the prototypes or real detector modules of the CMS calorimeter. These data are matched with Geant4 predictions using the same framework that is used for the entire CMS detector. Tuning of the Geant4 models is carried out and steps to be used in reproducing detector signals are defined in view of measurements of energy response, energy resolution, transverse and longitudinal shower profiles for a variety of hadron beams over a broad energy spectrum between 2 to 300 GeV/c. The tuned Monte Carlo predictions match many of these measurements within systematic uncertainties.

  11. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.; Guzik, T. Gregory

    2001-01-01

    During grant NAG5-5064, Louisiana State University (LSU) led the ATIC team in the development, construction, testing, accelerator validation, pre-deployment integration and flight operations of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment. This involved interfacing among the ATIC collaborators (UMD, NRL/MSFC, SU, MSU, WI, SNU) to develop a new balloon payload based upon a fully active calorimeter, a carbon target, a scintillator strip hodoscope and a pixilated silicon solid state detector for a detailed investigation of the very high energy cosmic rays to energies beyond 10(exp 14) eV/nucleus. It is in this very high energy region that theory predicts changes in composition and energy spectra related to the Supernova Remnant Acceleration model for cosmic rays below the "knee" in the all-particle spectrum. This report provides a documentation list, details the anticipated ATIC science return, describes the particle detection principles on which the experiment is based, summarizes the simulation results for the system, describes the validation work at the CERN SPS accelerator and details the balloon flight configuration. The ATIC experiment had a very successful LDB flight from McMurdo, Antarctica in 12/00 - 1/01. The instrument performed well for the entire 15 days. Preliminary data analysis shows acceptable charge resolution and an all-particle power law energy deposition distribution not inconsistent with previous measurements. Detailed analysis is underway and will result in new data on the cosmic ray charge and energy spectra in the GeV - TeV energy range. ATIC is currently being refurbished in anticipation of another LDB flight in the 2002-03 period.

  12. The Schladitz Fuel Injector: An Initial Performance Evaluation without Burning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    flows was obtained from soot-coated slides exposed to the spray by a simple rotating slit device. Reduction in mean droplet replica size and an...Particle Impaction Sites . ... 26 8. Pressure Drop Characteristics of Injector #1 ....... . 32 9. Performance Characteristics of Injector #1 . ....... ... 33...coatings were tried, albeit unsuccess- fully in that replica profiles became very inconsistent, except for the smallest particle ranges. Impact sites

  13. Spark-integrated propellant injector head with flashback barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Gregory Stuart (Inventor); Fisher, David James (Inventor); Mungas, Christopher (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    High performance propellants flow through specialized mechanical hardware that allows for effective and safe thermal decomposition and/or combustion of the propellants. By integrating a sintered metal component between a propellant feed source and the combustion chamber, an effective and reliable fuel injector head may be implemented. Additionally the fuel injector head design integrates a spark ignition mechanism that withstands extremely hot running conditions without noticeable spark mechanism degradation.

  14. Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don M.; Rosocha, Louis A.

    2009-12-01

    A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

  15. Optimum design of space storable gas/liquid coaxial injectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burick, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the results of a program of single-element, cold-flow/hot-fire experiments performed for the purpose of establishing design criteria for a high-performance gas/liquid (FLOX/CH4) coaxial injector. The approach and the techniques employed resulted in the direct design of an injector that met or exceeded the performance and chamber compatibility goals of the program without any need for the traditional 'cut-and-try' development methods.

  16. Longitudinal Beam Diagnostics for the ILC Injectors and Bunch Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe; Bracke, Adam; Demir, Veysel; Maxwell, Timothy; Rihaoui, Marwan; Jing, Chunguang; Power, John

    2010-12-01

    We present a diagnostics suite and analyze techniques for setting up the longitudinal beam dynamics in ILC e⁻ injectors and e⁺ and e⁻ bunch compressors. Techniques to measure the first order moments and recover the first order longitudinal transfer map of the injector's intricate bunching scheme are presented. Coherent transition radiation diagnostics needed to measure and monitor the bunch length downstream of the ~5 GeV bunch compressor are investigated using a vector diffraction model.

  17. Effect of injector configuration in rocket nozzle film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. Lakshya; Pisharady, J. C.; Shine, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations are carried out to analyze the effect of coolant injector configuration on overall film cooling performance in a divergent section of a rocket nozzle. Two different injector orientations are investigated: (1) shaped slots with a divergence angle of 15° (semi-divergent injector) (2) fully divergent slot (fully divergent injector). A 2-dimensional, axis-symmetric, multispecies computational model using finite volume formulation has been developed and validated against the experimental data. The experiments provided a consistent set of measurements for cooling effectiveness for different blowing ratios ranging from 3.7 to 6. Results show that the semi divergent configuration leads to higher effectiveness compared to fully divergent slot at all blowing ratios. The spatially averaged effectiveness results show that the difference between the two configurations is significant at higher blowing ratios. The increase in effectiveness was around 2 % at BR = 3.7 whereas it was around 12 % in the case of BR = 6. Numerical results show the presence of secondary flow recirculation zones near the jet exit for both the injectors. An additional recirculation zone present in the case of fully divergent injector caused an increase in mixing of the coolant and mainstream, and a reduction in film cooling performance.

  18. Liquid Methane/Oxygen Injector Study for Mars Ascent Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu Phuoc

    1999-01-01

    As a part of the advancing technology of the cryogenic propulsion system for the Mars exploration mission, this effort aims at evaluating propellant injection concepts for liquid methane/liquid oxygen (LOX) rocket engines. Split-triplet and unlike impinging injectors were selected for this study. A total of four injector configurations were tested under combustion conditions in a modular combustor test article (MCTA), equipped with optically accessible windows, at MSFC. A series of forty hot-fire tests, which covered a wide range of engine operating conditions with the chamber pressure ranging from 320 to 510 and the mixture ratio from 1.5 to 3.5, were conducted. The test matrix also included a variation in the combustion chamber length for the purpose of investigating its effects on the combustion performance and stability. Initial assessments of the test results showed that the injectors provided stable combustion and there were no injector face overheating problems under all operating conditions. The Raman scattering signal measurement method was successfully demonstrated for the hydrocarbon/oxygen reactive flow field. The near-injector face flow field was visually observed through the use of an infrared camera. Chamber wall temperature, high frequency chamber pressure, and average throat section heat flux were also recorded throughout the test series. Assessments of the injector performance are underway.

  19. Engine Hydraulic Stability. [injector model for analyzing combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesselring, R. C.; Sprouse, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical injector model was developed specifically to analyze combustion instability coupling between the injector hydraulics and the combustion process. This digital computer dynamic injector model will, for any imposed chamber of inlet pressure profile with a frequency ranging from 100 to 3000 Hz (minimum) accurately predict/calculate the instantaneous injector flowrates. The injector system is described in terms of which flow segments enter and leave each pressure node. For each flow segment, a resistance, line lengths, and areas are required as inputs (the line lengths and areas are used in determining inertance). For each pressure node, volume and acoustic velocity are required as inputs (volume and acoustic velocity determine capacitance). The geometric criteria for determining inertances of flow segments and capacitance of pressure nodes was set. Also, a technique was developed for analytically determining time averaged steady-state pressure drops and flowrates for every flow segment in an injector when such data is not known. These pressure drops and flowrates are then used in determining the linearized flow resistance for each line segment of flow.

  20. Main Chamber Injectors for Advanced Hydrocarbon Booster Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Matthew R.; Bazarov, Vladimir G.; Anderson, William E.

    2003-01-01

    Achieving the highest possible specific impulse has long been a key driver for space launch systems. Recently, more importance has been placed on the need for increased reliability and streamlined launch operations. These general factors along with more specific mission requirements have provided a new focus that is centered on the oxidizer rich staged combustion (ORSC) cycle. Despite a history of use in Russia that extends back to the 1960's, a proven design methodology for ORSC cycle engines does not exist in the West. This lack of design expertise extends to the main chamber injector, a critical subcomponent that largely determines the engine performance and main chamber life. The goals of the effort described here are to establish an empirical knowledge base to provide a fundamental understanding of main chamber injectors and for verification of an injector design methodology for the ORSC cycle. The design of a baseline injector element, derived from information on Russian engines in the open literature, is presented. The baseline injector comprises a gaseous oxidizer core flow and an annular swirling fuel flow. Sets of equations describing the steady-state and the dynamic characteristics of the injector are presented; these equations, which form the basis of the design analysis methodology, will be verified in tests later this year. On-going cold flow studies, using nitrogen and water as simulants, are described which indicate highly atomized and symmetric sprays.

  1. Space storable propellant performance program coaxial injector characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burick, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to characterize the circular coaxial injector concept for application with the space-storable gas/liquid propellant combination FLOX(82.6% F2)/CH4(g) at high pressure. The primary goal of the program was to obtain high characteristic velocity efficiency in conjunction with acceptable injector/chamber compatibility. A series of subscale (single element) cold flow and hot fire experiments was employed to establish design criteria for a 3000-lbf (sea level) engine operating at 500 psia. The subscale experiments characterized both high performance core elements and peripheral elements with enhanced injector/chamber compatibility. The full-scale injector which evolved from the study demonstrated a performance level of 99 percent of the theoretical shifting characteristic exhaust velocity with low chamber heat flux levels. A 44-second-duration firing demonstrated the durability of the injector. Parametric data are presented that are applicable for the design of circular, coaxial injectors that operate with injection dynamics (fuel and oxidizer velocity, etc.) similar to those employed in the work reported.

  2. Piezoelectric driven non-toxic injector for automated cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, H B; Su, Hao; Chen, H Y; Mills, J K

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated by state-of-the-art robotic and computer technology, Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) automation aims to scale and seamlessly transfer the human hand movements into more precise and fast movements of the micro manipulator. Piezo-drill cell injection, a novel technique using piezo-driven pipettes with a very small mercury column, has significantly improves the survival rates of ICSI process. It is found that complications are due, in large part, to toxicity of mercury and the damage to the cell membrane because of the lateral tip oscillations of injector pipette. In this paper, a new design of piezo-driven cell injector is proposed for automated suspended cell injection. This new piezo-driven cell injector design centralizes the piezo oscillation power on the injector pipette which eliminates the vibration effect on other parts of the micromanipulator. Detrimental lateral tip oscillations of the injector pipette are attenuated to a desirable level even without the help of mercury column. This mercury-free injector can sublime the piezoelectric driven injection technique to completely non-toxic level with great research and commercial application in gene injection, in-vitro fertilization, ICSI and drug development.

  3. Calibration of a digital hadron calorimeter with muons

    SciTech Connect

    Bilki, Burak; Butler, John; Cundiff, Tim; Drake, Gary; Haberichter, William; Hazen, Eric; Hoff, Jim; Holm, Scott; Kreps, Andrew; May, Ed; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; /Fermilab /Iowa U. /Argonne /Boston U. /Argonne, PHY

    2008-02-01

    The calibration procedure of a finely granulated digital hadron calorimeter with Resistive Plate Chambers as the active elements is described. Results obtained with a stack of nine layers exposed to muons from the Fermilab test beam are presented.

  4. The BaBar cesium iodide electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.

    1994-12-01

    The BABAR Cesium Iodide Electromagnetic Calorimeter is currently in the technical design stage. The calorimeter consists of approximately 10,000 individual thallium-doped cesium iodide crystals arranged in a near-hermetic barrel and endcap structure. Taking previous cesium iodide calorimeters as a benchmark, we hope to build a system with roughly two times better energy resolution. This will be achieved by a combination of high quality crystal growing, precision mechanical processing of crystals and support structure, highly efficient light collection and low noise readout electronics. The calorimeter described here represents the current state of the design and we are undertaking an active period of optimization before this design is finalized. We discuss here the physics motivation, the current design and options for optimization.

  5. The Forward Calorimeter of the GlueX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Daniel; GlueX Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Forward Calorimeter (FCAL) of the GlueX experiment is a lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter currently being built in Hall D of Jefferson Lab. The GlueX experiment is a photoproduction experiment that will utilize coherent bremsstrahlung radiation to map out the light meson spectrum, including a search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers (JPC). The FCAL will detect photons between 1° and 10 .8° downstream from the target. The calorimeter is built out of 2800 elements, each of which consists of a lead glass block, an FEU 84-3 PMT, and a custom Cockcroft-Walton electronic base. In the Fall of 2011, a 25 element prototype detector was installed in Hall B of Jefferson Lab to measure the energy and timing resolution of the calorimeter using electrons between 100 and 250 MeV. The design and construction of FCAL and the results from the prototype test will be discussed.

  6. Comparison of JP-8 Sprays from a Hydraulically Actuated Electronically Controlled Unit Injector and a Common Rail Injector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    were performed with a constant injector command for fuel injection pressures of 1080 bar and 1200 bar at 2 different oil temperatures consisting of 45...As shown in Figure 9, as the temperature is increased, the injected fuel mass also increases. For the 1200 bar and 1080 bar fuel pressure the...of 90°C but varying dwell time of the solenoid injector command for fuel pressures of 1080 bar and 1200 bar. Results of the 100 shot average

  7. ATLAS Tile Calorimeter performance with Run 1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá Alberich, L.

    2016-07-01

    The performance of the central hadronic calorimeter, TileCal, in the ATLAS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider is studied using cosmic-ray muons and the large sample of proton-proton collisions acquired during the Run 1 of LHC (2010-2012). Results are presented for the precision of the absolute energy scale and timing, noise characterization, and time-stability of the detector. The results show that the Tile Calorimeter performance is within the design requirements of the detector.

  8. Building and testing a high school calorimeter at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesot, L.; Crane, R.; Engelen, M. A. G.; van Haren, A. M. A.; van Kleef, R. H. B.; Leenders, O. R.; Timmermans, C.

    2016-11-01

    We have designed, built and tested a crystal calorimeter in the context of CERN’s first beam line for schools competition. The results of the tests at CERN show that the light output of our calorimeter depends on the energy deposited by particles (electrons and muons) hitting the crystals. Our design can be reproduced by high schools around the world, as we have avoided the use of toxic chemicals.

  9. Vibration isolation system for cryogenic phonon-scintillation calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Jo, H. S.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, I.; Kim, S. R.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, H. J.; So, J. H.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogen-free dilution refrigerators are getting popular for rare event searches underground due to their advantages. However, the application of a pulse tube refrigerator introduces mechanical vibration that can translate into temperature fluctuation for calorimeters. The effect is significant in particular when the sensor is attached to a large absorber. A mechanical filter is installed to isolate the calorimeters from the vibration inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator while meeting thermal requirements.

  10. The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2007-04-16

    A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

  11. Current Status and Performance of the BESIII Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldbauer, Florian; BESIII Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The BESIII experiment is located at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) in China. Its electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) consists of 6240 CsI(TI) crystals, each read out by two Photodiodes (PD) at the end of the crystal. Changes in the response of the calorimeter due to radiation damage in the crystals or changes in the photo detector output are monitored with a light pulser system.

  12. Computational simulation of liquid fuel rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landrum, D. Brian

    1994-01-01

    A major component of any liquid propellant rocket is the propellant injection system. Issues of interest include the degree of liquid vaporization and its impact on the combustion process, the pressure and temperature fields in the combustion chamber, and the cooling of the injector face and chamber walls. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code is a primary computational tool used in the MSFC Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch. The branch has dedicated a significant amount of resources to development of this code for prediction of both liquid and solid fuel rocket performance. The FDNS code is currently being upgraded to include the capability to model liquid/gas multi-phase flows for fuel injection simulation. An important aspect of this effort is benchmarking the code capabilities to predict existing experimental injection data. The objective of this MSFC/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship term was to evaluate the capabilities of the modified FDNS code to predict flow fields with liquid injection. Comparisons were made between code predictions and existing experimental data. A significant portion of the effort included a search for appropriate validation data. Also, code simulation deficiencies were identified.

  13. Development of a repetitive compact torus injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, Takumi; McColl, David; Dreval, Mykola; Rohollahi, Akbar; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira; Zushi, Hideki

    2013-10-01

    A system for Repetitive Compact Torus Injection (RCTI) has been developed at the University of Saskatchewan. CTI is a promising fuelling technology to directly fuel the core region of tokamak reactors. In addition to fuelling, CTI has also the potential for (a) optimization of density profile and thus bootstrap current and (b) momentum injection. For steady-state reactor operation, RCTI is necessary. The approach to RCTI is to charge a storage capacitor bank with a large capacitance and quickly charge the CT capacitor bank through a stack of integrated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). When the CT bank is fully charged, the IGBT stack will be turned off to isolate banks, and CT formation/acceleration sequence will start. After formation of each CT, the fast bank will be replenished and a new CT will be formed and accelerated. Circuits for the formation and the acceleration in University of Saskatchewan CT Injector (USCTI) have been modified. Three CT shots at 10 Hz or eight shots at 1.7 Hz have been achieved. This work has been sponsored by the CRC and NSERC, Canada.

  14. Micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Koenka, Israel Joel; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Müller, Beat; Chwalek, Thomas; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    A novel micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis for the handling of samples with volumes down to as little as 300 nL was designed and built in our laboratory for analyses in which the available volume is a limitation. The sample is placed into a small cavity located directly in front of the separation capillary, and the injection is then carried out automatically by controlled pressurization of the chamber with compressed air. The system also allows automated flushing of the injection chamber as well as of the capillary. In a trial with a capillary electrophoresis system with contactless conductivity detector, employing a capillary of 25 μm diameter, the results showed good stability of migration times and peak areas. To illustrate the technique, the fast separation of five inorganic cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH4 (+) , Ca(2+) , and Mg(2+) ) was set up. This could be achieved in less than 3 min, with good limits of detection (10 μM) and linear ranges (between about 10 and 1000 μM). The system was demonstrated for the determination of the inorganic cations in porewater samples of a lake sediment core.

  15. An Injector Test Facility for the LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, E.,; /SLAC

    2007-03-14

    SLAC is in the privileged position of being the site for the world's first 4th generation light source as well as having a premier accelerator research staff and facilities. Operation of the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility will require innovations in electron injectors to provide electron beams of unprecedented quality. Upgrades to provide ever shorter wavelength x-ray beams of increasing intensity will require significant advances in the state-of-the-art. The BESAC 20-Year Facilities Roadmap identifies the electron gun as ''the critical enabling technology to advance linac-based light sources'' and recognizes that the sources for next-generation light sources are ''the highest-leveraged technology'', and that ''BES should strongly support and coordinate research and development in this unique and critical technology''.[1] This white paper presents an R&D plan and a description of a facility for developing the knowledge and technology required to successfully achieve these upgrades, and to coordinate efforts on short-pulse source development for linac-based light sources.

  16. Electrothermal plasma gun as a pellet injector

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.

    1994-11-01

    The NCSU electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS has been used to accelerate plastic (Lexan polycarbonate) pellets, to determine the feasibility of the use of electrothermal guns as pellet injectors. The use of an electrothermal gun to inject frozen hydrogenic pellets requires a mechanism to provide protective shells (sabots) for shielding the pellet from ablation during acceleration into and through the barrel of the gun. The gun has been modified to accommodate acceleration of the plastic pellets using special acceleration barrels equipped with diagnostics for velocity and position of the pellet, and targets to absorb the pellet`s energy on impact. The length of the acceleration path could be varied between 15 and 45 cm. The discharge energy of the electrothermal gun ranged from 2 to 6 kJ. The pellet velocities have been measured via a set of break wires. Pellet masses were varied between 0.5 and 1.0 grams. Preliminary results on 0.5 and 1.0 g pellets show that the exit velocity reaches 0.9 km/s at 6 kJ input energy to the source. Higher velocities of 1.5 and 2.7 km/s have been achieved using 0.5 and 1.0 gm pellets in 30 cm long barrel, without cleaning the barrel between the shots.

  17. Injector for liquid fueled rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael David (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An injector for liquid fueled rocket engines wherein a generally flat core having a frustoconical dome attached to one side of the core to serve as a manifold for a first liquid, with the core having a generally circular configuration having an axis. The other side of the core has a plurality of concentric annular first slots and a plurality of annular concentric second slots alternating with the first slots, the second slots having a greater depth than said first slots. A bore extends through the core for inletting a second liquid into said core, the bore intersecting the second slots to feed the second liquid into the second slots. The core also has a plurality of first passageways leading from the manifold to the first annular slots for feeding the first liquid into said first slots. A faceplate brazed to said other side of the core is provided with apertures extending from the first and second slots through said face plate, these apertures being positioned to direct fuel and liquid oxygen into contact with each other in the combustion chamber. The first liquid may be liquid oxygen and the second liquid may be kerosene or liquid hydrogen.

  18. Energy Calibration of the Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Chamber (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. C.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T.; Roberts, F. E.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J.; Takahashi, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter (SOFCAL) detector is designed to make direct measures of the primary cosmic ray spectrum from -200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. The primary particles are resolved into groups according to their charge (p, He, CNO, Medium Z, Heavy Z) using both active and passive components integrated into the detector. The principal part of SOFCAL is a thin ionization calorimeter that measures the electromagnetic cascades that result from these energetic particles interacting in the detector. The calorimeter is divided into two sections: a thin passive emulsion/x-ray film calorimeter, and a fiber calorimeter that uses crossing layers of small scintillating optical fibers to sample the energy deposition of the cascades. The energy determination is made by fitting the fiber data to transition curves generated by Monte Carlo simulations. The fiber data must first be calibrated using the electron counts from the emulsion plates in the calorimeter for a small number of events. The technique and results of this calibration will be presented together with samples of the data from a balloon flight.

  19. An Imaging Calorimeter for Access-Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.; Adams, James H.; Binns, R. W.; Christl, M. J.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A mission concept study to define the "Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS)" was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The ACCESS instrument complement contains a transition radiation detector and an ionization calorimeter to measure tile spectrum of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei up to approximately 10(exp 15) eV to search for the limit of S/N shock wave acceleration, or evidence for other explanations of the spectra. Several calorimeter configurations have been studied, including the "baseline" totally active bismuth germanate instrument and sampling calorimeters utilizing various detectors. The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) concept comprises a carbon target and a calorimeter using a high atomic number absorber sampled approximately each radiation length (rl) by thin scintillating fiber (SCIFI) detectors. The main features and options of the ICA instrument configuration are described in this paper. Since direct calibration is not possible over most of the energy range, the best approach must be decided from simulations of calorimeter performance extrapolated from CERN calibrations at 0.375 TeV. This paper presents results from the ICA simulations study.

  20. Inherent stability of central element coaxial liquid-liquid injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoddard, Frank J.

    1993-01-01

    Most TRW liquid bi-propellant rocket engines built over the past thirty-plus years have employed a central element coaxial pintle injector and have operated with liquid/liquid propellant injection. This injector is a patented design exclusive to TRW and has unique features that make the rocket engine combustion characteristics different from those of other types of injector engine designs. Its many benefits include excellent combustion performance, efficient deep throttling, adaptability to low cost manufacturing, and high reliability. Approximately 200 pintle injector engines of various sizes and operating on a variety of propellants have been flown without a single inflight failure. An especially important feature of the pintle injector engine is its apparent inherent combustion stability. In over thirty years of development, testing, and production, TRW has never experienced combustion instability in any of its pintle injector engine designs. This has been true of engines operating over a range of thrust from 5 to 250,000 lbs. on earth-storable hypergolic propellants and a large number of smaller engines operating on a variety of propellants (21 combinations) in long duration-firing, pulsing (down to 2 msec), and deep throttling (as much as 19:1) modes. Operating chamber pressures have ranged from 10 to 3,500 psia. This record is particularly impressive given that typical TRW design practice does not consider combustion instability as an issue and no pintle engine has ever employed stability-enhancing features, such as baffles or acoustically resonant chambers. In spite of this, TRW engines have operated stably in regimes not possible with other types of injectors. Various physical explanations and combustion process models for this favorable stability characteristic have been postulated. However, a definitive study that unequivocally establishes the important stabilizing mechanisms still remains to be conducted.

  1. GEANT SIMULATIONS OF PRESHOWER CALORIMETER FOR CLAS12 UPGRADE OF THE FORWARD ELECTROMAGNETIC CALORIMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlow, K.; Stepanyan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility uses the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to study the structure of the nucleon. An upgrade from a 6 GeV beam to a 12GeV beam is currently planned. With the beam energy upgrade, more high-energy pions will be created from the interaction of the beam and the target. Above 6GeV, the angle between the two-decay photons of high-energy pions becomes too small for the current electromagnetic calorimeter (EC) of CLAS to differentiate between two photon clusters and single photon events. Thus, a preshower calorimeter will be added in front of the EC to enable fi ner granularity and ensure better cluster separation for all CLAS experiments at higher energies. In order to optimize cost without compromising the calorimeter’s performance, three versions of the preshower, varying in number of scintillator and lead layers, were compared by their resolution and effi ciency. Using GSIM, a GEANT detector simulation program for CLAS, the passage of neutral pions and single photons through CLAS and the new preshower calorimeter (CLAS12 EC) was studied. The resolution of the CLAS12 EC was calculated from the Gaussian fi t of the sampling fraction, the energy CLAS12 EC detected over the Monte Carlo simulated energy. The single photon detection effi ciency was determined from the energy and position of the photon hits. The fractional energy resolution measured was ΔE/E = 0.0972 in the fi ve-module version, 0.111 in the four-module version, and 0.149 in the three-module version. Both the fi ve- and four-module versions had 99% single photon detection effi ciency above 0.5GeV while the 3 module version had 99% effi ciency above 1.5GeV. Based on these results, the suggested preshower confi guration is the four-module version containing twelve layers of scintillator and fi fteen layers of lead. This version provides a reasonable balance of resolution, effi ciency, and

  2. Fundamental rocket injector/spray programs at the Phillips Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talley, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance and stability of liquid rocket engines is determined to a large degree by atomization, mixing, and combustion processes. Control over these processes is exerted through the design of the injector. Injectors in liquid rocket engines are called upon to perform many functions. They must first of all mix the propellants to provide suitable performance in the shortest possible length. For main injectors, this is driven by the tradeoff between the combustion chamber performance, stability, efficiency, and its weight and cost. In gas generators and preburners, however, it is also driven by the possibility of damage to downstream components, for example piping and turbine blades. This can occur if unburned fuel and oxidant later react to create hot spots. Weight and cost considerations require that the injector design be simple and lightweight. For reusable engines, the injectors must also be durable and easily maintained. Suitable atomization and mixing must be produced with as small a pressure drop as possible, so that the size and weight of pressure vessels and turbomachinery can be minimized. However, the pressure drop must not be so small as to promote feed system coupled instabilities. Another important function of the injectors is to ensure that the injector face plate and the chamber and nozzle walls are not damaged. Typically this requires reducing the heat transfer to an acceptable level and also keeping unburned oxygen from chemically attacking the walls, particularly in reusable engines. Therefore the mixing distribution is often tailored to be fuel-rich near the walls. Wall heat transfer can become catastrophically damaging in the presence of acoustic instabilities, so the injector must prevent these from occurring at all costs. In addition to acoustic stability (but coupled with it), injectors must also be kinetically stable. That is, the flame itself must maintain ignition in the combustion chamber. This is not typically a problem with main

  3. Achromatic beam transport of High Current Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-02-01

    The high current injector (HCI) provides intense ion beams of high charge state using a high temperature superconducting ECR ion source. The ion beam is accelerated upto a final energy of 1.8 MeV/u due to an electrostatic potential, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a drift tube linac (DTL). The ion beam has to be transported to superconducting LINAC which is around 50 m away from DTL. This section is termed as high energy beam transport section (HEBT) and is used to match the beam both in transverse and longitudinal phase space to the entrance of LINAC. The HEBT section is made up of four 90 deg. achromatic bends and interconnecting magnetic quadrupole triplets. Two RF bunchers have been used for longitudinal phase matching to the LINAC. The ion optical design of HEBT section has been simulated using different beam dynamics codes like TRACEWIN, GICOSY and TRACE 3D. The field computation code OPERA 3D has been utilized for hardware design of all the magnets. All the dipole and quadrupole magnets have been field mapped and their test results such as edge angles measurements, homogeneity and harmonic analysis etc. are reported. The whole design of HEBT section has been performed such that the most of the beam optical components share same hardware design and there is ample space for beam diagnostics as per geometry of the building. Many combination of achromatic bends have been simulated to transport the beam in HEBT section but finally the four 90 deg. achromatic bend configuration is found to be the best satisfying all the geometrical constraints with simplified beam tuning process in real time.

  4. Investigation of ramp injectors for supersonic mixing enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimovitch, Y.; Gartenberg, E.; Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study of wall mounted swept ramp injectors fitted with injector nozzles of different shape has been conducted in a constant area duct to explore mixing enhancement techniques for scramjet combustors. Six different injector nozzle inserts, all having equal exit and throat areas, were tested to explore the interaction between the preconditioned fuel jet and the vortical flowfield produced by the ramp: circular nozzle (baseline), nozzle with three downstream facing steps, nozzle with four vortex generators, elliptical nozzle, tapered-slot nozzle, and trapezoidal nozzle. The main flow was air at Mach 2, and the fuel was simulated by air injected at Mach 1.63 or by helium injected at Mach 1.7. Pressure and temperature surveys, combined with Mie and Rayleigh scattering visualization, were used to investigate the flow field. The experiments were compared with three dimensional Navier-Stokes computations. The results indicate that the mixing process is dominated by the streamwise vorticity generated by the ramp, the injectors' inner geometry having a minor effect. It was also found that the injectant/air mixing in the far-field is nearly independent of the injector geometry, molecular weight of the injectant, and the initial convective Mach number.

  5. Deuteron injector for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, H. T.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Zhou, Q. F.; Yuan, Z. X.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, M.; Song, Z. Z.; Yu, J. X.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2012-02-15

    The deuteron injector developed for the PKUNIFTY (Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility) has been installed and commissioned at Peking University (PKU). The injector system must transfer 50 keV 50 mA of D{sup +} ion beam to the entrance of the 2 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with 10% duty factor (1 ms, 100 Hz). A compact 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (PMECR) ion source and a 1.36 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT) line using two solenoids was developed as the deuteron injector. A {phi}5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was used to simulate the entrance of RFQ electrodes. The beam parameters are measured after this core with an emittance measurement unit (EMU) and a bending magnet for ion fraction analysis at the end of injector. During the commissioning, 77 mA of total deuteron beam was extracted from PMECR and 56 mA of pure D{sup +} beam that passed through the {phi}5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was obtained at the position of RFQ entrance with the measured normalized rms emittance 0.12-0.16{pi} mm mrad. Ion species analysis results show that the deuteron fraction is as high as 99.5%. All of the parameters satisfy PKUNIFTY's requirements. In this paper, we will describe the deuteron injector design and report the commissioning results as well as the initial operation.

  6. Deuteron injector for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility project.

    PubMed

    Ren, H T; Peng, S X; Lu, P N; Zhou, Q F; Yuan, Z X; Zhao, J; Zhang, M; Song, Z Z; Yu, J X; Guo, Z Y; Chen, J E

    2012-02-01

    The deuteron injector developed for the PKUNIFTY (Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility) has been installed and commissioned at Peking University (PKU). The injector system must transfer 50 keV 50 mA of D(+) ion beam to the entrance of the 2 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with 10% duty factor (1 ms, 100 Hz). A compact 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (PMECR) ion source and a 1.36 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT) line using two solenoids was developed as the deuteron injector. A φ5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was used to simulate the entrance of RFQ electrodes. The beam parameters are measured after this core with an emittance measurement unit (EMU) and a bending magnet for ion fraction analysis at the end of injector. During the commissioning, 77 mA of total deuteron beam was extracted from PMECR and 56 mA of pure D(+) beam that passed through the φ5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was obtained at the position of RFQ entrance with the measured normalized rms emittance 0.12-0.16π mm mrad. Ion species analysis results show that the deuteron fraction is as high as 99.5%. All of the parameters satisfy PKUNIFTY's requirements. In this paper, we will describe the deuteron injector design and report the commissioning results as well as the initial operation.

  7. Deuteron injector for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility projecta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H. T.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Zhou, Q. F.; Yuan, Z. X.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, M.; Song, Z. Z.; Yu, J. X.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    The deuteron injector developed for the PKUNIFTY (Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility) has been installed and commissioned at Peking University (PKU). The injector system must transfer 50 keV 50 mA of D+ ion beam to the entrance of the 2 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with 10% duty factor (1 ms, 100 Hz). A compact 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (PMECR) ion source and a 1.36 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT) line using two solenoids was developed as the deuteron injector. A ϕ5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was used to simulate the entrance of RFQ electrodes. The beam parameters are measured after this core with an emittance measurement unit (EMU) and a bending magnet for ion fraction analysis at the end of injector. During the commissioning, 77 mA of total deuteron beam was extracted from PMECR and 56 mA of pure D+ beam that passed through the ϕ5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was obtained at the position of RFQ entrance with the measured normalized rms emittance 0.12-0.16π mm mrad. Ion species analysis results show that the deuteron fraction is as high as 99.5%. All of the parameters satisfy PKUNIFTY's requirements. In this paper, we will describe the deuteron injector design and report the commissioning results as well as the initial operation.

  8. A fuel pellet injector for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, S.M.; Allen, S.L.; Petersen, D.E.; Sewall, N.R.

    1990-09-01

    Unlike other fueling systems for magnetically confined fusion plasmas, a pellet injector can deliver many fuel gas particles to the core of the plasma, enhancing plasma confinement. We installed a new pellet injector on the MTX (formerly Alcator-O) to provide a plasma with a high core density for experiments both with and without ultrahigh-power microwave heating. Its four-barrel pellet generator is the first to be designed and built at LLNL. Based on pipe-gun'' technology originated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it incorporates our structural and thermal engineering innovations and a unique control system. The pellet transport, differential vacuum-pumping stages, and fast-opening propellant valves are reused parts of the Impurity Study EXperiment (ISX) pellet injector built by ORNL. We tailored designs of all other systems and components to the MTX. Our injector launches pellets of frozen hydrogen or deuterium into the MTX, either singly or in timed bursts of up to four pellets at velocities of up to 1000 m/s. Pellet diameters range from 1.02 to 2.08 mm. A diagnostic stage measures pellet velocities and allows us to photograph the pellets in flight. We are striving to improve the injector's performance, but its operations is already very consistent and reliable.

  9. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  10. Thermal and electrostatic simulations of the diagnostic calorimeter for the Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma beam

    SciTech Connect

    Serianni, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; Fasolo, D.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pomaro, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Tollin, M.; De Muri, M.

    2012-02-15

    To study and optimise negative ion production for the ITER neutral beam injectors, a test facility is under construction in Padova with the aim of testing beam characteristics and to verify the source proper operation. The instrumented calorimeter STRIKE (short-time retractable instrumented kalorimeter experiment) is being developed to characterise the SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) beam during short operations. The paper presents an investigation of the response of STRIKE measurement systems. It results that biasing is necessary to cope with the influence of secondary electrons on current measurements; moreover, despite the discretisation of the recorded thermal patterns introduced by the pixels of thermal cameras, a sufficient spatial resolution is expected.

  11. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolic panel - comprehensive; Chem-20; SMA20; Sequential multi-channel analysis with computer-20; SMAC20; Metabolic panel 20 ... McPherson RA, Pincus MR. Disease/organ panels. McPherson RA, ... . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:appendix 7.

  12. Reinforced Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Balakrishna T.; Akutagawa, Wesley; Wang, Taylor G.; Barber, Dan

    1989-01-01

    New honeycomb panel structure has increased strength and stiffness with little increase in weight. Some or all of walls of honeycomb cells reinforced with honeycomb panels having smaller cells, lightweight foam, or other reinforcing material. Strong, lightweight reinforced panels used in aircraft, car and truck bodies, cabinets for equipment and appliances, and buildings.

  13. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  14. Performance of the 6 MeV injector for the Moscow racetrack microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, A. S.; Chepurnov, A. S.; Chubarov, O. V.; Gribov, I. V.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Piskarev, I. M.; Rzhanov, A. G.; Sotnikov, M. A.; Surma, I. V.; Shumakov, A. V.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Tiunov, A. V.; Ushkanov, V. A.

    1993-03-01

    The 6 MeV injector for the Moscow racetrack microtron is described. The work presents the accelerator description, the rf power supply system and results of the computer simulation. The method of injector tuning and experimental results are discussed.

  15. Measurements of admittances and characteristic combustion times of reactive gaseous propellant coaxial injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation that was concerned with the quantitative determination of the capabilities of combustion processes associated with coaxial injectors to amplify and sustain combustor oscillations was described. The driving provided by the combustion process was determined by employing the modified standing-wave method utilizing coaxial injectors and air-acetylene mixtures. Analyses of the measured data indicate that the investigated injectors are capable of initiating and amplifying combustion instabilities under favorable conditions of injector-combustion coupling and over certain frequency ranges. These frequency ranges and the frequency at which an injector's driving capacity is maximum are observed to depend upon the equivalence ratio, the pressure drop across the injector orifices and the number of injector elements. The characteristic combustion times of coaxial injectors were determined from steady state temperature measurements.

  16. Influence of injector geometry on particle trajectories: Analysis of particle dynamics in the injector and plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.; Dussoubs, B.; Fauchais, P.; Roemer, T.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Smith, M.F.

    1998-11-01

    The conditions of particle injection into the side of plasma jets play an important role in determining the microstructure and properties of sprayed deposits. However, few investigations have been carried out on this topic. The current work presents the results of an experimental and computational study of the influence of injector geometry and gas mass flow rate on particle dynamics at injector exit and in the plasma jet. Two injector geometries were tested: a straight tube and a curved tube with various radii of curvature. Zirconia powders with different particle size range and morphology were used. A possible size segregation effect in the injector was analyzed from the space distribution of particles collected on a stick tape. The spray patterns in the plasma jet was monitored from the thermal radiation emitted by particles. An analysis of the particle behavior in the injector and mixing of the carrier-gas flow with the plasma jet was carried out using a 3-D computational fluids dynamics code.

  17. Jefferson Lab injector development for next generation parity violation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grames, J.; Hansknect, J.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

    2011-11-01

    To meet the challenging requirements of next generation parity violation experiments at Jefferson Lab, the Center for Injectors and Sources is working on improving the parity-quality of the electron beam. These improvements include new electron photogun design and fast helicity reversal of the Pockels Cell. We proposed and designed a new scheme for slow helicity reversal using a Wien Filter and two Solenoids. This slow reversal complements the insertable half-wave plate reversal of the laser-light polarization by reversing the electron beam polarization at the injector while maintaining a constant accelerator configuration. For position feedback, fast air-core magnets located in the injector were commissioned and a new scheme for charge feedback is planned.

  18. RHIC injector complex online model status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Schoefer,V.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.

    2009-05-04

    An online modeling system is being developed for the RHIC injector complex, which consists of the Booster, the AGS and the transfer lines connecting the Booster to the AGS and the AGS to RHIC. Historically the injectors have been operated using static values from design specifications or offline model runs, but tighter beam optics constraints required by polarized proton operations (e.g, accelerating with near-integer tunes) have necessitated a more dynamic system. An online model server for the AGS has been implemented using MAD-X [1] as the model engine, with plans to extend the system to the Booster and the injector transfer lines and to add the option of calculating optics using the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC [2]) as the model engine.

  19. Tritium pellet injector design for tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, P.W.; Baylor, L.R.; Bryan, W.E.; Combs, S.K.; Easterly, C.E.; Lunsford, R.V.; Milora, S.L.; Schuresko, D.D.; White, J.A.; Williamson, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    A tritium pellet injector (TPI) system has been designed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Q approx. 1 phase of operation. The injector gun utilizes a radial design with eight independent barrels and a common extruder to minimize tritium inventory. The injection line contains guide tubes with intermediate vacuum pumping stations and fast valves to minimize propellant leakage to the torus. The vacuum system is designed for tritium compatibility. The entire injector system is contained in a glove box for secondary containment protection against tritium release. Failure modes and effects have been analyzed, and structural analysis has been performed for most intense predicted earthquake conditions. Details of the design and operation of this system are presented in this paper.

  20. Parametric Design of Injectors for LDI-3 Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Mongia, Hukam; Lee, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Application of a partially calibrated National Combustion Code (NCC) for providing guidance in the design of the 3rd generation of the Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) multi-element combustion configuration (LDI-3) is summarized. NCC was used to perform non-reacting and two-phase reacting flow computations on several LDI-3 injector configurations in a single-element and a five-element injector array. All computations were performed with a consistent approach for mesh-generation, turbulence, spray simulations, ignition and chemical kinetics-modeling. Both qualitative and quantitative assessment of the computed flowfield characteristics of the several design options led to selection of an optimal injector LDI- 3 design that met all the requirements including effective area, aerodynamics and fuel-air mixing criteria. Computed LDI-3 emissions (namely, NOx, CO and UHC) will be compared with the prior generation LDI- 2 combustor experimental data at relevant engine cycle conditions.

  1. Shielded fluid stream injector for particle bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Notestein, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    A shielded fluid-stream injector assembly is provided for particle bed reactors. The assembly includes a perforated pipe injector disposed across the particle bed region of the reactor and an inverted V-shaped shield placed over the pipe, overlapping it to prevent descending particles from coming into direct contact with the pipe. The pipe and shield are fixedly secured at one end to the reactor wall and slidably secured at the other end to compensate for thermal expansion. An axially extending housing aligned with the pipe and outside the reactor and an inline reamer are provided for removing deposits from the inside of the pipe. The assembly enables fluid streams to be injected and distributed uniformly into the particle bed with minimized clogging of injector ports. The same design may also be used for extraction of fluid streams from particle bed reactors.

  2. ELECTRON INJECTORS FOR NEXT GENERATION X-RAY SOURCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BLUEM,H.; BEN-ZVI,I.; SRINIVASAN-RAO,T.; ET AL.

    2004-08-02

    Next generation x-ray sources require very high-brightness electron beams that are typically at or beyond the present state-of-the-art, and thus place stringent and demanding requirements upon the electron injector parameters. No one electron source concept is suitable for all the diverse applications envisaged, which have operating characteristics ranging from high-average-current, quasi-CW, to high-peak-current, single-pulse electron beams. Advanced Energy Systems, in collaboration with various partners, is developing several electron injector concepts for these x-ray source applications. The performance and design characteristics of five specific RF injectors, spanning ''L'' to ''X''-band, normal-conducting to superconducting, and low repetition rate to CW, which are presently in various stages of design, construction or testing, is described. We also discuss the status and schedule of each with respect to testing.

  3. Shielded fluid stream injector for particle bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Notestein, John E.

    1993-01-01

    A shielded fluid-stream injector assembly is provided for particle bed reactors. The assembly includes a perforated pipe injector disposed across the particle bed region of the reactor and an inverted V-shaped shield placed over the pipe, overlapping it to prevent descending particles from coming into direct contact with the pipe. The pipe and shield are fixedly secured at one end to the reactor wall and slidably secured at the other end to compensate for thermal expansion. An axially extending housing aligned with the pipe and outside the reactor and an in-line reamer are provided for removing deposits from the inside of the pipe. The assembly enables fluid streams to be injected and distributed uniformly into the particle bed with minimized clogging of injector ports. The same design may also be used for extraction of fluid streams from particle bed reactors.

  4. Fuel injector for use in a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J.

    2012-10-09

    A fuel injector in a combustor apparatus of a gas turbine engine. An outer wall of the injector defines an interior volume in which an intermediate wall is disposed. A first gap is formed between the outer wall and the intermediate wall. The intermediate wall defines an internal volume in which an inner wall is disposed. A second gap is formed between the intermediate wall and the inner wall. The second gap receives cooling fluid that cools the injector. The cooling fluid provides convective cooling to the intermediate wall as it flows within the second gap. The cooling fluid also flows through apertures in the intermediate wall into the first gap where it provides impingement cooling to the outer wall and provides convective cooling to the outer wall. The inner wall defines a passageway that delivers fuel into a liner downstream from a main combustion zone.

  5. Simulations of space charge in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-03-01

    The Fermilab Project X plan for future high intensity operation relies on the Main Injector as the engine for delivering protons in the 60-120 GeV energy range. Project X plans call for increasing the number of protons per Main Injector bunch from the current value of 1.0 x 10{sup 11} to 3.0 x 10{sup 11}. Space charge effects at the injection energy of 8 GeV have the potential to seriously disrupt operations. We report on ongoing simulation efforts with Synergia, MARYLIE/Impact, and IMPACT, which provide comprehensive capabilities for parallel, multi-physics modeling of beam dynamics in the Main Injector including 3D space-charge effects.

  6. Final design of the beam source for the MITICA injector

    SciTech Connect

    Marcuzzi, D. Agostinetti, P.; Dalla Palma, M.; De Muri, M.; Chitarin, G.; Gambetta, G.; Marconato, N.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Pilan, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Serianni, G.; Toigo, V.; Trevisan, L.; Visentin, M.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaupa, M.; Boilson, D.; Graceffa, J.; Hemsworth, R. S.; and others

    2016-02-15

    The megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement experiment is the prototype and the test bed of the ITER heating and current drive neutral beam injectors, currently in the final design phase, in view of the installation in Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated facility in Padova, Italy. The beam source is the key component of the system, as its goal is the generation of the 1 MeV accelerated beam of deuterium or hydrogen negative ions. This paper presents the highlights of the latest developments for the finalization of the MITICA beam source design, together with a description of the most recent analyses and R&D activities carried out in support of the design.

  7. Heavy-Ion Injector for the High Current Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J. W.; Prost, L.; Seidl, P.

    2001-10-01

    We report on progress in development of the Heavy-Ion Injector at LBNL, which is being prepared for use as an injector for the High Current Experiment (HCX). It is composed of a 10-cm-diameter surface ionization source, an extraction diode, and an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator, with a typical operating current of 0.6 A of potassium ions at 1.8 MeV, and a beam pulse length of 4.5 microsecs. We have improved the Injector equipment and diagnostics, and have characterized the source emission and radial beam profiles at the diode and ESQ regions. We find improved agreement with EGUN predictions, and improved compatibility with the downstream matching section. Plans are to attach the matching section and the initial ESQ transport section of HCX. Results will be presented and compared with EGUN and WARP simulations.

  8. Final design of the beam source for the MITICA injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuzzi, D.; Agostinetti, P.; Dalla Palma, M.; De Muri, M.; Chitarin, G.; Gambetta, G.; Marconato, N.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pavei, M.; Pilan, N.; Rizzolo, A.; Serianni, G.; Toigo, V.; Trevisan, L.; Visentin, M.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaupa, M.; Boilson, D.; Graceffa, J.; Hemsworth, R. S.; Choi, C. H.; Marti, M.; Roux, K.; Singh, M. J.; Masiello, A.; Froeschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Tobari, H.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Muvvala, V. N.

    2016-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement experiment is the prototype and the test bed of the ITER heating and current drive neutral beam injectors, currently in the final design phase, in view of the installation in Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated facility in Padova, Italy. The beam source is the key component of the system, as its goal is the generation of the 1 MeV accelerated beam of deuterium or hydrogen negative ions. This paper presents the highlights of the latest developments for the finalization of the MITICA beam source design, together with a description of the most recent analyses and R&D activities carried out in support of the design.

  9. Final design of the beam source for the MITICA injector.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, D; Agostinetti, P; Dalla Palma, M; De Muri, M; Chitarin, G; Gambetta, G; Marconato, N; Pasqualotto, R; Pavei, M; Pilan, N; Rizzolo, A; Serianni, G; Toigo, V; Trevisan, L; Visentin, M; Zaccaria, P; Zaupa, M; Boilson, D; Graceffa, J; Hemsworth, R S; Choi, C H; Marti, M; Roux, K; Singh, M J; Masiello, A; Froeschle, M; Heinemann, B; Nocentini, R; Riedl, R; Tobari, H; de Esch, H P L; Muvvala, V N

    2016-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector and concept advancement experiment is the prototype and the test bed of the ITER heating and current drive neutral beam injectors, currently in the final design phase, in view of the installation in Padova Research on Injector Megavolt Accelerated facility in Padova, Italy. The beam source is the key component of the system, as its goal is the generation of the 1 MeV accelerated beam of deuterium or hydrogen negative ions. This paper presents the highlights of the latest developments for the finalization of the MITICA beam source design, together with a description of the most recent analyses and R&D activities carried out in support of the design.

  10. Design and status of the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dané, E.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Di Falco, S.; Donati, S.; Donghia, R.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Grancagnolo, F.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Miyashita, T.; Morescalchi, L.; Murat, P.; Pasciuto, D.; Pezzullo, G.; Porter, F.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.; Spinella, F.; Tassielli, G.; Tereshchenko, V.; Usubov, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims at measuring the neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron and reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5 ×10-17 after three years of data taking. The monoenergetic electron produced in the final state, is detected by a high precision tracker and a crystal calorimeter, all embedded in a large superconducting solenoid (SD) surrounded by a cosmic ray veto system. The calorimeter is complementary to the tracker, allowing an independent trigger and powerful particle identification, while seeding the track reconstruction and contributing to remove background tracks mimicking the signal. In order to match these requirements, the calorimeter should have an energy resolution of O(5)% and a time resolution better than 500 ps at 100 MeV. The baseline solution is a calorimeter composed of two disks of BaF2 crystals read by UV extended, solar blind, Avalanche Photodiode (APDs), which are under development from a JPL, Caltech, RMD consortium. In this paper, the calorimeter design, the R&D studies carried out so far and the status of engineering are described. A backup alternative setup consisting of a pure CsI crystal matrix read by UV extended Hamamatsu MPPC's is also presented.

  11. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-15

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an “inline” calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an “offline” calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a “cold test” on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the “inline” calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device’s power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the “offline” calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the “cold tests,” and the experiments show good agreement.

  12. Design and status of the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Colao, F.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Dane, E.; Davydov, Yu. I.; Di Falco, S.; Donati, S.; Donghia, R.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Grancagnolo, F.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, Stefano; Miyashita, T.; Morescalchi, L.; Murat, P.; Pasciuto, D.; Pezzullo, G.; Porter, F.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.; Spinella, F.; Tassielli, G.; Tereshchenko, V.; Usubov, Z.; Zhu, R. Y.

    2015-10-02

    Here, the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims at measuring the neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron and reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5×10–17 after three years of data taking. The monoenergetic electron produced in the final state, is detected by a high precision tracker and a crystal calorimeter, all embedded in a large superconducting solenoid (SD) surrounded by a cosmic ray veto system. The calorimeter is complementary to the tracker, allowing an independent trigger and powerful particle identification, while seeding the track reconstruction and contributing to remove background tracks mimicking the signal. In order to match these requirements, the calorimeter should have an energy resolution of O(5)% and a time resolution better than 500 ps at 100 MeV. The baseline solution is a calorimeter composed of two disks of BaF2 crystals read by UV extended, solar blind, Avalanche Photodiode (APDs), which are under development from a JPL, Caltech, RMD consortium. In this paper, the calorimeter design, the R&D; studies carried out so far and the status of engineering are described. A backup alternative setup consisting of a pure CsI crystal matrix read by UV extended Hamamatsu MPPC's is also presented.

  13. Design and status of the Mu2e electromagnetic calorimeter

    DOE PAGES

    Atanov, N.; Baranov, V.; Budagov, J.; ...

    2015-10-02

    Here, the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab aims at measuring the neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron and reach a single event sensitivity of 2.5×10–17 after three years of data taking. The monoenergetic electron produced in the final state, is detected by a high precision tracker and a crystal calorimeter, all embedded in a large superconducting solenoid (SD) surrounded by a cosmic ray veto system. The calorimeter is complementary to the tracker, allowing an independent trigger and powerful particle identification, while seeding the track reconstruction and contributing to remove background tracks mimicking the signal. In order to matchmore » these requirements, the calorimeter should have an energy resolution of O(5)% and a time resolution better than 500 ps at 100 MeV. The baseline solution is a calorimeter composed of two disks of BaF2 crystals read by UV extended, solar blind, Avalanche Photodiode (APDs), which are under development from a JPL, Caltech, RMD consortium. In this paper, the calorimeter design, the R&D; studies carried out so far and the status of engineering are described. A backup alternative setup consisting of a pure CsI crystal matrix read by UV extended Hamamatsu MPPC's is also presented.« less

  14. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an "inline" calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an "offline" calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a "cold test" on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the "inline" calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device's power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the "offline" calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the "cold tests," and the experiments show good agreement.

  15. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Brian D.; Parma, Edward J.; Peters, Curtis D.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field - a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP) bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ) contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified) cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ) cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy.

  16. Simulations of a Thin Sampling Calorimeter with GEANT/FLUKA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Watts, John; Howell, Leonard; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS) will investigate the origin, composition and acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays by measuring the elemental composition of the cosmic rays up to 10(exp 15) eV. These measurements will be made with a thin ionization calorimeter and a transition radiation detector. This paper reports studies of a thin sampling calorimeter concept for the ACCESS thin ionization calorimeter. For the past year, a Monte Carlo simulation study of a Thin Sampling Calorimeter (TSC) design has been conducted to predict the detector performance and to design the system for achieving the ACCESS scientific objectives. Simulation results show that the detector energy resolution function resembles a Gaussian distribution and the energy resolution of TSC is about 40%. In addition, simulations of the detector's response to an assumed broken power law cosmic ray spectra in the region where the 'knee' of the cosmic ray spectrum occurs have been conducted and clearly show that a thin sampling calorimeter can provide sufficiently accurate estimates of the spectral parameters to meet the science requirements of ACCESS. n

  17. DARHT-II Injector Transients and the Ferrite Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Will; Reginato, Lou; Chow, Ken; Houck, Tim; Henestroza, Enrique; Yu, Simon; Kang, Michael; Briggs, Richard

    2006-08-04

    This report summarizes the transient response of the DARHT-II Injector and the design of the ferrite damper. Initial commissioning of the injector revealed a rise time excited 7.8 MHz oscillation on the diode voltage and stalk current leading to a 7.8 MHz modulation of the beam current, position, and energy. Commissioning also revealed that the use of the crowbar to decrease the voltage fall time excited a spectrum of radio frequency modes which caused concern that there might be significant transient RF electric field stresses imposed on the high voltage column insulators. Based on the experience of damping the induction cell RF modes with ferrite, the concept of a ferrite damper was developed to address the crowbar-excited oscillations as well as the rise-time-excited 7.8 MHz oscillations. After the Project decided to discontinue the use of the crowbar, further development of the concept focused exclusively on damping the oscillations excited by the rise time. The design was completed and the ferrite damper was installed in the DARHT-II Injector in February 2006. The organization of this report is as follows. The suite of injector diagnostics are described in Section 2. The data and modeling of the injector transients excited on the rise-time and also by the crowbar are discussed in Section 3; the objective is a concise summary of the present state of understanding. The design of the ferrite damper, and the small scale circuit simulations used to evaluate the ferrite material options and select the key design parameters like the cross sectional area and the optimum gap width, are presented in Section 4. The details of the mechanical design and the installation of the ferrite damper are covered in Section 5. A brief summary of the performance of the ferrite damper following its installation in the injector is presented in Section 6.

  18. Local Heat Flux Measurements with Single Element Coaxial Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregg; Protz, Christopher; Bullard, Brad; Hulka, James

    2006-01-01

    To support the mission for the NASA Vision for Space Exploration, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a program in 2005 to improve the capability to predict local thermal compatibility and heat transfer in liquid propellant rocket engine combustion devices. The ultimate objective was to predict and hence reduce the local peak heat flux due to injector design, resulting in a significant improvement in overall engine reliability and durability. Such analyses are applicable to combustion devices in booster, upper stage, and in-space engines, as well as for small thrusters with few elements in the injector. In this program, single element and three-element injectors were hot-fire tested with liquid oxygen and ambient temperature gaseous hydrogen propellants at The Pennsylvania State University Cryogenic Combustor Laboratory from May to August 2005. Local heat fluxes were measured in a 1-inch internal diameter heat sink combustion chamber using Medtherm coaxial thermocouples and Gardon heat flux gauges. Injectors were tested with shear coaxial and swirl coaxial elements, including recessed, flush and scarfed oxidizer post configurations, and concentric and non-concentric fuel annuli. This paper includes general descriptions of the experimental hardware, instrumentation, and results of the hot-fire testing for three of the single element injectors - recessed-post shear coaxial with concentric fuel, flush-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel, and scarfed-post swirl coaxial with concentric fuel. Detailed geometry and test results will be published elsewhere to provide well-defined data sets for injector development and model validatation.

  19. New injectors and the social context of injection initiation

    PubMed Central

    Harocopos, Alex; Goldsamt, Lloyd A.; Kobrak, Paul; Jost, John J.; Clatts, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Preventing the onset of injecting drug use is an important public health objective yet there is little understanding of the process that leads to injection initiation. This paper draws extensively on narrative data to describe how injection initiation is influenced by social environment. We examine how watching other people inject can habitualise non-injectors to administering drugs with a needle and consider the process by which the stigma of injecting is replaced with curiosity. Method In-depth interviews (n=54) were conducted as part of a two-year longitudinal study examining the behaviours of new injecting drug users. Results Among our sample, injection initiation was the result of a dynamic process during which administering drugs with a needle became acceptable or even appealing. Most often, this occurred as a result of spending time with current injectors in a social context and the majority of this study’s participants were given their first shot by a friend or sexual partner. Initiates could be tenacious in their efforts to acquire an injection trainer and findings suggest that once injecting had been introduced to a drug-using network, it was likely to spread throughout the group. Conclusion Injection initiation should be viewed as a communicable process. New injectors are unlikely to have experienced the negative effects of injecting and may facilitate the initiation of their drug-using friends. Prevention messages should therefore aim to find innovative ways of targeting beginning injectors and present a realistic appraisal of the long-term consequences of injecting. Interventionists should also work with current injectors to develop strategies to refuse requests from non-injectors for their help to initiate. PMID:18790623

  20. Penetration of the LCLS Injector Shield Wall at Sector 20

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D

    2010-12-10

    Penetrations through the LCLS injector shield wall are needed for the alignment of the accelerator, a diagnostic laser beam and utilities, and are shown in figure 1. The 1-inch diameter LCLS injector beam tube is blocked by the PPS stopper when the injector side of the wall is occupied. The two 3-inch diameter penetrations above and to the left of the beam tube are used by Precision Alignment and will be open only during installation of the injector beamline. Additional 3-inch diameter penetrations are for laser beams which will be used for electron beam diagnostics. These will not be plugged when the injector occupied. Other penetrations for the RF waveguide and other utilities are approximately 13-inch from the floor and as such are far from the line-of-sight of any radiation sources. The waveguide and utility penetrations pass only through the thicker wall as shown in the figure. The principal issue is with the two laser penetrations, since these will be open when the linac is operating and people are in the LCLS injector area. A principal concern is radiation streaming through the penetrations due to direct line-of sight of the PEP-2 lines. To answer this, fans of rays were traced through the 3-inch diameter laser penetrations as shown in Figures 2 and 3. Figure 2 gives the top view of the shield walls, the main linac and PEP-2 lines, and the ray-fans. The fans appear to originate between the walls since their angular envelope is defined by the greatest angle possible when rays are just on the 3-inch diameter at the inner most and outermost wall surfaces. The crossovers of all possible rays lie half way between these two surfaces. As the end-on view of Figure 3 clearly shows, there is no direct line-of-sight through the laser penetrations of the PEP-2 or linac beamlines.

  1. Results of Beam Extraction Performance for the KSTAR Neutral Beam Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Doo-Hee; Jeong, Seung Ho; Kim, Tae-Seong; Lee, Kwang Won; Ryul In, Sang; Jin, Jung-Tae; Chang, Dae-Sik; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Bae, Young-Soon; Kim, Jong-Su; Cho, Wook; Park, Hyun-Taek; Park, Young-Min; Yang, Hyung-Lyeol; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Dairaku, Masayuki; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Hanada, Masaya; Inoue, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    The first neutral beam injector (NBI-1) has been developed for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. The first long pulse ion source (LPIS-1) has been installed on the NBI-1 for an auxiliary heating and current drive of KSTAR plasmas. The performance of ion and neutral beam extractions in the LPIS-1 was investigated initially on the KSTAR NBI-1 system, prior to the neutral beam injection into the main plasmas. The ion source consists of a magnetic bucket plasma generator with multipole cusp fields and a set of prototype tetrode accelerators with circular apertures. The inner volume of the plasma generator and accelerator column in the LPIS-1 is approximately 123 L. Design requirements for the ion source were a 120 kV/65 A deuterium beam and a 300 s pulse length. The extraction of ion beams was initiated by the formation of arc plasmas in the LPIS-1, called the arc-beam extraction method. A stable ion beam extraction of the LPIS-1 was achieved up to 85 kV/32 A for a 5 s pulse length and 80 kV/25 A for a 14 s pulse length. An optimum beam perveance of 1.15 µperv was observed at an acceleration voltage of 60 kV. Neutralization efficiency was measured by a water-flow calorimetry (WFC) method using a calorimeter and the operation of a bending magnet. The full-energy species of ion beams were detected by using the diagnostic method of optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). An arc efficiency of the LPIS was 0.6-1.1 A/kW depending on the operating conditions of arc discharge. A neutral beam power of ˜1.0 MW must be sufficiently injected into the KSTAR plasmas from the LPIS-1 at a beam energy of 80 keV.

  2. Safety Panel Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore what resources are potentially available to safety panels and to provide some guidance on how to utilize those resources. While the examples used in this paper will concentrate on the Flight Equipment and Reliability Review Panel (FESRRP) and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) hardware that have come through that panel, as well as resources at Johnson Space Center, the paper will address how this applies to safety panels in general, and where possible cite examples for other safety panels.

  3. The Berkeley 2 MV heavy ion fusion injector

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, H.L.; Faltens, A.; Vanecek, D.; Pike, C.; Brodzik, D.; Johnson, R.M.; Meyer, E.A.; Humphries, S. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    This paper is an update on the development of the 500 mA per beam sixteen beam injector being built at LBL. An inductively graded Marx bank provides the acceleration potential on the electrostatic column. A carbon arc source provides the pulsed current for the injector. We report recent results on extracted beam parameters, column performance, the generator performance, and system design changes. The carbon ion beam is diagnosed with Faraday cups and with a double slit emittance measurement system. Controls for the final machine are also discussed. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Small gas-turbine combustor study: Fuel injector evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort at the Lewis Research Center to improve performance, emissions, and reliability of turbine machinery, an investigation of fuel injection technique and effect of fuel type on small gas turbine combustors was undertaken. Performance and pollutant emission levels are documented over a range of simulated flight conditions for a reverse flow combustor configuration using simplex pressure-atomizing, spill-flow return, and splash cone airblast injectors. A parametric evaluation of the effect of increased combustor loading with each of the fuel injector types was obtained. Jet A and an experimental referee broad specification fuel were used to determine the effect of fuel type.

  5. Proposed FNAL 750 KeV Linac Injector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Bollinger, D.S.; Schmidt, C.W.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    The present FNAL linac H{sup -} injector has been operational since 1978 and consists of a magnetron H{sup -} source and a 750 keV Cockcroft-Walton Accelerator. The proposed upgrade to this injector is to replace the present magnetron source having a rectangular aperture with a circular aperture, and to replace the Cockcroft-Walton with a 200 MHz RFQ. Operational experience at other laboratories has shown that the upgraded source and RFQ will be more reliable and require less manpower than the present system.

  6. Injector spray characterization of methanol in reciprocating engines

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, L.; Naegeli, D.

    1994-06-01

    This report covers a study that addressed cold-starting problems in alcohol-fueled, spark-ignition engines by using fine-spray port-fuel injectors to inject fuel directly into the cylinder. This task included development and characterization of some very fine-spray, port-fuel injectors for a methanol-fueled spark-ignition engine. After determining the spray characteristics, a computational study was performed to estimate the evaporation rate of the methanol fuel spray under cold-starting and steady-state conditions.

  7. Dual mode fuel injector with one piece needle valve member

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, Keith E.; Hinrichsen, Michael H.; Buckman, Colby

    2005-01-18

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively by inner and outer needle value members. The homogenous charged nozzle outlet set is defined by an outer needle value member that is moveably positioned in an injector body, which defines the conventional nozzle outlet set. The inner needle valve member is positioned in the outer needle valve member. The outer needle valve member is a piece component that includes at least one external guide surface, an external value surface and an internal valve seat.

  8. A Compact Multi-Beamlets High Current Injector for HIFDrivers

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Grote, D.P.; Westenskow, G.A.

    2005-09-06

    Using curved electrodes in the injector, an array of converging beamlets can produce a beam with the envelope radius, convergence, and ellipticity matched to an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) channel. Experimental results were in good quantitative agreement with simulation and have demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. The size of a driver-scale injector system using this approach will be several times smaller than the one designed using traditional single large-aperture beams, so the success of this experiment has significant economical and technical impacts on the architecture of heavy ion fusion (HIF) drivers.

  9. The Effect of Resistance on Rocket Injector Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability, where unsteady heat release couples with acoustic modes, has long been an area of concern in liquid rocket engines. Accurate modeling of the acoustic normal modes of the combustion chamber is important to understanding and preventing combustion instability. This study evaluates the effect of injector resistance on the mode shapes and complex eigen-frequencies of an injector/combustion chamber system by defining a high Mach-flow form of the convective wave equation (see Eq. 1) in COMSOL Multiphysics' Coefficient Form PDE Mathematics Module.

  10. ICFA neutrino panel report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K.

    2015-07-01

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: "To promote international cooperation in the development of the accelerator-based neutrino-oscillation program and to promote international collaboration in the development of a neutrino factory as a future intense source of neutrinos for particle physics experiments." In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel's findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel's initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  11. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly includes an optical panel having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces. A light source provides an image beam to the panel first face for being channeled through the waveguides and emitted from the panel second face in the form of a viewable light image. A remote device produces a response beam over a discrete selection area of the panel second face for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides toward the panel first face. A light sensor is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides for detecting the response beam therein for providing interactive capability. 10 figs.

  12. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  13. Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Thomas N.

    2004-06-01

    The casting apparatus (50) includes a holding vessel (10) for containing a supply of molten metal (12) and a casting mold (52) located above the holding vessel (10) and having a casting cavity (54). A molten metal injector (14) extends into the holding vessel (10) and is at least partially immersed in the molten metal (12) in the holding vessel (10). The molten metal injector (14) is in fluid communication with the casting cavity (54). The molten metal injector (14) has an injector body (16) defining an inlet opening (24) for receiving molten metal into the injector body (16). A gas pressurization source (38) is in fluid communication with the injector body (16) for cyclically pressurizing the injector body (16) and inducing molten metal to flow from the injector body (16) to the casting cavity (54). An inlet valve (42) is located in the inlet opening (24) in the injector body (16) for filling molten metal into the injector body (16). The inlet valve (42) is configured to prevent outflow of molten metal from the injector body (16) during pressurization and permit inflow of molten metal into the injector body (16) after pressurization. The inlet valve (42) has an inlet valve actuator (44) located above the surface of the supply of molten metal (12) and is operatively connected to the inlet valve (42) for operating the inlet valve (42) between open and closed positions.

  14. A compact light readout system for longitudinally segmented shashlik calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, A.; Brizzolari, C.; Cecchini, S.; Cindolo, F.; Jollet, C.; Longhin, A.; Ludovici, L.; Mandrioli, G.; Mauri, N.; Meregaglia, A.; Paoloni, A.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Prest, M.; Sirri, G.; Terranova, F.; Vallazza, E.; Votano, L.

    2016-09-01

    The longitudinal segmentation of shashlik calorimeters is challenged by dead zones and non-uniformities introduced by the light collection and readout system. This limitation can be overcome by direct fiber-photosensor coupling, avoiding routing and bundling of the wavelength shifter fibers and embedding ultra-compact photosensors (SiPMs) in the bulk of the calorimeter. We present the first experimental test of this readout scheme performed at the CERN PS-T9 beamline in 2015 with negative particles in the 1-5 GeV energy range. In this paper, we demonstrate that the scheme does not compromise the energy resolution and linearity compared with standard light collection and readout systems. In addition, we study the performance of the calorimeter for partially contained charged hadrons to assess the e / π separation capability and the response of the photosensors to direct ionization.

  15. Highly granular hadron calorimeter: software compensation and shower decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadeeva, M.; CALICE Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The highly granular analogue hadron calorimeter was developed and constructed by the CALICE collaboration. The active layers of the calorimeter are assembled from scintillator tiles with individual readout by silicon photomultipliers and are interleaved with absorber plates. The response and resolution of the calorimeter equipped with steel absorber was intensively tested in single particle beams. The application of software compensation techniques developed for the scintillator-steel prototype allows for reduction of the stochastic term of the single particle resolution from 58%/ √E/GeV to 45%/ √E/GeV. The detailed study and decomposition of the longitudinal and radial profiles of hadron-induced showers in the energy range from 10 to 80 GeV are presented and compared to GEANT4 simulations.

  16. Calibration and monitoring systems of the ATLAS tile hadron calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumediene, D.

    2013-08-01

    The TileCal is the hadronic calorimeter covering the most central region of the ATLAS experiment at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter with iron plates as absorber and plastic scintillating tiles as the active material. The scintillation light produced by the passage of charged particles is transmitted by wavelength shifting fibers to about 10,000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). Integrated to the calorimeter, there is a composite device that allows to monitor and/or equalize the signals at various stages of their formation. This device is based on signal generation from different sources: radioactive, LASER, charge injection and minimum bias events produced in proton-proton collisions. Recent performances of these systems are presented.

  17. CMS Hadron Endcap Calorimeter Upgrade Studies for Super-LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilki, Burak; CMS HCAL Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    When the Large Hadron Collider approaches Super-LHC conditions above a luminosity of 1034cm-2s-1, the scintillator tiles of the CMS Hadron Endcap calorimeters will lose their efficiencies. As a radiation hard solution, the scintillator tiles are planned to be replaced by quartz plates. In order to improve the efficiency of the photodetection, various methods were investigated including radiation hard wavelength shifters, p-terphenyl or 4% gallium doped zinc oxide. We constructed a 20 layer calorimeter prototype with pTp coated plates of size 20 cm × 20 cm, and tested the hadronic and the electromagnetic capabilities at the CERN H2 beam-line. The beam tests revealed a substantial light collection increase with pTp or ZnO:Ga deposited quartz plates. Here we report on the current R&D for a viable endcap calorimeter solution for CMS with beam tests and radiation damage studies.

  18. Performance of the DELPHI small angle tile calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Alvsvaag, S.J.; Maeland, O.A.; Klovning, A.

    1996-06-01

    The DELPHI STIC detector is a lead-scintillator sampling calorimeter with wave length shifting optical fibers used for light collection. The main goal of the calorimeter at LEP100 is to measure the luminosity with an accuracy better than 0.1%. The detector has been in operation since the 1994 LEP run. Presented here is the performance measured during the 1994--1995 LEP runs, with the emphasis on the achieved energy and space resolution, the long-term stability and the efficiency of the detector. The new bunchtrains mode of LEP requires a rather sophisticated trigger and timing scheme which is also presented. To control the trigger efficiency and stability of the calorimeter channels, a LED-based monitoring system has been developed.

  19. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeter for the SELEX experiment

    SciTech Connect

    M. Y. Balatz et al.

    2004-07-19

    A large-acceptance, highly segmented electromagnetic lead glass calorimeter for Experiment E781 (SELEX) at Fermi National Acceleration Laboratory was designed and built. This detector has been used to reconstruct photons and electrons with energies ranging from few GeV up to 500 GeV in the collisions of the 650 GeV {Sigma}{sup -} hyperons and {pi}{sup -} mesons with the target nucleons. The design, calibration and performance of the calorimeter are described. Energy resolution and position resolution are assessed using both calibration electron beams and {pi}{sup 0} mesons reconstructed in 650 GeV hadron-hadron interactions. The performance of the calorimeter in selecting resonant states that involve photons is demonstrated.

  20. The NA62 liquid Krypton calorimeter's new readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccucci, A.; Fantechi, R.; Farthouat, P.; Lamanna, G.; Rouet, J.; Ryjov, V.; Venditti, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NA62 experiment [1] at CERN SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) accelerator aims at studying Kaon decays with high precision. The high resolution Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter, built for the NA48 [2] experiment, is a crucial part of the experiment photon-veto system; to cope with the new requirements, the back-end electronics of the LKr had to be completely renewed. Due to the huge number of the calorimeter readout channels ( ~ 14 K) and the maintenance requirement over 10 years of the experiment lifetime, the decision to sub-contract the development and production to industry was taken in 2011. This paper presents the primary test results of the Calorimeter REAdout Module (CREAM) [3] prototype delivered by the manufacturer in March 2013. All essential features, analog performance, data processing and readout, are covered.

  1. Development of Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Cameron Russell

    2015-03-11

    Many nuclear safeguards applications could benefit from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy achievable with metallic magnetic calorimeters. This dissertation covers the development of a system for these applications based on gamma-ray detectors developed at the University of Heidelberg. It demonstrates new calorimeters of this type, which achieved an energy resolution of 45.5 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV, roughly ten times better than current state of the art high purity germanium detectors. This is the best energy resolution achieved with a gamma-ray metallic magnetic calorimeter at this energy to date. In addition to demonstrating a new benchmark in energy resolution, an experimental system for measuring samples with metallic magnetic calorimeters was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system achieved an energy resolution of 91.3 eV full-width at half-maximum at 59.54 keV under optimal conditions. Using this system it was possible to characterize the linearity of the response, the count-rate limitations, and the energy resolution as a function of temperature of the new calorimeter. With this characterization it was determined that it would be feasible to measure 242Pu in a mixed isotope plutonium sample. A measurement of a mixed isotope plutonium sample was performed over the course of 12 days with a single two-pixel metallic magnetic calorimeter. The relative concentration of 242Pu in comparison to other plutonium isotopes was determined by direct measurement to less than half a percent accuracy. This is comparable with the accuracy of the best-case scenario using traditional indirect methods. The ability to directly measure the relative concentration of 242Pu in a sample could enable more accurate accounting and detection of indications of undeclared activities in nuclear safeguards, a better constraint on source material in forensic samples containing plutonium, and improvements in verification in a future plutonium

  2. Metallized Gelled Propellants: Heat Transfer of a Rocket Engine Fueled by Oxygen/RP-1/Aluminum Was Measured by a Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1998-01-01

    A set of analyses was conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics of metallized gelled liquid propellants in a rocket engine. These analyses used data from experiments conducted with a small 30- to 40-lbf thrust engine composed of a modular injector, igniter, chamber, and nozzle. The fuels used were traditional liquid RP-1 and gelled RP-1 with 0-, 5-, and 55-wt % loadings of aluminum (Al) with gaseous oxygen as the oxidizer. Heat transfer measurements were made with a calorimeter chamber and nozzle setup that had a total of 31 cooling channels. A gelled fuel coating, composed of unburned gelled fuel and partially combusted RP-1, formed in the 0-, 5- and 55-wt % engines. For the 0- and 5-wt % RP-1/Al, the coating caused a large decrease in calorimeter engine heat flux in the last half of the chamber. This heat flux reduction was analyzed by comparing engine firings and the changes in the heat flux during a firing at NASA Lewis Research Center's Rocket Laboratories. This work is part of an ongoing series of analyses of metallized gelled propellants.

  3. Improvements in a calorimeter for high-power CW lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, G. E.; Simpson, P. A.; Smith, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A technique for improving the measurement certainty with the BB series (Smith et al., 1972) of electrically calibrated calorimeters used in high-energy lasers is described. The technique is based on monitoring the energy which is backscattered from the meter and monitoring the overspill radiation impinging on the calorimeter at the entrance aperture. The design and performance of a second generation BB meter is discussed and compared to that of the original device in terms of number of electrical calibrations, the residual standard deviation of electrical calibration, the calibration constant for laser energy, the correcting factor for systematics, inaccuracy, imprecision, and uncertainty.

  4. The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Instrument Performance (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. J.; Benson, C. M.; Berry, F. A.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J. S.; Munroe, R. B.; Parnell, T. A.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    SOFCAL is a balloon-borne instrument designed to measure the P-He cosmic ray spectra from about 200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. SOFCAL uses a thin lead and scintillating-fiber ionization calorimeter to measure the cascades produced by cosmic rays interacting in the hybrid detector system. Above the fiber calorimeter is an emulsion chamber that provides the interaction target, primary particle identification and in-flight energy calibration for the scintillating fiber data. The energy measurement technique and its calibration are described, and the present results from the analysis of a 1 day balloon flight will be presented.

  5. Design and Prototyping of a High Granularity Scintillator Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Zutshi, Vishnu

    2016-03-27

    A novel approach for constructing fine-granularity scintillator calorimeters, based on the concept of an Integrated Readout Layer (IRL) was developed. The IRL consists of a printed circuit board inside the detector which supports the directly-coupled scintillator tiles, connects to the surface-mount SiPMs and carries the necessary front-end electronics and signal/bias traces. Prototype IRLs using this concept were designed, prototyped and successfully exposed to test beams. Concepts and implementations of an IRL carried out with funds associated with this contract promise to result in the next generation of scintillator calorimeters.

  6. Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noonan, D.

    2017-02-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is upgrading the photo-detection and readout system of the forward hadronic calorimeter. The phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward calorimeter requires the replacement of the current photomultiplier tubes, as well as the installation of a new front-end readout system. The new photomultiplier tubes contain a thinner window as well as multi-anode readout. The front-end electronics will use the QIE10 ASIC which combines signal digitization with timing information. The major components of the upgrade as well as the current status are described in this paper.

  7. Field test of the bulk-assay calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Keddar, A.

    1982-10-01

    The Bulk-Assay Calorimeter described in ANL-NDA-9/ISPO-14 was field tested at the Belgonucleaire mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plant at Dessel, Belgium, May 13-19, 1982. This instrument was developed under ISPO Tasks A-9 and A-47 at Argonne National Laboratory and was supplied to the IAEA through the U.S support program. Five containers of plutonium-oxide feed stock used in the manufacture of mixed-oxide LMFBR-type fuel were assayed during the test. Electrical measurements to verify the calibration of the calorimeter were also made.

  8. Radiation damage studies for the SDC electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R.; Imlay, R. L.; Khosravi, E. S.; Lim, Jit-Ning; Lyndon, C.; McMills, G.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W. J.; Courtney, J. C.; Tashakkori, R.; Vegara, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results from a year long study aimed at radiation resistance and optical performance of scintillator tile with green wave shifter fiber readout. A careful investigation of several rad-hard plastic scintillators from Bicron and Kuraray, studies indicate that for a specific rad-hard Bicron scintillator, it is possible to build a tile/fiber EM calorimeter that can operate in the design luminosity of SSC. This calorimeter with excellent optical response would only have a light loss of about 5% after being exposed to 1 Mrad.

  9. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the future PANDA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Rainer

    2006-10-27

    Experiments with a cooled antiproton beam at the future accelerator facility FAIR at GSI, Darmstadt, will be performed with the 4{pi} detector PANDA comprising a high resolution, compact and fast homogeneous electromagnetic calorimeter to detect photons between 10MeV and 10GeV energy inside a superconducting solenoid (2T). The target calorimeter comprises more than 20,000 PbWO4 crystals of significantly enhanced quality read-out with large area avalanche photodiodes at an operating temperature of -25 degree sign C. The paper describes the quality of PWO-II and illustrates the future performance based on response measurements with high-energy photons.

  10. The upgrade of the ATLAS first-level calorimeter trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shimpei

    2016-07-01

    The first-level calorimeter trigger (L1Calo) had operated successfully through the first data taking phase of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Towards forthcoming LHC runs, a series of upgrades is planned for L1Calo to face new challenges posed by the upcoming increases of the beam energy and the luminosity. This paper reviews the ATLAS L1Calo trigger upgrade project that introduces new architectures for the liquid-argon calorimeter trigger readout and the L1Calo trigger processing system.

  11. A purity monitor for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, P. N.; Kotov, K. Yu.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Snopkov, R. G.; Rogozin, A. I.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a purity monitor for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter. A new method is suggested based on the usage of a short pulse of a gas discharge as a source of ultraviolet radiation for the photoproduction of electrons in a drift cell of the monitor. This paper describes the design of the monitor, the results of experiments with gaseous and liquid krypton, as well as the experience of using the developed device in the process of krypton purification for the KEDR liquid krypton calorimeter.

  12. Review of Combustion Stability Characteristics of Swirl Coaxial Element Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulka, J. R.; Casiano, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engine injectors using coaxial elements where the center liquid is swirled have become more common in the United States over the past several decades, although primarily for technology or advanced development programs. Currently, only one flight engine operates with this element type in the United States (the RL10 engine), while the element type is very common in Russian (and ex-Soviet) liquid propellant rocket engines. In the United States, the understanding of combustion stability characteristics of swirl coaxial element injectors is still very limited, despite the influx of experimental and theoretical information from Russia. The empirical and theoretical understanding is much less advanced than for the other prevalent liquid propellant rocket injector element types, the shear coaxial and like-on-like paired doublet. This paper compiles, compares and explores the combustion stability characteristics of swirl coaxial element injectors tested in the United States, dating back to J-2 and RL-10 development, and extending to very recent programs at the NASA MSFC using liquid oxygen and liquid methane and kerosene propellants. Included in this study are several other relatively recent design and test programs, including the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME), COBRA, J-2X, and the Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE). A presentation of the basic data characteristics is included, followed by an evaluation by several analysis techniques, including those included in Rocket Combustor Interactive Design and Analysis Computer Program (ROCCID), and methodologies described by Hewitt and Bazarov.

  13. LOX/hydrogen coaxial injector atomization test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is needed to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability margin of liquid propellant rocket engines. To obtain this data, a facility for the study of spray atomization is being established at NASA-Lewis to determine the drop size and velocity distributions occurring in vaporizing liquid sprays at supercritical pressures. Hardware configuration and test conditions are selected to make the cold flow simulant testing correspond as closely as possible to conditions in liquid oxygen (LOX)/gaseous H2 rocket engines. Drop size correlations from the literature, developed for liquid/gas coaxial injector geometries, are used to make drop size predictions for LOX/H2 coaxial injectors. The mean drop size predictions for a single element coaxial injector range from 0.1 to 2000 microns, emphasizing the need for additional studies of the atomization process in LOX/H2 engines. Selection of cold flow simulants, measurement techniques, and hardware for LOX/H2 atomization simulations are discussed.

  14. Radiation shielding for the Main Injector collimation system

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding studies performed with the MARS15 code for the Main Injector collimation system at Fermilab are presented and discussed. MAD-to-MARS Beam Line Builder is used to generate realistic extended curvilinear geometry models.

  15. Single-element coaxial injector for rocket fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, L. L.

    1969-01-01

    Improved injector for oxygen difluoride and diborane has better mixing characteristics and is able to project fuel onto the wall of the combustion chamber for better cooling. It produces an essentially conical, diverging, continuous sheet of propellant mixture formed by similarly shaped and continuously impinging sheets of fuel and oxidant.

  16. The Effect of Resistance on Rocket Injector Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability, where unsteady heat release couples with acoustic modes, has long been an area of concern in liquid rocket engines. Accurate modeling of the acoustic normal modes of the combustion chamber is important to understanding and preventing combustion instability. The injector resistance can have a significant influence on the chamber normal mode shape, and hence on the system stability.

  17. Space shuttle orbital maneuvering engine platelet injector program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A platelet face injector for the Orbit Maneuvering Engine (OME) on the space shuttle was evaluated as a means of obtaining additional design margin and lower cost. The program was conducted in three phases. The first phase evaluated single injection elements, or unielements; it involved visual flow studies, mixing experiments using propellant simulants, and hot firings to assess combustion efficiency, chamber wall compatibility, and injector face temperatures. In the second phase, subscale units producing 600 lbf thrust were used to further evaluate the orifice patterns chosen on the basis of unielement testing. In addition to combustion efficiency, chamber and injector heat transfer, the subscale testing provided a preliminary indication of injector stability. Full scale testing of the selected patterns at 6,000 lbf thrust was performed in the third phase. Performance, heat transfer, and combustion stability were evaluated over the anticipated range of OMS operating conditions. The effects on combustion stability of acoustic cavity configuration, including cavity depth, open area, inlet contour, and other parameters, were investigated.

  18. Solid state lift for micrometering in a fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Milam, David M.; Carroll, Thomas S.; Lee, Chien-Chang; Miller, Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injector performs main fuel injection by raising fuel pressure in a nozzle chamber to lift a check valve member to a fully open position, and performs preinjection or microinjection by operating a solid state motor to lift the check valve member a much smaller distance.

  19. Simulations of transition crossing in the main injector

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, C.M.; MacLachlan, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    The design goal for the Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) is to accelerate a minimum of 6{times}10{sup 10} protons per bunch through the transition. We present here the results from simulation studies of the transition crossing in the FMI using the particle tracking code ESME.

  20. Construction of a thermodesorption injector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    A detailed description for the do-it-yourself construction of a high-performance thermodesorption GC injector (HPTI) is presented. The injector consists of a heated desorption chamber, a cooled loop for focusing the desorbed volatiles as well as a heating control for sample injection into the separation column. The gas flow is controlled by valve switching during the steps of the operation. Two versions of the injector function either for the injection of highly volatile compounds or for compounds with extremely low volatility, e.g. lubricants. The sophisticated gas flow management allows injection of highly concentrated samples without memory effects in a sample gas split mode, while traces may be injected with virtually 1:1 sample transfer. A wide range of adsorbents appropriate for the compounds can be chosen due to homemade adsorbent tubes and the achievability of high desorption temperature. Solutions may be injected from a carrier material after solvent evaporation. The HPTI fulfills all multipurpose GC injector requirements and with the support of downloadable instruction files can be built by anyone working with conventional GC devices.

  1. Antiproton Accumulator in the Main Injector era (2)

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1992-12-01

    By adding a single quadrupole per sextant in the Antiproton Accumulator it is possible to obtain a lattice well suited for higher bandwidth stochastic cooling systems such as those anticipated for the Main Injector era. The lattice proposed here has excellent properties concerning both the lattice functions and the stochastic cooling parameters.

  2. A Compact High-Brightness Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Halaxa, E; Kwan, J W; Bieniosek, F

    2005-05-11

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerators, we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. In an 80-kV 20-microsecond experiment, the RF plasma source has produced up to 5 mA of Ar{sup +} in a single beamlet. An extraction current density of 100 mA/cm{sup 2} was achieved, and the thermal temperature of the ions was below 1 eV. We have tested at full voltage gradient the first 4 gaps of an injector design. Einzel lens were used to focus the beamlets while reducing the beamlet to beamlet space charge interaction. We were able to reach greater than 100 kV/cm in the first four gaps. We also performed experiments on a converging 119 multi-beamlet source. Although the source has the same optics as a full 1.6 MV injector system, these test were carried out at 400 kV due to the test stand HV limit. We have measured the beam's emittance after the beamlets are merged and passed through an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ). Our goal is to confirm the emittance growth and to demonstrate the technical feasibility of building a driver-scale HIF injector.

  3. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Section 870.1650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries to study the heart and vessels by x-ray photography....

  4. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Section 870.1650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries to study the heart and vessels by x-ray photography....

  5. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 870.1650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries to study the heart and vessels by x-ray photography....

  6. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Section 870.1650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries to study the heart and vessels by x-ray photography....

  7. 21 CFR 870.1650 - Angiographic injector and syringe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Section 870.1650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a syringe and a high-pressure injector which are used to inject contrast material into the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries to study the heart and vessels by x-ray photography....

  8. LOX/Hydrogen Coaxial Injector Atomization Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is needed to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability margin of liquid propellant rocket engines. To obtain this data, a facility for the study of spray atomization is being established at NASA-Lewis to determine the drop size and velocity distributions occurring in vaporizing liquid sprays at supercritical pressures. Hardware configuration and test conditions are selected to make the cold flow simulant testing correspond as closely as possible to conditions in liquid oxygen (LOX)/gaseous H2 rocket engines. Drop size correlations from the literature, developed for liquid/gas coaxial injector geometries, are used to make drop size predictions for LOX/H2 coaxial injectors. The mean drop size predictions for a single element coaxial injector range from 0.1 to 2000 microns, emphasizing the need for additional studies of the atomization process in LOX/H2 engines. Selection of cold flow simulants, measured techniques, and hardware for LOX/H2 atomization simulations are discussed.

  9. Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    This report, entitled Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,'' describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

  10. X-ray Radiography Measurements of Shear Coaxial Rocket Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-07

    These injectors rely on the shear between an outer lower-density, high-velocity annulus and a higher-density, low-velocity inner jet to atomize and...velocities and the distance between radial points – Large uncertainty given the small distances, high velocities, and limited number of points

  11. ALS LOX/H2 subscale coaxial injector testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, Carol E.

    1991-01-01

    Tests of a 40K subscale LOX/H2 coaxial LOX swirl injector conducted without injector or chamber degradation are reported. Chamber pressures ranged from 1572 to 2355 psia with overall mixture ratios from 5.04 to 6.39. The highest characteristic velocities were measured when the mixture ratio across the injector face was uniform. Scarfing of the outer row LOX posts had the largest effect on chamber heating rates. As a result of the tests, the LSI design was modified to arrange the outer row LOX posts in a circular pattern, eliminate O/F biasing and fuel film cooling, and modify the interpropellant plate to allow for larger pressure differentials during the start and cutoff transients. Testing of a 100 K LOX/H2 coaxial LOX swirl injector involved chamber pressure ranging from 700 to 2500 psia with overall mixture ratios from 3.2 to 8.8. Stable combustion was observed to a fuel temperature of 90R and characteristic velocity efficiencies were good.

  12. Design considerations for single-stage and two-stage pneumatic pellet injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Milora, S.L.

    1988-09-01

    Performance of single-stage pneumatic pellet injectors is compared with several models for one-dimensional, compressible fluid flow. Agreement is quite good for models that reflect actual breech chamber geometry and incorporate nonideal effects such as gas friction. Several methods of improving the performance of single-stage pneumatic pellet injectors in the near term are outlined. The design and performance of two-stage pneumatic pellet injectors are discussed, and initial data from the two-stage pneumatic pellet injector test facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are presented. Finally, a concept for a repeating two-stage pneumatic pellet injector is described. 27 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Mixing characteristics of injector elements in liquid rocket engines - A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, Jonathan C.; Trinh, Huu P.

    1992-07-01

    A computational study has been performed to better understand the mixing characteristics of liquid rocket injector elements. Variations in injector geometry as well as differences in injector element inlet flow conditions are among the areas examined in the study. Most results involve the nonreactive mixing of gaseous fuel with gaseous oxidizer but preliminary results are included that involve the spray combustion of oxidizer droplets. The purpose of the study is to numerically predict flowfield behavior in individual injector elements to a high degree of accuracy and in doing so to determine how various injector element properties affect the flow.

  14. Commissioning of the 123 MeV injector for 12 GeV CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kazimi, Reza

    2015-09-01

    The upgrade of CEBAF to 12GeV included modifications to the injector portion of the accelerator. These changes included the doubling of the injection energy and relocation of the final transport elements to accommodate changes in the CEBAF recirculation arcs. This paper will describe the design changes and the modelling of the new 12GeV CEBAF injector. Stray magnetic fields have been a known issue for the 6 GeV CEBAF injector, the results of modelling the new 12GeV injector and the resulting changes implemented to mitigate this issue are described in this paper. The results of beam commissioning of the injector are also presented.

  15. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  16. Optimization of a GO2/GH2 Impinging Injector Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, P. Kevin; Shyy, Wei; Vaidyanathan, Rajkumar

    2001-01-01

    An injector optimization methodology, method i, is used to investigate optimal design points for a gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) impinging injector element. The unlike impinging element, a fuel-oxidizer- fuel (F-O-F) triplet, is optimized in terms of design variables such as fuel pressure drop, (Delta)P(sub f), oxidizer pressure drop, (Delta)P(sub o), combustor length, L(sub comb), and impingement half-angle, alpha, for a given mixture ratio and chamber pressure. Dependent variables such as energy release efficiency, ERE, wall heat flux, Q(sub w), injector heat flux, Q(sub inj), relative combustor weight, W(sub rel), and relative injector cost, C(sub rel), are calculated and then correlated with the design variables. An empirical design methodology is used to generate these responses for 163 combinations of input variables. Method i is then used to generate response surfaces for each dependent variable. Desirability functions based on dependent variable constraints are created and used to facilitate development of composite response surfaces representing some, or all, of the five dependent variables in terms of the input variables. Three examples illustrating the utility and flexibility of method i are discussed in detail. First, joint response surfaces are constructed by sequentially adding dependent variables. Optimum designs are identified after addition of each variable and the effect each variable has on the design is shown. This stepwise demonstration also highlights the importance of including variables such as weight and cost early in the design process. Secondly, using the composite response surface which includes all five dependent variables, unequal weights are assigned to emphasize certain variables relative to others. Here, method i is used to enable objective trade studies on design issues such as component life and thrust to weight ratio. Finally, specific variable weights are further increased to illustrate the high marginal cost of

  17. Tritium pellet injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma phase. An existing deuterium pellet injector (DPI) was modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed for frozen pellets ranging in size from 3 to 4 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at tritium pellet speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC). The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were also made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellets. Results of the testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI has been installed and operated on TFTR in support of the CY-92 deuterium plasma run period. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and tritium gloveboxes and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability.

  18. Tritium pellet injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1992-11-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma phase. An existing deuterium pellet injector (DPI) was modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed for frozen pellets ranging in size from 3 to 4 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at tritium pellet speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC). The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were also made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellets. Results of the testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI has been installed and operated on TFTR in support of the CY-92 deuterium plasma run period. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and tritium gloveboxes and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability.

  19. Titanium Honeycomb Panel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, W. Lance; Thompson, Randolph C.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical tests were performed on a titanium honeycomb sandwich panel to experimentally validate the hypersonic wing panel concept and compare test data with analysis. Details of the test article, test fixture development, instrumentation, and test results are presented. After extensive testing to 900 deg. F, non-destructive evaluation of the panel has not detected any significant structural degradation caused by the applied thermal-mechanical loads.

  20. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

  1. Computation of Transverse Injection Into Supersonic Crossflow With Various Injector Orifice Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Lancert; Engblom, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Computational results are presented for the performance and flow behavior of various injector geometries employed in transverse injection into a non-reacting Mach 1.2 flow. 3-D Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) results are obtained for the various injector geometries using the Wind code with the Mentor s Shear Stress Transport turbulence model in both single and multi-species modes. Computed results for the injector mixing, penetration, and induced wall forces are presented. In the case of rectangular injectors, those longer in the direction of the freestream flow are predicted to generate the most mixing and penetration of the injector flow into the primary stream. These injectors are also predicted to provide the largest discharge coefficients and induced wall forces. Minor performance differences are indicated among diamond, circle, and square orifices. Grid sensitivity study results are presented which indicate consistent qualitative trends in the injector performance comparisons with increasing grid fineness.

  2. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  3. Solar reflection panels

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Grossman, James W.; Reshetnik, Michael

    2006-07-18

    A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front surface of the composite panel. The composite panel comprises a front sheet affixed to a surface of a core material, preferably a core material comprising a honeycomb structure, and a back sheet affixed to an opposite surface of the core material. The invention may further comprise a sealing strip, preferably comprising EPDM, positioned between the glass mirror and the front surface of the composite panel. The invention also is of methods of making such solar collectors.

  4. LER-LHC injector workshop summary and super-ferric fast cycling injector in the SPS tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio; Hays, Steven; Huang, Yuenian; Johnstone, John; Kashikhin, Vadim; MacLachlan, James; Mokhov, Nikolai; Piekarz, Henryk; Sen, Tanaji; Shiltsev, Vladimir; de Rijk, Gijsbert; /CERN

    2007-03-01

    A Workshop on Low Energy Ring (LER) in the LHC tunnel as main injector was convened at CERN on October 11-12, 2006. We present the outline of the LER based on the presentations, and respond to the raised questions and discussions including the post-workshop studies. We also outline the possibility of using the LER accelerator technologies for the fast cycling injector accelerator in the SPS tunnel (SF-SPS). A primary goal for the LER (Low Energy Ring) injector accelerator is to inject 1.5 TeV proton beams into the LHC, instead of the current injection scheme with 0.45 TeV beams from the SPS. At this new energy, the field harmonics [1] of the LHC magnets are sufficiently satisfactory to prevent the luminosity losses expected to appear when applying the transfer of the 0.45 TeV SPS beams. In addition, a feasibility study of batch slip stacking in the LER has been undertaken with a goal of increasing in this way the LHC luminosity by up to a factor of 4. A combined luminosity increase may, therefore, be in the range of an order of magnitude. In the long term, the LER injector accelerator would greatly facilitate the implementation of a machine, which doubles the LHC energy (DLHC).

  5. The pad readout electronics of the SLD Warm Iron Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Cartwright, S.L.; Friedman, J.I.; Fuess, S.; Gonzalez, S.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Kendall, H.W.; Lath, A.; Lyons, T.; Osborne, L.S.; Rosenson, L.; Schneekloth, U.; Taylor, F.E.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Williams, D.C.; Yamartino, J.M. ); Byers, B.L.; Escalera, J.; Gioumousis, A.; Gray, R.; Horelick, D.; Kharakh, D.; Messner, R.L.; Moss, J.; Zdark

    1990-08-01

    The design of the pad readout electronics of the Warm Iron Calorimeter for the SLD detector at SLAC, consisting of about 9000 analog channels, is described. Results of various tests performed during the construction, installation and commissioning of the electronics mounted on the detector are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Development of shashlik electromagnetic calorimeter prototype for SoLID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Xiao, D.; Han, D.; Zou, Z.; Li, Y.; Zheng, X.; Chen, J.

    2017-03-01

    A shashlik electromagnetic calorimeter will be produced in Hall A of Jefferson Laboratory for Solenoidal large Intensity Device (SoLID) to measure the energy deposition of electrons and hadrons, and to provide particle identification after the energy of the accelerator was upgraded to 12 GeV. Tsinghua University is the member of Hall A collaboration in charge of development and production of the large shashlik electromagnetic calorimeter of SoLID. One module of that calorimeter is composed by 194 layers. Each layer consists of a 1.5 mm thick plastic scintillator put on top of a 0.5 mm thick lead plate. Scintillation light is read out by wave-length shifter fibers penetrating through the calorimeter modules longitudinally along the direction of flight of the impact particle. This paper describes the design and construction of that module, as well as a few optimization studies meant to improve its performance. A detailed Geant4 simulation also shows that an energy resolution of 5%/√ E (GeV) and a good containment for electromagnetic showers can be achieved, as well as some basic electron identification. A prototype of that module will be tested soon with an electron beam at JLab.

  7. Electromagnetic calorimeter for the HADES@FAIR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, O.; Blume, C.; Czyžycki, W.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Galatyuk, T.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Hlaváč, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kajetanowic, M.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, W.; Kugler, A.; Lapidus, K.; Lisowski, E.; Pietraszko, J.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Salabura, P.; Sobolev, Y. G.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.

    2014-05-01

    An electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is being developed to complement the dilepton spectrometer HADES currently operating on the beam of the SIS18 heavy-ion synchrotron at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany. The ECAL will allow the HADES@FAIR experiment to measure data on neutral meson production in heavy ion collisions in the energy range of 2-10 AGeV with the beam of the future accelerator SIS100@FAIR. The calorimeter will also improve the electron-hadron separation of the spectrometer, and will be used for the detection of photons from strange resonances in elementary and heavy ion reactions as well. The calorimeter will consist of 978 modules divided into 6 sectors, and it will cover forward angles of 16° < Θ < 45° and almost full azimuthal angle. Each module consists of a lead glass Cherenkov counter, photomultiplier, HV divider and an optical fiber. A dedicated LED based system being developed to monitor the stability of the calorimeter is discussed. Various prototypes of front-end electronics are presented and the achieved energy and time resolution determined using pulses from a pulse generator and a real detector signal induced by LED pulses and cosmic muons is shown as well.

  8. Balloon test project: Cosmic Ray Antimatter Calorimeter (CRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, J. C.; Dhenain, G.; Goret, P.; Jorand, J.; Masse, P.; Mestreau, P.; Petrou, N.; Robin, A.

    1984-01-01

    Cosmic ray observations from balloon flights are discussed. The cosmic ray antimatter calorimeter (CRAC) experiment attempts to measure the flux of antimatter in the 200-600 Mev/m energy range and the isotopes of light elements between 600 and 1,000 Mev/m.

  9. Temperature and humidity control in indirect calorimeter chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-chamber, indirect calorimeter has been a part of the Environmental Laboratory at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) for over 25 yr. Corrosion of the animal chambers and unreliable temperature control forced either major repairs or complete replacement. There is a strong demand for...

  10. Progress status for the Mu2e calorimeter system

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzullo, Gianantonio; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; Cervelli, F.; Cheng, C.; Cordelli, M.; Corradi, G.; Davydov, Yu.; Echenard, B.; Giovannella, S.; Glagolev, V.; Happacher, F.; Hitlin, D.; Luca, A.; Martini, M.; Miscetti, S.; Murat, P.; Ongmonkolkul, P.; Porter, F.; Saputi, A.; Sarra, I.; Spinella, F.; Stomaci, V.; Tassielli, G.

    2015-02-13

    The Mu2e experiment at FNAL aims to measure the charged-lepton flavor violating neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron. The conversion results in a monochromatic electron with an energy slightly below the muon rest mass (104.97 MeV). The calorimeter should confirm that the candidates reconstructed by the extremely precise tracker system are indeed conversion electrons while performing a powerful $\\mu/e$ particle identification. Moreover, it should also provide a high level trigger for the experiment independently from the tracker system. The calorimeter should also be able to keep functionality in an environment where the background delivers a dose of ~ 10 krad/year in the hottest area and to work in the presence of 1 T axial magnetic field. These requirements translate in the design of a calorimeter with large acceptance, good energy resolution O(5%) and a reasonable position (time) resolution of ~<1 cm (<0.5ns). The baseline version of the calorimeter is composed by two disks of inner (outer) radius of 351 (660) mm filled by 1860 hexagonal $BaF_2$ crystals of 20 cm length. Each crystal is readout by two large area APD's. In this study, we summarize the experimental tests done so far as well as the simulation studies in the Mu2e environment.

  11. Progress status for the Mu2e calorimeter system

    DOE PAGES

    Pezzullo, Gianantonio; Budagov, J.; Carosi, R.; ...

    2015-02-13

    The Mu2e experiment at FNAL aims to measure the charged-lepton flavor violating neutrinoless conversion of a negative muon into an electron. The conversion results in a monochromatic electron with an energy slightly below the muon rest mass (104.97 MeV). The calorimeter should confirm that the candidates reconstructed by the extremely precise tracker system are indeed conversion electrons while performing a powerfulmore » $$\\mu/e$$ particle identification. Moreover, it should also provide a high level trigger for the experiment independently from the tracker system. The calorimeter should also be able to keep functionality in an environment where the background delivers a dose of ~ 10 krad/year in the hottest area and to work in the presence of 1 T axial magnetic field. These requirements translate in the design of a calorimeter with large acceptance, good energy resolution O(5%) and a reasonable position (time) resolution of ~<1 cm (<0.5ns). The baseline version of the calorimeter is composed by two disks of inner (outer) radius of 351 (660) mm filled by 1860 hexagonal $$BaF_2$$ crystals of 20 cm length. Each crystal is readout by two large area APD's. In this study, we summarize the experimental tests done so far as well as the simulation studies in the Mu2e environment.« less

  12. CsI Calorimeter for a Compton-Pair Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Eric J.

    We propose to build and test a hodoscopic CsI(Tl) scintillating-crystal calorimeter for a medium-energy γ-ray Compton and pair telescope. The design and technical approach for this calorimeter relies deeply on heritage from the Fermi LAT CsI Calorimeter, but it dramatically improves the low-energy performance of that design by reading out the scintillation light with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), making the technology developed for Fermi applicable in the Compton regime. While such a hodoscopic calorimeter is useful for an entire class of medium-energy γ-ray telescope designs, we propose to build it explicitly to support beam tests and balloon flight of the Proto-ComPair telescope, the development and construction of which was funded in a four-year APRA program beginning in 2015 ("ComPair: Steps to a Medium Energy γ-ray Mission" with PI J. McEnery of GSFC). That award did not include funding for its CsI calorimeter subsystem, and this proposal is intended to cover that gap. ComPair is a MIDEX-class instrument concept to perform a high-sensitivity survey of the γ-ray sky from 0.5 MeV to 500 MeV. ComPair is designed to provide a dramatic increase in sensitivity relative to previous instruments in this energy range (predominantly INTEGRAL/SPI and Compton COMPTEL), with the same transformative sensitivity increase – and corresponding scientific return– that the Fermi Large Area Telescope provided relative to Compton EGRET. To enable transformative science over a broad range of MeV energies and with a wide field of view, ComPair is a combined Compton telescope and pair telescope employing a silicon-strip tracker (for Compton scattering and pair conversion and tracking) and a solid-state CdZnTe calorimeter (for Compton absorption) and CsI calorimeter (for pair calorimetry), surrounded by a plastic scintillator anti-coincidence detector. Under the current proposal, we will complete the detailed design, assembly, and test of the CsI calorimeter for the risk

  13. A Design Tool for Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Cheng, Gary; Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Tucker, P. Kevin; Hutt, John

    1999-01-01

    A practical design tool for the analysis of flowfields near the injector face has been developed and used to analyze the Fastrac engine. The objective was to produce a computational design tool which was detailed enough to predict the interactive effects of injector element impingement angles and points and the momenta of the individual orifice flows. To obtain a model which could be used to simulate a significant number of individual orifices, a homogeneous computational fluid dynamics model was developed. To describe liquid and vapor sub- and super-critical flows, the model included thermal and caloric equations of state which were valid over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. A homogeneous model was constructed such that the local state of the flow was determined directly, i.e. the quality of the flow was calculated. Such a model does not identify drops or their distribution, but it does allow the flow along the injector face and into the acoustic cavity to be predicted. It also allows the film coolant flow to be accurately described. The initial evaluation of the injector code was made by simulating cold flow from an unlike injector element and from a like-on-like overlapping fan (LOL) injector element. The predicted mass flux distributions of these injector elements compared well to cold flow test results. These are the same cold flow tests which serve as the data base for the JANNAF performance prediction codes. The flux distributions 1 inch downstream of the injector face are very similar; the differences were somewhat larger at further distances from the faceplate. Since the cold flow testing did not achieve good mass balances when integrations across the entire fan were made, the CFD simulation appears to be reasonable alternative to future cold flow testing. To simulate the Fastrac, an RP-1/LOX combustion model must be chosen. This submodel must be relatively simple to accomplish three-dimensional, multiphase flow simulations. Single RP-1

  14. Stereoscopic Flat Panel Display

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    the display of stereo imagery have been demonstrated. Stereoscopic displays typically require the user to wear special headgear. Autostereoscopic ...components and the resulting changes in the encoding algorithm. Keywords: Stereoscopic display, LCD, 3D , polarization encoding, flat panel 1...panel display when viewing non-stereoscopic imagery or data. Remotely operated vehicles do not represent the only potential application for 3D

  15. Flexible optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    A flexible optical panel includes laminated optical waveguides, each including a ribbon core laminated between cladding, with the core being resilient in the plane of the core for elastically accommodating differential movement thereof to permit winding of the panel in a coil.

  16. SNP panels/Imputation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participants from thirteen countries discussed services that Interbull can perform or recommendations that Interbull can make to promote harmonization and assist member countries in improving their genomic evaluations in regard to SNP panels and imputation. The panel recommended: A mechanism to shar...

  17. New mineral physics panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The AGU Committee on Mineral Physics has formed itself into six panels. The committee chairman is Orson L. Anderson of the Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles; foreign secretary is Robert Liebermann, Department of Earth and Space Sciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook. The six panels are as follows.

  18. Reinventing the solar panel

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, M.

    1995-08-01

    This article discusses new technology in solar panels. PowerSource is a solar collector which not only is less expensive than conventional panels to purchase and install, but also increases the electrical output by almost 20%. This article describes the results of testing this system.

  19. Digital holographic diagnostics of near-injector region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaiho

    Study of primary breakup of liquid jets is important because it is motivated by the application to gas turbine fuel injectors, diesel fuel injectors, industrial cleaning and washing machine, medical spray, and inkjet printers, among others. When it comes to good injectors, a liquid jet has to be disintegrated into a fine spray near injector region during primary breakup. However the dense spray region near the injectors is optically obscure for Phase Doppler Interferometer like Phase Doppler Particle Analyzers (PDPA). Holography can provide three dimensional image of the dense spray and eliminate the problem of the small depth of focus associated with shadowgraphs. Traditional film-based holographic technique has long been used for three dimensional measurements in particle fields, but it is time consuming, expensive, chemically hazardous. With the development of the CCD sensor, holograms were recorded and reconstructed digitally. Digital microscopic holography (DMH) is similar to digital inline holography (DIH) except that no lens is used to collimate the object beam. The laser beams are expanded with an objective lens and a spatial filter. This eliminates two lenses from the typical optical path used for in-line holography, which results in a much cleaner hologram recording. The DMH was used for drop size and velocity measurements of the breakup of aerated liquid jets because it is unaffected by the non-spherical droplets that are encountered very close to the injector exit, which would cause problems for techniques such as Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, otherwise. Large field of view was obtained by patching several high resolution holograms. Droplet velocities in three dimensions were measured by tracking their displacements in the streamwise and cross-stream direction and by tracking the change in the plane of focus in the spanwise direction. The uncertainty in spanwise droplet location and velocity measurements using single view DMH was large at least 33

  20. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panel seeks to take are outlined.

  1. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-03-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

  2. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

  3. Panel 5: Microbiology and Immunology Panel

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Barenkamp, Stephen; Kyd, Jennelle; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Patel, Janak A.; Heikkinen, Terho; Yamanaka, Noboru; Ogra, Pearay; Swords, W. Edward; Sih, Tania; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective is to perform a comprehensive review of the literature from January 2007 through June 2011 on the virology, bacteriology, and immunology related to otitis media. Data Sources PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Review Methods Three subpanels with co-chairs comprising experts in the virology, bacteriology, and immunology of otitis media were formed. Each of the panels reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a second draft was created. The entire panel met at the 10th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2011 and discussed the review and refined the content further. A final draft was created, circulated, and approved by the panel. Conclusion Excellent progress has been made in the past 4 years in advancing an understanding of the microbiology and immunology of otitis media. Advances include laboratory-based basic studies, cell-based assays, work in animal models, and clinical studies. Implications for Practice The advances of the past 4 years formed the basis of a series of short-term and long-term research goals in an effort to guide the field. Accomplishing these goals will provide opportunities for the development of novel interventions, including new ways to better treat and prevent otitis media. PMID:23536533

  4. An Approach to Improved Credibility of CFD Simulations for Rocket Injector Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Paul K.; Menon, Suresh; Merkle, Charles L.; Oefelein, Joseph C.; Yang, Vigor

    2007-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has the potential to improve the historical rocket injector design process by simulating the sensitivity of performance and injector-driven thermal environments to. the details of the injector geometry and key operational parameters. Methodical verification and validation efforts on a range of coaxial injector elements have shown the current production CFD capability must be improved in order to quantitatively impact the injector design process.. This paper documents the status of an effort to understand and compare the predictive capabilities and resource requirements of a range of CFD methodologies on a set of model problem injectors. Preliminary results from a steady Reynolds-Average Navier-Stokes (RANS), an unsteady Reynolds-Average Navier Stokes (URANS) and three different Large Eddy Simulation (LES) techniques used to model a single element coaxial injector using gaseous oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants are presented. Initial observations are made comparing instantaneous results, corresponding time-averaged and steady-state solutions in the near -injector flow field. Significant differences in the flow fields exist, as expected, and are discussed. An important preliminary result is the identification of a fundamental mixing mechanism, accounted for by URANS and LES, but missing in the steady BANS methodology. Since propellant mixing is the core injector function, this mixing process may prove to have a profound effect on the ability to more correctly simulate injector performance and resulting thermal environments. Issues important to unifying the basis for future comparison such as solution initialization, required run time and grid resolution are addressed.

  5. STE thrust chamber technology: Main injector technology program and nozzle Advanced Development Program (ADP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the STME Main Injector Program was to enhance the technology base for the large-scale main injector-combustor system of oxygen-hydrogen booster engines in the areas of combustion efficiency, chamber heating rates, and combustion stability. The initial task of the Main Injector Program, focused on analysis and theoretical predictions using existing models, was complemented by the design, fabrication, and test at MSFC of a subscale calorimetric, 40,000-pound thrust class, axisymmetric thrust chamber operating at approximately 2,250 psi and a 7:1 expansion ratio. Test results were used to further define combustion stability bounds, combustion efficiency, and heating rates using a large injector scale similar to the Pratt & Whitney (P&W) STME main injector design configuration including the tangential entry swirl coaxial injection elements. The subscale combustion data was used to verify and refine analytical modeling simulation and extend the database range to guide the design of the large-scale system main injector. The subscale injector design incorporated fuel and oxidizer flow area control features which could be varied; this allowed testing of several design points so that the STME conditions could be bracketed. The subscale injector design also incorporated high-reliability and low-cost fabrication techniques such as a one-piece electrical discharged machined (EDMed) interpropellant plate. Both subscale and large-scale injectors incorporated outer row injector elements with scarfed tip features to allow evaluation of reduced heating rates to the combustion chamber.

  6. Epinephrine auto-injector use and demographics in a Veterans Administration population.

    PubMed

    Amirzadeh, Ali; Verma, Prashant; Lee, Sabrina; Klaustermeyer, William

    2010-01-01

    The epinephrine auto-injector has been widely used over a long period of time. Certain aspects of this therapy and demographic data, however, have not been well studied. This study investigates patient use and understanding of epinephrine auto-injector use. As part of an ongoing quality assurance program, we evaluated 66 patients who had been given an epinephrine auto-injector and followed in the Allergy and Immunology Clinics at the West Los Angeles Veterans Medical Center. Data analyzed included patient demographics, medical indications for epinephrine auto-injector prescriptions, and the patient's understanding and use of the device. The mean age of our patients was 50 years. There were 44 men (66.7%) and 22 women (33%). Twenty-three patients were prescribed epinephrine auto-injector for adverse food reactions. Ninety-two percent (92%) of the patients knew how to use their epinephrine auto-injector properly, however, only 58% carried their device with them consistently. Of the patients, 91% understood why the auto-injector was prescribed. Of the total patients prescribed epinephrine auto-injector, 79% refilled their medication before the 1 year expiration date. Only 12% of the patients studied had required the use of their auto-injector. Most patients knew how and when to administer their epinephrine auto-injector. Despite detailed instructions in a specialty clinic only a slight majority carried it consistently. These data clearly indicate that further patient education or other measures are needed to improve compliance and effective use.

  7. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  8. Magnetized Target Fusion Propulsion: Plasma Injectors for MTF Guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2003-01-01

    To achieve increased payload size and decreased trip time for interplanetary travel, a low mass, high specific impulse, high thrust propulsion system is required. This suggests the need for research into fusion as a source of power and high temperature plasma. The plasma would be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) research consists of several related investigations into these topics. These include the orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the gun as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability are under investigation. One of the items under development is the plasma injector. This is a surface breakdown driven plasma generator designed to function at very low pressures. The performance, operating conditions and limitations of these injectors need to be determined.

  9. Injector nozzle for molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.

    1996-02-13

    An injector nozzle has been designed for safely injecting energetic waste materials, such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels, into a molten salt reactor in a molten salt destruction process without premature detonation or back burn in the injection system. The energetic waste material is typically diluted to form a fluid fuel mixture that is injected rapidly into the reactor. A carrier gas used in the nozzle serves as a carrier for the fuel mixture, and further dilutes the energetic material and increases its injection velocity into the reactor. The injector nozzle is cooled to keep the fuel mixture below the decomposition temperature to prevent spontaneous detonation of the explosive materials before contact with the high-temperature molten salt bath. 2 figs.

  10. Injector nozzle for molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.

    1996-01-01

    An injector nozzle has been designed for safely injecting energetic waste materials, such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels, into a molten salt reactor in a molten salt destruction process without premature detonation or back burn in the injection system. The energetic waste material is typically diluted to form a fluid fuel mixture that is injected rapidly into the reactor. A carrier gas used in the nozzle serves as a carrier for the fuel mixture, and further dilutes the energetic material and increases its injection velocity into the reactor. The injector nozzle is cooled to keep the fuel mixture below the decomposition temperature to prevent spontaneous detonation of the explosive materials before contact with the high-temperature molten salt bath.

  11. Fermilab Main Injector Collimation Systems: Design, Commissioning and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Drozhdin, A.I.; Johnson, David E.; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Morris, Denton K.; Rakhno, Igor; Seiya, Kiyomi; Sidorov, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector is moving toward providing 400 kW of 120 GeV proton beams using slip stacking injection of eleven Booster batches. Loss of 5% of the beam at or near injection energy results in 1.5 kW of beam loss. A collimation system has been implemented to localize this loss with the design emphasis on beam not captured in the accelerating RF buckets. More than 95% of these losses are captured in the collimation region. We will report on the construction, commissioning and operation of this collimation system. Commissioning studies and loss measurement tools will be discussed. Residual radiation monitoring of the Main Injector machine components will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of these efforts.

  12. Characterization of coaxial rocket injector sprays under high pressure environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, S. V.; Wang, G.; Brena De La Rosa, A.; Rudoff, R. C.; Isakovic, A.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of elevated environment pressures on the atomization characteristics of a single element, scaled-down, shear-coaxial rocket injector has been investigated. In this study, the shear coaxial injector was operated with water and air as simulants for conventionally used liquid oxygen and hydrogen gas, respectively. The experiments were conducted in a specially designed high pressure rig. A two-component PDPA/DSA system was used to study the spray characteristics at different chamber pressures ranging from atmospheric to 100 psig. The study showed an overall increase in the droplet sizes at higher chamber pressures. This phenomenon is attributed to a decrease in the secondary atomization effects at higher chamber pressures which, in turn, is directly related to a decrease in the shear experienced by the droplets as they move axially through the pressure chamber.

  13. Electron Cloud Measurements in Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey Scott; Backfish, M.; Tan, C. Y.; Zwaska, R.

    2015-06-01

    This conference paper presents a series of electron cloud measurements in the Fermilab Main Injector and Recycler. A new instability was observed in the Recycler in July 2014 that generates a fast transverse excitation in the first high intensity batch to be injected. Microwave measurements of electron cloud in the Recycler show a corresponding depen- dence on the batch injection pattern. These electron cloud measurements are compared to those made with a retard- ing field analyzer (RFA) installed in a field-free region of the Recycler in November. RFAs are also used in the Main Injector to evaluate the performance of beampipe coatings for the mitigation of electron cloud. Contamination from an unexpected vacuum leak revealed a potential vulnerability in the amorphous carbon beampipe coating. The diamond-like carbon coating, in contrast, reduced the electron cloud signal to 1% of that measured in uncoated stainless steel beampipe.

  14. Flow in a model of the SSME main injector bowl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, B. E.; Senaldi, J.; Vafidis, C.; Whitelaw, J. H.; Mcdonald, H.

    1989-01-01

    Mean-flow and turbulence quantities obtained in a 32-percent acrylic model of the SSME main injector bowl are presented. Flow visualization obtained with laser sheets and conventional photography shows the basic patterns and identifies regions of recirculating flow. Measurements of mean-flow and turbulence normal stresses are obtained with laser velocimetry to confirm these results and to quantify flow characteristics in the inlet ducts, entrance region, racetrack, LOX-post bundle, and exit nozzle. Measured velocity distributions show the upstream effect of the injector bowl in the transfer ducts, the plenum effect of the racetrack and LOX-post bundle, and the nonuniform distribution of flow into the main exit nozzle.

  15. A hot-spare injector for the APS linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J. W.

    1999-04-13

    Last year a second-generation SSRL-type thermionic cathode rf gun was installed in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac. This gun (referred to as ''gun2'') has been successfully commissioned and now serves as the main injector for the APS linac, essentially replacing the Koontz-type DC gun. To help ensure injector availability, particularly with the advent of top-up mode operation at the APS, a second thermionic-cathode rf gun will be installed in the APS linac to act as a hot-spare beam source. The hot-spare installation includes several unique design features, including a deep-orbit Panofsky-style alpha magnet. Details of the hot-spare beamline design and projected performance are presented, along with some plans for future performance upgrades.

  16. Drug injectors and the cleaning of needles and syringes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, R A

    2000-03-01

    When people share needles and syringes they risk transmitting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other infections including hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Cleaning needles and syringes can help to reduce, although not eliminate, these risks. This article begins by engaging with some of the literature on the cleaning of needles and syringes. Drawing on qualitative research conducted with drug injectors in England, the article then goes on to explore drug injectors' perceptions and experiences of cleaning needles and syringes inside and outside prison. The article concludes by highlighting the implications for future research and policy making. Ultimately there should be a stronger policy response to reduce the risks associated with sharing needles and syringes inside prison, which should include the piloting of prison needle and syringe exchange schemes.

  17. Space shuttle orbital maneuvering engine platelet injector program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A platelet-face injector for the fully reusable orbit maneuvering system OMS on the space shuttle was evaluated as a means of obtaining additional design margin and low cost. Performance, heat transfer, and combustion stability were evaluated over the anticipated range of OMS operating conditions. The effects of acoustic cavity configuration on combustion stability, including cavity depth, open area, inlet contour, and other parameters, were investigated using sea level bomb tests. Prototype injector and chamber behavior was evaluated for a variety of conditions; these tests examined the effects of film cooling, helium saturated propellants, chamber length, inlet conditions, and operating point, on performance, heat transfer and engine transient behavior. Helium bubble ingestion into both propellant circuits was investigated, as was chugging at low pressure operation, and hot and cold engine restart with and without a purge.

  18. Mixed mode fuel injector with individually moveable needle valve members

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Chris; Chockley, Scott A.; Ibrahim, Daniel R.; Lawrence, Keith; Tomaseki, Jay; Azam, Junru H.; Tian, Steven Ye; Shafer, Scott F.

    2004-08-03

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively, by first and second needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position while the other needle valve member remains stationary for a homogeneous charge injection event. The former needle valve member stays stationary while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. One of the needle valve members is at least partially positioned in the other needle valve member. Thus, the injector can perform homogeneous charge injection events, conventional injection events, or even a mixed mode having both types of injection events in a single engine cycle.

  19. Fermilab main injector: High intensity operation and beam loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Bruce C.; Adamson, Philip; Capista, David; Chou, Weiren; Kourbanis, Ioanis; Morris, Denton K.; Seiya, Kiyomi; Wu, Guan Hong; Yang, Ming-Jen

    2013-07-01

    From 2005 through 2012, the Fermilab Main Injector provided intense beams of 120 GeV protons to produce neutrino beams and antiprotons. Hardware improvements in conjunction with improved diagnostics allowed the system to reach sustained operation at 400 kW beam power. Transmission was very high except for beam lost at or near the 8 GeV injection energy where 95% beam transmission results in about 1.5 kW of beam loss. By minimizing and localizing loss, residual radiation levels fell while beam power was doubled. Lost beam was directed to either the collimation system or to the beam abort. Critical apertures were increased while improved instrumentation allowed optimal use of available apertures. We will summarize the improvements required to achieve high intensity, the impact of various loss control tools and the status and trends in residual radiation in the Main Injector.

  20. Compact High-Current Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G A; Grote, D P; Kwan, J W; Bieniosek, F

    2006-04-13

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. An array of converging beamlets was use to produce a beam with the envelope radius, convergence, and ellipticity matched to an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) channel. Experimental results were in good quantitative agreement with simulation and have demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. The size of a driver-scale injector system using this approach will be several times smaller than one designed using traditional single large-aperture beams. The success of this experiment has possible significant economical and technical impacts on the architecture of HIF drivers.

  1. Compact High-Current Heavy-Ion Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Grote, D.P.; Kwan, J.W.; Bieniosek, F.

    2005-10-05

    To provide a compact high-brightness heavy-ion beam source for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), we have been experimenting with merging multi-beamlets in an injector which uses an RF plasma source. An array of converging beamlets was used to produce a beam with the envelope radius, convergence, and ellipticity matched to an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) channel. Experimental results were in good quantitative agreement with simulation and have demonstrated the feasibility of this concept. The size of a driver-scale injector system using this approach will be several times smaller than one designed using traditional single large-aperture beams. The success of this experiment has possible significant economical and technical impacts on the architecture of HIF drivers.

  2. Fuel Injector Design Optimization for an Annular Scramjet Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A four-parameter, three-level, central composite experiment design has been used to optimize the configuration of an annular scramjet injector geometry using computational fluid dynamics. The computational fluid dynamic solutions played the role of computer experiments, and response surface methodology was used to capture the simulation results for mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery within the scramjet flowpath. An optimization procedure, based upon the response surface results of mixing efficiency, was used to compare the optimal design configuration against the target efficiency value of 92.5%. The results of three different optimization procedures are presented and all point to the need to look outside the current design space for different injector geometries that can meet or exceed the stated mixing efficiency target.

  3. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P. Sartori, E.

    2016-02-15

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed.

  4. On the Optimization of Homogenous Light Output in Scintillator Panels for the sPHENIX Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Carson, Sebastian; Sphenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The sPHENIX detector at RHIC will contain an electromagnetic and a hadronic calorimeter used for the detection of particles ejected in jets from heavy ion collisions. The hadronic calorimeter will be composed of layers of steel plates that are alternated with plastic scintillators. Within the scintillator panels, wavelength shifting fiber optic cables are embedded and coupled to silicon photo multipliers (SiPMs). The signal from the SiPMs pass through a preamp that shapes and amplifies the signal before passing it to a analog to digital converter (ADC) from which the energy deposited in the scintillator is calculated. The scintillator panels are manufactured with a diffusive coating to improve reflection and increase sensitivity. With the test setup at the University of Colorado at Boulder, we explored the correlation between the presence and density of the diffusive coating and the uniformity of light output within the panels. We prototyped various SiPM mounting systems and characterized the performance of the preamps with the aim of optimizing light collection, panel response sensitivity, and signal clarity.

  5. Flutter Research on Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordes, Eldon E.; Tuovila, Weimer J.; Guy, Lawrence D.

    1960-01-01

    Representative experimental results are presented to show the current status of the panel flutter problem. Results are presented for unstiffened rectangular panels and for rectangular panels stiffened by corrugated backing. Flutter boundaries are established for all types of panels when considered on the basis of equivalent isotropic plates. The effects of Mach number, differential pressure, and aerodynamic heating on panel flutter are discussed. A flutter analysis of orthotropic panels is presented in the appendix.

  6. Fabrication of small-orifice fuel injectors for diesel engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodford, J. B.; Fenske, G. R.

    2005-04-08

    Diesel fuel injector nozzles with spray hole diameters of 50-75 {micro}m have been fabricated via electroless nickel plating of conventionally made nozzles. Thick layers of nickel are deposited onto the orifice interior surfaces, reducing the diameter from {approx}200 {micro}m to the target diameter. The nickel plate is hard, smooth, and adherent, and covers the orifice interior surfaces uniformly.

  7. Study of Cavitation/Vaporization in Liquid Rocket Thruster Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-29

    performing the simulation on 381x100 grids, but it requires exceptionally long time to get the converged solution (approximately 30 days) so it is not...the United States9-13 have amplified on the initial body of work. Bazarov’s initial theory shows some opportunity for injector resonance at...that was placed on the axis of the exit nozzle. 7. Repeat the process for all frames for the total duration of the captured video. 8. Plot

  8. Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

  9. Scaling of Gas-Centered Swirl-Coaxial Injectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-14

    the liquid was a film while the outer, “ hollow ” cone contains larger droplets (likely 0.25 mm or larger) created from ligaments which form after part... CFD , but these models remain impractically time-consuming and are unvalidated at the conditions considered here. Instead, a geometric parameter...ratios. Such behavior is predicted from models of the injector. INTRODUCTION There has been much recent interest in moving from cryogenic

  10. Simulation of slow extraction in the Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.; Harfoush, F.A.; Johnstone, J.

    1993-08-01

    Recent modifications to the tracking code TEAPOT have allowed us to simulate both ramp and slow extraction in the Fermilab Main Injector at 120 GeV/c. This calculation includes all the magnetic field and alignment errors. Preliminary results from this calculation are presented here and compared with other calculations. Further studies to optimize the strength and ramp of the extraction elements are in progress.

  11. A transitionless lattice for the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Trbojevic, D. ); Lee, S.Y. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-05-01

    Medium energy (1 to 30 GeV) accelerators are often confronted with transition crossing during acceleration. A lattice without transition is presented, which is a design for the Fermilab Main Injector. The main properties of this lattice are that the {gamma}{sub t} is an imaginary number, the maxima of the dispersion function are small, and two long-straight section with zero dispersion. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  12. What Have we Learned from the LCLS Injector?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Feng; Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC

    2012-03-19

    The LCLS injector reliably delivered a high quality electron beam since it started operations three years ago. Some initial commissioning results were described in Ref. [1]. This note is to summarize what we have understood from the LCLS injector including drive laser, cathode, RF gun, injector beam line elements, beam modeling and operations. What we have learned during the LCLS injector commissioning and operation has lead to modified specifications for the UV drive laser system. A flat temporal profile originally required in the LCLS design is not necessary to achieve a low emittance electron beam for the LCLS operations. According to our recent studies, a laser pulse with 3 ps Gaussian temporal profile (FWHM) can achieve a similar emittance compared to a flat temporal profile laser. The sensitivity of the emittance to the laser pulse length at 250 pC of bunch charge was studied, as shown in Figure 1. Only slight variations were observed for both projected and time-sliced emittances with laser pulses from 2.2 ps to 4.5 ps FWHM. Space charge forces certainly become weak but RF emittance which is proportional to the bunch length square increases due to the longer laser pulse. Thus, the projected emittance optimum may be a trade-off between space charge forces and RF emittance, while the time-sliced emittance determined by space charge forces may be slightly improved with a longer laser pulse length. Simulations and theory also show that spatial Gaussian-cut laser profile produces a better emittance compared to uniform profiles due to increased linearity of the space charge forces. Preliminary experimental data show that the emittance with a Gaussian-cut is almost as good as the one with uniform although not better than. In addition, the laser transmission through the iris for spatial Gaussian-cut is about twice the one for spatial uniform. More experimental studies with the new Coherent laser system are needed to make a more solid conclusion.

  13. Electrostatic steering and beamlet aiming in large neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Veltri, P. Chitarin, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Cavenago, M.

    2015-04-08

    Neutral beam injection is the main method for plasma heating in magnetic confinement fusion devices. In high energy injector (E>100 keV/amu), neutrals are obtained with reasonable efficiency by conversion of negative ions (H- or D-) via electron detachment reactions. In the case of ITER injectors, which shall operate at 1 MeV, a total ion current of ∼ 40 A is required to satisfy the heating power demand. Gridded electrodes are therefore used in the accelerator, so that 1280 negative ion beamlets are accelerated together. A carefully designed aiming system is required to control the beamlet trajectories, and to deliver their power on a focal point located several meters away from the beam source. In nowadays injectors, the aiming is typically obtained by aperture offset technique or by grid shaping. This paper discuss an alternative concept of beamlets aiming, based on an electrostatic ”steerer” to be placed at the end of the accelerator. A feasibility study of this component is also presented, and its main advantages and drawbacks with respect to other methods are discussed.

  14. A Design Tool for Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R.; Cheng, G.; Trinh, H.; Tucker, K.

    2000-01-01

    A practical design tool which emphasizes the analysis of flowfields near the injector face of liquid rocket engines has been developed and used to simulate preliminary configurations of NASA's Fastrac and vortex engines. This computational design tool is sufficiently detailed to predict the interactive effects of injector element impingement angles and points and the momenta of the individual orifice flows and the combusting flow which results. In order to simulate a significant number of individual orifices, a homogeneous computational fluid dynamics model was developed. To describe sub- and supercritical liquid and vapor flows, the model utilized thermal and caloric equations of state which were valid over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The model was constructed such that the local quality of the flow was determined directly. Since both the Fastrac and vortex engines utilize RP-1/LOX propellants, a simplified hydrocarbon combustion model was devised in order to accomplish three-dimensional, multiphase flow simulations. Such a model does not identify drops or their distribution, but it does allow the recirculating flow along the injector face and into the acoustic cavity and the film coolant flow to be accurately predicted.

  15. Proposed Fermilab upgrade main injector project. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate a ``Fermilab Main Injector`` (FMI), a 150 GeV proton injector accelerator, at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. The purpose and need for this action are given of this Environmental Assessment (EA). A description of the proposed FMI and construction activities are also given. The proposed FMI would be housed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of approximately 2.1 miles (3.4 kilometers), and the construction would affect approximately 135 acres of the 6,800 acre Fermilab site. The purpose of the proposed FMI is to construct and bring into operation a new 150 GeV proton injector accelerator. This addition to Fermilab`s Tevatron would enable scientists to penetrate ever more deeply into the subatomic world through the detection of the super massive particles that can be created when a proton and antiproton collide head-on. The conversion of energy into matter in these collisions makes it possible to create particles that existed only an instant after the beginning of time. The proposed FMI would significantly extend the scientific reach of the Tevatron, the world`s first superconducting accelerator and highest energy proton-antiproton collider.

  16. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  17. Hot electron injector Gunn diode for advanced driver assistance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, A.; Lepsa, M. I.; Freundt, D.; Stock, J.; Montanari, S.

    2007-06-01

    This paper reviews the main aspects of the design, fabrication and characterization of GaAs Gunn diodes intended to be used in advanced driver assistance systems. The corresponding Gunn diode based oscillators operate at the microwave frequency of 77 GHz and deliver an output power up to 19.2 dBm (83.2 mW). To fulfill the high demands of the automotive industry, temperature stability and a high grade of frequency purity, the Gunn diode structure includes a hot electron injector. This is based on the heteroepitaxy of a graded gap AlxGa1-xAs layer and an adjacent thin highly doped GaAs layer. The hot electron injector properties are investigated using dc and rf electrical measurements, including the temperature influence as well. Specific production related data of the cavity oscillators using our Gunn diodes are presented. New alternatives, such as the resonant tunneling emitter as a hot electron injector and the Gunn diode based MMIC as oscillator, are introduced.

  18. Electrostatic steering and beamlet aiming in large neutral beam injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Chitarin, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2015-04-01

    Neutral beam injection is the main method for plasma heating in magnetic confinement fusion devices. In high energy injector (E>100 keV/amu), neutrals are obtained with reasonable efficiency by conversion of negative ions (H- or D-) via electron detachment reactions. In the case of ITER injectors, which shall operate at 1 MeV, a total ion current of ˜ 40 A is required to satisfy the heating power demand. Gridded electrodes are therefore used in the accelerator, so that 1280 negative ion beamlets are accelerated together. A carefully designed aiming system is required to control the beamlet trajectories, and to deliver their power on a focal point located several meters away from the beam source. In nowadays injectors, the aiming is typically obtained by aperture offset technique or by grid shaping. This paper discuss an alternative concept of beamlets aiming, based on an electrostatic "steerer" to be placed at the end of the accelerator. A feasibility study of this component is also presented, and its main advantages and drawbacks with respect to other methods are discussed.

  19. Effect of fuel injector type on performance and emissions of reverse-flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    The combustion process in a reverse-flow combustor suitable for a small gas turbine engine was investigated to evaluate the effect of fuel injector type on performance and emissions. Fuel injector configurations using pressure-atomizing, spill-flow, air blast, and air-assist techniques were compared and evaluated on the basis of performance obtained in a full-scale experimental combustor operated at inlet conditions corresponding to takeoff, cruise, low power, and idle and typical of a 16:1-pressure-ratio turbine engine. Major differences in combustor performance and emissions characteristics were experienced with each injector type even though the aerodynamic configuration was common to most combustor models. Performance characteristics obtained with the various fuel injector types could not have been predicted from bench-test injector spray characteristics. The effect of the number of operating fuel injectors on performance and emissions is also presented.

  20. Noise dependence with pile-up in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. Pile-up noise studies in the ATLAS TileCal calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Araque, J.P.

    2015-07-01

    The Tile Calorimeter, TileCal, is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, positioned between the electromagnetic calorimeter and the muon chambers. It comprises alternating layers of steel (as absorber material) and plastic (as active material), known as tiles. Between 2009 and 2012, the LHC has performed better than expected producing proton-proton collisions at a very high rate. These conditions are really challenging when dealing with the energy measurements in the calorimeter since not only the energy from an interesting event will be measured but a component coming from other collisions, which are difficult to distinguish from the interesting one, will also be present. This component is referred to as pile-up noise. Studies carried out to better understand how pile-up affects calorimeter noise under different circumstances are described. (author)

  1. Silicon Photomultiplier Characterization for sPHENIX Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Meghan; Skoby, Michael; Aidala, Christine; Sphenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are preferable to photomultiplier tubes due to their small size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, low operating voltage, and capability of detecting single photons. The sPHENIX collaboration at RHIC will use SiPMs in their proposed electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters. The University of Michigan is assembling and implementing a test stand to characterize the dark count rate, temperature dependence, gain, and photon detection efficiency of SiPMs. To more accurately determine the dark count rate, we have constructed a light tight box to isolate the SiPM, which surrounds an electronics enclosure that protects the SiPM circuitry, and installed software to record the output signals. With this system, we will begin to collect data and optimize the system to test arrays of SiPMs instead of single devices as the proposed calorimeters will require testing approximately 115,000 SiPMs.

  2. Micro-differential scanning calorimeter for liquid biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuyu; Yu, Shifeng; Siedler, Michael S.; Ihnat, Peter M.; Filoti, Dana I.; Lu, Ming; Zuo, Lei

    2016-10-01

    We developed an ultrasensitive micro-DSC (differential scanning calorimeter) for liquid protein sample characterization. This design integrated vanadium oxide thermistors and flexible polymer substrates with microfluidics chambers to achieve a high sensitivity (6 V/W), low thermal conductivity (0.7 mW/K), high power resolutions (40 nW), and well-defined liquid volume (1 μl) calorimeter sensor in a compact and cost-effective way. We further demonstrated the performance of the sensor with lysozyme unfolding. The measured transition temperature and enthalpy change were in accordance with the previous literature data. This micro-DSC could potentially raise the prospect of high-throughput biochemical measurement by parallel operation with miniaturized sample consumption.

  3. Micro-differential scanning calorimeter for liquid biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuyu; Yu, Shifeng; Siedler, Michael S.; Ihnat, Peter M.; Filoti, Dana I.; Lu, Ming; Zuo, Lei

    2016-10-20

    Here, we developed an ultrasensitive micro-DSC (differential scanning calorimeter) for liquid protein sample characterization. Our design integrated vanadium oxide thermistors and flexible polymer substrates with microfluidics chambers to achieve a high sensitivity (6 V/W), low thermal conductivity (0.7 mW/K), high power resolutions (40 nW), and well-defined liquid volume (1 μl) calorimeter sensor in a compact and cost-effective way. Furthermore, we demonstrated the performance of the sensor with lysozyme unfolding. The measured transition temperature and enthalpy change were in accordance with the previous literature data. This micro-DSC could potentially raise the prospect of high-throughput biochemical measurement by parallel operation with miniaturized sample consumption.

  4. Experience with a double-compensating beam calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Jarmie, N.; Brown, R.E.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Martinez, R.

    1982-01-01

    In an experiment to measure the D(t,..cap alpha..)n cross section at beam energies of 10 to 120 keV, we have developed a double-compensating beam calorimeter, based on a Swiss design to measure the partical beam intensity. A Faraday cup is not useful because of considerable charge exchange in the target gas at such low beam energies. We calibrated the calorimeter both with 10- and 3-MeV protons (comparing with a Faraday-cup measurement of the beam flux) and with the heat generated in a precision resistor. Both methods agree and give a calibration accurate to +- 0.08% over a range of 10 to 800 mW beam power. Beam powers as low as 5 mW may be used, but with less accuracy. The beam energy must be known in order to calculate the particle intensity. Some difficulties with and peculiarities of the device are discussed.

  5. Scanning calorimeter for nanoliter-scale liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, E. A.; Efremov, M. Yu.; Kwan, A. T.; Lai, S.; Petrova, V.; Schiettekatte, F.; Warren, J. T.; Zhang, M.; Allen, L. H.

    2000-10-01

    We introduce a scanning calorimeter for use with a single solid or liquid sample with a volume down to a few nanoliters. Its use is demonstrated with the melting of 52 nL of indium, using heating rates from 100 to 1000 K/s. The heat of fusion was measured to within 5% of the bulk value, and the sensitivity of the measurement was ±7 μW. The heat of vaporization of water was measured in the scanning mode to be within ±23% of the bulk value by actively vaporizing water droplets from 2 to 100 nL in volume. Results within 25% were obtained for the heat of vaporization by using the calorimeter in a heat-conductive mode and measuring the passive evaporation of water. Temperature measurements over a period of 10 h had a standard deviation of 3 mK.

  6. ANL four-meter calorimeter design and operation manual

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Lewis, R.N.; Youngdahl, G.A.; Jung, E.A.; Roche, C.T.

    1980-02-01

    The four-meter fuel rod calorimetric system measures the thermal power produced by radioactive decay of fuel rods containing Pu. The Pu mass is related to the measured power through the weighted average of the product of the isotopic decay energies and the decay constants of the Pu isotopes present. U content has no effect since the thermal power produced by the U nuclides is insignificant when compared to Pu. Radiations from Pu are alpha particles and low-energy photons. This calorimeter will measure samples producing power up to 1.5 watts at a rate of one sample every 120 min. The instrument consists of a data-acquisition module made up of a microprocessor, with an 8K-byte nonvolatile memory, a control cabinet and the calorimeter chamber. (FS)

  7. Verification of Electromagnetic Calorimeter Concept for the HADES spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, O.; Blume, C.; Czyžycki, W.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Galatyuk, T.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Hlaváč, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Kajetanowic, M.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, W.; Kugler, A.; Lapidus, K.; Linev, S.; Lisowski, E.; Ott, P.; Otte, P.; Petukhov; Pietraszko, J.; Reshetin, A.; Rodríguez-Ramos, P.; Rost, A.; Salabura, P.; Skott, P.; Sobolev, Y. G.; Steffen, O.; Thomas, A.; Tlustý, P.; Traxler, M.

    2015-04-01

    The HADES spectrometer currently operating on the beam of SIS18 accelerator in GSI will be moved to a new position in the CBM cave of the future FAIR complex. Electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) will enable the HADES@FAIR experiment to measure data on neutral meson production in heavy ion collisions at the energy range of 2-10 A GeVon the beam of the new accelerator SIS100. Calorimeter will be based on 978 massive lead glass modules read out by photomultipliers and a novel front-end electronics. Secondary gamma beam with energies ranging from 81 MeV up to 1399 MeV from MAMI-C Mainz facility was used to verify selected technical solutions. Relative energy resolution was measured using modules with three different types of photomultipliers. Two types of developed front-end electronics as well as energy leakage between neighbouring modules under parallel and declined gamma beams were studied in detail.

  8. Geometric calibration of the SND detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, A. A.; Melnikova, N. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation and validation of the software alignment procedure used to perform geometric calibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter with respect to the tracking system of the SND detector which is taking data at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider (BINP, Novosibirsk). This procedure is based on the mathematical model describing the relative calorimeter position. The parameter values are determined by minimizing a χ2 function using the difference between particle directions reconstructed in these two subdetectors for e+e- →e+e- scattering events. The results of the calibration applied to data and MC simulation fit the model well and give an improvement in particle reconstruction. They are used in data reconstruction and MC simulation.

  9. Micro-differential scanning calorimeter for liquid biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shuyu; Yu, Shifeng; Siedler, Michael S.; ...

    2016-10-20

    Here, we developed an ultrasensitive micro-DSC (differential scanning calorimeter) for liquid protein sample characterization. Our design integrated vanadium oxide thermistors and flexible polymer substrates with microfluidics chambers to achieve a high sensitivity (6 V/W), low thermal conductivity (0.7 mW/K), high power resolutions (40 nW), and well-defined liquid volume (1 μl) calorimeter sensor in a compact and cost-effective way. Furthermore, we demonstrated the performance of the sensor with lysozyme unfolding. The measured transition temperature and enthalpy change were in accordance with the previous literature data. This micro-DSC could potentially raise the prospect of high-throughput biochemical measurement by parallel operation with miniaturizedmore » sample consumption.« less

  10. Boronated Scintillator Detector for Use in Space with Ionization Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britvich, G. I.; Chernichenko, S. K.; Demichev, M. A.; Gnezdilov, I. I.; Mukhin, V. I.; Soukhih, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) for use in space with ionization calorimeters was suggested. BSD improved e/h showers separation, which are initiated in the ionization calorimeter in interaction it with high energy particles. Improve the rejection is based on the hadron-induced showers tend to be accompanied by significantly more neutron activity than electromagnetic showers. The detector is composed of natural boron-loaded (5%) castable plastic scintillation plates. To collect light using wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers. The experiment showed that the photoelectron yield is ∼ 40 ph.el./MeV with using PMT EMI 9954KB. Simulation on GEANT4 was obtained neutron detection efficiency. The simulation was conducted in the assumption that neutrons have the spectrum 252Cf and fall plane-parallel on the entry surface of the detector.

  11. The readout driver (ROD) for the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2001-04-01

    The Readout Driver (ROD) for the Liquid Argon calorimeter of the ATLAS detector is described. Each ROD module receives triggered data from 256 calorimeter cells via two fiber-optics 1.28 Gbit/s links with a 100 kHz event rate (25 kbit/event). Its principal function is to determine the precise energy and timing of the signal from discrete samples of the waveform, taken each period of the LHC clock (25 ns). In addition, it checks, histograms, and formats the digital data stream. A demonstrator system, consisting of a motherboard and several daughter-board processing units (PUs) was constructed and is currently used for tests in the lab. The design of this prototype board is presented here. The board offers maximum modularity and allows the development and testing of different PU designs based on today's leading integer and floating point DSPs.

  12. Active radiometric calorimeter for absolute calibration of radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, K.E.; DeWerd, L.A.; Rudman, D.A.; Schima, S.A.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the design and initial noise floor measurements of a radiometric calorimeter designed to measure therapeutic medical radioactive sources. The instrument demonstrates a noise floor of approximately 2 nW. This low noise floor is achieved by using high temperature superconducting (HTS) transition edge sensor (TES) thermometers in a temperature-control feedback loop. This feedback loop will be used to provide absolute source calibrations based upon the electrical substitution method. Other unique features of the calorimeter are (a) its ability to change sources for calibration without disrupting the vacuum of the instrument, and (b) the ability to measure the emitted power of a source in addition to the total contained source power.

  13. The iMPACT project tracker and calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiazzo, S.; Bisello, D.; Giubilato, P.; Pantano, D.; Pozzobon, N.; Snoeys, W.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. While traditional X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) fails in providing 3D images with the precision required for hadrons treatment guidance, Proton Computer Tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, can. A pCT scanner consists of a tracker system, to track protons, and of a calorimeter, to measure their residual energy. In this paper we will present the iMPACT project, which foresees a novel proton tracking detector with higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. The tracker will be matched to a fast, highly segmented proton range calorimeter.

  14. Shielding and radiation protection at the SSRL 3 GeV injector

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, N.E.; Liu, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) Injector is comprised of a linear accelerator (linac) capable of energies {le} 150 MeV, a 3 GeV booster synchrotron, and a beam line to transport the electrons into the storage ring SPEAR. The injector is shielded so that under normal operating conditions, the annual dose equivalent at the shield surface does not exceed 10 mSv. This paper describes the shielding and radiation protection at the injector.

  15. Design, fabrication, test, and delivery of a high-pressure oxygen/RP-1 injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.; Gross, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the design analyses for a liquid rocket injector using oxygen and RP-1 propellants at high chamber pressures of 20,682 kPa (3000 psia) is presented. This analytical investigation includes combustion efficiency versus injector element type, combustion stability, and combustor cooling requirements. The design and fabrication of a subscale injector/acoustic resonantor assembly capable of providing a nominal thrust of 222K N (50,000 lbF) is presented.

  16. Investigation of the burning configuration of a coaxial injector in a combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made into the stability of the burning configuration of a single coaxial injector surrounded by similar injectors. The stability criteria was based on an average pressure difference along the boundaries of the adjacent stream tubes as calculated using Spaulding's numerical method. The results indicate qualitatively that there is a tendency for the injectors to have different burning configurations. It is believed that the configuration achieved is random, however once the burning configuration is established, it is believed to persist.

  17. A systematic experimental and computational investigation of a class of contoured wall fuel injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.; Marble, Frank E.; Zukoski, Edward E.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of contoured wall fuel injectors for scramjet engine applications is considered. These fuel injectors were aimed at augmenting mixing through axial vorticity production arising from interaction of the fuel/air interface with an oblique shock. The effects of incoming boundary layer height, injector spacing, and injectant to freestream pressure and velocity ratios are examined. Results from 3D flow field surveys and Navier-Stokes simulations are presented.

  18. Spray Structure in Near-Injector Region of Aerated Jet in Subsonic Crossflow (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    diameter by introducing gas bubbles into the liquid stream inside the injector. Aerated injection is similar to the flash atomization because it...produces gas bubbles inside the injector for promoting atomization. However, unlike flash atomizers, aerated injection can easily control the amount of... bubbles and their sizes without the complications of dissolving gas or heating the liquid to its boiling point. The aerated liquid injector allows a

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    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    The Effect of Fuel Injector Nozzle Configuration on JP-8 Sprays at Diesel Engine Conditions by Matthew Kurman, Luis Bravo, Chol-Bum Kweon...Fuel Injector Nozzle Configuration on JP-8 Sprays at Diesel Engine Conditions Matthew Kurman, Luis Bravo, and Chol-Bum Kweon Vehicle Technology...March 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Effect of Fuel Injector Nozzle Configuration on JP-8 Sprays at Diesel Engine Conditions 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  20. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... related side effects. The hepatic function panel evaluates: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT). This enzyme, found in the liver, ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Mononucleosis Hepatitis Blood Test: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, or SGPT) Blood Test: Aspartate Aminotransferase ( ...